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Sample records for conditioning facility electrorefiner

  1. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner volume calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In one of the electrometallurgical process steps of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF), die in-process nuclear material is dissolved in the electrorefiner tank in an upper layer of a mixture of liquid LiCl-KCl salt and a lower layer of liquid cadmium. The electrorefiner tank, as most process tanks, is not a smooth right-circular cylinder for which a single linear volume calibration curve could be fitted over the whole height of the tank. Rather, the tank contains many internal components, which cause systematic deviations from a single linear function. The nominal operating temperature of the electrorefiner is 500 degrees C although the salt and cadmium are introduced at 410 degrees C. The operating materials and temperatures preclude multiple calibration runs at operating conditions. In order to maximize the calibration information, multiple calibration runs were performed with water at room temperature. These data allow identification of calibration segments, and preliminary estimation of the calibration function and calibration uncertainties. The final calibration function is based on a combination of data from die water calibrations and the measurements made during the filling of the electrorefiner with salt and cadmium for operation

  2. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner cadmium vapor trap operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Processing sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West involves an electrometallurgical process employing a molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of molten cadmium. Previous research has shown that the cadmium dissolves in the salt as a gas, diffuses through the salt layer and vaporizes at the salt surface. This cadmium vapor condenses on cool surfaces, causing equipment operation and handling problems. Using a cadmium vapor trap to condense the cadmium vapors and reflux them back to the electrorefiner has mitigated equipment problems and improved electrorefiner operations

  3. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner start-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, K.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Vaden, D.; Bonomo, N.L.; Cunningham, S.S.

    1996-01-01

    At ANL-West, there are several thousand kilograms of metallic spent nuclear fuel containing bond sodium. This fuel will be treated in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at ANL-West to produce stable waste forms for storage and disposal. The treatment operations will make use of an electrometallurgical process employing molten salts and liquid metals. The treatment equipment is presently undergoing testing with depleted uranium. Operations with irradiated fuel will commence when the environmental evaluation for FCF is complete

  4. Criticality safety evaluation of the fuel cycle facility electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Fujita, E.K.; Benedict, R.W.; Turski, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The integral Fast Reactor (IFR) being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal cooled reactors and a closed-loop fuel cycle. Some of the primary advantages are passive safety for the reactor and resistance to diversion for the heavy metal in the fuel cycle. in addition, the IFR pyroprocess recycles all the long-lived actinide activation products for casting into new fuel pins so that they may be burned in the reactor. A key component in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) recycling process is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the process, the metal fuel is electrochemically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt, and electrorefined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. This report addresses the new and innovative aspects of the criticality analysis ensuing from processing metallic fuel, rather than metal oxide fuel, and from processing the spent fuel in batch operations. in particular, the criticality analysis employed a mechanistic approach as opposed to a probabilistic one. A probabilistic approach was unsuitable because of a lack of operational experience with some of the processes, rendering the estimation of accident event risk factors difficult. The criticality analysis also incorporated the uncertainties in heavy metal content attending the process items by defining normal operations envelopes (NOES) for key process parameters. The goal was to show that reasonable process uncertainties would be demonstrably safe toward criticality for continuous batch operations provided the key process parameters stayed within their NOES. Consequently the NOEs became the point of departure for accident events in the criticality analysis

  5. Review of operating experience at the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Facility, 1963-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    This report reviews the operation of the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Plant at Technical Area 21 for the period 1964 through 1977. During that period, approximately 1568 kg of plutonium metal, > 99.95% pure, was produced in 653 runs from 1930 kg of metal fabrication scrap, 99% pure. General considerations of the electrorefining process and facility operation and recommendations for further improvement of the process are discussed

  6. Criticality safety strategy for the Fuel Cycle Facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory, West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactors and a closed fuel cycle. Presently, the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho is being modified to recycle spent metallic fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II as part of a demonstration project sponsored by the Department of Energy. A key component of the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. In this report, the criticality safety strategy for the FCF ER is summarized. FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. In order to show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOES) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOES, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that wig verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality

  7. Effects of operating conditions on molten-salt electrorefining for zirconium recovery from irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeyeong, E-mail: d486916@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sungyeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Sungjune [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Rag [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Il Soon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Computational simulation on electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding. • Composition of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. • Redox behavior of elements in irradiated Zircaloy cladding during electrorefining. • Effect of electrorefining operating conditions on decontamination factor. - Abstract: To reduce the final waste volume from used nuclear fuel assembly, it is significant to decontaminate irradiated cladding. Electrorefining in high temperature molten salt could be one of volume decontamination processes for the cladding. This study examines the effect of operating conditions on decontamination factor in electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. One-dimensional time-dependent electrochemical reaction code, REFIN, was utilized for simulating irradiated cladding electrorefining. Composition of irradiated Zircaloy was estimated based on ORIGEN-2 and other literatures. Co and U were considered in electrorefining simulation with major elements of Zircaloy-4 to represent activation products and actinides penetrating into the cladding respectively. Total 240 cases of electrorefining are simulated including 8 diffusion boundary layer thicknesses, 10 concentrations of contaminated molten salt and 3 termination conditions. Decontamination factors for each case were evaluated and it is revealed that the radioactivity of Co-60 in recovered zirconium on cathode could decrease below the clearance level when initial concentration of chlorides except ZrCl{sub 4} is lower than 1 × 10{sup −11} weight fraction if electrorefining is finished before anode potential reaches −1.8 V (vs. Cl{sub 2}/Cl{sup −})

  8. Developing a Signature Based Safeguards Approach for the Electrorefiner and Salt Cleanup Unit Operations in Pyroprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Chantell Lynne-Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-27

    Traditional nuclear materials accounting does not work well for safeguards when applied to pyroprocessing. Alternate methods such as Signature Based Safeguards (SBS) are being investigated. The goal of SBS is real-time/near-real-time detection of anomalous events in the pyroprocessing facility as they could indicate loss of special nuclear material. In high-throughput reprocessing facilities, metric tons of separated material are processed that must be accounted for. Even with very low uncertainties of accountancy measurements (<0.1%) the uncertainty of the material balances is still greater than the desired level. Novel contributions of this work are as follows: (1) significant enhancement of SBS development for the salt cleanup process by creating a new gas sparging process model, selecting sensors to monitor normal operation, identifying safeguards-significant off-normal scenarios, and simulating those off-normal events and generating sensor output; (2) further enhancement of SBS development for the electrorefiner by simulating off-normal events caused by changes in salt concentration and identifying which conditions lead to Pu and Cm not tracking throughout the rest of the system; and (3) new contribution in applying statistical techniques to analyze the signatures gained from these two models to help draw real-time conclusions on anomalous events.

  9. Basic design study on plutonium electro-refining facility of oxide fuel pyroelectrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Kondo, Naruhito; Kamoshida, Hiroshi; Omori, Takashi

    2001-02-01

    The test facility basic design, utility necessity and estimation cost of the Oxide Fuel Pyro-process for the use of Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) of JNC have been studied with the information of the previous year concept study and the additional conditions. Drastic down sizing design change or the building reconstruction is necessary to place the Oxide Fuel Pyro-process Facility in the laboratory ''C'', because it is not possible to reserve enough maintenance space and the weight of the facility is over the acceptable limit of the building. A further study such as facility down sizing, apparatus detail design and experiment detail process treatment has to be planned. (author)

  10. Advanced Electrorefining Process at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Jong Hyun Lee; Sung Bin Park; Yoon Sang Lee; Eung Ho Kim; Sung Won Park

    2008-01-01

    In order to enhance the throughput of a pyro-processing in which electrochemical processes are mostly engaged, the design of a continuous concept is required. The graphite cathode in the electro-refiner enables the uranium deposit on the cathodes to be stripped off spontaneously, resulting in a continuous reaction. The collected uranium deposits at the bottom of the inner cone of the reactor are transferred by a conveyor. The residuals in the anode basket after the uranium is depleted are noble metals. These are also collected at the bottom of the outer shell of the reactor, and conveyed from the reactor for a further treatment. This work addresses the design of the electro-refiner for a continuous operation. The behavior of particles such as uranium dendrites or noble metals was analyzed to achieve the proper operating conditions. The operating conditions for the cathode processor in which molten salt is distilled were also investigated. (authors)

  11. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  12. IFR electrorefining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, which is a key element of the IFR fuel cycle, permits the use of pyrochemical processing of the spent fuel. Electrorefining with molten salt electrolytes is a key step in the pyroprocess because the actinides are recovered, separated from the fission products present in the spent fuel in this operation and then recycled for use as fuel. Chemical and electrochemical aspects of the electrorefining method is to be described. (author)

  13. Electrorefining open-quotes Nclose quotes reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    Principles of purifying of uranium metal by electrorefining are reviewed. Metal reactor fuel after irradiation is a form of impure uranium. Dissolution and deposition electrorefining processes were developed for spent metal fuel under the Integral Fast Reactor Program. Application of these processes to the conditioning of spent N-reactor fuel slugs is examined

  14. Electrorefining cell evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, M.C.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

    1989-04-14

    Operational characteristics of the LANL electrorefining cell, a modified LANL electrorefining cell, and an advanced electrorefining cell (known as the CRAC cell) were determined. Average process yields achieved were: 75% for the LANL cell, 82% for the modified LANL cell, and 86% for the CRAC cell. All product metal from the LANL and modified LANL cells was within foundry specifications. Metal from one run in the CRAC cell exceeded foundry specifications for tantalum. The LANL and modified LANL cells were simple in design and operation, but product separation was more labor intensive than with the CRAC cell. The CRAC cell was more complicated in design but remained relatively simple in operation. A decision analysis concluded that the modified LANL cell was the preferred cell. It was recommended that the modified LANL cell be implemented by the Plutonium Recovery Project at Rocky Flats and that development of the CRAC cell continue. 8 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Development of Computational Models for Pyrochemical Electrorefiners of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, M.F.; Kim, K.-R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of closing the nuclear fuel cycle using non-aqueous separations technology, this project aims to develop computational models of electrorefiners based on fundamental chemical and physical processes. Spent driver fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being electrorefined in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). And Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing electrorefining technology for future application to spent fuel treatment and management in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Electrorefining is a critical component of pyroprocessing, a non-aqueous chemical process which separates spent fuel into four streams: (1) uranium metal, (2) U/TRU metal, (3) metallic high-level waste containing cladding hulls and noble metal fission products, and (4) ceramic high-level waste containing sodium and active metal fission products. Having rigorous yet flexible electrorefiner models will facilitate process optimization and assist in trouble-shooting as necessary. To attain such models, INL/UI has focused on approaches to develop a computationally-light and portable two-dimensional (2D) model, while KAERI/SNU has investigated approaches to develop a computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) model for detailed and fine-tuned simulation.

  16. Continuous process electrorefiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Joseph E [Naperville, IL; Saiveau, James G [Hickory Hills, IL; Krajtl, Lubomir [Woodridge, IL

    2006-08-29

    A new device is provided for the electrorefining of uranium in spent metallic nuclear fuels by the separation of unreacted zirconium, noble metal fission products, transuranic elements, and uranium from spent fuel rods. The process comprises an electrorefiner cell. The cell includes a drum-shaped cathode horizontally immersed about half-way into an electrolyte salt bath. A conveyor belt comprising segmented perforated metal plates transports spent fuel into the salt bath. The anode comprises the conveyor belt, the containment vessel, and the spent fuel. Uranium and transuranic elements such as plutonium (Pu) are oxidized at the anode, and, subsequently, the uranium is reduced to uranium metal at the cathode. A mechanical cutter above the surface of the salt bath removes the deposited uranium metal from the cathode.

  17. Retrieving Historical Electrorefining Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Meagan Daniella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Pyrochemical Operations began at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during 1962 (1). Electrorefining (ER) has been implemented as a routine process since the 1980’s. The process data that went through the ER operation was recorded but had never been logged in an online database. Without a database new staff members are hindered in their work by the lack of information. To combat the issue a database in Access was created to collect the historical data. The years from 2000 onward were entered and queries were created to analyze trends. These trends will aid engineering and operations staff to reach optimal performance for the startup of the new lines.

  18. Small-scale irradiated fuel electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Krsul, J.R.; Mariani, R.D.; Park, K.; Teske, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the metallic fuel cycle development for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), a small scale electrorefiner was built and operated in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West. The initial purpose of this apparatus was to test the single segment dissolution of irradiated metallic fuel via either direct dissolution in cadmium or anodic dissolution. These tests showed that 99.95% of the uranium and 99.99% of the plutonium was dissolved and separated from the fuel cladding material. The fate of various fission products was also measured. After the dissolution experiments, the apparatus was upgraded to stady fission product behavior during uranium electrotransport. Preliminary decontamination factors were estimated for different fission products under different processing conditions. Later modifications have added the following capabilities: Dissolution of multiple fuel segments simultaneously, electrotransport to a solid cathode or liquid cathode and actinide recovery with a chemical reduction crucible. These capabilities have been tested with unirradiated uranium-zirconium fuel and will support the Fuel Cycle Demonstration program

  19. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  20. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be

  1. Structural evaluation in the design of electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Blomquist, C.A.; Herceg, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The electrorefiner (ER) is one piece of the process equipment for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. The ER's principal function is to perform the pyrochemical and electrochemical refining of spent and experimental fuel elements. Its principal components include a primary vessel, a heater assembly, a support-structure assembly, a cover assembly, four electrode assemblies, four elevator and rotator assemblies, and a cover-gas system. In addition, there are various miscellaneous tools and fixtures. The electrorefiner is to be installed within an existing enclosed cell. Design requirements dictate that all equipment within the cell should not be anchored. To assess the integrity of the electrorefiner during operational and seismic loads, extensive structural analyses have been performed. This paper presents some of the major structural evaluations for the electrorefiner and its auxiliary equipment. Results show that the design code requirements are satisfied, and the integrity of the electrorefiner will not be jeopardized during operational and seismic loadings

  2. Structural evaluation in the design of electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Blomquist, C.A.; Herceg, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The electrorefiner is one piece of the process equipment for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. Its principal components include a primary vessel, a heater assembly, a support-structure assembly, a cover assembly, four electrode assemblies, four elevator and rotator assemblies, and a cover-gas system. In addition, there are various miscellaneous tools and fixtures. The electrorefiner is to be installed within an existing enclosed cell. Design requirements dictate that all equipment within the cell should not be anchored. To assess the integrity of the electrorefiner during operational and seismic loads, extensive structural analyses have been performed. This paper presents some of the major structural evaluations for the electrorefiner and its auxiliary equipment. Results show that the design code requirements are satisfied, and the integrity of the electrorefiner will not be jeopardized during operational and seismic loadings

  3. Fuel conditioning facility material accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacout, A.M.; Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of the Fuel conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. It differs significantly, therefore, from traditional PUREX process facilities in both processing technology and safeguards implications. For example, the fissile material is processed in FCF only in batches and is transferred within the facility only as solid, well-characterized items; there are no liquid steams containing fissile material within the facility, nor entering or leaving the facility. The analysis of a single batch lends itself also to an analytical relationship between the safeguards criteria, such as alarm limit, detection probability, and maximum significant amount of fissile material, and the accounting system's performance, as it is reflected in the variance associated with the estimate of the inventory difference. This relation, together with the sensitivity of the inventory difference to the uncertainties in the measurements, allows a thorough evaluation of the power of the accounting system. The system for the accountancy of the fissile material in the FCF has two main components: a system to gather and store information during the operation of the facility, and a system to interpret this information with regard to meeting safeguards criteria. These are described and the precision of the inventory closure over one batch evaluated

  4. Salt evaporation behaviors of uranium deposits from an electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung Bin Park; Dong Wook Cho; Gyu Hwan Oh; Sung Chan Hwang; Young Ho Kang; Hansoo Lee; Eung Ho Kim; Seong-Won Park; Jong Hyeon Lee

    2010-01-01

    From an electrorefining process, uranium deposits were recovered at the solid cathode of an electrorefining system. The uranium deposits from the electrorefiner contained about 30-40 wt% salts. In order to recover pure uranium and transform it into metal ingots, these salts have to be removed. A salt distiller was adapted for a salt evaporation. A batch operation for the salt removal was carried out by a heating and a vacuum evaporation. The operational conditions were a 700-1,000 deg C hold temperature and less than a 1 Torr under Argon atmosphere, respectively. The behaviors of the salt evaporations were investigated by focusing on the effects of the pressure and the holding temperature for the salt distillation. The removal efficiencies of the salts were obtained with regard to the operational conditions. The experimental results of the salt evaporations were evaluated by using the Hertz-Langmuir relation. The effective evaporation coefficients of this relation were obtained with regards to the vacuum pressures and the hold temperatures. The higher the vacuum pressure and the higher the holding temperature were, the higher the removal efficiencies of the salts were. (author)

  5. Facility engineering for Arctic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, D.M.; McClusky, K.R.; Shirley, R.; Spitzenberger, R. [Mustang Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Northstar Development Project is located on Seal Island in the Beaufort Sea, north of Prudhoe Bay. The design and engineering of the facilities for the Northstar Development Project was fraught with challenges. Mustang Engineering Incorporated was involved in the design and engineering of the pipe rack, pump house, process and compressor modules. All the characteristics of an offshore facility are present, even though the project is land-based on a man-made island. A number of the strategies developed for offshore platforms of the Gulf of Mexico were adapted to the fabrication, logistics and installation of the modules. To reduce yard fabrication time, a modularized design concept was adopted. Cost savings and onsite fabrication efficiencies were realized through open communication with the operator, early discussions with vendors, regulatory agencies, and local fabrication and installation contractors. Some improvisation and deviations were required to meet the stringent requirements for operation under Arctic conditions. The lessons learned on this project will be of use in future Arctic projects. 1 tab., 6 figs.

  6. A model for recovery of scrap monolithic uranium molybdenum fuel by electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleeck, Melissa A.

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program (RERTR) is toreduce enrichment at research and test reactors, thereby decreasing proliferation risk at these facilities. A new fuel to accomplish this goal is being manufactured experimentally at the Y12 National Security Complex. This new fuel will require its own waste management procedure,namely for the recovery of scrap from its manufacture. The new fuel is a monolithic uraniummolybdenum alloy clad in zirconium. Feasibility tests were conducted in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner using scrap U-8Mo fuel alloy. These tests proved that a uranium product could be recovered free of molybdenum from this scrap fuel by electrorefining. Tests were also conducted using U-10Mo Zr clad fuel, which confirmed that product could be recovered from a clad version of this scrap fuel at an engineering scale, though analytical results are pending for the behavior of Zr in the electrorefiner. A model was constructed for the simulation of electrorefining the scrap material produced in the manufacture of this fuel. The model was implemented on two platforms, Microsoft Excel and MatLab. Correlations, used in the model, were developed experimentally, describing area specific resistance behavior at each electrode. Experiments validating the model were conducted using scrap of U-10Mo Zr clad fuel in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner. The results of model simulations on both platforms were compared to experimental results for the same fuel, salt and electrorefiner compositions and dimensions for two trials. In general, the model demonstrated behavior similar to experimental data but additional refinements are needed to improve its accuracy. These refinements consist of a function for surface area at anode and cathode based on charge passed. Several approximations were made in the model concerning areas of electrodes which should be replaced by a more accurate function describing these areas.

  7. School Facility Conditions and Student Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Earthman, Glen I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows that the condition of school facilities has an important impact on student performance and teacher effectiveness. In particular, research demonstrates that comfortable classroom temperature and noise level are very important to efficient student performance. The age of school buildings is a useful proxy in this regard, since older facilities often have problems with thermal environment and noise level. A number of studies have measured overall building condition and its conne...

  8. Experimental observations to the electrical field for electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel in the Mark-IV electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results from the pilot scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER) treating spent nuclear fuel are reported in this article. The electrorefining processes were carried out in a LiCl-KCl-UCl 3 electrolyte. It has been noted that spool of molten cadmium below the electrolyte plays an important role in the electrorefining operations. In addition, formations of electrical shorting path between anode baskets and the electrorefiner vessel were observed, which lessened the uranium dissolution process from anode baskets, however appeared to improve the morphology of cathode deposit. The FIDAP simulation code was used to calculate the electrical potential field distributions and the potential gradient near the cathode. The effect of the electrical shorting between anode baskets and electrorefiner vessel on the morphology of cathode products is discussed

  9. Color center formation in plutonium electrorefining residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.E.; Eller, P.G.; Hobart, D.E.; Eastman, M.P.; McCurry, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium electrorefining residues containing Pu(III) in KCl exhibit dramatic reversible, light-induced color changes. Similar color changes were observed in Ln-doped (Ln = La, Nd, Gd, and Lu) and undoped KCl samples which were subjected to intense gamma irradiation. Diffuse reflectance electronic and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies were used to show conclusively that Pu(III) is present in both the bleached and unbleached plutonium-bearing residues and the spectacular color changes are the result of color center formation and alternation by visible light. (orig.)

  10. Power conditioning for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.W.; Anderson, R.; Boyes, J.

    1994-01-01

    A cost-effective, 320-MJ power-conditioning system has been completed for the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The design features include metallized dielectric capacitors, a simple topology, and large (1.6-MJ) module size. Experimental results address the technical risks associated with the design

  11. Experiments in anodic film effects during electrorefining of scrap U-10Mo fuels in support of modeling efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kleeck, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Willit, J.; Williamson, M.A. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fentiman, A.W. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A monolithic uranium molybdenum alloy clad in zirconium has been proposed as a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel option for research and test reactors, as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program. Scrap from the fuel's manufacture will contain a significant portion of recoverable LEU. Pyroprocessing has been identified as an option to perform this recovery. A model of a pyroprocessing recovery procedure has been developed to assist in refining the LEU recovery process and designing the facility. Corrosion theory and a two mechanism transport model were implemented on a Mat-Lab platform to perform the modeling. In developing this model, improved anodic behavior prediction became necessary since a dense uranium-rich salt film was observed at the anode surface during electrorefining experiments. Experiments were conducted on uranium metal to determine the film's character and the conditions under which it forms. The electro-refiner salt used in all the experiments was eutectic LiCl/KCl containing UCl{sub 3}. The anodic film material was analyzed with ICP-OES to determine its composition. Both cyclic voltammetry and potentiodynamic scans were conducted at operating temperatures between 475 and 575 C. degrees to interrogate the electrochemical behavior of the uranium. The results show that an anodic film was produced on the uranium electrode. The film initially passivated the surface of the uranium on the working electrode. At high over potentials after a trans-passive region, the current observed was nearly equal to the current observed at the initial active level. Analytical results support the presence of K{sub 2}UCl{sub 6} at the uranium surface, within the error of the analytical method.

  12. Cadmium release from a reprocessing electrorefiner falling over

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solbrig, Charles W., E-mail: Charles.solbrig@inl.gov [Batelle Energy Alliance, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States); Pope, Chad L. [Batelle Energy Alliance, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We model an accident in a nuclear fuel processing facility caused by an earthquake. ► The earthquake causes the argon cell to breach and the electrorefiner to tip over. ► Cadmium is spilled and a cathode falls on the cadmium and starts to burn. ► Cadmium can be transported to people in the building, the site, and the public. ► The results show negligible doses to all persons except in one low probability case. -- Abstract: The possible biological consequences of a release of cadmium due to a design basis earthquake in the Idaho Nuclear Laboratory's nuclear fuel reprocessing cell are evaluated. The facility is designed to withstand the design basis earthquake except for some non-seismically qualified feedthroughs. The earthquake is hypothesized to breach these feedthroughs (allowing air into the argon atmosphere processing cell) and cause the MK-IV electrorefiner (ER) in the cell to tip over or split and spill its contents of fission product laden salt and cadmium. In addition, the uranium dendrite product cathode is assumed to fall on the cadmium and burn. The heat from the burning cathode results in release of cadmium vapor into the cell atmosphere. Ingestion and inhalation of a sufficient concentration of cadmium for a critical time period can cause irreversible health effects or death. The release of the small quantity of fission products, analyzed elsewhere, results in negligible doses. Analysis reported here shows there is no danger to the general public by the cadmium release or to on-site workers except in one low probability case. This one case requires a fivefold failure where the safety exhaust system fails just after the 4% oxygen concentration combustion limit in the cell is reached. Failure of the SES allows oscillatory inflow and outflow (and hence cadmium outflow) from the cell due to gravity. The dose to a worker in the basement exceeds the mortality limit in this one event if the worker does not leave the basement.

  13. Cadmium release from a reprocessing electrorefiner falling over

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model an accident in a nuclear fuel processing facility caused by an earthquake. ► The earthquake causes the argon cell to breach and the electrorefiner to tip over. ► Cadmium is spilled and a cathode falls on the cadmium and starts to burn. ► Cadmium can be transported to people in the building, the site, and the public. ► The results show negligible doses to all persons except in one low probability case. -- Abstract: The possible biological consequences of a release of cadmium due to a design basis earthquake in the Idaho Nuclear Laboratory's nuclear fuel reprocessing cell are evaluated. The facility is designed to withstand the design basis earthquake except for some non-seismically qualified feedthroughs. The earthquake is hypothesized to breach these feedthroughs (allowing air into the argon atmosphere processing cell) and cause the MK-IV electrorefiner (ER) in the cell to tip over or split and spill its contents of fission product laden salt and cadmium. In addition, the uranium dendrite product cathode is assumed to fall on the cadmium and burn. The heat from the burning cathode results in release of cadmium vapor into the cell atmosphere. Ingestion and inhalation of a sufficient concentration of cadmium for a critical time period can cause irreversible health effects or death. The release of the small quantity of fission products, analyzed elsewhere, results in negligible doses. Analysis reported here shows there is no danger to the general public by the cadmium release or to on-site workers except in one low probability case. This one case requires a fivefold failure where the safety exhaust system fails just after the 4% oxygen concentration combustion limit in the cell is reached. Failure of the SES allows oscillatory inflow and outflow (and hence cadmium outflow) from the cell due to gravity. The dose to a worker in the basement exceeds the mortality limit in this one event if the worker does not leave the basement

  14. Zr-rich layers electrodeposited onto stainless steel cladding during the electrorefining of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Mariani, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent nuclear fuels. The initial demonstration of this process is being conducted on U-Zr alloy fuel elements irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). We report the first metallographic characterization of cladding hull remains for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuel. During the electrorefining process, Zr-rich layers, with some U, deposit on all exposed surfaces of irradiated cladding segments (hulls) that originally contained the fuel alloy that was being treated. In some cases, not only was residual Zr (and U) found inside the cladding hulls, but a Zr-rind was also observed near the interior cladding hull surface. The Zr-rind was originally formed during the fuel casting process on the fuel slug. The observation of Zr deposits on all exposed cladding surfaces is explained with thermodynamic principles, when two conditions are met. These conditions are partial oxidation of Zr and the presence of residual uranium in the hulls when the electrorefining experiment is terminated. Comparisons are made between the structure of the initial irradiated fuel before electrorefining and the morphology of the material remaining in the cladding hulls after electrorefining. (orig.)

