WorldWideScience

Sample records for conditions including diabetes

  1. Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets in Your Meal Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Including sweets in your meal plan Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods, but sweets aren't necessarily ... your meal plan. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods. But you can eat ...

  2. Ideal versus real conditions for type 2 diabetes care : diabetes specialty nurses’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jutterström, Lena; Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla; Isaksson, Ulf; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Since diabetes specialty nurses are the professionals who spend the most time with patients living with diabetes, they probably have the greatest influence on the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, their personal perceptions about what constitutes “good care” in type 2 diabetes care are important to explore. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe conditions for “good care” in type 2-diabetes as perceived by diabetes specialty nurses. Method: Twenty-one experienced diabetes s...

  3. Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.

  4. [Circadian blood pressure variation under several pathophysiological conditions including secondary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yutaka; Hosaka, Miki; Satoh, Michihiro

    2014-08-01

    Abnormality of circadian blood pressure (BP) variation, i.e. non-dipper, riser, nocturnal hypertension etc, is brought by several pathophysiological conditions especially by secondary hypertension. These pathophysiological conditions are classified into several categories, i.e. disturbance of autonomic nervous system, metabolic disorder, endocrine disorder, disorder of Na and water excretion (e.g. sodium sensitivity), severe target organ damage and ischemia, cardiovascular complications and drug induced hypertension. Each pathophysiological condition which brings disturbance of circadian BP variation is included in several categories, e.g. diabetes mellitus is included in metabolic disorder, autonomic imbalance, sodium sensitivity and endocrine disorder. However, it seems that unified principle of the genesis of disturbance of circadian BP variation in many pathophysiological conditions is autonomic imbalance. Thus, it is concluded that disturbance of circadian BP variation is not purposive biological behavior but the result of autonomic imbalance which looks as if compensatory reaction such as exaggerated Na-water excretion during night in patient with Na-water retention who reveals disturbed circadian BP variation.

  5. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia during day time fasting or hyperglycemia during the night. Patient with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan may be better managed with fast-acting insulin. They should have basic knowledge of carbohydrate metabolism, the standard principles of diabetes care, and pharmacology of various antidiabetic drugs. This Consensus Statement describes the management of the various diabetic emergencies that may occur during Ramadan.

  6. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamal; Pathan, Md Faruque; Jaleel, Mohammed Abdul; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Raza, Syed Abbas; Khan, A. K. Azad; Ishtiaq, Osama; Sheikh, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia during day time fasting or hyperglycemia during the night. Patient with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan may be better managed with fast-acting insulin. They should have basic knowledge of carbohydrate metabolism, the standard principles of diabetes care, and pharmacology of various antidiabetic drugs. This Consensus Statement describes the management of the various diabetic emergencies that may occur during Ramadan. PMID:22837906

  7. Psychosocial working conditions and diabetes self-management at work: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Nguyen, Xuan Quynh; Vu-Eickmann, Patricia; Krichbaum, Michael; Kulzer, Bernhard; Icks, Andrea; Angerer, Peter

    2018-03-31

    We conducted a qualitative study to expand our current understanding of the potential link between psychosocial working conditions and diabetes self-management at work. Thirty employed adults with diabetes mellitus living in Germany (n = 19 with type 1, n = 11 with type 2, 57% female, aged 24-64 years) were recruited. Using a topic guide, we carried out in-depth interviews in face-to-face contact or by telephone. Interviews were transcribed and content-analyzed using MaxQDA. Psychosocial working conditions perceived to detrimentally affect self-management activities included, amongst others, a high workload, poor job control, unhygienic working environments, the requirement to work under high or fluctuating temperature, perceived social norms at the workplace, and the attitude to prioritize work-related demands as opposed to diabetes-related demands. The types of self-management activities considered to be adversely affected related to glucose monitoring, insulin injections, dietary control, the ability to recognize hypoglycemia and health care use. Various types of occupational psychosocial factors may determine diabetes self-management practices at the workplace. Quantitative studies are needed to confirm our observations. Subsequently, interventions could be developed and evaluated to improve opportunities to adequately engage into diabetes self-management at work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Podocyte hypertrophy precedes apoptosis under experimental diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Ha; Moon, Sung Jin; Paeng, Jisun; Kang, Hye-Young; Nam, Bo Young; Kim, Seonghun; Kim, Chan Ho; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2015-08-01

    Podocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis are two hallmarks of diabetic glomeruli, but the sequence in which these processes occur remains a matter of debate. Here we investigated the effects of inhibiting hypertrophy on apoptosis, and vice versa, in both podocytes and glomeruli, under diabetic conditions. Hypertrophy and apoptosis were inhibited using an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (PKI 166) and a pan-caspase inhibitor (zAsp-DCB), respectively. We observed significant increases in the protein expression of p27, p21, phospho-eukaryotic elongation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and phospho-p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase, in both cultured podocytes exposed to high-glucose (HG) medium, and streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rat glomeruli. These increases were significantly inhibited by PKI 166, but not by zAsp-DCB. In addition, the amount of protein per cell, the relative cell size, and the glomerular volume were all significantly increased under diabetic conditions, and these changes were also blocked by treatment with PKI 166, but not zAsp-DCB. Increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, together with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratios, were also observed in HG-stimulated podocytes and DM glomeruli. Treatment with either zAsp-DCB or PKI 166 resulted in a significant attenuation of these effects. Both PKI 166 and zAsp-DCB also inhibited the increase in number of apoptotic cells, as assessed by Hoechst 33342 staining and TUNEL assay. Under diabetic conditions, inhibition of podocyte hypertrophy results in attenuated apoptosis, whereas blocking apoptosis has no effect on podocyte hypertrophy, suggesting that podocyte hypertrophy precedes apoptosis.

  9. Association Between Chronic Conditions and Physical Function Among Veteran and Non-Veteran Women With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kristen E.; Katon, Jodie G.; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; Bastian, Lori A.; Nelson, Karin M.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Reiber, Gayle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of the Study: To compare the number of chronic conditions among a list of 12 and their association with physical function among postmenopausal non-Veteran and Veteran women with diabetes. Design and Methods: Among women with diabetes from the Women’s Health Initiative, we compared the average number of chronic conditions between non-Veterans and Veterans and the association between total number of chronic conditions on subsequent RAND-36 physical function. To examine associations between each condition and subsequent physical function, we compared women with diabetes plus one chronic condition to women with diabetes alone using linear regression in separate models for each condition and for non-Veterans and Veterans. Results: Both non-Veterans ( N = 23,542) and Veterans ( N = 618) with diabetes had a median of 3 chronic conditions. Decreases in physical function for each additional condition were larger among Veterans than non-Veterans (−6.3 vs. −4.1 points). Decreases in physical function among women with diabetes plus one chronic condition were greater than that reported for diabetes alone for all combinations and were more pronounced among Veterans (non-Veterans: −11.1 to −24.2, Veterans: −16.6 to −40.4 points). Hip fracture, peripheral artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and coronary disease in combination with diabetes were associated with the greatest decreases in physical function. Implications: Chronic conditions were common among postmenopausal women with diabetes and were associated with large declines in physical function, particularly among Veterans. Interventions to prevent and reduce the impact of these conditions and facilitate coordination of care among women with diabetes may help them maintain physical function. PMID:26768385

  10. Optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Fengsheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Guo, Weiying; Li, Cai; Li, Wei; Wang, Guixia; Xing, Xiao; Gao, Ying; Ge, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guanjun; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Aims We reported the attenuation of diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by exposure to multiple low-dose radiation (LDR) at 25 mGy every other day via suppressing renal oxidative damage. We here explored the optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Main methods Type 1 diabetic mice were induced with multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin in male C57BL/6J mice. Diabetic mice received whole body X-irradiation at dose of 12.5, 25 or 50 mGy every other day for either 4 or 8 weeks. Age-matched normal mice were similarly irradiated at the dose of 25 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks. The renal function and histopathological changes were examined at the 4th and 8th week of the study. Key findings Diabetes induced renal dysfunction, shown by the decreased creatinine and increased microalbumin in urinary. Renal oxidative damage, detected by protein nitration and lipid oxidation, and remodeling, reflected by increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, collagen IV and fibronectin, were significantly increased in diabetic mice. All these renal pathological and function changes in diabetic mice were significantly attenuated by exposure to LDR at all regimens, among which, however, exposure to LDR at 12.5 mGy for 8 weeks provided the best preventive effect on the kidney of diabetic mice. Significance Our results suggest that whole-body LDR at 12.5 mGy every other day for 8 weeks is the optimal condition of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. PMID:24631139

  11. Willingness to pay for flexible working conditions for people with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Mette Andersen; Cleal, Bryan; Willaing, Ingrid

    Background The increasing number of people with chronic diseases challenges work force capacity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can have work related consequences such as increased risk of sickness absence and early retirement. Laws and guidelines of most high income countries, including Denmark, require...... implementation. Aim To examine Danish workers' willingness to pay (WTP) for five workplace initiatives that help individuals with type 2 diabetes manage their diabetes at work and to examine how background characteristics influence the WTP. Method Employed participants between 25 and 67 years from an online......’ and ‘without pay’. The WTP in Euro=€ for the five workplace initiatives was estimated by conditional logits models. Bootstrapping was used to estimate p- values examining significant differences (p type...

  12. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Ahmad; Md Faruque Pathan; Mohammed Abdul Jaleel; Farah Naaz Fathima; Syed Abbas Raza; A K Azad Khan; Osama Ishtiaq; Aisha Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the ...

  13. Contrast sensitivity to spatial gratings in moderate and dim light conditions in patients with diabetes in the absence of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Sare; Rahimi, Anoushiravan; Raeesi, Afsaneh; Safi, Hamid; Aghazadeh Amiri, Mohammad; Malek, Mojtaba; Yaseri, Mehdi; Haeri, Mohammad; Middleton, Frank A; Solessio, Eduardo; Ahmadieh, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of contrast sensitivity (CS) to discriminate loss of visual function in diabetic subjects with no clinical signs of retinopathy relative to that of normal subjects. In this prospective cross-sectional study, we measured CS in 46 diabetic subjects with a mean age of 48±6 years, a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 and no signs of diabetic retinopathy. The CS in these subjects was compared with CS measurements in 46 normal control subjects at four spatial frequencies (3, 6, 12, 18 cycles per degree) under moderate (500 lux) and dim (less than 2 lux) background light conditions. CS was approximately 0.16 log units lower in patients with diabetes relative to controls both in moderate and in dim background light conditions. Logistic regression classification and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that CS analysis using two light conditions was more accurate (0.78) overall compared with CS analysis using only a single illumination condition (accuracy values were 0.67 and 0.70 in moderate and dim light conditions, respectively). Our results showed that patients with diabetes without clinical signs of retinopathy exhibit a uniform loss in CS at all spatial frequencies tested. Measuring the loss in CS at two spatial frequencies (3 and 6 cycles per degree) and two light conditions (moderate and dim) is sufficiently robust to classify diabetic subjects with no retinopathy versus control subjects.

  14. [Vacuum-assisted therapy for various wound types including diabetic foot ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Raymond; Gantus, Maher; Kogan, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Vacuum is a noninvasive system that creates a localized controlled negative pressure environment. In this study, vacuum was provided by the V.A.C. Therapy system, which promotes wound healing by delayed primary or secondary intention through creating a moist wound environment, preparing the wound bed for closure, reducing edema, and promoting formation and perfusion of granulation tissue. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy is indicated for use in all care settings and for a variety of wound types including diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and clinical efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) compared with advanced moist wound therapy and standard treatment to treat foot ulcers in diabetic patients. This trial enrolled 43 patients; most of them were diabetic patients at any age with various skin ulcers and diabetic foot. These patients were divided into two groups, 17 patients were treated with vacuum and the 26 patients in the control group were treated with standard therapy including debridement. A greater proportion of foot and skin ulcers achieved complete ulcer closure with vacuum-assisted therapy p<0.001 compared with the standard therapy. Vacuum therapy significantly decreased the duration and frequency of admission p=0.032 and decreased the rate of amputation p<0.001. Results of our trial support other studies and demonstrate that vacuum is as safe as and more efficacious than standard therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A significantly greater number of patients achieved complete ulcer closure and granulation tissue formation with this therapy. The study group showed a significant reduction in the median time needed to heal ulcers, reduction of the number of admissions and amputation frequency.

  15. β-cell serotonin production is associated with female sex, old age, and diabetes-free condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Gi; Moon, Joon Ho; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Kim, Juok; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Junguee; Kang, Shinae; Park, Joon Seong; Kim, Hail

    2017-11-25

    Serotonin is known to be present in pancreatic β-cells and to play several physiological roles, including insulin secretion, β-cell proliferation, and paracrine inhibition of α-cells. However, the serotonin production of different cell lines and islets has not been compared based on age, sex, and diabetes related conditions. Here, we directly compared the serotonin concentrations in βTC and MIN6 cell lines, as well as in islets from mice using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The average serotonin concentration was 5-10 ng/mg protein in the islets of male and non-pregnant female mice. The serotonin level was higher in females than males at 8 weeks, although there was no difference at 1 year. Furthermore, we observed serotonin by immunofluorescence staining in the pancreatic tissues of mice and human. Serotonin was detected by immunofluorescence staining in a portion of β-cells from islets of old female mice, but not of male or young female mice. A similar pattern was observed in human pancreas as well. In humans, serotonin production in β-cells was associated with a diabetes-free condition. Thus, serotonin production in β-cells was associated with old age, female sex, and diabetes-free condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Survival in dialysis patients is not different between patients with diabetes as primary renal disease and patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroijen, Marielle A.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Noordzij, Marlies; Romijn, Johannes A.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Grave, W.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    On dialysis, survival among patients with diabetes mellitus is inferior to survival of non-diabetic patients. We hypothesized that patients with diabetes as primary renal disease have worse survival compared to patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition and aimed to compare all-cause mortality

  17. Musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merashli, M; Chowdhury, T A; Jawad, A S M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing significantly worldwide. Whilst vascular complications of diabetes are well recognized, and account for principle mortality and morbidity from the condition, musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes are common and whilst not life threatening, are an important cause of morbidity, pain and disability. Joints affected by diabetes include peripheral joints and the axial skeleton. Charcot neuroarthropathy is an important cause of deformity and amputation associated with peripheral neuropathy. A number of fibrosing conditions of the hands and shoulder are recognized, including carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, tenosynovitis and limited joint mobility. People with diabetes are more prone to gout and osteoporosis. Management of these conditions requires early recognition and close liaison between diabetes and rheumatology specialists. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes screening including prevention of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai; Jiwani, Aliya

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with elevated risks of perinatal complications and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and screening and intervention can reduce these risks. We quantified the cost, health impact and cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and intervention in India and Israel,...

  19. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Mei-Hui

    2018-01-01

    Background Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1) expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines); 2) comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals); 3) inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice); 4) impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress); and 5) weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support). Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion This study found that the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes was similar to that of a single disease, but the extent was greater than a single disease. The biggest difference is that the elderly think that their most serious problem is not diabetes, but rather, the comorbidities causing life limitations

  20. Plasma neuropeptide Y levels differ in distinct diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Aysegül; Rasul, Sazan; Dimitrov, Alexander; Handisurya, Ammon; Gartner, Wolfgang; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Wagner, Ludwig; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Base, Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important hormone in appetite regulation. Although the contribution of NPY to metabolic disease has been previously demonstrated, there are only a few reports addressing NPY plasma levels under distinct diabetic conditions. In this study we evaluated NPY plasma levels in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients with (n=34) and without (n=34) diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP) and compared these with age and gender matched healthy controls (n=34). We also analyzed NPY plasma levels in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients with age and pregnancy-week matched controls with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). NPY concentration was determined using a commercially available radioimmunoassay kit. In addition, metabolic parameters of DM2 and GDM patients were recorded. One-way ANOVA tests with appropriate post hoc corrections showed elevated levels of NPY in DM2 patients with and without PNP when compared with those of healthy controls (122.32±40.86 and 117.33±29.92 vs. 84.65±52.17 pmol/L; pwomen with NGT (74.87±14.36 vs. 84.82±51.13 pmol/L, respectively). Notably, the NPY concentration correlated positively with insulin levels in DM2 patients (R=0.35, pDM2 pathology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle-strengthening and conditioning activities and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Pan, An; Mekary, Rania A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well established that aerobic physical activity can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but whether muscle-strengthening activities are beneficial for the prevention of T2D is unclear. This study examined the association of muscle-strengthening activities with the risk of T2D...... at baseline. Participants reported weekly time spent on resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises (yoga, stretching, toning), and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at baseline and in 2004/2005. Cox regression with adjustment for major determinants for T2D...... include that muscle-strengthening and conditioning activity and other types of physical activity were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire and that the study population consisted of registered nurses with mostly European ancestry. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that engagement in muscle...

  2. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Marschalek

    Full Text Available Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB, whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON. Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.. No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD, defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women.

  3. Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Bot, Mariska; Browne, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, a more thorough understanding of the psychosocial aspects of living with this condition has become an important health care priority. While our knowledge has grown substantially over the past two decades with respect...... to the physical, emotional and social difficulties that people with diabetes may encounter, many important issues remain to be elucidated. Under the umbrella of the Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Study International Collaborative, Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands aims...... to examine how Dutch adults with diabetes manage their condition and how it affects their lives. Topics of special interest in Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands include subtypes of depression, Type D personality, mindfulness, sleep and sexual functioning. METHODS/DESIGN: Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands...

  4. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting patient engagement in diabetes self-management: perspectives of a certified diabetes educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kellie M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with diabetes are responsible for the vast majority of management requirements of their condition. However, their ability and motivation to engage in required self-management behaviors may be mitigated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic barriers include attitudes and health beliefs, limited diabetes knowledge and technical skill, reduced functional health literacy, and inadequate self-efficacy to promote positive behavior change. Extrinsic barriers include financial considerations, inadequate family and community support systems, ineffective clinical relationships, and limited access to effective diabetes health care delivery. Diabetes providers have opportunities for enhancing patient engagement with clinical recommendations and diabetes self-management through effective communication, including efforts to contextually assess patients' perceptions of diabetes and how the condition fits within the context of their changing lives. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing and building an effective clinical alliance with patients with the goal of empowering them to take more control of their diabetes and reduce their risks for poor diabetes outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Diabetes Condition on Topical Treatment of Binahong Leaf Fraction in Wound Healing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kintoko Kintoko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disease which is becoming the first number of health problem in Indonesia, based on the results of the Basic Health Research of Ministry of Health in 2013. One of the diabetes complications affected by high levels of blood glucose is diabetic ulcers wich 85% the number of cases was overed by amputation as the result of improper handling. Herbal treatments could be an alternative treatment of diabetic ulcers, one of them is binahong plant. The results of previous studies have shown the ability of ethanolic extract of binahong leaf in accelerating wound healing in diabetic rats. This study would be a continued study to test five kinds of binahong leaf fractions (FDB with gradual solvent polarity in accelerating wound healing in diabetic ulcer. Wound healing parameters observed were percentage of wound healing from the wound diameter contraction. The test begins with ethanolic extract of binahong leaf fractionation to produce fractions of hexane (FHDB, chloroform (FKDB, ethyl acetate (FEADB, and ethanol (FEDB. Water fraction (FADB was obtained from ethanolic leaf extract residues of binahong leaf extraction. Each fraction activity was tested topically twice daily on dorsal of test animals that created wounds using a punch biopsy 5 mm diameters. Grouping of test animals were divided into 13 groups with normal control group (non diabetes, negative control (diabetes + topical application of biocream®, positive control (diabetes + topical application of madecassol, and 10 diabetes groups with topical application of 5 kinds of binahong leaf fractions with each fractions consist of a concentrations of 5% and 10% with biocream® as a vehicle. Diabetic parameters measured include blood glucose levels (KGD and weight lost percentage (PB% in day 1 and 10 during a 10-day treatment. The results showed the influence of KGD in the condition of diabetes on wound healing rats diabetic ulcers which topically treated with

  6. Anti-oxidant effect of gold nanoparticles restrains hyperglycemic conditions in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eom SooHyun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is imperative for its morbidity towards diabetic complications, where abnormal metabolic milieu as a result of hyperglycemia, leads to the onset of several complications. A biological antioxidant capable of inhibiting oxidative stress mediated diabetic progressions; during hyperglycemia is still the need of the era. The current study was performed to study the effect of biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs to control the hyperglycemic conditions in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Results The profound control of AuNPs over the anti oxidant enzymes such as GSH, SOD, Catalase and GPx in diabetic mice to normal, by inhibition of lipid peroxidation and ROS generation during hyperglycemia evidence their anti-oxidant effect during hyperglycemia. The AuNPs exhibited an insistent control over the blood glucose level, lipids and serum biochemical profiles in diabetic mice near to the control mice provokes their effective role in controlling and increasing the organ functions for better utilization of blood glucose. Histopathological and hematological studies revealed the non-toxic and protective effect of the gold nanoparticles over the vital organs when administered at dosage of 2.5 mg/kilogram.body.weight/day. ICP-MS analysis revealed the biodistribution of gold nanoparticles in the vital organs showing accumulation of AuNPs in the spleen comparatively greater than other organs. Conclusion The results obtained disclose the effectual role of AuNPs as an anti-oxidative agent, by inhibiting the formation of ROS, scavenging free radicals; thus increasing the anti-oxidant defense enzymes and creating a sustained control over hyperglycemic conditions which consequently evoke the potential of AuNPs as an economic therapeutic remedy in diabetic treatments and its complications.

  7. Dental and periodontal health, and microbiological and salivary conditions in patients with or without diabetes undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Schiffers, Nora; Schwabe, Sandra; Vasko, Radovan; Müller, Gerhard A; Haak, Rainer; Mausberg, Rainer F; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the dental and periodontal health, as well as the microbiological and salivary conditions, of patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) who are receiving haemodialysis. One-hundred and fifty-nine haemodialysis patients were included and divided into groups according to the pre-existing diabetes status: DM or no DM. The oral examination included dental findings and assessment of the periodontal situation. The periodontal condition was classified as healthy/mild, moderate or severe periodontitis. Subgingival biofilm samples were analysed using the polymerase chain reaction. The salivary diagnostics included measurement of unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity. Statistical analyses used Fisher's test, the t-test and the Mann-Whitney U-test (α = 5%). The dental findings showed no significant difference between patients with and without DM (P = 0.44). The prevalence of periodontitis was high (96% in patients with DM and 97% in patients who did not have DM) and there was no significant difference between the groups (P = 0.71). There was a higher prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Parvimonas micros, Eubacterium nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. in patients without DM (P salivary pH was significantly higher in patients without DM (P salivary pH were detected between the groups, the dental and periodontal status was comparable between patients with and without DM. Accordingly, DM appears to have no decisive influence on the oral health in patients treated with haemodialysis who have well-controlled diabetes. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho HY

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsiu-Yu Ho,1,2 Mei-Hui Chen,2,3 Meei-Fang Lou1 1School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 2Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology, 3National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods: A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results: The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1 expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines; 2 comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals; 3 inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice; 4 impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress; and 5 weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support. Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion: This study found that the experience of older adults

  9. United States comparative costs and absenteeism of diabetic ophthalmic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Richard A; Kleinman, Nathan L; Patel, Sunil; Smeeding, Jim E; Beren, Ian A; Turpcu, Adam

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the impact of diabetic macular edema (DME), diabetic retinopathy (DR), or diabetes on annual health benefit costs and absenteeism in US employees. Claims data from 2001 to 2012 was extracted from the Human Capital Management Services Group Research Reference Database on annual direct/indirect health benefit costs and absences for employees aged ≥ 18 years. Employees with DME, DR, or diabetes were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Employees were divided into two groups, drivers or nondrivers, and examined in separate analyses. For drivers and nondrivers, the DME, DR, and diabetes cohorts were compared with their respective control groups (without diabetes). Two-part regression models controlled for demographics and job-related characteristics. A total of 39,702 driver and 426,549 nondriver employees were identified as having ≥ 1 year's continuous health plan enrollment. Direct medical costs for drivers with DME, DR, or diabetes were $6470, $8021, and $5102, respectively (>2.8 times higher and statistically significant compared with driver controls). Nondrivers with DME and DR incurred significantly higher sick leave and short-term disability costs compared with the nondrivers with diabetes and nondriver controls. In drivers with DME, the majority of days of absence were for short- and long-term disability (12.41 and 11.43 days, respectively). In drivers with DR, the majority of days of absence were for short-term disability (10.70 days). In nondrivers with DME and nondrivers with DR, the majority of days of absence were for sick leave (5.74 and 4.93 days, respectively) and short-term disability (5.08 and 4.93 days, respectively). DME and DR are associated with substantial direct medical cost and absenteeism in this real-world sample of medically insured employees. This research highlights the negative impact of DME and DR on annual costs and absenteeism

  10. Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Glomerular Endothelial Cells under Diabetic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Uchiyama, Takanobu; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic conditions promote glomerulosclerosis by mesangial cells but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. The present study evaluated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 in glomerular endothelial cells in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mouse (ICR-STZ) and the type 2 diabetic KK/TaJcl mouse which were fed a high fat diet feed (KK/Ta-HF). In the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF almost glomeruli were immunostained with anti-TLR4 but there was no glomerulus immunostained by ani-TLR4 in the control ICR and KK/Ta. Laser-scanning confocal microscopy showed that the TLR4-positive region did not coincide with the podoplanin-positive region but coincide with the PECAM-1- and VE-cadherin-positive regions in the glomeruli of the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF. The in situ hybridization showed that almost signals for TLR4 mRNA were present in the glomerulus of the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF to a stronger extent than in the control ICR and KK/Ta. These suggest that glomerular endothelial cells usually express the TLR4 gene and hyperglycemia in the diabetic condition induces the TLR4 protein expression in the glomerular capillary endothelial cells. Cytokine productions through the TLR signaling pathway in glomerular endothelial cells may allow mesangial cells to produce extracellular matrix proteins in the diabetic milieu

  11. Herb-drug interaction of Nisha Amalaki and Curcuminoids with metformin in normal and diabetic condition: A disease system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shengule, Sushant; Kumbhare, Kalyani; Patil, Dada; Mishra, Sanjay; Apte, Kishori; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2018-05-01

    Nisha Amalaki (NA), formulation with Curcuma longa Linn (Turmeric, Haridra, Nisha in Sanskrit; Family: Zingiberaceae) and Phyllanthus emblica Linn (Indian gooseberry, Amlaki in Sanskrit; Family: Phyllanthaceae) which is described for various diseases including diabetes in ayurvedic texts and Nighantus. The aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) interactions of chemically standardized NA and Curcuminoids (CE) with metformin (MET) in normal and diabetic animals. Oral administration of NA (200 mg/kg) and CE (30 mg/kg) was carried out for seven days followed by co-administration of MET till fifteen days. MET plasma PK parameters including C max , AUC 0-∞ , t 1/2 , CL and V d were measured on the eighth day. PD parameters including plasma glucose AUC followed by oral glucose tolerance test, high-density lipoproteins (HDL), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured on the fifteenth day. In normal animals, co-administration of NA + MET and CE + MET resulted in significant increase (p < 0.05) in C max , AUC 0-∞ , t 1/2, and reduction of CL and V d . We report that co-administration of NA + MET and CE + MET significantly (p < 0.01, p < 0.001) reduced plasma glucose level, HDL level while a notable reduction in TG and TC level was observed. Interestingly, in diabetic condition, co-administration of NA + MET and CE + MET indicated a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in C max , AUC 0-∞ , t 1/2 and enhanced CL and V d. Hence, to conclude, co-administration of NA + MET and CE + MET resulted in beneficial PK and PD interactions leading to antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects in both conditions. However, PK interaction was drastically different in diabetic and normal conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Validity of the RAI-MDS for ascertaining diabetes and comorbid conditions in long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M; Yan, Lin; Blackburn, David; Hu, Nianping; Schneider-Lindner, Verena; Teare, Gary F

    2014-01-15

    This study assessed the validity of the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) Version 2.0 for diagnoses of diabetes and comorbid conditions in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Hospital inpatient, outpatient physician billing, RAI-MDS, and population registry data for 1997 to 2011 from Saskatchewan, Canada were used to ascertain cases of diabetes and 12 comorbid conditions. Prevalence estimates were calculated for both RAI-MDS and administrative health data. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated using population-based administrative health data as the validation data source. Cohen's κ was used to estimate agreement between the two data sources. 23,217 LTCF residents were in the diabetes case ascertainment cohort. Diabetes prevalence was 25.3% in administrative health data and 21.9% in RAI-MDS data. Overall sensitivity of a RAI-MDS diabetes diagnoses was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.79, 0.80) and the PPV was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.92), when compared to administrative health data. Sensitivity of the RAI-MDS for ascertaining comorbid conditions ranged from 0.21 for osteoporosis to 0.92 for multiple sclerosis; specificity was high for most conditions. RAI-MDS clinical assessment data are sensitive to ascertain diabetes cases in LTCF populations when compared to administrative health data. For many comorbid conditions, RAI-MDS data have low validity when compared to administrative data. Risk-adjustment measures based on these comorbidities might not produce consistent results for RAI-MDS and administrative health data, which could affect the conclusions of studies about health outcomes and quality of care across facilities.

  13. Comparison of different insulin pump makes under routine care conditions in adults with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarathna, L; Roberts, S A; Hindle, A; Markakis, K; Alam, T; Chapman, A; Morris, J; Urwin, A; Jinadev, P; Rutter, M K

    2017-10-01

    To compare long-term HbA 1c changes associated with different insulin pumps during routine care in a large cohort of adults with Type 1 diabetes representative of other clinic populations. Observational, retrospective study of 508 individuals starting pump therapy between 1999 and 2014 (mean age, 40 years; 55% women; diabetes duration, 20 years; 94% Type 1 diabetes; median follow-up, 3.7 years). Mixed linear models compared covariate-adjusted HbA 1c changes associated with different pump makes. The pumps compared were: 50% Medtronic, 24% Omnipod, 14% Roche and 12% Animas. Overall HbA 1c levels improved and improvements were maintained during a follow-up extending to 10 years (HbA 1c : pre-continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (pre-CSII) vs. 12 months post CSII, 71 (61, 82) vs. 66 (56, 74) mmol/mol; 8.7 (7.7, 9.6) vs. 8.2 (7.3, 8.9)%; P < 0.0001). The percentage of individuals with HbA 1c ≥ 64 mmol/mol (8.0%) reduced from a pre-CSII level of 68% to 55%. After adjusting for baseline confounders, there were no between-pump differences in HbA 1c lowering (P = 0.44), including a comparison of patch pumps with traditional catheter pumps (P = 0.63). There were no significant (P < 0.05) between-pump differences in HbA 1c lowering in pre-specified subgroups stratified by pre-pump HbA 1c , age or diabetes duration. HbA 1c lowering was positively related to baseline HbA 1c (P < 0.001) and diabetes duration (P = 0.017), and negatively related to the number of years of CSII use (P = 0.024). Under routine care conditions, there were no covariate-adjusted differences in HbA 1c lowering when comparing different pump makes, including a comparison of patch pumps vs. traditional catheter pumps. Therefore, the choice of CSII make should not be influenced by the desired degree of HbA 1c lowering. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  14. Theobromine increases NAD⁺/Sirt-1 activity and protects the kidney under diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Silva, Kamila C; Peixoto, Elisa B M I; Borges, Cynthia M; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M; Lopes de Faria, José B

    2015-02-01

    Reduction in sirtuin 1 (Sirt-1) is associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in the diabetic kidney. Theobromine may reduce kidney ECM accumulation in diabetic rats. In the current study, we aimed to unravel, under diabetic conditions, the mechanism of kidney ECM accumulation induced by a reduction in Sirt-1 and the effect of theobromine in these events. In vitro, we used immortalized human mesangial cells (iHMCs) exposed to high glucose (HG; 30 mM), with or without small interfering RNA for NOX4 and Sirt-1. In vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were rendered diabetic by means of streptozotocin and studied after 12 wk. The effects of treatment with theobromine were investigated under both conditions. HG leads to a decrease in Sirt-1 activity and NAD(+) levels in iHMCs. Sirt-1 activity could be reestablished by treatment with NAD(+), silencing NOX4, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) blockade, or with theobromine. HG also leads to a low AMP/ATP ratio, acetylation of SMAD3, and increased collagen IV, which is prevented by theobromine. Sirt-1 or AMPK blockade abolished these effects of theobromine. In diabetic SHR, theobromine prevented increases in albuminuria and kidney collagen IV, reduced AMPK, elevated NADPH oxidase activity and PARP-1, and reduced NAD(+) levels and Sirt-1 activity. These results suggest that in diabetes mellitus, Sirt-1 activity is reduced by PARP-1 activation and NAD(+) depletion due to low AMPK, which increases NOX4 expression, leading to ECM accumulation mediated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling. It is suggested that Sirt-1 activation by theobromine may have therapeutic potential for diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Willingness to pay for flexible working conditions of people with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexo, M A; Cleal, B; Hagelund, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing number of people with chronic diseases challenges workforce capacity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can have work-related consequences, such as early retirement. Laws of most high-income countries require workplaces to provide accommodations to enable people with chronic...... disabilities to manage their condition at work. A barrier to successful implementation of such accommodations can be lack of co-workers' willingness to support people with T2D. This study aimed to examine the willingness to pay (WTP) of people with and without T2D for five workplace initiatives that help...... individuals with type 2 diabetes manage their diabetes at work. METHODS: Three samples with employed Danish participants were drawn from existing online panels: a general population sample (n = 600), a T2D sample (n = 693), and a matched sample of people without diabetes (n = 539). Participants completed...

  16. Energy principle with included boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Earlier comments by the author on the limitations of the classical form of the extended energy principle are supported by a complementary analysis on the potential energy change arising from free-boundary displacements of a magnetically confined plasma. In the final formulation of the extended principle, restricted displacements, satisfying pressure continuity by means of plasma volume currents in a thin boundary layer, are replaced by unrestricted (arbitrary) displacements which can give rise to induced surface currents. It is found that these currents contribute to the change in potential energy, and that their contribution is not taken into account by such a formulation. A general expression is further given for surface currents induced by arbitrary displacements. The expression is used to reformulate the energy principle for the class of displacements which satisfy all necessary boundary conditions, including that of the pressure balance. This makes a minimization procedure of the potential energy possible, for the class of all physically relevant test functions which include the constraints imposed by the boundary conditions. Such a procedure is also consistent with a corresponding variational calculus. (Author)

  17. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lochner, Elena [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Findeisen, Hannes M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Parhofer, Klaus G. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Internal Medicine II, Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  18. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L.; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  19. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  20. Knowing hypertension and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology...... for diagnosing and treating them. The response to the AIDS epidemic in Uganda provides an important context for, and contrast with, the emergence of hypertension and diabetes as social phenomena. Ethnographic fieldwork shows the interplay between experience of these conditions and the political economy...

  1. Optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes: exposure to 12.5 mGy X-rays for 8 weeks efficiently protects the kidney from diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Fengsheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Guo, Weiying; Li, Cai; Li, Wei; Wang, Guixia; Xing, Xiao; Gao, Ying; Ge, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guanjun; Cai, Lu

    2014-05-08

    We reported the attenuation of diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by exposure to multiple low-dose radiation (LDR) at 25 mGy every other day by suppressing renal oxidative damage. We here explored the optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice with type 1 diabetes were induced with multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin. Diabetic mice received whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 12.5, 25 or 50 mGy every other day for either 4 or 8 weeks. Age-matched normal mice were similarly irradiated at the dose of 25 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks. The renal function and histopathological changes were examined at the 4th and 8th weeks of the study. Diabetes induced renal dysfunction is shown by the decreased creatinine and increased microalbumin in the urine. Renal oxidative damage, detected by protein nitration and lipid oxidation, and remodeling, reflected by increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, collagen IV and fibronectin, were significantly increased in diabetic mice. All these renal pathological and function changes in diabetic mice were significantly attenuated by exposure to LDR at all regimens, among which, however, exposure to LDR at 12.5 mGy for 8 weeks provided the best protective effect on the kidney of diabetic mice. Our results suggest that whole-body LDR at 12.5 mGy every other day for 8 weeks is the optimal condition of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Whole-Body MR Imaging Including Angiography: Predicting Recurrent Events in Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Robert C; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M; Parhofer, Klaus G; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L

    2016-05-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30%) developed one, 8 (13%) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75%, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63%, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63%, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88%, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. • Patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus are at high risk for recurrent events. • Whole-body MRI predicts occurrence of recurrent events independently of clinical characteristics. • The vessel score derived from whole-body angiography is a good general risk-marker. • Whole-body MRI may also provide organ-specific risk assessment. • Current findings may indicate benefits of

  3. Patients' education, and its impact on care outcomes, resource consumption and working conditions: data from the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, J J; Aschner, P; Baik, S H; Chan, J; Chantelot, J M; Ilkova, H; Ramachandran, A

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of diabetes education provided to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in non-controlled studies ("real-world conditions") on quality of care, resource consumption and conditions of employment. This cross-sectional study and longitudinal follow-up describe the data (demographic and socioeconomic profiles, clinical characteristics, treatment of hyperglycaemia and associated cardiovascular risk factors, resource consumption) collected during the second phase (2006) of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS). Patients received diabetes education directly from the practice nurse, dietitian or educator, or were referred to ad hoc group-education programmes; all programmes emphasized healthy lifestyle changes, self-care and active participation in disease control and treatment. Educated vs non-educated T2DM patients (n=5692 in each group), paired by age, gender and diabetes duration, were randomly recruited for the IDMPS by participating primary-care physicians from 27 countries in Eastern Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Outcome measures included clinical (body weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, foot evaluation), metabolic (HbA(1c) levels, blood lipid profile) and biochemical control measures. Treatment goals were defined according to American Diabetes Association guidelines. T2DM patients' education significantly improved the percentage of patients achieving target values set by international guidelines. Educated patients increased their insulin use and self-care performance, had a lower rate of chronic complications and a modest increase in cost of care, and probably higher salaries and slightly better productivity. Diabetes education is an efficient tool for improving care outcomes without having a major impact on healthcare costs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes Mellitus and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Durmuş

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. Studies on the presence of a generalized osteoporosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM are few and controversial. Factors associated with osteoporosis diabetes in which may account for the patogenesis of diabetic bone loss have been studied. This article will review the relevant litarature relating to diabetes and osteoporosis including cellular and animal models. These studies include vascular and neuropathic mechanism, poor glisemic control, abnormalities of calcium and vitamin D metabolism and hypercalciuria with secondary increase in parathyroid hormone secretion, the role of insülin and insülin like growth factor I. It appears that there is a great deal of variability in the bone mineral density and fracture rates in both type I and type II DM. This may reflect multiple factors such as the population, age, duration of diabetes and insülin use. There is need for further longitudinal studies, including the incidence and risk factors for osteoporosis in DM.

  5. Detecting Diabetes (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    An estimated 30 million people have diabetes, including seven million adults who do not know they have it. That is, about one in four adults with diabetes are not aware of their condition. In this podcast, Nilka Rios Burrows discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes.

  6. Predictors for the initiation of a basal supported oral therapy (BOT) in type 2 diabetic patients under real-life conditions in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Dippel, Franz-Werner

    2012-12-01

    To assess the predictors for the initiation of a basal supported oral therapy (BOT) in type 2 diabetic patients under real-life conditions in Germany. A historical cohort study based on representative German real life data (IMS(®) Disease Analyzer) was performed. The study included patients with type 2 diabetes who started an oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) treatment between 01/1995 and 12/2011. Patients with consecutive treatment data for at least 12 months before the initiation of an OAD treatment were eligible for the analysis. The time-dependent rate of patients starting an insulin therapy with a long-acting insulin was calculated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analyses were applied to identify associated factors. The study included 194,967 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus being on OAD therapy. 24,964 patients were switched to BOT during the observational period. The probability of switching to insulin therapy was associated with three main predictors such as (1) poor metabolic control, (2) midlife age and (3) number and type of the OAD before insulinization. The variation of the HbA1c threshold to HbA1c≥7.5 leads to comparable outcomes with significant HR. The highest probability of initiating a basal supported oral therapy (BOT) under real life conditions was found for patients with poor metabolic control, midlife age and pre-treatment with specific OADs such as SU, GLI or AGI before initiation of insulin therapy. Copyright © 2012 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Skin changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Masson-Meyers, Daniela Santos; Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Terra, Vânia Aparecida; Ovidio, Paula Payão; Jordão-Júnior, Alceu Afonso; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2017-09-02

    Diabetes can cause serious health complications, which can affect every organ of the body, including the skin. The molecular etiology has not yet been clarified for all diabetic skin conditions. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the changes of diabetes in skin compared to non-diabetic skin in rats. Fifteen days after establishing the diabetic status, skin samples from the dorsum-cervical region were harvested for subsequent analysis of alterations caused by diabetes. Our results demonstrate that diabetes stimulated higher inflammation and oxidative stress in skin, but antioxidant defense levels were lower compared to the non-diabetic group (p skin changes compared to non-diabetic skin in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Attenuation of Diabetic Conditions by Sida rhombifolia in Moderately Diabetic Rats and Inability to Produce Similar Effects in Severely Diabetic in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja; Kwape, Tebogo Elvis

    2015-12-01

    This study was done out to evaluate the effects of Sida rhombifolia methanol extract (SRM) on diabetes in moderately diabetic (MD) and severely diabetic (SD) Sprague-Dawley rats. SRM was prepared by soaking the powdered plant material in 70% methanol and rota evaporating the methanol from the extract. Effective hypoglycemic doses were established by performing oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in normal rats. Hourly effects of SRM on glucose were observed in the MD and the SD rats. Rats were grouped, five rats to a group, into normal control 1 (NC1), MD control 1 (MDC1), MD experimental 1 (MDE1), SD control 1 (SDC1), and SD experimental 1 (SDE1) groups. All rats in the control groups were administered 1 mL of distilled water (DW). The rats in the MDE1 and the SDE1 groups were administered SRM orally at 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (BW), respectively, dissolved in 1 mL of DW. Blood was collected initially and at intervals of 1 hour for 6 hours to measure blood glucose. A similar experimental design was followed for the 30-day long-term trial. Finally, rats were sacrificed, and blood was collected to measure blood glucose, lipid profiles, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH). OGTTs indicated that two doses (200 and 300 mg/kg BW) were effective hypoglycemic doses in normal rats. Both doses reduced glucose levels after 1 hour in the MDE1 and the SDE1 groups. A long-term trial of SRM in the MD group showed a reduced glucose level, a normal lipid profile, and normal GSH and TBARS levels. In SD rats, SRM had no statistically significant effects on these parameters. Normal weight was achieved in the MD rats, but the SD rats showed reduced BW. The study demonstrates that SRM has potential to alleviate the conditions of moderate diabetic, but not severe diabetes.

  9. A Review of Fatigue Condition in Patients with Type II Diabetes in Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Vard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Complications of Diabetes such as Fatigue is a serious obstacle hindering the enhancement of health behaviors, including participation in Diabetes self-care programs, and is considered as a challenging problem for nurses and health-care providers in the process of diseases’ treatments and therapies. These complications not only influence the patients’ quality of life, but also, increases the risk of complications. Hence, regarding the importance of the role of fatigue and its subsequent effects on Diabetes’ control as well as the paucity of studies carried out in this field, the current research intended to review fatigue condition in patients with type II Diabetes in Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center. The nature of this study is a Quantitative-Descriptive research. For the purpose of the present study, 195 patients with type II Diabetes were selected as the target sample population, based on Non-probability Convenience Sampling Method, from Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center. To collect the research data, the researcher used a two-part written questionnaire encompassing Personal Information and Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory- Short Form (MFSI-SF as the data collection tool. Each of the participants in the present research were briefly advised about the nature and objectives of the research and they were interviewed by the researcher to complete the questionnaire after consent reached with the patients. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS16 statistical analysis software; accordingly the significance level of all the tests was estimated as P˂0.05. The results of the data analysis showed that %85.1 of the patients suffered from fatigue. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean of the severity of fatigue condition between female and male patients in the present study, i.e.23.22 ± 17.49 for women and 13.24 ± 17.73 for men, indexing a significance level of P˂0

  10. Characterization and comparison of SGLT2 inhibitors: Part 3. Effects on diabetic complications in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Atsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Yokono, Masanori; Imamura, Masakazu; Kurosaki, Eiji

    2017-08-15

    In this study, we investigated and compared the effects of all six sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors commercially available in Japan on diabetes-related diseases and complications in type 2 diabetic mice. Following 4-week repeated administration to diabetic mice, all SGLT2 inhibitors showed significant improvement in diabetes-related diseases and complications, including obesity; abnormal lipid metabolism; steatohepatitis; inflammation; endothelial dysfunction; and nephropathy. While all SGLT2 inhibitors exerted comparable effects in reducing hyperglycemia, improvement of these diabetes-related diseases and complications was more potent with the two long-acting drugs (ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin) than with the four intermediate-acting four drugs (tofogliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and luseogliflozin), albeit without statistical significance. These findings demonstrate that SGLT2 inhibitors alleviate various diabetic pathological conditions in type 2 diabetic mice, and suggest that SGLT2 inhibitors, particularly long-acting drugs, might be useful not only for hyperglycemia but also in diabetes-related diseases and complications, including nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gestational diabetes insipidus: a review of an underdiagnosed condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Audibert, François; Bedard, Marie-Josée; Mahone, Michèle; Goffinet, François; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    To review the etiology, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus during pregnancy. A search of the literature was performed in PubMed using key word searching and citation snowballing to identify articles published in English between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 2008, on the subject of diabetes insipidus during pregnancy. Once the articles were identified, a thorough review of all results was conducted. Results and conclusions were compiled and summarized. We reviewed 50 studies selected using the following key words: diabetes insipidus, pregnancy, arginine vasopressin, vasopressinase. Gestational diabetes insipidus is underdiagnosed because polyuria is often considered normal during pregnancy. Clinicians caring for pregnant women should consider screening for gestational diabetes insipidus, because it could be associated with serious underlying pathology.

  12. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  13. Safety of Anti-Diabetic Therapies on Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis and diabetic disease have reached epidemic proportion and create significant public health concerns. The prevalence of these diseases is alarming, and indicates that in the US, 50% of elderly individuals are osteoporotic and almost 20% of population has either diabetic or prediabetic conditions (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; http://www.cdc.gov). Osteoporosis and diabetes share many features including genetic predispositions and molecular mechanisms. The linkage betw...

  14. Cost-Utility Analysis of Extending Public Health Insurance Coverage to Include Diabetic Retinopathy Screening by Optometrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Katwyk, Sasha; Jin, Ya-Ping; Trope, Graham E; Buys, Yvonne; Masucci, Lisa; Wedge, Richard; Flanagan, John; Brent, Michael H; El-Defrawy, Sherif; Tu, Hong Anh; Thavorn, Kednapa

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness in Canada. Eye examinations play an important role in early detection. However, DR screening by optometrists is not always universally covered by public or private health insurance plans. This study assessed whether expanding public health coverage to include diabetic eye examinations for retinopathy by optometrists is cost-effective from the perspective of the health care system. We conducted a cost-utility analysis of extended coverage for diabetic eye examinations in Prince Edward Island to include examinations by optometrists, not currently publicly covered. We used a Markov chain to simulate disease burden based on eye examination rates and DR progression over a 30-year time horizon. Results were presented as an incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. A series of one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists was associated with higher costs ($9,908,543.32) and improved QALYs (156,862.44), over 30 years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1668.43/QALY gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential determinants of the results were the cost of optometric screening and selected utility scores. At the commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY, the probability that the new policy was cost-effective was 99.99%. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists is cost-effective based on a commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY. Findings from this study can inform the decision to expand public-insured optometric services for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detecting Diabetes (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-02

    An estimated 30 million people have diabetes, including seven million adults who do not know they have it. That is, about one in four adults with diabetes are not aware of their condition. In this podcast, Nilka Rios Burrows discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes.  Created: 11/2/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/2/2017.