  15. Zirconium behaviour during electrorefining of actinide-zirconium alloy in molten LiCl-KCl on aluminium cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe 76125 (Germany); Heidelberg University, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Souček, P., E-mail: Pavel.Soucek@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe 76125 (Germany); Malmbeck, R.; Krachler, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe 76125 (Germany); Fanghänel, Th. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe 76125 (Germany); Heidelberg University, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    A pyrochemical electrorefining process for the recovery of actinides from metallic nuclear fuel based on actinide-zirconium alloys (An–Zr) in a molten salt is being investigated. In this process actinides are group-selectively recovered on solid aluminium cathodes as An–Al alloys using a LiCl–KCl eutectic melt at a temperature of 450 °C. In the present study the electrochemical behaviour of zirconium during electrorefining was investigated. The maximum amount of actinides that can be oxidised without anodic co-dissolution of zirconium was determined at a selected constant cathodic current density. The experiment consisted of three steps to assess the different stages of the electrorefining process, each of which employing a fresh aluminium cathode. The results indicate that almost a complete dissolution of the actinides without co-dissolution of zirconium is possible under the applied experimental conditions. - Highlights: • Recovery of actinides was shown by electrorefining of U/Pu–Zr alloys in LiCl–KCl. • Constant current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2} is applied. • Most of the actinides were dissolved avoiding zirconium co-dissolution. • Deterioration of the deposit quality by a small amount of co-deposited Zr is not observed.

  16. Proposed high throughput electrorefining treatment for spent N- Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A high-throughput electrorefining process is being adapted to treat spent N-Reactor fuel for ultimate disposal in a geologic repository. Anodic dissolution tests were made with unirradiated N-Reactor fuel to determine the type of fragmentation necessary to provide fuel segments suitable for this process. Based on these tests, a conceptual design was produced of a plant-scale electrorefiner. In this design, the diameter of an electrode assembly is about 1.07 m (42 in.). Three of these assemblies in an electrorefiner would accommodate a 3-metric-ton batch of N-Reactor fuel that would be processed at a rate of 42 kg of uranium per hour

  17. Six-kilogram-scale electrorefining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.; Apgar, S.A. III; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-01

    The electrorefining of metallic plutonium scrap to produce high purity metal has been an established procedure at Los Alamos since 1964. This is a batch process and was limited to 4-kg plutonium because of criticality safety considerations. Improvements in critical mass measurements have permitted us to develop a process for 6-kg plutonium. The 6-kg process is now operational. The increased size of the process, together with other improvements which have been made, makes plutonium electrorefining the principal industrial tool for processing and purifying metallic plutonium scrap

  18. Study on a Salt Evaporation of the Uranium Deposits from an Electro-refiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung Bin Park; Dong Wook Cho; Gyu Hwan Oh; Jong Hyeon Lee; Sung Chan Hwang; Young Ho Kang; Han Soo Lee; Eung Ho Kim; Seong Won Park

    2008-01-01

    Uranium metal is electrodeposited onto a solid cathode during the electrorefining process. Uranium deposits from an electro-refiner contain about 30∼40 wt% salts. In order to recover pure uranium and transform it into metal ingots, the salts have to be removed. A salt distiller is adapted for a salt evaporation. A batch operation for the salt removal is carried out by a heating and vacuum evaporation. It is operated at 700 ∼ 1000 deg. C and less than 1 Torr, respectively. The behaviors of the salt evaporations were investigated by focusing on the effects of the vacuum pressure and the holding temperature on the salt distillation. The salt removal efficiencies were obtained with regards to the operational conditions. The Hertz-Langmuir relation was applied to the experimental results of the salt evaporations. The effective evaporation coefficients of the relation were obtained with regards to the operational conditions. The lower the vacuum pressure and the higher the holding temperature were, the higher the removal efficiencies of the salts were. (authors)

  19. Partitioning of actinides and fission products using molten salt electrorefining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, Jose A.; Wiesztort, Andres; Azcona, Alejandra; Bollini, Edgardo; Forchetti, Alberto; Orce, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Electrorefining is the key step of pyrometallurgical processing for separating actinides from fission products. In this work, the electrorefining process is carried out in a electrorefining cell that contains molten salts (49% LiCl- 51% KCL) floating on a liquid cadmium. The cell is operated under an inert atmosphere at 500 degree C. In this work we describe in detail the construction of the cell and the way of operation

  20. Isotope investigation of anodic slime movements in copper electrorefining baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanski, T.; Kohman, L.; Strzelecki, M.; Chojecki, M.; Kaczynska, R.; Wieclaw, B.

    1975-01-01

    A method was developed and introduced for monitoring the movement of silver-containing anodic slimes in copper electrorefining baths. Radioactive 111 Ag was used as tracer and copper plates labelled with the tracer were inserted into the anodes. During electrorefining the slime produced was continuously marked by the tracer. The activity of 111 Ag was measured at various points inside the bath by sampling and continuously registered with the aid of integrators. It was found that more than 99 percent of the slime slipped to the bottom of the bath close to the anode surface and did not migrate even at highest electrolyte flow rates. Small quantities of suspended slime contained an insignificant concentration of silver and should not be a source of cathode contamination. (author)

  1. Separation of actinides from irradiated An–Zr based fuel by electrorefining on solid aluminium cathodes in molten LiCl–KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souček, P., E-mail: Pavel.Soucek@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Murakami, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Claux, B.; Meier, R.; Malmbeck, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Electrorefining process in molten LiCl-KCl using solid Al electrodes was demonstrated. • High separation factors of actinides over lanthanides were achieved. • Efficient recovery of actinides from irradiated nuclear fuel was achieved. • Uniform, dense and well adhered deposits were obtained and characterised. • Kinetic parameters of actinide–aluminium alloy formation were evaluated. - Abstract: An electrorefining process for metallic spent nuclear fuel treatment is being investigated in ITU. Solid aluminium cathodes are used for homogeneous recovery of all actinides within the process carried out in molten LiCl–KCl eutectic salt at a temperature of 500 °C. As the selectivity, efficiency and performance of solid Al has been already shown using un-irradiated An–Zr alloy based test fuels, the present work was focused on laboratory-scale demonstration of the process using irradiated METAPHIX-1 fuel composed of U{sub 67}–Pu{sub 19}–Zr{sub 10}–MA{sub 2}–RE{sub 2} (wt.%, MA = Np, Am, Cm, RE = Nd, Ce, Gd, Y). Different electrorefining techniques, conditions and cathode geometries were used during the experiment yielding evaluation of separation factors, kinetic parameters of actinide–aluminium alloy formation, process efficiency and macro-structure characterisation of the deposits. The results confirmed an excellent separation and very high efficiency of the electrorefining process using solid Al cathodes.

  2. Safeguards approach for conditioning facility for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, J.M.; Barham, M.; Moran, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    A safeguards approach has been developed for conditioning facilities associated with the final disposal of spent fuel in geologic repositories. The proposed approach is based on a generic conditioning facility incorporating common features of conditioning facility designs currently proposed. The generic facility includes a hot cell for consolidation of spent fuel pins and repackaging of spent fuel items such as assemblies and cans of pins. The consolidation process introduces safeguards concerns which have not previously been addressed in traditional safeguards approaches. In developing the safeguards approach, diversion of spent fuel was assessed in terms of potential target items, operational activities performed on the items, containment of the items, and concealment activities performed on the items. The combination of these factors defines the potential diversion pathways. Diversion pathways were identified for spent fuel pellets, pins, assemblies, canisters, and casks. Diversion activities provide for opportunities of detection along the diversion paths. Potential detection methods were identified at several levels of diversion activities. Detection methods can be implemented through safeguards measures. Safeguards measures were proposed for each of the primary safeguards techniques of design information verification (DIV), containment and surveillance (C/S), and material accountancy. Potential safeguards approaches were developed by selection of appropriate combinations of safeguards measures. For all candidate safeguards approaches, DIV is a fundamental component. Variations in the approaches are mainly in the degree of C/S measures and in the types and numbers of material accountancy verification measures. The candidate safeguards approaches were evaluated toward the goal of determining a model safeguards approach. This model approach is based on the integrated application of selected safeguards measures to use International Atomic Energy Agency resources

  3. Mixing time study to select suitable stirrer for electrorefiner. Contributed Paper RD-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Sourabh; Mythili, M; Joseph, Joby; Nandakumar, V.; Muralidharan, B.; Padmakumar, G.; Rajan, K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyro-processing is an alternative to conventional methods of aqueous reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Electrorefining is an important process step in pyro-processing, carried out in a high temperature molten salt bath in an Electrorefiner. The recovery of actinides from the spent fuels has to be high. One of the methods to achieve this is to ensure proper mixing of the molten salt in the electrorefiner. The optimum design of the stirrer should ensure efficient mixing with minimum mixing time. Studies have been carried out in an engineering scale model of the electrorefiner to study the mixing phenomena. This paper brings outs the series of experiments conducted on an ambient temperature electrorefiner to select a suitable stirrer. (author)

  4. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  5. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  6. Reduction of radioactive waste by improvement of conditioning facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radde, E.

    2014-07-01

    The NES (Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf) is the only radioactive waste conditions and storage facility in Austria. It manages waste originating from research, industry and medicine. Its main goal is, not only to treat and store waste safety, but also to optimize processes to further reduce the waste volume. To achieve this goal, the New Handling Facility was built. In this paper we will show how the waste volume can be easily reduced by optimizing the conditioning and waste stream process. The NES owns a water treatment plant for cleaning of active waste water, an incineration plant that is used to burn radioactive waste. (Author)

  7. A study of the morphological aspects of the indium electrorefining process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PERICA PAUNOVIC

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The cathodic deposition of In was performed under conditions suitable for electrorefining purposes. The main goal of the study was: i to determine the possibilities for In ultrapurification through multiple electrorefining with controlled parameters and ii to study the regularities of the morphology of the In deposit as influenced by the electrodeposition conditions. Without application of special high purity techniques, it was possible to obtain an In purity level of 99.997 %, by repeating the refining procedure in a set of modular electrolysis cells with forced electrolyte circulation and applying modified current regimes. Irregular (non planparallel migration of indium from the anode to the cathode and vice versa, as well as dendrite formation at the edges of the electrode prevented further repetition necessary for the achievment of higher purification levels. This provoked the need to study the morphology of the In-deposits. The phenomena and some regularities of In nucleation and grain growth, as influenced by the applied overpotential and quantity of current passed through the cell, were studied. Electrodeposition was performed onto a stationary Pt-electrode from a mixed sulfate–chloride solution. SEM with magnification up to 1000 × was used to identify the morphology of the deposits. Granular grains were dominant at overpotentials of 85 and 110 mV, while at 160 and 185 mV, needle-like and nonbranched dendrites were visible. The deposit became less compact as its thickness advanced. The apparent thickness of the In layer increased from 20–25 to 320–380 mm when the amount of charge was increased from 1 to 10 mA h cm-2.

  8. Development of Computational Models for Pyrochemical Electrorefiners of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. R.; Lee, H. S.; Hwang, I. S.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this project is to develop multi-dimensional computational models in order to improve the operation of uranium electrorefiners currently used in pyroprocessing technology. These 2-D (US) and 3-D (ROK) mathematical models are based on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the electrorefiner processes. The validated models by compiled and evaluated experimental data could provide better information for developing advanced electrorefiners for uranium recovery. The research results in this period are as follows: - Successfully assessed a common computational platform for the modeling work and identify spatial characterization requirements. - Successfully developed a 3-D electro-fluid dynamic electrorefiner model. - Successfully validated and benchmarked the two multi-dimensional models with compiled experimental data sets

  9. R and D status of oxide electro-refining reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myochin, Munetaka

    2005-01-01

    The oxide electro-refining pyrochemical reprocessing is excellent in the resistivity against nuclear material diversion and in the suitability for oxide fuel cycle and has an excellent affinity for the technology of fuel production using the vibropac method. The oxide electro-refining pyrochemical reprocessing system has therefore been examined as a part of studies of commercialization of FBR cycle. This report outlines the examination results of fundamental data acquired for the system design. (M.H.)

  10. Recovery of plutonium from electrorefining anode heels at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.; Karraker, D.G.

    1987-03-01

    In a joint effort, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have developed two processes to recover plutonium from electrorefining anode heel residues. Aqueous dissolution of anode heel metal was demonstrated at SRL on a laboratory scale and on a larger pilot scale using either sulfamic acid or nitric acid-hydrazine-fluoride solutions. This direct anode heel metal dissolution requires the use of a geometrically favorable dissolver. The second process developed involves first diluting the plutonium in the anode heel residues by alloying with aluminum. The alloyed anode heel plutonium can then be dissolved using a nitric acid-fluoride-mercury(II) solution in large non-geometrically favorable equipment where nuclear safety is ensured by concentration control

  11. Electrorefining of Cerium in LiCl-KCl Molten Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell-Kelly, R.P.; Paget, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining of cerium from cerium-gallium alloys has been demonstrated in lithium chloride-potassium chloride salts at temperatures below 500 deg. C, with excellent current efficiencies and high product yields. These experiments are being carried out as non-active trials for a process for the purification of impure actinide metals. The results reported show anodic current efficiencies consistently close to 100%, and in several experiments complete oxidation of the cerium in the feed occurred. The cathodic product is hard and metallic, and incorporates a significant amount of salt into its structure. The product can be consolidated into a dense, pure metal by melting under calcium chloride at 850 deg. C. The yield of this consolidation step varies between 16 and 75%, seeming to depend on the total mass of metal being consolidated and the quality of inert atmosphere. A small-scale electrochemical cell has been demonstrated which will be used in initial active experiments. (authors)

  12. First principles study of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U in an electrorefining system using molybdenum cathode and LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Choah; Kang, Joonhee; Kang, Woojong; Kwak, Dohyun; Han, Byungchan

    2016-01-01

    Using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations we obtain thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U in an electrorefining process for spent nuclear fuels using a LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt and Mo as a cathode. The thermodynamic stability of electrodeposited U from the molten salt onto the Mo(110) surface electrode is evaluated by activity coefficients as function of surface coverages of U and Cl. Additionally, ab-initio molecular dynamic simulations combined with the Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland relation enables us to calculate the viscosity of the LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt. Our results well agree with previously reported experimental data endorsing the credibility. Based on our atomic-level mechanical understanding we propose that an accurate computational model system incorporating the electrochemical conditions of the electrorefining process essential for the purpose of establishing thermodynamic and kinetic database of U, otherwise critical deviations are inevitable. More interestingly, the effect of coadsorption of Cl with U on the Mo(110) surface plays a key role in stabilizing electrodeposited U on the cathode. Our approach can be useful for validating published experimental database and for identifying key factors guiding a rational design of highly efficient electrorefining system for spent nuclear fuels, and thus reducing high-level radioactive nuclear wastes.

  13. Modelling the effect of temperature and free acid, silver, copper and lead concentrations on silver electrorefining electrolyte conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Aji, Arif T.; Kalliomäki, Taina; Wilson, Benjamin P.; Aromaa, Jari; Lundström, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Conductivity is one of the key physico-chemical properties of electrolyte in silver electrorefining since it affects the energy consumption of the process. As electrorefining process development trends towards high current density operation, having electrolytes with high conductivities will greatly reduce the energy consumption of the process. This study outlines investigations into silver electrorefining electrolyte conductivity as a function of silver, free acid, copper and lead concentrati...

  14. Contribution to the knowledge of the mechanism of the electrorefining of uranium in fused salt baths (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, G.; Chauvin, G.; Coriou, H.; Hure, J.

    1961-01-01

    Very pure uranium can be obtained by electrorefining under the following conditions: electrolyte: UCl 3 (ca. 30 per cent wt.) dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic, cathode: molybdenum, atmosphere: argon, temperature: 400-450 deg. C. The detailed mechanism of the refining process has been hitherto unknown. Electrode-potential studies undertaken to fill this gap have shown that: 1. UCl prepared according to Newton contains an impurity (perhaps UH 3 ) that interferes with the yield of the cathode deposit. We propose a treatment to eliminate this impurity. 2. The quasi-reversible character of the system U +3 ↔U 0 is the principal reason for the production of high purity uranium. The cathodic deposition and anodic dissolution seem to be primary reactions. 3. The presence of moisture in the molten bath has a very harmful influence on the overall electrorefining process: the uranium obtained contains many impurities; the cathode current efficiency falls from 80 to about 10 per cent; and the anode is substantially corroded, the apparent anode current efficiency rising from 90 to about 120 per cent. An interpretation of these effects is given, based on the experimental polarization curves. (authors) [fr

  15. Impedimetric Thiourea Sensing in Copper Electrorefining Bath based on DC Magnetron Sputtered Nanosilver as Highly Uniform Transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozaffari, S.A.; Amoli, H. Salar; Simorgh, S.; Rahmanian, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of a novel disposable impedimetric thiourea sensor based on nanostructured Ag film transducer. • Exploiting sputtering as a high-tech method for preparation of highly uniform nanostructured Ag film. • A wonderful combination of nanostructured Ag film and carbon paper substrate as remarkably stable and reproducible sensor for thiourea detection in copper electrorefining bath. • Application of impedimetric assessment for thiourea monitoring due to its rapidity, sensitivity, and repeatability. - Abstract: Highly uniform sputtered nanostructured silver (Nano-Ag) film on the conductive carbon paper (CP) substrate (Nano-Ag/CP) was applied as a novel approach for thiourea (TU) measurement in copper electrorefining bath. Nano-Ag film was achieved by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering system at the optimized instrumental deposition conditions. Characterization of the surface structure of Nano-Ag film by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), exhibits uniform Nano-Ag film as an effective transducer for TU sensing. Step by step monitoring of Nano-Ag/CP electrode fabrication were performed using electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Fabricated Nano-Ag/CP electrode was used for TU determination using EIS assessment. The impedimetric results show high sensitivity for TU sensing within 2.0–250 ppm.

  16. Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W.; Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E.; Anderson, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system

  17. Safeguards System for the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho-dong; Lee, T.H.; Yoon, J.S.; Park, S.W; Lee, S.Y.; Li, T.K.; Menlove, H.; Miller, M.C.; Tolba, A.; Zarucki, R.; Shawky, S.; Kamya, S.

    2007-01-01

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) which is a part of a pyro-processing has been under development at Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since 1997 to tackle the problem of an accumulation of spent fuel. The concept is to convert spent oxide fuel into a metallic form in a high temperature molten salt in order to reduce the heat energy, volume, and radioactivity of a spent fuel. Since the inactive tests of the ACP have been successfully implemented to confirm the validity of the electrolytic reduction technology, a lab-scale hot test will be undertaken in a couple of years to validate the concept. For this purpose, the KAERI has built the ACP Facility (ACPF) at the basement of the Irradiated Material Examination Facility (IMEF) of KAERI, which already has a reserved hot-cell area. Through the bilateral arrangement between US Department of Energy (DOE) and Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) for safeguards R and D, the KAERI has developed elements of safeguards system for the ACPF in cooperation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The reference safeguards design conditions and equipment were established for the ACPF. The ACPF safeguards system has many unique design specifications because of the particular characteristics of the pyro-process materials and the restrictions during a facility operation. For the material accounting system, a set of remote operation and maintenance concepts has been introduced for a non-destructive assay (NDA) system. The IAEA has proposed a safeguards approach to the ACPF for the different operational phases. Safeguards measures at the ACPF will be implemented during all operational phases which include a 'Cold Test', a 'Hot Test' and at the end of a 'Hot test'. Optimization of the IAEA's inspection efforts was addressed by designing an effective safeguards approach that relies on, inter alia, remote monitoring using cameras, installed NDA instrumentation, gate monitors and seals

  18. Understanding Functional Adequacy and Facility Condition for Strategic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Ray

    2012-01-01

    At colleges and universities today, the increasing number of students is putting new pressure on facilities--and on facility staff. Student needs are also increasingly different, and most campus facilities have not kept up with the changing times. Facilities are expensive to build, maintain, and renovate, and costs are on the rise. Funds for…

  19. Material accountancy in an electrometallurgical Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Benedict, R.W.; Goff, K.M.; Keyes, R.W.; Mariani, R.D.; Bucher, R.G.; Yacout, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: first, it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security; second, it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and material are under control. By weighing material entering and leaving a process, and using sampling results to determine composition, an inventory difference (ID) results when the measured inventory is compared to the predicted inventory. The ID and its uncertainty, based on error propagation, determines the degree of assurance that an operation proceeded according to expectations. FCF uses the ID calculation in two ways: closeout, which is the ID and uncertainty for a particular operational step, and material accountancy, which determines an ID and its associated uncertainty for a material balance area through several operational steps. Material accountancy over the whole facility for a specified time period assists in detecting diversion of nuclear material. Data from depleted uranium operations are presented to illustrate the method used in FCF

  20. Microbial Condition of Water Samples from Foreign Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    In order to assess the microbial condition of foreign spent nuclear fuel storage facilities and their possible impact on SRS storage basins, twenty-three water samples were analyzed from 12 different countries. Fifteen of the water samples were analyzed and described in an earlier report (WSRC-TR-97-00365 [1]). This report describes nine additional samples received from October 1997 through March 1998. The samples include three from Australia, two from Denmark and Germany and one sample from Italy and Greece. Each water sample was analyzed for microbial content and activity as determined by total bacteria, viable aerobic bacteria, viable anaerobic bacteria, viable sulfate-reducing bacteria, viable acid-producing bacteria and enzyme diversity. The results for each water sample were then compared to all other foreign samples analyzed to date and monthly samples pulled from the receiving basin for off-site fuel (RBOF), at SRS. Of the nine samples analyzed, four samples from Italy, Germany and Greece had considerably higher microbiological activity than that historically found in the RBOF. This microbial activity included high levels of enzyme diversity and the presence of viable organisms that have been associated with microbial influenced corrosion in other environments. The three samples from Australia had microbial activities similar to that in the RBOF while the two samples from Denmark had lower levels of microbial activity. These results suggest that a significant number of the foreign storage facilities have water quality standards that allow microbial proliferation and survival

  1. Radiation Monitoring System in Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Gil Sung; Kook, D. H.; Choung, W. M.; Ku, J. H.; Cho, I. J.; You, G. S.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, W. K.; Lee, E. P

    2006-09-15

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process is under development for effective management of spent fuel by converting UO{sub 2} into U-metal. For demonstration of this process, {alpha}-{gamma} type new hot cell was built in the IMEF basement . To secure against radiation hazard, this facility needs radiation monitoring system which will observe the entire operating area before the hot cell and service area at back of it. This system consists of 7 parts; Area Monitor for {gamma}-ray, Room Air Monitor for particulate and iodine in both area, Hot cell Monitor for hot cell inside high radiation and rear door interlock, Duct Monitor for particulate of outlet ventilation, Iodine Monitor for iodine of outlet duct, CCTV for watching workers and material movement, Server for management of whole monitoring system. After installation and test of this, radiation monitoring system will be expected to assist the successful ACP demonstration.

  2. Radiation Monitoring System in Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Kook, D. H.; Choung, W. M.; Ku, J. H.; Cho, I. J.; You, G. S.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, W. K.; Lee, E. P.

    2006-09-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process is under development for effective management of spent fuel by converting UO 2 into U-metal. For demonstration of this process, α-γ type new hot cell was built in the IMEF basement . To secure against radiation hazard, this facility needs radiation monitoring system which will observe the entire operating area before the hot cell and service area at back of it. This system consists of 7 parts; Area Monitor for γ-ray, Room Air Monitor for particulate and iodine in both area, Hot cell Monitor for hot cell inside high radiation and rear door interlock, Duct Monitor for particulate of outlet ventilation, Iodine Monitor for iodine of outlet duct, CCTV for watching workers and material movement, Server for management of whole monitoring system. After installation and test of this, radiation monitoring system will be expected to assist the successful ACP demonstration

  3. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described; this technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described. This technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components

  5. Direct plutonium oxide reduction/electrorefining interface program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.E.; Berry, J.W.; Giebel, R.E.; Long, J.L.; Moser, W.S.; Navratil, J.D.; Tibbitts, S.F.

    1986-01-01

    Research test work and production data evaluation were performed by the Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR)/Electrorefining (ER) Interface Task Team to determine the cause for poor efficiency and yields during ER of DOR metal product. Production data and preliminary test results provided a working hypothesis. Extremely high loadings of impurities (whatever their exact source and identity) in the DOR product metal may lead to failure of the metal to become a molten anode at ER operating temperatures. Moderate impurity levels permit attainment of a molten anode, but lead to low yields because of premature anode solidification. The test results did not conclusively prove the hypothesis or identify specific mechanisms, but were qualitatively supportive. By stirring the molten anode metal pool, as well as the molten salt phase, generally good ER runs were obtained with both DOR and non-DOR feeds. These limited preliminary results suggest that anode stirring decreases the sensitivity of the ER process to DOR-related impurities. Suggested corrective measures included: (1) minimizing impurities in DOR feed to ER and (2) continued evaluation of anode stirring along with run termination by back-EMF measurements. 1 ref., 3 figs., 13 tabs

  6. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  7. Simulation of electrorefining process using time-dependent multi-component electrochemical model: REFIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Gi; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    REFIN model is applied to analyze a series of experiments that had been conducted by Tomczuk, et al. at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the U.S.A.. Predicted results from REFIN model for the electrorefining experiment are compared with the published experimental results. It is demonstrated that REFIN model can predict faradic current of each element and electrochemical potential as a function of time over the entire campaign of the electrorefining experiment. The elemental concentration changes agree with the experimental results well. Elemental concentration changes during an open-circuit equilibration period are revealed to suggest that the electrorefining process could not be adequately described by the equilibrium model often applied for an electrode surface. Surface potential drop is changed according to equilibrium potential of chemical species with high activity in liquid metal.

  8. Estimation of zirconium in various process streams in molten salt electrorefining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganthi, S.; Vandarkuzhali, S.; Venkatesh, P.; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is a non-aqueous pyrochemical process suitable for reprocessing spent metallic fuel. In this process the spent fuel is taken at the anode and the fuel elements are selectively electrotransported to a suitable cathode (either a solid steel cathode or liquid cadmium cathode) using molten LiCl-KCI as electrolyte. We have demonstrated electrorefining of UZr alloy at engineering scale level. 1 Kg U-6%Zr alloy was taken at the anode and pure uranium was recovered at a steel cathode using molten LiCIKCI-5%UCI 3 as electrolyte at 773 K. In this paper we present the method of dissolution, sample preparation and estimation of zirconium in various process streams in the electrorefining experiments carried out in our laboratory

  9. Roadmap for disposal of Electrorefiner Salt as Transuranic Waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, Robert P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trone, Janis R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Lawrence C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II) used fuel with a layer of sodium surrounding the uranium-zirconium fuel to improve heat transfer. Disposing of EBR-II fuel in a geologic repository without treatment is not prudent because of the potentially energetic reaction of the sodium with water. In 2000, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to treat the sodium-bonded fuel with an electrorefiner (ER), which produces metallic uranium product, a metallic waste, mostly from the cladding, and the salt waste in the ER, which contains most of the actinides and fission products. Two waste forms were proposed for disposal in a mined repository; the metallic waste, which was to be cast into ingots, and the ER salt waste, which was to be further treated to produce a ceramic waste form. However, alternative disposal pathways for metallic and salt waste streams may reduce the complexity. For example, performance assessments show that geologic repositories can easily accommodate the ER salt waste without treating it to form a ceramic waste form. Because EBR-II was used for atomic energy defense activities, the treated waste likely meets the definition of transuranic waste. Hence, disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southern New Mexico, may be feasible. This report reviews the direct disposal pathway for ER salt waste and describes eleven tasks necessary for implementing disposal at WIPP, provided space is available, DOE decides to use this alternative disposal pathway in an updated environmental impact statement, and the State of New Mexico grants permission.

  10. High-temperature distillation and consolidation of U–Zr cathode product from molten salt electrorefining of simulated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Masatoshi; Akagi, Masaaki; Koyama, Tadafumi

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature distillation experiments were performed using U–Zr cathode products of various compositions to obtain knowledge on suitable operation conditions and equipment design such as the container material. The LiCl–KCl–UCl 3 electrolyte adhering to the U–Zr cathode products was almost completely vaporized at 1273–1573 K, under pressure of 10–300 Pa. Massive ingots were obtained from the remaining cathode products by heating them at 1573–1673 K. Three different phases were identified in a distillation product of a higher Zr content. A U-rich bulk (3.9 wt% Zr) and a deposit of a relatively low Zr content (17.2 wt% Zr) were considered to be formed during the cooling process of the distillation product. Another Zr-rich deposit (64.7 wt% Zr), which might cause the inhomogeneity of product ingots, was expected to result from Zr-rich spots that originally existed in the cathode product. The Cl content in the cathode product was decreased by distillation to less than 1/200 of that after electrorefining, while it was markedly larger at a higher Zr concentration. To limit the amount of Zr-rich deposit and the Cl content, the amount of Zr in the distillation product should be controlled to a sufficiently low level by optimization of the operating procedures and conditions in the electrorefining and distillation steps. The zirconia coating material developed in this study showed superior performance in inhibiting reaction between the melted U–Zr alloy melt and the graphite crucible and also in the easy release of the U–Zr ingot from the crucible

  11. Analysis of contamination conditions of the Joyo Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, S.; Ishijima, N.; Tanimoto, K.

    1999-08-01

    Decontamination methods have been studied for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility whose operation has been stopped in 1994. In this study, we analyzed samples of its system piping, whose dose rate was relatively low, to determine conditions of contamination. We also study appropriate decontamination methods for them. Results are as follows. 1. The inner surfaces of piping were covered with a very thin clad that was less than 1 micrometer in thickness and had many vacancies, looked like particle detachment, which were about 20 micrometers in depth. Something like corrosion product was observed near the surface and it was 440 micrometers in depth. 2. Radioactive contamination was considered to settle on a lower part of the piping and to be buried in the clad. A kind of dominant contamination nuclide was 60 Co. 3. Hot nitric acid process will be suitable for system decontamination to reduce dose rate before dismantling. But its feasibility tests are indispensable using samples of main system components that have high dose rate. Rubber lining tanks requires another methods because of its difficulty of decontamination. 4. Analyses and decontamination tests using main system are required to decide through decontamination methods according to the clearance level. (author)

  12. Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container types for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion

  13. 42 CFR 483.450 - Condition of participation: Client behavior and facility practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client behavior and... Retarded § 483.450 Condition of participation: Client behavior and facility practices. (a) Standard: Facility practices—Conduct toward clients. (1) The facility must develop and implement written policies and...

  14. Development of system analysis code for pyrochemical process using molten salt electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Kakehi, I.

    2000-04-01

    This report describes accomplishment of development of a cathode processor calculation code to simulate the mass and heat transfer phenomena with the distillation process and development of an analytical model for cooling behavior of the pyrochemical process cell on personal computers. The pyrochemical process using molten salt electrorefining would introduce new technologies for new fuels of particle oxide, particle nitride and metallic fuels. The cathode processor calculation code with distillation process was developed. A code validation calculation has been conducted on the basic of the benchmark problem for natural convection in a square cavity. Results by using the present code agreed well for the velocity-temperature fields, the maximum velocity and its location with the benchmark solution published in a paper. The functions have been added to advance the reality in simulation and to increase the efficiency in utilization. The test run has been conducted using the code with the above modification for an axisymmetric enclosed vessel simulating a cathode processor, and the capability of the distillation process simulation with the code has been confirmed. An analytical model for cooling behavior of the pyrochemical process cell was developed. The analytical model was selected by comparing benchmark analysis with detailed analysis on engineering workstation. Flow and temperature distributions were confirmed by the result of steady state analysis. In the result of transient cooling analysis, an initial transient peak of temperature occurred at balanced heat condition in the steady-state analysis. Final gas temperature distribution was dependent on gas circulation flow in transient condition. Then there were different final gas temperature distributions on the basis of the result of steady-state analysis. This phenomenon has a potential for it's own metastable condition. Therefore it was necessary to design gas cooling flow pattern without cooling gas circulation

  15. Experimental observations on electrorefining spent nuclear fuel in molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T. A.; Laug, D. V.; Li, S. X.; Sofu, T.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is currently performing a demonstration program for the Department of Energy (DOE) which processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). One of the key steps in this demonstration program is electrorefining of the spent fuel in a molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system using a pilot scale electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER). This article summarizes experimental observations and engineering aspects for electrorefining spent fuel in the molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system. It was found that the liquid cadmium pool acted as an intermediate electrode during the electrorefining process in the ER. The cadmium level was gradually decreased due to its high vapor pressure and vaporization rate at the ER operational temperature. The low cadmium level caused the anode assembly momentarily to touch the ER vessel hardware, which generated a periodic current change at the salt/cathode interface and improved uranium recovery efficiency for the process. The primary current distributions calculated by numerical simulations were used in interpreting the experimental results

  16. Summary of beryllium electrorefining technology developed by KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistole, C.O.

    1983-01-01

    Proprietary beryllium electrorefining technology has been purchased from the KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc. by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, as part of a DOE beryllium option study. This technology has been reviewed and is summarized. 12 figures, 7 tables

  17. 42 CFR 483.430 - Condition of participation: Facility staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... comparable body. (v) To be designated as a psychologist, an individual must have at least a master's degree...; (ii) Clients who are aggressive, assaultive or security risks; (iii) More than 16 clients; or (iv... security risks; and (iii) Sixteen or fewer clients, (4) The facility must provide sufficient support staff...

  18. Thermal operations conditions in a national waste terminal storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Some of the major technical questions associated with the burial of radioactive high-level wastes in geologic formations are related to the thermal environments generated by the waste and the impact of this dissipated heat on the surrounding environment. The design of a high level waste storage facility must be such that the temperature variations that occur do not adversely affect operating personnel and equipment. The objective of this investigation was to assist OWI by determining the thermal environment that would be experienced by personnel and equipment in a waste storage facility in salt. Particular emphasis was placed on determining the maximum floor and air temperatures with and without ventilation in the first 30 years after waste emplacement. The assumed facility design differs somewhat from those previously analyzed and reported, but many of the previous parametric surveys are useful for comparison. In this investigation a number of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional simulations of the heat flow in a repository have been performed on the HEATING5 and TRUMP heat transfer codes. The representative repository constructs used in the simulations are described, as well as the computational models and computer codes. Results of the simulations are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the recent results and those from previous analyses. Finally, a summary of study limitations, comparisons, and conclusions is given

  19. Condition of America's Public School Facilities: 2012-13. First Look. NCES 2014-022

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Debbie; Lewis, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This report provides nationally representative data on the condition of public school facilities. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) previously collected data on this topic in 1999 (Lewis et al. 2000). The study presented in this report collected information about the condition of public school facilities in the 2012-13 school…

  20. Simplified Reference Electrode for Electrorefining of Spent Nuclear Fuel in High Temperature Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Davies; Shelly X Li

    2007-01-01

    Pyrochemical processing plays an important role in development of proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel cycles. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a pyrochemical process has been implemented for the treatment of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) in the last decade. Electrorefining in a high temperature molten salt is considered a signature or central technology in pyroprocessing fuel cycles. Separation of actinides from fission products is being demonstrated by electrorefining the spent fuel in a molten UCl3-LiCl-KCl electrolyte in two engineering scale electrorefiners (ERs). The electrorefining process is current controlled. The reference electrode provides process information through monitoring of the voltage difference between the reference and the anode and cathode electrodes. This information is essential for monitoring the reactions occurring at the electrodes, investigating separation efficiency, controlling the process rate, and determining the process end-point. The original reference electrode has provided good life expectancy and signal stability, but is not easily replaceable. The reference electrode used a vycor-glass ion-permeable membrane containing a high purity silver wire with one end positioned in ∼2 grams of LiCl/KCl salt electrolyte with a low concentration (∼1%) AgCl. It was, however, a complex assembly requiring specialized skill and talent to fabricate. The construction involved multiple small pieces, glass joints, ceramic to glass joints, and ceramic to metal joints all assembled in a high purity inert gas environment. As original electrodes reached end-of-life it was uncertain if the skills and knowledge were readily available to successfully fabricate replacements. Experimental work has been conducted to identify a simpler electrode design while retaining the needed long life and signal stability. This improved design, based on an ion-permeable membrane of mullite has been completed. Use of the silver

  1. Simplified Reference Electrode for Electrorefining of Spent Nuclear Fuel in High Temperature Molten Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Davies; Shelly X Li

    2007-09-01

    Pyrochemical processing plays an important role in development of proliferation- resistant nuclear fuel cycles. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a pyrochemical process has been implemented for the treatment of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) in the last decade. Electrorefining in a high temperature molten salt is considered a signature or central technology in pyroprocessing fuel cycles. Separation of actinides from fission products is being demonstrated by electrorefining the spent fuel in a molten UCl3-LiCl-KCl electrolyte in two engineering scale electrorefiners (ERs). The electrorefining process is current controlled. The reference electrode provides process information through monitoring of the voltage difference between the reference and the anode and cathode electrodes. This information is essential for monitoring the reactions occurring at the electrodes, investigating separation efficiency, controlling the process rate, and determining the process end-point. The original reference electrode has provided good life expectancy and signal stability, but is not easily replaceable. The reference electrode used a vycor-glass ion-permeable membrane containing a high purity silver wire with one end positioned in ~2 grams of LiCl/KCl salt electrolyte with a low concentration (~1%) AgCl. It was, however, a complex assembly requiring specialized skill and talent to fabricate. The construction involved multiple small pieces, glass joints, ceramic to glass joints, and ceramic to metal joints all assembled in a high purity inert gas environment. As original electrodes reached end-of-life it was uncertain if the skills and knowledge were readily available to successfully fabricate replacements. Experimental work has been conducted to identify a simpler electrode design while retaining the needed long life and signal stability. This improved design, based on an ion-permeable membrane of mullite has been completed. Use of the silver wire

  2. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  3. Ventilation and air conditioning system in waste treatment and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hirotsugu; Sugawara, Kazushige.

    1987-01-01

    So far, the measures concerning the facilities for treating and storing radioactive wastes in nuclear fuel cycle in Japan were in the state which cannot be said to be sufficient. In order to cope with this situation, electric power companies constructed and operated radioactive waste concentration and volume reduction facilities, solid waste storing facilities for drums, high level solid waste storing facilities, spent fuel cask preserving facilities and so on successively in the premises of nuclear power stations, and for the wastes expected in future, the research and the construction plan of the facilities for treating and storing low, medium and high level wastes have been advanced. The ventilation and air conditioning system for these facilities is the important auxiliary system which has the mission of maintaining safe and pleasant environment in the facilities and lowering as far as possible the release of radioactive substances to outside. The outline of waste treatment and storage facilities is explained. The design condition, ventilation and air conditioning method, the features of respective waste treatment and storage facilities, and the problems for the future are described. Hereafter, mechanical ventilation system continues to be the main system, and filters become waste, while the exchange of filters is accompanied by the radiation exposure of workers. (Kako, I.)

  4. The application of electrorefining for recovery and purification of fuel discharged from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    An electrorefining process employing a molten salt electrolyte and a molten cadmium anode is proposed for the separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products and cladding material in discharged IFR driver fuel. The use of a liquid cadmium anode, which is the unique feature of the process, permits selective dissolution of the fuel from the cladding and prevents electrolytic corrosion of the steel container and contamination of the product by noble metal fission products

  5. Numerical simulation of minor actinide recovery behaviour in batch processing of spent metallic fuel by electrorefining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawada, H P; Bhat, N P [Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Balasubramanian, G R [Atomic Energy Commission, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Numerical simulation of electro-transport of fuel actinides (FAs), minor actinides (MAs) and rare earths (REs) in the electro-refiner (ER) for pyrochemical reprocessing of a typical spent IFR metallic fuel has been attempted based on improved thermo-chemical model developed for application to multi-component system in the ER. Optimization of MA recovery and decontamination factors (DFs) for MAs and REs in batch processing is presented. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The application of electrorefining for recovery and purification of fuel discharged from the Integral Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, L.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    An electrorefining process employing a molten salt electrolyte and a molten cadmium anode is proposed for the separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products and cladding material in discharged IFR driver fuel. The use of a liquid cadmium anode, which is the unique feature of the process, permits selective dissolution of the fuel from the cladding and prevents electrolytic corrosion of the steel container and contamination of the product by noble metal fission products.

  7. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  8. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  9. Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-10-18

    A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

  10. LiCl-KCl-UCl3 Salt production and Transfer for the Uranium Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Moon Sik; Kang, Hee Suk; Lee, Han Soo

    2009-01-01

    A pyrometallurgical partitioning technology to recover uranium from an uranium-TRU mixture which is the product material of electroreduction system is being developed at KAERI since 1997. In the process, the reactor of an electrorefiner consists of the electrodes and the molten chloride salt which is LiCl-KCl-UCl 3 . The role of uranium chloride salt (UCl 3 ) is to stabilize the initial cell voltage between electrodes in the electrorefining reactor. The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form the CdCl 2 occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl 3 by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl 2 . The apparatus for producing UCl 3 consists of a chlorine gas generator, a chlorinator, and a off-gas wet scrubber. The temperature of the reactants are maintained at about 600 .deg. C . After the reaction is completed, the product salt is transferred from the vessel to the electrorefiner by a transfer system

  11. Air conditioning facilities in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Michitaka; Oka, Tsutomu

    1987-01-01

    Reprocessing plants are the facilities for separating the plutonium produced by nuclear reaction and unconsumed remaining uranium from fission products in the spent fuel taken out of nuclear reactors and recovering them. The fuel reprocessing procedure is outlined. In order to ensure safety in handling radioactive substances, triple confinement using vessels, concrete cells and buildings is carried out in addition to the prevention of criticality and radiation shielding, and stainless steel linings and drip trays are installed as occasion demands. The ventilation system in a reprocessing plant is roughly divided into three systems, that is, tower and tank ventilation system to deal with offgas, cell ventilation system for the cells in which main towers and tanks are installed, and building ventilation system. Air pressure becomes higher from tower and tank system to building system. In a reprocessing plant, the areas in a building are classified according to dose rate. The building ventilation system deals with green and amber areas, and the cell ventilation system deals with red area. These three ventilation systems are explained. Radiation monitors are installed to monitor the radiation dose rate and air contamination in working places. The maintenance and checkup of ventilation systems are important. (Kako, I.)

  12. Recommended parameters for effect assessment of radioactive airborne effluents under normal condition of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Fang Dong; Sun Chengzhi; Xiao Naihong

    2003-01-01

    A set of models and default parameters are recommended for effect assessment of radioactive airborne effluents under normal condition of nuclear facilities in order to standardize the environmental effect assessment of nuclear facilities, and to simplify the observation and investigation in early phase. The paper introduces the input data and default parameters used in the model

  13. Measuring School Facility Conditions: An Illustration of the Importance of Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lance W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that taking the educational purposes of schools into account is central to understanding the place and importance of facilities to learning outcomes. The paper begins by observing that the research literature connecting facility conditions to student outcomes is mixed. A closer examination of this…

  14. An experimental study of molten salt electrorefining of uranium using solid iron cathode and liquid cadmium cathode for development of pyrometallurgical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Shoji, Yuichi; Fujita, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Electrorefining of uranium was studied for developing pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology of metal fuel cycle. After concentration dependence of polarization curve was measured, uranium was electrodeposited either on solid iron cathode or in liquid cadmium cathode. Design and operational conditions of the cathode were improved for obtaining much greater quantity of deposit, resulting in recovery of 732g of dendritic uranium on a single solid cathode, and of 232g of uranium in 2,344g of a liquid cadmium cathode. The behaviors of electro-codeposition of rare earth elements with uranium were observed for liquid cadmium cathode, and were found to follow the local equilibrium between salt electrolyte and cathode. The decontamination factors of FP simulating elements from uranium were tentatively determined as >2,000 for deposition to solid cathode and as >7 for deposition to liquid cadmium cathode, respectively. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessinger, G.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product.

  16. Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessinger, G.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product

  17. Conceptual structure design of experimental facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, J. S.; Koo, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Jo, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Yoo, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    A study on the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) is carring out for the effective management of spent fuels of domestic nuclear power plants. This study presents basic shielding design, modification of IMEF's reserve hot cell facility which reserved for future usage, conceptual and structural architecture design of ACP hot cell and its contents, etc. considering the characteristics of ACP. The results of this study will be used for the basic and detail design of ACP demonstration facility, and utilized as basic data for the safety evaluation as essential data for the licensing of the ACP facility

  18. Safety evaluation report of hot cell facilities for demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Choung, W. M.; Ku, J. H.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Park, S. W.; Bek, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.

    2004-10-01

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. In the next phase(2004∼2006), the hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α- type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β- type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. Up to now, the detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. The design data were submitted for licensing which was necessary for construction and operation of hot cell facilities. The safety investigation of KINS on hot cell facilities was completed, and the license for construction and operation of hot cell facilities was acquired already from MOST. In this report, the safety analysis report submitted to KINS was summarized. And also, the questionnaires issued from KINS and answers of KAERI in process of safety investigation were described in detail

  19. Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction in Cranfield Multiphase Flow Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedorf, Søren; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    , or even to the environment. To cope with these, adverse condition and critical event prediction plays an important role. Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox (ACCEPT) is a tool which has been recently developed by NASA to allow for a timely prediction of an adverse event, with low false...... alarm and missed detection rates. While ACCEPT has shown to be an effective tool in some applications, its performance has not yet been evaluated on practical well-known benchmark examples. In this paper, ACCEPT is used for adverse condition and critical event prediction in a multiphase flow facility....... Cranfield multiphase flow facility is known to be an interesting benchmark which has been used to evaluate different methods from statistical process monitoring. In order to allow for the data from the flow facility to be used in ACCEPT, methods such as Kernel Density Estimation (KDE), PCA-and CVA...

  20. Assessment of Radionuclides Release from Inshas LILW Disposal Facility Under Normal and Unusual Operational Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Disposing of low and intermediate radioactive waste (LILW) is a big concern for Egypt due to the accumulated waste as a result of past fifty years of peaceful nuclear applications. Assessment of radionuclides release from Inshas LILW disposal facility under normal and unusual operational conditions is very important in order to apply for operation license of the facility. Aqueous release of radionuclides from this disposal facility is controlled by water flow, access of the water to the wasteform, release of the radionuclides from the wasteform, and transport to the disposal facility boundary. In this work, the release of 137 Cs , 6C o, and 90 Sr radionuclides from the Inshas disposal facility was studied under the change of operational conditions. The release of these radio contaminants from the source term to the unsaturated and saturated zones , to groundwater were studied. It was found that the concentration of radionuclides in a groundwater well located 150 m away from the Inshas disposal facility is less than the maximum permissible concentration in groundwater in both cases

  1. Development of metallic uranium recovery technology from uranium oxide by Li reduction and electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kawabe, Akihiro; Yuda, Ryouichi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Reiko; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yahata, Hidetsugu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop technology for pre-treatment of oxide fuel reprocessing through pyroprocess. In the pre-treatment process, it is necessary to reduce actinide oxide to metallic form. This paper outlines some experimental results of uranium oxide reduction and recovery of refined metallic uranium in electrorefining. Both uranium oxide granules and pellets were used for the experiments. Uranium oxide granules was completely reduced by lithium in several hours at 650degC. Reduced uranium pellets by about 70% provided a simulation of partial reduction for the process flow design. Almost all adherent residues of Li and Li 2 O were successfully washed out with fresh LiCl salt. During electrorefining, metallic uranium deposited on the iron cathode as expected. The recovery efficiencies of metallic uranium from reduced uranium oxide granules and from pellets were about 90% and 50%, respectively. The mass balance data provided the technical bases of Li reduction and refining process flow for design. (author)

  2. Salt stripping: a pyrochemical approach to the recovery of plutonium electrorefining salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Mullins, L.J.

    1982-10-01

    A pyrochemical process has been developed to take the salt residue from the plutonium electrorefining process and strip the plutonium from it. The process, called salt stripping, uses calcium as a reducing/coalescing agent. In a one-day operation, greater than 95% of the plutonium can be recovered as a metallic button. As much as 88% of the residue is either reused as metal or discarded as a clean salt. A thin layer of black salts, which makes up the bulk of the unrecovered Pu, is a by-product of the initial reductions. A number of black salts can be collected together and re-reduced in a second step. Greater than 88% of this plutonium can be successfully recovered in this second stage with the resulting residues being discardable. The processing time, number of processor hours, and the volume of secondary residues are greatly reduced over the classical aqueous recovery methods. In addition, the product metal is of sufficient quality to be fed directly to the electrorefining process for purification. 8 figures, 7 tables

  3. Making a Pellet-type LiCl-KCl-UCl3 salt for Electrorefining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, M. S.; Jin, H. J.; Kim, I. T.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The role of uranium chloride salt (UCl3) is to stabilize the initial cell voltage between electrodes in the electrorefining reactor. The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form the CdCl2 occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl3 by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl2 The apparatus for producing UCl3 consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, and a off-gas and a dry scrubber. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The salt products is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of pelletizer by a transfer system to make pellet type salt. Making pellet type LiCl-KCl-UCl3 salt for electrorefining was carried out using the chlorinator, Cd distiller, and pelletizer. Salt transfer carried out by salt transfer equipment heated 500 .deg. C. The Cd concentration of final salt products distillated at 60 torr, 2 hrs, 600 .deg. C was 200 ppm from the ICP, XRD analysis. And pellet type salt products were fabricated by using the mould of pelletizer at 90∼130 .deg. C.

  4. Simulated real-time process monitoring of a molten salt electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappleye, Devin; Simpson, Michael; Cumberland, Riley; McNelis, David; Yim, Man-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An alternative approach to safeguarding and monitoring pyroprocessing is proposed. • Possible signals to be used to monitor an electrorefiner are identified. • An inverse model was developed to determine deposition rates at the cathode. • The sensitivity of certain parameters in the inverse model are presented. - Abstract: An alternative approach to monitoring the pyrochemical process (pyroprocessing) for spent nuclear fuel treatment is proposed and examined. This approach relies on modeling and the real-time analysis of process readings. Using an electrorefiner model, named ERAD, cathode potential and cell current were identified as useful process readings. To provide a real-time analysis of these two process readings, an inverse model was developed based on fundamental electrochemical relations. The model was applied to the following operating modes: pure uranium deposition, co-deposition of uranium and plutonium, and co-deposition of uranium and zirconium. Using the cell current and cathode potential, the model predicted which species were depositing and their rates. The deposition rates predicted by the inverse model compared favorably to those calculated by ERAD

  5. Making a Pellet-type LiCl-KCl-UCl3 salt for Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, M. S.; Jin, H. J.; Kim, I. T.; Kim, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The role of uranium chloride salt (UCl3) is to stabilize the initial cell voltage between electrodes in the electrorefining reactor. The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form the CdCl2 occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl3 by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl2 The apparatus for producing UCl3 consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, and a off-gas and a dry scrubber. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The salt products is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of pelletizer by a transfer system to make pellet type salt. Making pellet type LiCl-KCl-UCl3 salt for electrorefining was carried out using the chlorinator, Cd distiller, and pelletizer. Salt transfer carried out by salt transfer equipment heated 500 .deg. C. The Cd concentration of final salt products distillated at 60 torr, 2 hrs, 600 .deg. C was 200 ppm from the ICP, XRD analysis. And pellet type salt products were fabricated by using the mould of pelletizer at 90∼130 .deg. C

  6. Viscosity and density models for copper electrorefining electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliomäki Taina; Aji Arif T.; Aromaa Jari; Lundström Mari

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity and density are highly important physicochemical properties of copper electrolyte since they affect the purity of cathode copper and energy consumption [1, 2] affecting the mass and heat transfer conditions in the cell [3]. Increasing viscosity and density decreases the rate in which the anode slime falls to the bottom of the cell [4, 5] and lowers the diffusion coefficient of cupric ion (DCu2+) [6]. Decreasing the falling rate of anode slime increases movement of the slime to other...

  7. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Averseng, J.L.; Serpantie, J.P. [Novatome Industries, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs.