  16. Diabetic Mastopathy as a Radiographically Occult Palpable Breast Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Thanarajasingam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon, benign disease of the breast that can occur in women with diabetes and clinically mimic breast cancer. We describe a patient with long-standing type 1 diabetes who presented with a palpable breast mass with negative imaging findings on mammography, ultrasonography, and breast MRI. Surgical biopsy and histopathology confirmed diabetic mastopathy. We use this case to highlight the recognition, radiographic features, pathology, and management of this benign breast condition and emphasize that, in diabetic patients, the differential diagnosis of a new breast mass should include diabetic mastopathy.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Peru is an upper medium-income developing country with an increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, including diabetes. To review and describe the epidemiology, drivers, and diabetes care plan in Peru. The medical literature was reviewed based on systematic searching of PubMed, Scielo, and various gray literature from the International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organization, and local Peruvian agencies. In Peru, diabetes affects 7% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 96.8% of outpatients visits with this condition. Type 1 diabetes has an incidence of 0.4/100,000 per year, and gestational diabetes affects 16% of pregnancies. The prevalence of glucose intolerance is 8.11% and that of impaired fasting glucose 22.4%. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adults is 34.7%, 17.5%, and 25%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is greater in women and the elderly and at urban and low-altitude locations. Diabetes is the eighth cause of death, the sixth cause of blindness, and the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease and nontraumatic lower limb amputation. In Peru, diabetes accounts for 31.5% of acute myocardial infarctions and 25% of strokes. Infections, diabetic emergencies, and cardiovascular disorders are the main causes for admissions, with a mortality rate Diabetes is a major health care issue in Peru that exposes difficult challenges and shortcomings. The national strategy for tackling diabetes includes promotion of healthy lifestyles; training primary care physicians and providing them with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, safe and effective medications, and tools for monitoring treatment; and, finally, construction of a comprehensive health care network for early referral in order to prevent, detect, and treat diabetic complications. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Should diabetes be commissioned through multidisciplinary networks, rather than Practice Based Commissioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David; English, Patrick; Robins, Peter; Craig, Andrew; Addicott, Rachael

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes is recognized as a complex, long term, largely asymptomatic condition requiring self management skills, a range of health care professionals and articulated health services. Diabetes Networks have been introduced to provide guidance from people with diabetes and local health professionals with different skills to ensure that diabetes care is well organized, sustainable and delivers quality care. We have considered the role of Diabetes Networks in the English setting. Drawing on studies of health service organization and health policy, we describe the context in which diabetes commissioning is currently occurring in England, the role of Diabetes Networks and key components for an effective Diabetes Network. We have identified that Diabetes Networks are not currently mandatory and discovered policy approaches that are likely to work against safe, timely, integrated approaches to diabetes services with potentially harmful impacts on people with diabetes in the future. Practice Based Commissioning, where it sidelines Diabetes Networks, is a particular concern. We have identified key components of Diabetes Networks including explicit frameworks for leadership, membership, funding, decision making, communication and action. Diabetes is a condition requiring collaboration between all involved. Diabetes Networks include patients and all relevant health professionals and should dictate what and how diabetes care should be commissioned within the local health economy. Copyright © 2010 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CKD in diabetes: diabetic kidney disease versus nondiabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Huber, Tobias B; Isermann, Berend; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has prompted research efforts to tackle the growing epidemic of diabetic kidney disease (DKD; also known as diabetic nephropathy). The limited success of much of this research might in part be due to the fact that not all patients diagnosed with DKD have renal dysfunction as a consequence of their diabetes mellitus. Patients who present with CKD and diabetes mellitus (type 1 or type 2) can have true DKD (wherein CKD is a direct consequence of their diabetes status), nondiabetic kidney disease (NDKD) coincident with diabetes mellitus, or a combination of both DKD and NDKD. Preclinical studies using models that more accurately mimic these three entities might improve the ability of animal models to predict clinical trial outcomes. Moreover, improved insights into the pathomechanisms that are shared by these entities - including sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) and renin-angiotensin system-driven glomerular hyperfiltration and tubular hyper-reabsorption - as well as those that are unique to individual entities might lead to the identification of new treatment targets. Acknowledging that the clinical entity of CKD plus diabetes mellitus encompasses NDKD as well as DKD could help solve some of the urgent unmet medical needs of patients affected by these conditions.

  20. Vulvodynia: An unrecognized diabetic neuropathic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar pain syndromes, including vulvodynia, are a common source of morbidity in women and cause much physical and psychological suffering. This brief communication postulates the hypothesis that unexplained vulvar pain may be hitherto undescribed manifestation of painful sensory diabetic neuropathy. It describes the clinical characteristics of vulvodynia and highlights the similarities between this condition and diabetic neuropathy. The hypothesis calls for women presenting with vulvar pain to be screened for diabetes, as well as women with diabetes to be questioned about vulvar symptomatology. The paper hopes to stimulate extensive research in this important, but so far neglected, field of women′s endocrine health.

  1. Diabetic Myonecrosis: An Atypical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Hernán Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic myonecrosis is a frequently unrecognized complication of longstanding and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. The clinical presentation is swelling, pain, and tenderness of the involved muscle, most commonly the thigh muscles. Management consists of conservative measures including analgesia and rest. Short-term prognosis is good, but long-term prognosis is poor with most patients dying within 5 years. Failure to properly identify this condition will expose the patient to aggressive measures that could result in increased morbidity. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in which there was involvement of multiple muscle groups including upper and lower limbs.

  2. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  3. Diabetic patients served at a regional level hospital: what is their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... Obesity remains a major modifiable risk factor in both type 1 and 2 diabetes patients. Blood glucose .... JEMDSA. Co-morbid conditions found in our patients included: ..... were probably type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood,.

  4. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  5. Evaluation of Plasma Lipoprotein (A Levels in Diabetic and Non Diabetic Indiviuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BA Jalai

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipoprotein (a is a particle rich in cholesterol in human plasma and it is known as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. In addition to genetic background, other factors such as diabetes affect the plasma concentration of this lipoprotein as a risk factor. The aim of this study was evaluation and comparison of plasma concentration of Lp(a in type II diabetics and non diabetic individuals. Material and Methods: The study population included 180 diabetic patients who had referred to the Diabetic Research center of Yazd and 180 non diabetic individuals who were matched according to age and sex with the patient group. Blood samples were collected from the study groups in fasting condition. Glycated hemoglobin, glucose, lipids and lipoproteins were measured by routine laboratory methods and Lp(a assay was carried out by electro immunodiffusion. Results were analyzed with the use of SPSS program. Statistical tests included variance analysis, t-test for comparing lipids and lipoproteins, U-test for comparing Lp(a in the two groups and Pearson Correlation for determining of the variables with Lp(a. Results: Mean plasma concentratin of Lp(a in diabetic patients (Mean + SD 41.98+ 34.63 mg/dl was significantly higher than that of the control group (26.6 + 20.2 mg/dl (P<0.001. Mean concentration of cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL cholesterol in the patient group was higher but mean HDL cholesterol in control group was higher than patient group. However, no significant correlation was found between Lp(a and other variables in the patient and control groups. Conclusion: Plasma concentration of Lp(a in Diabetes Mellitus is increased independently. In diabetic patients, the risk of coronary artery disease may increase with increase in Lp(a.

  6. Comparison of iron status and insulin resistance between non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics and non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, U.; Qureshi, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is positively correlated with body iron. It is unclear whether iron is a cause or an outcome of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance precedes type 2 diabetes mellitus. Offspring of type 2 diabetics are insulin resistant as compared to those of the non-diabetics. The present study was designed to compare and correlate insulin resistance with iron parameters (including serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and blood haemoglobin) in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics and non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Methods: It was a cross-sectional study, conducted on one hundred and twenty male subjects 20-40 years of age. They were divided into two groups, each group having 60 subjects. Group A included non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics, while Group B included non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Fasting blood sample was taken and examined for glucose, haemoglobin, insulin, iron, TIBC and ferritin. Data was analysed by SPSS-17. Results: Insulin resistance and iron parameters were significantly higher (p<0.05) in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics as compared to those of the non-diabetics. There was significant positive correlation (p=0.027) between insulin resistance and serum iron in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics. There was also significant positive correlation between insulin resistance and serum iron, transferrin saturation and haemoglobin in non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Conclusion: Non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics have iron load and insulin resistance, that predispose them to the development of type 2 diabetes. (author)

  7. Diabetes Self-Management Education: Miles to Go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Altman Klein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis assessed how successfully Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME interventions help people with type 2 diabetes achieve and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. We included 52 DSME programs with 9,631 participants that reported post-intervention A1c levels in randomized controlled trials. The training conditions resulted in significant reductions in A1c levels compared to control conditions. However, the impact of intervention was modest shifting of only 7.23% more participants from diabetic to pre-diabetic or normal status, relative to the control condition. Most intervention participants did not achieve healthy A1c levels. Further, few DSME studies assessed long-term maintenance of A1c gains. Past trends suggest that gains are difficult to sustain over time. Our results suggested that interventions delivered by nurses were more successful than those delivered by non-nursing personnel. We suggest that DSME programs might do better by going beyond procedural interventions. Most DSME programs relied heavily on rules and procedures to guide decisions about diet, exercise, and weight loss. Future DSME may need to include cognitive self-monitoring, diagnosis, and planning skills to help patients detect anomalies, identify possible causes, generate corrective action, and avoid future barriers to maintaining healthy A1c levels. Finally, comprehensive descriptions of DSME programs would advance future efforts.

  8. F1 occurrence including L condition in TUCUMAN and BUENOS AIRES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosert Gonzalez, M. de; Ezquer, R.G.; Oviedo, R.V. del

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the occurrence of the F1 layer including the L condition has been done, using data from two Argentine stations: TUCUMAN and BUENOS AIRES, at different seasons and solar activity conditions. The comparisons between observations and the F1 occurrence predicted by the IRI-90 model show the need of reviewing the use of the DuCharme et al. (1973) formula adopted by the model to predict the occurrence of the intermediate F1 layer including the L condition. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Appraisal Of Quality Of Life Of Diabetic Patients, Including Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review showed that patients with diabetes mellitus had signi cantly low ... of life (physical health, psychological health, social relations, and environment). ... of quality of life regarding gender, age, or the level of education of the patients. ... neuropathy, impaired vision, elevated blood lipids and amputation of toes or feet.

  10. Periodontal Inflammatory Conditions Among Smokers and Never-Smokers With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Salazar-Lazo, Karem; Yanez-Fontenla, Virginia; Aldosary, Khalid M; Alshehri, Mohammed; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    There is a dearth of studies regarding the influence of cigarette smoking on periodontal inflammatory conditions among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present study is to assess periodontal inflammatory conditions among smokers and never-smokers with and without T2DM. One hundred individuals (50 patients with T2DM [25 smokers and 25 never-smokers] and 50 controls [25 smokers and 25 never-smokers]) were included. Information regarding age, sex, duration and daily frequency of smoking, duration and treatment of diabetes, and oral hygiene was recorded using a questionnaire. Periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], probing depth [PD], clinical attachment loss [AL], and marginal bone loss [MBL]) were measured. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also recorded. Mean age, monthly income status, and education levels were comparable among smokers and never-smokers with and without T2DM. Mean HbA1c levels were significantly higher among patients with T2DM (8.2% ± 0.1%) compared with controls (4.4% ± 0.3%) (P Smokers in the control group were smoking significantly greater numbers of cigarettes (15.5 ± 2.5 cigarettes daily) compared with smokers with T2DM (6.2 ± 2.1 cigarettes daily) (P smokers and never-smokers with T2DM. Among controls, periodontal parameters (PI [P smokers than never-smokers. Never-smokers with T2DM had worse periodontal status than smokers and never-smokers in the control group (P smokers and never-smokers with T2DM. Among controls, periodontal inflammation is worse among smokers than never-smokers.

  11. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection. At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

  12. The ECG Vertigo in Diabetes and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers...

  13. Willingness to pay for flexible working conditions of people with type 2 diabetes: discrete choice experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexo, M A; Cleal, B; Hagelund, Lise; Willaing, I; Olesen, K

    2017-12-15

    The increasing number of people with chronic diseases challenges workforce capacity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can have work-related consequences, such as early retirement. Laws of most high-income countries require workplaces to provide accommodations to enable people with chronic disabilities to manage their condition at work. A barrier to successful implementation of such accommodations can be lack of co-workers' willingness to support people with T2D. This study aimed to examine the willingness to pay (WTP) of people with and without T2D for five workplace initiatives that help individuals with type 2 diabetes manage their diabetes at work. Three samples with employed Danish participants were drawn from existing online panels: a general population sample (n = 600), a T2D sample (n = 693), and a matched sample of people without diabetes (n = 539). Participants completed discrete choice experiments eliciting their WTP (reduction in monthly salary, €/month) for five hypothetical workplace initiatives: part-time job, customized work, extra breaks with pay, and time off for medical consultations with and without pay. WTP was estimated by conditional logits models. Bootstrapping was used to estimate confidence intervals for WTP. There was an overall WTP for all initiatives. Average WTP for all attributes was 34 €/month (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27-43] in the general population sample, 32 €/month (95% CI: 26-38) in the T2D sample, and 55 €/month (95% CI: 43-71) in the matched sample. WTP for additional breaks with pay was considerably lower than for the other initiatives in all samples. People with T2D had significantly lower WTP than people without diabetes for part-time work, customized work, and time off without pay, but not for extra breaks or time off with pay. For people with and without T2D, WTP was present for initiatives that could improve management of diabetes at the workplace. WTP was lowest among people with T2D. Implementation of these

  14. Animal Models of Diabetes Mellitus for Islet Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoaki Sakata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to current improvements in techniques for islet isolation and transplantation and protocols for immunosuppressants, islet transplantation has become an effective treatment for severe diabetes patients. Many diabetic animal models have contributed to such improvements. In this paper, we focus on 3 types of models with different mechanisms for inducing diabetes mellitus (DM: models induced by drugs including streptozotocin (STZ, pancreatomized models, and spontaneous models due to autoimmunity. STZ-induced diabetes is one of the most commonly used experimental diabetic models and is employed using many specimens including rodents, pigs or monkeys. The management of STZ models is well established for islet studies. Pancreatomized models reveal different aspects compared to STZ-induced models in terms of loss of function in the increase and decrease of blood glucose and therefore are useful for evaluating the condition in total pancreatomized patients. Spontaneous models are useful for preclinical studies including the assessment of immunosuppressants because such models involve the same mechanisms as type 1 DM in the clinical setting. In conclusion, islet researchers should select suitable diabetic animal models according to the aim of the study.

  15. The relationship between patients' knowledge of diabetes therapeutic goals and self-management behaviour, including adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheedi, Mohammad; Awad, Abdelmoneim; Hatoum, Hind T; Enlund, Hannes

    2017-02-01

    Background The Middle East region has one the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world. Little is known about the determinants of adherence and the role of knowledge in diabetes self-management within these populations. Objective To investigate the relationship between patients knowledge of diabetes therapeutic targets with adherence to self-care measures in a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes in Kuwait. Setting Primary care chronic care clinics within the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. Methods A cross sectional survey was carried out with 238 patients from six clinics. A multistage stratified clustered sampling method was used to first randomly select the clinics and the patients. Self-reported adherence to three behaviours: medication taking, diet and physical activity. Results Respondents were able to correctly report a mean (SD) of 1.6 (1.3) out of 5 of the pre-specified treatment targets. Optimal adherence to physical activity, diet and medications was reported in 25, 33 and 47 % of the study cohort, respectively. A structural equation model analysis showed better knowledge of therapeutic goals and own current levels translated into better adherence to medications, diet and physical activity. Conclusion Knowledge of therapeutic goals and own recent levels is associated with adherence to medications, diet, or physical activity in this Kuwaiti cohort of patients with diabetes. Low adherence to self-care management and poor overall knowledge of diabetes is a big challenge to successful diabetes care in Kuwait.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  17. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  18. Anti-Diabetic, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activities of Flavonoids from Corn Silk on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Liying; Ma, Zhongsu; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-12-23

    Corn silk is a well-known ingredient frequently used in traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of crude flavonoids extracted from corn silk (CSFs) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results revealed that treatment with 300 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg of CSFs significantly reduced the body weight loss, water consumption, and especially the blood glucose (BG) concentration of diabetic mice, which indicated their potential anti-diabetic activities. Serum total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays were also performed to evaluate the anti-oxidant effects. Besides, several serum lipid values including total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were reduced and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C) was increased. The anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic effect of the CSFs suggest a potential therapeutic treatment for diabetic conditions.

  19. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes in a general hospital in a middle income country: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, María de Los Angeles; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Pinto, Miguel E; Ticse, Ray; Malaga, German; Sacksteder, Katherine; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the morbidity rate and associated factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a low-middle income country setting. Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin.

  20. TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity

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    Andrea Zsombok

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last three to four decades the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus has greatly increased worldwide, including in the United States. Both the short- and long-term forecasts predict serious consequences for the near future, and encourage the development of solutions for the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels were identified in tissues and organs important for the control of whole body metabolism. A variety of TRP channels has been shown to play a role in the regulation of hormone release, energy expenditure, pancreatic function, and neurotransmitter release in control, obese and/or diabetic conditions. Moreover, dietary supplementation of natural ligands of TRP channels has been shown to have potential beneficial effects in obese and diabetic conditions. These findings raised the interest and likelihood for potential drug development. In this mini-review, we discuss possibilities for better management of obesity and diabetes mellitus based on TRP-dependent mechanisms.

  1. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (years of age) will be included. MAIN VARIABLES: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes......, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ∼3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients years of age were diagnosed in 2014). The disease management has...... classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy...

  2. Symptom profiles of subsyndromal depression in disease clusters of diabetes, excess weight, and progressive cerebrovascular conditions: a promising new type of finding from a reliable innovation to estimate exhaustively specified multiple indicators–multiple causes (MIMIC models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoeur RB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard B Francoeur School of Social Work, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA Abstract: Addressing subsyndromal depression in cerebrovascular conditions, diabetes, and obesity reduces morbidity and risk of major depression. However, depression may be masked because self-reported symptoms may not reveal dysphoric (sad mood. In this study, the first wave (2,812 elders from the New Haven Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE was used. These population-weighted data combined a stratified, systematic, clustered random sample from independent residences and a census of senior housing. Physical conditions included progressive cerebrovascular disease (CVD; hypertension, silent CVD, stroke, and vascular cognitive impairment [VCI] and co-occurring excess weight and/or diabetes. These conditions and interactions (clusters simultaneously predicted 20 depression items and a latent trait of depression in participants with subsyndromal (including subthreshold depression (11≤ Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] score ≤27. The option for maximum likelihood estimation with standard errors that are robust to non-normality and non-independence in complex random samples (MLR in Mplus and an innovation created by the author were used for estimating unbiased effects from latent trait models with exhaustive specification. Symptom profiles reveal masked depression in 1 older males, related to the metabolic syndrome (hypertension–overweight–diabetes; silent CVD–overweight; and silent CVD–diabetes and 2 older females or the full sample, related to several diabetes and/or overweight clusters that involve stroke or VCI. Several other disease clusters are equivocal regarding masked depression; a couple do emphasize dysphoric mood. Replicating findings could identify subgroups for cost-effective screening of subsyndromal depression. Keywords: depression, diabetes, overweight, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, metabolic

  3. Pivotal role of oxidative stress in tumor metastasis under diabetic conditions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Mai; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kusamori, Kosuke; Fukuoka, Miho; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2013-09-10

    Diabetic patients are reported to have a high incidence and mortality of cancer, but little is known about the linkage. In this study, we investigated whether high oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis in diabetic mice. Murine melanoma B16-BL6 cells stably labeled with firefly luciferase (B16-BL6/Luc) were inoculated into the tail vein of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated or untreated mice. A luciferase assay demonstrated that tumor cells were present largely in the lung of untreated mice, whereas large numbers of tumor cells were detected in both the lung and liver of STZ-treated mice. Repeated injections of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase), a long-circulating derivative, reduced the elevated fasting blood glucose levels and plasma lipoperoxide levels of STZ-treated mice, but had no significant effects on these parameters in untreated mice. In addition, the injections significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the lung and liver in both untreated and STZ-treated mice. Culture of B16-BL6/Luc cells in medium containing over 45 mg/dl glucose hardly affected the proliferation of the cells, whereas the addition of plasma of STZ-treated mice to the medium significantly increased the number of cells. Plasma samples of STZ-treated mice receiving PEG-catalase exhibited no such effect on proliferation. These findings indicate that a hyperglycemia-induced increase in oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis, and the removal of systemic hydrogen peroxide by PEG-catalase can inhibit the progression of diabetic conditions and tumor metastasis in diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression study of GLUT4 translocation-related genes in a porcine pre-diabetic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thea; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera Salicio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide exponentially growing health problem that increases the risk of co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and cancer. These co-morbidities are all complex conditions constituting a big challenge when searching for susceptib......Obesity is a world-wide exponentially growing health problem that increases the risk of co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and cancer. These co-morbidities are all complex conditions constituting a big challenge when searching...... for susceptibility genes. Identification of relevant genes, which could contribute to an earlier identification of individuals prone to develop diabetes, is urgently needed as many long-term complications can be avoided by preventive measures. Pre-diabetes is mainly associated with hyperglycemia; thus studying...... this phenotype might provide knowledge on relevant genes implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying pre-diabetes, and contributing to the development of T2DM. In the present study, two groups of pigs with high (HGG, N = 6) and low (NGG, N = 6) fasting plasma glucose level respectively were selected from...

  6. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and a...

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  8. Anti-Diabetic, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activities of Flavonoids from Corn Silk on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Corn silk is a well-known ingredient frequently used in traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of crude flavonoids extracted from corn silk (CSFs on streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results revealed that treatment with 300 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg of CSFs significantly reduced the body weight loss, water consumption, and especially the blood glucose (BG concentration of diabetic mice, which indicated their potential anti-diabetic activities. Serum total superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA assays were also performed to evaluate the anti-oxidant effects. Besides, several serum lipid values including total cholesterol (TC, triacylglycerol (TG, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C were reduced and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C was increased. The anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic effect of the CSFs suggest a potential therapeutic treatment for diabetic conditions.

  9. PRE-DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Pre-diabetes is a condition where the body's cells begin to show resistance to insulin. Glucose circulates in the blood instead of being used by the cells for energy. Blood sugar levels become elevated. Increased weight, unhealthy diet and a sedentary lifestyle can lead to pre-diabetes. WHAT IS PRE-DIABETES A diagnosis of pre-diabetes means that the cells in your body are becoming resistant to insulin and your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be. Since the levels aren't as hig...

  10. Current knowledge on diabetic retinopathy from humandonor tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica H Eisma; Jennifer E Dulle; Patrice E Fort

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death, and diabetic retinopathy the leading cause of blindness in working age adults in the United States in 2010. Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia associated with either hypoinsulinemia or insulin resistance, and over time, this chronic metabolic condition may lead to various complications including kidney failure, heart attacks,and retinal degeneration. In order to better understandthe molecular basis of this disease and its complications,animal models have been the primary approach usedto investigate the effects of diabetes on various tissuesor cell types of the body, including the retina. However,inherent to these animal models are critical limitationsthat make the insight gained from these modelschallenging to apply to the human pathology. Thesedifficulties in translating the knowledge obtained fromanimal studies have led a growing number of researchgroups to explore the diabetes complications, especiallydiabetic retinopathy, on tissues from human donors.This review summarizes the data collected from diabeticpatients at various stages of diabetic retinopathy andclassifies the data based upon their relevance to themain aspects of diabetic retinopathy: retinal vasculaturedysfunction, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. Thisreview discusses the importance of those studies todiscriminate and establish the relevance of the findingsobtained from animal models but also the limitations ofsuch approaches.

  11. The ECG Vertigo in Diabetes and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Voulgari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  12. Association of multiple chronic conditions and pain among older black and white adults with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Baker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is often associated with the challenge of navigating daily tasks with a painful chronic medical illness. Yet, there is concern of the number of older adults impacted with more than one chronic condition. Despite the increasing number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and comorbid chronic illnesses, there remains a lack of understanding in how multiple illnesses relate to experiences of pain. To assess the association between multiple chronic conditions and pain, this study aimed to identify clusters of chronic medical conditions and their association with pain among a sample of older Black and White adults diagnosed with diabetes. Methods Two hundred and thirty-six participants responded to a series of questions assessing pain frequency and severity, as well as health and social characteristics. A factor analysis was used to categorize clusters of medical conditions, and multiple regression models were used to examine predictors of pain. Results Seven of the assessed chronic medical conditions loaded on three factors, and accounted for 57.2% of the total variance, with heart disease (factor 1 accounting for 21.9%, musculoskeletal conditions (factor 2 for another 18.4%, and factor 3 (microvascular diseases accounting for a final 16.9% of the variability among the chronic medical conditions. Covariate-adjusted models showed that fewer years of education and higher scores on the microvascular and musculoskeletal conditions factors were associated with higher pain frequency, with the musculoskeletal conditions factor being the strongest predictor. Conclusions Findings from this study compliment existent literature underscoring the prevalence and importance of comorbid diagnoses in relation to pain. Examining health-related factors beyond a single disease diagnosis also provides an opportunity to explore underlying disease co-occurrences that may persist beyond organ system classifications.

  13. Off-loading strategies in diabetic foot syndrome-evaluation of different devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Jürgen; Lange, Mario; Dullien, Silvia; Grifka, Joachim; Hertel, Gernot; Baier, Clemens; Koeck, Franz

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the most dreaded complications in diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of different offloading devices compared to walking in barefoot condition and in normal shoes both in healthy subjects and in patients with diabetes and neuropathy. Twenty patients with diabetes and polyneuropathy and ten healthy probands were included. Pedobarographic examination was performed in barefoot condition, with sneakers, postoperative shoes, Aircast® Diabetic Pneumatic Walker™ and VACO®diaped. In the diabetic group, a total contact cast was additionally tested. The most effective reduction of force was achieved by TCC (75%) and VACOdiaped (64.3%) with the VACO®diaped resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of forces all over the foot. A customized device like the TCC is still the most proven offloading device. However, a removable cast walker being based on vacuum pads and a cushioning sole, provides better results concerning force distribution.

  14. Presentations and complications of diabetes patients presenting to diabetic clinic of Eastern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Kumar Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Diabetes mellitus leads to damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs especially eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The latency of occurence of hyperglycemia and diagnosis may be of long duration. This study was aimed to find out the mode of presetation of diabetes mellitus in diabetic patients attending out patients clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Associated complications and comorbid condition present at the time of presenation were also studied. Methods The diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Out Patient Clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences during June 2006 to June 2007 were included in this study.The patients details were collected from the predefined Proforma for diabetes patient from the database. This included demographic data, biochemical parameters and diabetic complications. For the purpose of study a total of 775 patients were randomly selected.The Data collected were entered and analysed using excel and SPSS(version 11.5 Results Out of 775 cases 436 (56.3% were male and 339(43.7% were female. Majority of patients 81.55% (n=632 had osmotic sympmtoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes at the time of presentation to the clinic. Asymptomatic patient constituted 18.45% (n=143. The most common presenting complaints were polyuria (44.58%, followed by polydypsia (39.62% and polyphagia (24.88%. About 54.97% (n=426 had symptoms of complications related to diabetes. Among them most common complication was neurological (39.67%, followed by renal (10.8% metabolic (4.93%, cardiac(4.46%, autonomic neuropathy (4.93% and peripheral vascular disease (3.99%. Conclusion Majority of the patients presenting in our OPD had osmotic symptoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes. Access to diabetes care and lack of awareness of the disease and its complication might had contributed to this. Community awareness, program for early detection and managemnet may help proper diabetes care

  15. The 2017 Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-Management Education National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Joanne; Dickinson, Jane K; Litchman, Michelle L; Williams, Ann S; Kolb, Leslie E; Cox, Carla; Lipman, Ruth D

    2018-06-01

    , socioeconomically, and racially diverse patient populations. DSMES was delivered using a number of different educational strategies. Diabetes educators have direct influence in care and services that people with diabetes receive. Conclusions The results of the 2017 NPS demonstrate that diabetes educators are meeting the needs of varied populations in various practice settings. They are working with individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, those at risk for diabetes, and women with gestational diabetes and are involved in recommending, implementing, and providing key referrals and recommendations for diabetes care, including insulin initiation, titration, medication adjustments, recommendations on devices, and technology. Identified areas for improvement include needs for increased racial and ethnic diversity in the workforce, recruiting young professionals, drawing practice approaches from related disciplines (eg, mental health and disability rehabilitation), and encouraging tracking of more areas of outcomes data. Diabetes educators are playing an increasingly central role within multidisciplinary care teams with people at risk for diabetes, those who have diabetes, and those with other chronic conditions.

  16. Resilient, Empowered, Active Living with Diabetes (REAL Diabetes) study: Methodology and baseline characteristics of a randomized controlled trial evaluating an occupation-based diabetes management intervention for young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Vigen, Cheryl; Blanchard, Jeanine; Sequeira, Paola A; Wood, Jamie R; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Whittemore, Robin; Peters, Anne L

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the study protocol used to evaluate the Resilient, Empowered, Active Living with Diabetes (REAL Diabetes) intervention and reports on baseline characteristics of recruited participants. REAL Diabetes is an activity-based intervention designed to address the needs of young adults diagnosed with type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) from low socioeconomic status or racial/ethnic minority backgrounds. The REAL intervention incorporates tailored delivery of seven content modules addressing various dimensions of health and well-being as they relate to diabetes, delivered by a licensed occupational therapist. In this pilot randomized controlled trial, participants are assigned to the REAL Diabetes intervention or an attention control condition. The study's primary recruitment strategies included in-person recruitment at diabetes clinics, mass mailings to clinic patients, and social media advertising. Data collection includes baseline and 6-month assessments of primary outcomes, secondary outcomes, and hypothesized mediators of intervention effects, as well as ongoing process evaluation assessment to ensure study protocol adherence and intervention fidelity. At baseline, participants (n=81) were 51% female, 78% Latino, and on average 22.6years old with an average HbA1c of 10.8%. A majority of participants (61.7%) demonstrated clinically significant diabetes distress and 27.2% reported symptoms consistent with major depressive disorder. Compared to participants with T1D, participants with T2D had lower diabetes-related self-efficacy and problem-solving skills. Compared to participants recruited at clinics, participants recruited through other strategies had greater diabetes knowledge but weaker medication adherence. Participants in the REAL study demonstrate clinically significant medical and psychosocial needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The “Face” of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesch, Shari K; Babler, Elizabeth K

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to assess the ability of youth to create a meaningful drawing related to living with type 1 diabetes and explore the benefits of expressing emotion through drawing in future interventional work. Methods: Youth aged 4 to 19 years (N = 242) with type I diabetes attending routine follow-up appointments within a pediatric specialty clinic were asked to draw: “If diabetes had a face what would it look like?” Results: Drawings reflected many emotions and ranged from simple to complex in detail. Drawings reflected multiple experiences of living with diabetes including emotions, tools used for management, and effects of self-care. Conclusions: Youth were able to create drawings reflecting their experience of living with diabetes. Youth conveyed a variety of emotions, attitudes, and experiences in drawing the “face” of diabetes. Drawing during clinic visits provides opportunity to explore the unspoken experiences of living with a chronic health condition, which may not be obtained during routine clinical information gathering. Deeper understanding of patient’s lived experience may assist providers in therapeutic management. PMID:28725833

  18. The impact of bodyweight and body condition on behavioral testing for painful diabetic neuropathy in the streptozotocin rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoybergs, Yves M J J; Biermans, Ria L V; Meert, Theo F

    2008-05-02

    The streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model is widely used for the induction of neuropathy in the rat. In this model, diabetic animals often display chronic illness, which raises objections not only on ethical but also on scientific grounds. In this study, the investigators set out to determine the impact of bodyweight and body condition (BC) on behavioral testing in the rat. Animals were allocated to four different groups as a function of their bodyweight, in particular one control group and three experimental groups with different starting weights (low bodyweight [LBW], medium bodyweight [MBW] and high bodyweight [HBW]), the groups having been rendered diabetic with an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (65mg/kg). Bodyweight, blood glucose, body condition and thresholds for mechanical hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia were measured or evaluated over a 68-day period. Animals with a LBW at the start of the experiment showed a gradual increase in BW with a decrease in mechanical nociceptive thresholds, while MBW and HBW animals presented a decrease in both thresholds and BW. The body condition score (BCS) decreased in all STZ-treated groups over time. Since correlations between mechanical thresholds and BW were similar between the control group and the HBW and MBW groups, the loss in BW clearly contributed to the decrease in thresholds. In the LBW group, thresholds and BW correlated negatively, so that the decrease in thresholds was mainly caused by the development of a painful neuropathy. From an ethical and a scientific point of view, in the STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy model, animals should be chosen on the basis of bodyweight and it must also be ensured that STZ is correctly dosed.

  19. Hypertension is a conditional factor for the development of cardiac hypertrophy in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc van Bilsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is frequently associated with co-morbidities, including hypertension. Here we investigated if hypertension is a critical factor in myocardial remodeling and the development of cardiac dysfunction in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. METHODS: Thereto, 14-wks-old male db/db mice and non-diabetic db/+ mice received vehicle or angiotensin II (AngII for 4 wks to induce mild hypertension (n = 9-10 per group. Left ventricular (LV function was assessed by serial echocardiography and during a dobutamine stress test. LV tissue was subjected to molecular and (immunohistochemical analysis to assess effects on hypertrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. RESULTS: Vehicle-treated diabetic mice neither displayed marked myocardial structural remodeling nor cardiac dysfunction. AngII-treatment did not affect body weight and fasting glucose levels, and induced a comparable increase in blood pressure in diabetic and control mice. Nonetheless, AngII-induced LV hypertrophy was significantly more pronounced in diabetic than in control mice as assessed by LV mass (increase +51% and +34%, respectively, p<0.01 and cardiomyocyte size (+53% and +31%, p<0.001. This was associated with enhanced LV mRNA expression of markers of hypertrophy and fibrosis and reduced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, while accumulation of Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs and the expression levels of markers of inflammation were not altered. Moreover, AngII-treatment reduced LV fractional shortening and contractility in diabetic mice, but not in control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, the present findings indicate that type 2 diabetes in its early stage is not yet associated with adverse cardiac structural changes, but already renders the heart more susceptible to hypertension-induced hypertrophic remodeling.

  20. Evaluation of subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems under routine environmental conditions in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberer, Felix; Hajnsek, Martin; Rumpler, Markus; Zenz, Sabine; Baumann, Petra M; Elsayed, Hesham; Puffing, Adelheid; Treiber, Gerlies; Pieber, Thomas R; Sourij, Harald; Mader, Julia K

    2017-07-01

    Continuous and flash glucose monitoring (GM) systems have been established in diabetes care. We compared the sensor performance of 3 commercially available GM systems. A total of 12 patients with type 1 diabetes were included in a single-centre, open-label study in which the sensor performance of the Abbott FreeStyle libre (Abbott), Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom) and Medtronic MiniMed 640G (Medtronic) systems over 12 hours was compared during mimicked real-life conditions (meals, exercise, hypo- and hyperglycaemia). Sensor performance was determined by fulfilment of ISO 15197:2013 criteria, calculating mean absolute relative difference (MARD), and was also illustrated using Parkes error grid and Bland-Altman plots. Sensor performance during changes in metabolic variables (lactate, betahydroxybutyrate, glucagon, non-esterified-fatty-acids) was determined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient testing. The systems fulfilled ISO 15197:2013 criteria by 73.2% (Abbott), 56.1% (Dexcom) and 52.0% (Medtronic). The MARDs ± standard deviation in the entire glycaemic range were 13.2% ± 10.9% (Abbott), 16.8% ± 12.3% (Dexcom) and 21.4% ± 17.6% (Medtronic), respectively. All sensors performed less accurately during hypoglycaemia and best during hyperglycaemia. We did not observe an influence of metabolic variables on sensor performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes.

  2. Analysis of correlation between the clinical feature of dry eye and the disease condition in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the clinical features of dry eye with type 2 diabetic patients, and to analyze the correlation between the clinical features of dry eye and the disease condition. METHODS: Retrospective case series study. Dry eye cases with type 2 diabetic were analyzed from March to December in 2016. And the clinical features of patients were summarized. Dry eye examination including tear break-up time(BUTand Schirmer test(schirmer Ⅰ test, SⅠt. Patients were divided into RESULTS: There were 178 cases collected. All cases were diagnosed as dry eye both eyes. The patient's age ranged from 32 to 85 years, with an average 58.41±13.06 years. There were 110(61.8%male cases, and 68(38.2%female cases. In all cases, the mean value of BUT was 4.52±2.31s, and the mean value of SⅠt was 4.25±1.99mm/5min. The value of women were more than men, but the differences were not significant statistically. Patients of ≥60 group were less than the age group of t=4.153, 4.021; PF=68.884, 60.204; Pt=-6.615, -5.918; PCONCLUSION:There were two types dry eye in 2 diabetic patients: the instability of tear-film and the reduction of tear secretion. The clinic features of dry eye were related to age, the course of the disease, and the level of blood glucose.

  3. Does diabetes increase the risk of periodontitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Gustavo G; Leite, Fábio R M; Vestergaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    AIM: Even though the association between diabetes and periodontitis is taken for granted, results on this association are conflicting within the literature. This systematic review assessed whether poorly controlled diabetes was associated with periodontitis onset or progression. METHODS: Electronic...... searches were performed in PubMed, Scopus and Embase databases. Hand search was carried out in the reference list of all articles included. Gray literature was investigated with a Google Scholar search. Prospective longitudinal studies on the association between diabetes and periodontitis were considered...... for this review. Studies should have presented at least two measurements of periodontal conditions over time. Data on study design, crude and adjusted estimates were collected. We used meta-analysis to estimate the pooled effect of hyperglycemia in people with diabetes on periodontitis onset or progression. Meta...

  4. Race/Ethnic Difference in Diabetes and Diabetic Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Spanakis, Elias K.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in diabetes and its complications and co-morbidities exist globally. A recent Endocrine Society Scientific Statement described the Health Disparities in several endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize that statement and provide novel updates on race/ethnic differences in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, children with type 2 diabetes and in Latino subpopulations. We also review race/ethnic differences in the epidemiology of diabet...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Gestational diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood ...

  6. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van’t Riet Esther

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geographical areas in the Netherlands. The aim of the study is to create a research infrastructure that will allow the study of risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic determinants for severe diabetes complications. Methods/design Baseline examinations began November 2009 and will continue through 2012. By the end of 2012, it is expected that 7000 patients with type 2 diabetes will be included in the Diabetes Pearl cohort. To ensure quality of the data collected, standard operation procedures were developed and used in all 8 recruitment centers. From all patients who provide informed consent, the following information is collected: personal information, medication use, physical examination (antropometry, blood pressure, electrocardiography (ECG, retina photographs, ankle-brachial index, peripheral vibration perception, self-report questionnaire (socio-economic status, lifestyle, (family history of disease, and psychosocial well-being, laboratory measurements (glucose, A1c, lipid profile, kidney function, biobank material (storage of urine and blood samples and isolated DNA. All gathered clinical data and biobank information is uploaded to a database for storage on a national level. Biobanks are maintained locally at all recruitment centers. Discussion The Diabetes Pearl is large-scale cohort of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands aiming to study risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic markers, for disease deterioration and the development of severe diabetes complications. As a result of the well-designed research design and the national coverage, the Diabetes Pearl data can be of great value to national and international researchers with

  7. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Foot (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection. Abstract... (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY...)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  8. EVALUATION OF DRY EYES IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to the National Eye Institute, dry eye is a condition in which the eye does not produce tears properly. It can also involve tears not having the right consistency or evaporating too quickly. Tears are necessary to help maintain moisture on the surface of the eye and for clear vision. Diabetes is often associated with several significant ocular conditions such as retinopathy, refractive changes, cataracts, glaucoma and macular oedema. However, one of the most common ocular complications associated with diabetes is dry eye. The aim of the study is to study the prevalence of dry eyes in diabetes mellitus and to evaluate ocular and other risk factors relevant to diabetic dry eyes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based cross-sectional clinical study of 100 diabetic patients who presented to the Department of Ophthalmology, Santosh Medical College and Hospital, Ghaziabad, between January 2016 to June 2017 was conducted. Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of anterior segment via slit-lamp biomicroscopy was done. The examinations for dry eyes included Schirmer's test, tear breakup time, fluorescein and rose Bengal staining. RESULTS Sixty two (62% diabetic patients had dry eye. The prevalence in type I was 3% and prevalence in type II was 59%. Dry eye prevalence was maximum in those above 40 years of age. Symptoms like reduced corneal sensation (44% and meibomitis (20% were major attributable risk factors. Ocular surface damage was predominantly superficial punctate keratitis. Retinopathy was not statistically associated with the prevalence of dry eyes. CONCLUSION Diabetes and dry eye appears to be a common association. Reduction in the modifiable risk factors of dry eye is essential to reduce its prevalence. No significant statistical correlation was found between retinopathy and dry eyes. However, examination for dry eyes should be an integral part of the assessment of diabetic eye disease.

  9. Comparison of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Jotkowitz, Alan; Rabaev, Elena; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, however patients with type 2 diabetes are also susceptible to DKA under stressful conditions. The aims of our study were to evaluate and compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with DKA. A retrospective cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with DKA between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of DKA patients with type-1 DM were compared with those of patients with type-2 DM. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 201 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was DKA: 166 patients (82.6%) with type-1 DM and 35 patients (17.4%) with type-2 DM. The patients with DKA and type-2 DM were significantly older than patients with type-1 DM (64.3 versus 37.3, P ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  10. Telehealth Interventions to Support Self-Management of Long-Term Conditions: A Systematic Metareview of Diabetes, Heart Failure, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Peter; Daines, Luke; Campbell, Christine; McKinstry, Brian; Weller, David; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-05-17

    Self-management support is one mechanism by which telehealth interventions have been proposed to facilitate management of long-term conditions. The objectives of this metareview were to (1) assess the impact of telehealth interventions to support self-management on disease control and health care utilization, and (2) identify components of telehealth support and their impact on disease control and the process of self-management. Our goal was to synthesise evidence for telehealth-supported self-management of diabetes (types 1 and 2), heart failure, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer to identify components of effective self-management support. We performed a metareview (a systematic review of systematic reviews) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of telehealth interventions to support self-management in 6 exemplar long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases for reviews published from January 2000 to May 2016 and screened identified studies against eligibility criteria. We weighted reviews by quality (revised A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews), size, and relevance. We then combined our results in a narrative synthesis and using harvest plots. We included 53 systematic reviews, comprising 232 unique RCTs. Reviews concerned diabetes (type 1: n=6; type 2, n=11; mixed, n=19), heart failure (n=9), asthma (n=8), COPD (n=8), and cancer (n=3). Findings varied between and within disease areas. The highest-weighted reviews showed that blood glucose telemonitoring with feedback and some educational and lifestyle interventions improved glycemic control in type 2, but not type 1, diabetes, and that telemonitoring and telephone interventions reduced mortality and hospital admissions in heart failure, but these findings were not consistent in all reviews. Results for the other conditions were mixed, although no reviews showed evidence of harm. Analysis of the mediating role of self-management, and of components of successful

  11. Control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: data from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Mastura, Ismail; Ahmad, Zaiton; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Adam, Bujang-Mohamad; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Lee, Ping-Yein; Syed-Alwi, Syed-Abdul-Rahman; Chew, Boon-How; Sriwahyu, Taher

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the association between age and these controls among older adults with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out using cases notified to the Adult Diabetes Control and Management database between 1 January and 31 December 2009. A total of 10 363 people aged over 60 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the analyses. A standard online case report form was used to record demographic data, clinical factors (diabetes duration, comorbid condition and treatment modalities), cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes complications and laboratory assessments. The cardiovascular disease risk factors controls assessed included glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) control of cardiovascular disease risk factors was suboptimal in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The oldest elderly were more likely to achieve target HbA(1c) (<7.0%) and triglycerides (<1.7 mmol/L) than older adults aged 60-69 years. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Periodontal Disease Behavior in Children and Adolescents with Diabetes in Cienfuegos in 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Arasay Calzada Bandomo; Esther María Castillo Betancourt

    2011-01-01

    Background: chronic inflammatory periodontal diseases are a set of entities of multifactorial etiology. Diabetes mellitus is one of the conditions with a great impact on the periodontium and its interaction with microorganisms. Objective: to characterize the behaviour of periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes in Cienfuegos in 2008. Method: an epidemiological, descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The sample included diabetic children and adolescents under...

  13. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System

    OpenAIRE

    D'Silva, Linda J.; Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pa...

  14. Selected antibacterial factors in the saliva of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicka, Barbara; Kaczmarek, Urszula; Skośkiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to many systemic complications, including changes in the morphology, function of the salivary glands, and the composition of saliva. The study comprised a randomly selected 156 adults, of both genders, aged from 21 to 79, out of which patients with diabetes type 1 and 2, and healthy subjects forming two control age- and gender matched to the ill subjects. In unstimulated mixed saliva, total protein, peroxidase, myeloperoxidase and immunoglobulin A were measured as well as salivary flow rate. The periodontal condition was assessed with the use of GI, mSBI and PSR index. The obtained data were analysed with the use of U Mann-Whitney's test, Spearman's rang correlation and Chi-square test at a significant level of p diabetics in comparison to healthy age and gender matched control group had a lower salivary flow rate (p diabetics in comparison to control subjects had a higher level of total protein concentration (p diabetes type 1 and 2 can cause abnormalities in salivary glands function resulting in the diminishing of salivary flow rate and the increase in total protein content. Higher levels of myeloperoxidase and IgA in the saliva can be linked to worse periodontal condition in the diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Adenosinergic System in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vindeirinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative and inflammatory environment that is prevalent in the diabetic eye is a key player in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The adenosinergic system is widely regarded as a significant modulator of neurotransmission and the inflammatory response, through the actions of the four types of adenosine receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R, and thus could be revealed as a potential player in the events unfolding in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we review the studies that explore the impact of diabetic conditions on the retinal adenosinergic system, as well as the role of the said system in ameliorating or exacerbating those conditions. The experimental results described suggest that this system is heavily affected by diabetic conditions and that the modulation of its components could reveal potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, particularly in the early stages of the disease.