  8. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs

  9. Criticality control during conditioning of spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Khalil, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel may be unacceptable for direct repository storage because of composition, enrichment, form, physical condition, or the presence of undesirable materials such as sodium. Fuel types which are not acceptable for direct storage must be processed or conditioned to produce physical forms which can safely be stored in a repository. One possible approach to conditioning is the pyroprocess implemented in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West. Conditioning of binary (U-Zr) and ternary (U-Pu-Zr) metallic fuels from the EBR-2 reactor is used to demonstrate the process. Criticality safety considerations limit batch sizes during the conditioning steps and provide one constraint on the final form of conditioned material. Criticality safety during conditioning is assured by the integration of criticality safety analysis, equipment design, process development, a measurement program, accountability procedures, and a computerized Mass Tracking System. Criticality issues related to storage and shipment of conditioned material have been examined

  10. The regulatory approach for spent nuclear storage and conditioning facility: The Hanford example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, E.D.; Mooers, G.C. III; Daschke, K.D.; Driggers, S.A.; Timmins, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Hearings held before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources in March 1994, requested that officials of federal agencies and other experts explore options for providing regulatory oversight of the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and operations. On January, 25, 1995, the DOE, supported by the White House Office of Environmental Quality and the Office of Management and Budget, formally initiated an Advisory Committee on External Regulation of DOE Nuclear Safety. In concert with this initiative and public opinion, the DOE Richland Operations Office has initiated the K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project -- Regulatory Policy. The DOE has established a program to move the spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the K Basins to a new storage facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. New facilities will be designed and constructed for safe conditioning and interim storage of the fuel. In implementing this Policy, DOE endeavors to achieve in these new facilities ''nuclear safety equivalency'' to comparable US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. The DOE has established this Policy to take a proactive approach to better align its facilities to the requirements of the NRC, anticipating the future possibility of external regulation. The Policy, supplemented by other DOE rules and directives, form the foundation of an enhanced regulatory, program that will be implemented through the DOE K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (the Project)

  11. LSST summit facility construction progress report: reacting to design refinements and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey D.; Gressler, William; Sebag, Jacques; Seriche, Jaime; Serrano, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    The civil work, site infrastructure and buildings for the summit facility of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are among the first major elements that need to be designed, bid and constructed to support the subsequent integration of the dome, telescope, optics, camera and supporting systems. As the contracts for those other major subsystems now move forward under the management of the LSST Telescope and Site (T and S) team, there has been inevitable and beneficial evolution in their designs, which has resulted in significant modifications to the facility and infrastructure. The earliest design requirements for the LSST summit facility were first documented in 2005, its contracted full design was initiated in 2010, and construction began in January, 2015. During that entire development period, and extending now roughly halfway through construction, there continue to be necessary modifications to the facility design resulting from the refinement of interfaces to other major elements of the LSST project and now, during construction, due to unanticipated field conditions. Changes from evolving interfaces have principally involved the telescope mount, the dome and mirror handling/coating facilities which have included significant variations in mass, dimensions, heat loads and anchorage conditions. Modifications related to field conditions have included specifying and testing alternative methods of excavation and contending with the lack of competent rock substrate where it was predicted to be. While these and other necessary changes are somewhat specific to the LSST project and site, they also exemplify inherent challenges related to the typical timeline for the design and construction of astronomical observatory support facilities relative to the overall development of the project.

  12. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  13. MODERN CONDITIONS OF ROAD FACILITIES AND INTERNATIONAL AUTOMOTIVE TRANSPORTATION OF THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Tsarenkova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For analysis of technical and economic conditions of automotive roads and determination of reserves for improvement of financial situation and usage of capital in road facilities operational efficiency of road facilities and automotive freight-traffic services that provide significant currency receipt for Republic budget. The main ways for higher export of construction services are involvement of road facilities enterprises in this activity and introduction of highly-productive technologies in their operation. The paper demonstrates an importance of non-conventional sources of investment attractions such as leasing which is used for renovation of capital assets and invests resources in the basic capital on the return basis in the natural form. For application of new technologies and modern technique it is justifiable to establish joint road-construction enterprises with foreign sub-contractors. The paper reveals main reasons of profit increase due to operation and services of road branch.

  14. Separation of adhered salt from uranium deposits generated in electro-refiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.W.; Park, K.M.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, J.G.; Ahn, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to increase a throughput of the salt removal process from uranium deposits which is generated on the solid cathode of electro-refiner in pyroprocess. In this study, it was proposed to increase the throughput of the salt removal process by the separation of the liquid salt prior to the distillation of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from the uranium deposits. The feasibility of liquid salt separation was examined by salt separation experiments on a stainless steel sieve. It was found that the amount of salt to be distilled could be reduced by the liquid salt separation prior to the salt distillation. The residual salt remained in the deposits after the liquid salt separation was successfully removed further by the vacuum distillation. It was concluded that the combination of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation is an effective route for the achievement of a high throughput performance in the salt separation process. (author)

  15. Electrorefining of High Carbon Ferromanganese in Molten Salts to Produce Pure Ferromanganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao S. J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High carbon ferromanganese is used as a starting material to prepare pure ferromanganese by electrorefining in molten salts. High carbon ferromanganese was applied as the anode, molybdenum was the cathode and Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. The anodic dissolution was investigated by linear polarization in molten NaCl-KCl system. Then potentiostatic electrolysis was carried out to produce pure ferromanganese from high carbon ferromanganese. The cathodic product was determined to be a mixture of manganese and iron by x-ray diffraction (XRD. The content of carbon in the product was analyzed by carbon and sulfur analyzer. The post-electrolysis anode was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The mechanism of the anode dissolution and the distribution of the main impurity of carbon and silicon after electrolysis were discussed.

  16. Investigation of electrorefining of metallic alloy fuel onto solid Al cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassayre, L.; Malmbeck, R.; Masset, P.; Rebizant, J.; Serp, J.; Soucek, P.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2007-01-01

    This work concerned the electrorefining of UZr and UPuZr alloys on a solid aluminium cathode, in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing U 3+ , Pu 3+ , Np 3+ , Zr 2+ or Zr 4+ , Am 3+ , Nd 3+ , Y 3+ , Ce 3+ and Gd 3+ chlorides. During constant current electrolyses, the use of a cathodic cut-off potential (-1.25 V versus Ag/AgCl) allowed to selectively deposit actinides (mainly U), while lanthanides remained in the salt. The aim was to determine the maximal load achievable on a single aluminium electrode. The total exchange charge was 4300 C, which represents the deposition of 3.72 g of actinides in 4.17 g Al, yielding a composition of 44.6 wt% An in Al. It was shown that the melting of the cathode contributed to increase the total amount of actinides deposited on the aluminium

  17. Air-conditioning and ventilation systems and components of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide defines the requirements for the design, implementation and operation of the air-conditioning and ventilation systems of nuclear facilities belonging to safety classes 3 and 4, and for the related documents to be submitted to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland). Furthermore, the Guide describes the inspections of air-conditioning and ventilation systems to be conducted by STUK during construction and operation of the facilities. As far as systems and components belonging to safety class 2 are concerned, STUK sets additional requirements case by case. In general, air-conditioning systems refer to systems designed to manage the indoor air cleanness, temperature, humidity and movement. In some rooms of a nuclear power plant, ventilation systems are also used to prevent radioactive materials from spreading outside the rooms. Guide YVL1.0 defines the safety principles concerning the air-conditioning and ventilation of nuclear power plants. Guide YVL2.0 gives the requirements for the design of nuclear power plant systems. In addition, YVLGuide groups 3, 4, 5 and 7 deal with the requirements for air-conditioning and ventilation systems with regard to the mechanical equipment, fire prevention, electrical systems, instrumentation and control technology, and the restriction of releases. The rules and regulations issued by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior (RakMK, the Finnish building code) concerning the design and operation of air-conditioning and ventilation systems and the related fire protection design bases also apply to nuclear facilities. Exhaust gas treatment systems, condenser vacuum systems of boiling water reactor plants and leak collection systems are excluded from the scope of this Guide

  18. Design and operation of off-gas cleaning systems at high level liquid waste conditioning facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The immobilization of high level liquid wastes from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels is of great interest and serious efforts are being undertaken to find a satisfactory technical solution. Volatilization of fission product elements during immobilization poses the potential for the release of radioactive substances to the environment and necessitates effective off-gas cleaning systems. This report describes typical off-gas cleaning systems used in the most advanced high level liquid waste immobilization plants and considers most of the equipment and components which can be used for the efficient retention of the aerosols and volatile contaminants. In the case of a nuclear facility consisting of several different facilities, release limits are generally prescribed for the nuclear facility as a whole. Since high level liquid waste conditioning (calcination, vitrification, etc.) facilities are usually located at fuel reprocessing sites (where the majority of the high level liquid wastes originates), the off-gas cleaning system should be designed so that the airborne radioactivity discharge of the whole site, including the emission of the waste conditioning facility, can be kept below the permitted limits. This report deals with the sources and composition of different kinds of high level liquid wastes and describes briefly the main high level liquid waste solidification processes examining the sources and characteristics of the off-gas contaminants to be retained by the off-gas cleaning system. The equipment and components of typical off-gas systems used in the most advanced (large pilot or industrial scale) high level liquid waste solidification plants are described. Safety considerations for the design and safe operation of the off-gas systems are discussed. 60 refs, 31 figs, 17 tabs

  19. Experimental Studies of the Effects of Anode Composition and Process Parameters on Anode Slime Adhesion and Cathode Copper Purity by Performing Copper Electrorefining in a Pilot-Scale Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weizhi; Wang, Shijie; Free, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Copper electrorefining tests were conducted in a pilot-scale cell under commercial tankhouse environment to study the effects of anode compositions, current density, cathode blank width, and flow rate on anode slime behavior and cathode copper purity. Three different types of anodes (high, mid, and low impurity levels) were used in the tests and were analyzed under SEM/EDS. The harvested copper cathodes were weighed and analyzed for impurities concentrations using DC Arc. The adhered slimes and released slimes were collected, weighed, and analyzed for compositions using ICP. It was shown that the lead-to-arsenic ratio in the anodes affects the sintering and coalescence of slime particles. High current density condition can improve anode slime adhesion and cathode purity by intensifying slime particles' coalescence and dissolving part of the particles. Wide cathode blanks can raise the anodic current densities significantly and result in massive release of large slime particle aggregates, which are not likely to contaminate the cathode copper. Low flow rate can cause anode passivation and increase local temperatures in front of the anode, which leads to very intense sintering and coalescence of slime particles. The results and analyses of the tests present potential solutions for industrial copper electrorefining process.

  20. Improving of spent fuel monitoring in condition of Slovak wet interim spent fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklos, M.; Krsjak, V.; Bozik, M.; Vasina, D.

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring of WWER fuel assemblies condition in Slovakia is presented in the paper. The leak tightness results of fuel assemblies used in Slovak WWER units in last 20 years are analyzed. Good experiences with the 'Sipping system' are described. The Slovak wet interim spent fuel storage facility in NPP Jaslovske Bohunice was build and put in operation in 1986. Since 1999, leak tests of WWER-440 fuel assemblies are provided by special leak tightness detection system 'Sipping in Pool' delivered by Framatome-ANP facility with external heating for the precise detection of active specimens. Another system for monitoring of fuel assemblies condition was implemented in December 2006 under the name 'SVYPP-440'. First non-active tests started at February 2007 and are described in the paper. Although those systems seems to be very effective, the detection time of all fuel assemblies in one storage pool is too long (several months). Therefore, a new 'on-line' detection system, based on new sorbent KNiFC-PAN for effective 134 Cs and 137 Cs activity was developed. This sorbent was compared with another type of sorbent NIFSIL and results are presented. The design of this detection system and its possible application in the Slovak wet spent fuel storage facility is discussed. For completeness, the initial results of the new system are also presented. (authors)

  1. Hanford facility RCRA permit condition II.U.1 report: mapping of underground piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, C.B.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill Condition Il.U.1. of the Hanford Facility (HF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit. The HF RCRA Permit, Number WA7890008967, became effective on September 28, 1994 (Ecology 1994). Permit Conditions Il.U. (mapping) and II.V. (marking) of the HF RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste (OW) Portion, require the mapping and marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines subject to the provisions of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-303. Permit Condition Il.U.I. requires the submittal of a report describing the methodology used to generate pipeline maps and to assure their quality. Though not required by the Permit, this report also documents the approach used for the field marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines.

  2. Necessity and opportunity of building a mobile facility for conditioning the spent ionic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, Gheorghe

    2002-01-01

    The ionic resins utilized in nuclear industry for purification of different working fluids become contaminated by important amounts of radionuclides incorporated in their structure. Thus, these resins become intermediate-level radioactive wastes, containing radioisotopes of rather long lifetimes, and so their conditioning is required to ensure binding and isolation of the radionuclides over a period long enough, until their decay. Binding the radionuclides in stable matrices and their isolation by means of engineered barriers ensures protection of environment against contamination. In the frame of Radioactive Waste Management Program related to Cernavoda NPP, optimal technologies for processing the radioactive waste generated during the NPP operation were developed and also a site for final disposal of the low and intermediate level waste was selected. The last one is a modern, ground repository with multiple engineered barriers based on the natural properties of the host geological formation. The final disposal concept implies building a conditioning facility to ensure: a super-compacting stage of the already compacted wastes; cementing the uncompactable wastes; cementing spent filters; cementing the pellets resulted from the super-compacting stage and drums with conditioned wastes in concrete modules; cementing the organic wastes; cementing the spent ionic resins by means of a mobile facility. The spent ionic resins removed from the technologic purification systems of the station are discharged by means of demineralized water and transferred, corresponding to source, to one of the 3 storage 200 m 3 basins from the basement of the CANDU 6 NPP servicing building. To avoid the danger of spent resins being cemented at basin's bottom the basins should be emptied at every 10-15 years. To comply with IAEA requirements concerning the radioactive waste final disposal, a procedure for establishing the quantitative concentration of solidification agents and additives

  3. Numerical simulations of the first operational conditions of the negative ion test facility SPIDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Baltador, C.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Toigo, V.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-01-01

    In view of the realization of the negative ion beam injectors for ITER, a test facility, named SPIDER, is under construction in Padova (Italy) to study and optimize production and extraction of negative ions. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of the expected first operations of SPIDER in terms of single-beamlet and multiple-beamlet simulations of the hydrogen beam optics in various operational conditions. The effectiveness of the methods adopted to compensate for the magnetic deflection of the particles is also assessed. Indications for a sequence of the experimental activities are obtained

  4. Conditioning and handling of tritiated wastes at Canadian nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krochmalnek, L.S.; Krasznai, J.P.; Carney, M.

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro operates a 10,000 MW capacity nuclear power system utilizing the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor design. The use of D 2 O as moderator and coolant results in the production of about 2400 Ci of tritium per MWe-yr. As a result, there is significant Canadian experience in the treatment, handling, transport and storage of tritiated wastes. Ontario Hydro operates its own reactor waste storage site which includes systems for volume reduction, immobilization and packaging of wastes. In addition, a facility to remove tritium from heavy water is presently being commissioned at the Darlington nuclear site. This facility will generate tritiated liquid and solid waste that will have to be properly conditioned prior to storage or disposal. The nature of these various wastes and the processes/packaging required to meet storage/disposal criteria are judged to have relevance to investigations in fusion facility waste arisings. Experience to date, planned operational procedures and ongoing R and D in this area are described

  5. Environmental conditions in health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries: Coverage and inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2018-04-01

    Safe environmental conditions and the availability of standard precaution items are important to prevent and treat infection in health care facilities (HCFs) and to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for health and water, sanitation, and hygiene. Baseline coverage estimates for HCFs have yet to be formed for the SDGs; and there is little evidence describing inequalities in coverage. To address this, we produced the first coverage estimates of environmental conditions and standard precaution items in HCFs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); and explored factors associated with low coverage. Data from monitoring reports and peer-reviewed literature were systematically compiled; and information on conditions, service levels, and inequalities tabulated. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with low coverage. Data for 21 indicators of environmental conditions and standard precaution items were compiled from 78 LMICs which were representative of 129,557 HCFs. 50% of HCFs lack piped water, 33% lack improved sanitation, 39% lack handwashing soap, 39% lack adequate infectious waste disposal, 73% lack sterilization equipment, and 59% lack reliable energy services. Using nationally representative data from six countries, 2% of HCFs provide all four of water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management services. Statistically significant inequalities in coverage exist between HCFs by: urban-rural setting, managing authority, facility type, and sub-national administrative unit. We identified important, previously undocumented inequalities and environmental health challenges faced by HCFs in LMICs. The information and analyses provide evidence for those engaged in improving HCF conditions to develop evidence-based policies and efficient programs, enhance service delivery systems, and make better use of available resources. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  7. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  8. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  9. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  10. Development of an U and Pu recovery process by molten salt electrorefining. Behavior of U and Pu at simultaneous recoveries into liquid cadmium cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Koichi; Kato, Tetsuya; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Inoue, Tadashi; Iwai, Takashi; Shirai, Osamu; Arai, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    In order to study behaviors of U and Pu at simultaneous recoveries into liquid cadmium cathodes (LCCs) in the electrorefining of pyrometallurgical reprocessing, several experiments were conducted to recover U and Pu into LCCs at different U/Pu ratios in the salt phase. The major results were as follows: (1) The weight ratios of U and Pu in 120 g LCCs reached 10 wt.% (the tentative target), with current efficiencies higher than 80 %. (2) Under the conditions of U/Pu ratios in the initial salt phase less than 1/4.3, the amounts of recovered U and Pu were proportional to the passed electric charges, with the separation factors of U to Pu (= (U/Pu ration in the recovered product)/(U/Pu ratio in the salt)) between 1.2 and 2.0. (3) On the other hand, under the condition of U/Pu ratio in the initial salt phase at 1/1.73, only U was recovered into the LCC after the saturation of LCC with U and Pu. Accordingly, there will be a threshold in the U/Pu ratio of the salt phase for the simultaneous recovery of U and Pu. (4) Am showed a similar behavior to Pu. The separation factors of Am to Pu (=(AM/Pu ratio in the recovered product)/(Am/Pu ratio in the salt)) was 0.78, which means that Am is co-recovered with Pu into LCC. (author)

  11. Failure of PWR-RHRS under cold shutdown conditions: Experimental results from the PKL test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, R.M.; Umminger, K.J.; Logt, J.V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) of a PWR is designed to transfer thermal energy from the core after plant shutdown and maintain the plant in cold shutdown or refuelling conditions for extended periods of time. Initial reactor cooling after shutdown is achieved by dissipating heat through the steam generators (SGs) and discharging steam to the condenser by means of the Turbine Bypass System (TBS). When the reactor coolant temperature has dropped to about 160C and pressure has been reduced to 30 bar the RHRS is placed into operation. it reduces the coolant temperature to 50C within 20 hours after shutdown. The time margin for establishing alternate methods of heat removal following a failure of the RHRS depends on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) temperature, the decay heat rate and the amount of RCS inventory. During some shutdown operations the RCS may be partially drained (e. g. to perform SG inspections). Decreased primary system inventory can significantly reduce the time available to recover the RHRS's function prior to bulk boiling and possible core uncovery. In the PKL test facility, which simulates a 1,300 MWe 4-loop PWR on a scale 1:145, a failure of RHRS under cold shutdown conditions was performed. This presentation gives a brief description of the test facility followed by the test objectives and results of this experiment

  12. University of the Witwatersrand physiotherapy undergraduate curriculum alignment to medical conditions of patients within Gauteng state health facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgobadibe V. Ntsiea

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The Wits physiotherapy curriculum covers all medical conditions treated by physiotherapists within the Gauteng state health facilities, and overall, the curriculum prepares the students to practise in a variety of situations.

  13. Pyrometallurgical partitioning of uranium and transuranic elements from rare earth elements by electrorefining and reductive extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Koichi; Kinoshita, Kensuke; Inoue, Tadashi; Storvick, T.S.; Krueger, C.L.; Nabelek, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    High-level liquid waste generated from PUREX reprocessing contains a small amount of transuranic elements, such as Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, with long-lived radioactivities. A pyrometallurgical partitioning process is being developed to recover transuranic elements from such waste. Small amounts of U contained in the high-level liquid waste are also recovered in the process. A key issue for developing the process is effective separation of U and the transuranic elements from the rare-earth elements, because the two elemental groups are chemically analogous. A series of process tests were carried out in the present study to demonstrate that a combination of electrorefining and reductive extraction is useful for separating U and transuranic elements from the rare-earth elements. The results indicate that 99% of U and each transuranic elements is recovered by the combination process as a product, and that the quantity of rare-earth elements contained in the product is smaller than the transuranic elements by weight. The overall mass balance of U and transuranic elements in the system ranged within the experimental errors assigned to sampling and analysis. (author)

  14. Investigation of electrorefining of metallic alloy fuel onto solid Al cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassayre, L. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Malmbeck, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: rikard.malmbeck@cec.eu.int; Masset, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rebizant, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Serp, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Soucek, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    This work concerned the electrorefining of UZr and UPuZr alloys on a solid aluminium cathode, in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing U{sup 3+}, Pu{sup 3+}, Np{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 2+} or Zr{sup 4+}, Am{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+} chlorides. During constant current electrolyses, the use of a cathodic cut-off potential (-1.25 V versus Ag/AgCl) allowed to selectively deposit actinides (mainly U), while lanthanides remained in the salt. The aim was to determine the maximal load achievable on a single aluminium electrode. The total exchange charge was 4300 C, which represents the deposition of 3.72 g of actinides in 4.17 g Al, yielding a composition of 44.6 wt% An in Al. It was shown that the melting of the cathode contributed to increase the total amount of actinides deposited on the aluminium.

  15. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J., E-mail: brian.riley@pnnl.gov; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-15

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na{sub 8}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite with a solution-based approach to immobilize a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The reactants used were the salt solution, NaAlO{sub 2}, and either Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4} or Ge(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}. Additionally, seven different glass sintering aids (at loadings of 5 mass%) were evaluated as sintering aids for consolidating the as-made powders using a cold-press-and-sinter technique. This process of using alkoxide additives for the Group IV component can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at near-room temperature as compared to a method where colloidal silica was used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during heat treatments.

  16. Performance of the Fuel Conditioning Facility electronic in-cell mass balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orechwa, Y.; Bucher, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    An approach to error estimation and measurement control in the analysis of the balance measurements of mass standards on the in-cell electronic mass balances of the Fuel Conditioning Facility is presented. In light of measurement data from one year of operation, the algorithms proposed are evaluated. The need to take into account the effects of facility operations on the estimates of measurement uncertainty is demonstrated. In the case of a newly installed balance, where no historical data exists, an ad hoc procedure of adding a term which takes into account the operational variability is proposed. This procedure allows a sufficiently long operation so as to collect data for the estimate of the contribution of operational effects to the uncertainty estimate. An algorithm for systematically taking into account historical data is developed and demonstrated for two balances over two calibration periods. The algorithm, both asymptotically and in the two samples cases, has the necessary desirable properties for estimating the uncertainty in the measurements of the balances

  17. A test facility for heat transfer, pressure drop and stability studies under supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manish; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Jana, S.S.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-02-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) exhibits excellent heat transfer characteristics and high volumetric expansion coefficient (hence high mass flow rates in natural circulation systems) near pseudo-critical temperature. SCW is being considered as a coolant in some advanced nuclear reactor designs on account of its potential to offer high thermal efficiency, compact size, elimination of steam generator, separator and dryer, making it economically competitive. The elimination of phase change results in elimination of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon. Cooling a reactor at full power with natural instead of forced circulation is generally considered as enhancement of passive safety. In view of this, it is essential to study natural circulation, heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of supercritical fluids. Carbon-dioxide can be considered to be a good simulant of water for natural circulation at supercritical conditions since the density and viscosity variation of carbon-dioxide follows a parallel curve as that of water at supercritical conditions. Hence, a supercritical pressure natural circulation loop (SPNCL) has been set up in Hall-7, BARC to investigate the heat transfer, pressure drop and stability characteristics of supercritical carbon-dioxide under natural circulation conditions. The details of the experimental facility are presented in this report. (author)

  18. Assessment of radiation doses in normal operation, upset accident conditions at the Olkiluoto nuclear waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.; Raiko, H.; Suolanen, V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation doses for workers of the facility, for inhabitants in the environment and for terrestrial ecosystem possibly caused by the encapsulation and disposal facility to be built at Olkiluoto during its operation were considered in the study. The study covers both the normal operation of the plant and some hypothetical incidents and accidents. Release through the ventilation stack is assumed to be filtered both in normal operation and in hypothetical abnormal fault and accident cases. Calculation of the offsite doses from normal operation is based on the hypothesis that on average one fuel pin per 100 fuel bundles for all batches of spent fuel transported to the encapsulation facility is leaking. The release magnitude in incidents and accidents is based on the event chains, which lead to loss of fuel pin tightness followed by a discharge of radionuclides into the handling space and to some degree to the atmosphere through the ventilation stack equipped with redundant filters. The critical group is conservatively assumed to live at the distance of 200 meters from the encapsulation and disposal plant and thus it will receive the largest doses in most dispersion conditions. The dose value to a member of the critical group was calculated on the basis of the weather data in such a way that greater dose than obtained here is caused only in 0.5 percent of dispersion conditions. The results obtained indicate that during normal operation the doses to workers remain small and the dose to the member of the critical group is less than 0,001 mSv per year. In the case of hypothetical fault and accident releases the offsite doses do not exceed either the limit values set by the safety authority. The highest dose rates to the reference organisms of the terrestrial ecosystem with conservative assumptions from the largest release were estimated to be of the order of 100 μ Gy/h at the distance of 200 m. As a chronic exposure this dose rate is expected to bring up detrimental

  19. Beam plug replacement and alignment under high radiation conditions for cold neutron facilities at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeong-Garp, Cho; Jin-Won, Shin; Jung-Hee, Lee; Jeong-Soo, Ryu

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of a 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating for 15 years since its initial criticality in February 1995. The beam port assigned for the cold neutron at HANARO had been used for an 8-m SANS without neutron guides until it was replaced by a cold neutron guide system in 2008. It was developed a cold neutron guide system for the delivery of cold neutrons from the cold neutron source in the reactor to the neutron scattering instruments in the guide hall. Since the HANARO has been operated from 1995, it was a big challenge to replace the existing plug and shutter with the new facilities under high radiation conditions. When the old plug was removed from the beam port in 2008, the radiation level was 230 mSv/hr at the end of beam port. In addition to that, there were more difficult situations such as the poor as-built dimensions of the beam port, limited work space and time constraint due to other constructions in parallel in the reactor hall. Before the removal of the old plug the level of the radiation was measured coming out through a small hole of the plug to estimate the radiation level during the removal of the old plug and installation of a new plug. Based on the measurement and analysis results, special tools and various shielding facilities were developed for the removal of old in-pile plug and the installation of the new in-pile plug assembly safely. In 2008, the old plug and shutter were successfully replaced by the new plug and shutter as shown in this article with a minimum exposure to the workers. A laser tracker system was also one of the main factors in our successful installation and alignment under high radiation conditions and limited work space. The laser tracker was used to measure and align all the mechanical facilities and the neutron guides with a minimum radiation exposure to workers. The alignment of all the guides and accessories were possible during reactor operation because

  20. 33 CFR 126.15 - What conditions must a designated waterfront facility meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., access to the facility must be limited to— (i) Personnel working on the facility or vessel; (ii) Delivery... meet the requirements of NFPA 307, chapter 9. (10) Smoking. Smoking is allowed on the facility where permitted under State or local law. Signs must be posted marking authorized smoking areas. “No Smoking...

  1. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, M.A., E-mail: marose@anl.gov [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Williamson, M.A.; Willit, J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl{sub 3}. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U{sup 3+} ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl{sub 3} or in the case of the eutectic salt for K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5}. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5} is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  2. Performance Test of the Salt transfer and Pellet fabrication of UCl3 Making Equipment for Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, M. S.; Jin, H. J.; Park, G. I.; Park, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form the CdCl 2 occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl 3 by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl 2 . Chemical reaction is next chlorination reaction; - Cd chlorination : Cd + Cl2 → CdCl 2 - U chlorination : 3CdCl2 + 2U → 3Cd + 2UCl 3 The apparatus for producing UCl 3 consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, a off-gas wet scrubber and a dry scrubber. Salt transfer system set among reactors to transfer salt at 500 .deg. C. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The Salt product is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of pelletizer by a transfer system to fabricate pellet type salt. Performance test of the salt transfer and pellet fabrication of its equipment was tested in this work. Performance test of the salt transfer and pellet fabrication of UCl3 making equipment for Electrorefining carried out in this work. The result of equipment test is that melted salt at 600 .deg. C was easy transferred by salt transfer equipment heated at 500 .deg. C. In this time, salt transfer was carried out by argon gas pressurization at 3bar. When velocity of salt transfer was controlled under reduce pressure, velocity of salt transfer was difficult to control. And when salt pellet was fabricated by the mold of pelletizer heated at 90 .deg. C better than mold of pelletizer heated at 200 .deg. C because salt melted prevent leakage from mold of pelletizer

  3. Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G. [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B. [FSESP ' Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation); Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE ' Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including {sup 222}Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese

  4. Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B.; Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including 222 Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess

  5. Development and Optimization of Voltammetric Methods for Real Time Analysis of Electrorefiner Salt with High Concentrations of Actinides and Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael F.; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2018-03-30

    This project addresses the problem of achieving accurate material control and accountability (MC&A) around pyroprocessing electrorefiner systems. Spent nuclear fuel pyroprocessing poses a unique challenge with respect to reprocessing technology in that the fuel is never fully dissolved in the process fluid. In this case, the process fluid is molten, anhydrous LiCl-KCl salt. Therefore, there is no traditional input accountability tank. However, electrorefiners (ER) accumulate very large quantities of fissile nuclear material (including plutonium) and should be well safeguarded in a commercial facility. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently operates a pyroprocessing facility for treatment of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II with two such ER systems. INL implements MC&A via a mass tracking model in combination with periodic sampling of the salt and other materials followed by destructive analysis. This approach is projected to be insufficient to meet international safeguards timeliness requirements. A real time or near real time monitoring method is, thus, direly needed to support commercialization of pyroprocessing. A variety of approaches to achieving real time monitoring for ER salt have been proposed and studied to date—including a potentiometric actinide sensor for concentration measurements, a double bubbler for salt depth and density measurements, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for concentration measurements. While each of these methods shows some promise, each also involves substantial technical complexity that may ultimately limit their implementation. Yet another alternative is voltammetry—a very simple method in theory that has previously been tested for this application to a limited extent. The equipment for a voltammetry system consists of off-the-shelf components (three electrodes and a potentiostat), which results in substantial benefits relative to cost and robustness. Based on prior knowledge of electrochemical

  6. Treatment and conditioning of low-level radioactive waste in Belgium: initial operating results of the Cilva facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsch, O.; Renard, C.; Deckers, J.; Luycx, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Belgian National Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material Agency (ONDRAF), which is responsible for the management of all radioactive waste in Belgium, recently decided to commission the CILVA facility. Operation of this facility, which comprises a number of units for the treatment of low-level radwaste, has been contracted to ONDRAF's Belgoprocess subsidiary based at the Dessel site. A consortium comprising SGN and Fabricom was in charge of building the CILVA facility's waste preparation and conditioning (concrete solidification) units. The concrete solidification processes, which were devised and developed by SGN, have been qualified to secure ONDRAF certification of the process and the facility. This enabled active commissioning of the waste conditioning unit in mid-August 1994. Active commissioning of the waste preparation unit was carried out in several stages up to the beginning of 1995 in accordance with operating requirements. Initial operating results of the two units are presented. (author)

  7. An analysis of heating, ventilation and air conditioning system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Byung Tae; Park, Seong Won; Cho, Soo Haeng; Lee, Yong Rae; Lee, Kyung Ku; Park, Seung Hyub; Hwang, Jeong Ki; Kim, Jeong Mook; Oh, Haeng Yoeb

    1988-12-01

    An analysis of HVAC system was made on various nuclear facilities such as the existing nuclear power plants in Korea, Post Irradiation Examination Facility at KAERI and Midwest Fuel Recovery Plant in USA, to get basic data and information for the design of the spent fuel interim storage facility to be implemented as one of the radwaste management projects. With the results of this study, the HVAC system to be applied to the spent fuel interim storage facility was selected and the major design considerations of the facility were suggested. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of gas migration characteristics of compacted bentonite considering in-situ conditions of disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2012-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for radioactive waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the effect of gas pressure generation and gas migration on the engineered barrier, peripheral facilities and ground. CRIEPI already proposed an analytical method for simulating gas migration through the compacted bentonite using the model of two phase flow through deformable porous media. Though validity of the analytical code of CRIEPI was examined by comparing existing gas migration test results with the calculated results, further validation is needed because in situ conditions, such as stress conditions and boundary condition, are different from conventional laboratory gas migration tent. In this study, gas migration tests whose initial axial stress is larger than initial radial stress and gas migration tests whose gas inlet is small. Simulation of the test results is also conducted. Comparing the test results with the calculated results, it is revealed that the analytical code of CRIEPI can simulate gas migration behavior through compacted bentonite with accuracy. (author)

  9. Nuclear Criticality Calculation for Determining the Bach Size in a Pyroprocessing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Lee, Ho Hee; Chang, Hong Rae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Jung, Chang Jun; Yoon, Suk Kyun

    2009-01-01

    The criticality analysis in a pyroprocessing facility is very important element for the R and D and the facility design in terms of the determination of batch size of the sub-processes as well as facility safety. Particularly, the determining the batch size is essential at the beginning stage of the R and D. In this report, the criticality analysis was carried out for the subprocesses such as voloxidation, electrolytic reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning process in order to estimate the maximum batch size of each process by using Monte Carlo code (MCNP4/C2). On the whole, the criticality problem could not give a big effect on the batch sizes in the voloxidation, electrolytic reduction and electrorefining. However, it was resulted that permissible amount of nuclear material to prevent the criticality accident in the electrowinning process was about 10kgHM

  10. Nuclear Criticality Calculation for Determining the Bach Size in a Pyroprocessing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Lee, Ho Hee; Chang, Hong Rae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Jung, Chang Jun; Yoon, Suk Kyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    The criticality analysis in a pyroprocessing facility is very important element for the R and D and the facility design in terms of the determination of batch size of the sub-processes as well as facility safety. Particularly, the determining the batch size is essential at the beginning stage of the R and D. In this report, the criticality analysis was carried out for the subprocesses such as voloxidation, electrolytic reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning process in order to estimate the maximum batch size of each process by using Monte Carlo code (MCNP4/C2). On the whole, the criticality problem could not give a big effect on the batch sizes in the voloxidation, electrolytic reduction and electrorefining. However, it was resulted that permissible amount of nuclear material to prevent the criticality accident in the electrowinning process was about 10kgHM

  11. Shield wall evaluation of hot cell facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I. J.; Kuk, D. H.; Ko, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Yoo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    The future hot cell is located in the Irradiated Material Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). It is β-γ type hot cell that was constructed on the base floor in IMEF building for irradiated material testing. And this hot cell will be used for carrying out the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). The radiation shielding capability of hot cell should be sufficient to meet the radiation dose requirements in the related regulations. Because the radioactive sources of ACP are expected to be higher than radioactive sources of IMEF design criteria, the future hot cell in current status is unsatisfactory to hot test of ACP. So the shielding analysis of the future hot cell is performed to evaluate shielding ability of concrete shield wall. The shielding analysis included (a) identification of ACP source term; (b) photon source spectrum; (c) shielding analysis by QADS and MCNP-4C; and (d) enhancement of concrete shield wall. In this research, dose rates are obtained according to ACP source, geometry and hot cell shield wall thickness. And the evaluation and reinforcement thickness of the shield wall about future hot cell are concluded

  12. Safeguardability assessment on pilot-scale advanced spent fuel conditioning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Li, T.K.; Pickett, S.E.; Miller, M.C.; Ko, W.I.; Kim, H.D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In South Korea, approximately 6,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactor operation has been accumulated with the expectation of more than 30,000 metric tons, three times the present storage capacity, by the end of 2040. To resolve these challenges in spent fuel management, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a dry reprocessing technology called Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). This is an electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert oxide-type spent fuel into a metallic form, and the electrolytic reduction (ER) technology developed recently is known as a more efficient concept for spent fuel conditioning. The goal of the ACP study is to recover more than 99% of the actinide elements into a metallic form with minimizing the volume and heat load of spent fuel. The significant reduction of the volume and heat load of spent fuel is expected to lighten the burden of final disposal in terms of disposal size, safety, and economics. In the framework of R and D collaboration for the ACP safeguards, a joint study on the safeguardability of the ACP technology has been performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and KAERI. The purpose of this study is to address the safeguardability of the ACP technology, through analysis of material flow and development of a proper safeguards system that meet IAEA's comprehensive safeguards objective. The sub-processes and material flow of the pilot-scale ACP facility were analyzed, and subsequently the relevant material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) were designed for material accounting. The uncertainties in material accounting were also estimated with international target values, and design requirements for the material accounting systems were derived

  13. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S.D.; Li, S.X.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl - 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  14. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.

    1997-02-07

    A pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-RR-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator. The dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of the double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer program RCOL. The RCOL was designed in FORTRAN-77 to operate on PCs. (author).

  15. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-RR-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator. The dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of the double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer program RCOL. The RCOL was designed in FORTRAN-77 to operate on PCs. (author)

  16. Fuel Performance Characterisation under Various PWR Conditions: Description of the Annealing Test Facilities available at the LECA-STAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Cornu, B.; Clement, S.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P.; Malgouyres, P.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DEC/SA3C - Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour has led Cea to improve its post-irradiation examination capacities in term of test facilities and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache Cea center. as far as the annealing test facilities are concerned, fuel qualification and improvement of knowledge require a set of furnaces which are already used or will be used. The main characteristics of these furnaces strongly depend on the experimental objectives. The aim of this paper is to review the main aspects of these specific experiments concerning: (i) fission gas release from high burn up fuel, (ii) global fission product release in severe-accident conditions and (iii) fuel microstructural changes, potential cladding failure, radionuclide source terms... under conditions representative of long term dry storage and geological disposal. (authors)

  17. Analysis on the Present Status of Conceptually Designed Pyroprocessing Facilities for Determining a Reference Pyroprocessing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Ahn, Seong Kyu; Song, Dae Yong; Lee, Tae Hoon; Kim, Ho Dong; Seo, Ji Sun; Im, Hye In; Jang, Je Nam

    2009-12-01

    In this report, pyro processing facility concepts suggested by US, Japan, and Republic of Korea have been summarized and analyzed, and the determination principles were established to determine a reference pyro processing facility concept. Three proposals for a reference pyro processing facility concept were suggested based on these principles. The 1st proposal is based on the GEN-IV PR/PP model except the metal fuel fabrication process. It may be possible to later add the metal fuel fabrication process, UO2 recovery process of Japan, and continuous electrorefining process invented in Republic of Korea to be the generic model including all pyroprocessing facility concepts in the world. The 2nd proposal is based on INL and ANL model which is simple for the most part and has basic essential processes. The 3rd proposal is determined to be the ESPF of KAERI, which is almost identical with that of the 2nd proposal except in regards to utilization of an input accountability tank and continuous electrorefining process and the 3rd proposal is planned to be realized in 7 years. After the review of the IAEA and discussions at 3rd Working Group Meeting held in IAEA headquarters, the 3rd proposal has been determined as the final version of a reference pyroprocessing facility concept

  18. Proposal of conditioning of the not-in-use sealed sources which are stored in the Radioactive Wastes Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jova, L.; Garcia, N.; Benitez, J.C.; Salgado, M.; Hernandez, A.

    1996-01-01

    There is a considerable number of sealed sources which are no longer in use at the radioactive wastes treatment facility. In the present work a methodology is proposed for the final conditioning of these sources, based on their immobilization in a cement matrix. This cementation is accomplished within a 200-liter tank

  19. 42 CFR 412.604 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient rehabilitation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient rehabilitation facilities. 412.604 Section 412.604 Public Health CENTERS FOR... SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment for Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals and Rehabilitation Units § 412.604 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient...

  20. Design of the PRIDE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Eun Pyo; Cho, Il Je; Kwon, Kie Chan; Hong, Dong Hee; Lee, Won Kyung; Ku, Jeong Hoe

    2009-01-01

    From 2007, KAERI is developing a PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration facility (the PRIDE facility). The maximum annual treatment capacity of this facility will be a 10 ton-HM. The process will use a natural uranium feed material or a natural uranium mixed with some surrogate material for a simulation of a spent fuel. KAERI has also another plan to construct a demonstration facility which can treat a real spent fuel by pyroprocessing. This facility is called by ESPF, Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility. The ESPF will have the same treatment capability of spent fuel with the PRIDE facility. The only difference between the PRIDE and the ESPF is a radiation shielding capability. From the PRIDE facility designing works and demonstration with a simulated spent fuel after construction, it will be able to obtain the basic facility requirements, remote operability, interrelation properties between process equipment for designing of the ESPF. The flow sheet of the PRIDE processes is composed of five main processes, such as a decladding and voloxidation, an electro-reduction, an electrorefining, an electro-winning, and a salt waste treatment. The final products from the PRIDE facility are a simulated TRU metal and U metal ingot

  1. Analysis on the application and actual condition of facilities preservation system in each industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, Seon Duk; Nam, Ji Hee

    2000-11-01

    In order to secure the maximum of a company's benefit through increasing the efficiency and the productivity of it. the facility preservation system has been developed and used so that can find it's maximum efficiency with a series of activities which make a plan for, install, maintain, and improve for it. Factories are managed to be classified by operation and maintenance with great interest in the facility preservation in South Korea. and the facilities has taken up much part in the management. But it has not been researched how the facilities affects the management of a company. According to that reasons, the facility preservation is underestimated compared with what it is and is regarded just as a cost. This report has an object to construct a fundamental electronic-database on the facility preservation in order to obtain excellent results in KAERI with researches into the introduction of the TPM technology in South Korea, and analysis the effect of the TPM on a company

  2. Analysis on the application and actual condition of facilities preservation system in each industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, Seon Duk; Nam, Ji Hee

    2000-11-01

    In order to secure the maximum of a company's benefit through increasing the efficiency and the productivity of it. the facility preservation system has been developed and used so that can find it's maximum efficiency with a series of activities which make a plan for, install, maintain, and improve for it. Factories are managed to be classified by operation and maintenance with great interest in the facility preservation in South Korea. and the facilities has taken up much part in the management. But it has not been researched how the facilities affects the management of a company. According to that reasons, the facility preservation is underestimated compared with what it is and is regarded just as a cost. This report has an object to construct a fundamental electronic-database on the facility preservation in order to obtain excellent results in KAERI with researches into the introduction of the TPM technology in South Korea, and analysis the effect of the TPM on a company.

  3. [Preoperational study for the improvement of hygiene conditions in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, A C; Spegel, H; Kolb, S; Hierl, W; Müller, C; Höller, C; Liebl, B; Rudolph, P; Herr, C

    2014-12-01

    Hygiene is becoming more and more important in long-term care facilities. Long-term care facilities are subject to monitoring by the Public Health Service (PHS) and other authorities. For the PHS in Bavaria the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (Landesamt für Gesundheit und Lebensmittelsicherheit, LGL) published a hygiene monitoring concept and there exists an inspection guide developed by a specialist department for nursing homes and institutions for the handicapped (Fachstelle für Pflege und Behinderteneinrichtungen, FQA). Because inspections are performed in multiprofessional teams, it makes sense to use a coordinated inspection catalog. The aim was to integrate hygienic requirements specified in the Bavarian guidelines for hygiene by the LGL into the inspection guide published by the FQA to obtain a quality assured surveillance. The involved parties were questioned about the inspection guide and their hygiene management and then the hygiene criteria of the LGL were implemented into the inspection guide. Questions dealing with hygiene requirements concerning intensive care, management of multidrug resistant bacteria and interviews with the person responsible for infection control in the facility itself were developed for the first time and were integrated into the inspection guide. The revised inspection guide was tested for its applicability. With the revised inspection guide there now exists a tool which allows not only comprehensive inspections of the facilities including hygiene issues but also a good cooperation of the various parties involved. There are many actions which have to be conveyed into the future, especially programs to train staff to apply the inspection guide and to enhance the ability of all participants to act in cooperation. The guide will also allow the facilities to cooperate more easily and more closely, as the guide takes the respective problems and challenges of the different facilities into consideration. Additionally the

  4. Literature survey on metal waste form for metallic waste from electrorefiners for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tomohiro

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the recent results of the metal waste form development activities at the Argonne National Laboratory in the USA for high-level radioactive metallic waste (stainless-steel (SS) cladding hulls, zirconium (Zr), noble-metal fission products (NMFPs), etc.) from electrorefiners for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuels. Their main results are as follows: (1) SS- 15 wt.% Zr- ∼4 wt.% NMFPs alloy was selected as the metal waste form, (2) metallurgical data, properties, long-term corrosion data, etc. of the alloy have been collected, (3) 10-kg ingots have been produced in hot tests and a 60-kg production machine is under development. The following research should be made to show the feasibility of the metal waste form in Japan: (1) degradation assessment of the metal waste form in Japanese geological repository environments, and (2) clarification of the maximum allowable contents of NMFPs. (author)

  5. 9 CFR 307.2 - Other facilities and conditions to be provided by the establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY... used in dressing diseased carcasses, floors, and such other articles and places as may be contaminated... accomplish sanitary dressing procedures, the following inspection station facilities for cattle and swine...

  6. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs

  7. Identification of relevant ICF categories by patients with neurological conditions in early post-acute rehabilitation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Lipp, Berthold; Boldt, Christine; Stucki, Gerold; Koenig, Eberhard

    To describe functioning and health of patients with neurological conditions in early post-acute rehabilitation facilities and to identify the most common problems using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Cross-sectional survey in a convenience sample of patients with neurological conditions requiring rehabilitation in early post-acute facilities. The second-level categories of the ICF were used to collect information on patients' problems. For the ICF components Body Functions, Body Structures and Activities and Participation absolute and relative frequencies of impairments/limitations in the study population were reported. For the component Environmental Factors absolute and relative frequencies of perceived barriers or facilitators were reported. The mean age in the sample was 56.6 years with a median age of 60 years. Forty percent of the patients were female. In 292 neurological patients 125 categories (51%) had a prevalence of 30% and above: 39 categories (49%) of Body Functions, 11 categories (28%) of Body Structures, 64 categories (88%) of Activities and Participation and 10 (20%) categories of Environmental Factors. This study is a first step towards the development of ICF Core Sets for of patients with neurological conditions in early post-acute rehabilitation facilities.

  8. Pre-feasibility analysis of powering a remote research facility under arid conditions in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagimbayev Sagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the feasibility of using photovoltaic solar cells and solar water heating in a remote off-grid research facility for scientists in the steppe of Kazakhstan. The objective of the facility is to observe wildlife in this region, especially saiga antelope, whose population has been drastically reduced in recent years. The analysis is conducted using RETScreen software and includes energy, cost, emissions, and financial assessment. The proposed energy model is compared with a traditional base case scenario (based on a diesel boiler and reciprocating engine. Despite the challenges and constraints, the project pays off within its lifespan. It eliminates greenhouse gas emissions and reduces human interference with local wildlife.

  9. Simulation of experiment on aerosol behaviour at severe accident conditions in the LACE experimental facility with the ASTEC CPA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment LACE LA4 on thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment, which was performed in the LACE experimental facility, was simulated with the ASTEC CPA module of the severe accident computer code ASTEC V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the module (code) to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions and aerosol behavior in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. The test was simulated with boundary conditions, described in the experiment report. Results of thermal-hydraulic conditions in the test vessel, as well as dry aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere, are compared to experimental results and analyzed. (author)

  10. 24 CFR 100.65 - Discrimination in terms, conditions and privileges and in services and facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination in terms, conditions... Discriminatory Housing Practices § 100.65 Discrimination in terms, conditions and privileges and in services and... rental of a dwelling, because a person failed or refused to provide sexual favors. ...

  11. Analysis of conditions to safety and radiological protection of Brazilian research particle accelerators facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, Manuel Jacinto Martins

    2010-01-01

    Eleven institutions of education and research in Brazil use particle accelerators, which fulfill different functions and activities. Currently, these institutions employ a total of fifteen accelerators. In this paper, the object of study is the radiological protection of occupationally exposed individuals, the general public and the radiation safety of particle accelerators. Research facilities with accelerators are classified in categories I and II according to the International Atomic Energy Agency or groups IX and X in accordance with the Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy. Of the 15 accelerators in use for research in Brazil, four belong to category I or group X and eleven belong to category II or group IX. The methodology presented and developed in this work was made through the inspection and assessment of safety and radiological protection of thirteen particle accelerators facilities, and its main purpose was to promote safer use of this practice by following established guidelines for safety and radiological protection. The results presented in this work showed the need to create a program, in our country, for the control of safety and radiological protection of this ionizing radiation practice. (author)

  12. Influence of facilities of ski preparation on the bodily condition of teenagers 11-12 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorona V.V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The indexes of bodily condition of teenagers were determined. A dynamics and increase of the explored indexes were analyzed in the process of ski preparation in the system of lessons of the physical culture of schoolchildren. The 156 teenagers at the age 11-12 years old took part in the experiment. The positive effect of ski training in the bodily condition of the investigated teenagers is proved. Reliable intercommunication was determined between the ski movements and indexes of bodily condition, which characterize work of the cardiovascular system.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigations into natural circulation behaviour in a simulated facility of the Indian PHWR under reduced inventory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satish Kumar, N.V.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Pal, A.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been carried out to study natural circulation characteristics of an Indian PHWR under reduced inventory conditions. The theoretical model incorporates a quasi-steady state analysis of natural circulation at different system inventories. It predicts the system flow rate under single-phase and two-phase conditions and the inventory at which reflux condensation occurs. The model predictions were compared with test data obtained from FISBE (facility for integral system behaviour experiments), which simulates the thermal hydraulic behaviour of the Indian 220 MWe PHWR. The experimental results were found to be in close agreement with the predictions. It was also found that the natural circulation could be oscillatory under reduced inventory conditions. (orig.)

  14. Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J.; Laub, T.W.

    1992-06-01

    This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10 -11 /yr to 10 -5 /yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10 -9 /yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution

  15. Analysis of operational possibilities and conditions of remote handling systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourfar, D.

    1989-01-01

    Accepting the development of the occupational radiation exposure in nuclear facilities, it will be showing possibilities of cost effective reduction of the dose rate through the application of robots and manipulators for the maintenance of nuclear power plants, fuel reprocessing plants, decommissioning and dismantling of the mentioned plants. Based on the experiences about industrial robot applications by manufacturing and manipulator applications by the handling of radioactive materials as well as analysis of the handling procedures and estimation of the dose intensity, it will be defining task-orientated requirements for the conceptual design of the remote handling systems. Furthermore the manifold applications of stationary and mobil arranged handling systems in temporary or permanent operation are described. (orig.) [de

  16. Nitridation of U and Pu recovered in liquid Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Solid solutions of actinide mono-nitrides have been proposed as a candidate fuel of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) and Gen.IV-type fast reactors because the thermal conductivity and metal density are higher than those of actinide oxides and also they have high melting temperature. Pyrochemical process has several advantages over conventional wet process in treating of spent nitride fuel. One of the key technologies of the pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel is the formation of the nitrides from actinides in the liquid Cd cathode. The nitridation-distillation combined method was developed and has been adopted to convert the actinides to the nitrides. In this method, the nitridation of actinides and the distillation of Cd occurred simultaneously by heating the actinide-Cd alloys in N{sub 2} gas stream. In the present study, the nitride formation behavior of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N was experimentally investigated. In addition, the nitride pellet was prepared form the powder obtained by the nitridation of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode. (U,Pu)N (PuN = 80 mol %) was used as the starting material in the experiment. Molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N pellet was carried out in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt with 1.2 wt% PuCl{sub 3} and 0.3 wt% UCl{sub 3} of about 110 g at the constant anodic potential of -0.60 to -0.55 V vs. Ag/AgCl for about 9 hours at 773 K. After the electrorefining, about 42 % of U and Pu in the starting (U,Pu)N pellet was dissolved at the anode and recovered into the liquid Cd cathode. The recovered U-Pu-Cd alloy was heated in an alumina crucible at 973 K for 10 hours under N{sub 2} gas (99.999 %) stream (0.015 L/min). Fine black powder was recovered after heating the U-Pu-Cd alloy. The powder was identified as the single phase solid solution of (U,Pu)N by the XRD analysis. After milling in the agate mortar for 1 hour, the powder was compacted into green pellet under a pressure of about

  17. Model experiments on simulation of the WWER water-chemical conditions at loop facilities of the MIR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderskaya, O.S.; Zotov, E.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on simulation of the WWER type reactors water-chemical conditions have been started at the State Scientific Center RIAR. These experiments are being conducted at the multi-loop research MIR reactor at the PVK-2 loop facility. The dosage stand was created. It allows introduction of boric acid, potassium and lithium hydroxides, ammonia solutions and gaseous hydrogen. Corrosion tests of the Russian E-635 and E-110 alloys are being conducted at the PVK-2 loop under the WWER water-chemical conditions. If necessary, fuel elements are periodically extracted from the reactor to perform visual examination, to measure their length, diameter, to remove the deposits from the claddings, to measure the burnup and to distribute the fission products over the fuel element by gamma-spectrometry. The chemical analytical 'on line' equipment produced by the ORBISPHERE Laboratory (Switzerland) will be commissioned in the nearest future to measure concentration of the dissolved hydrogen and oxygen as well as pH and specific conductivity. The objective of the report is to familiarize the participants of the IAEA Technical Committee with the capabilities of performing the model water-chemical experiments under the MIR reactor loop facility conditions. (author)

  18. Bayesian updating of reliability of civil infrastructure facilities based on condition-state data and fault-tree model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching Jianye; Leu, S.-S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers a difficult but practical circumstance of civil infrastructure management-deterioration/failure data of the infrastructure system are absent while only condition-state data of its components are available. The goal is to develop a framework for estimating time-varying reliabilities of civil infrastructure facilities under such a circumstance. A novel method of analyzing time-varying condition-state data that only reports operational/non-operational status of the components is proposed to update the reliabilities of civil infrastructure facilities. The proposed method assumes that the degradation arrivals can be modeled as a Poisson process with unknown time-varying arrival rate and damage impact and that the target system can be represented as a fault-tree model. To accommodate large uncertainties, a Bayesian algorithm is proposed, and the reliability of the infrastructure system can be quickly updated based on the condition-state data. Use of the new method is demonstrated with a real-world example of hydraulic spillway gate system.