  16. Driving with diabetes: precaution, not prohibition, is the proper approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrman, Daniel B

    2013-03-01

    Safety issues posed by driving with diabetes are primarily related to severe hypoglycemia, yet some public authorities rely on categorical restrictions on drivers with diabetes. This approach is misguided. Regulation of all drivers with diabetes, or all drivers using insulin, ignores the diversity of people with diabetes and fails to focus on the subpopulation posing the greatest risk. Advances in diabetes care technology and understanding of safety consequences of diabetes have expanded techniques available to limit risks of driving with diabetes. New means of insulin administration and blood glucose monitoring offer greater ease of anticipating and preventing hypoglycemia, and thus, limit driving risk for persons with diabetes. So too do less sophisticated steps taken by people with diabetes and the health care professionals they consult. These include adoption and endorsement of safety-sensitive behaviors, such as testing before a drive and periodic testing on longer trips. Overall, and in most individual cases, driving risks for persons with diabetes are less than those routinely tolerated by our society. Examples include freedom to drive in dangerous conditions and lax regulation of drivers in age and medical cohorts with elevated overall rates of driving mishaps. Data linking specific diabetes symptoms or features with driving risk are quite uncertain. Hence, there is much to recommend: a focus on technological advances, human precautions, and identifying individuals with diabetes with a specific history of driving difficulty. By contrast, available evidence does not support unfocused regulation of all or most drivers with diabetes. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  18. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  19. Influence of comorbidities on therapeutic progression of diabetes treatment in Australian veterans: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes I Vitry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study assessed whether the number of comorbid conditions unrelated to diabetes was associated with a delay in therapeutic progression of diabetes treatment in Australian veterans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken using data from the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA claims database between July 2000 and June 2008. The study included new users of metformin or sulfonylurea medicines. The outcome was the time to addition or switch to another antidiabetic treatment. The total number of comorbid conditions unrelated to diabetes was identified using the pharmaceutical-based comorbidity index, Rx-Risk-V. Competing risk regression analyses were conducted, with adjustments for a number of covariates that included age, gender, residential status, use of endocrinology service, number of hospitalisation episodes and adherence to diabetes medicines. Overall, 20,134 veterans were included in the study. At one year, 23.5% of patients with diabetes had a second medicine added or had switched to another medicine, with 41.4% progressing by 4 years. The number of unrelated comorbidities was significantly associated with the time to addition of an antidiabetic medicine or switch to insulin (subhazard ratio [SHR] 0.87 [95% CI 0.84-0.91], P<0.001. Depression, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, and Parkinson's disease were individually associated with a decreased likelihood of therapeutic progression. Age, residential status, number of hospitalisations and adherence to anti-diabetic medicines delayed therapeutic progression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increasing numbers of unrelated conditions decreased the likelihood of therapeutic progression in veterans with diabetes. These results have implications for the development of quality measures, clinical guidelines and the construction of models of care for management of diabetes in elderly people with comorbidities.

  20. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management.

  1. [Platelet hyperreactivity and antiaggregatory properties of nootropic drugs under conditions of alloxan-induced diabetes in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiliuk, V I; Levykh, A É; Mamchur, V I

    2012-01-01

    The effects of nootropic drugs (noopept, pentoxifylline, piracetam, pramiracetam, Ginkgo biloba extract, entrop, cerebrocurin and citicoline) on platelet aggregation in rats with experimental diabetes have been studied. It is established that all these drugs exhibit an inhibitory action of various degrees against platelet hyperreactivity under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The maximum universality of the antiaggregatory action is characteristic of pramiracetam, entrop and Ginkgo biloba extract.

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Three Screening Alternatives for People with Diabetes with No or Early Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, David B; Wittenborn, John S; Zhang, Xinzhi; Allaire, Benjamin A; Song, Michael S; Klein, Ronald; Saaddine, Jinan B

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether biennial eye evaluation or telemedicine screening are cost-effective alternatives to current recommendations for the estimated 10 million people aged 30–84 with diabetes but no or minimal diabetic retinopathy. Data Sources United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Patterns, Medicare Payment Schedule. Study Design Cost-effectiveness Monte Carlo simulation. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Literature review, analysis of existing surveys. Principal Findings Biennial eye evaluation was the most cost-effective treatment option when the ability to detect other eye conditions was included in the model. Telemedicine was most cost-effective when other eye conditions were not considered or when telemedicine was assumed to detect refractive error. The current annual eye evaluation recommendation was costly compared with either treatment alternative. Self-referral was most cost-effective up to a willingness to pay (WTP) of U.S.$37,600, with either biennial or annual evaluation most cost-effective at higher WTP levels. Conclusions Annual eye evaluations are costly and add little benefit compared with either plausible alternative. More research on the ability of telemedicine to detect other eye conditions is needed to determine whether it is more cost-effective than biennial eye evaluation. PMID:21492158

  3. Using Behavioral Interventions to Assist Children with Type 1 Diabetes Manage Blood Glucose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecki, Kim; Olympia, Daniel; Clark, Elaine; Jenson, William; Heathfield, Lora Tuesday

    2008-01-01

    Treatment and management of chronic disease processes on children occurs across multiple settings, placing demands for consultation and expertise on school personnel, including school psychologists. One such chronic condition in children is type I diabetes. Children with type I insulin dependent diabetes mellitus exhibit high rates of…

  4. MyDiabetesMyWay: An Evolving National Data Driven Diabetes Self-Management Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Deborah J; He, Jinzhang; Czesak, Anna Maria; Mughal, Fezan; Cunningham, Scott G

    2016-09-01

    MyDiabetesMyWay (MDMW) is an award-wining national electronic personal health record and self-management platform for diabetes patients in Scotland. This platform links multiple national institutional and patient-recorded data sources to provide a unique resource for patient care and self-management. This review considers the current evidence for online interventions in diabetes and discusses these in the context of current and ongoing developments for MDMW. Evaluation of MDMW through patient reported outcomes demonstrates a positive impact on self-management. User feedback has highlighted barriers to uptake and has guided platform evolution from an education resource website to an electronic personal health record now encompassing remote monitoring, communication tools and personalized education links. Challenges in delivering digital interventions for long-term conditions include integration of data between institutional and personal recorded sources to perform big data analytics and facilitating technology use in those with disabilities, low digital literacy, low socioeconomic status and in minority groups. The potential for technology supported health improvement is great, but awareness and adoption by health workers and patients remains a significant barrier. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. Relationship between limited joint mobility of the hand and diabetic foot risk in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineoka, Yusuke; Ishii, Michiyo; Tsuji, Akiko; Komatsu, Yoriko; Katayama, Yuko; Yamauchi, Mitsuko; Yamashita, Aki; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Naoto; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Isono, Motohide; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-06-01

    Foot ulceration is a serious problem for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the early detection of risks for this condition is important to prevent complications. The present cross-sectional study in T2D patients determined the relationship between limited joint mobility (LJM) of the hand and diabetic foot risk classified using the criteria of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF). Relationships between LJM of the hand and foot risk according to IWGDF category, HbA1c, age, body mass index, blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR), and diabetic complications (including diabetic peripheral neuropathy [DPN] and peripheral arterial disease [PAD]) were evaluated in 528 consecutive T2D patients. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c ≥ 7%. Patients with LJM of the hand were older and had a longer duration of diabetes, a higher prevalence of diabetic complications, including DPN and PAD, and a higher IWDGF category (all P foot risk assessed with IWDGF category was correlated with age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.06; P = 0.001), poor glycemic control (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.00-2.77; P = 0.04), eGFR (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-0.99; P = 0.02), and the presence of LJM of the hand (OR 3.86; 95% CI 2.21-6.86; P foot risk. Diagnosis of diabetic hand is simple and non-invasive, and is thus a useful method for assessing the risk of diabetic foot in T2D patients. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Ten years of a multidisciplinary diabetic foot team approach in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Fábio; Augusto Magalhães, Antonio; Gamba, Mônica; Nery, Caio; Cardoso, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus can cause devastating foot problems including loss of protective sensation with subsequent ulcerations and amputations. The natural history and pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulcers is best understood and managed by a multiprofessional team approach. The main factors for prevention and treatment of these devastating diabetic foot conditions are shown, with special attention to education of the patient. This approach decreases the morbidity of the disease, besides its economical and social feasibility. PMID:22396805

  7. Increased mortality risk in women with depression and diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, An; Lucas, Michel; Sun, Qi; van Dam, Rob M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Ascherio, Alberto; Hu, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Context Both depression and diabetes have been associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) mortality. However, data evaluating the joint effects of these two conditions on mortality are sparse. Objectives To evaluate the individual and joint effects of depression and diabetes on all-cause and CVD mortality in a prospective cohort study. Design, Settings and Participants A total of 78282 female participants in the Nurses' Health Study aged 54-79 years at baseline in 2000 were followed until 2006. Depression was defined as having self-reported diagnosed depression, treatment with antidepressant medications, or a score indicating severe depressive symptomatology, i.e., a five-item Mental Health Index score ≤52. Self-reported type 2 diabetes was confirmed using a supplementary questionnaire. Main outcome measures All-cause and CVD-specific mortality. Results During 6 years of follow-up (433066 person-years), 4654 deaths were documented, including 979 deaths from CVD. Compared to participants without either condition, the age-adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval, CI) for all-cause mortality were 1.76 (1.64-1.89) for women with depression only, 1.71 (1.54-1.89) for individuals with diabetes only, and 3.11 (2.70-3.58) for those with both conditions. The corresponding age-adjusted relative risks of CVD mortality were 1.81 (1.54-2.13), 2.67 (2.20-3.23), and 5.38 (4.19-6.91), respectively. These associations were attenuated after multivariate adjustment for other demographic variables, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, and major comorbidities (including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, heart diseases, stroke and cancer) but remained significant, with the highest relative risks for all-cause and CVD mortality found in those with both conditions (2.07 [95% CI, 1.79-2.40] and 2.72 [95% CI, 2.09-3.54], respectively). Furthermore, the combination of depression with a long duration of diabetes

  8. Diabetes Australia position statement. A new language for diabetes: improving communications with and about people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, J; Conn, J; Dunning, T; Skinner, T C

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Australia, affecting 1.7 million Australians, requiring daily self-care, and known to reduce quantity and quality of life. On average, people with diabetes experience greater emotional distress than those without diabetes. One source of distress can be the language used to refer to diabetes, its management and the person with diabetes. The way verbal and written language is used reflects and shapes people's thoughts, beliefs and behaviours. Language has the power to persuade, change or reinforce beliefs and stereotypes - for better or worse. Words do more than reflect people's reality: they create reality and affect how people view the world and their diabetes. Language needs to engage people with diabetes and support their self-care efforts. Importantly, language that de-motivates or induces fear, guilt or distress needs to be avoided and countered. Diabetes Australia believes optimal communication increases the motivation, health and well-being of people with diabetes, and that careless or negative language can be de-motivating, is often inaccurate, and can be harmful. Diabetes Australia developed this position statement to encourage greater awareness of the language surrounding diabetes and provide recommendations for more careful and positive language use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diabetes and Anemia: International Diabetes Federation (IDF) - Southeast Asian Region (SEAR) position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Manisha; Kalra, Sanjay; Badani, Rajesh; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Bhoraskar, Anil; Das, A K; Dhorepatil, Bharati; Ghosh, Sujoy; Jeloka, Tarun; Khandelwal, Deepak; Latif, Zafar Ahmed; Nadkar, Milind; Pathan, Md Faruque; Saboo, Banshi; Sahay, Rakesh; Shimjee, Suleiman; Shrestha, Dina; Siyan, Ali; Talukdar, Shamim Hayder; Tiwaskar, Mangesh; Unnikrishnan, A G

    2017-12-01

    Anemia is often associated with diabetes mellitus and is known to intensify the risk of developing diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular complications. There is paucity in understanding of co-existence of these conditions, especially in Southeast Asian countries. Iron and/or erythropoietin deficiencies are the major causes of anemia in diabetes, and diabetic kidney disease plays a key role. Patients with diabetes need to be screened for anemia along with other risk factors and anemia should be corrected appropriately to improve overall clinical outcomes. This position statement aims to provide a comprehensive overview and an algorithm for appropriate management of anemia in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of semiquantitative parameters of bone scintigraphy in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhchelyan, Kh.; Klisarova, A.; Koeva, L.; Pranchev, L.; Tranulov, G.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study is to introduce semiquantitative indicators, contributing to early detection and dynamic measurement of the degree of bone metabolism in the foot of diabetic patients. Ten diabetics (3 women and 7 men) and 20 controls (10 women and 10 men) are included in the study. All patients are subjected to bone scintigraphy, clinical and biochemical investigation. Data are obtained pointing to enhanced and disproportional fixation of the radionuclide in symmetrical zones of the foot. The results are interpreted with a special reference to the extent of metabolic control and complications of the diabetic condition. Enhanced bone metabolism in the foot of the diabetic patients examined was established. Semiquantitative parameters enabling early detection and dynamic measurement of bone metabolism in the diabetic foot are practically implemented

  11. An Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastura, I; Zanariah, H; Fatanah, I; Feisul Idzwan, M; Wan Shaariah, M Y; Jamaiyah, H; Geeta, A

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes is a chronic condition that is one of the major causes of illness, disability, and death in Malaysia. Cost in managing diabetes plus indirect cost of lost work, pain, and suffering have all increased. The optimal management of patients with diabetes require the tracking of patients over time to monitor the progression of the disease, compliance with treatment, and preventive care. Diabetes care can be improved by standardizing access to, and improving the use of, clinical information. Access to timely, accurate and well-organized electronic data will improve the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Clinical Research Center convened an expert workshop to forecast how physicians, hospitals and clinics will employ clinical information technology (IT) applications to diabetes care over the next year. Workshop participants included experts from research organizations, government, and the IT vendor. This is a summary of the workshop organised for the purpose of the Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM) project. We hope to identify the gaps, if any, that exists in delivering diabetes care and to improve the quality of care. In future, we hope to develop an expansion of this project for the Adult Diabetes Registry that will be implemented for the whole country.

  12. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro; Romero-Aroca

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition,which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases,kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation.Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema,is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries.Today,blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy.The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia,arterial tension,lipids and renal status.The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries,but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs,the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema(DME),can be valid as gold standard in many countries.The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs(ranibizumab and bevacizumab),are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME,but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies.The corticosteroids for diffuse DME,has a place in pseudophakic patients,but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients.Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients.

  13. Diabetes and dementia links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jankowska

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is growing globally. It is expected to observe 253.4 million sufferers in geriatric population in 2045. In this time, also 131.5 million of people is going to have dementia and other cognitive problems. In people aged over 65 these two diseases are concomitant quite often. What are the connections in the area of etiology and treatment? Aim The purpose of this study is to present links between dementia and diabetes are depicted in professional literature. Results Diabetes and dementia are associated on many levels. These conditions have common risk factors. Diabetes may contribute to cognitive impairment in many ways, promoting development of atherosclerosis, brain vessel damage and vascular dementia. Alzheimer disease may be promoted by hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. On contrary also hypoglycaemia, often met in elderly diabetic patients has negative impact on cognitive function. Dementia seriously affects treatment of diabetes. The main problems are not satisfying adherence and diabetes self-management. Conclusions Prevention of diabetes and dementia risk factors can be performed simultaneously as the are common for both diseases. Enhancing physical activity, reducing saturated fats consumption, levels of cholesterol and body mass are considered to be beneficial in the context of described conditions. Furthermore, treatment of diabetes is strongly affected by cognitive dysfunction. Management of dementive diabetics requires individualization and using long-acting drugs. It is crucial to reduce risk of life-threatening hypoglycaemias and to create wide team to take care of these patients.

  14. New Therapeutic Approaches in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Relhan, Nidhi; Kishor, Krishna S.; Flynn Jr, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It affects a substantial proportion of US adults over age 40. The condition is a leading cause of visual loss. Much attention has been given to expanding the role of current treatments along with investigating various novel therapies and drug delivery methods. In the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), intravitreal pharmacotherapies, especially anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, have gained popularity. Currently, anti-VEGF agents are often used as first-line agents in center-involved DME, with recent data suggesting that among these agents, aflibercept leads to better visual outcomes in patients with worse baseline visual acuities. While photocoagulation remains the standard treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), recent FDA approvals of ranibizumab and aflibercept in the management of diabetic retinopathy associated with DME may suggest a potential for pharmacologic treatments of PDR as well. Novel therapies, including small interfering RNAs, chemokines, kallikrein-kinin inhibitors, and various anti-angiogenic agents, are currently being evaluated for the management of diabetic retinopathy and DME. In addition to these strategies, novel drug delivery methods such as sustained-release implants and refillable reservoir implants are either under active evaluation or have recently gained FDA approval. This review provides an update on the novel developments in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26676668

  15. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07-2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41-4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06-2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45-0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41-0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.97). There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Argon laser in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (Preliminary communication)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saprykin, P.I.; Simonova, K.K.; Belyaeva, M.I.

    1974-01-01

    The complications observed in the photocoagulation treatment of diabetic angiopathy and retinopathy include the following conditions: tractional retinal detachment, accelerated development of proliferating retinitis and massive hemmorrhaging into the vitreous body. (V.A.P.)

  17. Effects of Selenium Supplementation on the Diabetic Condition Depend on the Baseline Selenium Status in KKAy Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febiyanto, Novian; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Sari, Dian K; Puspitasari, Irma M; Sunjaya, Deni K; Herawati, Dewi M D; Nugraha, Gaga I; Fukuda, Toshio; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress in obesity leads to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Some selenoproteins possess antioxidant properties, suggesting that selenium (Se) may protect against type 2 diabetes; however, evidence from epidemiological studies is contradictory. We hypothesized that Se status before supplementation (baseline) contributes to the supplementation outcome. This study aimed to clarify the influence of baseline Se status on the effect of Se supplementation on the diabetic condition. Six-week-old KKAy mice were fed a diet without supplemental Se or with 0.1 ppm Se in the form of L-selenomethionine (SeM) for 2 weeks to create low-Se and sufficient-Se baseline statuses, respectively. For the next 4 weeks, low-Se mice were given a SeM (0.5 ppm Se)-supplemented diet, and sufficient-Se mice were given either a SeM (0.5 ppm Se)- or sodium selenite (0.5 ppm Se)-supplemented diet; control groups continued on baseline diets. Serum Se concentrations, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, adiponectin levels, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity were analyzed. All mice became diabetic during the 2-week baseline induction period. At the end of the supplementation period, Se-receiving groups demonstrated significantly higher Se concentrations and GPx activities than their respective controls. Sufficient-Se mice receiving SeM had lower blood glucose levels and better insulin sensitivity than control and sodium selenite-receiving mice, whereas low-Se mice receiving SeM showed no such improvements compared with their controls. Our results suggest that Se supplementation in the form of SeM may help prevent type 2 diabetes aggravation in people taking the 55 μg/day Se recommended dietary allowance.

  18. Abdominal obesity and type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians: dietary strategies including edible oils, cooking practices and sugar intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Misra, A

    2017-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are increasing in rural and urban regions of South Asia including India. Pattern of fat deposition in abdomen, ectopic fat deposition (liver, pancreas) and also low lean mass are contributory to early-onset insulin resistance, dysmetabolic state and diabetes in Asian Indians. These metabolic perturbations are further exacerbated by changing lifestyle, diet urbanization, and mechanization. Important dietary imbalances include increasing use of oils containing high amount of trans fatty acids and saturated fats (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, palmolein oil) use of deep frying method and reheating of oils for cooking, high intake of saturated fats, sugar and refined carbohydrates, low intake of protein, fiber and increasing intake of processed foods. Although dietary intervention trials are few; the data show that improving quality of carbohydrates (more complex carbohydrates), improving fat quality (more monounsaturated fatty acids and omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) and increasing protein intake could improve blood glucose, serum insulin, lipids, inflammatory markers and hepatic fat, but more studies are needed. Finally, regulatory framework must be tightened to impose taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages, oils such as palmolein, and dietary fats and limit trans fats.

  19. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors of Parents of Children with Diabetes Compared to Those of Parents of Children without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hyun A; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2015-06-01

    To compare the oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of parents of children, aged 6 to 13, who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes to those of parents of similarly aged children without diabetes. The study population consisted of 46 parents of children with diabetes and 46 parents of children without diabetes from outpatient clinics, providing medical care to children with and without diabetes, respectively. After gaining permission of clinic directors, the investigator approached parents, who were waiting in the clinics' reception areas, to complete the 33-item survey. The survey included questions on socio-demographic characteristics, their child's oral hygiene practices, dental visits, dietary habits, their own oral health knowledge and attitudes, and their child's diabetic condition, when relevant. A Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between responses of the two groups of parents. All parents approached completed the survey. Children with diabetes had significantly less frequent sugary drink consumption and less untreated dental caries than children without diabetes. The majority of parents of children with diabetes selected "don't know" for statements related to diabetes and oral health, whereas most parents of children without diabetes agreed with the statements, resulting in significant differences between groups. Most parents of children with diabetes considered these same statements important to them, while the importance to parents of children without diabetes was variable. To maintain their children's oral health, parents of children with diabetes must receive more education regarding the prevention and control of the oral complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  20. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Diabetic Hyperglycemic Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Machado Ramírez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic state are two of the major metabolic emergencies that may occur. These conditions are not always treated properly.Objective: to describe the metabolic hyperglycemic emergencies in diabetic patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit, and to assess the use of sodium bicarbonate. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted including 52 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of the Enrique Cabrera Hospital from 2000 through 2007. The following variables were analyzed: type of diabetes mellitus, type of acute complication, use or not of sodium bicarbonate, blood gases, ionogram and progress of patients. Kitabchi criteria were used for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and its severity and for the diagnosis of the hyperglycemic state as well. Criteria proposed by an Expert Committee of the American Diabetes Association and a World Health Organization Expert Committee were adopted for the diagnosis of diabetes and its classification. Results: diabetic ketoacidosis was confirmed in 57,5 % of type 1 diabetic patients and in 42,5 % of those with type 2 diabetes. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic state was observed in 23,0 % of type 2 diabetics. There was not any death among patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who did not use sodium bicarbonate whereas 80,0 % of patients with hyperglycemic state who used it died. Conclusions: diabetic ketoacidosis was the most common complication. Mortality due to ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic state was high. Sodium bicarbonate was not properly used.

  1. Identification of Individuals With Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in a Danish Cohort Attending Dental Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Niels-Christian Reimers; Belstrøm, Daniel; Østergaard, Jakob Appel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is estimated that 3.6% and 13.6% of the Danish population suffer from undiagnosed type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes, respectively. Periodontitis is an established complication to diabetes. Identification of individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes is important...... to reduce diabetes-related complications including periodontitis. The objective of the study was to identify individuals with undiagnosed diabetes or pre-diabetes among individuals attending a dental setting for diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: 291 adults with no history of diabetes were included......c levels corresponding to guideline values for diabetes and pre-diabetes respectively. Higher proportions of patients with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes were observed in the periodontitis group (32.7%) than in the control group (17.4%) (p=0.054). Identification of diabetes and pre-diabetes...

  2. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talma Rosenthal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors (ACEIs, various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment.

  3. Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Michael C; Gallen, Ian W; Smart, Carmel E; Taplin, Craig E; Adolfsson, Peter; Lumb, Alistair N; Kowalski, Aaron; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; McCrimmon, Rory J; Hume, Carin; Annan, Francesca; Fournier, Paul A; Graham, Claudia; Bode, Bruce; Galassetti, Pietro; Jones, Timothy W; Millán, Iñigo San; Heise, Tim; Peters, Anne L; Petz, Andreas; Laffel, Lori M

    2017-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition to manage for various physiological and behavioural reasons. Regular exercise is important, but management of different forms of physical activity is particularly difficult for both the individual with type 1 diabetes and the health-care provider. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be at least as inactive as the general population, with a large percentage of individuals not maintaining a healthy body mass nor achieving the minimum amount of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week. Regular exercise can improve health and wellbeing, and can help individuals to achieve their target lipid profile, body composition, and fitness and glycaemic goals. However, several additional barriers to exercise can exist for a person with diabetes, including fear of hypoglycaemia, loss of glycaemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management. This Review provides an up-to-date consensus on exercise management for individuals with type 1 diabetes who exercise regularly, including glucose targets for safe and effective exercise, and nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to protect against exercise-related glucose excursions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NTproBNP in insulin-resistance mediated conditions: overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The population-based Casale Monferrato Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Stefano; Fragapani, Salvatore; Panero, Antonio; Fedele, Debora; Pinach, Silvia; Lucchiari, Manuela; Vitale, Anna Rita; Mengozzi, Giulio; Gruden, Gabriella; Bruno, Graziella

    2017-09-25

    NTproBNP and BNP levels are reduced in obese subjects, but population-based data comparing the pattern of this relationship in the full spectrum of insulin-resistance mediated conditions, overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, are limited. The study-base were 3244 individuals aged 45-74 years, none of whom had heart failure, 1880 without diabetes and 1364 with diabetes, identified as part of two surveys of the population-based Casale Monferrato Study. All measurements were centralized. We examined with multiple linear regression and cubic regression splines the relationship between NTproBNP and BMI, independently of known risk factors and confounders. A logistic regression analysis was also performed to assess the effect of overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ), diabetes and metabolic syndrome on NTproBNP values. Out of the overall cohort of 3244 people, overweight/obesity was observed in 1118 (59.4%) non-diabetic and 917 (67.2%) diabetic subjects, respectively. In logistic regression, compared to normal weight individuals, those with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 had a OR of 0.70 (95% CI 0.56-0.87) of having high NTproBNP values, independently of diabetes. As interaction between diabetes and NTproBNP was evident (p obesity or metabolic syndrome enhanced fourfold and over the OR of having high NTproBNP levels, while the presence of metabolic syndrome alone had a more modest effect (OR 1.54, 1.18-2.01) even after having excluded individuals with CVD. In the non-diabetic cohort, obesity/overweight and HOMA-IR ≥ 2.0 decreased to a similar extent the ORs of high NTproBNP [0.76 (0.60-0.95) and 0.74 (0.59-0.93)], but the association between overweight/obesity and NTproBNP was no longer significant after the inclusion into the model of HOMA-IR, whereas CRP > 3 mg/dl conferred a fully adjusted OR of 0.65 (0.49-0.86). NT-proBNP levels are lower in overweight/obesity, even in those with diabetes. Both insulin-resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation

  5. Use of Readily Accessible Inflammatory Markers to Predict Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Winter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the primary cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease will facilitate early intervention aimed at reducing the rate of progression to end-stage renal disease. Diabetic kidney disease has been traditionally classified based on the presence of albuminuria. More recently estimated glomerular filtration rate has also been incorporated into the staging of diabetic kidney disease. While albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is well described, the phenotype of non-albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is now widely accepted. An association between markers of inflammation and diabetic kidney disease has previously been demonstrated. Effector molecules of the innate immune system including C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are increased in patients with diabetic kidney disease. Furthermore, renal infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes are observed in renal biopsies of patients with diabetic kidney disease. Similarly high serum neutrophil and low serum lymphocyte counts have been shown to be associated with diabetic kidney disease. The neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio is considered a robust measure of systemic inflammation and is associated with the presence of inflammatory conditions including the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a link between high levels of the above inflammatory biomarkers and diabetic kidney disease. Further longitudinal studies will be required to determine if these readily available inflammatory biomarkers can accurately predict the presence and prognosis of diabetic kidney disease, above and beyond albuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Baez, Maria Valeria; Marquez-Gonzalez, Horacio; Barcenas-Contreras, Rodolfo; Morales Montoya, Carlos; Espinosa-Garcia, Laura Fatima

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a strategy for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in Quintana Roo, México. Study transversal, observational, prospective, analytical, eight primary care units from Mexican Social Security Institute in the northern delegation of the State of Quintana Roo, Mexico were included. A program for early detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adult 376,169 was designed. Were diagnosed 683 cases of type 2 diabetes, in 105 patients randomized was conducted to direct ophthalmoscopy were subjected to a secondary hospital were assigned. Will determine the degree of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema was performed. In population were 55.2% female, mean age 48+11.1 years, 23.8 % had some degree of DR, 28.0% with mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy 48.0 % moderate 16.0% and severe and 8.0% showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Those over age 30 are 2.8 times more risk of developing DR, OR= 2.8; 95%CI: 0.42-18.0, and OR= 1.7; 95%CI: 1.02-2.95 women. The implementation of programs aimed at the early detection of debilitating conditions such as diabetic retinopathy health impact beneficiaries, effective links between primary care systems and provide second level positive health outcomes for patient diseases.

  8. Addressing the double-burden of diabetes and tuberculosis: lessons from Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Round, Jeff; Arnold, Matthias; Abdraimova, Aida; Akkazieva, Baktygul; Beran, David

    2017-03-15

    The incidence of diabetes and tuberculosis co-morbidity is rising, yet little work has been done to understand potential implications for health systems, healthcare providers and individuals. Kyrgyzstan is a priority country for tuberculosis control and has a 5% prevalence of diabetes in adults, with many health system challenges for both conditions. Patient exit interviews collected data on demographic and socio-economic characteristics, health spending and care seeking for people with diabetes, tuberculosis and both diabetes and tuberculosis. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with healthcare workers involved in diabetes and tuberculosis care, to understand delivery of care and how providers view effectiveness of care. The experience of co-affected individuals within the health system is different than those just with tuberculosis or diabetes. Co-affected patients do not receive more care and also have different care for their tuberculosis than people with only tuberculosis. Very high levels of catastrophic spending are found among all groups despite these two conditions being included in the Kyrgyz state benefit package especially for medicines. This study highlights that different patterns of service provision by disease group are found. Although Kyrgyzstan has often been cited as an example in terms of health reforms and developing Primary Health Care, this study highlights the challenge of managing conditions that are viewed as "too complicated" for non-specialists and the impact this has on costs and management of individuals.

  9. Dental, periodontal and salivary conditions in diabetic children associated with metabolic control variables and nutritional plan adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Rosas, C Y; Cárdenas Vargas, E; Castañeda-Delgado, J E; Aguilera-Galaviz, L A; Aceves Medina, M C

    2018-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that has manifestations other than alterations in endocrine regulation or in metabolic pathways. Several diseases of the oral cavity have been associated with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2 in young people according to their evolution. Scarce information exists regarding the role of diabetes and its association with the oral health status in paediatric diabetic patients. The aims of the study were to assess the quality of saliva, saliva acidogenicity, dental caries experience, fluorosis and periodontal status in diabetic patients and to evaluate their relationship with metabolic control variables and nutritional plan adherence. The study population consisted of 60 paediatric patients with both types of diabetes mellitus. Saliva testing included stimulated flow, pH (using pH indicator strips), buffer capacity and Snyder's Test. DMFT/dmft and dental caries experience were determined on the basis of ICDAS II codes. The periodontal status was assessed by PI and GI and fluorosis by FI. Nutritional plan adherence was established from the subscale "Dietary Control" of the Diabetes Self-Management Profile questionnaire. Medical Data was retrieved from the clinical registers in the Diabetic Clinic. We describe the main characteristics of the oral cavity related variables of our population that might guide the clinical practice in similar settings; we found a dmft/DMFT of 1.71 ± 1.74 and 0.64 ± 1.03, PI of 1.91 ± 0.75, GI of 0.50 ± 0.56 and a fluorosis prevalence of 61%. We identified several correlated variables, which indicate strong associations between the nutritional habits of the patients and co-occurrence of oral cavity physiopathological alterations. Several correlations were found between acidogenic activity of the saliva (Snyder Test) and the percentage of adherence to the nutritional plan and to the dmft index. Furthermore, a significant correlation between the buffering capacity of the saliva and the glycemic control of

  10. Diabetes MILES--Australia (management and impact for long-term empowerment and success: methods and sample characteristics of a national survey of the psychological aspects of living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Australian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speight Jane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful management of diabetes requires attention to the behavioural, psychological and social aspects of this progressive condition. The Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success Study is an international collaborative. Diabetes MILES--Australia, the first Diabetes MILES initiative to be undertaken, was a national survey of adults living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Australia. The aim of this study was to gather data that will provide insights into how Australians manage their diabetes, the support they receive and the impact of diabetes on their lives, as well as to use the data to validate new diabetes outcome measures. Methods/design The survey was designed to include a core set of self-report measures, as well as modules specific to diabetes type or management regimens. Other measures or items were included in only half of the surveys. Cognitive debriefing interviews with 20 participants ensured the survey content was relevant and easily understood. In July 2011, the survey was posted to 15,000 adults (aged 18-70 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes selected randomly from the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS database. An online version of the survey was advertised nationally. A total of 3,338 eligible Australians took part; most (70.4% completed the postal survey. Respondents of both diabetes types and genders, and of all ages, were adequately represented in both the postal and online survey sub-samples. More people with type 2 diabetes than type 1 diabetes took part in Diabetes MILES--Australia (58.8% versus 41.2%. Most respondents spoke English as their main language, were married/in a de facto relationship, had at least a high school education, were occupied in paid work, had an annual household income > $AUS40,000, and lived in metropolitan areas. Discussion A potential limitation of the study is the under-representation of respondents from culturally and

  11. Diabetes UK Position Statement. Competency frameworks in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, D; Deakin, T; Walsh, N; Turner, B; Lawrence, S; Priest, L; George, S; Vanterpool, G; McArdle, J; Rylance, A; Terry, G; Little, P

    2015-05-01

    The quality, skills and attitudes of staff working in the healthcare system are central to multidisciplinary learning and working, and to the delivery of the quality of care patients expect. Patients want to know that the staff supporting them have the right knowledge and attitudes to work in partnership, particularly for conditions such as diabetes where 95% of all care is delivered by the person with diabetes themselves. With the current changes in the NHS structures in England, and the potential for greater variation in the types of 'qualified provider', along with the recent scandal at Mid-Staffordshire Hospital, staff need to be shown to be competent and named/accredited or recognized as such. This will help to restore faith in an increasingly devolved delivery structure. The education and validation of competency needs to be consistently delivered and assured to ensure standards are maintained for different roles and disciplines across each UK nation. Diabetes UK recommends that all NHS organizations prioritize healthcare professional education, training and competency through the implementation of a National Diabetes Competency Framework and the phased approach to delivery to address this need. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  12. Diabetes mellitus, a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the role of insulin resistance as a determinant of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasingly recognized as a heterogeneous condition. The individualization of care and treatment necessitates an understanding of the individual patient's pathophysiology of DM that underpins their DM classification and clinical presentation. Classical type-2 diabetes mellitus is due to a combination of insulin resistance and an insulin secretory defect. Type-1 diabetes is characterized by a near-absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. More recently, advances in genetics and a better appreciation of the atypical features of DM has resulted in more categories of diabetes. In the context of kidney disease, patients with DM and microalbuminuria are more insulin resistant, and insulin resistance may be a pathway that results in accelerated progression of diabetic kidney disease. This review summarizes the updated classification of DM, including more rarer categories and their associated renal manifestations that need to be considered in patients who present with atypical features. The benefits and limitations of the tests utilized to make a diagnosis of DM are discussed. We also review the putative pathways and mechanisms by which insulin resistance drives the progression of diabetic kidney disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  13. Choroidal thickness alterations in diabetic nephropathy patients with early or no diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocasarac, Can; Yigit, Yavuz; Sengul, Erkan; Sakalar, Yildirim Beyazit

    2018-04-01

    To assess changes in choroidal thickness (CT) in diabetes patients with and without diabetic nephropathy using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Thirty-five type 2 diabetes patients with a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DNP) in nephrology department and 35 type 2 diabetes patients without nephropathy (non-DNP) were included in our prospective study consecutively. The control group comprised 34 healthy individuals. CT measurements were recorded under the fovea and at 1500 µm from the foveal center in the nasal and temporal sides. The study parameters also included age, refractive error, axial length, intraocular pressure, HbA1c, glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria amount. The subfoveal, temporal and nasal choroidal thickness was noted to be thinner in patients with DNP compared with non-DNP and normal subjects (p diabetic patients when diabetic nephropathy accompanies diabetes mellitus.

  14. Diabetic Myopathy: Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M D'Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases that are associated with the presence of a hyperglycemic state due to impairments in insulin function. While the development of each form of diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2 drastically differs, resultant pathologies often overlap. In each diabetic condition a failure to maintain healthy muscle is often observed, and is termed diabetic myopathy. This significant, but often overlooked, complication is believed to contribute to the progression of additional diabetic pathologies due to the vital importance of skeletal muscle for our physical and metabolic well-being. While studies have investigated the link between changes to skeletal muscle metabolic health following diabetes mellitus onset (particularly Type 2 diabetes mellitus, few have examined the negative impact of diabetes mellitus on the growth and reparative capacities of skeletal muscle that often coincides with disease development. Importantly, evidence is accumulating that the muscle progenitor cell population (particularly the muscle satellite cell population is also negatively affected by the diabetic environment, and as such, likely contributes to the declining skeletal muscle health observed in diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge surrounding the influence of diabetes mellitus on skeletal muscle growth and repair, with a particular emphasis on the impact of diabetes mellitus on the progenitor cell population of skeletal muscle.

  15. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  16. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Diabetes-Related Distress, Quality of Life, and Metabolic Control Among Persons with Diabetes: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusch, Leah M; O'Brien, William H

    2018-04-04

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have improved psychological outcomes for multiple chronic health conditions, including diabetes. A meta-analytic review of the literature was conducted on all located studies (n = 14) investigating MBIs that targeted diabetes-related distress (DRD) and diabetes-related outcomes among people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. PsychInfo, PubMed, Medline, and Web of Science were searched for MBIs that were designed to improve DRD and other secondary outcomes, including quality of life and measures of metabolic control. A meta-analysis of these outcomes uncovered small-to-moderate effect sizes for intervention studies measuring pretreatment to posttreatment changes in DRD and metabolic control among treatment group participants. However, the pretreatment to follow-up comparisons for DRD and metabolic control were small and unreliable. For control groups, all pre-treatment to post-treatment and pre-treatment to follow-up comparisons were unreliable for all outcomes. A moderate effect size for treatment-control comparisons was found for intervention studies measuring quality of life outcomes at posttreatment, but not at follow-up comparisons. All other effect sizes for treatment-control comparisons were unreliable. Limitations and implications for MBIs among individuals with diabetes are discussed.

  17. Organising care for people with diabetes and renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the commonest long-term conditions. One-fifth of patients with diabetes will have CKD, and diabetes is the commonest cause of advanced kidney disease. For most patients these comorbidities will be managed in primary care with the focus on cardiovascular prevention. Many patients with more advanced disease and complications require joint care from multidisciplinary specialist teams in diabetes and renal disease to ensure that care is consistent and coordinated. Models of joint speciality care, include joint registry management, parallel clinics, shared consulting and case discussion, but require more evaluation than has currently been performed. These underpin more informal interactions between the specialist teams. A local model of care for diabetes and renal disease that incorporates the roles of primary care, members of multidisciplinary teams and speciality care should be agreed, resourced appropriately and its effectiveness monitored. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  18. Diabetes care: model for the future of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, L Michael; Tanzi, Maria G

    2010-01-01

    To review relevant trends threatening primary care and the evidence supporting use of nonphysicians in primary and chronic care of patients with diabetes. Current medical and pharmacy literature as selected by authors. The care needed by patients with diabetes does not fit well into our current medical model for primary care, and an adequate supply of physicians is not likely to be available for primary care roles in coming years. Patients with diabetes who are placed on evidence-based regimens, are educated about their disease, are coached in ways that motivate them to lose weight and adopt other therapeutic lifestyle changes, and are adhering to and persisting with therapy will soon have improved clinical parameters. These quickly translate into fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. A growing body of literature supports the use of pharmacists and other nonphysicians in meeting the needs of patients with diabetes. Pharmacists should join nurse practitioners, specially trained nurses, and physician assistants as integral members of the health care team in providing care to patients with diabetes and, by logical extension, other chronic conditions. Demand for primary care is likely to outstrip the available supply of generalist physicians in the coming years. In addition to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, pharmacists should be considered for key roles in future interdisciplinary teams that triage and provide direct care to patients, including those with diabetes and other chronic conditions.

  19. Understanding Experiences of Diabetes Medications Among African Americans Living With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockwoldt, Denise; Staffileno, Beth A; Coke, Lola; Hamilton, Rebekah; Fogg, Lou; Calvin, Donna; Quinn, Lauretta

    2017-07-01

    African American (AA) adults are disproportionally affected by type 2 diabetes and are diagnosed at an earlier age, but are less adherent to diabetes medications compared with the general population. This qualitative study sought to describe the experiences of taking diabetes medications among midlife AA men and women with type 2 diabetes and to identify factors that influence these experiences. Fifteen AAs completed semistructured interviews. Using the Roy adaptation model, thematic analysis coded for both adaptive and ineffective experiences. Adaptive experiences included self-confidence in one's ability to control diabetes, a belief in the value of diabetes medication, assuming responsibility for one's health, developing a routine for taking medication, and positive relationships with the care team. Ineffective experiences for medication taking included: feeling powerless over diabetes, self-blame, and fear. One's self-concept as a person with diabetes, as well as assuming the role of "medication taker," were prominent themes.

  20. The modulative effects of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation on diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chun-Feng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Lin, Che-Li

    2017-02-28

    Diabetes (one of non-communicable diseases) is serious due to its complications, such like, cardiovascular ailments, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, wound gangrene and sexual impotence. Diabetes and associated chronic conditions are rapidly emerging as major health problems. In clinical, there were different drugs for diabetes treatment on different mechanisms. However, there were limited studies on the efficacy of electric stimulations on diabetes therapeutic application. In current study, we try to evaluate the effect of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulator (MENS) on diabetes modulation as an alternative medicine. A total of 36 male ICR mice of 6 weeks old were randomly divided into 4 groups [1] Control, [2] MENS only, [3] DM, [4] DM with MENS. During 8 weeks treatments, the diabetes-associated assessments included body weight, diet utilization, blood glucose measurement, other biochemistries and histopathological observations. The diabetes animal model induced by STZ had 180 mg/dl fasting blood glucose (GLU-AC) before MENS intervention. After 3 and 6 weeks administration, the GLU-AC of DM+MENS group significantly decreased 31.97% and 50.82% (P < 0.0001), respectively, as compared to DM group and the OGTT also demonstrated the similar significant results. The diabetic syndromes of polydipsia and polyphagia were also significantly ameliorated by MENS intervention. In other biochemical indexes, the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hyperinsulinemia, liver functions (AST & ALT) and kidneys function (BUN & Creatinine) were also significantly mitigated by MENS under diabetes model. The histological observation also showed the MENS administration improved the diabetes-related pathological characteristics in liver, kidney and pancreas tissues. Our results suggest that administration of MENS could significantly improve diabetes animal model on blood sugar homeostasis, diabetic polydipsia, biochemistries, and tissue damage. In the health conditions, the MENS didn

  1. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  2. The study of Insulin Resistance in the Off Springs of Diabetics and Non Diabetic Patients

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    Ganesh Manoorkar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin resistance is one of the main cause in the pathogenesis of the development of type- 2 diabetes mellitus. Elevated insulin levels and insulin resistance may be present several years prior to the development of hyperglycaemia. Hence the diagnosis of insulin resistance at the initial stages in risk group people could be used as an effective measure to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus and its outcome, including reduction in morbidity and mortality. Though type 2 diabetes mellitus has multifactorial aetiology, genetic factor plays an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus. So we have tried to establish relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance by studying the insulin resistance in off springs of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Aims and objectives: Estimation of insulin levels in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Comparision of insulin resistance in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics. To find the relation between insulin resistance and genetic factor. Material and method: This study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry Grant Government Medical College Mumbai. Total 100 non diabetic people were included in the study of age above 30 years. These are divided into two groups as- Group-I includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of non diabetic people. Group-II includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of diabetic people. The fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels are estimated in the above two groups. The insulin resistance was calculated by using HOMA-IR model. Result: Fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin level and insulin resistance is significantly increased in group-II people as compared to group-I people. Conclusion: There is a strong relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance which exist prior to the development of diabetes mellitus. The people of group-II are susceptible for the

  3. Comparison of Dry Eye Parameters between Diabetics and Non-Diabetics in District of Kuantan, Pahang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarousha, Mohammed; Badarudin, Noor Ezailina; Che Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes may affect the human body's systems and organs, including the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is the 5th leading cause of blindness globally. Diabetic subjects demonstrated dry eye symptoms that were also supported by the low values of the clinical tests. This study aimed to compare the dry eye symptoms and signs between diabetics and non-diabetics and tear functions between diabetic subjects with and without dry eye. This retrospective study was based on the observation of 643 medical files. Using a convenience sampling method, 88 subjects were found to report diabetes mellitus. The information extracted from the files included: date of first examination, age at first visit, gender, past ocular history, systemic disease, symptoms of dry eye disease and details of clinical diagnostic signs. Non-contact lens wearers were excluded. A group of 88, age and gender matched, control subjects were included for this comparison study. The percentage of dry eye symptoms was higher in diabetic subjects (15.9%) compared with non-diabetic subjects (13.6%; p<0.001). The percentage of dry eye symptoms was also higher in diabetics with dry eye (63%) than in diabetics without dry eye (36.9%; p<0.001). Tear break up time was significantly different between diabetics and non-diabetics (p<0.001) and between diabetics with and without dry eye (p=0.046). The corneal staining was significantly different between diabetic subjects with and without dry eye (p=0.028). Dry eye symptoms were significantly associated with diabetics. Tear break up time was significantly shorter in diabetics with dry eye compared to diabetics without dry eye.

  4. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  5. A Narrative Review of Diabetes Intervention Studies to Explore Diabetes Care Opportunities for Pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamala Ayadurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a review of current diabetes intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and identified opportunities for pharmacists to deliver quality diabetes care. Methods. A search on randomised controlled trials (RCT on diabetes management by healthcare professionals including pharmacists published between 2010 and 2015 was conducted. Results and Discussion. Diabetes management includes multifactorial intervention which includes seven factors as outlined in diabetes guidelines, namely, glycaemic, cholesterol and blood pressure control, medication, lifestyle, education, and cardiovascular risk factors. Most studies do not provide evidence that the intervention methods used included all seven factors with exception of three RCT which indicated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin reduction range of 0.5% to 1.8%. The varied HbA1C reduction suggests a lack of standardised and consistent approach to diabetes care. Furthermore, the duration of most studies was from one month to two years; therefore long term outcomes could not be established. Conclusion. Although pharmacists’ contribution towards improving clinical outcomes of diabetes patients was well documented, the methods used to deliver structured, consistent evidence-based care were not clearly stipulated. Therefore, approaches to achieving long term continuity of care are uncertain. An intervention strategy that encompass all seven evidence-based factors will be useful.

  6. Diabetes mellitus in childhood: an emerging condition in the 21st century

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    Thais Della Manna

    Full Text Available Summary The International Diabetes Federation (IDF-2015 estimates the existence of 30,900 children under 15 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 in Brazil, and an increase of 3.0% per year is expected. This review focused on meta-analysis and pediatric diabetes update articles in order to draw attention to the need of planning coping strategies to support this serious public health problem in coming years. DM1 is considered an immuno-mediated disease with a complex transmission influenced by genetic and environmental factors responsible for a gradual destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells. Seroconversion to DM1-associated autoantibodies and abnormalities in metabolic tests that assess insulin secretion and glucose tolerance can be used as predictive criteria of beta cells functional reserve and the onset of the clinical disease. Symptomatic DM1 treatment is complex and the maintenance of good metabolic control is still the only effective strategy for preserving beta cell function. Disease duration and hyperglycemia are both risk factors for the onset of chronic vascular complications that negatively affect the quality of life and survival of these patients. In this regard, health teams must be trained to provide the best possible information on pediatric diabetes, through continuing education programs focused on enabling these young people and their families to diabetes self-management.

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Bhaskar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The study objective was to examine the effect of glycaemic control and variations on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR among the diabetes mellitus patients visiting Medicine and Ophthalmology OPD Sapthagiri Medical college, Bangalore. MATERIALS AND METHODS 10 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and 70 persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, visiting the Medicine OPD of Sapthagiri Medical College and referred to Ophthalmology department of the above to detect the Diabetic Retinopathy changes in a diabetes mellitus management programme conducted for 3 months in Bangalore, participated in the study. Patients who were followed up for 6 months the same above were also included in the study. Analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the risk factors, incidence and progression of Diabetic Retinopathy among Diabetes Mellitus patients and management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES To determine the risk factors associated with it, stage of retinopathy diagnosed at presentation, management of it, and final visual outcome. The prevention is by strict glycaemic control, prompt use of anti-diabetic drugs and regular exercises. These included age and gender-adjusted prevalence of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, 1 and correlation of prevalence with history-based risk factors. RESULTS The three months cumulative incidence of DR was 58 %in type I diabetes mellitus and 42 % among type II Diabetes mellitus. After controlling for known risk factors for DR,1 a high baseline haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, ethnicity, age, type of diabetes mellitus, duration were associated with the incidence of referable DR in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rate of diabetes in urban Bangalore 28.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in general population was 3.5% (95% CI. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the population with diabetes

  8. Polyuria with the Concurrent manifestation of Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) & Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Jae-Ha; Yi, Joo-Hark; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of the concurrent manifestation of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A 56 year-old man was diagnosed as a type 2 DM on the basis of hyperglycemia with polyuria and polydipsia at a local clinic two months ago and started an oral hypoglycemic medication, but resulted in no symptomatic improvement at all. Upon admission to the university hospital, the patient's initial fasting blood sugar level was 140 mg/dL, and he showed polydipsic and polyuric conditions more than 8 L urine/day. Despite the hyperglycemia controlled with metformin and diet, his symptoms persisted. Further investigations including water deprivation test confirmed the coexisting CDI of unknown origin, and the patient's symptoms including an intense thirst were markedly improved by desmopressin nasal spray (10 µg/day). The possibility of a common origin of CDI and type 2 DM is raised in a review of the few relevant adult cases in the literature.

  9. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, is characterized by underlying maternal defects in the β-cell response to insulin during pregnancy. Women with a previous history of GDM have a greater than 7-fold higher risk of developing postpartum diabetes compared with women without GDM. Various risk factors for postpartum diabetes have been identified, including maternal age, glucose levels in pregnancy, family history of diabetes, pre-pregnancy and postpartum body mass index, dietary patterns, physical activity, and breastfeeding. Genetic studies revealed that GDM shares common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes. A number of lifestyle interventional trials that aimed to ameliorate modifiable risk factors, including diet, exercise, and breastfeeding, succeeded in reducing the incidence of postpartum diabetes, weight retention, and other obesity-related morbidities. The present review summarizes the findings of previous studies on the incidence and risk factors of postpartum diabetes and discusses recent lifestyle interventional trials that attempted to prevent postpartum diabetes.

  10. Relationship of microalbuminuria with the diabetic foot ulcers in type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Romero, F; Rodríguez-Morán, M

    1998-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a significant risk factor associated with nephropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease; however, there are no previous reports on the relationship of microalbuminuria with diabetic foot ulcers or stroke, despite the fact that microalbuminuria is a marker of vascular damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of microalbuminuria with diabetic foot ulcers in type II diabetes patients. In this, cross-sectional clinical study, outpatients of the offices at first level medical care in Durango, Mexico, were included in one of two groups; (a) patients with diabetic foot ulcers and (b) control of group patients without diabetic foot ulcers. Diabetic foot diagnosis was established on the basis of clinical criteria and pletismography. Patients diagnosed with renal disease, urinary tract infection, acute febrile illness, or heart failure and those receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were excluded from the study. Microalbuminuria was measured, on a 24-h urine collection, by precipitation with sulfasalicylic acid, and turbidity was determined by measuring absorbance with a spectrophotometer. The study included 670 diabetic patients. Using both odds ratio and logistic regression analyses, diabetes duration, cigarette smoking, aging, and microalbuminuria showed a strong relationship with diabetic foot ulcers. Microalbuminuria should be considered as an independent risk factor for diabetic foot ulcers.

  11. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

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    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  12. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults

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    Kyung Soo Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the near future, the majority of patients with diabetes will be adults aged 65 or older. Unlike young adults with diabetes, elderly diabetic people may be affected by a variety of comorbid conditions such as depression, cognitive impairment, muscle weakness (sarcopenia, falls and fractures, and physical frailty. These geriatric syndromes should be considered in the establishment of treatment goals in older adults with diabetes. Although there are several guidelines for the management of diabetes, only a few are specifically designed for the elderly with diabetes. In this review, we present specific conditions of elderly diabetes which should be taken into account in the management of diabetes in older adults. We also present advantages and disadvantages of various glucose-lowering agents that should be considered when choosing a proper regimen for older adults with diabetes.

  13. Pancreatic Response to Gold Nanoparticles Includes Decrease of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation In Autistic Diabetic Model

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    Manar E. Selim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have a wide range of applications in various fields. This study provides an understanding of the modulatory effects of AuNPs on an antioxidant system in male Wistar diabetic rats with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Normal littermates fed by control mothers were injected with citrate buffer alone and served as normal, untreated controls controlin this study. Diabetes mellitus (DM was induced by administering a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (100 mg/kg to the pups of (ND diabetic group, which had been fasted overnight. Autistic pups from mothers that had received a single intraperitoneal injection of 600 mg/kg sodium valproate on day 12.5 after conception were randomly divided into 2 groups (n 2 7/group as follow; administering single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ ( (100 mg/kg to the overnight fasted autistic pups of (AD autistic diabetic group. The treatment was started on the 5th day after STZ injection with the same dose as in group II and it was considered as 1st day of treatment with gold nanoparticles for 7 days to each rat of (group IV treated autistic diabetic group(TAD at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg. b. wt. Results: At this dose of administration AuNPs, the activities of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase were greater in group TAD compared with the control group (P 0.05 in the liver of autistic diabetic AuNPs -supplemented rats, whereas reduced glutathione was markedly higher than in control rats, especially after administration of AuNPs. Moreover, the kidney functions in addition to the fat profile scoring supported the protective potential of that dose of AuNPs. The beta cells revealed euchromatic nuclei with no evidence of separation of nuclear membrane. Conclusions: Our results showed that AuNPs improved many of the oxidative stress parameters (SOD, GPx and, CAT, plasma antioxidant capacity (ORAC and lipid profile

  14. Subjective Wellbeing Among Adults with Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Browne, Jessica L; Pouwer, Frans

    2016-01-01

    duration, body mass index, number of diabetes-related complications, and depression). Furthermore, adults with type 2 diabetes using insulin to manage their condition report the lowest levels of subjective wellbeing, and are also most likely to report dissatisfaction with their current health....... These findings suggest that living with diabetes, and in particular, living with type 2 diabetes and using insulin, strongly challenges the maintenance of subjective wellbeing.......This study examines the subjective wellbeing of Australian adults with diabetes who completed the Diabetes MILES—Australia survey, investigating by diabetes type and treatment, and by comparing with the subjective wellbeing of the general Australian adult population. In addition, the extent...

  15. Pathogenesis and treatment of diabetic glomerulopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marre, M.; Le Jeune, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Diabetic glomerulopathy is the consequence, at the glomerular level, of diabetes. Diagnosis is based on the association of proteinuria, arterial hypertension and an early reduction of glomerular filtration in a diabetic patient, generally insulin-dependent. Diabetic glomerulopathy is a complication of type I diabetes, which begins in childhood or adolescence, but can also be discovered in type II diabetes. A definite diagnosis requires histological evidences ; glomerular clearance measurements ( 125 I-iodothalamate or 51 Cr-EDTA) yield important information concerning glomerular filtration. The authors subsequently address pathogenesis and therapeutic regimens, and they report on the particularities of this condition in type II diabetes. (authors). 30 refs., 2 tabs

  16. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS IN CHILDREN- CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME

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    Bindu Krishnan Padma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening condition, which accounts for the majority of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Early diagnosis and prompt management substantially reduces the mortality. The aim of the study is to assess the clinical characteristics and early outcome in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study done in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis in children of age ≤12 years admitted during the period 2011 to 2016 were included in the study. Clinical details, investigations and complications were recorded in a pro forma and data was analysed using statistical tests. RESULTS Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis were included in the study. Thirty three (63.5% children presented with DKA at first diagnosis of diabetes, whereas 19 (36.5% were DKA among children with established diabetes. Mean age at presentation was 9.048 ± 3.24. Female-to-male ratio was (1.36:1. The mean duration of onset of symptom before hospitalisation was 10.10 ± 9.52. Most commonly observed presenting symptoms were polyuria (63.46%, polydipsia (65.38%, tiredness (61.54%, vomiting (36.54% and pain abdomen (32.69%. Mild DKA occurred frequently than moderate and severe forms. Among these children, 40.4% had infection as the predisposing factor. Demographic variables like age, gender, socioeconomic status, family history of diabetes did not have any significant association with the severity of DKA. The clinical parameters like tachypnoea, Kussmaul breathing, shock, altered sensorium at presentation and dehydration had significant association with the severity of DKA. Similarly, hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, hyponatraemia, acute kidney injury and cerebral oedema had significant association with the severity of DKA. All the patients recovered with therapy. No mortality was reported. CONCLUSION Diabetic

  17. Distribution of Different Sized Ocular Surface Vessels in Diabetics and Normal Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaee, Touka; Pourreza, Hamidreza; Doosti, Hassan; Abrishami, Mojtaba; Ehsaei, Asieh; Basiry, Mohsen; Pourreza, Reza

    2017-01-01

    To compare the distribution of different sized vessels using digital photographs of the ocular surface of diabetic and normal individuals. In this cross-sectional study, red-free conjunctival photographs of diabetic and normal individuals, aged 30-60 years, were taken under defined conditions and analyzed using a Radon transform-based algorithm for vascular segmentation. The image areas occupied by vessels (AOV) of different diameters were calculated. The main outcome measure was the distribution curve of mean AOV of different sized vessels. Secondary outcome measures included total AOV and standard deviation (SD) of AOV of different sized vessels. Two hundred and sixty-eight diabetic patients and 297 normal (control) individuals were included, differing in age (45.50 ± 5.19 vs. 40.38 ± 6.19 years, P distribution curves of mean AOV differed between patients and controls (smaller AOV for larger vessels in patients; P distribution curve of vessels compared to controls. Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with contraction of larger vessels in the conjunctiva. Smaller vessels dilate with diabetic retinopathy. These findings may be useful in the photographic screening of diabetes mellitus and retinopathy.

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker.

  19. DIABETES MELLITUS AND BELL’S PALSY IN IRANIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Karimi-Yazdi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nDuring last decades many researchers have focused on the conditions associated with Bell's palsy including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and viral infections. This study was performed to evaluate correlation of diabetes mellitus and Bell's palsy and some relevant features not discussed in the literature in an Iranian population. The presence of diabetes mellitus was evaluated in a total number of 275 subjects (75 patients with Bell's palsy and 200 control subjects. Diabetes mellitus was noted in 10 (13.3% patients with Bell's palsy among which 6 case were diagnosed as new cases of diabetes. Previous history of Bell's palsy was present in 10.67% of the subjects with Bell's palsy. Symptoms of other cranial nerves revealed higher figures in Bell's palsy patients with underlying diabetes. Such studies in developing countries may reveal some unknown features of the disease. This study confirms the correlation of diabetes mellitus and Bell's palsy for the first time in an Iranian population. The results also suggest that diabetic patients with Bell's palsy suffer from more cranial nerve symptoms. We offer screening tests of diabetes as a routine process in the management of Bell's palsy especially in developing countries.

  20. Diabetes and Driving Safety: Science, Ethics, Legality & Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J.; Singh, Harsimran; Lorber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes affects over 25 million people in the United States, most of whom are over the age of 16 and many of whom are licensed to drive a motor vehicle. Safe operation of a motor vehicle requires complex interactions of cognitive and motor functions and medical conditions that affect these functions often will increase the risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVA). In the case of diabetes, hypoglycemia is the most common factor that has been shown to increase MVA rates. When people with diabetes are compared with non-diabetic controls, systematic analyses show that the relative risk of MVA is increased by between 12 and 19% (RRR 1.12-1.19). In comparison, the RRR for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is 4.4 and for Sleep Apnea is 2.4. Epidemiologic research suggests that patients at risk for hypoglycemia-related MVAs may have some characteristics in common, including a history of severe hypoglycemia or of hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps. Experimental studies also have shown that people with a history of hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps have abnormal counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia and greater cognitive impairments during moderate hypoglycemia. There are medical, ethical and legal issues for health care professionals who care for people with diabetes regarding their patients’ risk of hypoglycemia-related driving mishaps. This includes identifying those at increased risk and counseling them on preventive measures, including more frequent blood glucose testing, delaying driving with low or low normal blood glucose, and carrying readily available emergency supplies in the vehicle for the treatment of hypoglycemia. PMID:23531955

  1. Diabetes education for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Robert; Jetha, Mary; Dryden, Donna M; Hooten, Nicola; Liang, Yuanyuan; Durec, Tamara; Sumamo, Elizabeth; Spooner, Carol; Milne, Andrea; O'Gorman, Kate; Klassen, Terry P

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of diabetes education on metabolic control, diabetes-related hospitalizations, complications, and knowledge, quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes for children with type 1 diabetes and their families. A systematic and comprehensive literature review was conducted in 21 electronic databases of medical and health education literature to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies evaluating the effectiveness of diabetes education. Study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted independently by several investigators in duplicate. A descriptive analysis is presented. From 12,756 citations, 80 studies were identified and included in the review (53 RCTs or CCTs, 27 observational studies). The methodological quality of studies was generally low. Most studies (35/52) that examined the effect of educational interventions on HbA1c found no evidence of increased effectiveness of the interventions over the education provided as part of standard care. Successful interventions were heterogeneous and included cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, skills training and general diabetes education. Most studies reported a positive effect on health service utilization (i.e., reduced use), although less than half were statistically significant. There was no clear evidence that educational interventions had an effect on short-term complications. The effect of educational interventions on diabetes knowledge was unclear with 12/30 studies reporting a significant improvement. Interventions which had varying effects on knowledge scores included diabetes camp, general diabetes education, and cognitive behavioral therapy. In the area of self management/regimen adherence, 10/21 studies reported improving this outcome significantly. Successful interventions included general diabetes education and cognitive behavioral therapy. Educational interventions were successful in improving various

  2. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9:00 to 16:00 at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 14:00 until 16:00. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  3. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9 am to 4 pm at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 2 pm until 4 pm. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  4. Exercise interventions in polypathological aging patients that coexist with diabetes mellitus: improving functional status and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-06-01

    In elderly populations, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength, poor muscle quality, and accelerated loss of muscle mass. In addition, diabetes mellitus increases risk for accelerated aging and for the development of frailty syndrome. This disease is also associated with a polypathological condition, and its complications progressively affect quality of life and survival. Exercise interventions, including resistance training, represent the cornerstones of diabetes management, especially in patients at severe functional decline. This review manuscript aimed to describe the beneficial effects of different exercise interventions on the functional capacity of elderly diabetics, including those at polypathological condition. The SciELO, Science Citation Index, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect databases were searched from 1980 to 2015 for articles published from original scientific investigations. In addition to the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on glycemic control, and on the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes, physical exercise is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength, power output, and aerobic power and functional capacity in elderly diabetic patients. Thus, a combination of resistance and endurance training is the most effective exercise intervention to promote overall physical fitness in these patients. In addition, in diabetic patients with frailty and severe functional decline, a multicomponent exercise program including strength and power training, balance exercises, and gait retraining may be an effective intervention to reduce falls and improve functional capacity and quality of life in these patients.

  5. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  6. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  7. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  8. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  9. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C.

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, is characterized by underlying maternal defects in the β-cell response to insulin during pregnancy. Women with a previous history of GDM have a greater than 7-fold higher risk of developing postpartum diabetes compared with women without GDM. Various risk factors for postpartum diabetes have been identified, including maternal age, glucose levels in pregnancy, family history of diabetes, pre-pregnancy and postpartum body mass index, dietary patterns, physical activity, and breastfeeding. Genetic studies revealed that GDM shares common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes. A number of lifestyle interventional trials that aimed to ameliorate modifiable risk factors, including diet, exercise, and breastfeeding, succeeded in reducing the incidence of postpartum diabetes, weight retention, and other obesity-related morbidities. The present review summarizes the findings of previous studies on the incidence and risk factors of postpartum diabetes and discusses recent lifestyle interventional trials that attempted to prevent postpartum diabetes. PMID:28049284

  10. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is associated with microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Boelter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in working-age individuals. Diabetic patients with proteinuria or those on dialysis usually present severe forms of diabetic retinopathy, but the association of diabetic retinopathy with early stages of diabetic nephropathy has not been entirely established. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1214 type 2 diabetic patients to determine whether microalbuminuria is associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in these patients. Patients were evaluated by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and grouped according to the presence or absence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The agreement of diabetic retinopathy classification performed by ophthalmoscopy and by stereoscopic color fundus photographs was 95.1% (kappa = 0.735; P < 0.001. Demographic information, smoking history, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, glycemic and lipid profile, and urinary albumin were evaluated. On multiple regression analysis, diabetic nephropathy (OR = 5.18, 95% CI = 2.91-9.22, P < 0.001, insulin use (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.47-4.31, P = 0.001 and diabetes duration (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07, P = 0.011 were positively associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and body mass index (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.86-0.96, P < 0.001 was negatively associated with it. When patients with macroalbuminuria and on dialysis were excluded, microalbuminuria (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.56-6.98, P = 0.002 remained associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Therefore, type 2 diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy more often presented renal involvement, including urinary albumin excretion within the microalbuminuria range. Therefore, all patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy should undergo an evaluation of renal function including urinary albumin measurements.

  11. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  12. Primary care for diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the care model for chronic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Salci

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the health care Primary Health Care professionals provide to diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas. Method: qualitative study, using the theoretical framework of Complex Thinking and the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas and the methodological framework of assessment research. To collect the data, 38 interviews were held with health professionals and managers; observation of the activities by the health teams; and analysis of 25 files of people who received this care. The data analysis was supported by the software ATLAS.ti, using the directed content analysis technique. Results: at the micro level, care was distant from the integrality of the actions needed to assist people with chronic conditions and was centered on the biomedical model. At the meso level, there was disarticulation among the professionals of the Family Health Strategy, between them and the users, family and community. At the macro level, there was a lack of guiding strategies to implement public policies for diabetes in care practice. Conclusion: the implementation of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas represents a great challenge, mainly needing professionals and managers who are prepared to work with chronic conditions are who are open to break with the traditional model.

  13. Salivary flow and composition in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasisi, T J; Fasanmade, A A

    2012-06-07

    The study investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on salivary flow and composition in humans compared to healthy sex and age matched controls. Forty adult human subjects divided into 20 diabetic and 20 non-diabetic healthy subjects were included. Saliva samples were collected and analysed for glucose, total protein, calcium, sodium, potassium, chloride and bicarbonate. Salivary flow rate was also determined. The results showed that salivary glucose and potassium levels were significantly higher (p = 0.01 and 0.002 respectively) in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic participants. It was also found that the diabetic patients had significant reduction in salivary flow rate when compared with non-diabetic individuals. In contrast, there was no significant difference in levels of total protein, Na+, Ca++, Cl- and HCO3- between the two groups. These results suggest that some oral diseases associated with diabetes mellitus may be due to altered levels of salivary glucose, potassium and flow.

  14. The Diabetic Heart: Too Sweet for Its Own Good?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J. Whittington

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD. Patients with diabetes and IHD experience worse clinical outcomes, suggesting that the diabetic heart may be more susceptible to ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. In contrast, the animal data suggests that the diabetic heart may be either more, equally, or even less susceptible to IRI. The conflicting animal data may be due to the choice of diabetic and/or IRI animal model. Ischemic conditioning, a phenomenon in which the heart is protected against IRI by one or more brief nonlethal periods of ischemia and reperfusion, may provide a novel cardioprotective strategy for the diabetic heart. Whether the diabetic heart is amenable to ischemic conditioning remains to be determined using relevant animal models of IRI and/or diabetes. In this paper, we review the limitations of the current experimental models used to investigate IRI and cardioprotection in the diabetic heart.

  15. Waiting for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troughton, Jacqui; Jarvis, Janet; Skinner, Chas

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to inform the development of an educational intervention for people with pre-diabetes in the UK by ascertaining individuals' experience of screening and diagnosis, their appraisal of the condition, and experience of health service delivery from diagnosis to 1 year post......-diagnosis. Methods: Qualitative interviews directed by framework methodology. Fifteen people diagnosed with pre-diabetes from the community (Midlands, UK) as part of a screening programme. Results: Respondents consistently expressed the need for education and support at diagnosis. Dominating all respondents......' narratives was the theme of 'uncertainty', which linked to two further themes of seriousness and taking action. These themes were influenced by respondents' prior experience and appraisal of both diabetes and pre-diabetes and their interpretation of health professionals' attitudes and actions towards them...

  16. Evaluation of New-Onset Diabetes in Patients Presenting Emergency Service with a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Yiğit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM in patients presenting to our emergency department with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated hospital records of patients who presented to the Emergency Department at Istanbul Goztepe Research and Training Hospital between 01 April 2009 and 01 April 2011 and were diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. 57 patients having complete clinical data were included in the study. Results: 45.6%of patients had type 1 DM, 33.3%- type 2 DM, and 21%of them were with new-onset DM. No statistically significant difference was found between type 1 DM, type 2 DM and new-onset DM patients with respect to arterial blood pH and HCO3 levels and serum sodium, potassium and plasma glucose levels at presentation as well as time of presentation (p>0.05, while HbA1c levels showed statistically significant difference in new-onset DM patients. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between types of DM in patients diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis except for precipitating factors, age and HbA1c. Detecting high blood glucose levels in patients presenting to emergency room for reasons other than DM is not a rare condition. Cautious evaluation and recognition of these patients in emergency room for the possibility of undiagnosed DM is important for prevention of future diabetic ketoacidosis episodes. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013; 51: 168-72

  17. The 24-month metabolic benefits of the healthy living partnerships to prevent diabetes: A community-based translational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, Carolyn F; Case, L Douglas; Blackwell, Caroline S; Katula, Jeffrey A; Vitolins, Mara Z

    2018-05-01

    Large-scale clinical trials and translational studies have demonstrated that weight loss achieved through diet and physical activity reduced the development of diabetes in overweight individuals with prediabetes. These interventions also reduced the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and risk factors linked to other chronic conditions including obesity-driven cancers and cardiovascular disease. The Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) was a clinical trial in which participants were randomized to receive a community-based lifestyle intervention translated from the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) or an enhanced usual care condition. The objective of this study is to compare the 12 and 24 month prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the two treatment arms of HELP PD. The intervention involved a group-based, behavioral weight-loss program led by community health workers monitored by personnel from a local diabetes education program. The enhanced usual care condition included dietary counseling and written materials. HELP PD included 301 overweight or obese participants (BMI 25-39.9kg/m 2 ) with elevated fasting glucose levels (95-125mg/dl). At 12 and 24 months of follow-up there were significant improvements in individual components of the metabolic syndrome: fasting blood glucose, waist circumference, HDL, triglycerides and blood pressure and the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in the intervention group compared to the usual care group. This study demonstrates that a community diabetes prevention program in participants with prediabetes results in metabolic benefits and a reduction in the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in the intervention group compared to the enhanced usual care group. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  19. Impact of diabetic serum on endothelial cells: An in-vitro-analysis of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzel, Daniela; Lehle, Karla; Haubner, Frank; Schmid, Christof; Birnbaum, Dietrich E.; Preuner, Juergen G.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by altered levels of adhesion molecules and cytokines. Aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of diabetic serum on cell-growth and proinflammatory markers in human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) from diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic serum showed (1) complementary proliferative activity for non-diabetic and diabetic HSVEC, (2) unchanged surface expression of adhesion molecules, and (3) elevated levels of sICAM-1 in HSVEC of all donors. The concentration of sVCAM-1 was increased only in diabetic cells. The proinflammatory state of diabetic HSVEC characterized by increased levels of cytokines was compensated. We concluded that even under normoglycemic conditions the serum itself contains critical factors leading to abnormal regulation of inflammation in diabetics. We introduced an in vitro model of diabetes representing the endothelial situation at the beginning of diabetes (non-diabetic cells/diabetic serum) as well as the diabetic chronic state (diabetic cells/diabetic serum)

  20. Oral health awareness, practices and status of patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-five (24.5%) knew that diabetes could worsen oral health condition and only 3 (2.1%) could correctly explain the association between diabetes and oral health conditions. Forty-three (30.1%) had participated in an oral health education program focused on diabetes and oral health. The majority (88.6%) had calculus ...

  1. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%, Group-II included 11 patients (17% and Group-III included 23 patients (31%. Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years. The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%; membranous nephropathy (12% and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%. Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years, and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases. Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years. The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of

  2. The interplay between noncoding RNAs and insulin in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan; Xu, Jia; Du, Xiao; Fu, Xianghui

    2018-04-10

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs and circular RNAs, regulate various biological processes and are involved in the initiation and progression of human diseases. Insulin, a predominant hormone secreted from pancreatic β cells, is an essential factor in regulation of systemic metabolism through multifunctional insulin signaling. Insulin production and action are tightly controlled. Dysregulations of insulin production and action can impair metabolic homeostasis, and eventually lead to the development of multiple metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. Accumulating data indicates that ncRNAs modulate β cell mass, insulin synthesis, secretion and signaling, and their role in diabetes is dramatically emerging. This review summarizes our current knowledge of ncRNAs as regulators of insulin, with particular emphasis on the implications of this interplay in the development of diabetes. We outline the role of ncRNAs in pancreatic β cell mass and function, which is critical for insulin production and secretion. We also highlight the involvement of ncRNAs in insulin signaling in peripheral tissues including liver, muscle and adipose, and discuss ncRNA-mediated inter-organ crosstalk under diabetic conditions. A more in-depth understanding of the interplay between ncRNAs and insulin may afford valuable insights and novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of diabetes, as well as other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A alimentação e a dieta alimentar no gerenciamento da condição crônica do diabetes Food and diet in the diabetes chronic condition management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Aparecida Barsaglini

    2010-12-01

    services. METHODOLOGY: this qualitative study was based on social representations and experience in the management of the disease. It involved the handling of food and diet among men and women diagnosed with type II diabetes and their families, living in a city in the state of São Paulo-Brazil, users of the primary care services. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and the thematic analysis identified structures of relevance, reference values and ways of action both reported and underlying the reports, which were analyzed in light of the purposes of the study and compared to the specialized literature. RESULTS: in the management of diabetes, the handling of food and diet by the ill people is not separate from the disease representations and experience, which are oriented by ideas, beliefs and by a set of daily adjustments and micro-decisions in order to control the adverse effects of the disease so that it is possible to live with and despite this condition. The ways of managing the food and diet are important components of diabetes control, extracted from the exclusive power of knowledge and medical and nutritional practices. CONCLUSION: the handling of food and diet in the chronic condition management is complex, involving issues related to the objective life conditions, socio-cultural dimensions, values and ideations, which permeate the ill people's representations and experience, being inserted in their life, social relations and in the characteristics of their social group.

  4. Designing an ICT self-management service: suggestions from persons with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardsten, Cecilia; Mörtberg, Christina; Blomqvist, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the wishes and needs of people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) for a future information and communication technology (ICT) self-management service to help manage their condition and their everyday life. Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting more and more people and placing increasing demands on health care. The self-management of diabetes includes instrumental and, decision-making skills and skills in managing daily activities, which may be supported by an ICT service. In this study we used a participatory design including two sessions of Future Workshop (FW) as part of a larger research project on the self-management of diabetes. Adults with type 2 diabetes participated in two FW sessions in which their expressed wishes and needs for an ICT service all fell under the broad category of Acceptance of the diagnosis, with three other suggestions; Trust in partnerships, Communication, and Individualized information. The participants' experience of the FW as a democratic process and their appreciation of mutual learning contributed to these results, which are consistent with the aims of person-centred care.

  5. Pharmacological treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Argoff, Charles E

    2011-03-26

    Neuropathic pain continues to be a difficult and challenging clinical issue to deal with effectively. Painful diabetic polyneuropathy is a complex pain condition that occurs with reasonable frequency in the population and it may be extremely difficult for clinicians to provide patients with effective analgesia. Chronic neuropathic pain may occur in approximately one of every four diabetic patients. The pain may be described as burning or a deep-seated ache with sporadic paroxysms of lancinating painful exacerbations. The pain is often constant, moderate to severe in intensity, usually primarily involves the feet and generally tends to worsen at night. Treatment may be multimodal but largely involves pharmacological approaches. Pharmacological therapeutic options include antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), α2δ ligands and topical (5%) lidocaine patch. Other agents may be different antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate), topical capsaicin, tramadol and other opioids. Progress continues with respect to understanding various mechanisms that may contribute to painful diabetic neuropathy. Agents that may hold some promise include neurotrophic factors, growth factors, immunomodulators, gene therapy and poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. It is hoped that in the future clinicians will be able to assess patient pathophysiology, which may help them to match optimal therapeutic agents to target individual patient aberrant mechanisms.

  6. Aggressive conservative therapy for refractory ulcer with diabetes and/or arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Hisashi; Ohashi, Natsuko; Harada, Teruichi; Muraoka, Michinari; Ishii, Masamitsu

    2006-05-01

    A foot ulcer due to diabetes and/or arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) frequently results in an intractable condition that resists treatment. To cope with this condition, we have developed a combination therapy that includes conventional conservative therapy plus surgical therapy. This aggressive conservative therapy using aggressive debridement, trafermin (Fiblast Spray, Kaken, Japan) treatment and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was adopted to treat seven patients suffering from diabetes and ASO-related refractory foot ulcer accompanied by bone exposure. With the exception of one patient who died during the treatment, the remaining six patients obtained limb salvage. The mean time to cure was 8.3 months. This approach should be considered before amputation. Some patients may refuse amputation or cannot tolerate highly invasive surgical treatment including tissue transplantation. In such cases, this aggressive conservative therapy can be employed as a highly useful and reproducible technique requiring simple techniques.

  7. Edukační proces u pacienta s diagnózou diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Krmenčíková, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This Bachelor's thesis covers the topic of Diabetes Mellitus patient education. It consists of a theoretical and a practical part. The theoretical part is further divided into two sections. The first theoretical section describes the condition of Diabetes Mellitus, including possible complications and treatment. The second theoretical part contains a list of basic concepts of patient education and the terms related to the patient education process. The quintessential part of the thesis is the...

  8. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Perceptions among women with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Judith; Ismail, Khalida; Amiel, Stephanie; Forbes, Angus

    2014-04-01

    Women with gestational diabetes are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which could be prevented or delayed by lifestyle modification. Lifestyle interventions need to take into account the specific situation of women with gestational diabetes. We aimed to gain a deeper understanding of women's experiences of gestational diabetes, their diabetes risk perceptions, and their views on type 2 diabetes prevention, to inform future lifestyle interventions. We conducted a metasynthesis that included 16 qualitative studies and identified 11 themes. Factors that require consideration when developing a type 2 diabetes prevention intervention in this population include addressing the emotional impact of gestational diabetes; providing women with clear and timely information about future diabetes risk; and offering an intervention that fits with women's multiple roles as caregivers, workers, and patients, and focuses on the health of the whole family.

  10. Contraception for Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P.; Mathiesen, E.; Clausen, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  11. Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  12. Current practices and research updates on diabetes mellitus in canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has evidence in ancient literatures, though recently is being considered as one amongst the most emerging disease condition in both human and companion animals. Diabetes mellitus is one of the common endocrinopathy of dog characterized by hyperglycemia, glycosuria and weight loss. Reports suggests high fraction of canine population suffer with diabetes world over. Studies in different veterinary hospitals of United States suggest increase in cases of canine diabetes and decrease in case fatality rate over time. Increase in cases of canine diabetes worldwide is attributed to awareness amongst pet owners, better veterinary health facilities, breed preferences by dog owners, increase dependence on commercial feeds, obesity, etc. Diabetes in most dogs is immune mediated and insulin dependent. Breed predisposition in canine is attributed to dog leukocyte antigen gene pool encoding form major histocompatibility complex-II molecules, however research is still underway. Diagnosis of diabetes still relies on blood sugar evaluation for screening of canine population, though many other diagnostic methods have shown promising benefits including measurement of fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin. Management of diabetes in dog is based on insulin therapy, diet modification and exercise. Use of oral anti-diabetics drugs in canine is limited though experimental studies have shown promising results. Alternative therapies have been explored, but only a few approaches have shown promise for clinical application.

  13. The Charcot Foot in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykberg, Robert G.; Armstrong, David G.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Edmonds, Michael; Van, Georges Ha; Hartemann, Agnes; Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Jirkovska, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Morbach, Stephan; Morrison, William B.; Pinzur, Michael; Pitocco, Dario; Sanders, Lee; Wukich, Dane K.; Uccioli, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity. PMID:21868781

  14. For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure, depression, sexual dysfunction, and diabetes. Historically, men have not been forthcoming about their health, particularly conditions like diabetes, depression, or sexual dysfunction. But today, many men are ...

  15. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  16. Vejle Diabetes Biobank - a resource for studies of the etiologies of diabetes and its comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eva Rabing Brix; Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Christensen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    as numerous original and pertinent bioclinical hypotheses related to human disease etiology and prognosis. The objective of the present study was to present the baseline data, design, and methods used for the establishment of the Vejle Diabetes Biobank. Further aims included assessment of the prevalence...... of diabetes and quality of diabetes treatment in a specified Danish region. METHODS: The Vejle Diabetes Biobank was established from 2007 to 2010 as a regional Biobank containing blood, DNA, and urine samples from patients with diabetes and a gender- and age-matched control population aged 25-75 years...... individuals and 3,320 patients with diabetes were included. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients had a higher body mass index (30 kg/m(2)) than type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (25 and 26 kg/m(2) in women and men, respectively) and control subjects (25 and 27 kg/m(2) in women and men, respectively). Fasting levels...

  17. Telemedical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Jane; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2007-01-01

    Telemedicine allows for remote treatment and access to medical experts no matter where the location of the patient. This enables the monitoring and treatment of conditions like diabetes from one location via video consultations......Telemedicine allows for remote treatment and access to medical experts no matter where the location of the patient. This enables the monitoring and treatment of conditions like diabetes from one location via video consultations...

  18. Juvenile-Onset Diabetes and Congenital Cataract: “Double-Gene” Mutations Mimicking a Syndromic Diabetes Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lenfant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic forms of diabetes may account for 1–5% of all cases of diabetes, and may occur in the context of syndromic presentations. We investigated the case of a girl affected by insulin-dependent diabetes, diagnosed at 6 years old, associated with congenital cataract. Her consanguineous parents and her four other siblings did not have diabetes or cataract, suggesting a recessive syndrome. Using whole exome sequencing of the affected proband, we identified a heterozygous p.R825Q ABCC8 mutation, located at the exact same amino-acid position as the p.R825W recurring diabetes mutation, hence likely responsible for the diabetes condition, and a homozygous p.G71S mutation in CRYBB1, a gene known to be responsible for congenital cataract. Both mutations were predicted to be damaging and were absent or extremely rare in public databases. Unexpectedly, we found that the mother was also homozygous for the CRYBB1 mutation, and both the mother and one unaffected sibling were heterozygous for the ABCC8 mutation, suggesting incomplete penetrance of both mutations. Incomplete penetrance of ABCC8 mutations is well documented, but this is the first report of an incomplete penetrance of a CRYBB1 mutation, manifesting between susceptible subjects (unaffected mother vs. affected child and to some extent within the patient herself, who had distinct cataract severities in both eyes. Our finding illustrates the importance of family studies to unmask the role of confounding factors such as double-gene mutations and incomplete penetrance that may mimic monogenic syndromes including in the case of strongly evocative family structure with consanguinity.

  19. Experimentally-induced learned helplessness in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Elizabeth; Lefaivre, Marie-josée; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether adolescents with type 1 diabetes are more at risk for learned helplessness than their healthy peers. Twenty-three adolescents with diabetes and 25 controls completed a solvable or unsolvable concept formation task. All completed pre- and post-task performance and attribution ratings, and later completed an anagram-solving task to determine if perceived helplessness on the first task would negatively impact performance on the second. Participants in the unsolvable condition solved fewer anagrams; those with diabetes did not show weaker performance than controls. Participants in the solvable condition (diabetes and controls) showed an increase in internal attributions from before the concept formation task to after. In the unsolvable condition, only participants with diabetes made more external attributions for their failure. Contrary to the only other controlled study to use this paradigm in youth with chronic illness, adolescents with diabetes were not more susceptible to learned helplessness.

  20. Diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-07-30

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg.

  1. Hospital Guidelines for Diabetes Management and the Joint Commission-American Diabetes Association Inpatient Diabetes Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Pamela; Scheurer, Danielle; Dake, Andrew W; Hedgpeth, Angela; Hutto, Amy; Colquitt, Caroline; Hermayer, Kathie L

    2016-04-01

    The Joint Commission Advanced Inpatient Diabetes Certification Program is founded on the American Diabetes Association's Clinical Practice Recommendations and is linked to the Joint Commission Standards. Diabetes currently affects 29.1 million people in the USA and another 86 million Americans are estimated to have pre-diabetes. On a daily basis at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Medical Center, there are approximately 130-150 inpatients with a diagnosis of diabetes. The program encompasses all service lines at MUSC. Some important features of the program include: a program champion or champion team, written blood glucose monitoring protocols, staff education in diabetes management, medical record identification of diabetes, a plan coordinating insulin and meal delivery, plans for treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, data collection for incidence of hypoglycemia, and patient education on self-management of diabetes. The major clinical components to develop, implement, and evaluate an inpatient diabetes care program are: I. Program management, II. Delivering or facilitating clinical care, III. Supporting self-management, IV. Clinical information management and V. performance measurement. The standards receive guidance from a Disease-Specific Care Certification Advisory Committee, and the Standards and Survey Procedures Committee of the Joint Commission Board of Commissioners. The Joint Commission-ADA Advanced Inpatient Diabetes Certification represents a clinical program of excellence, improved processes of care, means to enhance contract negotiations with providers, ability to create an environment of teamwork, and heightened communication within the organization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Autoamputation of diabetic toe with dry gangrene: a myth or a fact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Wahbi A

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Al Wahbi Division of Vascular Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Diabetes is associated with various complications and reduced quality of life. Of the many complications, some are life-threatening. Among these, foot complications remain an important concern. The major foot complications include foot ulceration, cellulitis, abscess, wet gangrene, dry gangrene, and necrotizing fasciitis, with different pathophysiological concepts behind each of them. Gangrene occurs due to reduced blood supply in the body tissues that leads to necrosis. This condition may arise because of an injury, infection, or other health conditions, majorly diabetes. Gangrene is classified as dry, wet, and gas gangrene. In case of wet and gas gangrene, surgical amputation is usually performed to prevent the spread of infection to other tissues. In dry gangrene, due to the presence of clear demarcation, autoamputation is preferred in certain parts of the globe. The present review aims to analyze the mode of dry gangrene management in diabetic patients based on previous evidence and plans to highlight various management strategies available for dry gangrene and the advantages/disadvantages of different treatments with special consideration to autoamputation. Keywords: dry gangrene, amputation, surgical amputation, diabetic foot, diabetic toe, foot care

  3. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus: a complication of diabetic neuropathy or a different type of diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis). Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  4. Macroscopic placental changes associated with fetal and maternal events in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karina Marques Salge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The current study sought to identify macroscopic placental changes associated with clinical conditions in women with or without diabetes and their newborns. METHODS: The study population consisted of 62 pregnant women clinically diagnosed with diabetes and 62 healthy women (control group. RESULTS: Among the subjects with diabetes, 43 women (69.3% were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus, 15 had diabetes mellitus I (24.2%, and four had diabetes mellitus II (6.5%. The mean age of the women studied was 28.5 ± 5.71 years, and the mean gestational age of the diabetic women was 38.51 weeks. Of the 62 placentas from diabetic pregnancies, 49 (79% maternal surfaces and 59 (95.2% fetal surfaces showed abnormalities, including calcium and fibrin deposits, placental infarction, hematoma, and fibrosis. A statistical association was found between newborn gender and fetal and maternal placental changes (p = 0.002. The mean weight of the newborns studied was 3,287 ± 563 g for women with diabetes mellitus, 3,205 ± 544 g for those with gestational diabetes mellitus, 3,563 ± 696 g forthose with diabetes mellitus II, and 3,095 ± 451 g forthose with diabetes mellitus I. CONCLUSIONS: Infarction, hematoma, calcification, and fibrin were found on the maternal and fetal placental surfaces in women with diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes and post-term infants had more calcium deposits on the maternal placental surface as compared to those with type I and type II diabetes.

  5. Macrosomia Predictors in Infants Born to Cuban Mothers with Gestational Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jeddú; Grandía, Raiden; Padilla, Liset; Rodríguez, Suilbert; Hernández García, Pilar; Lang Prieto, Jacinto; Márquez-Guillén, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Fetal macrosomia is the most important complication in infants of women with diabetes, whether preconceptional or gestational. Its occurrence is related to certain maternal and fetal conditions and negatively affects maternal and perinatal outcomes. The definitive diagnosis is made at birth if a newborn weighs >4000 g. OBJECTIVE Identify which maternal and fetal conditions could be macrosomia predictors in infants born to Cuban mothers with gestational diabetes. METHODS A case-control study comprising 236 women with gestational diabetes who bore live infants (118 with macrosomia and 118 without) was conducted in the América Arias University Maternity Hospital, Havana, Cuba, during 2002-2012. The dependent variable was macrosomia (birth weight >4000 g). Independent maternal variables included body mass index at pregnancy onset, overweight or obesity at pregnancy onset, gestational age at diabetes diagnosis, pregnancy weight gain, glycemic control, triglycerides and cholesterol. Fetal variables examined included third-semester fetal abdominal circumference, estimated fetal weight at ≥28 weeks (absolute and percentilized by Campbell and Wilkin, and Usher and McLean curves). Chi square was used to compare continuous variables (proportions) and the student t test (X ± SD) for categorical variables, with significance threshold set at p gestational diabetes diagnosis, total fasting cholesterol and hypercholesterolemia. The highest OR for macrosomia were for maternal hypertriglyceridemia (OR 4.80, CI 2.34-9.84), third-trimester fetal abdominal circumference >75th percentile (OR 7.54, CI 4.04-14.06), and estimated fetal weight >90th percentile by Campbell and Wilkin curves (OR 4.75, CI 1.42-15.84) and by Usher and McLean curves (OR 8.81, CI 4.25-18.26). CONCLUSIONS Most variables assessed were predictors of macrosomia in infants of mothers with gestational diabetes. They should therefore be taken into account for future studies and for patient management

  6. Arterial diseases of lower extremities in diabetic patients: current state and prospects of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery diseases (PAD are most serious diabetic complications responsible for the high risk of amputation of lower extremities. The occurrenceof PAD in diabetic patients is much higher than in subjects with undisturbed carbohydrate metabolism. PAD in diabetic patients is frequentlyan asymptomatic condition affecting distal portions of arterial segments and associated with pronounced mediacalcinosis. Standard diagnostic proceduresfor the screening of arterial lesions must be supplemented by non-invasive visualization and measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tensionin patients at risk of PAD and persisting foot ulcers. Of special importance is early diagnosis of critical limb ischemia and prevention of foot lesions.Combined treatment of diabetic foot syndrome in patients with critical limb ischemia includes normalization of foot circulation, surgical interventionand conservative therapy of the wound, monitoring concomitant micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications?

  7. Association of hypertension and diastolic dysfunction with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, S.M.S.; Basir, F.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of hypertension and diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) with normal ejection fraction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. Two hundred twelve diabetic patients (98 females and 114 males) from January 2005 to June 2006 were enrolled in this study. Their ages ranged from 35 to 65 years with mean age of 55 years. Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type-2, Hypertension: BP/sup 3/140/90 (with or without medication) Body Mass Index/sub 3/30, Waist-Hip ratio>0.90. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction (LVDD) and Serum Triglyceride and HDL Cholesterol were included. Out of 212 patients, 104 (49%) were found to be hypertensive (both systolic and diastolic) and 12 patients (5.6%) were found to be suffering from isolated systolic hypertension. Hence total number of hypertensive patients was 116 (54.6%). Thirty two patients were found to be suffering from diastolic dysfunction. Hypertension and Diabetes are interlinked and show how micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes are increased when two conditions occur together. The LVDD is much more prevalent than previously suggested in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Hence LVDD is an early marker of diabetic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  8. Monitoring of psychological well-being in outpatients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J; Van Der Ploeg, Henk M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether monitoring and discussing psychological well-being in outpatients with diabetes improves mood, glycemic control, and the patient's evaluation of the quality of diabetes care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This study was a randomized controlled trial of 461...... outpatients with diabetes who were randomly assigned to standard care or to the monitoring condition. In the latter group, the diabetes nurse specialist assessed and discussed psychological well-being with the patient (with an interval of 6 months) in addition to standard care. The computerized Well...... nurse. The two groups did not differ for HbA(1c) or in their overall evaluation of the quality of diabetes care. In the monitoring condition, significantly more subjects were referred to the psychologist. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring and discussing psychological well-being as part of routine diabetes...

  9. Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a mom with gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). Being African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander. Having one or more conditions related to insulin resistance. If your child is overweight and has any ...

  10. Knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, F.; Afridi, A.K.; Rahim, F.; Ashfaq, M.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Results: Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 ± 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 ± 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Conclusions: Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus. (author)

  11. KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Fahim; Afridi, Ayesha Khan; Rahim, Fawad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Khan, Sheema; Shabbier, Ghulam; Rahman, Sadiq Ur

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 +/- 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 +/- 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus.