  19. Data support system for controlling decentralised nuclear power industry facilities through uninterruptible condition monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povarov Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the automated uninterruptible multi-parameter system for monitoring operational vulnerability of critical NPP components, which differs from existing ones by being universally applicable for analysing mechanical damage of nuclear power unit components. The system allows for performing routine assessment of metal structures. The assessment of strained condition of a deteriorating component is based on three-dimensional finite element simulation with calculations adjusted with reference to in-situ measurements. A program for calculation and experimental analysis of maximum load and durability of critical area forms the core of uninterruptible monitoring system. The knowledge base on performance of the monitored components in different operating conditions and the corresponding comprehensive analysis of strained condition and deterioration rates compose the basis of control system data support, both for operating nuclear power units and robotic maintenance and repair systems.

  20. Feasibility Assessment of an ISS Artificial Gravity Conditioning Facility by Means of Multi-Body Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Mario; Baldesi, Gianluigi; Moratto, Claudio; De Wilde, Don; Bureo Dacal, Rafael; Castellsaguer, Joaquim

    2012-07-01

    Even though human exploration of Mars is a distant objective, it is well understood that, for human space voyages of several years duration, crews would be at risk of catastrophic consequences should any of the systems that provide adequate air, water, food, or thermal protection fail. Moreover, crews will face serious health and/or safety risks resulting from severe physiologic deconditioning associated with prolonged weightlessness. The principal ones are related to physical and functional deterioration of the regulation of the blood circulation, decreased aerobic capacity, impaired musculo-skeletal systems, and altered sensory- motor system performance. As the reliance of future space programmes on virtual modelling, simulation and justification has substantially grown together with the proto-flight hardware development approach, a range of simulation capabilities have become increasingly important in the requirements specification, design, verification, testing, launch and operation of new space systems. In this frame, multibody software is a key tool in providing a more coordinated and consistent approach from the preliminary development phases of the most complex systems. From a scientific prospective, an artificial gravity facility, such as the one evaluated in this paper, would be the first in-flight testing of the effectiveness and acceptability of short radius centrifuge as a countermeasure to human deconditioning on orbit. The ISS represents a unique opportunity to perform this research. From an engineering point of view, the preliminary assessment described in this paper, highlights the difficult engineering challenges of such a facility. The outcome proves that a human can be accommodated in the available volume, while respecting the human ergonomic basic requirements and preserving the global structural integrity of the hosting ISS module. In particular, analysis shows that, although the load capacity of the structural interfaces imposes a very low

  1. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  2. Validity of the RAI-MDS for ascertaining diabetes and comorbid conditions in long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M; Yan, Lin; Blackburn, David; Hu, Nianping; Schneider-Lindner, Verena; Teare, Gary F

    2014-01-15

    This study assessed the validity of the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) Version 2.0 for diagnoses of diabetes and comorbid conditions in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Hospital inpatient, outpatient physician billing, RAI-MDS, and population registry data for 1997 to 2011 from Saskatchewan, Canada were used to ascertain cases of diabetes and 12 comorbid conditions. Prevalence estimates were calculated for both RAI-MDS and administrative health data. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated using population-based administrative health data as the validation data source. Cohen's κ was used to estimate agreement between the two data sources. 23,217 LTCF residents were in the diabetes case ascertainment cohort. Diabetes prevalence was 25.3% in administrative health data and 21.9% in RAI-MDS data. Overall sensitivity of a RAI-MDS diabetes diagnoses was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.79, 0.80) and the PPV was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.92), when compared to administrative health data. Sensitivity of the RAI-MDS for ascertaining comorbid conditions ranged from 0.21 for osteoporosis to 0.92 for multiple sclerosis; specificity was high for most conditions. RAI-MDS clinical assessment data are sensitive to ascertain diabetes cases in LTCF populations when compared to administrative health data. For many comorbid conditions, RAI-MDS data have low validity when compared to administrative data. Risk-adjustment measures based on these comorbidities might not produce consistent results for RAI-MDS and administrative health data, which could affect the conclusions of studies about health outcomes and quality of care across facilities.

  3. Air conditioning device for pool facilities in nuclear power plant buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taruishi, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Seiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the temperature and humidity conditions for the working circumstance, prevent condensations on the wall surface and enable the reduction in the irradiation exposure to workers. Constitution: Air intake ports are provided on the side wall of a fuel storage pool or an equipment installation pool above the water level and connected by way of their exhaust ducts to the exhaust ducts of an air ventilation system. While on the other hand, air feed ducts having horizontally opened blowing ports and air exhaust ducts having horizontally opened exhaust ports above and in adjacent to the air feed ducts are provided on the side walls of the pool buildings at the height near the floor level. With this structure, fresh outdoor airs blown out horizontally from the blowing ports provided near the floor level can improve the temperature and humidity conditions of the working circumstance for the workers working on the floor. Further, an air clean up device is provided to the feed and exhaust systems for clean up the feed and exhaust airs. (Furukawa, Y.)

  4. Retention of iodine and other airborne radionuclides in nuclear facilities during abnormal and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Extensive research efforts have been undertaken in the world scientific community advancing the status of systems to maintain high air cleaning efficiency under the extreme abnormal conditions. The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme to upgrade technology in the area started in 1983 on the recommendations of a previous programme and the development covering a five year term is described in this document. Research laboratories from ten Member States participated, Belgium, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, India and Yugoslavia for three years with Austria, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany, Republic of Korea and UK for lesser periods. Research co-ordination meetings were held in Belgium (1984), Canada (1986) and Hungary (1988). A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 presentations from experts from the above mentioned Member States who participated in this research programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber Hashem Gaber Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions, while solely carbon dots (C-dots were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum, under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined.

  6. Replenishment policy for non-instantaneous deteriorating items in a two storage facilities under inflationary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra K. Jaggi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates an inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items under inflationary conditions with partially backlogged shortages. In today’s market structure consumers are looking for goods for which there is a delay in deterioration. At the same time, the consumers’ willingness to wait has been decreased over time, which leads to lost sales. Moreover in financial decision-making, the effects of inflation and time value of money cannot be oblivious to an inventory system. In this scenario, managing inventory of goods remains a challenging task for the decision makers, who may also have to rent warehouse under different prevailing factors such as, bulk discount, limited space in the retail outlet, or increasing inflation rates. With a focus on reduction of costs and increasing customer service, warehouse decision models are crucial for an organization’s profitability. Hence a mathematical model has been developed in the view of above scenario, in order to determine the optimal policy for the decision maker, by minimizing the present worth of total cost. The optimization procedure has been illustrated by a numerical example and detailed sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution has been performed to showcase the effect of various parameters. Managerial implications has also been presented to aid the decision making process.

  7. Systematic handling of requirements and conditions (in compliance with waste acceptance requirements for a radioactive waste disposal facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyser, Peter; Helander, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This Abstract and presentation will demonstrate the need for a structured requirement management and draw upon experiences and development from SKB requirements data base and methodology, in addition to international guidelines and software tools. The presentation will include a discussion on how requirement management can be applied for the decommissioning area. The key issue in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is the progressive removal of hazards, by stepwise decontamination and dismantling activities that have to be carried out safely and within the boundaries of an approved safety case. For decommissioning there exists at least two safety cases, one for the pre-disposal activities and one for the disposal facility, and a need for a systematic handling of requirements and conditions to safely manage the radioactive waste in the long term. The decommissioning safety case is a collection of arguments and evidence to demonstrate the safety of a decommissioning project. It also includes analyzing and updating the decommissioning safety case in accordance with the waste acceptance criteria's and the expected output, i.e. waste packages. It is a continuous process to confirm that all requirements have been met. On the other hand there is the safety case for a radioactive waste disposal facility, which may include the following processes and requirements: i) Integrating relevant scientific (and other) information in a structured, traceable and transparent way and, thereby, developing and demonstrating an understanding of the potential behavior and performance of the disposal system; ii) Identifying uncertainties in the behavior and performance of the disposal system, describing the possible significance of the uncertainties, and identifying approaches for the management of significant uncertainties; iii) Demonstrating long-term safety and providing reasonable assurance that the disposal facility will perform in a manner that protects human health and the

  8. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  9. Reforming Management of Behavior Symptoms and Psychiatric Conditions in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Different Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Steven A; Desai, Abhilash K

    2017-04-01

    Despite much attention including national initiatives, concerns remain about the approaches to managing behavior symptoms and psychiatric conditions across all settings, including in long-term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities. One key reason why problems persist is because most efforts to "reform" and "correct" the situation have failed to explore or address root causes and instead have promoted inadequate piecemeal "solutions." Further improvement requires jumping off the bandwagon and rethinking the entire issue, including recognizing and applying key concepts of clinical reasoning and the care delivery process to every situation. The huge negative impact of cognitive biases and rote approaches on related clinical problem solving and decision making and patient outcomes also must be addressed. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Versatile 0.5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed

  11. Feasibility Study for Monitoring Actinide Elements in Process Materials Using FO-LIBS at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bo-Young; Choi, Daewoong; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong [Nonproliferation System Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Dae, Dongsun [Department of Chemistry, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Whitehouse, Andrew I. [Applied Photonics Ltd., Unit 8 Carleton Business Park, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 2DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been developing the design and deployment methodology of Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for safeguards application within the argon hot cell environment at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), where ACPF is a facility being refurbished for the laboratory-scaled demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process. LIBS is an analysis technology used to measure the emission spectra of excited elements in the local plasma of a target material induced by a laser. The spectra measured by LIBS are analyzed to verify the quality and quantity of the specific element in the target matrix. Recently LIBS has been recognized as a promising technology for safeguards purposes in terms of several advantages including a simple sample preparation and in-situ analysis capability. In particular, a feasibility study of LIBS to remotely monitor the nuclear material in a high radiation environment has been carried out for supporting the IAEA safeguards implementation. Fiber-Optic LIBS (FO-LIBS) deployment was proposed by Applied Photonics Ltd because the use of fiber optics had benefited applications of LIBS by delivering the laser energy to the target and by collecting the plasma light. The design of FO-LIBS instrument for the measurement of actinides in the spent fuel and high temperature molten salt at ACPF had been developed in cooperation with Applied Photonics Ltd. FO-LIBS has some advantages as followings: the detectable plasma light wavelength range is not limited by the optical properties of the thick lead-glass shield window and the potential risk of laser damage to the lead-glass shield window is not considered. The remote LIBS instrument had been installed at ACPF and then the feasibility study for monitoring actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in process materials has been carried out. (authors)

  12. Feasibility Study for Monitoring Actinide Elements in Process Materials Using FO-LIBS at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bo-Young; Choi, Daewoong; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong; Dae, Dongsun; Whitehouse, Andrew I.

    2015-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been developing the design and deployment methodology of Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for safeguards application within the argon hot cell environment at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), where ACPF is a facility being refurbished for the laboratory-scaled demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process. LIBS is an analysis technology used to measure the emission spectra of excited elements in the local plasma of a target material induced by a laser. The spectra measured by LIBS are analyzed to verify the quality and quantity of the specific element in the target matrix. Recently LIBS has been recognized as a promising technology for safeguards purposes in terms of several advantages including a simple sample preparation and in-situ analysis capability. In particular, a feasibility study of LIBS to remotely monitor the nuclear material in a high radiation environment has been carried out for supporting the IAEA safeguards implementation. Fiber-Optic LIBS (FO-LIBS) deployment was proposed by Applied Photonics Ltd because the use of fiber optics had benefited applications of LIBS by delivering the laser energy to the target and by collecting the plasma light. The design of FO-LIBS instrument for the measurement of actinides in the spent fuel and high temperature molten salt at ACPF had been developed in cooperation with Applied Photonics Ltd. FO-LIBS has some advantages as followings: the detectable plasma light wavelength range is not limited by the optical properties of the thick lead-glass shield window and the potential risk of laser damage to the lead-glass shield window is not considered. The remote LIBS instrument had been installed at ACPF and then the feasibility study for monitoring actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in process materials has been carried out. (authors)

  13. Performance Test of the Salt transfer and Pellet fabrication of UCl{sub 3} Making Equipment for Electrorefining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, M. S.; Jin, H. J.; Park, G. I.; Park, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form the CdCl{sub 2} occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl{sub 3} by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl{sub 2}. Chemical reaction is next chlorination reaction; - Cd chlorination : Cd + Cl2 → CdCl{sub 2} - U chlorination : 3CdCl2 + 2U → 3Cd + 2UCl{sub 3} The apparatus for producing UCl{sub 3} consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, a off-gas wet scrubber and a dry scrubber. Salt transfer system set among reactors to transfer salt at 500 .deg. C. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The Salt product is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of pelletizer by a transfer system to fabricate pellet type salt. Performance test of the salt transfer and pellet fabrication of its equipment was tested in this work. Performance test of the salt transfer and pellet fabrication of UCl3 making equipment for Electrorefining carried out in this work. The result of equipment test is that melted salt at 600 .deg. C was easy transferred by salt transfer equipment heated at 500 .deg. C. In this time, salt transfer was carried out by argon gas pressurization at 3bar. When velocity of salt transfer was controlled under reduce pressure, velocity of salt transfer was difficult to control. And when salt pellet was fabricated by the mold of pelletizer heated at 90 .deg. C better than mold of pelletizer heated at 200 .deg. C because salt melted prevent leakage from mold of pelletizer.

  14. Efficiency analysis of solar facilities for building heating and household water heating under conditions in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Pivko, Michal; Jursová, Simona; Turjak, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    The paper studies the efficiency of solar facilities applied for the heating of buildings and household water heating in the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic is situated in the temperate zone characterized by changeable weather. It is respected in the assessment of a solar facility installation. The efficiency of solar facilities is evaluated according to energy and economic balances. It is analyzed for solar facilities heating both household water and buildings. The main problems relating ...

  15. PWR-related integral safety experiments in the PKL 111 test facility SBLOCA under beyond-design-basis accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.; Umminger, K.J.; Schoen, B. [Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU), Erlangen (France)

    1995-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR during beyond-design-basis accident scenarios is of vital interest for the verification and optimization of accident management procedures. Within the scope of the German reactor safety research program experiments were performed in the volumetrically scaled PKL 111 test facility by Siemens/KWU. This highly instrumented test rig simulates a KWU-design PWR (1300 MWe). In particular, the latest tests performed related to a SBLOCA with additional system failures, e.g. nitrogen entering the primary system. In the case of a SBLOCA, it is the goal of the operator to put the plant in a condition where the decay heat can be removed first using the low pressure emergency core cooling system and then the residual heat removal system. The experimental investigation presented assumed the following beyond-design-basis accident conditions: 0.5% break in a cold leg, 2 of 4 steam generators (SGs) isolated on the secondary side (feedwater- and steam line-valves closed), filled with steam on the primary side, cooldown of the primary system using the remaining two steam generators, high pressure injection system only in the two loops with intact steam generators, if possible no operator actions to reach the conditions for residual heat removal system activation. Furthermore, it was postulated that 2 of the 4 hot leg accumulators had a reduced initial water inventory (increased nitrogen inventory), allowing nitrogen to enter the primary system at a pressure of 15 bar and nearly preventing the heat transfer in the SGs ({open_quotes}passivating{close_quotes} U-tubes). Due to this the heat transfer regime in the intact steam generators changed remarkably. The primary system showed self-regulating system effects and heat transfer improved again (reflux-condenser mode in the U-tube inlet region).

  16. Electrical conductivity of the thermal dusty plasma under the conditions of a hybrid plasma environment simulation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukhovitskii, Dmitry I.; Petrov, Oleg F.; Hyde, Truell W.; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Dropmann, Michael; Matthews, Lorin S.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the inductively heated plasma generator (IPG) facility in application to the generation of the thermal dusty plasma formed by the positively charged dust particles and the electrons emitted by them. We develop a theoretical model for the calculation of plasma electrical conductivity under typical conditions of the IPG. We show that the electrical conductivity of dusty plasma is defined by collisions with the neutral gas molecules and by the electron number density. The latter is calculated in the approximations of an ideal and strongly coupled particle system and in the regime of weak and strong screening of the particle charge. The maximum attainable electron number density and corresponding maximum plasma electrical conductivity prove to be independent of the particle emissivity. Analysis of available experiments is performed, in particular, of our recent experiment with plasma formed by the combustion products of a propane-air mixture and the CeO2 particles injected into it. A good correlation between the theory and experimental data points to the adequacy of our approach. Our main conclusion is that a level of the electrical conductivity due to the thermal ionization of the dust particles is sufficiently high to compete with that of the potassium-doped plasmas.

  17. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, G.R.; Al-Mughrabi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused SHARS in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell would allow source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at single sites in each IAEA Member State. The mobile hot cell and related equipment is transported in two shipping containers to a specific country where the following process takes place: 1-) Assembly of hot cell; 2-) Removal of SHARS from working shields, encapsulation into a stainless steel capsule and placement into a long term storage shield; 3-) Conditioning of any other spent sources the country may require; 4-) Dismantling of the hot cell; 5-) Shipping equipment out of country. The operation in a specific country is planned to be executed over a three week period. This presentation will discuss the development of the mobile hot cell facility as well as the demonstration of the state of readiness of the system for manipulation of SHARS and the planned execution of the conditioning operations. As a result of this project, excess SHARS could be managed safely and securely and possibly be more easily repatriated to their country of origin for appropriate final disposition. (author)

  18. Decree of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission No. 191/1989 on procedures, terms and conditions for examining special professional qualification and competence of selected nuclear facility personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The procedures, terms and conditions for examining special professional competence of selected nuclear facility personnel are specified, including conditions for professional training and for issuing licenses qualifying the personnel for their work. Nuclear safety-related jobs at nuclear facilities are listed. Professional licenses with a two-year term of validity are granted by the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Agency (CSAEC) to candidates who have passed examination before the State Examination Commission. Personnel training may only be performed by bodies authorized for that by the CSAEC. The Decree entered into force on 1 January 1990. (J.B.)

  19. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the et-R R-1 reactor. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K; Habib, N; Kilany, M; Adib, M [Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA., Cairo (Egypt); Wahba, M [Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-R R-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator, the dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer programme RCOL. The RCOL was designed in Fortran-77 to operate on PCs. 6 figs.

  20. The optimum operating conditions of the phased double-rotor facility at the et-R R-1 reactor. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Habib, N.; Kilany, M.; Adib, M.; Wahba, M.

    1996-01-01

    The pulsed neutron polyenergetic thermal beam at ET-R R-1 is produced by a phased double-rotor facility. One of the rotors has two diametrically opposite curved slots, while the second is designed to operate as a rotating collimator, the dimensions of the phased rotating collimator are selected to match the curved slot rotor. The calculated collimator transmissions at different operating conditions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. The optimum operating conditions of double-rotor facility are deduced. The calculations were carried out using a computer programme RCOL. The RCOL was designed in Fortran-77 to operate on PCs. 6 figs

  1. Development of molten salt electrorefining process. Basic behavior of deposition on the stirred liquid cadmium cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondou, Naruhito; Koyama, Masashi; Iizuka, Masatoshi

    1996-01-01

    An impeller type liquid metal cathode has been studied by the authors for designing and developing a liquid cadmium cathode which is capable of collects the mixture of plutonium and uranium without formation of dendritic uranium. In this study, radial profile of the liquid surface was measured with various rotating speed and dimension of the impeller. Then, electrodepositions of zinc metal in the liquid gallium metal cathode was carried out for obtaining operational conditions such as current density and Reynolds number. The obtained result can be written in the following form, w c ∞i -1 ·N Re 0.3 , where w c is the maximum concentration in the liquid metal cathode, i is the cathode current density and N Re is the agitational Reynolds number. (author)

  2. Contribution to the knowledge of the mechanism of the electrorefining of uranium in fused salt baths (1961); Contribution a la connaissance du mecanisme de l'electroraffinage de l'uranium en bains de sels fondus (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisde, G; Chauvin, G; Coriou, H; Hure, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    Very pure uranium can be obtained by electrorefining under the following conditions: electrolyte: UCl{sub 3} (ca. 30 per cent wt.) dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic, cathode: molybdenum, atmosphere: argon, temperature: 400-450 deg. C. The detailed mechanism of the refining process has been hitherto unknown. Electrode-potential studies undertaken to fill this gap have shown that: 1. UCl prepared according to Newton contains an impurity (perhaps UH{sub 3}) that interferes with the yield of the cathode deposit. We propose a treatment to eliminate this impurity. 2. The quasi-reversible character of the system U{sup +3}{r_reversible}U{sup 0} is the principal reason for the production of high purity uranium. The cathodic deposition and anodic dissolution seem to be primary reactions. 3. The presence of moisture in the molten bath has a very harmful influence on the overall electrorefining process: the uranium obtained contains many impurities; the cathode current efficiency falls from 80 to about 10 per cent; and the anode is substantially corroded, the apparent anode current efficiency rising from 90 to about 120 per cent. An interpretation of these effects is given, based on the experimental polarization curves. (authors) [French] De l'uranium a un tres haut degre de purete peut etre obtenu par electroraffinage clans les conditions suivantes: electrolyte = UCl{sub 3} (30 pour cent en poids env.) dissous dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl, cathode = tige de molybdene, atmosphere = argon, temperature = 400 a 450 deg. C. Toutefois, on ne connaissait pas, jusqu'a present, le mecanisme intime du processus de raffinage. Des etudes de potentiels d'electrodes, entreprises pour tenter de combler cette lacune, nous ont permis de mettre en evidence differents points : 1. UCl{sub 3} prepare selon la methode de Newton contient une impurete (peut-etre UH{sub 3}) qui nuit au rendement du depot cathodique. Nous proposons un traitement d'elimination de cette impurete. 2. Le caractere de quasi

  3. Periodontal conditions, low birth weight and preterm birth among postpartum mothers in two tertiary health facilities in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwazi, Louis; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha; Nkamba, Moses; Kutesa, Annet; Kagawa, Mike; Mugyenyi, Godfrey; Kwizera, Godfrey; Okullo, Isaac

    2014-04-28

    Literature reports have indicated an increase in research evidence suggesting association between periodontal disease and the risk of pre-term birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). Periodontal diseases in Uganda have been documented as a public health problem, but their association to adverse pregnancy outcomes is unknown. This study was conducted to assess the association between periodontital diseases in postpartum mothers and PTB and LBW of babies in Mulago and Mbarara referral hospitals. This was a cross sectional study using medical records, clinical examination and oral interview of mothers at the two tertiary health facilities. Mothers with singleton babies from Mulago (n = 300) and Mbarara Hospital (n = 100) were recruited for the study. The women were clinically examined for periodontal disease by 2 trained and calibrated dentists. Data on PTB and LBW were retrieved from medical records. The data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the four parameters for periodontal disease (bleeding gingiva, periodontal pockets, gingival recession and calculus with plaque deposits) and the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Frequency distribution was used to describe the data. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to study the association between the periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Approximately 26% and 29% of the postpartum mothers examined had bleeding gingiva and periodontal pockets of 4 mm or more deep, respectively. Advanced periodontitis i.e. pocket depth ≥ 6 mm was recorded in 13 (3.6%) of the mothers. Calculus with plaque deposits were recorded in 86% (n = 343) of the mothers. Gingival recession was recorded in 9.0% of the mothers and significantly and directly related to birth weight (p Periodontal conditions of postpartum mothers in this study were found to be better than previously reported amongst the Ugandan population. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association only between gingival

  4. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, O; Beteva, A; Borrel, J; Bugnazet, D; Gatla, S; Hino, R; Kantor, I; Mairs, T; Munoz, M; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Pascarelli, S

    2015-11-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5-75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment.

  5. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, O., E-mail: mathon@esrf.fr; Beteva, A.; Borrel, J.; Bugnazet, D.; Gatla, S.; Hino, R.; Kantor, I.; Mairs, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Munoz, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Université Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Pasternak, S.; Perrin, F.; Pascarelli, S. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-10-17

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high-signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5–75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5–75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment.

  6. An 8-year Retrospective Review of Gastrointestinal Medical Emergency Conditions at a Tertiary Health Facility in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguntoye Oluwatosin Oluwagbenga

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Gastrointestinal medical conditions are common indications for emergency admission. Measures should be taken to avoid these preventable conditions in a bid to reduce their morbidity and mortality.

  7. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: experimental study in the TOSQAN facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcheron, E.; Lemaitre, P.; Malet, J.; Nuboer, A.; Brun, P.; Bouilloux, L.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Surete des Usines, des laboratoires, des transports et des dechets, Saclay, BP 68 - 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and steam wall condensation. In order to assess the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, hydrogen distribution in the containment has to be known. The TOSQAN experimental program has been created to simulate typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work is devoted to study the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation mean in order to reduce containment pressure and to produce a mixing of air, steam and hydrogen induced by spray entrainment and condensation on droplet. In order to have a better understanding of physical phenomena, we need to make a detailed characterization of the spray and the gas. The TOSQAN facility that is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics consists in a closed cylindrical vessel (7 m{sup 3} volume, 4 m high, 1.5 m i.d.) into which steam is injected. Water droplets size is measured in the vessel by the Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing technique. Droplet velocity is obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, and droplet temperature is measured by global rainbow refractometry. Gas concentration measurements are performed by Spontaneous Raman Scattering. The walls of the vessel are thermostatically controlled by heated oil circulation. Inner spray system that is located on the top of the enclosure on the vertical axis, is composed of a single nozzle producing a full cone water spray. Spray test scenario consists of water spray injection in TOSQAN that is first pressurized with a steam injection (steam injection is stopped before spray injection). Water spray falling into the sump is removed to avoid accumulation and evaporation

  8. Molten salt electrorefining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Shoji, Yuichi; Matsumaru, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    A molten cadmium phase (lower side) and a molten salt phase (upper side) are filled in an electrolytic bath. A basket incorporating spent nuclear fuels is inserted/disposed in the molten cadmium phase. A rotatable solid cathode is inserted/disposed in the molten salt phase. The spent fuels, for example, natural uranium, incorporated in the basket is dissolved in the molten cadmium phase. In this case, the uranium concentration in the molten salt phase is determined as from 0.5 to 20wt%. Then, electrolysis is conducted while setting a stirring power for stirring at least the molten salt phase of from 2.5 x 10 2 to 1 x 10 4 based on a reynolds number. Crystalline nuclei of uranium are precipitated uniformly on the surface of the solid cathode, and they grow into fine dendrites. With such procedures, since short-circuit between the cathode precipitates and the molten cadmium phase (anode) is scarcely caused, to improve the recovering rate of uranium. (I.N.)

  9. Actinide separation by electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, S.P.; Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Grimmett, D.L.; Roy, J.J.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Takahashi, N.