  12. Fasting, Diabetes, and Optimizing Health Outcomes for Ramadan Observers: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Hadi A; Chaar, Betty; Saini, Bandana

    2017-04-01

    Globally, and in Australia, diabetes has become a common chronic health condition. Diabetes is also quite prevalent in culturally and linguistically diverse pockets of the Australian population, including Muslims. There are over 90 million Muslims with diabetes worldwide. Diabetes management and medication use can be affected by religious practices such as fasting during Ramadan. During Ramadan, Muslims refrain from oral or intravenous substances from sunrise to sunset. This may lead to many potential health or medication-related risks for patients with diabetes who observe this religious practice. This literature review aimed to explore (1) health care-related interventions and (2) intentions, perspectives, or needs of health care professionals (HCPs) to provide clinical services to patients with diabetes while fasting during Ramadan with a view to improve health outcomes for those patients. Using a scoping review approach, a comprehensive search was conducted. Databases searched systematically included PubMed, Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Studies published in English that described interventions or intentions to provide interventions regarding diabetes and Ramadan fasting were included. Fourteen published articles that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved and content analyzed. Of those, nine intervention studies regarded diabetes management education. Five studies described professional service intention, four of which were related to the role of pharmacists in diabetes management in Qatar, Australia, and Egypt, and one French study examined the general practitioners' (GPs) experiences in diabetes management for Ramadan observers. The intervention studies had promising outcomes for diabetes management during Ramadan. Effect sizes for improvement in HbA1c post intervention ranged widely from -1.14 to 1.7. Pharmacists appeared to be willing to participate in programs to help fasting patients with diabetes achieve a safe

  13. Mayombian ethnic, vegetables low intake, insulin treatment, diabetic nephropathy and severe diabetic retinopathy are determinants of blindness in diabetic Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Mvitu Muaka; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza; Enoch, Cibanda Yokobo; Igor, Longo Phemba

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency and causes of blindness in diabetic Africans. METHODS The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out among known black diabetics consecutively admitted at the Teaching Hospital, University of Kinshasa, between 2005 and 2007. Examination methods included interviewer-administered structured questionnaire, eye examinations (visual acuity, tonometry, funduscopy), and fasting plasma glycaemia test. RESULTS Of the 227 patients examined, 15.9% had blindness. Univariate analyses showed significant association between female, severity of diabetic retinopathy, Mayombian ethnic group, use of insulin treatment, low intake of vegetables, diabetic nephropathy, open angle glaucoma and blindness in all diabetics. After logistic regression, only diabetic nephropathy, use of insulin treatment, macular oedema, Mayombian ethnic group and vegetables low intake were the independent risk factors of blindness in all diabetics. However, after logistic regression in the sub-group with diabetic retinopathy, only open angle glaucoma and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were the independent determinants of blindness. CONCLUSION The majority of the causes of blindness in these diabetic Africans are avoidable. It is recommended that appropriate diabetes care, nutrition education, periodic eye examination and laser photocoagulation facilities should be provided for treating diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24195057

  14. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  15. Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Aroda, Vanita R; Goldberg, Ronald B; Younes, Naji; Edelstein, Sharon L; Carrion-Petersen, MaryLou; Ehrmann, David A

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear whether relative elevations in androgens or irregular menses (IM) are associated with greater cardiometabolic risk among women who are already overweight and glucose intolerant. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). Participants included women with sex hormone measurements who did not use exogenous estrogen (n = 1422). We examined whether free androgen index (FAI) or IM was associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS or with coronary artery calcification (CAC) at DPPOS year 10. Models were adjusted for menopausal status, age, race or ethnicity, randomization arm, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin A1c. Women had an average age of 48.2 ± 9.9 years. Elevations in FAI and IM were associated with greater BMI, waist circumference, and blood pressure and lower adiponectin. FAI was not associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93 to 1.02] or increased odds of CAC [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.23]. IM was also not associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS (HR 1.07; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.31) or increased odds of CAC (OR 0.89; 95% CI, 0.53 to 1.49). Women who had both relative elevations in FAI and IM had similar diabetes risk and odds of CAC as women without these conditions. Differences by treatment arm and menopausal status were not observed. Among midlife women who were already glucose intolerant and overweight, androgen concentrations and IM did not additionally contribute to increased risk for diabetes or CAC. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  16. Sugar Sweetened Beverage Consumption among Adults with Gout or Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Murphy

    Full Text Available Current guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes and gout recommend that people with these conditions limit their sugar sweetened beverage (SSB intake. We examined self-reported SSB intake among New Zealand adults with gout or type 2 diabetes, including those on hemodialysis.1023 adults with gout and 580 adults (including 206 receiving hemodialysis with type 2 diabetes, participated in this study of between 2009 and 2012. Participants completed an interviewer-administered SSB intake question "how many sugar sweetened drinks (including fruit juice, but not including diet drinks, do you normally drink per day?" SSB consumption was recorded as a circled number 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or >5, cans or large glasses (300 mL per day.Consuming one or more SSB per day was reported by 64% (622/1023 of subjects with gout, 49% (176/374 with type 2 diabetes without dialysis, and 47% (96/206 with diabetes on dialysis. Consuming four or more SSBs per day was reported by 18% (179/1023, 9% (31/374 and 9% (18/206, respectively. Such high consumers of SSB were characterized after multivariable analysis to be more likely to be male (adjusted odds ratio (OR 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.9, younger in age (40 vs 65 years: 1.6; 1.1-2.3, current smoker (5.2; 2.7-10.1, obese (BMI 41 vs 26 kg/m(2: 1.4; 1-1.9, and report Māori (1.8; 1.2-2.8 or Pacific (1.6; 1.1-2.5 ancestry, compared to Caucasian. People with gout were more likely to report heavy SSB intake compared to people with diabetes (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-3.9. Heavy SSB consumption reported by people with diabetes was similar if they did or did not require dialysis.A high proportion of patients with gout and type 2 diabetes, including those on haemodialysis, are not responding to health messages to abstain from SSB consumption.

  17. Diabetes and thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barnard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a significant complication of b-thalassaemia major. The aetiology includes iron overload causing b-cell destruction, autoimmunity, insulin resistance secondary to liver disease and development of type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are specific issues for patients with diabetes and thalassaemia which will be discussed here. Impaired carbohydrate metabolism must be detected early, to allow intensification of iron chelation. As life expectancy in thalassaemia rises, diabetic complications are seen. Optimising blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factor control is essential. Insulin remains critical for severely symptomatic patients. With milder hyperglycaemia, oral antidiabetic drugs are increasingly used. At Whittington Hospital, we wanted to address these issues. In 2005, we developed a unique Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, where patients are reviewed jointly by specialist teams, including Consultant Diabetologist and Haematologist. The Joint Clinic aims to optimise diabetes, endocrine and thalassaemia care, while supporting patient self-management. A retrospective audit of the Joint Clinic (2005-09, showed improvement in glycaemic control, (Fructosamine falling from 344 umol/l to 319 umol/l. We compared our cohort to the National Diabetes Audit for England (2007-08. Patients attending the Joint Clinic achieved better glycaemic control (target reached: 73% Joint Clinic vs. 63% Nationally, blood pressure control (target reached: 58% Joint Clinic vs. 30% Nationally and cholesterol control (target reached: 81% Joint Clinic vs. 78% Nationally. 22.7% of our patients had ≥1 microvascular complication. A significant proportion had endocrinopathies (86% hypogonadism, 23% hypoparathyroidism, 18% hypothyroidism. Managing diabetes is one of the greatest challenges a person with thalassaemia can face. Training people to self-manage their diabetes and providing support from specialist teams working together are critical. The unique partnership

  18. Skin and diabetes mellitus: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quondamatteo, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Although major complications of this condition involve kidney, retina and peripheral nerves, the skin of diabetic patients is also frequently injured. Hence, interest is mounting in the definition of the structural and molecular profile of non-complicated diabetic skin, i.e., before injuries occur. Most of the available knowledge in this area has been obtained relatively recently and, in part, derives from various diabetic animal models. These include both insulin-dependent and insulin-resistant models. Structural work in human diabetic skin has also been carried out by means of tissue samples or of non-invasive methods. Indications have indeed been found for molecular/structural changes in diabetic skin. However, the overall picture that emerges is heterogeneous, incomplete and often contradictory and many questions remain unanswered. This review aims to detail, as much as possible, the various pieces of current knowledge in a systematic and synoptic manner. This should aid the identification of areas in which key questions are still open and more research is needed. A comprehensive understanding of this field could help in determining molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of skin injuries in DM and markers for the monitoring of cutaneous and systemic aspects of the disease. Additionally, with the increasing development of non-invasive optics-based deep-tissue-imaging diagnostic technologies, precise knowledge of cutaneous texture and molecular structure becomes an important pre-requisite for the use of such methods in diabetic patients.

  19. 'I call it the blame and shame disease': a qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Jessica L; Ventura, Adriana; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane

    2013-11-18

    While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (obesity and HIV/AIDS), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. The aim of the current study was to explore the social experiences of Australian adults living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with a particular focus on the perception and experience of diabetes-related stigma. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. This study was conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan and regional areas in the Australian state of Victoria. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes. All adults aged ≥18 years with T2DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Twenty-five adults with T2DM participated (12 women; median age 61 years; median diabetes duration 5 years). A total of 21 (84%) participants indicated that they believed T2DM was stigmatised, or reported evidence of stigmatisation. Specific themes about the experience of stigma were feeling blamed by others for causing their own condition, being subject to negative stereotyping, being discriminated against or having restricted opportunities in life. Other themes focused on sources of stigma, which included the media, healthcare professionals, friends, family and colleagues. Themes relating to the consequences of this stigma were also evident, including participants' unwillingness to disclose their condition to others and psychological distress. Participants believed that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience similar stigmatisation. Our study found evidence of people with T2DM experiencing and perceiving diabetes-related social stigma. Further research is needed to explore ways to measure and minimise diabetes-related stigma at the individual and societal levels, and also to explore perceptions and experiences of stigma in people with

  20. Sleep Behavior and Unemployment Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Antillón, Marina; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Mullahy, John

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has reported that habitually short sleep duration is a risk factor for declining health, including increased risk of obesity, diabetes and coronary heart disease. In this study we investigate whether macroeconomic conditions are associated with variation in mean sleep time in the United States, and if so, whether the effect is procyclical or countercyclical. We merge state unemployment rates from 2003 through 2012 with the American Time Use Survey, a nationally representative ...

  1. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Shinji; Koya, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kume

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Luteolin and fisetin suppress oxidative stress by modulating sirtuins and forkhead box O3a expression under in vitro diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arang; Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2017-10-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress via accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contributes to diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia induces mitochondrial superoxide anion production through the increased activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. This study aimed to determine whether fisetin and luteolin treatments suppress the oxidative stress by modulating the expression of sirtuins (SIRTs) and forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) under hyperglycemic conditions in human monocytes. Human monocytic cells (THP-1) were cultured under osmotic control (14.5 mmol/L mannitol), normoglycemic (NG, 5.5 mmol/L glucose), or hyperglycemic (HG, 20 mmol/L glucose) conditions, in the absence or presence of fisetin and luteolin for 48 h. To determine the effect of fisetin and luteolin treatments on high glucose-induced oxidative stress, western blotting and intracellular staining were performed. Hyperglycemic conditions increased the ROS production, as compared to normoglycemic condition. However, fisetin and luteolin treatments inhibited ROS production under hyperglycemia. To obtain further insight into ROS production in hyperglycemic conditions, evaluation of p47phox expression revealed that fisetin and luteolin treatments inhibited p47phox expression under hyperglycemic conditions. Conversely, the expression levels of SIRT1, SIRT3, SIRT6, and FOXO3a were decreased under high glucose conditions compared to normal glucose conditions, but exposure to fisetin and luteolin induced the expression of SIRT1, SIRT3, SIRT6, and FOXO3a. The above findings suggest that fisetin and luteolin inhibited high glucose-induced ROS production in monocytes through the activation of SIRTs and FOXO3a. The results of our study supports current researches that state fisetin and luteolin as potential agents for the development of novel strategies for diabetes.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so fa...

  5. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L; Kluding, Patricia M

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pathophysiological changes in peripheral and central vestibular structures due to diabetes have been noted. Vestibular dysfunction is associated with impaired balance and a higher risk of falls. As the prevalence of diabetes increases, so does the potential for falls due to diabetic complications. The purpose of this perspective article is to present evidence on the pathophysiology of diabetes-related complications and their influence on balance and falls, with specific attention to emerging evidence of vestibular dysfunction due to diabetes. Understanding this relationship may be useful for screening (by physical therapists) for possible vestibular dysfunction in people with diabetes and for further developing and testing the efficacy of interventions to reduce falls in this population. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  7. Postpartum management of diabetes pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Nazli

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus has assumed the role of an epidemic. Previously considered a disease of affluent developed countries, it has become more common in developing countries. Pakistan is included among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes. In this scenario, postpartum management of a woman with diabetes mellitus becomes more important as in this period counseling and educating a woman is essential. Counselling includes life style modifications to prevent future risks involving all the systems of the body. This review article discusses management of diabetes mellitus in postpartum period, guidelines for postpartum screening of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, risks involved in future life and stresses upon the need of local population based studies. Primary care providers and gynaecologists must realize the importance of postpartum screening for diabetes mellitus and provide relevant information to women as well.

  8. The Danish adult diabetes registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Kristensen, Jette K.; Husted, Gitte Reventlov

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The aim of the Danish Adult Diabetes Registry (DADR) is to provide data from both the primary health care sector (general practice [GP]) and the secondary sector (specialized outpatient clinics) to assess the quality of treatment given to patients with diabetes. The indicators...... represent process and outcome indicators selected from the literature. Study population: The total diabetes population in Denmark is estimated to be ∼300,000 adult diabetes patients. Approximately 10% have type 1 diabetes, which is managed mainly in the secondary sector, and 90% have type 2 diabetes......, glucose-, blood pressure-, and lipid-lowering treatment (yes/no), insulin pump treatment (yes/ no), and date of last eye and foot examination. Descriptive data: In 2014, the annual report included data regarding over 38,000 patients from outpatient clinics, which is assumed to have included almost all...

  9. Diabetic Foot Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes at the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hosseini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Diabetic foot problems are one of the major causes of mortality and disability in diabetic patients. It is considered one of the costliest conditions for health care systems. This study is designed to identify diabetic foot risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus at Kamkar Hospital diabetes clinic in Qom, Iran during 2006.MethodsThis study was performed on 140 diabetes mellitus patients at the Kamkar Hospital diabetic clinic. International working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF guidelines were used for physical exam of diabetic foot in these patients. The physical exam consisted of inspection of foot appearance for deformity, skin keratosis and ulcer, and neurological and arterial pulse exam of the lower extremities of these patients. Patients in this study were divided into four risk groups based on the IWGDF guidelines. ANOVA method was used for analysis and comparison of the results with P<0.05 considered as significant. ResultsMean age of the participants in this study was 52.4±11.2 years old from which 67.1% were female, 37.1% of patients were illiterate, and 10% were active smokers. Mean duration of diabetes in these patients was 8.9 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 29.4± 4.4 and HbA1C was 9.3 ± 1.9. Percentages of the patients with retinopathy and nephropathy were 33.6% and 17.7% respectively. 95% of the patients did not know the correct way of nail clipping, 95.5% were wearing uncomfortable shoes, and 14.3% of patients had history of foot ulcer. None of the them had any education about foot care. Physical examination with monofilament, ankle reflex and vibration perception were defected in 28.6%, 52.5%, and 32.1% of patients respectively. 37.7% of patients had a decreased lower extremity pulse that was not felt by touch. Based on the IWGDF classifications, 70% of the patients were in the higher-risk group for diabetic foot ulcer. In the high risk group, age, duration of diabetes, illiteracy was

  10. Psychological impacts from expectation of worsening conditions and obstacles to life planning are affected by glycemic control, self-reported symptoms, and drug therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hara, Yoriko; Ishihara, Yoko

    2016-05-01

    It is important to reduce psychological stresses for glycemic control in diabetes. We investigated the factors affecting psychological impact, which was involved in the disease conditions in 378 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients' self-assessed symptoms and four subscales of psychological impacts on diabetes - impact from diabetes (S1), anxiety from having a chronic disease (S2), expectation of worsening conditions (S3) and obstacles to life planning (S4) - were analyzed. Significant odds ratios (ORs) were found for sex and age in S1, age and glycemic control in S2, glycemic control in S3, disease duration and glycemic control in S4, and number of symptoms in S1-S4. Scores of S1 and S2 in women were lower than those in men, and decreased age-dependently. Significant ORs for the number of symptoms in S3 and S4 were greater than in S1 and S2. ORs increased markedly for patients under oral hypoglycemic agent therapy in S4 and insulin therapy in S1-S4 when compared with ORs for lifestyle therapy alone. The psychological impact of type 2 diabetes involved a priori factors dependent on sex and aging in the subscales of current anxieties and impact, and a posteriori factors, such as disease duration, glycemic control and treatment methods, in the subscales of expectation of worsening conditions and obstacles to life planning.

  11. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetes Mellitus: A Complication of Diabetic Neuropathy or a Different Type of Diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Hardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis. Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  12. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and end‑stage renal disease respectively in adults of both ... Departments of Medicine, and 1Ophthalmology, Era's Lucknow Medical ... The collected data included age, gender, duration of diabetes and ..... also shown to be effective in preventing DR in individuals .... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema disease severity.

  13. Parameters for measurement of oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus: applicability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiri, Eisei; Tsukahara, Hirokazu

    2005-05-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of diabetes have recently confronted the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemic conditions induces nonenzymatic glycation of protein via the so-called Maillard reaction, resulting in Schiff-base products and Amadori products that engender ROS production. These processes initiate and exacerbate micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. Increased oxidative stress is induced by excessive ROS production and inadequate antioxidant defenses. Recently, oxidative stress status markers have been associated directly with the severity and prognosis of diabetes. To examine oxidative stress, reliable and high-throughput methods are needed to examine large numbers of clinical samples. The emerging availability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for oxidative stress status markers allows its application to assessment of various pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes. This review outlines the recent achievements of ELISA application for clinical studies elucidating oxidative stress. It introduces the potential applicability of ELISA for investigating oxidative stress in diabetes.

  14. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism - is brain glycogen a significant player?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the br......Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose...... to the brain may be affected and have important impacts on brain metabolism and neurotransmission. This also implies that brain glycogen may serve an essential role in the diabetic state to sustain appropriate brain function. There are two main types of diabetes; type 1 and type 2 diabetes and both types may...... understanding of how brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism is affected in diabetes. There will be a particular focus on the role of brain glycogen to support glycolytic and TCA cycle activity as well as glutamate-glutamine cycle in type 1 and type 2 diabetes....

  15. Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esteem. Sometimes medication is an option as well. Metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, others), an oral diabetes medication, may ... Conditions and Terms Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the ...

  16. Curcumin Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yu, Jinqiang; Ke, Feng; Lan, Mei; Li, Dekun; Tan, Ke; Ling, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kaili; Li, Dai

    2018-03-29

    To investigate the potential protective effects of curcumin on the retina in diabetic rats. An experimental diabetic rat model was induced by a low dose of streptozotocin combined with a high-energy diet. Rats which had blood glucose levels ≥11.6 mmol/L were used as diabetic rats. The diabetic rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: diabetic rats with no treatment (DM), diabetic rats treated with 100 mg/kg curcumin (DM + Cur 100 mg/kg), and diabetic rats treated with 200 mg/kg curcumin (DM + Cur 200 mg/kg). Curcumin was orally administered daily for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks of administration, the rats were euthanized, and eyes were dissected. Retinal histology was examined, and the thickness of the retina was measured. Ultrastructural changes of retinal ganglion cells, inner layer cells, retinal capillary, and membranous disks were observed by electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and total antioxidant capacity were measured by ELISA. Expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retina tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and ELISA. Expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 in retina tissues were determined by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Curcumin reduced the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats and decreased diabetes-induced body weight loss. Curcumin prevented attenuation of the retina in diabetic rats and ameliorated diabetes-induced ultrastructure changes of the retina, including thinning of the retina, apoptosis of the retinal ganglion cells and inner nuclear layer cells, thickening of retinal capillary basement membrane and disturbance of photoreceptor cell membranous disks. We also found that curcumin has a strong antioxidative ability in the retina of diabetic rats. It was observed that curcumin attenuated the expression of VEGF in the retina of diabetic rats. We also discovered that curcumin had an antiapoptotic effect by upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 and downregulating

  17. Novel biomarkers for prediabetes, diabetes, and associated complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcely B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brenda Dorcely,1 Karin Katz,1 Ram Jagannathan,2 Stephanie S Chiang,1 Babajide Oluwadare,1 Ira J Goldberg,1 Michael Bergman1 1New York University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, 2Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: The number of individuals with prediabetes is expected to grow substantially and estimated to globally affect 482 million people by 2040. Therefore, effective methods for diagnosing prediabetes will be required to reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes and its complications. The current biomarkers, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fructosamine, and glycated albumin have limitations including moderate sensitivity and specificity and are inaccurate in certain clinical conditions. Therefore, identification of additional biomarkers is being explored recogni­zing that any single biomarker will also likely have inherent limitations. Therefore, combining several biomarkers may more precisely identify those at high risk for developing prediabetes and subsequent progression to diabetes. This review describes recently identified biomarkers and their potential utility for addressing the burgeoning epidemic of dysglycemic disorders. Keywords: prediabetes, biomarkers, inflammatory markers, diabetes, diabetes complications

  18. Demographic, medical and visual aspects of Dia- betic Retinopathy (DR and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME in South African diabetic patients*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Y. Sukha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate some of the demographic, medical, and visual aspects of diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic macula edema (DME in diabetics attending an urban clinic in Johannesburg, Gauteng. Design: In this cross-sectional study, 202 diabetic patients were recruited. Demographic variables included age, gender, race, age of diagnosis, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM, and social habits. Medical variables included systemic conditions present, blood pressures, body mass indices (BMI, lipid profiles, glycerated haemoglobin (HbA1c, and other biochemical data. Visual variables included distance, pinhole and near visual acuities, contrast visual acuities (CVA, refractive status, colour vision, central visual field evaluation with the Amsler grid, intraocular pressures (IOP, fundus photography and administration of the Impact of Visual Impairment (IVI questionnaire. All variables were compared between diabetic subjects with and with-out DR and DME in both right and left eyes. Results: Overall prevalence of DR was 22.8% and DME 12.5%. In DR subjects, significant results indicated that Whites were more likely to present with DR (p = 0.002. Subjects with DR had a higher mean duration of DM (p = 0.002 and a higher mean diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.035. Autorefraction suggested that more myopia and less astigmatism might be associated with DR. A higher mean CVA at the 2.5% level in DR was significant in both the right eyes (p = 0.042 and left eyes (p = 0.035. These subjects also reported a higher mean IVI score in the consumer and social interaction domain (p = 0.032. Similarly, DME subjects displayed a higher mean duration of DM (p = 0.042 and a higher mean diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.048. A higher mean CVA was associated at both the 10% level: right eyes (p = 0.021; and left eyes (p = 0.046, and at the 2.5% level: right eyes (p = 0.033 and left eyes (p = 0.045. A higher mean IVI score in leisure and work (p = 0.026, consumer and social

  19. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Katie L.; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D. PMID:22947656

  20. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammati...

  1. Dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanjani Shirazi, Azam; Nasiri, Morteza; Yazdanpanah, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DFS) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), which early effective assessment can reduce the severity of complications including ulceration and amputations. This study aimed to review dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot. In this review article, we searched for articles published between March 1, 1980 and July 28, 2015 in PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus, for both English and non-English language articles with the following keywords: "Diabetic foot syndrome", "Ulceration", "Amputation", "Foot assessment", "Skin disorders" and "Musculoskeletal deformities". In dermatological dimension, most studies focused on elucidated changes in skin temperature, color, hardiness and turgor as well as common skin disorders such as Diabetic Dermopathy (DD), Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) and Diabetic Bullae (DB), which are common in diabetic patients and have high potential for leading to limb-threatening problems such as ulceration and infection. In musculoskeletal dimension, most studies focused on range of motion and muscle strength, gait patterns and as well as foot deformities especially Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA), which is the most destructive musculoskeletal complication of diabetes. DFS as a common condition in DM patients lead to ulceration and lower limb amputation frequently unless a prompt and comprehensive assessment was taken. So that dermatological and musculoskeletal assessments are usually neglected in primary health care, these assessments should be done frequently to reduce the high risk of serious complications. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The "Face" of Diabetes: Insight Into Youths' Experiences as Expressed Through Drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elertson, Kathleen M; Liesch, Shari K; Babler, Elizabeth K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to assess the ability of youth to create a meaningful drawing related to living with type 1 diabetes and explore the benefits of expressing emotion through drawing in future interventional work. Youth aged 4 to 19 years (N = 242) with type I diabetes attending routine follow-up appointments within a pediatric specialty clinic were asked to draw: "If diabetes had a face what would it look like?" Drawings reflected many emotions and ranged from simple to complex in detail. Drawings reflected multiple experiences of living with diabetes including emotions, tools used for management, and effects of self-care. Youth were able to create drawings reflecting their experience of living with diabetes. Youth conveyed a variety of emotions, attitudes, and experiences in drawing the "face" of diabetes. Drawing during clinic visits provides opportunity to explore the unspoken experiences of living with a chronic health condition, which may not be obtained during routine clinical information gathering. Deeper understanding of patient's lived experience may assist providers in therapeutic management.

  3. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... on March 22, 1995) UTI Urinary tract infection I. Background Title XIX of the Social Security Act... Diabetes with Hyperosmolarity. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). Vascular Catheter... for State Health Policy, the National Association of Children's Hospitals, the Joint Commission, and...

  4. Enhanced Healing of Diabetic Wounds by Subcutaneous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Derived Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Chandrama; Zhao, Liling; Chen, Ke; He, Honghui; Mo, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from the umbilical cord and their conditioned media (CM) can be easily obtained and refined compared with stem cells from other sources. Here, we explore the possibility of the benefits of these cells in healing diabetic wounds. Methodology and Results. Delayed wound healing animal models were established by making a standard wound on the dorsum of eighteen db/db mice, which were divided into three groups with six mice in each: groups I, II, and III received PBS, UC-MSC, and CM, respectively. UC-MSC and their CM significantly accelerated wound closure compared to PBS-treated wounds, and it was most rapid in CM-injected wounds. In day-14 wounds, significant difference in capillary densities among the three groups was noted (n = 6; P UC-MSC-injected wounds compared to the PBS-treated wounds were seen. The expression levels of PDGF-β and KGF were higher in CM-treated wounds than those in UC-MSC-treated wounds. Conclusion. Both the transplantation of UC-MSC and their CM are beneficial to diabetic wound healing, and CM has been shown to be therapeutically better than UC-MSC, at least in the context of diabetic wound healing. PMID:24089612

  5. Relationship Between Resilience and Quality of Life in Diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, A.; Malik, J. A.; Batool, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between resilience and quality of life of diabetes patients controlling the effect of personal level (i.e., gender, age, and income) and disease-specific (i.e., duration of disease, and current glucose level) demographics. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Outpatient Departments of various hospitals in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, from October to November 2012. Methodology: Patients diagnosed with diabetes taking treatment in an outdoor patients facility were included. Patients with a major diabetes complications causing or coexistent with a physical disability, medical condition or psychiatric comorbidity were excluded. Informed consent was taken from patients before administration of questionnaires. The patients were asked to respond to a demographic sheet, State-Trait resilience inventory, and WHO-Quality of Life BREF. Statistical testing was conducting using bivariate correlation, Mann-Whitney U-test, and multiple linear regression analysis for moderation testing. Results: There were 242 patients including (n=108, 44% females; and n=134, 56% males) aged 17 - 85 years with mean of 44.56 +- 16.56 years. Trait resilience predicted all aspects of quality of life of diabetic patients (b range = 0.30 to 0.42, p < .01) and explained 17% variance in physical functioning, 29% in psychological functioning, 17% in environmental functioning, 30% in social dimension, and 29% in overall quality of life. Duration of diabetes moderated effect of state resilience on all aspects of quality of life (b interaction range = 0.20 to 0.26, p < .05) and explained an additional 4% variance in physical functioning, 5% in psychological functioning, 3% in environmental functioning, 5% in social dimension, and 4% in overall quality of life of diabetics. Conclusion: Trait resilience has unconditional positive effect on all aspect of quality of life. Long standing diabetics may benefit from intervention addressing state

  6. Diabetes Care in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis; González-Rivas, Juan P; Lima-Martínez, Marcos; Stepenka, Victoria; Rísquez, Alejandro; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its economic burden have increased in Venezuela, posing difficult challenges in a country already in great turmoil. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence, causes, prevention, management, health policies, and challenges for successful management of diabetes and its complications in Venezuela. A comprehensive literature review spanning 1960 to 2015 was performed. Literature not indexed also was reviewed. The weighted prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was estimated from published regional and subnational population-based studies. Diabetes care strategies were analyzed. In Venezuela, the weighted prevalence of diabetes was 7.7% and prediabetes was 11.2%. Diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death (7.1%) in 2012 with the mortality rate increasing 7% per year from 1990 to 2012. In 2012, cardiovascular disease and diabetes together were the leading cause of disability-adjusted life years.T2D drivers are genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle, including unhealthy dietary patterns and physical inactivity. Obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome are present at lower cutoffs for body mass index, homeostatic model assessment, and visceral or ectopic fat, respectively. Institutional programs for early detection and/or prevention of T2D have not been established. Most patients with diabetes (∼87%) are cared for in public facilities in a fragmented health system. Local clinical practice guidelines are available, but implementation is suboptimal and supporting information is limited. Strategies to improve diabetes care in Venezuela include enhancing resources, reducing costs, improving education, implementing screening (using Latin America Finnish Diabetes Risk Score), promoting diabetes care units, avoiding insulin levels as diagnostic tool, correct use of oral glucose tolerance testing and metformin as first-line T2D treatment, and reducing health system fragmentation. Use of the Venezuelan adaptation of

  7. Protein O-GlcNAcylation in diabetes and diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W

    2013-08-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is highly ubiquitous, dynamic and inducible. Protein O-GlcNAcylation serves as a key regulator of critical biological processes including transcription, translation, proteasomal degradation, signal transduction and apoptosis. Increased O-GlcNAcylation is directly linked to insulin resistance and to hyperglycemia-induced glucose toxicity, two hallmarks of diabetes and diabetic complications. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about protein O-GlcNAcylation and nutrient metabolism, as well as discuss the commonly used tools to probe changes of O-GlcNAcylation in cultured cells and in animal models. We then focus on some key proteins modified by O-GlcNAc, which play crucial roles in the etiology and progression of diabetes and diabetic complications. Proteomic approaches are also highlighted to provide a system view of protein O-GlcNAcylation. Finally, we discuss how aberrant O-GlcNAcylation on certain proteins may be exploited to develop methods for the early diagnosis of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes.

  8. Restoration of autophagy in endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus improves nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Flint, Nir; Feng, Bihua; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Duess, Mai-Ann; Farb, Melissa G; Gokce, Noyan; Shirihai, Orian S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Autophagy is a multistep mechanism for the removal of damaged proteins and organelles from the cell. Under diabetic conditions, inadequate autophagy promotes cellular dysfunction and insulin resistance in non-vascular tissue. We hypothesized that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. We measured autophagy markers and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in freshly isolated endothelial cells from diabetic subjects (n = 45) and non-diabetic controls (n = 41). p62 levels were higher in cells from diabetics (34.2 ± 3.6 vs. 20.0 ± 1.6, P = 0.001), indicating reduced autophagic flux. Bafilomycin inhibited insulin-induced activation of eNOS (64.7 ± 22% to -47.8 ± 8%, P = 0.04) in cells from controls, confirming that intact autophagy is necessary for eNOS signaling. In endothelial cells from diabetics, activation of autophagy with spermidine restored eNOS activation, suggesting that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction (P = 0.01). Indicators of autophagy initiation including the number of LC3-bound puncta and beclin 1 expression were similar in diabetics and controls, whereas an autophagy terminal phase indicator, the lysosomal protein Lamp2a, was higher in diabetics. In endothelial cells under diabetic conditions, the beneficial effect of spermidine on eNOS activation was blocked by autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine. Blocking the terminal stage of autophagy with bafilomycin increased p62 (P = 0.01) in cells from diabetics to a lesser extent than in cells from controls (P = 0.04), suggesting ongoing, but inadequate autophagic clearance. Inadequate autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes and may be a target for therapy of diabetic vascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficient conditioned pain modulation despite pain persistence in painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Yelena; Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Khamaisi, Mogher; Granot, Michal

    2017-05-01

    Alleviation of pain, by either medical or surgical therapy, is accompanied by transition from less efficient, or pro-nociceptive, to efficient conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Spontaneous decrease or resolution of pain with disease progression is reported for some patients with painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). To explore whether CPM changes similarly in parallel to spontaneous resolution of pain in PDN patients. In this cross-sectional study, thirty-three patients with PDN underwent psychophysical assessment of pain modulation on the forearm, remote from the clinical pain. Pain duration was not correlated with neuropathic pain intensity, yet, it correlated with CPM efficiency; patients with longer pain duration had same pain level, but more efficient CPM than those with short-pain duration (ρ = -0.417; P = 0.025, Spearman correlation). Patients with pain more than 2 years (median split) expressed efficient CPM that was not different from that of healthy controls. These patients also had lower temporal summation of pain than the short-pain duration patients group ( P < 0.05). The 2 patient groups did not differ in clinical pain characteristics or use of analgesics. Pro-nociception, expressed by less efficient CPM and high temporal summation that usually accompanies clinical painful conditions, seems to "normalize" with chronicity of the pain syndrome. This is despite continuing pain, suggesting that pro-nociceptivity in pain syndromes is multifactorial. Because the pain modulation profile affects success of therapy, this suggests that different drugs might express different efficacy pending on duration of the pain in patients with PDN.

  10. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L; Crandall, Jill P; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Hamman, Richard F; Montez, Maria G; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    The study objectives were to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopause status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. The study population included women in premenopause (n = 708), women in natural postmenopause (n = 328), and women with bilateral oophorectomy (n = 201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose-intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy use. After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of hormone therapy use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.63-2.64) or placebo arms (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.74-2.55). Among women at high risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with a decreased diabetes risk.

  11. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclara Michel-Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective: To determine the variability of heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods: The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results: In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD, and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50. In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions: There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  12. 'I'm not a druggie, I'm just a diabetic': a qualitative study of stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Jessica L; Ventura, Adriana; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane

    2014-07-23

    While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (eg, HIV/AIDS, obesity), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. Our aim was to explore perceptions and experiences of diabetes-related stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. All interviews were conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan areas of Victoria, Australia. Adults aged ≥18 years with T1DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes. A total of 27 adults with T1DM took part: 15 (56%) were women; median IQR age was 42 (23) years and diabetes duration was 15 (20) years). Australian adults with T1DM perceive and experience T1DM-specific stigma as well as stigma-by-association with type 2 diabetes. Such stigma is characterised by blame, negative social judgement, stereotyping, exclusion, rejection and discrimination. Participants identified the media, family and friends, healthcare professionals and school teachers as sources of stigma. The negative consequences of this stigma span numerous life domains, including impact on relationships and social identity, emotional well-being and behavioural management of T1DM. This stigma also led to reluctance to disclose the condition in various environments. Adults with T1DM can be both the target and the source of diabetes-related stigma. Stigmatisation is part of the social experience of living with T1DM for Australian adults. Strategies and interventions to address and mitigate this diabetes-related stigma need to be developed and evaluated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Evaluation of Cognitive Functions in Iranian Children and Adolescents With Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabbasi, Ata; Tehrani-Doost, Mehdi; Ebrahimi Qavam, Soqra; Farzami, Jalal; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes in children and adolescents is a chronic condition with an expanding trend in the community. Several studies have shown cognitive dysfunctions are the most important side effects of diabetes among individuals of younger ages. Due to cultural differences and their impact on cognitive issues, the authors decided to assess the cognitive functions of Iranian children and adolescents with diabetes. Cognitive functions including memory, attention and executive functions were evaluated in 62 diabetic children and adolescents and healthy peers using CANTAB cognitive tests. Other data such as demographic, school performance and medical information were collected by questionnaires. Except in the case of few variables in RVP, SSP and SST, no significant difference exists between diabetic children and the control group in terms of different cognitive domains. But cognitive variables, especially in PRM, SWM and SOC test, has been shown to be deteriorated with increasing HbA1C values in serum levels. Diabetes has no impact on the cognitive functioning of children provided by maintaining a glycemic control. It is proposed that the adoption of appropriate parenting styles and family and social support can prevent cognitive changes in children with diabetes.

  14. Evaluation of Cognitive Functions in Iranian Children and Adolescents With Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Pourabbasi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes in children and adolescents is a chronic condition with an expanding trend in the community. Several studies have shown cognitive dysfunctions are the most important side effects of diabetes among individuals of younger ages. Due to cultural differences and their impact on cognitive issues, the authors decided to assess the cognitive functions of Iranian children and adolescents with diabetes. Cognitive functions including memory, attention and executive functions were evaluated in 62 diabetic children and adolescents and healthy peers using CANTAB cognitive tests. Other data such as demographic, school performance and medical information were collected by questionnaires. Except in the case of few variables in RVP, SSP and SST, no significant difference exists between diabetic children and the control group in terms of different cognitive domains. But cognitive variables, especially in PRM, SWM and SOC test, has been shown to be deteriorated with increasing HbA1C values in serum levels. Diabetes has no impact on the cognitive functioning of children provided by maintaining a glycemic control. It is proposed that the adoption of appropriate parenting styles and family and social support can prevent cognitive changes in children with diabetes.

  15. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... 1995 (Pub. L. 104-04, enacted on March 22, 1995) UTI Urinary tract infection I. Background Title XIX of.... + Secondary Diabetes with Hyperosmolarity. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). Vascular... of Children's Hospitals, the Joint Commission, and State Medicaid Medical Directors. Most of these...

  16. Brazil's staple food and incident diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria Luiza Garcia; Falcão, Paula M; Yokoo, Edna Massae; da Cruz Filho, Rubens Antunes; Alcoforado, Veronica Miranda; de Souza, Barbara da Silva Nalin; Pinto, Fernanda Neves; Nery, Aline Barreto

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Brazil's staple food, rice, beans and manioc, and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) in adults assisted by a Brazilian Family Doctor Program (FDP). The baseline information was collected on visits to 13 units of the FDP from July 2006 to December 2007 (CAMELIA Study). The units were revisited by trained researchers between July and December 2011, who reviewed medical records of all participants of the baseline. Biochemical, anthropometrical and blood pressure measurements, new diagnoses, and medical prescriptions were collected. Individuals ages ≥20 y, who were non-diabetic at baseline were included (N = 409). Food consumption was estimated using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Incident of diabetes was classified according to fasting serum glucose (≥126 mg/dL), individual's use of antidiabetic drugs, and/or diagnosis of diabetes described in the medical record. Individuals who were negative at baseline and also were negative for the above conditions were classified as non-diabetics. Individuals who developed T2DM (N = 30) reported higher consumption of red meat and beans and less consumption of cassava flour, independent of the interval between visits and other potential confounding variables. The cassava flour showed a protective effect (relative risk, 0.910; 95% confidence interval, 0.842-0.982). The consumption of cassava flour, a low-cost product, could be considered in diets for the prevention and control of diabetes. The hypothesis must be investigated in cohorts from different populations and tested in randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetes technology: improving care, improving patient-reported outcomes and preventing complications in young people with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, P; Tanenbaum, M; Hood, K; Maahs, D M

    2018-04-01

    With the evolution of diabetes technology, those living with Type 1 diabetes are given a wider arsenal of tools with which to achieve glycaemic control and improve patient-reported outcomes. Furthermore, the use of these technologies may help reduce the risk of acute complications, such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as long-term macro- and microvascular complications. In addition, diabetes technology can have a beneficial impact on psychosocial health by reducing the burden of diabetes. Unfortunately, diabetes goals are often unmet and people with Type 1 diabetes too frequently experience acute and long-term complications of this condition, in addition to often having less than ideal psychosocial outcomes. Increasing realization of the importance of patient-reported outcomes is leading to diabetes care delivery becoming more patient-centred. Diabetes technology in the form of medical devices, digital health and big data analytics have the potential to improve clinical care and psychosocial support, resulting in lower rates of acute and chronic complications, decreased burden of diabetes care, and improved quality of life. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment patterns in U.S. nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowitz, Barbara; Allen, Carrie; O'Shea, Terrence; Dalal, Mehul R; Haumschild, Mark; DiGenio, Andres

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes) in nursing home residents (NHRs) is increasing, concurrently with obesity and other comorbid conditions. NHR would benefit greatly from antidiabetic medications that would improve glycemic control and give a lower risk of hypoglycemia but that do not contribute to weight gain in obese individuals. To examine the prescription patterns to NHRs with diabetes, including the use of newer injectable therapies such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. Treatment patterns of diabetes in NHR were analyzed using Minimum Data Set records and prescription claims from the Omnicare Senior Health Outcomes data repository (May 2011-September 2012). The prevalence of diabetes in this population of 229,283 NHRs was 35.4%. Among the 44,665 NHRs with diabetes and prescription claims data, the prevalence of obesity (40.3%) and multiple comorbidities (100%) was high. Approximately 20% of the NHRs with diabetes were aged diabetes that was untreated with medications during the study period. Insulin was the mainstay of treatment (>80%), followed by oral agents (54%). GLP-1 receptor agonist use was low (0.5%) and associated with poor treatment persistence. Considerations other than glycemic control may drive prescribing decisions, contrary to recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, American Medical Directors Association, and European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

  19. Predictors of low diabetes risk perception in a multi-ethnic cohort of women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, G; Kainth, S; Pendrith, C; Lowe, J; Feig, D S; Banerjee, A T; Wu, W; Lipscombe, L L

    2016-10-01

    To determine what proportion of women with gestational diabetes underestimate their diabetes risk and identify factors associated with low diabetes risk perception. Participants included pregnant adult women with gestational diabetes between 2009 and 2012 across seven diabetes clinics in Ontario, Canada. Data were collected through chart review and a survey that included a diabetes risk perception question. Of the 614 of 902 women (68% response rate) with gestational diabetes, 89% correctly responded that gestational diabetes increases the risk for developing diabetes. However, 47.1% of women perceived themselves to be at low risk for developing diabetes within 10 years. On multivariable analysis, BMI gestational diabetes history, absent diabetes family history and absent insulin use were appropriately associated with low diabetes risk perception. However, compared with Caucasian ethnicity, high-risk ethnicity (Aboriginal, Latin American, West Indian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, Filipino, Black, Pacific Islander) [odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95% CI 1.30-3.31] and East and South East Asian ethnicity (OR 2.01; 1.10-3.67) were associated with low diabetes risk perception. After further adjustment for immigration, only high-risk ethnicity remained a predictor of low diabetes risk perception (OR 1.86; 1.09-3.19), whereas East and South East Asian ethnicity did not (OR 1.67; 0.86-3.22). Although the majority of women recognized gestational diabetes as a risk factor for diabetes, almost half underestimated their personal high diabetes risk despite prenatal care. Furthermore, women from high-risk ethnic groups were more likely to underestimate their risk, even after adjusting for immigration. Interventions tailored to these groups are necessary to enhance perceived diabetes risk. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  20. Diabetes screening in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Risikostratificering af patienter med diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Peter; Glintborg, Dorte; Andries, Alin

    2008-01-01

    with diabetes mellitus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included patients with diabetes from the catchment areas of four diabetes out-patient clinics in southern Denmark. Patients were risk-stratified to 3 follow-up levels (level 1 - follow-up only by their GP, level 2 - intensified follow-up by GP and/or shared care...... schemes, level 3 - follow-up only in out-patient clinics). The results were subsequently compared with the patients' actual follow-up status. RESULTS: A total of 647 patients (563 type 2 diabetes and 84 type 1 diabetes) were included from 15 GPs. Among these, 139 were stratified to level 1, 409 to level 2...

  2. Exercise prescription for patients with type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes: a position statement from Exercise and Sport Science Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Matthew D; Dunstan, David W; Prins, Johannes B; Baker, Michael K; Singh, Maria A Fiatarone; Coombes, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetic conditions such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are rapidly increasing in prevalence. There is compelling evidence that T2DM is more likely to develop in individuals who are insufficiently active. Exercise training, often in combination with other lifestyle strategies, has beneficial effects on preventing the onset of T2DM and improving glycaemic control in those with pre-diabetes. In addition, exercise training improves cardiovascular risk profile, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness, all strongly related to better health outcomes. Based on the evidence, it is recommended that patients with T2DM or pre-diabetes accumulate a minimum of 210 min per week of moderate-intensity exercise or 125 min per week of vigorous intensity exercise with no more than two consecutive days without training. Vigorous intensity exercise is more time efficient and may also result in greater benefits in appropriate individuals with consideration of complications and contraindications. It is further recommended that two or more resistance training sessions per week (2-4 sets of 8-10 repetitions) should be included in the total 210 or 125 min of moderate or vigorous exercise, respectively. It is also recommended that, due to the high prevalence and incidence of comorbid conditions in patients with T2DM, exercise training programs should be written and delivered by individuals with appropriate qualifications and experience to recognise and accommodate comorbidities and complications. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiglycation activity of thiamin-HCl and benfotiamine in diabetic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousar, Samina; Sheikh, Munir Ahmad; Asghar, Muhammad

    2012-10-01

    To observe the antiglycation effect of water-soluble vitamin, thiamin-hydrochloride (B1) and its fat-soluble derivative benfotiamine and their comparison with two different glycation assays in diabetics. Plasma of both the normal's and diabetic persons was taken for this experimental study which was conducted in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad in 2008. Varying concentrations of both the glycation inhibitors and glucose were incubated for 5 weeks at 37 degrees C. Thiobarbituric acid and periodate borohydride assays were used to measure the antiglycation activity. The increase in glycation was observed from 1st to 3rd week of incubation, while it decreased after the 5th week due to the formation of advanced glycation end products. It was observed that 10mM concentration of benfotiamine and 5mM and 1mM concentrations of thiamine-hydrochloride produced fairly good response to decreased glycation. Comparison between two assays proved periodate borohydride to be more reliable and sensitive than thiobarbituric acid.

  4. Associations of sex hormone-binding globulin and testosterone with diabetes among men and women (the Saku Diabetes study: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels and sex hormones have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. As fatty liver has been suggested to be a major determinant of SHBG levels, we examined whether the associations of SHBG and testosterone with diabetes were independent of fatty liver. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 300 diabetes cases (215 men and 85 women and 300 matched controls from the Saku cohort study. Diabetes was defined by either fasting plasma glucose levels ≥126 mg/dL, 2-h post-load glucose levels ≥200 mg/dL after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, or diabetes diagnosed by physicians. We fitted conditional logistic regression models to examine the associations between SHBG and total testosterone levels with diabetes by sex. To evaluate the impact of fatty liver, we used the fatty liver index (FLI, a validated measure derived from serum triglyceride levels, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, and γ-glutamyltransferase levels. Results After adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity, BMI, and FLI, SHBG levels were inversely associated with diabetes among women (odds ratio [OR] comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles, 0.13 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.02–0.96], but not among men. Similar patterns were observed in a subgroup analysis restricted to postmenopausal women"(OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01–1.17]. In contrast, testosterone levels were inversely associated with diabetes among men (OR, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.23–0.89], but not among women. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SHBG in women and testosterone in men may be inversely associated with diabetes.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-11-14

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so far. In contrast to the management of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, the endocrinopathy in type 3c is very complex. The course of the disease is complicated by additional present comorbidities such as maldigestion and concomitant qualitative malnutrition. General awareness that patients with known and/or clinically overt chronic pancreatitis will develop type 3c diabetes mellitus (up to 90% of all cases) is rather good. However, in a patient first presenting with diabetes mellitus, chronic pancreatitis as a potential causative condition is seldom considered. Thus many patients are misdiagnosed. The failure to correctly diagnose type 3 diabetes mellitus leads to a failure to implement an appropriate medical therapy. In patients with type 3c diabetes mellitus treating exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, preventing or treating a lack of fat-soluble vitamins (especially vitamin D) and restoring impaired fat hydrolysis and incretin secretion are key-features of medical therapy.

  6. Diabetes stigma is associated with negative treatment appraisals among adults with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, E.; Browne, J. L.; Ventura, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 456 adults with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes (38% women; mean ± sd age: 61.2 ± 8.8 years; diabetes duration: 14.5 ± 7.5 years; years using insulin: 6.4 ± 5.5). Participants completed validated measures of perceived and experienced......, BMI, years using insulin, injections per day), self-efficacy, diabetes-specific distress and diabetes stigma (all P diabetes......Aim: To explore factors associated with negative insulin appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes, including perceived and experienced diabetes stigma. Methods: The second Diabetes MILES - Australia study (MILES-2) is a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural...

  7. Diabetes in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khue, Nguyen Thy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence for diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes in Vietnam are low relative to other parts of the world, but they are increasing at alarming rates. These changes have occurred in the setting of economic and cultural transitions. The aim of this study was to provide relevant information depicting the diabetes burden in Vietnam. Literature was reviewed using PubMed and local Vietnamese sources, including papers published in the Vietnamese language. In 2012, the prevalence of diabetes was 5.4% and prediabetes 13.7%. In 2005, the prevalence of obesity was 1.7%. There is a dual burden of over- and undernutrition observed in Vietnam. Diabetes is associated with an increased waist-to-hip ratio despite normal body mass index. Nutritional transitions occurred with increased protein, fat, and fast foods, and with decreased fresh fruits and vegetables. Tobacco use is very high in Vietnam with 66% of adult men currently smoking. Challenges include endocrinology training, health care coverage, patient education, and lack of coordination among government and specialist agencies. Diabetes is a growing problem in Vietnam and is associated with obesity, changes in dietary patterns, and other cultural transitions. More research is needed to better understand this health care problem and to devise targeted interventions. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Connection Between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea-Călin Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the commonest liver condition in the world, accounting for 20-30% of the adult population, and encompasses a spectrum of liver disorders characterized by fat accumulation within the liver, associated or not with varying degrees of hepatic inflammation and liver fibrosis through to cirrhosis. The prevalence of NAFLD increases significantly in the presence of obesity (60-80% and type 2 diabetes (60%. NAFLD is associated with metabolic disorders (type 2 diabetes, obesity and hyperlipidemia grouped together as the metabolic syndrome (MetS. It is now regarded as the hepatic manifestation of this syndrome and is closely linked to insulin resistance (IR.The presence of NAFLD predicts the development of type 2 diabetes independent of established risk factors. NAFLD patients should therefore be screened for diabetes, including by the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT if there any abnormalities of fasting blood glucose (FBG and given appropriate lifestyle advice. Early diagnosis with the institution of lifestyle measures could help prevent or retard the onset of these metabolic disorders. Type 2 diabetes causes more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients with diabetes have an increased risk for cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC

  9. Osteoporosis and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbagallo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis are chronic diseases with an elevated and growing incidence in the elderly. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an elevated risk of hip, humerus and foot fractures in elder diabetic subjects. While type 1 diabetes is generally associated with a mild reduction in bone mineral density (BMD, type 2 diabetes, more prevalent in old subjects, is frequently linked to a normal or high BMD. Studies on experimental models of diabetes have suggested an altered bone structure that may help to explain the elevated risk of fractures observed in these animals and may as well help to explain the paradox of an incremented risk of fractures in type 2 diabetic elderly in the presence of normal or elevated BMD. In addition, diabetic elderly have an increased risk of falls, consequent at least in part to a poor vision, peripheral neuropathy, and weaken muscular performance. Diabetes may affect bone tissue by different mechanisms including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, deposit of advanced glycosilation end products in collagen fibre, reduced circulating levels of IGF-1, hypercalciuria, renal function impairment, microangiopathy and chronic inflammation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help implement the prevention of fractures in the growing population of mature diabetics.

  10. Tendinopathy in diabetes mellitus patients-Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, P P Y

    2017-08-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a frequent and disabling musculo-skeletal problem affecting the athletic and general populations. The affected tendon is presented with local tenderness, swelling, and pain which restrict the activity of the individual. Tendon degeneration reduces the mechanical strength and predisposes it to rupture. The pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy are not fully understood and several major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses including activation of the hypoxia-apoptosis-pro-inflammatory cytokines cascade, neurovascular ingrowth, increased production of neuromediators, and erroneous stem cell differentiation have been proposed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk/causative factors can predispose to the development of tendinopathy. Among them, diabetes mellitus is an important risk/causative factor. This review aims to appraise the current literature on the epidemiology and pathology of tendinopathy in diabetic patients. Systematic reviews were done to summarize the literature on (a) the association between diabetes mellitus and tendinopathy/tendon tears, (b) the pathological changes in tendon under diabetic or hyperglycemic conditions, and (c) the effects of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia on the outcomes of tendon healing. The potential mechanisms of diabetes mellitus in causing and exacerbating tendinopathy with reference to the major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses of the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy as reported in the literature are also discussed. Potential strategies for the management of tendinopathy in diabetic patients are presented. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yingfeng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM and diabetic retinopathy (DR in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR. Presenting visual impairment (VI was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1% English-speaking and 885 (27.9% Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p  Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations.

  12. The Role of Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The multipronged drug approach targeting blood pressure and serum levels of glucose, insulin, and lipids fails to fully prevent the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, a new therapeutic target to combat diabetic nephropathy is required. Autophagy is a catabolic process that degrades damaged proteins and organelles in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. The accumulation of proteins and organelles damaged by hyperglycemia and other diabetes-related metabolic changes is highly associated with the development of diabetic nephropathy. Recent studies have suggested that autophagy activity is altered in both podocytes and proximal tubular cells under diabetic conditions. Autophagy activity is regulated by both nutrient state and intracellular stresses. Under diabetic conditions, an altered nutritional state due to nutrient excess may interfere with the autophagic response stimulated by intracellular stresses, leading to exacerbation of organelle dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we discuss new findings showing the relationships between autophagy and diabetic nephropathy and suggest the therapeutic potential of autophagy in diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Interactions between diabetes and anxiety and depression: implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Danial, Jessica; Kronemyer, David

    2014-03-01

    Anxiety or depression may be a risk factor for the development of diabetes. This relationship may occur through a combination of genetic predispositions; epigenetic contingencies; exacerbating conditions such as metabolic syndrome (a precursor to diabetes); and other serious medical conditions. Medications used to treat anxiety and depression have significant side effects, such as weight gain, further increasing the possibility of developing diabetes. These components combine, interact, and reassemble to create a precarious system for persons with, or predisposed to, diabetes. Clinicians must be aware of these interrelationships to adequately treat the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, William M

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon condition with various aetiologies. Recent research has uncovered new mechanisms underlying the syndrome. Careful attention to management is essential in pregnant women to avoid serious complications. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy may be due to relative reduction in secretion of AVP from the posterior pituitary (cranial DI), increase in breakdown of AVP by placental cystine aminopeptidase with vasopressinase activity, or resistance of the rental tubules to AVP (nephrogenic DI). PMID:27579058

  15. Diabetic and endocrine emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, T; Dang, C

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine emergencies constitute only a small percentage of the emergency workload of general doctors, comprising about 1.5% of all hospital admission in England in 2004–5. Most of these are diabetes related with the remaining conditions totalling a few hundred cases at most. Hence any individual doctor might not have sufficient exposure to be confident in their management. This review discusses the management of diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, hypoglycaemia, hyperca...

  16. [Total homocysteine levels in children with diabetes type 1. Conditional factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Laborda, S; Salazar García-Blanco, M I; Rodríguez Rigual, M; Baldellou Vázquez, A

    2008-03-01

    To measure the plasma levels of total homocysteine (tHcy) in children with type I diabetes mellitus and their relationship with the control of the disease. We studied a total of 46 patients with ages between 4 and 19 years. The analyzed variables were: sex, age, puberty stage by Tanner, BMI, years of evolution of the illness, self-monitoring, associated diseases, tHcy, folic acid, vitamin B12, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profile and renal function. The mean tHcy was of 5.48 +/- 1,64 microm/l, similar to that in our control population. There was a positive correlation with tHcy when analyzing the puberty stage by the Tanner scale. The years of evolution of diabetes varied between 0.4 and 15, with a mean of 5.77 +/- 3.69, with no correlation with tHcy. The glycosylated haemoglobin mean was 7.35 %, with no correlation with tHcy. The levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 were similar to the control population. The lipid profile of our patients was normal, with no association with tHcy levels. There was no correlation between GFR and tHcy. A clinically correct control of children with diabetes mellitus type 1, appears to ensure a normal total homocysteinemia, with no significant differences with the healthy individuals of the same age and social environment.

  17. Prevalence and types of sexual dysfunction amongst female with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Eregie, A.; Ohwovoriole, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and types of sexual dysfunction (SD) amongst female with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in Benin City, Nigeria. This is a cross sectional study. A total of 225 female with DM and 225 female without DM who served as controls were studied. Data obtained included age, anthropometric indexes, presence and type of sexual dysfunction. Fifteen (6.6%) subjects with DM had sexual dysfunction and four (1.7%) in the control group had SD with sexual pain disorder being the commonest SD, seen in both groups. Other SD seen was lubrication disorder and sexual arousal disorder. The prevalence of SD in diabetic female was significantly higher than in the control group (6.6% vs. 1.7% p < 0.05). Sexual Dysfunction appears to be relatively uncommon amongst Nigerian women with Diabetes Mellitus. However diabetes care providets should address this issue during consultations with patients and provide treatment as this is a treatable condition. (author)

  18. Assessment of oral health in peritoneal dialysis patients with and without diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltas, Abubekir; Tozoğlu, Ummühan; Keleş, Mustafa; Canakci, Varol

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure continues to rise worldwide, and although the oral and dental changes in individuals with this condition have been examined, investigations with diabetic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. We therefore examined salivary pH, dry mouth, taste change, and mucosal ulceration in diabetic and nondiabetic uremic patients receiving PD. A total of 49 patients undergoing PD therapy were allocated to either the diabetic or the nondiabetic group. Salivary pH, dry mouth, taste change, and mucosal ulceration were determined for both groups. Salivary flow rate and pH were both lower in the diabetic group. Buffer capacity, dry mouth, taste change, and mucosal ulceration were all increased in that group. These findings were associated with level of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c. Our observations indicate that, compared with nondiabetic PD patients, patients with diabetes exhibit more severe oral uremic symptoms, including dry mouth, burning mouth syndrome, taste change, and mucosal ulcerations. The oral health in these patients should be followed.

  19. High Density Lipoprotein: A Therapeutic Target in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Barter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High density lipoproteins (HDLs have a number of properties that have the potential to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis and thus reduce the risk of having a cardiovascular event. These protective effects of HDLs may be reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the concentration of HDL cholesterol is frequently low. In addition to their potential cardioprotective properties, HDLs also increase the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle and stimulate the synthesis and secretion of insulin from pancreatic β cells and may thus have a beneficial effect on glycemic control. This raises the possibility that a low HDL concentration in type 2 diabetes may contribute to a worsening of diabetic control. Thus, there is a double case for targeting HDLs in patients with type 2 diabetes: to reduce cardiovascular risk and also to improve glycemic control. Approaches to raising HDL levels include lifestyle factors such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and stopping smoking. There is an ongoing search for HDL-raising drugs as agents to use in patients with type 2 diabetes in whom the HDL level remains low despite lifestyle interventions.

  20. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes and multiple chronic conditions: A Delphi consensus of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ena, Javier; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Sánchez-Fuentes, Demetrio; Camafort-Babkowsk, Miguel; Formiga, Francesc; Michán-Doña, Alfredo; Casariego, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    To develop consensus-based recommendations for the management of chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a two round Delphi technique. Experts from the Diabetes and Obesity Working Group (DOWG) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) reviewed MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS and Cochrane Library databases up to September 2014 to gather information on organization and health care management, stratification of therapeutic targets and therapeutic approach for glucose control in chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A list of 6 recommendations was created and rated by a panel of 75 experts from the DOWG by email (first round) and by open discussion (second round). A written document was produced and sent back to DOWG experts for clarification purposes. A high degree of consensus was achieved for all recommendations summarized as 1) there is a need to redesign and test new health care programs for chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus; 2) therapeutic targets in patients with short life expectancy should be individualized in accordance to their personal, clinical and social characteristics; 3) patients with chronic complex conditions and type 2 diabetes mellitus should be stratified by hypoglycemia risk; 4) age and specific comorbidities should guide the objectives for glucose control; 5) the risk of hypoglycemia should be a key factor when choosing a treatment; and 6) basal insulin analogs compared to human insulin are cost-effective options. The assessment and recommendations provided herein represent our best professional judgment based on current data and clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyon K; Serafin, Bethany L

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by the body's inability to process blood glucose properly. It is generally classified as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or type 1, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or type 2. Type 1 is characterized by a defect in insulin secretion by the beta cells of the pancreas, usually secondary to autoimmune destruction of those cells. Type 2 is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance with an insulin-secretory defect that varies in severity. Diabetes is a common medical condition that affects 6% of Americans younger than 50 years and approximately 10% to 15% of those older than 50 years. Increasing numbers of patients who have diabetes are presenting to the oral surgeon's office for care. Patients who have diabetes have a 50% chance of undergoing a surgical procedure in their lifetime.

  2. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  3. Novel biomarkers for prediabetes, diabetes, and associated complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcely, Brenda; Katz, Karin; Jagannathan, Ram; Chiang, Stephanie S; Oluwadare, Babajide; Goldberg, Ira J; Bergman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The number of individuals with prediabetes is expected to grow substantially and estimated to globally affect 482 million people by 2040. Therefore, effective methods for diagnosing prediabetes will be required to reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes and its complications. The current biomarkers, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fructosamine, and glycated albumin have limitations including moderate sensitivity and specificity and are inaccurate in certain clinical conditions. Therefore, identification of additional biomarkers is being explored recognizing that any single biomarker will also likely have inherent limitations. Therefore, combining several biomarkers may more precisely identify those at high risk for developing prediabetes and subsequent progression to diabetes. This review describes recently identified biomarkers and their potential utility for addressing the burgeoning epidemic of dysglycemic disorders. PMID:28860833

  4. Diabetes mellitus, fasting glucose, and risk of cause-specific death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Kaptoge, Stephen; Thompson, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain.......The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain....

  5. Strategies to overcome type 1 diabetes-related social stigma in the Iranian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Mehri Doosti; Abdoli, Samereh; Bijan, Iraj; Parvizy, Soroor; Fatemi, Naimeh Seyed; Amini, Massoud

    2014-09-01

    This study explored the strategies to overcome diabetes-related social stigma in Iran. This paper is part of an action research study which was designed in Iran in 2012 to plan and implement a program for overcoming diabetes-related stigma. Participants were people with type 1 diabetes, their family members, people without diabetes, and care providers in a diabetes center. Data collection was done through unstructured in-depth interviews, focus groups, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), and telephone interview. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis approach. Participants believed that it is impossible to overcome the stigma without community-based strategies. Community-based strategies include education, advocacy, contact, and protest. The anti-stigma strategies obtained in the study are based on the cultural context in Iran. They are extracted from statements of a wide range of people (with and without diabetes). However, during planning for stigma reduction, it is necessary to note that the effectiveness of social strategies varies in different studies and in different stigmatizing conditions and many factors are involved. These strategies should be implemented simultaneously at different levels to produce structural and social changes. It should be accepted that research on reducing health-related stigma has shown that it is very difficult to change beliefs and behavior. Evidence suggests that individuals and their families should be involved in all aspects of the program, and plans should be made according to the local conditions.

  6. Update on Health Literacy and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Brega, Angela G.; Crutchfield, Trisha M.; Elasy, Tom; Herr, Haley; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Karter, Andrew J.; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Pignone, Michael; Rothman, Russell; Schillinger, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Inadequate literacy is common among patients with diabetes and may lead to adverse outcomes. We reviewed the relationship between literacy and health outcomes in patients with diabetes and potential interventions to improve such outcomes. Methods We reviewed 79 articles covering three key domains: 1) evaluation of screening tools to identify inadequate literacy and numeracy; 2) the relationships of a range of diabetes-related health outcomes with literacy and numeracy; and 3) interventions to reduce literacy-related differences in health outcomes. Results Several screening tools are available to assess patients' print literacy and numeracy skills, some of which specifically address diabetes. Literacy and numeracy are consistently associated with diabetes-related knowledge. Some studies suggest literacy and numeracy are associated with intermediate outcomes, including self-efficacy, communication, and self-care (including adherence), but the relationship between literacy and glycemic control is mixed. Few studies have assessed more distal health outcomes, including diabetes-related complications, health care utilization, safety, or quality of life, but available studies suggest low literacy may be associated with an increased risk of complications, including hypoglycemia. Several interventions appear effective in improving diabetes-related outcomes regardless of literacy status, but it is unclear if these interventions can reduce literacy-related differences in outcomes. Conclusions Low literacy is associated with less diabetes-related knowledge and may be related to other important health outcomes. Further studies are needed to better elucidate pathways by which literacy skills affect health outcomes. Promising interventions are available to improve diabetes outcomes for patients with low literacy, but more research is needed to determine their effectiveness outside of research settings. PMID:24947871

  7. Diabetes eye screening in urban settings serving minority populations: detection of diabetic retinopathy and other ocular findings using telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald; Lee, David J; Lam, Byron L; Friedman, David S; Gower, Emily W; Haller, Julia A; Hark, Lisa A; Saaddine, Jinan

    2015-02-01

    The use of a nonmydriatic camera for retinal imaging combined with the remote evaluation of images at a telemedicine reading center has been advanced as a strategy for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening, particularly among patients with diabetes mellitus from ethnic/racial minority populations with low utilization of eye care. To examine the rate and types of DR identified through a telemedicine screening program using a nonmydriatic camera, as well as the rate of other ocular findings. A cross-sectional study (Innovative Network for Sight [INSIGHT]) was conducted at 4 urban clinic or pharmacy settings in the United States serving predominantly ethnic/racial minority and uninsured persons with diabetes. Participants included persons aged 18 years or older who had type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and presented to the community-based settings. The percentage of DR detection, including type of DR, and the percentage of detection of other ocular findings. A total of 1894 persons participated in the INSIGHT screening program across sites, with 21.7% having DR in at least 1 eye. The most common type of DR was background DR, which was present in 94.1% of all participants with DR. Almost half (44.2%) of the sample screened had ocular findings other than DR; 30.7% of the other ocular findings were cataract. In a DR telemedicine screening program in urban clinic or pharmacy settings in the United States serving predominantly ethnic/racial minority populations, DR was identified on screening in approximately 1 in 5 persons with diabetes. The vast majority of DR was background, indicating high public health potential for intervention in the earliest phases of DR when treatment can prevent vision loss. Other ocular conditions were detected at a high rate, a collateral benefit of DR screening programs that may be underappreciated.

  8. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR, using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001. The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001. Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic

  9. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Gao; Yan; Zhang; Yu-Sha; Ru; Xiao-Wu; Wang; Ji-Zhong; Yang; Chun-Hui; Li; Hong-Xing; Wang; Xiao-Rong; Li; Bing; Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy(DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy.METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR(NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time(NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy.RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001).Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover,significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density andmorphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients.CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores,and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate with the

  10. Prevalence of blindness and diabetic retinopathy in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Mansur M; Al Bdour, Muawyah D; Abu Ameerh, Mohammed A; Jadoon, Muhammed Z

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of blindness, visual impairment, diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy in north Jordan (Irbid) using the rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy methodology. A multistage cluster random sampling technique was used to select participants for this survey. A total of 108 clusters were selected using probability proportional to size method while subjects within the clusters were selected using compact segment method. Survey teams moved from house to house in selected segments examining residents 50 years and older until 35 participants were recruited. All eligible people underwent a standardized examination protocol, which included ophthalmic examination and random blood sugar test using digital glucometers (Accu-Chek) in their homes. Diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients was assessed through dilated fundus examination. A total of 3638 out of the 3780 eligible participants were examined. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of blindness, severe visual impairment, and visual impairment with available correction were 1.33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.73), 1.82% (95% CI 1.35-2.25), and 9.49% (95% CI 8.26-10.74), respectively, all higher in women. Untreated cataract and diabetic retinopathy were the major causes of blindness, accounting for 46.7% and 33.2% of total blindness cases, respectively. Glaucoma was the third major cause, accounting for 8.9% of cases. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 28.6% (95% CI 26.9-30.3) among the study population and higher in women. The prevalence of any retinopathy among diabetic patients was 48.4%. Cataract and diabetic retinopathy are the 2 major causes of blindness and visual impairment in northern Jordan. For both conditions, women are primarily affected, suggesting possible limitations to access to services. A diabetic retinopathy screening program needs to proactively create sex-sensitive awareness and provide easily accessible screening services with prompt treatment.

  11. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  12. Position statement of the Australian Diabetes Society: individualisation of glycated haemoglobin targets for adults with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, N Wah; Conn, Jennifer J; d'Emden, Michael C; Gunton, Jenny E; Jenkins, Alicia J; Ross, Glynis P; Sinha, Ashim K; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Colagiuri, Stephen; Twigg, Stephen M

    2009-09-21

    Tight glycaemic control reduces the risk of development and progression of organ complications in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this position statement, the Australian Diabetes Society recommends a general target glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) level of position statement also provides guidelines for the individualisation of glycaemic targets to a tighter or lesser degree, with a recommended target HbA(1c) level of diabetes and its duration, pregnancy, diabetes medication being taken, presence of cardiovascular disease, risk of and problems from hypoglycaemia, and comorbidities. Management of diabetes also includes: adequate control of other cardiovascular risk factors, including weight, blood pressure and lipid serum levels; antiplatelet therapy; and smoking cessation.

  13. Weight change and incident diabetes: addressing an unresolved issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-van der Bruggen, M.A.M.; Spijkerman, A.M.W.; Baal, van P.H.M.; Baan, C.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Picavet, H.S.J.; A, van der A.D.; Verschuren, W.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of weight change on diabetes incidence remains unclear. To clarify the role of weight change as a risk factor for diabetes, the authors assessed the association between weight change and diabetes incidence conditional upon either initial or attained body mass index (BMI). They used 7,837

  14. Potential Effect of Opium Consumption on Controlling Diabetes and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Methods This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnair...

  15. Enhanced Healing of Diabetic Wounds by Subcutaneous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Derived Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrama Shrestha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the umbilical cord and their conditioned media (CM can be easily obtained and refined compared with stem cells from other sources. Here, we explore the possibility of the benefits of these cells in healing diabetic wounds. Methodology and Results. Delayed wound healing animal models were established by making a standard wound on the dorsum of eighteen db/db mice, which were divided into three groups with six mice in each: groups I, II, and III received PBS, UC-MSC, and CM, respectively. UC-MSC and their CM significantly accelerated wound closure compared to PBS-treated wounds, and it was most rapid in CM-injected wounds. In day-14 wounds, significant difference in capillary densities among the three groups was noted (n=6; P<0.05, and higher levels of VEGF, PDGF, and KGF expression in the CM- and UC-MSC-injected wounds compared to the PBS-treated wounds were seen. The expression levels of PDGF-β and KGF were higher in CM-treated wounds than those in UC-MSC-treated wounds. Conclusion. Both the transplantation of UC-MSC and their CM are beneficial to diabetic wound healing, and CM has been shown to be therapeutically better than UC-MSC, at least in the context of diabetic wound healing.

  16. The Impact of Built Environment on Diabetic Patients: The Case of Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidawi, Bhzad; Al-Hariri, Mohamed Taha Ali

    2012-01-01

    At present, Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the main threats to the human health in the 21st century. It may lead to severe conditions such as blindness, end-stage of renal disease, limb amputation and a variety of debilitating neuropathies. Previous researches indicated that diabetes is caused by a complex interaction of patient’s genetics, life-style and environmental factors. They also highlighted that providing quality and healthy built environment to citizens including diabetic patients would prevent poor and unhealthy condition. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is one of top ten countries in the prevalence of diabetes. Little researches though were conducted in KSA in regards to the effect of environmental conditions of the built environment. In 2011, the present researchers have carried out a pilot survey on a number of diabetic patients to find out the possible impact of built environment settings on the patient’s lifestyle. The research explored whether diabetic patients use smart tools in their daily life to overcome the daily life’s difficulties and perform their life as normal as possible. The results showed a close link between a poor home and environmental settings, the patient’s lifestyle, and the patient’s health status. It also highlighted the absence of smart tools and systems use. The paper argues that certain changes to the built environment must be done and to provide a healthy and safe environment for diabetic patients. This would help these patients to abandon their bad habits and adopt healthier lifestyle. PMID:22980349

  17. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Education Program HealthSense Home Make a Plan Articles About HealthSense Diabetes HealthSense Title/Keywords: Go Diabetes ... Use NDEP’s promotional kit , including a presentation, newsletter article, and flyer to promote Diabetes HealthSense in your ...

  18. Comparison of the clinical parameters of benign prostate hyperplasia in diabetic and non diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ozcan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the correlation between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH measures and diabetes mellitus in men with benign prostate hyperplasia in a prospective study. Materials and methods: Between 2008-2012, 100 diabetic and 200 non diabetic patients undergoing surgery due to benign prostate hyperplasia were enrolled in the study. The parameters evaluated for each patients included prostate volume, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, total testosterone, total prostatic specific antigen (T-PSA, triglicerides, total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI. A questionnaire including international prostate symptom score (IPSS was sdministered and uroflow test measuring the peak urinary flow rate was performed to appreciate the complaints of the patients objectively. Results: Diabetic patients are more likely to have larger prostate volume. The symptom score evaluated by IPSS and post micturition residual volume were also significantly higher in diabetic groups. The other statistically significant different parameter between two groups was total testosterone that diabetic patients tend to have lower levels. Diabetic counterparts were established to have higher BMI. No statistically significant differentiation was observed about trigliceryde and total cholesterol levels and uroflow rates. Conclusions: Our study suggests a positive correlation between high prostate volume and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also observed a positive correlation between symptom scores and post micturion residual volumes and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus suggesting that the presence of diabetes is related to both static and dynamic components of benign prostate hyperplasia. Additionally testosterone levels were lower in diabetic patients. Further studies need to confirm these relationship in a larger population.

  19. A needs assessment of people living with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Claudette E; Hall, Anthony B; Kok, Gerjo; Mallya, Joyse; Courtright, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Kilimanjaro Diabetic Programme was initiated in response to the needs of people living with diabetes (PWLD) to identify barriers to uptake of screening for diabetic retinopathy, to improve management of diabetes, and establish an affordable, sustainable eye screening and treatment programme for diabetic retinopathy. Intervention Mapping was used as the framework for the needs assessment. A mixed methods approach was used. Five psychometric measures, Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire, Diabetes Health Beliefs, Self-Efficacy scale, Problem Areas in Diabetes scale, and Hopkins Scale Checklist-25 and a structured interview relating to self-efficacy, addressing disclosure of living with diabetes and life-style changes were used to triangulate the quantitative findings. These were administered to 26 PWLD presenting to rural district hospitals. The interviewees demonstrated low levels of perceived stigma regarding disclosure of living with diabetes and high levels of self-efficacy in raising community awareness of diabetes, seeking on going treatment from Western medicine over traditional healers and in seeking care on sick days. Self-efficacy was high for adjusting diet, although comprehensive dietary knowledge was poor. Negative emotions expressed at diagnosis, changes in life style and altered quality of life were reflected in high levels of anxiety and depression. Low levels of stigma surrounding living with diabetes were linked to a desire to raise community awareness of diabetes, help others live with diabetes and to secure social support to access hospital services. Confusion over what constituted a healthy diet showed the importance of comprehensive, accessible diabetes education, essential to ensuring good glycaemic control, and preventing diabetic complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Low levels of self-efficacy along with high levels of anxiety and depression may have a negative impact on the uptake of screening for Diabetic Retinopathy. The findings

  20. Built environment and diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, ‘the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.’ Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

  1. Current Trends In The Management Of Diabetes Mellitus: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic, non-communicable disease with concomitant oral manifestations that impact on dental care. Approximately 40-80 persons in 2,000 adult population visiting dental practice are diabetic and about half are unaware of their condition. The average dentist attends to over 100 diabetic patients ...

  2. Incentives in Diabetic Eye Assessment by Screening (IDEAS): study protocol of a three-arm randomized controlled trial using financial incentives to increase screening uptake in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judah, Gaby; Vlaev, Ivo; Gunn, Laura; King, Dominic; King, Derek; Valabhji, Jonathan; Darzi, Ara; Bicknell, Colin

    2016-03-18

    Diabetes is an increasing public health problem in the UK and globally. Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of diabetes, and is one of the leading causes of blindness in the UK working age population. The diabetic eye screening programme in England aims to invite all people with diabetes aged 12 or over for retinal photography to screen for the presence of diabetic retinopathy. However, attendance rates are only 81 %, leaving many people at risk of preventable sight loss. This is a three arm randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of different types of financial incentives (based on principles from behavioral economics) on increasing attendance at diabetic eye screening appointments in London. Eligible participants will be aged 16 or over, and are those who have been invited to screening appointments annually, but who have not attended, or telephoned to rearrange an appointment, within the last 24 months. Eligible participants will be randomized to one of three conditions: 1. Control condition (usual invitation letter) 2. Fixed incentive condition (usual invitation letter, including a voucher for £10 if they attend their appointment) 3. Probabilistic incentive condition (invitation letter, including a voucher for a 1 in 100 chance of winning £1000 if they attend their appointment). Participants will be sent invitation letters, and the primary outcome will be whether or not they attend their appointment. One thousand participants will be included in total, randomized with a ratio of 1.4:1:1. In order to test whether the incentive scheme has a differential impact on patients from different demographic or socio-economic groups, information will be recorded on age, gender, distance from screening center, socio-economic status and length of time since they were last screened. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. This study will be the first trial of financial incentives for improving uptake of diabetic eye screening. If

  3. Use of acetazolamide in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macau, Ricardo A; da Silva, Tiago Nunes; Silva, Joana Rego; Ferreira, Ana Gonçalves; Bravo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (Li-NDI) is a rare and difficult-to-treat condition. A study in mice and two recent papers describe the use of acetazolamide in Li-NDI in 7 patients (a case report and a 6 patient series). We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with bipolar disorder treated with lithium and no previous history of diabetes insipidus. She was hospitalized due to a bowel obstruction and developed severe dehydration after surgery when she was water deprived. After desmopressin administration and unsuccessful thiazide and amiloride treatment, acetazolamide was administrated to control polyuria and hydroelectrolytic disorders without significant side effects. To our knowledge, this is the third publication on acetazolamide use in Li-NDI patients. Treatment of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus might be challenging.Vasopressin, amiloride and thiazide diuretics have been used in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus treatment.Acetazolamide might be an option to treat lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus patients who fail to respond to standard treatment.The use of acetazolamide in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus must be monitored, including its effects on glomerular filtration rate.

  4. Diabetes mellitus and its relevance to the practice of dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2010-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome of abnormal carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism that results in acute and chronic complications due to the absolute or relative lack of insulin. Globally, it is expected that the number of people with diabetes will increase, and as a result dental practitioners will encounter an increasing number of patients affected by this chronic condition, which may have implications for the provision of safe and appropriate dental treatment. This article aims to provide an overview of diabetes and to discuss aspects of the condition relevant to dentistry. The article also discusses the management of diabetic emergencies in a dental practice setting.

  5. The metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by coronary calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria G; Polk, Donna; Gallagher, Amy; Miranda-Peats, Lisa; Whitcomb, Brian; Hachamovitch, Rory; Friedman, John D; Hayes, Sean; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-05-07

    We compared the prevalence and extent of coronary artery calcium (CAC) among persons with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), diabetes, and neither condition. The prevalence and extent of CAC has not been compared among those with MetS, diabetes, or neither condition. Of 1,823 persons (36% female) age 20 to 79 years who had screening for CAC by computed tomography, 279 had MetS, 150 had diabetes, and the remainder (n = 1,394) had neither condition. Metabolic syndrome was defined with >or=3 of the following: body mass index >or=30 kg/m(2); high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or=150 mg/dl; blood pressure >or=130/85 mm Hg or on treatment; or fasting glucose 110 to 125 mg/dl. The prevalence and odds of any and significant (>or=75th percentile) CAC among these groups and by number of MetS risk factors were determined. Those with neither MetS nor diabetes, MetS, or diabetes had a prevalence of CAC of 53.5%, 58.8%, and 75.3% (p 20% 10-year risk of CHD or CAC >or=75th percentile for age and gender. Risk factor-adjusted odds for the presence of CAC were 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05 to 1.87) among those with MetS and 1.67 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.50) among those with diabetes, versus those with neither condition. Those with MetS or diabetes have an increased likelihood of CAC compared with those having neither condition.

  6. Insulin sensitivity to trace metals (Chromium, manganese) in type 2 diabetic patients and diabetic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajra, B.; Orakzai, S.A.; Faryal, U.; Hassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus constitutes one of the most important problems in developing and non-developing countries. The purpose of the study to estimate the concentrations of Chromium and Manganese in diabetic and non-diabetic population of Hazara division. The cross sectional comparative study was carried out on one hundred blood samples of Type 2 Diabetic patients collected non-randomly from Ayub Teaching Hospital and one hundred normal healthy controls from Women Medical College Abbottabad from September 2014 to April 2015. Methods: The study included two hundred subjects. Among them 100 were diabetic and 100 non diabetic respectively. The blood samples were collected from Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad. The serum Chromium and Manganese levels were determined by Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer. Results: Serum Chromium and Manganese levels were decreased in diabetic and increased in non-diabetic patients. Conclusion: Low serum level of Chromium and manganese were found in diabetic patients as compare to non-diabetic individuals. (author)

  7. Role of Nutrient-Sensing Signals in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kume

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The multipronged drug approach still fails to fully prevent the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, a new therapeutic target to improve the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy is urgently required. Nutrient-sensing signals and their related intracellular machinery have evolved to combat prolonged periods of starvation in mammals; and these systems are conserved in the kidney. Recent studies have suggested that the activity of three nutrient-sensing signals, mTORC1, AMPK, and Sirt1, is altered in the diabetic kidney. Furthermore, autophagy activity, which is regulated by the above-mentioned nutrient-sensing signals, is also altered in both podocytes and proximal tubular cells under diabetic conditions. Under diabetic conditions, an altered nutritional state owing to nutrient excess may disturb cellular homeostasis regulated by nutrient-responsible systems, leading to exacerbation of organelle dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we discuss new findings showing relationships between nutrient-sensing signals, autophagy, and diabetic nephropathy and suggest the therapeutic potential of nutrient-sensing signals in diabetic nephropathy.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Mariko; Miwa, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Some studies report that complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) than in non-diabetic patients. This study used transnasal endoscopy to elucidate the current status of concurrent GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to examine the associations between intraesophageal pressure and GERD, as well as other neuropathic conditions. The study included 57 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age was 67 years and the duration of DM was 13 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 6.8%. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation items were (i) the presence or absence of esophagitis and its severity; (ii) intraesophageal pressure; and (iii) Helicobacter pylori status, which was evaluated by endoscopic findings, such as the presence or absence of gastritis and peptic ulcer, and by urea breath test. Of 57 patients, 24 (42.1%) were given a diagnosis of GERD based on endoscopy. Patients with concurrent GERD were younger, had shorter duration of DM, and were taller and heavier. Interestingly, no difference in body mass index was observed. There was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and diabetic complications, including peripheral neuropathy, and infection or non-infection with H. pylori. Although there was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and intraesophageal pressure values, we found aging, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the presence of autonomic nerve symptoms to correlate with reduced intraesophageal pressure. The results of this study could be used to answer the question of whether or not endoscopic GERD is a diabetic complication; however, further study is required. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Oral Health Conditions of Older People: Focus on the Balkan Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzopoulos Georgios S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral health plays a pivotal role in general health, especially in older people. Oral diseases may affect the development of systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension. The most important oral health conditions that have been recorded in dental literature for older population include tooth loss, dental caries, periodontal diseases, xerostomia (dry mouth) and oral cancer. Edentulism influences social life, either causing aesthetic problems or...

  10. Diabetes and Stroke Prevention: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hewitt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and diabetes mellitus are two separate conditions which share multiple common threads. Both are increasing in prevalence, both are diseases which affect blood vessels, and both are associated with other vascular risk factors, such as hypertension and dyslipidemia. Abnormal glucose regulation, of which diabetes is one manifestation, is seen in up to two-thirds of people suffering from an acute stroke. Surprisingly, aggressive management of glucose after an acute stroke has not been shown to improve outcome or reduce the incidence of further strokes. More encouragingly, active management of other cardiovascular risk factors has been demonstrated to prevent stroke disease and improve outcome following a stroke in the diabetic person. Hypertension should be treated with a target of 140/80 mmHg, as a maximum. The drug of choice would be an ACE inhibitor, although the priority is blood pressure reduction regardless of the medication chosen. Lipids should be treated with a statin whatever the starting cholesterol. Antiplatelet treatment is also essential but there are no specific recommendations for the diabetic person. As these conditions become more prevalent it is imperative that the right treatment is offered for both primary and secondary prevention in diabetic people, in order to prevent disease and minimize disability.

  11. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Chang Jin; Hong, Sung Kwan; Na, Dong Gyu

    2001-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment

  12. The Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-management Education Engagement: The 2015 National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth D

    2015-10-01

    The National Practice Study (NPS) is conducted biannually to assess current diabetes education practices in the United States with the goal of understanding current trends in the work in which diabetes educators engage. The 2015 NPS contained 54 questions about the individuals providing diabetes education, people with diabetes participating in education, and programs providing the education. The survey was sent electronically to approximately 21 975 people who were members of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) or who were Certified Diabetes Educators with the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators but were not currently AADE members. In addition, both the AADE and the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators promoted participation in the NPS via social media. The combination of efforts resulted in completion of the survey by 4855 respondents. Testing was completed with a significance level of 0.05 or 95% confidence. Diabetes educators continue to represent a diverse group of health care professionals-nurses (50%), dietitians (35%), pharmacists (6%), and others (6%). By far, the most commonly held credential for the specialty continues to be the Certified Diabetes Educator (86%), with only 5% of survey respondents indicating that they held the Board Certified-Advanced Diabetes Management credential. Diabetes educators are working with individuals across the diabetes continuum, as well as with people who do not have diabetes but have other chronic conditions. The data demonstrate that much of the diabetes educator's work with people with diabetes is beyond the first year of diagnosis. Diabetes educators are increasingly seen to be providing a broader array of the integrated AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors™. The specialty of diabetes educator continues to be populated by a professionally diverse workforce, meeting the needs of people across a wide spectrum. Diabetes educators can be found providing services in primary prevention

  13. Diabetes Care in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gerry H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in Asian countries including the Philippines. Both the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continue to increase with a commensurate upward trend in the prevalence of prediabetes. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines and to describe extensively the characteristics of diabetes care in the Philippines from availability of diagnostics tests to the procurement of medications. A literature search was performed using the search words diabetes care and Philippines. Articles that were retrieved were reviewed for relevance and then synthesized to highlight key features. The prevalence of diabetes in the Philippines is increasing. Rapid urbanization with increasing dependence on electronic gadgets and sedentary lifestyle contribute significantly to this epidemic. Diabetes care in the Philippines is disadvantaged and challenged with respect to resources, government support, and economics. The national insurance system does not cover comprehensive diabetes care in a preventive model and private insurance companies only offer limited diabetes coverage. Thus, most patients rely on "out-of-pocket" expenses, namely, laboratory procedures and daily medications. Consequently, poor pharmacotherapy adherence impairs prevention of complications. Moreover, behavioral modifications are difficult due to cultural preferences for a traditional diet of refined sugar, including white rice and bread. Translating clinical data into practice in the Philippines will require fundamental and transformative changes that increase diabetes awareness, emphasize lifestyle change while respecting cultural preferences, and promote public policy especially regarding the health insurance system to improve overall diabetes care and outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of type 2 diabetes on health related quality of life in Bangladesh: results from a matched study comparing treated cases with non-diabetic controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safita, Novie; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Chow, Clara K; Niessen, Louis; Lechner, Andreas; Holle, Rolf; Laxy, Michael

    2016-09-13

    Little is known about the association between diabetes and health related quality of life (HRQL) in lower-middle income countries. This study aimed to investigate HRQL among individuals with and without diabetes in Bangladesh. The analysis is based on data of a case-control study, including 591 patients with type 2 diabetes (cases) who attended an outpatient unit of a hospital in Dhaka and 591 age -and sex-matched individuals without diabetes (controls). Information about socio-demographic characteristics, health conditions, and HRQL were assessed in a structured interview. HRQL was measured with the EuroQol (EQ) visual analogue scale (VAS) and the EQ five-dimensional (5D) descriptive system. The association between diabetes status and quality of life was examined using multiple linear and logistic regression models. Mean EQ-VAS score of patients with diabetes was 11.5 points lower (95 %-CI: -13.5, -9.6) compared to controls without diabetes. Patients with diabetes were more likely to report problems in all EQ-5D dimensions than controls, with the largest effect observed in the dimensions 'self-care' (OR = 5.9; 95 %-CI: 2.9, 11.8) and 'mobility' (OR = 4.5; 95 %-CI: 3.0, -6.6). In patients with diabetes, male gender, high education, and high-income were associated with higher VAS score and diabetes duration and foot ulcer associated with lower VAS scores. Other diabetes-related complications were not significantly associated with HRQL. Our findings suggest that the impact of diabetes on HRQL in the Bangladeshi population is much higher than what is known from western populations and that unlike in western populations comorbidities/complications are not the driving factor for this effect.

  15. Helicobacter pylori in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients with Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Hashemi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is one of the most common chronic infections in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Recent reports suggested that H. pylori might have high prevalence among patients with diabetes. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection in diabetes mellitus and to study the relationship between histological findings and H. pylori infection in diabetic patients. Eighty patients with dyspepsia that were referred to our gastrointestinal department between May 2007 and May 2008 were included in our study. We checked fasting blood sugar for all of the study samples. All of patients underwent upper endoscopy and biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum and the corpus. The specimens for the presence of H. pylori were colored by Giemsa stains. A single pathologist evaluated the histology slides. We found that prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (P=0.001. Indeed, the prevalence of gastritis did differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.001. According to our results diabetes mellitus is one of the risk factor that must be considered in evaluation of H. pylori infection in diabetic patients with dyspepsia.

  16. Candida colonization on the denture of diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Lotfi-Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in diabetic patients. Presence of denture in the oral cavity of diabetic patients can promote Candida colonization and results in the higher incidence of oral and systemic candidiasis. The general purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare Candida colonization in denture of diabetic patients and non-diabetic control group. Methods: In current case-control study, samples for mycological examinations were collected from the palatal impression surface of maxillary dentures from 92 edentulous patients including 46 dia-betic and 46 non-diabetic denture wearers. All samples were cultured directly on sabouraud agar me-dium and isolated colonies were counted and identified based on specific tests. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests. Results: The higher density of isolated colonies was seen in diabetic group in compare with control group (P = 0.0001. There was a statistically significant correlation between the blood glucose level (P = 0.0001 and the duration of denture usage (P = 0.022 with the colonization of Candida on den-ture of diabetic patients. C. albicans was the most common isolated Candida species in both groups, though diabetic patients with dentures had more non-albicans Candida isolated from their dentures compared to non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: Mycological findings from the present study revealed that diabetes mellitus can in-crease colonization of Candida in denture and mouth. By elimination of local and systemic factors in diabetic patients and improving their oral health care, Candida colonization and the risk of oral and systemic candidiasis will be decreased.

  17. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  18. Effects of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes care: results of the OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Kostapanos, Michael S.; Moulis, Alexandros; Nikas, Nikos; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) care in Greece. Methods: The OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00681850] was an international multicenter, prospective cohort study. It included physicians randomized 3:1 to either receive benchmarking for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment targets (benchmarking group) or not (control group). The proportions of patients achieving the targets of the above-mentioned parameters were compared between groups after 12 months of treatment. Also, the proportions of patients achieving those targets at 12 months were compared with baseline in the benchmarking group. Results: In the Greek region, the OPTIMISE study included 797 adults with T2DM (570 in the benchmarking group). At month 12 the proportion of patients within the predefined targets for SBP and LDL-C was greater in the benchmarking compared with the control group (50.6 versus 35.8%, and 45.3 versus 36.1%, respectively). However, these differences were not statistically significant. No difference between groups was noted in the percentage of patients achieving the predefined target for HbA1c. At month 12 the increase in the percentage of patients achieving all three targets was greater in the benchmarking (5.9–15.0%) than in the control group (2.7–8.1%). In the benchmarking group more patients were on target regarding SBP (50.6% versus 29.8%), LDL-C (45.3% versus 31.3%) and HbA1c (63.8% versus 51.2%) at 12 months compared with baseline (p Benchmarking may comprise a promising tool for improving the quality of T2DM care. Nevertheless, target achievement rates of each, and of all three, quality indicators were suboptimal, indicating there are still unmet needs in the management of T2DM. PMID:26445642

  19. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Norimasa; Sowa, Etsuji; Fujii, Satoru; Seki, Junichi; Wada, Masahisa

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75 Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75 Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  20. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, N; Sowa, E; Fujii, S; Seki, J; Wada, M [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-09-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200..mu..Ci of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arterioscl-erosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions.

  1. Comparison of diabetics and non-diabetics presenting with acute myocardial infraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naseem, A.; Moin, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To identify differences in incidence and clinical manifestations of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and prevalence of coronary disease risk factors in diabetic and non-diabetics. Design: A prospective longitudinal survey. Place and duration of study: The study was carried out in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology/National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC/NIHD) Rawalpindi, over a period of one month (1st August to 1st September, 1994). Subject and Methods: After fulfilling the inclusion criteria, a total of 100 patients were included in the study. Fifty patients had diabetes and AMI while 50 patients had AMI but were not diabetic. All the patients were studies for at least 15 days in hospital and data collected on a pre-designed proforma. Results: Among diabetic patients, 84% were not insulin-dependant, while remaining 16% were on insulin therapy. Duration of diabetes was over 20 years in 18% between 10 and 20 years in 62% and less than 10 years in 8%. Male to female ratio was 7.3:1 in non-diabetic group while in diabetic group it was 4.5:1. Mean age at the time of the first AMI was 54.6 years in non-diabetic group and 52.8 years in diabetic group, with women in diabetic group having mean age of 51.9 years, men 53.2 years, while non-diabetic women had a mean age of 54.2 years and the men 55 years. Incidence of hypertension was 32% among diabetic patients and 24% among non-diabetics. Lipid abnormalities were 44% in diabetic group and 36% in non-diabetic group the most common mode of presentation in both groups was chest pain or chest discomfort, but one-fourth of the diabetics presented without any chest pain. Q-wave AMI of the anterior wall of the myocardium predominated in both group, but non-Q wave infarctions were more frequent in the diabetic group (28% vs. 16%). Diabetic group tended to be identified later and only half the diabetics with AMI qualified for thrombolytic therapy as compared to more than 2/3 cases of the non-diabetic group

  2. Vitamina A e diabetes gestacional Vitamin A and gestational diabetes

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    Larissa Queiroz de Lira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O diabetes mellitus (DM, patologia de caráter crônico e evolutivo, atualmente apresenta configuração de epidemia mundial. O diabetes gestacional, condição associada tanto à resistência à insulina quanto à diminuição da função das células-β, também caracteriza-se pela elevada incidência em diversas populações e grupos étnicos. Recentemente têm sido constatadas fortes evidências para o comprometimento dos níveis de retinol de gestantes com DM em resposta à evolução dessa patologia. Essa condição torna as gestantes diabéticas mais propensas a apresentar estado bioquímico marginal ou deficiente em vitamina A quando comparadas com as de gestação saudável. Dessa maneira, tendo conhecimento sobre o papel fisiológico da vitamina A e as consequências do DM na gestação, esta revisão visa esclarecer o impacto da instalação do DM sobre os níveis de retinol dessas gestantes, bem como, as consequências que o estado de deficiência em vitamina A poderá causar para essas mulheres e para seus lactantes.Diabetes mellitus (DM a pathology with chronic evolution, has now acquired a connotation of global epidemic. Gestational diabetes, a condition associated with insulin resistance and decreased β-cells function is also characterized by a high incidence in different populations and ethnic groups. Recently strong evidence has been found for involvement of retinol levels of pregnant women with DM due to the pathology’s evolution. This condition makes these diabetics prone to have a marginal biochemical profile or a vitamin A deficiency when compared to those of healthy pregnant women. Therefore, with an awareness of the physiological role of vitamin A and consequences of diabetes during pregnancy, this review intends to clarify the impact of DM on retinol levels of these pregnant women and the consequences that vitamin A deficiency may cause to these women and their infants.