    1995-01-01

    TRUMP-S is a pyrochemical process being developed for the recovery of actinides from PUREX wastes. This paper describes development of the electrochemical partitioning step for recovery of actinides in the TRUMP-S process. The objectives are to remove 99 % of each actinide from PUREX wastes, with a product that is > 90 % actinides. Laboratory tests indicate that > 99 % of actinides can be removed in the electrochemical partitioning step. A dynamic (not equilibrium) process model predicts that 90 wt % product actinide content can be achieved through 99 % actinide removal. Accuracy of model simulation results were confirmed in tests with rare earths. (authors)

  10. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option research center

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the Research Center, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the Research Center and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  11. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the nuclear reactor domain, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the nuclear reactor and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  12. Assessment of activity-based pyroprocess costs for an engineering-scale facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Won Il [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis Department, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Sung Sig [Dept. of Business and Technology Management, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study set the pyroprocess facility at an engineering scale as a cost object, and presented the cost consumed during the unit processes of the pyroprocess. For the cost calculation, the activity based costing (ABC) method was used instead of the engineering cost estimation method, which calculates the cost based on the conceptual design of the pyroprocess facility. The calculation results demonstrate that the pyroprocess facility's unit process cost is $194/kgHM for pretreatment, $298/kgHM for electrochemical reduction, $226/kgHM for electrorefining, and $299/kgHM for electrowinning. An analysis demonstrated that the share of each unit process cost among the total pyroprocess cost is as follows: 19% for pretreatment, 29% for electrochemical reduction, 22% for electrorefining, and 30% for electrowinning. The total unit cost of the pyroprocess was calculated at $1,017/kgHM. In the end, electrochemical reduction and the electrowinning process took up most of the cost, and the individual costs for these two processes was found to be similar. This is because significant raw material cost is required for the electrochemical reduction process, which uses platinum as an anode electrode. In addition, significant raw material costs are required, such as for Li3PO4, which is used a lot during the salt purification process.

  13. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  14. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Nam Yu

    2015-10-01

    Results and conclusion: Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  15. The Potential and Utilization of Unused Energy Sources for Large-Scale Horticulture Facility Applications under Korean Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Tak Hyun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As the use of fossil fuel has increased, not only in construction, but also in agriculture due to the drastic industrial development in recent times, the problems of heating costs and global warming are getting worse. Therefore, introduction of more reliable and environmentally-friendly alternative energy sources has become urgent and the same trend is found in large-scale horticulture facilities. In this study, among many alternative energy sources, we investigated the reserves and the potential of various different unused energy sources which have infinite potential, but are nowadays wasted due to limitations in their utilization. In addition, we utilized available unused energy as a heat source for a heat pump in a large-scale horticulture facility and analyzed its feasibility through EnergyPlus simulation modeling. Accordingly, the discharge flow rate from the Fan Coil Unit (FCU in the horticulture facility, the discharge air temperature, and the return temperature were analyzed. The performance and heat consumption of each heat source were compared with those of conventional boilers. The result showed that the power load of the heat pump was decreased and thus the heat efficiency was increased as the temperature of the heat source was increased. Among the analyzed heat sources, power plant waste heat which had the highest heat source temperature consumed the least electric energy and showed the highest efficiency.

  16. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, G.R.; Al-Mughrabi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell allows source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at national radioactive waste storage facilities. (authors)

  17. Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Laub, T.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-06-01

    This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10{sup {minus}11}/yr to 10{sup {minus}5}/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution.

  18. Recalculating the steady state conditions of the V-1000 zero-power facility at Kurchatov Institute using Monte Carlo and nodal diffusion codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlberg, Ville [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, VTT (Finland)

    2017-09-15

    Continuous-energy Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent 2 was used to model the critical steady state conditions measured in V-1000 zero-power critical facility at Kurchatov Institute (KI), Moscow in 1990-1992. The Serpent 2 results were compared to measurements and Serpent 2 was used to generate group constants for reactor dynamics code HEXTRAN. The results of a HEXTRAN calculation of the steady state were compared to Serpent 2. The relative power density distribution of the SERPENT2 calculations compared with the measurements was within the statistical accuracy. The comparison of HEXTRAN and Serpent 2 node-wise relative power density distributions showed an accuracy of ±10%.

  19. Selective N-alkylation of amines using nitriles under hydrogenation conditions: facile synthesis of secondary and tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Takashi; Fujita, Yuki; Mizusaki, Tomoteru; Betsuin, Sae; Takamatsu, Haruki; Maegawa, Tomohiro; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2012-01-14

    Nitriles were found to be highly effective alkylating reagents for the selective N-alkylation of amines under catalytic hydrogenation conditions. For the aromatic primary amines, the corresponding secondary amines were selectively obtained under Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions. Although the use of electron poor aromatic amines or bulky nitriles showed a lower reactivity toward the reductive alkylation, the addition of NH(4)OAc enhanced the reactivity to give secondary aromatic amines in good to excellent yields. Under the same reaction conditions, aromatic nitro compounds instead of the aromatic primary amines could be directly transformed into secondary amines via a domino reaction involving the one-pot hydrogenation of the nitro group and the reductive alkylation of the amines. While aliphatic amines were effectively converted to the corresponding tertiary amines under Pd/C-catalyzed conditions, Rh/C was a highly effective catalyst for the N-monoalkylation of aliphatic primary amines without over-alkylation to the tertiary amines. Furthermore, the combination of the Rh/C-catalyzed N-monoalkylation of the aliphatic primary amines and additional Pd/C-catalyzed alkylation of the resulting secondary aliphatic amines could selectively prepare aliphatic tertiary amines possessing three different alkyl groups. According to the mechanistic studies, it seems reasonable to conclude that nitriles were reduced to aldimines before the nucleophilic attack of the amine during the first step of the reaction.

  20. FY1999 Meeting of The Society of Heating, Air-Conditioning and Sanitary Engineering of Japan. Air conditioning systems for various facilities; 1999 nendo gakujutsu koenkai gaiyo. Kakushu shisetsu kucho system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, K. [Takenaka Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-12-05

    B-49 reported the outline of an artificial weather room composed of one inner room and two outer rooms, and its temperature change and temperature profiles during air conditioning. The room is scheduled to be used for evaluation of air conditioning systems, thermal performance evaluation of building materials and study on ventilation efficiency. B-50 reported the seasonal measurement results on thermal environment, and cooling and heating use patterns of living rooms and common spaces of 4 welfare homes for aged persons, and showed that room temperature difference in winter should be considered. Measurement data on facilities with floor heating were required. B-51 reported the experiment and numerical analysis results on thermal environment, draft sensation, condensation and radiation effect of patient bedrooms by using a full-scale 4-bed room model with a specific outlet developed for patient bedroom air conditioning. B-52 reported the outline of an air conditioning system for vegetable factories, and its performance evaluation result during cooling. The effect of blackout curtains and local air conditioning was reported. B-53 reported the comparison study result on air conditioning for animal breeding rooms by full-scale model experiment and numerical analysis. The line outlet + hanging wall + rack back exhaust system was most favorable from the viewpoint of temperature profile and prevention of pollutants from diffusion. (translated by NEDO)

  1. Thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR under beyond-design-basis accident conditions: Conclusions from an experimental program in a 4-loop test facility (PKL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umminger, K.J.; Kastner, W.; Mandl, R.M.; Weber, P.

    1993-01-01

    Within the scope of German reactor safety research, extensive experiments covering the behavior of nuclear power plants under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility which simulates a 4-loop, 1,300 MWe KWU-designed PWR. While the investigations dealing with design-basis accidents and with the efficiency of the emergency core cooling systems have been largely completed, the main interest nowadays concentrates on the investigation of beyond-design-basis accidents to demonstrate the safety margins of nuclear power plants and to investigate the contribution of the built-in safety features for a further reduction of the residual risk. The thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR under these extreme accident conditions was experimentally investigated within the PKL III B test program. This paper presents the fundamental findings with some of the most important results being discussed in detail. Future plans are also outlined

  2. Investigation of Thermal Comfort Conditions in Higher Education Facilities: A Case Study for Engineering Faculty in Edirne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mıhlayanlar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a higher education institution in Edirne (Trakya University Engineering Faculty is investigated for indoor thermal comfort conditions of the classrooms (indoor temperature, relative humidity, average radiant temperature, “Satisfaction from thermal environment” (PMV and “Dissatisfaction from thermal environment” (PPD. The classrooms in the institution are heated by a central heating system and utilise natural ventilation system. Measurements were taken with the proper devices at the same time of the weekdays during lecture times in winter (heating season in December. The results obtained from measurements are given in graphics and compared with the values given in ASHRAE 55 and ISO 7730 standards.

  3. Efficient and facile one pot carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by using oxidation with ozone under mild conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeimi, Hossein; Mohajeri, Ali; Moradi, Leila; Rashidi, Ali Morad

    2009-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this work, oxidation of carbon nanotubes with ozone in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reactions were performed under clean and mild conditions and oxidized products with high concentration of oxygenated groups were yielded. The reaction products were characterized with attenuated total reflectance (ATR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), back titration, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the dispersion behavior of the oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was also studied. The results confirmed the presence of high concentrations of oxidative groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) treated by the method of the present work.

  4. The Predictive Capability of Conditioned Simulation of Discrete Fracture Networks using Structural and Hydraulic Data from the ONKALO Underground Research Facility, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. R. N.; Baxter, S.; Hartley, L.; Appleyard, P.; Koskinen, L.; Vanhanarkaus, O.; Selroos, J. O.; Munier, R.

    2017-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models provide a natural analysis framework for rock conditions where flow is predominately through a series of connected discrete features. Mechanistic models to predict the structural patterns of networks are generally intractable due to inherent uncertainties (e.g. deformation history) and as such fracture characterisation typically involves empirical descriptions of fracture statistics for location, intensity, orientation, size, aperture etc. from analyses of field data. These DFN models are used to make probabilistic predictions of likely flow or solute transport conditions for a range of applications in underground resource and construction projects. However, there are many instances when the volumes in which predictions are most valuable are close to data sources. For example, in the disposal of hazardous materials such as radioactive waste, accurate predictions of flow-rates and network connectivity around disposal areas are required for long-term safety evaluation. The problem at hand is thus: how can probabilistic predictions be conditioned on local-scale measurements? This presentation demonstrates conditioning of a DFN model based on the current structural and hydraulic characterisation of the Demonstration Area at the ONKALO underground research facility. The conditioned realisations honour (to a required level of similarity) the locations, orientations and trace lengths of fractures mapped on the surfaces of the nearby ONKALO tunnels and pilot drillholes. Other data used as constraints include measurements from hydraulic injection tests performed in pilot drillholes and inflows to the subsequently reamed experimental deposition holes. Numerical simulations using this suite of conditioned DFN models provides a series of prediction-outcome exercises detailing the reliability of the DFN model to make local-scale predictions of measured geometric and hydraulic properties of the fracture system; and provides an understanding

  5. Facile synthesis of 1-naphthol azo dyes with nano SiO2/HIO4 under solvent-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Pourali

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nano-silica supported periodic acid (nano-SPIA has been utilized as a heterogeneous reagent for a highly efficient and one pot synthesis of azo dyes based on 1-naphthol under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This method has some advantages, the reaction workup is very easy and the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture and one-pot procedure. The related products have been obtained in good to excellent yields, high purity and short reaction times. The structures of the products have been characterized by several techniques using UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v27i3.13

  6. XRMON-GF: A novel facility for solidification of metallic alloys with in situ and time-resolved X-ray radiographic characterization in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Thi, H.; Reinhart, G.; Salloum Abou Jaoude, G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Zimmermann, G.; Houltz, Y.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; Browne, D. J.; Murphy, A. G.

    2013-07-01

    As most of the phenomena involved during the growth of metallic alloys from the melt are dynamic, in situ and time-resolved X-ray imaging should be retained as the method of choice for investigating the solidification front evolution. On Earth, the gravity force is the major source of various disturbing effects (natural convection, buoyancy/sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure) which can significantly modify or mask certain physical mechanisms. Therefore solidification under microgravity is an efficient way to eliminate such perturbations to provide unique benchmark data for the validation of models and numerical simulations. Up to now, in situ observation during microgravity solidification experiments were limited to the investigations on transparent organic alloys, using optical methods. On the other hand, in situ observation on metallic alloys generally required synchrotron facilities. This paper reports on a novel facility we have designed and developed to investigate directional solidification on metallic alloys in microgravity conditions with in situ X-ray radiography observation. The facility consists of a Bridgman furnace and an X-ray radiography device specifically devoted to the study of Al-based alloys. An unprecedented experiment was recently performed on board a sounding rocket, with a 6 min period of microgravity. Radiographs were successfully recorded during the entire experiment including the melting and solidification phases of the sample, with a Field-of-View of about 5 mm×5 mm, a spatial resolution of about 4 µm and a frequency of 2 frames per second. Some preliminary results are presented on the solidification of the Al-20 wt% Cu sample, which validate the apparatus and confirm the potential of in situ X-ray characterization for the investigation of dynamical phenomena in materials processing, and particularly for the studying of metallic alloys solidification.

  7. Description of the blowdown test facility COG program on in-reactor fission product release, transport, and deposition under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbach, P.J.; Wood, J.C.

    1987-06-01

    Loss-of-coolant accidents with additional impairment of emergency cooling would probably result in high fuel temperatures leading to severe fuel damage (SFD) and significant fission product activity would then be transported along the PHTS to the break where a fraction of it would be released and transport under such conditions, there are many interacting and sometimes competing phenomena to consider. Laboratory simulations are being used to provide data on these individual phenomena, such as UO 2 oxidation and Zr-UO 2 interaction, from which mathematical models can be constructed. These are then combined into computer codes to include the interaction effects and assess the overall releases. In addition, in-reactor tests are the only source of data on release and transport of short-lived fission product nuclides, which are important in the consequence analysis of CANDU reactor accidents. Post-test decontamination of an in-reactor test facility also provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate techniques and obtain decontamination data relevant to post-accident rehabilitation of CANDU power reactors. Specialized facilities are required for in-reactor testing because of the extensive release of radioactive fission products and the high temperatures involved (up to 2500 degrees Celsius). To meet this need for the Canadian program, the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) has been built in the NRU reactor at Chalk River. Between completion of construction in mid-1987 and the first Zircaloy-sheathed fuel test in fiscal year 1987/88, several commissioning tests are being performed. Similarly, extensive development work has been completed to permit application of instrumentation to irradiated fuel elements, and in support of post-test fuel assembly examination. A program of decontamination studies has also been developed to generate information relevant to post-accident decontamination of power reactors. The BTF shared cost test program funded by the COG High Temperature

  8. Estimation of risk due to accidents for the transport of radioactive wastes to the conditioning and storage facilities in the Research Center of Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejsa, P.

    1977-02-01

    By the use of an American statistic of accidents on roads the risk of body burden is estimated resulting from the transport of radioactive wastes to the central collection, conditioning and storage facilities in Seibersdorf. It is shown that the risk of the transport from power stations up to 1990 is below that of other producers of radioactive wastes (hospitals, industry and research laboratories). The risk of the individual body burden is estimated to be in 1976: 1,1 . 10 -10 mrem/a; 1978: 2,8 . 10 -10 mrem/a; 1985: 3,0 . 10 -10 mrem/a; 1995: 3,3 . 10 -10 mrem/a. These results are so much below the natural radiation in the environment, that they cannot be seen as an increase in the given potential hazard. (author)

  9. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.)

  10. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B. [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  11. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y N; Vasilenko, V A; Zasukha, V K; Migrov, Y A; Khabensky, V B [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  12. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  13. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  14. Analysis of Unit Process Cost for an Engineering-Scale Pyroprocess Facility Using a Process Costing Method in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungki Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing, which is a dry recycling method, converts spent nuclear fuel into U (Uranium/TRU (TRansUranium metal ingots in a high-temperature molten salt phase. This paper provides the unit process cost of a pyroprocess facility that can process up to 10 tons of pyroprocessing product per year by utilizing the process costing method. Toward this end, the pyroprocess was classified into four kinds of unit processes: pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning. The unit process cost was calculated by classifying the cost consumed at each process into raw material and conversion costs. The unit process costs of the pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning were calculated as 195 US$/kgU-TRU, 310 US$/kgU-TRU, 215 US$/kgU-TRU and 231 US$/kgU-TRU, respectively. Finally the total pyroprocess cost was calculated as 951 US$/kgU-TRU. In addition, the cost driver for the raw material cost was identified as the cost for Li3PO4, needed for the LiCl-KCl purification process, and platinum as an anode electrode in the electrochemical reduction process.

  15. Thermal analysis of the modified Hallum Nuclear Power Facility cask using experimentally obtained thermal boundary conditions corresponding to an engulfing open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longenbaugh, R.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Gregory, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the two-dimensional heat transfer analysis of an open pool fire surrounding a modified radioactive materials transport cask. The cask is an older cask that was used by the Hallum Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF). The HNPF cask did not have a neutron shielding region but was modified to include one for testing purposes. Analysis of the thermal effects of an engulfing open pool fire was performed with the use of the heat transfer code Q/TRAN, which had previously been used in thermal benchmarking problems for spent nuclear fuel casks. Boundary condition data for the analysis were derived from experimental open pool fire tests of large-scale calorimeter test articles performed at SNL that produced information about cask surface heat flux versus surface temperature relationships. Data analysis was directed toward a determination of the thermal response of the cask, particularly the extent of lead melt since lead is used within the HNPF cask's gamma-shielding region. Parameters, such as surface emissivity and internal heat generation rate, can affect the results of the thermal analysis which control the amount of lead melt. A parameter sensitivity analysis was performed using a one-dimensional model to describe how surface emissivity and internal heat generation rates affect the temperature distribution within the cask. The information from this analysis was used to determine the range of parameters for the two-dimensional thermal analysis. 13 refs., 57 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Actinide speciation bound to hydrous ferric oxide colloids in the near-field conditions of the waste pond at 'Mayak' facility (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, St.; Khasanova, A.; Kriventsov, V.; Teterin, Y.; Novikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 'Mayak' facility is a nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant located in Ural Mountains, Russia. The opened pond, Karachay Lake, was used for several decades for the discharge of low- and intermediate level waste solutions containing fission products and traces of actinides. Due to high salt concentration and high density of waste solutions, they are penetrating into the groundwater system that is represented by oxic Eh conditions. The speciation of actinides in groundwater samples collected close to Karachay Lake was studied by successive micro- and ultra-filtrations with subsequent SEM, TEM, nano-SIMS, membrane extraction and other techniques. It was established that U and Np were found in soluble fraction (pass through 10 kD ultra-filter) in the form of their bi- and tri-carbonate complexes that was supported by chemical thermodynamic calculations. In contrast, Pu and Am were bound to nano-colloids 10 kD - 50 nm in size. The SEM and TEM data indicate the presence of variety of different colloidal particles which relative concentration decrease in the row: hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) >> clays ≅ calcite > rutile ≅ hematite ≅ barite ≅ MnO 2 > monazite > other phases. The SIMS with submicron resolution (Cameca nanoSIMS-50) was used to study local concentration of actinides. According to the obtained data among different colloids detected in the sample actinides were preferentially bound to HFO and MnO 2 while other phases did not sorb actinides. In order to determine actinide speciation bound to HFO colloids XPS and An L 3 edge XAFS measurements were done at Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Centre. The storage ring VEPP-3 with electron beam energy of 2 GeV and an average stored current of 80 mA was used as the source of radiation. Since the concentration of actinides in actual samples was too low for XAFS, the samples for measurements were prepared by contacting about 10 -5 M solutions of Np(V) and Pu(V) with

  17. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  18. Evaluation of chloride-ion-specific electrodes as in situ chemical sensors for monitoring total chloride concentration in aqueous solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1992-10-01

    Two commercially available chloride-ion-specific electrodes (CLISEs), a solid-state type and a membrane type, were evaluated as potential in situ chemical sensors for determining total chloride ion concentration in mixed sodium chloride/potassium chloride/hydrochloric acid solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations. Because the response of the solid-state CLISE was closer than was the response of the membrane-type CLISE to the theoretical response predicted by the Nernst equation, the solid-state CLISE was selected for further evaluation. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of the chloride system and the corresponding CLISE response to concentration changes suggested four methods by which the CLISE could be used either as a direct, in situ sensor or as an indirect sensor through which an analysis could be performed on-line with a sample extracted from the process solution

  19. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  20. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  1. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River, Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri, January 2003 through March 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The Johnson County Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility discharges into the upper Blue River near the border between Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. During 2005 through 2007 the wastewater treatment facility underwent upgrades to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal. The effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River were assessed by comparing an upstream site to two sites located downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data, and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This evaluation is useful for understanding the potential effects of wastewater effluent on water quality, biological community structure, and ecosystem function. In addition, this information can be used to help achieve National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit requirements after additional studies are conducted. The effects of wastewater effluent on the water-quality conditions of the upper Blue River were most evident during below-normal and normal streamflows (about 75 percent of the time), when wastewater effluent contributed more than 20 percent to total streamflow. The largest difference in water-quality conditions between the upstream and downstream sites was in nutrient concentrations. Total and inorganic nutrient concentrations at the downstream sites during below-normal and normal streamflows were 4 to 15 times larger than at the upstream site, even after upgrades to the wastewater treatment facility were completed. However, total nitrogen concentrations decreased in wastewater effluent and at the downstream site following wastewater treatment facility upgrades. Similar decreases in total phosphorus were not observed, likely because the biological

  2. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  3. Specific schedule conditions for the formation of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. Option nuclear reactor-borne

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the specific dispositions relative to the nuclear reactor-borne domain, for the formation to the conventional and radiation risks prevention of personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities. The application domain, the applicable documents, the liability, the specificity of the nuclear reactor-borne and of the retraining, the Passerelle formation, are presented. (A.L.B.)

  4. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  5. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  6. Geohydrologic conditions at the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant and Waste-Management Facilities at the western New York Nuclear Service Center, Cattaraugus County, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, M.P.; Kappel, W.M.; Yager, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, a high-level radioactive liquid-waste tank complex, and related waste facilities occupy 100 hectares (ha) within the Western New York Nuclear Service Center near West Valley, NY. The facilities are underlain by glacial and postglacial deposits that fill an ancestral bedrock valley. The main plant facilities are on an elevated plateau referred to as the north plateau. Groundwater on the north plateau moves laterally within a surficial sand and gravel from the main plant building to areas northeast, east, and southeast of the facilities. The sand and gravel ranges from 1 to 10 m thick and has a hydraulic conductivity ranging from 0.1 to 7.9 m/day. Two separate burial grounds, a 4-ha area for low-level radioactive waste disposal and a 2.9-ha area for disposal of higher-level waste are excavated into a clay-rich till that ranges from 22 to 28 m thick. Migration of an organic solvent from the area of higher level waste at shallow depth in the till suggests that a shallow, fractured, oxidized, and weathered till is a significant pathway for lateral movement of groundwater. Below this zone, groundwater moves vertically downward through the till to recharge a lacustrine silt and fine sand. Within the saturated parts of the lacustrine unit, groundwater moves laterally to the northeast toward Buttermilk Creek. Hydraulic conductivity of the till, based on field and laboratory analyses, ranges from 0.000018 to 0.000086 m/day

  7. Validation of the RELAP5 code for the modeling of flashing-induced instabilities under natural-circulation conditions using experimental data from the CIRCUS test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozmenkov, Y. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (FZD), Institute of Safety Research, P.O.B. 510119, D-01324 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Rohde, U., E-mail: U.Rohde@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (FZD), Institute of Safety Research, P.O.B. 510119, D-01324 Dresden (Germany); Manera, A. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report about the simulation of flashing-induced instabilities in natural circulation systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flashing-induced instabilities are of relevance for operation of pool-type reactors of small power at low pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RELAP5 code is validated against measurement data from natural circulation experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnitude and frequency of the oscillations were reproduced in good agreement with the measurement data. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of the RELAP5 code for the simulation of flashing-induced instabilities in natural circulation systems. The RELAP 5 code is intended to be used for the simulation of transient processes in the Russian RUTA reactor concept operating at atmospheric pressure with forced convection of coolant. However, during transient processes, natural circulation with flashing-induced instabilities might occur. The RELAP5 code is validated against measurement data from natural circulation experiments performed within the framework of a European project (NACUSP) on the CIRCUS facility. The facility, built at the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands, is a water/steam 1:1 height-scaled loop of a typical natural-circulation-cooled BWR. It was shown that the RELAP5 code is able to model all relevant phenomena related to flashing induced instabilities. The magnitude and frequency of the oscillations were reproduced in a good agreement with the measurement data. The close correspondence to the experiments was reached by detailed modeling of all components of the CIRCUS facility including the heat exchanger, the buffer vessel and the steam dome at the top of the facility.

  8. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL's ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002

  9. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  10. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  11. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  12. Projected Salt Waste Production from a Commercial Pyroprocessing Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Simpson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel inevitably produces salt waste from electrorefining and/or oxide reduction unit operations. Various process design characteristics can affect the actual mass of such waste produced. This paper examines both oxide and metal fuel treatment, estimates the amount of salt waste generated, and assesses potential benefit of process options to mitigate the generation of salt waste. For reference purposes, a facility is considered in which 100 MT/year of fuel is processed. Salt waste estimates range from 8 to 20 MT/year from considering numerous scenarios. It appears that some benefit may be derived from advanced processes for separating fission products from molten salt waste, but the degree of improvement is limited. Waste form production is also considered but appears to be economically unfavorable. Direct disposal of salt into a salt basin type repository is found to be the most promising with respect to minimizing the impact of waste generation on the economic feasibility and sustainability of pyroprocessing.

  13. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  14. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  15. Survey report 1998. Survey on actual condition of science parks and similar facilities in Asian countries; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Asia shokoku chiiki ni okeru science park nado no jittai chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Implemented at NEDO, on such technical development issues peculiar to developing nations as are difficult to solve by their research and development ability alone, has been a consistent research cooperation with countries in question, such as installation of plants and research facilities, joint research operation, and training of researchers, while Japanese technological skill and research and development know how are utilized, as the international cooperation projects. In this survey, an actual condition was investigated including potential of science parks and similar facilities in Asian countries (Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and India), for the purpose of unearthing the needs, seeds, etc., of the future international research cooperation projects. The parks and facilities selected for the survey are as follows. The Thai technology/science parks are the Thai Science Park and four other parks; the Indonesian technology parks are Bukit Indah Industrial City and eleven other parks; the major Malaysian technology parks are Technology Park Malaysia and fourteen other parks; the major Indian technology parks are Electronics City and fifteen other parks. (NEDO)

  16. Facile Condensation of Aromatic Aldehydes with Chroman-4-ones and 1-Thiochroman-4-ones Catalysed by Amberlyst-15 under Microwave Irradiation Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas K. Mandal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Different aromatic aldehydes and cinnamaldehyde undergo cross-aldol condensation with chroman-4-ones and1-thiochroman-4-ones in the presence of amberlyst-15 under microwave irradiation in solvent free condition to afford rapidly the corresponding E-3-arylidene and E-3-cinnamylidene derivatives, respectively, in high yield. This process is simple, efficient and environmentally benign.