  3. Comparison of Oral Manifestations of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Uremic Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Seyed Javad Kia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Chronic renal failure (CRF, also known as chronic kidney disease, caused by devastated nephron mass of the kidney results in uremia. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and glomerulonephritis are common etiologic factors of CRF. This condition causes miscellaneous oral manifestations especially in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to comparison oral manifestations of diabetic and non-diabetic uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis.   Methods: A total of 95 patients who undergoing hemodialysis in Razi hospital in Rasht city participated in this descriptive analytical study. Patients were divided into two diabetic and non- diabetic groups. Oral cavity examinations were done by latex gloves and single use mirror. Objective and subjective oral manifestations such as xerostomia, bad taste, mucosal pain, uremic odor, coating tongue, petechial, purpura, pale oral mucosa, ulcer, dental erosion and candida infection were recorded in questionnaire. After gathering of information, the data were analyzed by SPSS 15 software using t-test and chi square statistical test.   Results: About 60% of patients (57 person were men and 40 % (38 person were women. The mean age of patients was 48 years (range of 20 -76 years. Common subjective oral manifestation in both groups was xerostomia and most common objective oral manifestations were pale oral mucosa, uremic odor and coating tongue respectively. The DMFT index in diabetic group was significantly higher (17.3±7.63 than non-diabetic patients (12.4±8.26. There was no significant statistical correlation between the time of dialysis, number of dialysis appointment during the week and objective and subjective oral manifestations in two groups.   Conclusion: Although, the present study has shown an increase in oral manifestations in diabetic patients undergoing hemodialysis relative to non-diabetic group, but this increase was not statistically significant. On the other hand

  4. Spousal Concordance of Diabetes Mellitus among Women in Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharbatti, Shatha S; Abed, Yasmeen I; Al-Heety, Lujain M; Basha, Shaikh A

    2016-05-01

    Spousal concordance is defined as similar behaviours and associated health statuses between spouses. This study aimed to identify the concordance of diabetes mellitus (DM) and related variables among genetically unrelated couples in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE). This cross-sectional study included 270 married women attending either the Mushairef Health Center or the Gulf Medical College Hospital in Ajman between May and November 2012. A validated questionnaire was designed to determine sociodemographic characteristics and a history or family history of DM, hypertension, coronary artery disease or dyslipidaemia among the women and their husbands. The weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, fasting blood sugar and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of all women were measured. Of the women, 39.3% of those with diabetic husbands and 39.9% of those with non-diabetic husbands were diabetic themselves (P >0.050). The prevalence of DM spousal concordance was 17.8%. A history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and dyslipidaemia was significantly more frequent among women whose husbands had a history of the same conditions (P = 0.001, 0.040 and 0.002, respectively). Spousal concordance of abnormal glycaemia among non-diabetic women with diabetic husbands was significant (P = 0.001). Having a diabetic husband (P = 0.006) and being obese (P = 0.009) were the only significant predictors of hyperglycaemia among non-diabetic women after controlling for confounding factors. There was significant concordance of abnormal glycaemia among non-diabetic women with diabetic husbands. The spouses of diabetic patients may therefore be a target population for regular hyperglycaemia and DM screening.

  5. Diabetes Care in Republic of Macedonia: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokovski, Ivica; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Trapp, Caroline; Mitov, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Macedonia (RoM) has experienced a rapid rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over the past 2 decades, a period characterized by significant social, political, and economic change. RoM now has one of the highest rates of diabetes in Europe. To explore the modifiable conditions that may underlie and exacerbate the T2D epidemic; describe the state of diabetes care; and consider improved mechanisms for prevention and treatment, including research priorities, in RoM. Methods included data mining from reliable sources and collaboration of authors to consider and describe applications of research from outside RoM and to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the burden of T2D in RoM. In 2014, the national prevalence of diabetes was 11.44% of the population (20-79 years) of RoM. Per capita caloric intake has increased significantly over the past 2 decades, with the majority of these calories coming from sugar, pork, chicken, beef, and sunflower oil. Excess calories, in the form of nutrient-deficient foods, animal products, and added oils promote insulin resistance and T2D. Tobacco use and lack of physical activity also contribute to the diabetes epidemic. Insulin, especially insulin analogues, are widely available and used to manage diabetes, often over other interventions that are more appropriate for patients with T2D, and more frequently than in other more developed countries, resulting in higher and unsustainable related costs. A new National eHealth System allows for better identification and monitoring of citizens with diabetes. However, the rapidly growing expense of insulin in the past has been unsustainable. The potential exists for a stronger role for lifestyle interventions in prevention and treatment of T2D. Significant changes in dietary patterns parallel the rise in diabetes prevalence and are likely a leading cause of diabetes and its complications. Research in RoM is needed to determine the impact and acceptability of

  6. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  7. Diabetic retinopathy in Swaziland

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    Helen Burn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that between 2010 and 2030 there will be a 98% increase in the number of adults in sub-Saharan Africa with diabetes.1 This is just one aspect of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases facing sub-Saharan Africa, driven by urbanisation, ageing, and changes to lifestyle and environment. The diabetes epidemic poses a significant challenge to health services, as non-communicable conditions should be managed by multi-disciplinary teams, with prevention as a primary aim.

  8. Disease and Economic Burden of Hospitalizations Attributable to Diabetes Mellitus and Its Complications: A Nationwide Study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Quarti Machado Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with a significant burden globally. The costs of diabetes-related hospitalizations are unknown in most developing countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the total number and economic burden of hospitalizations attributable to diabetes mellitus (DM and its complications in adults from the perspective of the Brazilian Public Health System in 2014. Data sources included the National Health Survey (NHS and National database of Hospitalizations (SIH. We considered diabetes, its microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy and macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease, respiratory and urinary tract infections, as well as selected cancers. Assuming that DM patients are hospitalized for these conditions more frequently that non-DM individuals, we estimated the etiological fraction of each condition related to DM, using the attributable risk methodology. We present number, average cost per case, and overall costs of hospitalizations attributable to DM in Brazil in 2014, stratified by condition, state of the country, gender and age group. In 2014, a total of 313,273 hospitalizations due to diabetes in adults were reported in Brazil (4.6% of total adult hospitalization, totaling (international dollar Int$264.9 million. The average cost of an adult hospitalization due to diabetes was Int$845, 19% higher than hospitalization without DM. Hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases related to diabetes accounted for the higher proportion of costs (47.9%, followed by microvascular complications (25.4% and DM per se (18.1%. Understanding the costs of diabetes and its major complications is crucial to raise awareness and to support the decision-making process on policy implementation, also allowing the assessment of prevention and control strategies.

  9. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, May M; Haddad, Mera F; Gammoh, Yazan S

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is considered an important factor for early diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness of diabetic retinopathy among a sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Jordan. The study period was from August to December 2015. The sample was selected randomly from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the general population in three main cities of Jordan (Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa). A questionnaire was distributed to 237 participants with diabetes to assess their awareness and knowledge of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The questionnaire included questions to assess awareness about diabetic retinopathy, sources of knowledge about the disease, and patients' knowledge and compliance with available treatments and routine eye examinations. Patients were also questioned about the barriers that may interfere with early eye examination. A total of 237 participants (107 [45.1%] females and 130 [54.9%] males) with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. Mean age±SD for the study population was 54.51±10.28 years. Of the study population, 88.2% were aware that diabetes can affect the eyes and 81% reported that diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. Higher level of patients' awareness of diabetic retinopathy was related to higher level of formal education ( p diabetic retinopathy as reported by 47.3% patients was general practitioners. Patients' compliance with diabetes management was relatively high; however, their compliance with routine retinal assessment was poor, with only a total of 29.5% of participants having had an eye examination in the previous year. Awareness of the nature and consequences of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes in Jordan is relatively high. However, patients' motivation to undergo retinal assessment was poor in the sample, thus hindering early diagnosis and management.

  10. Risk Perception for Developing Diabetes among Non-diabetic Individuals

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    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: the incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus have increased in recent decades and this trend is expected to continue. Objective: to determine the risk perception for developing type 2 diabetes among non-diabetic individuals. Methods: a cross-sectional study involving non-diabetic individuals in the catchment area of the doctor-and-nurse office No.15 of the Manuel Fajardo Polyclinic in Cienfuegos was conducted between May 2013 and June 2014. The universe consisted of 1145 people, and the sample included 323 individuals of different age groups selected by sex. The variables studied were: age, sex, body mass index, nutritional assessment, and having a perceived risk when they answered 70 % of questions correctly. The arithmetic mean, standard deviation, Chi-square test, and risk estimation were calculated with a 95 % confidence interval. Results: individuals aged 25 to 34 years and females predominated. Fifty nine point two percent of the study participants knew of their risk. Eighty one point one percent understood that diabetes is preventable and 93.5 % stated that it is their responsibility to prevent its development. Thirty five point two percent of women considered normal-weight/thin fully agreed on the importance of physical activity and diabetes prevention. Eighty point five percent of women and 78.5 % of men answered positively to the question about obesity and diabetes. Conclusions: study participants knew of their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, although a large number of them attributed all responsibility for prevention to the health personnel.

  11. Liver enzymes in diabetic and non diabetic subjects with clinically diagnosed hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Chandra Sarkar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of liver disease and raised liver enzymes is common in diabetic patients and the increasing level of enzymes indicates the severity of hepatic injury. Very few studies have addressed this issue in Bangladesh though Bangladeshi population is very much susceptible to diabetes. This study investigated a total of 1400 diabetic patients and 100 non diabetic individuals to compare the level of liver enzymes between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The comparisons were made among subjects who were referred to the department of Gastro-hepato-pancreatic diseases (GHPD of BIRDEM with the clinical diagnosis of chronic hepatitis and other gastro-intestinal disorders. The investigations included alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and bilirubin levels. The subjects were categorized with and without hepatitis based on these investigations. The biochemical markers (ALT, AST, ALP, bilirubin did not differ significantly between non-diabetic male and female subjects. Neither the differences were significant between diabetic males and females though the diabetic patients had higher level of markers. In contrast, when compared between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects there were striking differences in either sex. Compared with the non-diabetic the diabetic subjects had significantly higher level of ALT (48.3 vs. 277.0, AST (42.0 vs. 213.0 and ALP (148 vs. 302 in males (p<0.005 for all. Similarly, these values were found significantly higher in diabetic females than their non-diabetic counterparts (p<0.01. For bilirubin, it was also found significant in males (p<0.001. The study revealed that the liver enzymes were found elevated in both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects who were referred with clinically diagnosed hepatitis. The enzymes were found markedly elevated among the diabetic than non diabetic patients, which indicate hepatic injury was more marked among the diabetic patients. Further

  12. Content Analysis of Mobile Health Applications on Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarafina Izahar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes self-management offers an opportunity to patients to be actively involved in managing their conditions and modifying lifestyle behaviors to attain positive health outcomes. With the unprecedented growth of mobile technology, smartphone plays a role in supporting diabetes self-management. Nonetheless, selecting appropriate mobile applications (apps is challenging for patients. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate and compare the contents and features of mobile medical apps for diabetes self-management. Of 346 commercial apps, 16 (16% and 19 (7.72% of the diabetes apps found in Apple and Google Play stores, respectively, were included based on the selection criteria and individually scored for the availability of 8 main features of diabetes self-management. The apps supported self-management by offering features such as free installation, less than 50 MB space used, offline use, automated data entry, data export and sharing, educational tool, and advice. Of the 8 evaluated features, only 11 (31.4% apps had a score of 5 whereas 7 (20% apps scored the lowest, with a score of 3. The majority of apps were free, required no Internet connectivity to use and were less than 50 MB in size. Our findings showed that the design of diabetes mobile apps focused on reporting and setting reminders, rather than providing personalized education or therapeutic support. In the future, the design of apps could be improved to integrate patients’ needs, usability for disease management, and lifestyle modifications.

  13. Content Analysis of Mobile Health Applications on Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izahar, Syarafina; Lean, Qi Ying; Hameed, Mohammed Abdul; Murugiah, Muthu Kumar; Patel, Rahul P; Al-Worafi, Yaser Mohammed; Wong, Tin Wui; Ming, Long Chiau

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes self-management offers an opportunity to patients to be actively involved in managing their conditions and modifying lifestyle behaviors to attain positive health outcomes. With the unprecedented growth of mobile technology, smartphone plays a role in supporting diabetes self-management. Nonetheless, selecting appropriate mobile applications (apps) is challenging for patients. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate and compare the contents and features of mobile medical apps for diabetes self-management. Of 346 commercial apps, 16 (16%) and 19 (7.72%) of the diabetes apps found in Apple and Google Play stores, respectively, were included based on the selection criteria and individually scored for the availability of 8 main features of diabetes self-management. The apps supported self-management by offering features such as free installation, less than 50 MB space used, offline use, automated data entry, data export and sharing, educational tool, and advice. Of the 8 evaluated features, only 11 (31.4%) apps had a score of 5 whereas 7 (20%) apps scored the lowest, with a score of 3. The majority of apps were free, required no Internet connectivity to use and were less than 50 MB in size. Our findings showed that the design of diabetes mobile apps focused on reporting and setting reminders, rather than providing personalized education or therapeutic support. In the future, the design of apps could be improved to integrate patients' needs, usability for disease management, and lifestyle modifications.

  14. An investigation into diabetic patients knowledge of diabetes and its ocular complications in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Clarke-Farr

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study which evaluated the knowledge of a sample of diabetic patients about their disease and its ocular complications. A comprehensive questionnaire was provided to diabetic patients in the Cape Town metropolitan district and its surrounds. Specifically, the questionnaire aimed to determine the patient’s knowledge of diabetes, their knowledge of the ocular complications of diabetes, the options for its management and treatment as well as a section considering other general information relating to diabetes and its ocular complications. Their subject knowledge about diabetes and its ocular complications was relatively limited as only 42% of respondents knew about the existence of two types of diabetes. Twenty nine percent of respondents believed that diabetes would not affect their eyes. Although 76% of the patients felt it very important to measure their blood sugar and 80% rated blood sugar control as very important, only 37% of the respondents measured their blood sugar on a daily basis. A particular concern was that although 96% of the respondents felt that it was important to have their eyes checked regularly, only 30% of the respondents stated that they had actually had their eyes checked every year. The results of this investigation support the need for diabetic patients to receive better patient education about diabetes and its ocular complications. Furthermore, attention needs to be paid to expanding patient access to diabetic screenings and ocular examinations in order to manage this condition effectively.

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ... and delivering it to the trillions of cells that make up the body. Watch this movie to learn more about diabetes. More ...

  16. Protective Effects of Melatonin on Retinal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathogenic factors contributing to the etiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Melatonin is an endogenous hormone that exhibits a variety of biological effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. The goals of this study were to determine whether melatonin could ameliorate retinal injury and to explore the potential mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of STZ (60 mg/kg in Sprague-Dawley rats. Melatonin (10 mg kg−1 daily, i.p. was administered from the induction of diabetes and continued for up to 12 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and retinal samples were collected. The retina of diabetic rats showed depletion of glutathione and downregulation of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL. Melatonin significantly upregulated GCL by retaining Nrf2 in the nucleus and stimulating Akt phosphorylation. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins, including interleukin 1β, TNF-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, was inhibited by melatonin through the NF-κB pathway. At 12 weeks, melatonin prevented the significant decrease in the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes under the diabetic condition. Our results suggest potent protective functions of melatonin in diabetic retinopathy. In addition to being a direct antioxidant, melatonin can exert receptor-mediated signaling effects to attenuate inflammation and oxidative stress of the retina.

  17. Diabetic microangiopathy in capillaroscopic examination of juveniles with diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska-Winciorek, Grażyna; Deja, Grażyna; Polańska, Joanna; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-30

    The aim of this work was a quantitative and qualitative assessment of a selected part of the microcirculation in children with diabetes type 1 using videocapillaroscopy technique. The authors tested a group consisting of 145 children (70 boys, 75 girls) diagnosed and treated for diabetes type 1 in the Diabetic Clinic of GCZD in Katowice for at least one year. The study included history, clinical examination (including dermatological examination) and videocapillaroscopy. Capillaroscopy, a non-invasive, painless and easily repeatable test, was performed using videocapillaroscopy with digital storage of the obtained images. All nailfolds were examined in all children using videocapillaroscopy, and the obtained images were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively for changes in capillary loops in the tested children according to the defined diagnostic procedure. The analysis of capillaroscopic images described selected quantitative and qualitative characteristics. The conducted analysis showed an increase in the number of capillaries and their elongation, the presence of megacapillaries and Raynaud loops, which were accompanied by an intensive red background, indicating possible neoangiogenesis. The increase in the number of capillaries, disturbances in distribution of capillaries and the presence of abnormal capillaries were correlated with the longer duration of diabetes. Raynaud loops were more frequently found in the cases of increased mean values of HbA1c. Higher values of HbA1c influenced the capillaroscopic images, mainly the number of vessels, including Raynaud loops. Videocapillaroscopy technique could be a useful tool to detect the early changes of microangiopathy in children with diabetes type 1.

  18. Diabetic microangiopathy in capillaroscopic examination of juveniles with diabetes type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kaminska-Winciorek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The aim of this work was a quantitative and qualitative assessment of a selected part of the microcirculation in children with diabetes type 1 using videocapillaroscopy technique.Material/Methods:The authors tested a group consisting of 145 children (70 boys, 75 girls diagnosed and treated for diabetes type 1 in the Diabetic Clinic of GCZD in Katowice for at least one year. The study included history, clinical examination (including dermatological examination and videocapillaroscopy. Capillaroscopy, a non-invasive, painless and easily repeatable test, was performed using videocapillaroscopy with digital storage of the obtained images. All nailfolds were examined in all children using videocapillaroscopy, and the obtained images were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively for changes in capillary loops in the tested children according to the defined diagnostic procedure.Results:The analysis of capillaroscopic images described selected quantitative and qualitative characteristics. The conducted analysis showed an increase in the number of capillaries and their elongation, the presence of megacapillaries and Raynaud loops, which were accompanied by an intensive red background, indicating possible neoangiogenesis. The increase in the number of capillaries, disturbances in distribution of capillaries and the presence of abnormal capillaries were correlated with the longer duration of diabetes. Raynaud loops were more frequently found in the cases of increased mean values of HbA1c. Higher values of HbA1c influenced the capillaroscopic images, mainly the number of vessels, including Raynaud loops.Conclusions:Videocapillaroscopy technique could be a useful tool to detect the early changes of microangiopathy in children with diabetes type 1.

  19. Diabetes mellitus in Bahrain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, A O

    1992-07-01

    Bahrain has faced a rapid transition in its socio-economic status, which resulted in great changes both in life-style and in patterns of health and disease. There has been a marked decline in infectious diseases and an increase in chronic diseases. Diabetes mellitus has become one of the most common public health problems in the country. In 1988 it was estimated that 3.4% of total deaths in Bahrain were due to diabetes. A community-based study among mothers aged 18 to 48 years showed that 8.5% of them had diabetes. The percentage was found to be higher among elderly Bahrainis (12.9%). Obesity, lack of physical activity, alteration in food habits, and change in social conditions have all played a vital role in the changing prevalence of diabetes in this country. The current programmes to manage and control diabetes are limited and ineffective. Thus measures to treat diabetes should be given a high priority in the national health policy. Training of physicians in the management of diabetes, public education, epidemiological surveys, and nutritional evaluation of local foods are among the most important measures needed to control diabetes in Bahrain.

  20. Averting Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in India through Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxation: An Economic-Epidemiologic Modeling Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, S; Vellakkal, S; Agrawal, S; Stuckler, D; Popkin, B; Ebrahim, S

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity (excessive body mass) are major threats to global health. Each year NCDs kill 36 million people (including 29 million people in low- and middle-income countries), thereby accounting for nearly two-thirds of the world's annual deaths. Cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases, and diabetes (a condition characterized by raised blood sugar levels) are responsible for most NCD-related deaths. Worldwide, diabetes...

  1. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-01

    We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions.

  2. Diabetes Health Literacy Among Somali Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in a US Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; Hagi-Salaad, Misbil F; Haji, Habibo; Cha, Stephen S; Wieland, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe diabetes literacy among Somali immigrants with diabetes and its association with diabetes outcomes. Among Somali immigrants in North America, the prevalence of diabetes exceeds that of the general population, and their measures of diabetes control are suboptimal when compared with non-Somali patients. Diabetes literacy is an important mediator of diabetes outcomes in general populations that has not been previously described among Somali immigrants and refugees. Diabetes literacy was measured using a translated version of the spoken knowledge in low literacy in diabetes (SKILLD) scale among Somali immigrants and refugees with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes outcome measures, including hemoglobin A1C, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and blood pressure, were obtained for each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess associations between diabetes literacy and diabetes outcomes. Among 50 Somali patients with diabetes who completed the survey, the mean SKILLD score was low (42.2 %). The diabetes outcome measures showed a mean hemoglobin A1C of 8 %, LDL cholesterol of 99.17 mg/dL (2.57 mmol/L), systolic blood pressure of 130.9 mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure of 70.2 mmHg. There was no association between diabetes literacy scores and diabetes outcome measures. Somali patients with diabetes mellitus had low diabetes literacy and suboptimal measures of diabetes disease control. However, we found no association between diabetes literacy and diabetes outcomes. Future work aimed at reduction of diabetes-related health disparities among Somali immigrants and refugees to high-income countries should go beyond traditional means of patient education for low-literacy populations.

  3. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing with adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial-differentiated stem cells, and topical conditioned medium therapy in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Robin F; Cahill, Kevin W; Rattigan, Deviney A; Marcotte, Joseph H; Fromer, Marc W; Chang, Shaohua; Zhang, Ping; Behling, Eric M; Behling, Kathryn C; Caputo, Francis J

    2018-05-09

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), endothelial-differentiated ASCs (EC/ASCs), and various conditioned media (CM) on wound healing in a diabetic swine model. We hypothesized that ASC-based therapies would accelerate wound healing. Diabetes was induced in four Yorkshire swine through intravenous injection of streptozotocin. ASCs were harvested from flank fat and cultured in either M199 or EGM-2 medium. A duplicate series of seven full-thickness dorsal wounds were surgically created on each swine. The wounds in the cellular treatment group underwent injection of low-dose or high-dose ASCs or EC/ASCs on day 0, with a repeat injection of one half of the initial dose on day 15. Wounds assigned to the topical CM therapy were covered with 2 mL of either serum-free M199 primed by ASCs or human umbilical vein endothelial cells every 3 days. Wounds were assessed at day 0, 10, 15, 20, and 28. The swine were sacrificed on day 28. ImageJ software was used to evaluate the percentage of wound healing. The wounded skin underwent histologic, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay examinations to evaluate markers of angiogenesis and inflammation. We found an increase in the percentage of wound closure rates in cell-based treatments and topical therapies at various points compared with the untreated control wounds (P swine model. Enhanced angiogenesis and immunomodulation might be key contributors to this process. The purpose of the present study was to translate the known beneficial effects of adipose-derived stem cells and associated conditioned medium therapy on diabetic wound healing to a large animal model. We demonstrated that stem cell and conditioned medium therapy significantly accelerate gross wound healing in diabetic swine, with data suggesting this might result from a decreased inflammatory response and increased angiogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Society for

  4. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  6. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension: a dual threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Ahmet Afşin; Akturk, Halis Kaan; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-07-01

    The following is a review of the current concepts on the relationship between hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus with a focus on the epidemiology and cardiovascular prognostic implications of coexistent HTN and diabetes mellitus, shared mechanisms underlying both conditions and pathophysiology of increased risk of cardiovascular disease, treatment of HTN in individuals with diabetes mellitus, and effects of anti-diabetic medications on blood pressure (BP). Diabetes mellitus and HTN often coexist in the same individual. They share numerous risk factors and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, most important of which are insulin resistance and inappropriate activation of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Recently updated guidelines recommend a BP goal of 140/90 mmHg in most individuals with diabetes mellitus. A new class of anti-diabetic medications, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, has shown favorable effects on BP. HTN affects the majority of individuals with diabetes mellitus. Coexistence of diabetes mellitus and HTN, especially if BP is not well controlled, dramatically increases the risk of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. BP control is an essential part of management of patients with diabetes mellitus, because it is one of the most effective ways to prevent vascular complications and death.

  7. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system." Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of Neurology

  8. Taurine Alleviates the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hyun Koh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, the protective effects of taurine on diabetic nephropathy along with its underlying mechanism were investigated. Experimental animals were divided into three groups: LETO rats as normal group (n=10, OLETF rats as diabetic control group (n=10, and OLETF rats treated with taurine group (n=10. We treated taurine (200 mg/kg/day for 20 weeks and treated high glucose (HG, 30 mM with or without taurine (30 mM in mouse cultured podocyte. After taurine treatment, blood glucose level was decreased and insulin secretion was increased. Taurine significantly reduced albuminuria and ACR. Also it decreased glomerular volume, GBM thickness and increased open slit pore density through decreased VEGF and increased nephrin mRNA expressions in renal cortex. The antioxidant effects of taurine were confirmed by the reduction of urine MDA in taurine treated diabetic group. Also reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were decreased in HG condition with taurine treated podocytes compared to without taurine. These results indicate that taurine lowers glucose level via increased insulin secretion and ameliorates the progression of diabetic nephropathy through antifibrotic and antioxidant effects in type 2 diabetes rat model.

  9. CERN Diabetes Awareness Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness and of heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if it is diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences...

  10. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness, heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences if und...

  11. Psychiatric and Medical Conditions in Transition-Aged Individuals With ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davignon, Meghan N; Qian, Yinge; Massolo, Maria; Croen, Lisa A

    2018-04-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a variety of medical and psychiatric conditions and an increased use of health care services. There is limited information about the prevalence of psychiatric and medical conditions in adolescents and young adults with ASD. Our objective was to describe the frequency of medical and psychiatric conditions in a large population of diverse, insured transition-aged individuals with ASD. Participants included Kaiser Permanente Northern California members who were enrolled from 2013 to 2015 and who were 14 to 25 years old. Individuals with ASD ( n = 4123) were compared with peers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( n = 20 615), diabetes mellitus ( n = 2156), and typical controls with neither condition ( n = 20 615). Over one-third (34%) of individuals with ASD had a co-occurring psychiatric condition; the most commonly reported medical conditions included infections (42%), obesity (25%), neurologic conditions (18%), allergy and/or immunologic conditions (16%), musculoskeletal conditions (15%), and gastrointestinal (11%) conditions. After controlling for sex, age, race, and duration of Kaiser Permanente Northern California membership, most psychiatric conditions were significantly more common in the ASD group than in each comparison group, and most medical conditions were significantly more common in the ASD group than in the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typical control groups but were similar to or significantly less common than the diabetes mellitus group. Although more research is needed to identify factors contributing to this excess burden of disease, there is a pressing need for all clinicians to approach ASD as a chronic health condition requiring regular follow-up and routine screening and treatment of medical and psychiatric issues. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Diabetes in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feig, Denice S; Corcoy, Rosa; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising rates of diabetes in pregnancy have led to an escalation in research in this area. As in any area of clinical research, outcome definitions vary from study to study, making it difficult to compare research findings and draw conclusions. Our aim was to compile and create...... a repository of definitions, which could then be used universally. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed of published and ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the area of diabetes in pregnancy between Jan 1, 2000 and June 1, 2012. Other sources included the World Health...... Organization and Academic Society Statements. The advice of experts was sought when appropriate definitions were lacking. RESULTS: Among the published RCTs on diabetes and pregnancy, 171 abstracts were retrieved, 64 full texts were reviewed, and 53 were included. Among the ongoing RCTs published in Clinical...

  13. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) for type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    In the UK, diabetes mellitus affects around 3 million people, of whom over 90% have type 2 diabetes. Aims of treatment include minimising long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, blindness, chronic kidney disease, premature mortality) and avoiding unwanted effects of treatment (e.g. severe hypoglycaemia, weight gain). Management of diabetes includes patient support and education; addressing symptoms; lifestyle modification; targeting associated risk factors for cardiovascular disease; and surveillance for, and management of, complications including treatment-related hypoglycaemia. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) belongs to a new class of oral glucose-lowering drugs that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glycosuria. It is licensed in the UK in adults with type 2 diabetes as monotherapy when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control and who are unable to tolerate metformin; or, as add-on therapy, with other glucose-lowering agents including insulin, when these, with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycaemic control. The company's advertising materials claim that dapagliflozin provides a "novel method of controlling excess glucose" with "secondary benefit of weight loss". Here, we review the evidence for the use of dapagliflozin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal changes in experimental type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Edgardo O; Beauquis, Juan; Revsin, Yanina; Banzan, Arturo M; Roig, Paulina; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Saravia, Flavia

    2009-03-02

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is accompanied by a "diabetic encephalopathy" including hypersensitivity to stress, increased risk of stroke, dementia and cognitive impairment. In previous works we reported several brain alterations including a strong decrease in hippocampal proliferation and survival in both spontaneous and streptozotocin-induced models of experimental T1D. The aim of this study was to explore in streptozotocin-treated mice and other parameters associated to mild neurodegeneration in the dentate gyrus and the potential correlation with behavioural changes. The neurogenic status, measured by doublecortin (DCX) expression, showed an important decline in the number of positive cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ). However, neuronal migration was not affected. We found a marked enhancement of intracellular lipofuscin deposits, characteristic of increased oxidative stress and aging in both, the hilus and the SGZ and granular cell layer (GCL). Diabetic mice showed a significant impairment in learning and memory tests, exhibiting a higher latency to show an escape response and a poorer learning efficiency of an active avoiding response compared with control mice. Both, exploratory and non-exploratory activities in a conflictive environment in the asymmetric elevated plus maze were not affected by the diabetic condition. In conclusion, experimental diabetes showed clear signs of changes in the dentate gyrus, changes similar to those present in the aging process. Correlatively, these alterations were in line with a reduced performance in learning and memory tests. The mechanism that could potentially link neural and behavioural disturbances is not yet fully comprehended.

  15. Effects of Mindfulness on Diabetes Mellitus: Rationale and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Wilson L; Wilson, David; de Salvo, Vera; Vannucchi, Bruna; de Souza, Érika Leonardo; Lucena, Leandro; Sarto, Héctor Morillo; Modrego-Alarcón, Marta; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Demarzo, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an emerging global healthcare problem and its prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite improvements in both medical and pharmacological therapies, a complex medical condition may demand a diversified approach, such as: drug therapy, healthy diet and exercises, diabetes education programs, adherence to medical treatment and active participation of the patients in their lifestyle changes, such as stress management. The concept of mindfulness is here defined as the awareness that unfolds from the intention to attentively observe the current experience in a non-judgmental and non-evaluative way. This state of awareness can be enhanced through the use of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), which have been associated to many physical and psychological health indicators. The aim of this overview is to offer the rationale and potential benefits of mindfulness in the control of DM and its complications. a narrative review of the current and updated literature available on online database and which came up using the terms "mindfulness" and "diabetes mellitus". Mindfulness-based Interventions (MBIs) can be seen as preventive and complementary interventions in DM, particularly for the relief of symptoms related to depression and anxiety in diabetic patients and also in the management of other factors, including mindful eating, physical exercises and treatment adherence. Although many studies only present research protocols, mindfulness seems to have beneficial effects on all aspects of diabetes, including incidence, control and complications. Furthermore, longer term and more carefully controlled trials are necessary in order to draw consistent conclusions on the beneficial role of MBIs on DM. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Prevalence and Predictors of Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes among Adults 18 Years or Older in Florida: A Multinomial Logistic Modeling Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifechukwude Obiamaka Okwechime

    Full Text Available Individuals with pre-diabetes and diabetes have increased risks of developing macro-vascular complications including heart disease and stroke; which are the leading causes of death globally. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes, and to investigate their predictors among adults ≥18 years in Florida.Data covering the time period January-December 2013, were obtained from Florida's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS. Survey design of the study was declared using SVYSET statement of STATA 13.1. Descriptive analyses were performed to estimate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes. Predictors of pre-diabetes and diabetes were investigated using multinomial logistic regression model. Model goodness-of-fit was evaluated using both the multinomial goodness-of-fit test proposed by Fagerland, Hosmer, and Bofin, as well as, the Hosmer-Lemeshow's goodness of fit test.There were approximately 2,983 (7.3% and 5,189 (12.1% adults in Florida diagnosed with pre-diabetes and diabetes, respectively. Over half of the study respondents were white, married and over the age of 45 years while 36.4% reported being physically inactive, overweight (36.4% or obese (26.4%, hypertensive (34.6%, hypercholesteremic (40.3%, and 26% were arthritic. Based on the final multivariable multinomial model, only being overweight (Relative Risk Ratio [RRR] = 1.85, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] = 1.41, 2.42, obese (RRR = 3.41, 95% CI = 2.61, 4.45, hypertensive (RRR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.33, 2.15, hypercholesterolemic (RRR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.55, 2.43, and arthritic (RRR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.55 had significant associations with pre-diabetes. However, more predictors had significant associations with diabetes and the strengths of associations tended to be higher than for the association with pre-diabetes. For instance, the relative risk ratios for the association between diabetes and being overweight (RRR = 2.00, 95

  17. Metabolic footprint of diabetes: a multiplatform metabolomics study in an epidemiological setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Suhre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolomics is the rapidly evolving field of the comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in a biological fluid. However, no single analytic technique covers the entire spectrum of the human metabolome. Here we present results from a multiplatform study, in which we investigate what kind of results can presently be obtained in the field of diabetes research when combining metabolomics data collected on a complementary set of analytical platforms in the framework of an epidemiological study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 40 individuals with self-reported diabetes and 60 controls (male, over 54 years were randomly selected from the participants of the population-based KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg study, representing an extensively phenotyped sample of the general German population. Concentrations of over 420 unique small molecules were determined in overnight-fasting blood using three different techniques, covering nuclear magnetic resonance and tandem mass spectrometry. Known biomarkers of diabetes could be replicated by this multiple metabolomic platform approach, including sugar metabolites (1,5-anhydroglucoitol, ketone bodies (3-hydroxybutyrate, and branched chain amino acids. In some cases, diabetes-related medication can be detected (pioglitazone, salicylic acid. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study depicts the promising potential of metabolomics in diabetes research by identification of a series of known and also novel, deregulated metabolites that associate with diabetes. Key observations include perturbations of metabolic pathways linked to kidney dysfunction (3-indoxyl sulfate, lipid metabolism (glycerophospholipids, free fatty acids, and interaction with the gut microflora (bile acids. Our study suggests that metabolic markers hold the potential to detect diabetes-related complications already under sub-clinical conditions in the general population.

  18. Renal glucose metabolism in normal physiological conditions and in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2017-11-01

    The kidney plays an important role in glucose homeostasis via gluconeogenesis, glucose utilization, and glucose reabsorption from the renal glomerular filtrate. After an overnight fast, 20-25% of glucose released into the circulation originates from the kidneys through gluconeogenesis. In this post-absorptive state, the kidneys utilize about 10% of all glucose utilized by the body. After glucose ingestion, renal gluconeogenesis increases and accounts for approximately 60% of endogenous glucose release in the postprandial period. Each day, the kidneys filter approximately 180g of glucose and virtually all of this is reabsorbed into the circulation. Hormones (most importantly insulin and catecholamines), substrates, enzymes, and glucose transporters are some of the various factors influencing the kidney's role. Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased renal glucose uptake and release in the fasting and the post-prandial states. Additionally, glucosuria in these patients does not occur at plasma glucose levels that would normally produce glucosuria in healthy individuals. The major abnormality of renal glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetes appears to be impaired renal glucose release during hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetics within the scope of education in diabetes – in the light of nationwide research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abramczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A family is a significant asset, which may support a diabetic in his efforts and strengthen his concern for health. Properly prepared families/guardians may protect the patient from many medical mistakes and also help ensure suitable conditions for treatment and satisfactory care. Recommendations required in the process of diabetes treatment are better complied with if the needs, expectations as well as previous experience of both patients and supporting family members are respected in the planned care. The aim of the work: The paper presents the expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetes patients within the scope of education in diabetes and their conditions. Material and methods: To meet the objective , research was carried out by the author of this work on 1366 family patients with diabetes from 61 randomly chosen national primary health service units, within the scope of NCSR grant no 6P05D02320. The research was conducted on the basis of: guided nursing interviews, relative assessment of fitness and independence of the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by families/guardians and analysis of medical records. Results: Results of the research show that: most families are open to increase their level of competence and expect education on diabetes. Openness to education shown by families/guardians of diabetics is determined by many factors. Conclusions: Education of families/guardians of diabetics may lead to lower demand for professional care, reduced costs of care as well as increased satisfaction with this care and effects of diabetics treatment.

  20. MANIFESTASI RONTGENOGRAFI DIABETES MELLITUS DI RONGGA MULUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trelia Boel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common disease, described as a systemic disease of carbohydrate metabolism caused by a realtive or absolute deficiency of insulum. This condition is characterized by hyperglyecemia, glucosuria, polyuria, polydipsia, pruritis, and weight loss. Diabetes mellitus in itself does not cause periodontal disease, however diabetes or patients with an increased blood glucose concentration (>200mg/dl tend to gave increased incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Patient with diabetics above 50 years old (3 cases radiographically can be seen as alveolar bone loss in maxilla and mandible. Alveolar bone loss is seen larger in the posterior maxilla region. The vascular alteration in diabetics may enhance the susceptibility of periodontium to become periodontitis and serve as an etiology factor in pathologic bone resorption.

  1. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  2. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

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    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  3. Improving outcomes in patients with coexisting multimorbid conditions-the development and evaluation of the combined diabetes and renal control trial (C-DIRECT): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griva, Konstadina; Mooppil, Nandakumar; Khoo, Eric; Lee, Vanessa Yin Woan; Kang, Augustine Wee Cheng; Newman, Stanton P

    2015-02-12

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients with diabetes on dialysis have worse clinical outcomes and increased psychological burden. The need to manage the combined treatment demands for both conditions is particularly challenging yet there is paucity of data of the barriers preventing optimal management to combined therapy for diabetes and kidney failure. The study aims to explore needs of patients and develop an intervention to enable people with diabetes and ESRD to better manage both their conditions. A two-phase study comprising a mixed method observational study (phase I) and a feasibility trial (phase II). Phase I will seek to document outcomes and needs of the population (patients with DM-ESRD) and seek input on preferred delivery/implementation for the programme. Data will be collected with in-depth interviews with patients, caregivers and healthcare providers (N=50), and from a questionnaire-based survey (N=170). Phase 2 will build on these data to design and test the feasibility of a practical, low-intensity, clinic-integrated intervention using a self-management paradigm. The intervention will primarily seek to support behavioural change so as to improve adherence and clinical outcomes for DM as well as for ESRD. For the feasibility trial, we will be evaluating acceptability, retention and completion rates of the programme. The study protocol has been approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent is required from every participant. Findings will be disseminated through journals, conferences and will be used to create a fully manualised intervention (materials) and training course for facilitators. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Diabetes Treatment as “Homework"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health professionals assign diabetes patients “homework” in that they give them instructions on how to manage diabetes, recognizing that most diabetes care takes place in the home setting. We studied how homework is practiced and whether knowledge and behavioral practices related...... to diabetes self-management diffuse from patients to their housemates. Method: This mixed-methods study combined quantitative data from a household survey including 90 rural Ugandan households (50% had a member with type 2 diabetes [T2D]) with qualitative data from health facilities and interviews with 10...... patients with T2D. Focus for data collection was knowledge and practices related to diabetes homework. A generalized mixed model was used to analyze quantitative data, while content analysis was used for qualitative data analysis. Results: Patients with T2D generally understood the diabetes homework...

  5. Decrease in toe pinch force in male type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Kitayama, Naomi; Murao, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the toe pinch force (TPF) of type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy by disease stage, and to clarify the factors affecting the TPF. Seventy-four men with diabetic nephropathy (age: 62.7 ± 8.9 years, duration of diabetes: 14.2 ± 8.6 years) were enrolled. According to the staging of diabetic nephropathy, TPF and knee extension force (KEF) were compared among three groups: normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, and overt nephropathy. In addition, we investigated factors influencing TPF and KEF by performing multiple regression analysis. Normoalbuminuria group, microalbuminuria group, and overt nephropathy group included 26, 25, and 23 patients, respectively. The TPF of the overt nephropathy group (3.15 ± 0.75 kg) was significantly lower than that of the normoalbuminuria (4.2 ± 0.7 kg, p diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and diabetic nephropathy were determinant factors of the TPF; and age, body mass index, and diabetic nephropathy were determinant factors of the KEF. We found in male patients with diabetic nephropathy, the TPF and KEF decreased with progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, our findings suggest diabetic nephropathy and DPN are critically involved in the reduction of TPF and KEF.

  6. Diabetes distress: understanding the hidden struggles of living with diabetes and exploring intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Emma; Lockhart, Sam; Davies, Mark; Lindsay, John R; Dempster, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes distress is a rational emotional response to the threat of a life-changing illness. Distinct from depression, it is conceptually rooted in the demands of diabetes management and is a product of emotional adjustment. Diabetes distress has been found to be significantly associated with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the likelihood of an individual adopting self-care behaviours. The lack of perceived support from family, friends and healthcare professionals significantly contributes to elevated diabetes distress, and this issue tends to be overlooked when designing interventions. Pioneering large-scale research, DAWN2, gives voices to the families of those with diabetes and reaffirms the need to consider psychosocial factors in routine diabetes care. Structured diabetes education programmes are the most widely used in helping individuals cope with diabetes, but they tend not to include the psychological or interpersonal aspects of diabetes management in their curricula. The need for health practitioners, irrespective of background, to demonstrate an understanding of diabetes distress and to actively engage in discussion with individuals struggling to cope with diabetes is emphasised. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Let's prevent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, Laura J.; Khunti, Kamlesh; Williams, Sian

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevention of type 2 diabetes is a globally recognised health care priority, but there is a lack of rigorous research investigating optimal methods of translating diabetes prevention programmes, based on the promotion of a healthy lifestyle, into routine primary care. The aim...... of the study is to establish whether a pragmatic structured education programme targeting lifestyle and behaviour change in conjunction with motivational maintenance via the telephone can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose regulation (a composite of impaired glucose...... of type 2 diabetes. Secondary outcomes include changes in HbA1c, blood glucose levels, cardiovascular risk, the presence of the Metabolic Syndrome and the cost-effectiveness of the intervention.Methods: The study consists of screening and intervention phases within 44 general practices coordinated from...

  8. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  9. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase's latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  10. Optical coherence tomography angiography discerns preclinical diabetic retinopathy in eyes of patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Yang, Dawei; Huang, Zhongning; Zeng, Yunkao; Wang, Jun; Hu, Yunyan; Zhang, Liang

    2018-05-01

    To investigate changes in retinal vascular plexuses and choriocapillaris in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) without diabetic retinopathy (DR) and healthy controls using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). A total of 71 DM2 and 67 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent OCTA examination (RTVue-XR Avanti; Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA). Average vessel density in superficial capillary plexus (SCP), deep capillary plexus (DCP) and choriocapillaris, parafoveal vessel density in SCP and DCP, FAZ area (mm 2 ) in SCP, microaneurysms and capillary nonperfusion were taken into analysis. Parafoveal vessel density in both SCP and DCP decreased in the eyes without clinical DR compared to normal controls (p Diabetic patients with no signs of DR also had a significant reduction in average vessel density of SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris (p diabetic eyes, and capillary nonperfusion was noted in 18 of 71 diabetic eyes. We demonstrated that OCTA can identify preclinical DR before the manifestation of clinically apparent retinopathy in diabetic eyes. DM2 patients without DR have SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris impairment. Our results suggested that OCTA might be a promising tool for regular screening of diabetic eyes for DR.

  11. Situational analysis of services for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy and evaluation of programs for the detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy in India: Methods for the India 11-city 9-state study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G V S; Gilbert, Clare E; Shukla, Rajan; Vashist, Praveen; Shamanna, B R

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual impairment in India. Available evidence shows that there are more than 60 million persons with diabetes in India and that the number will increase to more than a 100 million by 2030. There is a paucity of data on the perceptions and practices of persons with diabetes and the available infrastructure and uptake of services for DR in India. Assess perception of care and challenges faced in availing eye care services among persons with diabetics and generate evidence on available human resources, infrastructure, and service utilization for DR in India. The cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in eleven cities across 9 States in India. In each city, public and private providers of eye-care were identified. Both multispecialty and standalone facilities were included. Specially designed semi-open ended questionnaires were administered to the clients. Semi-structured interviews were administered to the service providers (both diabetic care physicians and eye care teams) and observational checklists were used to record findings of the assessment of facilities conducted by a dedicated team of research staff. A total of 859 units were included in this study. This included 86 eye care and 73 diabetic care facilities, 376 persons with diabetes interviewed in the eye clinics and 288 persons with diabetes interviewed in the diabetic care facilities. The findings will have significant implications for the organization of services for persons with diabetes in India.

  12. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain clinical utility of pregabalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinik AI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aaron I Vinik, Carolina M Casellini Strelitz Diabetes Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Abstract: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy

  13. Subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansournia, N; Riyahi, S; Tofangchiha, S; Mansournia, M A; Riahi, M; Heidari, Z; Hazrati, E

    2017-03-01

    Association of subclinical hypothyroidism with type 2 diabetes and its complications has been previously documented. These reports were, however, inconclusive and mainly gathered from Chinese and East Asian populations. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and its relationship with diabetic nephropathy in Iranian individuals with type 2 diabetes, drawn from a white Middle Eastern population with an increasing prevalence of diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, 255 Iranian participants with type 2 diabetes and without history of thyroid disorders were included. Patients with TSH > 4.2 mIU/L and normal T4 were classified as having subclinical hypothyroidism. Diabetic nephropathy was diagnosed based on abnormal 24-h urinary albumin or protein measurements (24-h urinary albumin ≥30 mg/day or 24-h urinary protein ≥150 mg/day). Multivariate logistic regression was employed to obtain the OR for the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy. We found that subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy were as prevalent as 18.1 and 41.2 %, respectively, among the participants. We also found that subclinical hypothyroidism was independently associated with higher rates of diabetic nephropathy, after multivariable adjustment (OR [95 % CI] 3.23 [1.42-7.37], p = 0.005). We found that the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in Iranian diabetic population was among the highest rates reported to date. Our data supported the independent association of subclinical hypothyroidism with diabetic nephropathy, calling for further investigations to evaluate their longitudinal associations.

  14. Development of a screening tool for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Bency, Mayur Joseph; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a condition of the eye of diabetic patients where the retina is damaged because of long-term diabetes. The condition deteriorates towards irreversible blindness in extreme cases of diabetic retinopathy. Hence, early detection of diabetic retinopathy is important to prevent blindness. Regular screening of fundus images of diabetic patients could be helpful in preventing blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we propose techniques for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images using several shape and texture features computed from detected microaneurysms, exudates, and hemorrhages. The classification accuracy is reported in terms of the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve using 200 fundus images from the MESSIDOR database. The value of Az for classifying normal images versus mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is 0:9106. The value of Az for classification of mild NPDR versus moderate and severe NPDR is 0:8372. The Az value for classification of moderate NPDR and severe NPDR is 0:9750.

  15. Prevalence and impact of initial misclassification of pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Avnish; Rizvi, Ali A; Knight, Lisa M; Jerrell, Jeanette M

    2012-10-01

    To characterize rates of initial misclassification of type 1 diabetes mellitus as type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus in a cohort of children/adolescents and to examine the impact of misclassification on the risk of diabetes-related complications. An 11-year dataset (1996-2006) was analyzed. Inclusion criteria included age 17 years and younger, enrollees in South Carolina State Medicaid, and diagnosis of type 2/unspecified or type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least two visits, 15 days apart. Survival analysis was used to assess the association of "misclassification" with the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and the cumulative incidence of neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications, after controlling for individual risk factors and comorbid conditions. A total of 1130 individuals meeting the inclusion criteria were studied for a median of 7 years. Of the 1130 individuals, 669 (59.2%) maintained a diagnosis of type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus, 205 (18.1%) were consistently diagnosed as type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the remaining 256 individuals (22.7%) were misclassified. Insulin treatment was used in 100% of the type 1 diabetes mellitus group and 73% of the misclassified group. Compared with the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, being misclassified was associated with earlier development of DKA (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 5.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.09-8.37), neuropathy (aHR 1.94, CI 1.31-2.88), and nephropathy (aHR 1.72, CI 1.19-2.50), whereas being consistently classified with type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated only with earlier development of DKA (aHR 4.96, CI 2.56-9.61). Proper categorization of pediatric diabetes can be challenging, especially with comorbid obesity. Failure to ascertain type 1 diabetes mellitus in a timely manner in a pediatric population may increase the risk of substandard care and diabetes-related complications.

  16. Gestational Diabetes and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This women's health podcast focuses on gestational diabetes (GDM) to help educate women who may have been diagnosed with GDM now or in the past. GDM is a condition that can lead to pregnancy complications.

  17. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...... and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in the background...

  18. Diabetes connect: African American men's preferences for a community-based diabetes management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Krysia; Sherrer, Nathan; Rushton, Tullia; Willig, Amanda; Agne, April; Shelton, Tanya; Cherrington, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore African American men's perceptions of how community-based, community-health worker (CHW)-delivered diabetes interventions might best be implemented. Four 90-minute focus groups were guided by a trained moderator with a written guide to facilitate discussion on the topic of diabetes management and preferences for community-based programs. Participants were recruited from the diabetes education database at a safety-net health system in Jefferson County, AL. Two independent reviewers performed content analysis to identify major themes using an iterative, combined deductive and inductive approach. There were 25 male participants. Mean years living with diabetes was 9.6 (range, 1-20). Participants demonstrated knowledge of self-management strategies and identified various hardships including emotional and physical manifestations of diabetes, dietary restrictions, and institutional frustrations with the health system that contributed to self-management barriers. Their preferred CHW responsibilities were to educate, hold support groups, help track daily activities, and help find resources. Potential concerns included the need for confidentiality and fears of being stereotyped. Participants identified critical self-management strategies but endure hardships that present barriers to daily diabetes management. Preferences for community-based programs and suggested CHW responsibilities could help to overcome many of those barriers by increasing access and providing support. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Omani Type 2 Diabetics in Al-Dakhiliyah Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhakeem Hamood Alrawahi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic nephropathy among Omani type 2 diabetics in Al-Dakhiliyah region of the Sultanate of Oman.Methods: A cross-sectional and a case control study designs were used to assess the prevalence and risk factors respectively. For the prevalence study a sample of 699 diabetic subjects were selected randomly from two polyclinics in Al-Dakhiliyah region; Sumail and Nizwa polyclinics. For the case control study, a sample consisting of 215 cases and 358 controls were randomly selected from those who were included in the cross-sectional study. A well designed questionnaire has been used to collect data regarding the disease and risk factors. Data was analyzed using SPSS19 statistical program.Results: Total prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was calculated as 42.5% (95% C.I: 38.83% - 46.15%. The difference in the prevalence in the two polyclinic catchment area was not significant. The prevalence was significantly higher among males (51.6% compared to females (36.5%. Crude analysis of the risk factors showed significant association between diabetic nephropathy and the following factors; male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, retinopathy, neuropathy, family history of diabetic nephropathy, poor glycemic control (high HbA1c, and hypertriglyceridemia. Multivariate analysis showed the following factors to be independent risk factors; male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes, family history of diabetic nephropathy and poor glycaemic control (high HbA1c.Conclusion: The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy in this study was 42.5% and the significant risk factors associated with it included male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes, family history of diabetic nephropathy and poor glycemic control (high HbA1c.

  20. Hiperurisemia pada Pra Diabetes

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    Ellyza Nasrul

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakAsam urat (AU merupakan produk akhir dari katabolisme adenin dan guanin yang berasal dari pemecahannukleotida purin. Urat dihasilkan oleh sel yang mengandung xanthine oxidase, terutama hepar dan usus kecil.Hiperurisemia adalah keadaan kadar asam urat dalam darah lebih dari 7,0 mg/dL.Pra diabetes adalah subjek yangmempunyai kadar glukosa plasma meningkat akan tetapi peningkatannya masih belum mencapai nilai minimaluntuk kriteria diagnosis diabetes melitus (DM. Glukosa darah puasa terganggu merupakan keadaan dimanapeningkatan kadar FPG≥100 mg/dL dan <126 mg/dL. Toleransi glukosa terganggu merupakan peningkatanglukosa plasma 2 jam setelah pembebanan 75 gram glukosa oral (≥140 mg/dL dan <200mg/dL dengan FPG<126 mg/dL.Insulin juga berperan dalam meningkatkan reabsorpsi asam urat di tubuli proksimal ginjal. Sehinggapada keadaan hiperinsulinemia pada pra diabetes terjadi peningkatan reabsorpsi yang akan menyebabkanhiperurisemia. Transporter urat yang berada di membran apikal tubuli renal dikenal sebagai URAT-1 berperandalam reabsorpsi urat.Kata kunci: Hiperurisemia, Pra DiabetesAbstractUric acid (AU is the end product of the catabolism of adenine and guanine nucleotides derived from thebreakdown of purines. Veins produced by cells containing xanthine oxidase, especially the liver and small intestine.Hyperuricemia is a state in the blood uric acid levels over 7.0 mg / dL.Pre-diabetes is a subject which has a plasmaglucose level will rise but the increase is still not reached the minimum value for the diagnostic criteria for diabetesmellitus (DM. Impaired fasting blood glucose is a condition in which increased levels of FPG ≥ 100 mg / dL and<126 mg / dL. Impaired glucose tolerance is an increase in plasma glucose 2 hours after 75 gram oral glucose load(≥ 140 mg / dL and <200mg/dl with FPG <126 mg / dL.Insulin also plays a role in increasing the reabsorption ofuric acid in renal proximal tubule. So that the hyperinsulinemia in the pre-diabetic

  1. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Memory in Diabetes Study (ACCORD-MIND): rationale, design, and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeff D; Miller, Michael E; Bryan, R Nick; Lazar, Ronald M; Coker, Laura H; Johnson, Janice; Cukierman, Tali; Horowitz, Karen R; Murray, Anne; Launer, Lenore J

    2007-06-18

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairment are 2 of the most common chronic conditions found in persons aged > or = 60 years. Clinical studies have shown a greater prevalence of global cognitive impairment, incidence of cognitive decline, and incidence of Alzheimer disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. To date, there have been no randomized trials of the effects of long-term glycemic control on cognitive function and structural brain changes in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Memory in Diabetes Study (ACCORD-MIND) is to test whether there is a difference in the rate of cognitive decline and structural brain change in patients with diabetes treated with standard-care guidelines compared with those treated with intensive-care guidelines. This comparison will be made in a subsample of 2,977 patients with diabetes participating in the ongoing ACCORD trial, a clinical trial sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) with support from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Data from this ACCORD substudy on the possible beneficial or adverse effects of intensive treatment on cognitive function will be obtained from a 30-minute test battery, administered at baseline and 20-month and 40-month visits. In addition, full-brain magnetic resonance imaging will be performed on 630 participants at baseline and at 40 months to assess the relation between the ACCORD treatments and structural brain changes. The general aim of ACCORD-MIND is to determine whether the intensive treatment of diabetes, a major risk factor for Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia, can reduce the early decline in cognitive function that could later evolve into more cognitively disabling conditions. This report presents the design, rationale, and methods of the ACCORD-MIND substudy.

  2. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs.Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard.Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs.Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  3. Diet in 45- to 74-year-old individuals with diagnosed diabetes: comparison to counterparts without diabetes in a nationally representative survey (Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé 2006-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castetbon, Katia; Bonaldi, Christophe; Deschamps, Valérie; Vernay, Michel; Malon, Aurélie; Salanave, Benoit; Druet, Céline

    2014-06-01

    A healthy diet has been shown to prevent diabetes complications. However, the eating habits of individuals with diabetes who are aware of their glycemic condition have been poorly studied. This study's objective was to assess the dietary behavior overall and according to dietary recommendations in adults diagnosed with diabetes compared with those of a general population of the same age (45 to 74 years) in a nationally representative survey carried out in France in 2006-2007 (Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé) (n=1,476 including 101 patients with diabetes). Trained dietitians assessed diet using three 24-hour recalls and diabetes was self-declared. After weighting and using multiple adjustments, mean food and nutrient intakes were compared according to diabetes status. Interactions with age and sex were sought. Adults with diabetes had lower intakes of sweetened foods (40 g/day vs 125 g/day), alcohol (1.45 g/day vs 1.64 g/day), energy (1,790 kcal/day vs 1,986 kcal/day), and simple sugar (63.1 g/day vs 89.8 g/day) and higher intakes of meat (126 g/day vs 109 g/day), complex carbohydrates (26.3% energy intake vs 23.6% energy intake), and vitamins B and E (628 μg/day vs 541 μg/day). In addition, 45- to 59-year-old individuals with diabetes ate more fruits and vegetables, fiber, beta carotene, folate, vitamin C, and potassium than adults of the same age who did not have diabetes. Overall, 45- to 74-year-old adults with diabetes had a higher-quality diet than individuals without diabetes. However, compared with recommendations, a healthy diet continues to represent a public health challenge in terms of preventing diabetes complications. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Comparative Effectiveness of Diabetes Prevention Strategies to Reduce Postpartum Weight Retention in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: The Gestational Diabetes' Effects on Moms (GEM) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Assiamira; Hedderson, Monique M; Brown, Susan D; Albright, Cheryl L; Ehrlich, Samantha F; Tsai, Ai-Lin; Caan, Bette J; Sternfeld, Barbara; Gordon, Nancy P; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Gunderson, Erica P; Mevi, Ashley A; Herman, William H; Ching, Jenny; Crites, Yvonne; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of diabetes prevention strategies addressing postpartum weight retention for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) delivered at the health system level: mailed recommendations (usual care) versus usual care plus a Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)-derived lifestyle intervention. This study was a cluster randomized controlled trial of 44 medical facilities (including 2,280 women with GDM) randomized to intervention or usual care. The intervention included mailed gestational weight gain recommendations plus 13 telephone sessions between 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Primary outcomes included the following: proportion meeting the postpartum goals of 1) reaching pregravid weight if pregravid BMI Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Chang Jin; Hong, Sung Kwan [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Gyu [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment.

  6. Frequency of diabetic cardiomyopathy among type-2 diabetics presenting as heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Z.; Hashmi, A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of diabetic cardiomyopathy among patients with type-2 diabetes presenting with overt heart failure. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Cardiology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from April 2008 to July 2009. Methodology: One hundred patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus having symptoms and signs of heart failure were enrolled. Anthropometric parameters were recorded and all patients had investigations including complete blood count, blood glucose (fasting and random), serum creatinine, fasting lipid profile, haemoglobin A1c, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram and Doppler echocardiography. After stabilization, every patient underwent coronary angiography. The data was entered in a structured proforma. Results: Sixty (60%) patients were males and 40 (40%) were females. Duration of diabetes was > 10 years in all. Eighty (80%) were on oral hypoglycemic and 20 (20%) were on insulin. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was found in 40 patients (40%) of the total study patients. Forty percent (40%) patients had marked left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction < 30%). Three (5%) patients died during hospitalization. Conclusion: Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a fairly common cause of heart failure in the native population with type-2 diabetes mellitus and results in high morbidity and mortality. (author)

  7. Case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki (Hamamatsu Univ. Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with /sup 131/I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Adm of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ following /sup 131/I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm.

  8. A case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki

    1982-01-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following 131 I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with 131 I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Administration of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration inistration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T 3 and T 4 following 131 I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm. (author)

  9. Comparative Healthcare: Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Mohammed Ali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the third in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to diabetes inBangaldesh and Australia respectively. The social and medical consequences of this chronic conditionare highlighted through the approach to patients at various stages of the disease from two nationalperspectives. An astonishing 7% of the 153 million people are reported to have diabetes in Bangladesh. Manyremain undiagnosed. Delays in diagnosis or management of diabetes have life limiting consequences for thosewho can ill afford private health care in the poorer nation. Screening and early intervention appear to bedenied to many in the developing country. The context is very different with Australians very fortunate to havea coordinated primary health care sector. The outlook for Bangladeshis with uncontrolled diabetes or withtreatable sequela would be unacceptable in Australia. At every stage in the disease trajectory the doctorsemphasise the importance of life style modification, a particular challenge in affluent Australia with its growingincidence of life style related pre morbid conditions in an increasingly sedentary population. A corner stone ofthe support of people with diabetes is the role of nurses and allied health professionals. With a fundedcommitment to multidisciplinary care in the community people with diabetes in Australia have access tosupport closer to home whereas those in Bangladesh remain heavily dependent on specialist, hospital basedservices. One can only speculate how Bangladesh will cope as its population ages and there are an everincreasing proportion of people who require urgent and expensive medical interventions. At the very leastthere is a strong case for greater investment in primary care especially to limit the economic consequences ofdiabetes and other chronic conditions. Finally as in other articles in this series we would like to emphasise that,the views expressed are those of the authors and do

  10. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes for Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Celia

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease affecting approximately 9% of the United States population. Successful management of diabetes demands constant self-management on the part of the patient. The patient has to balance diabetes medications, blood glucose monitoring, food intake, physical activity, and management of diabetes-related acute and chronic complications. The patient is often bombarded with misinformation from friends, relatives, and such sources as the Internet and social media. This article discusses the current recommendations for diabetes self-management education and skills including medical nutrition therapy, physical activity, smoking cessation, and assessment for diabetes distress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  12. Diabetes: Models, Signals and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelli, C.

    2010-07-01

    Diabetes and its complications impose significant economic consequences on individuals, families, health systems, and countries. The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes significant components of modeling, signal processing and control. Models: first, I will discuss the minimal (coarse) models which describe the key components of the system functionality and are capable of measuring crucial processes of glucose metabolism and insulin control in health and diabetes; then, the maximal (fine-grain) models which include comprehensively all available knowledge about system functionality and are capable to simulate the glucose-insulin system in diabetes, thus making it possible to create simulation scenarios whereby cost effective experiments can be conducted in silico to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies - in particular I will focus on the first in silico simulation model accepted by FDA as a substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. Signals: I will review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the crucial role of models to enhance the interpretation of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Control: I will review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, I will discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers.

  13. Diabetes in Patients With Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, A M; Thompson, C J; Sherlock, M

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a clinical syndrome which results from growth hormone excess. Uncontrolled acromegaly is associated with cardiovascular mortality, due to an excess of risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiomegaly. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication of acromegaly with a prevalence of 12-37%. This review will provide an overview of a number of aspects of diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance in acromegaly including the following: 1. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis 2. The impact of different management options for acromegaly on glucose homeostasis 3. The management options for diabetes mellitus in patients with acromegaly RECENT FINDINGS: Growth hormone and IGF-1 have complex effects on glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and increased gluconeogenesis combine to produce a metabolic milieu which leads to the development of diabetes in acromegaly. Treatment of acromegaly should ameliorate abnormalities of glucose metabolism, due to reversal of insulin resistance and a reduction in gluconeogenesis. Recent advances in medical therapy of acromegaly have varying impacts on glucose homeostasis. These adverse effects influence management choices in patients with acromegaly who also have diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance. The underlying mechanisms of disorders of glucose metabolism in patients with acromegaly are complex. The aim of treatment of acromegaly is normalisation of GH/IGF-1 with reduction of co-morbidities. The choice of therapy for acromegaly should consider the impact of therapy on several factors including glucose metabolism.

  14. Physical activity at altitude: challenges for people with diabetes: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, P. de; Vries, S.T. de; Koning, E.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Bilo, H.J.; Tack, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of subjects with diabetes take part in physical activities at altitude such as skiing, climbing, and trekking. Exercise under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia poses some unique challenges on subjects with diabetes, and the presence of diabetes can complicate safe and

  15. Physical Activity at Altitude : Challenges for People With Diabetes A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Pieter; de Vries, Suzanna T.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Tack, Cees J.

    BACKGROUND A growing number of subjects with diabetes take part in physical activities at altitude such as skiing, climbing, and trekking. Exercise under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia poses some unique challenges on subjects with diabetes, and the presence of diabetes can complicate safe and

  16. The Influence of Smoking on Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chien, Shun-Tien; Suk, Chi-Won; Chiang, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Both smoking and diabetes can increase the risk and influence the manifestations and outcomes of tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear whether the influence of smoking on pulmonary TB differs between non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Herein, we assessed the manifestations and outcomes of TB in relation to smoking in both diabetic and non-diabetic TB patients. Methodology/Principal Findings All diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients notified from 2005–2010 at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. A culture-positive pulmonary TB patient without DM who was notified to the health authority immediately prior to each diabetic TB patient was selected for comparison. The 972 patients in this study cohort included 365 (37.6%) non-diabetic non-smokers, 149 (15.3%) non-diabetic smokers, 284 (29.2%) diabetic non-smokers, and 174 (17.9%) diabetic smokers. The adjusted relative risk of a pretreatment positive smear for a smoker compared with a non-smoker was 2.19 (95% CI 1.38–3.47) in non-diabetic patients and 2.23 (95% CI 1.29–3.87) in diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients. The adjusted relative risk for a positive smear among diabetic smokers was 5.61 (95% CI 3.35–9.41) compared with non-diabetic non-smokers. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased frequency of bilateral lung parenchyma involvement (AdjOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.93), far-advanced pulmonary TB (AdjOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04–3.50), cavitary lesions (AdjOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29–3.20), and unfavorable outcomes of TB (AdjOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02–5.41) in non-diabetic patients. However, smoking was not associated with cavitary lung parenchyma lesions regarding the location, number or size of the cavity in diabetic TB patients. Conclusions/Significance Smoking and diabetes have joint effects on a pretreatment positive smear. Diabetic smokers had more than a 5-fold increased risk of a pretreatment positive smear than did non-diabetic non-smokers, indicating

  17. Seizure-related hospital admissions, readmissions and costs: Comparisons with asthma and diabetes in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Michelle L; Barton, Christopher; McCaffrey, Nikki; Parker, Denise; Hutchinson, Claire

    2017-08-01

    Seizures are listed as an Ambulatory Care Sensitive Condition (ACSC), where, in some cases, hospitalisation may be avoided with appropriate preventative and early management in primary care. We examined the frequencies, trends and financial costs of first and subsequent seizure-related hospital admissions in the adult and paediatric populations, with comparisons to bronchitis/asthma and diabetes admissions in South Australia between 2012 and 2014. De-identified hospital separation data from five major public hospitals in metropolitan South Australia were analysed to determine the number of children and adults admitted for the following Australian Refined Diagnosis Related Groups: seizure related conditions; bronchitis/asthma; and diabetes. Additional data included length of hospital stay and type of admission. Demographic data were analysed to identify whether social determinants influence admission, and a macro costing approach was then applied to calculate the financial costs to the Health Care System. The rate of total seizure hospitalizations was 649 per 100,000; lower than bronchitis/asthma (751/100,000), yet higher than diabetes (500/100,000). The highest proportions of subsequent separations were recorded by children with seizures regardless of complexity (47% +CSCC; 17% -CSCC) compared with asthma (11% +CSCC; 14% -CSCC) or diabetes (14% +CSCC; 13% -CSCC), and by adults with seizures with catastrophic or severe complications/comorbidity (25%), compared with diabetes (22%) or asthma (14%). The mean cost per separation in both children and adults was highest for diabetes (AU$4438/$7656), followed by seizures (AU$2408/$5691) and asthma (AU$2084/$3295). Following the lead of well-developed and resourced health promotion initiatives in asthma and diabetes, appropriate primary care, community education and seizure management services (including seizure clinics) should be targeted in an effort to reduce seizure related hospitalisations which may be avoidable

  18. [Diabetes mellitus in Mexico. Status of the epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the magnitude of diabetes in Mexico, as well as discuss alternative policies to face it appropriately. Descriptive analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012, using reported information on previous diagnosis of diabetes from adults and adolescents. From all adults 20 years and older in Mexico, 9.17% has been diagnosed with diabetes, presenting an important geographical heterogeneity, ranging from 5.6% in the southern state of Chiapas, to 12.3% in Mexico City. Of all people with diabetes, 46.95% also have been diagnosed with hypertension, 4.47% has had a stroke, and 54.46%, reported family background of diabetes. Regarding adolescents, 0.68% has been already diagnosed with diabetes. The burden of diabetes in Mexico and the fact that is a preventable condition, calls to strengthen the health sector strategies to face it. The negative effect it has on the quality of life makes diabetes a priority for the health sector.

  19. Cellular dysfunction in the diabetic fibroblast: impairment in migration, vascular endothelial growth factor production, and response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Oren Z; Galiano, Robert D; Armour, Mary; Levine, Jamie P; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2003-01-01

    Although it is known that systemic diseases such as diabetes result in impaired wound healing, the mechanism for this impairment is not understood. Because fibroblasts are essential for wound repair, we compared the in vitro behavior of fibroblasts cultured from diabetic, leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice with wild-type fibroblasts from mice of the same genetic background in processes important during tissue repair. Adult diabetic mouse fibroblast migration exhibited a 75% reduction in migration compared to normal fibroblasts (P under basal or hypoxic conditions, confirming that the results from db/db fibroblasts in mature mice resulted from the diabetic state and were not because of alterations in the leptin-leptin receptor axis. Markers of cellular viability including proliferation and senescence were not significantly different between diabetic and wild-type fibroblasts. We conclude that, in vitro, diabetic fibroblasts show selective impairments in discrete cellular processes critical for tissue repair including cellular migration, VEGF production, and the response to hypoxia. The VEGF abnormalities developed concurrently with the onset of hyperglycemia and were not seen in normoglycemic, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice. These observations support a role for fibroblast dysfunction in the impaired wound healing observed in human diabetics, and also suggest a mechanism for the poor clinical outcomes that occur after ischemic injury in diabetic patients.

  20. Design for Health and Well Being: Knitted Products for Diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper will discuss the design development, manufacturing and testing of knitted products maximizing the use of new innovations in Nano- technology and the integration of Phase Changing Materials specifically for diabetics. The project identified key aspects requiring design solutions to bring improvement to the circulatory problems with specific reference to the diabetic condition. Diabetics have particular difficulty in regulating their body temperature and this can result in the condition worsening, and resulting in loss of digits or limbs. The design of products to prevent the deterioration of the diabetic condition and to help those with limb loss was developed in collaboration with a Northern Ireland diabetic consultant, a product engineer and a knitwear designer. The fusion of ideas between the stakeholders resulted in the development and manufacture of a range of products that have been successfully tested at the yarn and fabric development stage and have been proven to maintain body temperature by either cooling or warming and therefore bring improvement to health and well-being. Whilst the product has a performance element the design ideas created desirable products that not only provided solutions to the brief but also resulted in products that had further market applications.

  1. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anna; Grøntved, Anders; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    2015-01-01

    and the classification of previously undiagnosed individuals as having diabetes versus not having diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examination surveys in different regions. METHODS: We used data from 96 population-based health examination surveys that had measured at least two...... assessed the sources of heterogeneity of sensitivity by meta-regressions for study characteristics selected a priori. FINDINGS: Population prevalence of diabetes based on FPG-or-2hOGTT was correlated with prevalence based on FPG alone (r=0·98), but was higher by 2-6 percentage points at different......BACKGROUND: Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes...

  2. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as possible. Doing so will help keep the complications of diabetes away. Steps include: Checking your blood sugar at ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... raise awareness about diverse women of different ages, races, ethnic backgrounds, and health conditions participating in clinical trials. Visit the Women in Clinical Trials webpage to learn how women with diabetes can make a difference. Other Resources from the FDA FDA Information on ...

  4. Identifying diabetes knowledge network nodes as sites for a diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M; Arcury, Thomas A; Skelly, Anne H; Nash, Sally; Soward, April; Dougherty, Molly

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports on the methods used and results of a study that identified specific places within a community that have the potential to be sites for a diabetes prevention program. These sites, termed diabetes knowledge network nodes (DKNNs), are based on the concept of socio-spatial knowledge networks (SSKNs), the web of social relationships within which people obtain knowledge about type 2 diabetes. The target population for the study was working poor African Americans, Latinos, and European Americans of both sexes in a small rural southern town who had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Information was collected from a sample of 121 respondents on the places they visited in carrying out their daily activities. Data on number of visits to specific sites, degree of familiarity with these sites, and ratings of sites as places to receive diabetes information were used to develop three categories of DKNNs for six subgroups based on ethnicity and sex. Primary potential sites of importance to one or more subgroups included churches, grocery stores, drugstores, the local library, a beauty salon, laundromats, a community service agency, and a branch of the County Health Department. Secondary potential sites included gas stations, restaurants, banks, and post offices. Latent potential sites included three medical facilities. Most of the DKNNs were located either in the downtown area or in one of two shopping areas along the most used highway that passed through the town. The procedures used in this study can be generalized to other communities and prevention programs for other chronic diseases.

  5. Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarif, N.; Al-Badr, W.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be a catastrophic event during pregnancy, complicating almost nine percent of diabetics in pregnancy. It includes both maternal and fetal mortality. Ketosis has been implicated in fetal distress and causes adverse neurological outcome. DKA with relatively low blood sugar levels is called euglycemic DKA, which is a rare entity and reported usually in type I diabetic patients. A 37-years-old Saudi female patient known to have type II diabetes developed euglycemic [blood glucose level 4.3 mmol/L (78 mg/dl) DKA while in her fifth pregnancy. She responded to intravenous dextrose and insulin with gradual improvement. Euglycemic DKA should be considered in type II diabetics during pregnancy and treated promptly. (author)

  6. Drug treatment in elderly diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, A O

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes causes greater decline in physical and functional status in elderly diabetic than in a younger one. Also the rise of MI, stroke and hypertension is also higher. In elderly diabetics management is always on challenging task due to atypical disease presentation, classical symptoms often absent, presence of other coexisting conditions delays the diagnosis, dietary advice not followed properly and due to non-compliance of drug therapy. The antidiabetic drugs which are often used are: sulfonylureas, metformin, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, insulin. Advantages and disadvantages of these drugs are discussed in a nutshell. Moreover control of hypertension, CAD risk reduction and practice pearls eg, lifestyle changes and goals setting for HbA(1c) are important.

  7. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  8. The 6-month effectiveness of Internet-based guided self-help for depression in adults with Type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D D; Nobis, S; Lehr, D; Baumeister, H; Riper, H; Auerbach, R P; Snoek, F; Cuijpers, P; Berking, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the 6-month effects of an Internet-based guided self-help intervention for comorbid depressive symptoms in people with diabetes. Participants (n = 260) with Type 1 or 2 diabetes and elevated depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) ≥ 23] were randomly assigned to a guided Internet-based self-help intervention or a control condition (treatment as usual + online psychoeducation about depression). The primary outcome was a change in depressive symptom severity (CES-D) from baseline to 6-month follow-up. The secondary outcomes included numbers of people achieving treatment response (reliable change of depressive symptoms) and remission (CES-D ≤ 16), as well as the effects on glycaemic control, diabetes-related emotional distress and diabetes acceptance. Repeated measures analysis of variance examined between-group differences using intent-to-treat principles. Both conditions showed improvements in depression severity: intervention condition, d = 1.48 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.21 to 1.76]; control condition d = 0.55 (95% CI: 0.30 to 0.80). Changes were significantly greater in the intervention condition with a large between-group effect size (d = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.57 to 1.08). Accordingly, effects on response [relative risk (RR) = 2.60 (95% CI: 2.01 to 3.36), P 1] and remission [RR = 3.36 (95% CI: 2.98 to 5.44), P 1] were in favour of the intervention group, as were differences in change in diabetes emotional distress (d = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.54), and physical and mental functioning [Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) Physical d = 0.27 (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.51) and SF-12 Mental d = 0.68 (95% CI: 0.11 to 0.40)]. The intervention group was not superior with regard to glycaemic control, diabetes self-management and diabetes acceptance. The trial indicates that Internet-based guided self-help treatments for depression in people with diabetes can have sustained effects on depressive

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs ... who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering it to the trillions of cells ...

  10. Gold nanostructure materials in diabetes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Satyabrata; Mohanta, Jagdeep; Satapathy, Smith Sagar; Pal, Arttatrana

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and is now one of the most non-communicable diseases globally and can be lethal if not properly controlled. Prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycemia, without proper management, can lead to various vascular complications and represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes patients. Studies have indicated that major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative-nitrosative stress and dysregulation in multiple metabolic pathways. Presently, the main focus for diabetes management is to optimize the available techniques to ensure adequate blood sugar level, blood pressure and lipid profile, thereby minimizing the diabetes complications. In this regard, nanomedicine utilizing gold nanostructures has great potential and seems to be a promising option. The present review highlights the basic concepts and up-to-date literature survey of gold nanostructure materials in management of diabetes in several ways, which include sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy. The work can be of interest to various researchers working on basic and applied sciences including nanosciences. (paper)

  11. Attitudes towards gestational diabetes among a multiethnic cohort in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary; Steele, Cheryl; Margetts, Heather

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the attitudes and beliefs towards gestational diabetes of a multiethnic sample of pregnant women with gestational diabetes. Women from non-Caucasian background are disproportionately represented in gestational diabetes statistics. This is of particular importance in multicultural Australia, where increasing numbers of non-Caucasian women give birth. Cross-sectional survey. The Diabetes Attitude Scale, version 3 was administered to 200 women with gestational diabetes from Vietnamese, Indian, Filipino and Caucasian backgrounds. A total of 143 questionnaires were returned indicating a response rate of 71·5%. There were significant between group differences in terms of educational level (p = 0·001) and English fluency (p = 0·001). Lower educational level, though not English language fluency, was associated with poorer appreciation of gestational diabetes as a serious condition and also with a lower valuing of tight glucose control. This effect was seen irrespective of ethnic group. Indian and Vietnamese women indicated a lower valuing of patient autonomy and also reported less negative psychological effects than Caucasian and Filipino women. Women from non-Caucasian ethnicities may be at risk of poorer self-management of gestational diabetes related to lower education, lower health literacy and a lower appreciation of gestational diabetes as a serious condition. Nurses and midwives provide information and advice to women with gestational diabetes. Knowledge about factors that impact on attitude towards gestational diabetes among multiethnic populations is important for developing educational programmes to address their needs. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Family diabetes matters: a view from the other side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Cene, Crystal W; Corsino, Leonor; Thomas, Chelsea; Svetkey, Laura P

    2013-03-01

    Typically, chronic disease self-management happens in a family context, and for African American adults living with diabetes, family seems to matter in self-management processes. Many qualitative studies describe family diabetes interactions from the perspective of adults living with diabetes, but we have not heard from family members. To explore patient and family perspectives on family interactions around diabetes. Qualitative study using focus group methodology. PARTICIPANTS & APPROACH: We conducted eight audiotaped focus groups among African Americans (four with patients with diabetes and four with family members not diagnosed with diabetes), with a focus on topics of family communication, conflict, and support. The digital files were transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Directed content analysis and grounded theory approaches guided the interpretation of code summaries. Focus groups included 67 participants (81 % female, mean age 64 years). Family members primarily included spouses, siblings, and adult children/grandchildren. For patients with diabetes, central issues included shifting family roles to accommodate diabetes and conflicts stemming from family advice-giving. Family members described discomfort with the perceived need to police or "stand over" the diabetic family member, not wanting to "throw diabetes in their [relative's] face," perceiving their communications as unhelpful, and confusion about their role in diabetes care. These concepts generated an emergent theme of "family diabetes silence." Diabetes silence, role adjustments, and conflict appear to be important aspects to address in family-centered diabetes self-management interventions. Contextual data gathered through formative research can inform such family-centered intervention development.

  13. Self-management of gestational diabetes among Chinese migrants: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Yat Yin Eric; McGill, Margaret; Wong, Jencia; Ross, Glynis P; Harding, Anna-Jane; Krass, Ines

    2018-04-21

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. Women with Gestational diabetes are at increased risk of serious health outcomes, such as pre-eclampsia, obstructed labor, and the development of Type 2 diabetes later in life. Chinese migrants, the third largest cultural group in Australia, are more likely to develop Gestational diabetes than Australian-born women. However, to date, Gestational diabetes self-management has not been investigated in this population. To explore the understanding and self-management experiences of Gestational diabetes among Chinese migrants. Data were collected through individual semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Participants were recruited from the antenatal clinic at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Although the majority of participants demonstrated a good understanding of Gestational diabetes, some did not understand the principles behind healthcare advice and faced challenges in self-management. Confusion about self-monitoring of blood glucose and fear of insulin were also evident. Participants relied on both formal and informal sources of information. Some had difficulty obtaining adequate support. Cultural influences on self-management included meeting family needs, Chinese diet and use of Chinese medicines. To assist Chinese women with Gestational diabetes to better self-manage their condition, there is a need for clinicians to: (1) provide more effective diabetes education to ensure clear understanding of self-management principles; (2) actively elicit and respond to women's confusion and concerns; (3) provide women with adequate practical support; and (4) develop greater cultural awareness. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  15. An Overview of Diabetes Management in Schizophrenia Patients: Office Based Strategies for Primary Care Practitioners and Endocrinologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Tek, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is common and seen in one in five patients with schizophrenia. It is more prevalent than in the general population and contributes to the increased morbidity and shortened lifespan seen in this population. However, screening and treatment for diabetes and other metabolic conditions remain poor for these patients. Multiple factors including genetic risk, neurobiologic mechanisms, psychotropic medications, and environmental factors contribute to the increased prevalence of diabetes. Primary care physicians should be aware of adverse effects of psychotropic medications that can cause or exacerbate diabetes and its complications. Management of diabetes requires physicians to tailor treatment recommendations to address special needs of this population. In addition to behavioral interventions, medications such as metformin have shown promise in attenuating weight loss and preventing hyperglycemia in those patients being treated with antipsychotic medications. Targeted diabetes prevention and treatment is critical in patients with schizophrenia and evidence-based interventions should be considered early in the course of treatment. This paper reviews the prevalence, etiology, and treatment of diabetes in schizophrenia and outlines office based interventions for physicians treating this vulnerable population. PMID:25878665

  16. An Overview of Diabetes Management in Schizophrenia Patients: Office Based Strategies for Primary Care Practitioners and Endocrinologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniyizhai Annamalai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is common and seen in one in five patients with schizophrenia. It is more prevalent than in the general population and contributes to the increased morbidity and shortened lifespan seen in this population. However, screening and treatment for diabetes and other metabolic conditions remain poor for these patients. Multiple factors including genetic risk, neurobiologic mechanisms, psychotropic medications, and environmental factors contribute to the increased prevalence of diabetes. Primary care physicians should be aware of adverse effects of psychotropic medications that can cause or exacerbate diabetes and its complications. Management of diabetes requires physicians to tailor treatment recommendations to address special needs of this population. In addition to behavioral interventions, medications such as metformin have shown promise in attenuating weight loss and preventing hyperglycemia in those patients being treated with antipsychotic medications. Targeted diabetes prevention and treatment is critical in patients with schizophrenia and evidence-based interventions should be considered early in the course of treatment. This paper reviews the prevalence, etiology, and treatment of diabetes in schizophrenia and outlines office based interventions for physicians treating this vulnerable population.

  17. Hypertension og diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler; Gaede, Peter Haulund

    2009-01-01

    The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin aldoster......The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin...

  18. Situational analysis of services for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy and evaluation of programs for the detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy in India: Methods for the India 11-city 9-state study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. S. Murthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a leading cause of visual impairment in India. Available evidence shows that there are more than 60 million persons with diabetes in India and that the number will increase to more than a 100 million by 2030. There is a paucity of data on the perceptions and practices of persons with diabetes and the available infrastructure and uptake of services for DR in India. Objectives: Assess perception of care and challenges faced in availing eye care services among persons with diabetics and generate evidence on available human resources, infrastructure, and service utilization for DR in India. Methods: The cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in eleven cities across 9 States in India. In each city, public and private providers of eye-care were identified. Both multispecialty and standalone facilities were included. Specially designed semi-open ended questionnaires were administered to the clients. Semi-structured interviews were administered to the service providers (both diabetic care physicians and eye care teams and observational checklists were used to record findings of the assessment of facilities conducted by a dedicated team of research staff. Results: A total of 859 units were included in this study. This included 86 eye care and 73 diabetic care facilities, 376 persons with diabetes interviewed in the eye clinics and 288 persons with diabetes interviewed in the diabetic care facilities. Conclusions: The findings will have significant implications for the organization of services for persons with diabetes in India.

  19. The role of hormonal treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam SK

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Syed Khalid ImamLiaquat National Hospital and Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan; Al-Mouwasat Hospital, Jubail Industrial City, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a disorder of abnormal glucose metabolism resulting primarily from insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency and characterized by hyperglycemia causing significant short- and long-term complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM contributes to more than 90% of cases of diabetes. Obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and consumption of very high-caloric meals are thought to be the primary triggering factors causing T2DM in genetically predisposed individuals. Although treatment of hyperglycemia plays a key role in the management, therapies directed at other comorbid conditions, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, hypercoagulability, obesity, and insulin resistance, have also been a major focus of research and therapy. DM is rising to an epidemic proportion globally, and it is, indeed, one of the most challenging public health problems in the 21st century. According to 2011 statistics, there were approximately 366 million diabetes cases worldwide, and this figure would probably increase to 552 million by 2030. Long-term complications from high blood sugar include coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular events, peripheral arterial diseases leading to amputation, retinopathy, nephropathy leading to end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis and transplantation, and neuropathy. The acute complication of T2DM includes drug-induced hypoglycemia, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, and although uncommon, ketoacidosis. Diabetes care requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to delay the progression to acute as well as chronic and debilitating long-term complications. This approach requires the thorough understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia and impact of various risk factors and comorbidities, careful selection of antihyperglycemic

  20. Estimating the proportion of persons with diabetes developing diabetic retinopathy in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A T Jotheeswaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Available evidence from India shows that the control of diabetes is poor in majority of the population. This escalates the risk of complications. There is no systematic review to estimate the magnitude of diabetic retinopathy (DR in India. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was carried out in Ovid Medline and EMBASE databases using Mesh and key search terms. Studies which reported the proportion of people with diabetes with DR in a representative community population were included. Two independent reviewers reviewed all the retrieved publications. Data were extracted using a predefined form. Review Manager software was used to perform meta-analysis to provide a pooled estimate. Studies included were assessed for methodological quality using selected items from the STROBE checklist. Results: Seven studies (1999–2014; n = 8315 persons with diabetes were included in the review. In the meta-analysis, 14.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.7–19.0% of known diabetics aged ≥30 years and 18.1% (95% CI 14.8–21.4 among those aged ≥50 years had DR. Heterogeneity around this estimate ranged from I2= 79–87%. No linear trend was observed between age and the proportion with DR. The overall methodological quality of included studies was moderate. Conclusions: Early detection of DR is currently not prioritized in public health policies for noncommunicable diseases and blindness programs. Methodological issues in studies suggest that the proportion of diabetics with DR is underestimated in the Indian population. Future research should emphasize more robust methodology for assessing diabetes and DR status.

  1. Literature-based discovery of diabetes- and ROS-related targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Manjusha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are known mediators of cellular damage in multiple diseases including diabetic complications. Despite its importance, no comprehensive database is currently available for the genes associated with ROS. Methods We present ROS- and diabetes-related targets (genes/proteins collected from the biomedical literature through a text mining technology. A web-based literature mining tool, SciMiner, was applied to 1,154 biomedical papers indexed with diabetes and ROS by PubMed to identify relevant targets. Over-represented targets in the ROS-diabetes literature were obtained through comparisons against randomly selected literature. The expression levels of nine genes, selected from the top ranked ROS-diabetes set, were measured in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG of diabetic and non-diabetic DBA/2J mice in order to evaluate the biological relevance of literature-derived targets in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Results SciMiner identified 1,026 ROS- and diabetes-related targets from the 1,154 biomedical papers (http://jdrf.neurology.med.umich.edu/ROSDiabetes/. Fifty-three targets were significantly over-represented in the ROS-diabetes literature compared to randomly selected literature. These over-represented targets included well-known members of the oxidative stress response including catalase, the NADPH oxidase family, and the superoxide dismutase family of proteins. Eight of the nine selected genes exhibited significant differential expression between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. For six genes, the direction of expression change in diabetes paralleled enhanced oxidative stress in the DRG. Conclusions Literature mining compiled ROS-diabetes related targets from the biomedical literature and led us to evaluate the biological relevance of selected targets in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Involvement of Histone Lysine Methylation in p21 Gene Expression in Rat Kidney In Vivo and Rat Mesangial Cells In Vitro under Diabetic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN, a common complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, characterized by glomerular mesangial expansion, inflammation, accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM protein, and hypertrophy, is the major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Increasing evidence suggested that p21-dependent glomerular and mesangial cell (MC hypertrophy play key roles in the pathogenesis of DN. Recently, posttranscriptional modifications (PTMs have uncovered novel molecular mechanisms involved in DN. However, precise regulatory mechanism of histone lysine methylation (HKme mediating p21 related hypertrophy associated with DN is not clear. We evaluated the roles of HKme and histone methyltransferase (HMT SET7/9 in p21 gene expression in glomeruli of diabetic rats and in high glucose- (HG- treated rat mesangial cells (RMCs. p21 gene expression was upregulated in diabetic rats glomeruli; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed decreased histone H3-lysine9-dimethylation (H3K9me2 accompanied with enhanced histone H3-lysine4-methylation (H3K4me1/3 and SET7/9 occupancies at the p21 promoter. HG-treated RMCs exhibited increased p21 mRNA, H3K4me level, SET7/9 recruitment, and inverse H3K9me, which were reversed by TGF-β1 antibody. These data uncovered key roles of H3Kme and SET7/9 responsible for p21 gene expression in vivo and in vitro under diabetic conditions and confirmed preventive effect of TGF-β1 antibody on DN.

  3. Tobacco and diabetes: clinical relevance and approach to smoking cessation in diabetic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Zubizarreta, Marco; Hernández Mezquita, Miguel Ángel; Miralles García, José Manuel; Barrueco Ferrero, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Smoking is, together with diabetes mellitus, one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Diabetic patients have unique features and characteristics, some of which are not well known, that cause smoking to aggravate the effects of diabetes and impose difficulties in the smoking cessation process, for which a specificand more intensive approach with stricter controls is required. This review details all aspects with a known influence on the interaction between smoking and diabetes, both as regards the increased risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes and the factors with an impact on the results of smoking cessation programs. The treatment guidelines for these smokers, including the algorithms and drug treatment patterns which have proved most useful based on scientific evidence, are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of diabetes determinants in woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Burns, R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jansen, W.L.; Ferket, P.R.; Heugten, E.

    2007-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha) are a threatened specie in the wild with limited successful management in captivity due to diagnosed hypertension and suspected diabetic conditions. Six woolly monkeys with known hypertension problems were tested to determine if diabetes mellitus and current

  5. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  6. Anti-Diabetic Activity and Metabolic Changes Induced by Andrographis paniculata Plant Extract in Obese Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Tayyab; Bin Mohd Sarib, Mohamad Syakir; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Shaari, Khozirah

    2016-08-09

    Andrographis paniculata is an annual herb and widely cultivated in Southeast Asian countries for its medicinal use. In recent investigations, A. paniculata was found to be effective against Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM). Here, we used a non-genetic out-bred Sprague-Dawley rat model to test the antidiabetic activity of A. paniculata against Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM). Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the A. paniculata and metformin induced metabolic effects on the obese and obese-diabetic (obdb) rat models. Compared to the normal rats, high levels of creatinine, lactate, and allantoin were found in the urine of obese rats, whereas, obese-diabetic rats were marked by high glucose, choline and taurine levels, and low lactate, formate, creatinine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, dimethylamine, acetoacetate, acetate, allantoin and hippurate levels. Treatment of A. paniculata leaf water extract was found to be quite effective in restoring the disturbed metabolic profile of obdb rats back towards normal conditions. Thisstudy shows the anti-diabetic potential of A. paniculata plant extract and strengthens the idea of using this plant against the diabetes. Further classical genetic methods and state of the art molecular techniques could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic effects of A. paniculata water extract.

  7. Modern diagnostic and treatment aspects of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Viktorovich Doga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular oedema (DMO is the leading cause of vision loss and disability in working-age people with diabetes mellitus. This literature review describes pathogenetic mechanisms, concepts, diagnostic techniques and capabilities of novel laser technologies in the treatment of DMO. In recent years, the role of cytokines and growth factors in retinal neurodegeneration has been actively investigated. Modern diagnostic techniques for the treatment of diabetic macular oedema, in addition to conventional techniques, include optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence and microperimetry. These techniques allow the visualization of retinal structures and its functional condition, and they can be used to detect DMO at early stages and to provide the most effective treatment. The evolution of laser technology resulted in the formation of new approaches to DMO treatment. Subthreshold micropulse laser (SML treatment, in conjunction with conventional photocoagulation, has pronounced therapeutic effects. SML shows high selectivity towards retinal pigment epithelium while avoiding neurosensory retina injury. Owing to the chronic nature of DMO and pathogenetic mechanisms recently discovered, further elaboration of the SML technique appears to be a very promising treatment.

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Clinical Findings and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Murray McGavin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic abnormality in which there is a failure to utilise glucose and hence a state of hyperglycaemia can occur. If hyperglycaemia continues uncontrolled over time, it will lead to significant and widespread pathological changes, including involvement of the retina, brain and kidney.In industrialised countries, approximately 1% of the population is diabetic, and at least another 1% are undiagnosed diabetics. Insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM, accounts for approximately 10-15% of cases, the remainder being maturity onset or non-insulin dependent diabetics (NIDDM. Diabetes mellitus is an international public health problem with estimated prevalences ranging from 2.0% to 11.7% in studied populations across the world.

  9. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Among Elderly Persons in an Urban Slum of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The increasing proportion of elderly persons is contributing to an increase in the prevalence of diabetes. The residents of urban slums are more vulnerable due to poverty and lack of access to health care. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of diabetes in elderly persons in an urban slum and to assess their awareness, treatment and control of this condition. Materials and Methods : All persons aged 60 years and above, residing in an urban slum of Delhi, were included in this cross-sectional community- based study. Data were collected on sociodemographic variables. The participants′ awareness and treatment of diabetes was recorded. Their fasting blood sugar was estimated using an automated glucometer. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting blood glucose was ≥126 mg/dL, or if the participant was taking treatment for diabetes. Impaired fasting blood glucose was diagnosed if fasting blood glucose was 110-125 mg/dL. Results: Among the 474 participants studied, the prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 18.8% (95% CI 15.3-21.5. It decreased with increasing age, and was higher among women. The prevalence of impaired fasting blood glucose was 19.8% (95% CI 16.3-23.7. It was higher among women. One-third of the diabetic participants were aware of their condition; two-thirds of these were on treatment and three-fourths of those on treatment had controlled fasting blood sugar level. The awareness, treatment and control were better among women. Conclusions : Diabetes is common among elderly persons in urban slums. Its magnitude and low awareness warrant effective public health interventions for their treatment and control.

  10. Role of autogenic relaxation in management of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type II diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manish K. Verma; D. A. Biswas; Shambhavi Tripathi; N. S. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a very common complication of Type II diabetes mellitus patients. Early detection and treatment of CAN is necessary for reduction of mortality and morbidity in type II diabetes patients. Methods: The study included 120 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy both male and female, with more than 5 years duration of disease. Age group of the study subjects was between 30 and ndash; 70 years. All the 120 diabet...

  11. Evaluation of the impact of a diabetes education eLearning program for school personnel on diabetes knowledge, knowledge retention and confidence in caring for students with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nehad A; Rahme, Zahra; Mesbah, Naglaa; Mahmoud, Fatma; AlKandari, Sarah; Othman, Nashwa; Sharaikha, Hanan; Lari, Bashayer S; AlBeloushi, Shaima; Saad, Eglal; Arefanian, Hossein; Sukkar, Faten F

    2018-05-01