  17. The Maintenance of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Systems and Indoor Air Quality in Schools: A Guide for School Facility Managers. Technical Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    To help maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, guidance for the development and implementation of an effective program for maintenance and operation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are discussed. Frequently, a building's occupants will complain about IAQ when the temperature or humidity are at uncomfortable…

  18. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile (“low-foot” and “high-foot” regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  19. Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

  20. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  1. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  2. Equipment for the conditioning of core components in the fuel element storage pool with particular respect to the design required by the conditions for nuclear facilities in operation and the surveillance in accordance with atomic rules and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumpe, J.; Schwiertz, V.; Geiser, C.; Prucker, E.

    2001-01-01

    In nuclear power plants worn out and activated parts from the reactor core (core components) which are placed into the fuel element storage pool arise on a regular basis during the technical maintenance and the review. The disposal of these core components due to radiation protection aspects is only feasible within the fuel element storage pool during the operation of the NPP using techniques of the under water conditioning. Therefore, special GNS equipment is used for the conditioning, using under water conditioning equipment, such as UWS, BZ, and ZVA, a number of lifting and auxiliary equipment for mounting and dismantling purposes and the handling of the core components and the waste casks within the fuel element storage pool. These components must meet particular safety requirements with regard to their integrity and reliability. They are designed according to the requirements on nuclear components (KTA). The manipulating equipment must be partly redundant and the protection goals for nuclear accidents must be met. The Bavarian Ministry for Development and Environment tasked the TUeV Sueddeutschland with the surveillance and control. The conditioning equipment of GNS is therefore designed in co-ordination with the examiner of the Governmental Regulating Agency, in particular respect to all safety aspects. Furthermore the examiners perform reviews of the construction and the documentation during the design and construction phase. (orig.)

  3. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Risk Analysis of Flare Flame-out Condition in a Gas Process Facility Analyse des risques des conditions d’extinction de torche au sein d’une installation de traitement de gaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadakbar O.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaring is a common method of disposal of flammable waste gases in the downstream industries. Flare flame out (flame lift-off or blow-outs often occurs causing toxic vapors to discharge. The toxic gases released may have hazardous effects on the surrounding environment. To study the effect of inhalation exposure of these toxic gases on human health, the four steps of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency framework with the field data to quantify the cancer and non-cancer health risks are integrated in this paper. As a part of exposure assessment, gas dispersion modeling using AERMOD and UDM-PHAST is applied in two different conditions of normal flaring and flare flame out during a particular climate condition in Khangiran region. Recommendations to avoid flare flame out conditions are also presented here. Le torchage est un procédé courant d’élimination des gaz résiduaires inflammables dans les industries de traitement. L’extinction de la torche (par décollage ou soufflage de flamme provoque souvent une émission de vapeurs toxiques. Ces gaz toxiques libérés peuvent présenter des effets dangereux sur le milieu environnant. Pour étudier l’effet d’une exposition par inhalation de ces gaz toxiques sur la santé, cet article croise les quatre étapes de la démarche de l’EPA (Environmental Protection Agency, Agence de protection de l’environnement avec les données d’exploitation afin de quantifier le risque sanitaire cancérologique et non cancérologique. Dans le cadre de l’estimation d’exposition, une modélisation de dispersion des gaz utilisant AERMOD et UDM-PHAST est évaluée dans deux configurations différentes de torchage normal et d’extinction de torche à l’occasion de conditions climatiques particulières dans la région du Khangiran. L’article propose également des recommandations destinées à éviter les conditions d’une extinction de flamme de torche.

  5. Treatment of waste salt from the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (I): characterization of Zeolite A in Molten LiCl Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2004-01-01

    The oxide fuel reduction process based on the electrochemical method (Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process; ACP) and the long-lived radioactive nuclides partitioning process based on electro-refining process, which are being developed ay the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), are to generate two types of molten salt wastes such as LiCl salt and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, respectively. These waste salts must meet some criteria for disposal. A conditioning process for LiCl salt waste from ACP has been developed using zeolite A. This treatment process of waste salt using zeolite A was first developed by US ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste from an electro-refining process of EBR (Experimental Breeder Reactor)-II spent fuel. This process has been developed recently, and a ceramic waste form (CWF) is produced in demonstration-scale V-mixer (50 kg/batch). However, ANL process is different from KAERI treatment process in waste salt, the former is LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the latter is LiCl salt. Because of melting point, the immobilization of eutectic salt is carried out at about 770 K, whereas LiCl salt at around 920 K. Such difference has an effect on properties of immobilization media, zeolite A. Here, zeolite A in high-temperature (923 K) molten LiCl salt was characterized by XRD, Ion-exchange, etc., and evaluated if a promising media or not

  6. Aqueous hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorophenol over an Rh/reduced graphene oxide synthesized by a facile one-pot solvothermal process under mild conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Yanlin; Fan, Guangyin; Wang, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The Rh nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Rh NPs/RGO) nanocatalyst synthesized by a solvothermal technique showed high activity and stability for the hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorophenol under mild conditions. - Highlights: • Rh/RGO was synthesized through a one-pot polyol reduction of GO and RhCl 3 . • Complete HDC of 4-chlorophenol was obtained in aqueous phase without any additive. • The Rh/RGO exhibited an excellent catalytic performance for HDC reaction. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) supported rhodium nanoparticles (Rh-NPs/RGO) was synthesized through one-pot polyol co-reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and rhodium chloride. The catalytic property of Rh-NPs/RGO was investigated for the aqueous phase hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). A complete conversion of 4-CP into high valued products of cyclohexanone (selectivity: 23.2%) and cyclohexanol (selectivity: 76.8%) was successfully achieved at 303 K and balloon hydrogen pressure in a short reaction time of 50 min when 1.5 g/L of 4-CP was introduced. By comparing with Rh-NPs deposited on the other supports, Rh-NPs/RGO delivered the highest initial rate (111.4 mmol/g Rh min) for 4-CP HDC reaction under the identical conditions. The substantial catalytic activity of Rh-NPs/RGO can be ascribed to the small and uniform particle size of Rh (average particle size was 1.7 ± 0.14 nm) on the surface of the RGO sheets and an electron-deficient state of Rh in the catalyst as a result of the strong interaction between the active sites and the surface function groups of RGO

  7. UO3 plant turnover - facility description document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document was developed to provide a facility description for those portions of the UO 3 Facility being transferred to Bechtel Hanford Company, Inc. (BHI) following completion of facility deactivation. The facility and deactivated state condition description is intended only to serve as an overview of the plant as it is being transferred to BHI

  8. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  9. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  10. Depreciation cost for the capital investment of a pyroprocess facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The pyroprocess produces U/TRU metal ingots using four important processes, pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning, in order to recycle spent fuel. KAPF+'s capacity is shown the cost that is injected into the KAPF+. The pyroprocess unit cost is data that are essential for inputting to calculate the pyroprocess-Sodiumcooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear fuel cycle cost. Moreover, since the pyroprocess facility's depreciation cost is included in the manufacturing indirect cost of the pyroprocess cost, it can become an important element for judging the pyroprocess' economic viability. Since the pyroprocess unit cost calculates the sum of the costs that are incurred each year by dividing with the total amount of U/TRU ingot produced, the pyroprocess unit cost uncertainty increases as well when the uncertainty of the costs incurred by each year increases. KAPF+, which is a commercialization facility, was set as the cost object, and the existing methods (straightline method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method) used today and the depreciation cost of the ADDM were subjected to a comparative analysis. The results are as follows. First, in case of the straight-line method that calculated the durable period as 40 years, and in case of ADDM that factored in a 5% deceleration rate, the difference in the depreciation costs of $65.26/kgHM and $119.05/kgHM resulted during the first and last years, respectively. Accordingly, it was analyzed that there is a significant difference in terms of the cost of the capital investment every year depending on the depreciation method. Secondly, since the depreciation cost is a component of the manufacturing indirect cost, it is necessary to maintain a trend that is similar to that of the direct labor cost in addition to the direct material cost.

  11. Depreciation cost for the capital investment of a pyroprocess facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, W. I.

    2015-01-01

    The pyroprocess produces U/TRU metal ingots using four important processes, pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning, in order to recycle spent fuel. KAPF+'s capacity is shown the cost that is injected into the KAPF+. The pyroprocess unit cost is data that are essential for inputting to calculate the pyroprocess-Sodiumcooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear fuel cycle cost. Moreover, since the pyroprocess facility's depreciation cost is included in the manufacturing indirect cost of the pyroprocess cost, it can become an important element for judging the pyroprocess' economic viability. Since the pyroprocess unit cost calculates the sum of the costs that are incurred each year by dividing with the total amount of U/TRU ingot produced, the pyroprocess unit cost uncertainty increases as well when the uncertainty of the costs incurred by each year increases. KAPF+, which is a commercialization facility, was set as the cost object, and the existing methods (straightline method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method) used today and the depreciation cost of the ADDM were subjected to a comparative analysis. The results are as follows. First, in case of the straight-line method that calculated the durable period as 40 years, and in case of ADDM that factored in a 5% deceleration rate, the difference in the depreciation costs of $65.26/kgHM and $119.05/kgHM resulted during the first and last years, respectively. Accordingly, it was analyzed that there is a significant difference in terms of the cost of the capital investment every year depending on the depreciation method. Secondly, since the depreciation cost is a component of the manufacturing indirect cost, it is necessary to maintain a trend that is similar to that of the direct labor cost in addition to the direct material cost

  12. Behavior of a VVER fuel element tested under severe accident conditions in the CORA facility. Test results of experiment CORA-W1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-01-01

    Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material. As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the test were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zirconium/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundle to a maximum temperature of approximately 1900 C. With the movement of the melt also heat is transported to the lower region. Below 300 mm elevation the test bundle remained intact due to the axial temeprature distribution. W2 ist characterized by a strong oxidation above 300 mm elevation. Besides the severe oxidation the test bundle resulted in considerable fuel dissolution by ZrNb1/UO 2 interaction in the upper part, complete spacer destruction at 600 mm due to chemical interactions between steel and the ZSrNb1 cladding. Despite some specific features the material behavior of the VVER-1000 bundle is comparable to that observed in the PWR and BWR test using fuel elements typical for Western countries. (orig./HP) [de

  13. The Impact of Biofilms upon Surfaces Relevant to an Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Geological Disposal Facility under Simulated Near-Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Charles

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of biofilms to form on a range of materials (cementious backfill (Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB, graphite, and stainless steel relevant to potential UK intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW disposal concepts was investigated by exposing these surfaces to alkaliphilic flocs generated by mature biofilm communities. Flocs are aggregates of biofilm material that are able to act as a transport vector for the propagation of biofilms. In systems where biofilm formation was observed there was also a decrease in the sorption of isosaccharinic acids to the NRVB. The biofilms were composed of cells, extracellular DNA (eDNA, proteins, and lipids with a smaller polysaccharide fraction, which was biased towards mannopyranosyl linked carbohydrates. The same trend was seen with the graphite and stainless steel surfaces at these pH values, but in this case the biofilms associated with the stainless steel surfaces had a distinct eDNA basal layer that anchored the biofilm to the surface. At pH 13, no structured biofilm was observed, rather all the surfaces accumulated an indistinct organic layer composed of biofilm materials. This was particularly the case for the stainless steel coupons which accumulated relatively large quantities of eDNA. The results demonstrate that there is the potential for biofilm formation in an ILW-GDF provided an initiation source for the microbial biofilm is present. They also suggest that even when conditions are too harsh for biofilm formation, exposed surfaces may accumulate organic material such as eDNA.

  14. Applied Horizontal and Vertical Geothermal Heat Exchanger with Heat Pump System to Provide Air Conditioning for an Academic Facility in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alcantar Martínez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available At present in Mexico, the renewable energy has become more important due to the great dependence of the country for fossil fuels. Within the several applications of renewable energy, there are the geothermal applications for the air conditioning of spaces. This technology employs heat pumps that interexchange heat with the ground. This technology is relatively young in Mexico, leaving a large field for study and application throughout the country. In this way, to calculate the correct sizing of geothermal heat exchangers, it is necessary to calculate the thermal loads of the complex in which this technology of geothermal heat pumps using vertical heat exchangers type U will be installed, to perform the calculation of thermal loads Autodesk Revit® software was used, with which was possible to make a virtual model in detail of the botanical center that is located in Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico and belongs to the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo (UMNSH. This study shows the results of the analysis of the installations and determination of the thermal loads of the complex due to this type of infrastructure. By obtaining the values of the thermal loads, the dimensioning of the heat exchanger was archived, which will have to be installed to cover the thermal requirement of this system and his installation, in addition to the selection of the heat pump. This complex of 2 levels, where, on the first floor there are cubicles and laboratories and on the second floor, several common areas. The design was developed in detail in Autodesk Revit 2015. After obtaining the thermal loads, the GLHEPro software was used for dimensioning the Vertical heat exchangers with the number and depth of the exchangers was obtained. the GLD 2014 software was used for dimensioning the Horizontal heat exchangers with the number and depth of the exchangers was obtained.

  15. Studies and testing in water and steam of valves and fittings, and nuclear components. The result of 25 years of testing using a comprehensive range of test facilities under service conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berail, J.F.; Bruneau, S.; Crouzet, D.; Haas, J.L.; Zbinden, M.

    1998-05-01

    Electricite de France operates 58 PWR nuclear power stations, for which the behaviour of valves and fittings is of major importance for safety, for the availability of the plants, and for maintenance costs. Since the early 70's, EDF has developed a comprehensive range of facilities to test valves and fittings in PWR service and accident conditions. It has carried out studies, tests, development work, experimental and numerical research in collaboration with external organisations and manufacturers, to improve the technologies of these equipment as well as maintenance tools and methods. In the present paper, the authors quantify the importance of valves and fittings studies for EDF, which has led to the drawing up of a catalogue of approved equipment. They describe the principle test facilities, and the structure of the EDF 'valves and fittings tests results' data base. They show the importance of twenty-five years of testing experience for both the evolution of equipment and for the increase in French nuclear plants availability. (author)

  16. Improved Emission Spectrographic Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, C.R.; Lethco, A.J.; Hosken, G.B.; Geckeler, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    The Savannah River Plant's original Emission Spectrographic Laboratory for radioactive samples had been in operation for 25 years. Due to the deteriorated condition and the fire hazard posed by the wooden glove box trains, a project to update the facility was funded. The new laboratory improved efficiency of operation and incorporated numerous safety and contamination control features

  17. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  18. PRTR/309 building nuclear facility preliminary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The hazard classification of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR)/309 building as a ''Radiological Facility'' and the office portions as ''Other Industrial Facility'' are documented by this report. This report provides: a synopsis of the history and facility it's uses; describes major area of the facility; and assesses the radiological conditions for the facility segments. The assessment is conducted using the hazard category threshold values, segmentation methodology, and graded approach guidance of DOE-STD-1027-92

  19. Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each…

  20. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  1. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  2. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, M.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of one environmental monitoring program for nuclear facilities, are presented. The program in Federal Republic of Germany, its goals, its basic conditions, its regulations, and its dose limits are emphasized. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    The 'Severe Fuel Damage' (SFD) experiments of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Federal Republic of Germany, were carried out in the out-of-pile facility 'CORA' as part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on the failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 C to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992 a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented 'Western-type' fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1 [de

  4. Hanford Surplus Facilities Program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.C.; Wahlen, R.K.; Winship, R.A.

    1989-09-01

    The Hanford Surplus Facilities Program is responsible for the safe and cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities at the Hanford Site. The management of these facilities requires a surveillance and maintenance program to keep them in a safe condition and development of a plan for ultimate disposition. Criteria used to evaluate each factor relative to decommissioning are based on the guidelines presented by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, Defense Facilities Decommissioning Program Office, and are consistent with the Westinghouse Hanford Company commitment to decommission the Hanford Site retired facilities in the safest and most cost-effective way achievable. This document outlines the plan for managing these facilities to the end of disposition

  5. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  6. Instrumentation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides instrumentation support for flight tests of prototype weapons systems using a vast array of airborne sensors, transducers, signal conditioning and encoding...

  7. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  8. Strategic facility planning improves capital decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, J R

    2001-03-01

    A large, Midwestern IDS undertook a strategic facility-planning process to evaluate its facility portfolio and determine how best to allocate future investments in facility development. The IDS assembled a facility-planning team, which initiated the planning process with a market analysis to determine future market demands and identify service areas that warranted facility expansion. The team then analyzed each of the IDS's facilities from the perspective of uniform capacity measurements, highest and best use compared with needs, building condition and investment-worthiness, and facility growth and site development opportunities. Based on results of the analysis, the strategy adopted entailed, in part, shifting some space from inpatient care to ambulatory care services and demolishing and replacing the 11 percent of facilities deemed to be in the worst condition.

  9. Conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for permanent disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    A compact, efficient method for conditioning spent nuclear fuel is under development This method, known as pyrochemical processing, or open-quotes pyroprocessing,close quotes provides a separation of fission products from the actinide elements present in spent fuel and further separates pure uranium from the transuranic elements. The process can facilitate the timely and environmentally-sound treatment of the highly diverse collection of spent fuel currently in the inventory of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The pyroprocess utilizes elevated-temperature processes to prepare spent fuel for fission product separation; that separation is accomplished by a molten salt electrorefining step that provides efficient (99.9%) separation of transuranics. The resultant waste forms from the pyroprocess are stable under envisioned repository environment conditions and highly leach-resistant. Treatment of any spent fuel type produces a set of common high-level waste forms, one a mineral and the other a metal alloy, that can be readily qualified for repository disposal and preclude the substantial costs that would be associated with the qualification of the numerous spent fuel types included in the DOE inventory

  10. Conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for permanent disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    A compact, efficient method for conditioning spent nuclear fuel is under development. This method, known as pyrochemical processing, or pyroprocessing, provides a separation of fission products from the actinide elements present in spent fuel and further separates pure uranium from the transuranic elements. The process can facilitate the timely and environmentally-sound treatment of the highly diverse collection of spent fuel currently in the inventory of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The pyroprocess utilizes elevated-temperature processes to prepare spent fuel for fission product separation; that separation is accomplished by a molten salt electrorefining step that provides efficient (> 99.9%) separation of transuranics. The resultant waste forms from the pyroprocess are stable under envisioned repository environment conditions and highly leach-resistant. Treatment of any spent fuel type produces a set of common high-level waste forms, one a mineral and the other a metal alloy, that can be readily qualified for repository disposal and that avoid the substantial costs that would be associated with the qualification of the numerous spent fuel types included in the DOE inventory

  11. PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    This test report documents the results obtained while conducting operational testing of the sampling equipment in the 225-WC building, the PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility. The Wastewater Sampling Facility houses equipment to sample and monitor the PFP's liquid effluents before discharging the stream to the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The majority of the streams are not radioactive and discharges from the PFP Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC). The streams that might be contaminated are processed through the Low Level Waste Treatment Facility (LLWTF) before discharging to TEDF. The sampling equipment consists of two flow-proportional composite samplers, an ultrasonic flowmeter, pH and conductivity monitors, chart recorder, and associated relays and current isolators to interconnect the equipment to allow proper operation. Data signals from the monitors are received in the 234-5Z Shift Office which contains a chart recorder and alarm annunciator panel. The data signals are also duplicated and sent to the TEDF control room through the Local Control Unit (LCU). Performing the OTP has verified the operability of the PFP wastewater sampling system. This Operability Test Report documents the acceptance of the sampling system for use

  12. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  13. Regulatory inspection of BARC facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajdeep; Jayarajan, K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear and radiation facilities are sited, constructed, commissioned, operated and decommissioned, in conformity with the current safety standards and codes. Regulatory bodies follow different means to ensure compliance of the standards for the safety of the personnel, the public and the environment. Regulatory Inspection (RI) is one of the important measures employed by regulatory bodies to obtain the safety status of a facility or project and to verify the fulfilment of the conditions stipulated in the consent

  14. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  15. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  16. Filters in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, K.H.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The topics of the nine papers given include the behavior of HEPA filters during exposure to air flows of high humidity as well as of high differential pressure, the development of steel-fiber filters suitable for extreme operating conditions, and the occurrence of various radioactive iodine species in the exhaust air from boiling water reactors. In an introductory presentation the German view of the performance requirements to be met by filters in nuclear facilities as well as the present status of filter quality assurance are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  18. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Facilities Research Facilities NREL's state-of-the-art wind research facilities at the Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being tested. Structural Research Facilities A photo of two people silhouetted against a computer simulation of

  19. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  20. Identifying and Funding the Greatest Needs in School Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrell, Bob; Salamone, Frank

    2012-01-01

    How should public school facilities programs allocate limited resources to school facilities needs fairly, cost-effectively, and efficiently while taking into account facility condition, educational adequacy, and other priorities? New Mexico has developed a solution that overcomes key challenges that are common to school facilities programs across…

  1. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  2. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  3. Characterization of the 309 fuel examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This document identifies radiological, chemical and physical conditions inside the Fuel Examination Facility. It is located inside the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment structure (309 Building.) The facility was a hot cell used for examination of PRTR fuel and equipment during the 1960's. Located inside the cell is a PRTR shim rod assembly, reported are radiological conditions of the sample. The conditions were assessed as part of overall 309 Building transition

  4. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  5. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  6. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  7. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  8. Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.; Grady, L.M.; Bennett, H.A.; Sasser, D.W.; Engi, D.

    1978-08-01

    An automated approach to facility safeguards effectiveness evaluation has been developed. This automated process, called Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), consists of a collection of a continuous stream of operational modules for facility characterization, the selection of critical paths, and the evaluation of safeguards effectiveness along these paths. The technique has been implemented on an interactive computer time-sharing system and makes use of computer graphics for the processing and presentation of information. Using this technique, a comprehensive evaluation of a safeguards system can be provided by systematically varying the parameters that characterize the physical protection components of a facility to reflect the perceived adversary attributes and strategy, environmental conditions, and site operational conditions. The SAFE procedure has broad applications in the nuclear facility safeguards field as well as in the security field in general. Any fixed facility containing valuable materials or components to be protected from theft or sabotage could be analyzed using this same automated evaluation technique

  9. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  10. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric Loros

    2001-01-01

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation

  11. Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility Interim Operational Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management of administrative controls to ensure safe operation of the facility

  12. Evaluation of six papers from France, F.R. Germany, Italy, Japan, UK, USA, on the need for new safety testing facilities to study fuel-failure under loss-of-flow and transient overpower conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicognani, C.; Justin, F.; Jakeman, D.; Hannum, W.H.; Kawaguchi, O.; Kessler, G.

    1975-01-01

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors invited six countries (France, FRG, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, USA) to express their views on the importance of fast reactor safety experiments and asked them to give an assessment of the current and future needs of additional safety testing facilities. This papers includes the results of an evaluation of the different views and statements as well as conclusions listed for comparison

  13. Evaluation of six papers from France, F.R. Germany, Italy, Japan, UK, USA, on the need for new safety testing facilities to study fuel-failure under loss-of-flow and transient overpower conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicognani, C; Justin, F; Jakeman, D; Hannum, W H; Kawaguchi, O; Kessler, G

    1975-08-01

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors invited six countries (France, FRG, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, USA) to express their views on the importance of fast reactor safety experiments and asked them to give an assessment of the current and future needs of additional safety testing facilities. This papers includes the results of an evaluation of the different views and statements as well as conclusions listed for comparison.

  14. Deregulation in the field of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Legal frame conditions and regulations in the field of nuclear engineering; Deregulierung bei der Stillegung und Beseitigung nuklearer Anlagen; Rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen und kerntechnisches Regelwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, A [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Vorstandsbereich 2 - Neue Technologien und Grundlagenforschung; Baumgaertel, G [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Koordinationsstelle Genehmigungsverfahren (KGV)

    1994-05-01

    The report comprises two articles covering current topics of the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. In the first article written by Kurz, the legal standards are listed together with conclusions and proposals regarding their implementation for the further development of this field of law. The article by Baumgaertel is aimed at evaluating the regulations governing nuclear technology as regards their applicability to the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. These articles shall contribute to the discussions taking place in this field at the moment. As a result, an appropriate and project-specific application of the legal provisions and not legally binding (technical) regulations in the field of nuclear technology (deregulation) in the licensing procedures required for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities is requested by the authors. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Bericht enthaelt zwei Ausarbeitungen zu aktuellen Themenstellungen der Stillegung und Beseitigung nuklearer Anlagen. Der Bericht von Kurz beinhaltet eine thesenartige Auflistung der normativen Voraussetzungen mit Schlussfolgerungen und Umsetzungsvorschlaegen zur Weiterentwicklung dieses Rechtsgebietes; die Ausarbeitung von Baumgaertel beinhaltet eine wertende Durchsicht des kerntechnischen Regelwerkes im Hinblick auf die Anwendbarkeit bei der Stillegung und Beseitigung nuklearer Anlagen. Die Ausarbeitungen dienen als Beitrag zur aktuellen Diskussion in diesem Themenfeld. Im Ergebnis fordern die Autoren die angemessene, vorhabensspezifische Anwendung der rechtlichen Voraussetzungen des kerntechnischen Regelwerkes (Deregulierung) in den zur Stillegung und Beseitigung nuklearer Anlagen erforderlichen Genehmigungsverfahren. (orig.)

  15. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  16. Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel

  17. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  18. DKIST facility management system integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles R.; Phelps, LeEllen

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Observatory is under construction at Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i. When complete, the DKIST will be the largest solar telescope in the world. The Facility Management System (FMS) is a subsystem of the high-level Facility Control System (FCS) and directly controls the Facility Thermal System (FTS). The FMS receives operational mode information from the FCS while making process data available to the FCS and includes hardware and software to integrate and control all aspects of the FTS including the Carousel Cooling System, the Telescope Chamber Environmental Control Systems, and the Temperature Monitoring System. In addition it will integrate the Power Energy Management System and several service systems such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), the Domestic Water Distribution System, and the Vacuum System. All of these subsystems must operate in coordination to provide the best possible observing conditions and overall building management. Further, the FMS must actively react to varying weather conditions and observational requirements. The physical impact of the facility must not interfere with neighboring installations while operating in a very environmentally and culturally sensitive area. The FMS system will be comprised of five Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs). We present a pre-build overview of the functional plan to integrate all of the FMS subsystems.

  19. Tritium Systems Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cafasso, F.A.; Maroni, V.A.; Smith, W.H.; Wilkes, W.R.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This TSTF proposal has two principal objectives. The first objective is to provide by mid-FY 1981 a demonstration of the fuel cycle and tritium containment systems which could be used in a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor for operation in the mid-1980's. The second objective is to provide a capability for further optimization of tritium fuel cycle and environmental control systems beyond that which is required for the EPR. The scale and flow rates in TSTF are close to those which have been projected for a prototype experimental power reactor (PEPR/ITR) and will permit reliable extrapolation to the conditions found in an EPR. The fuel concentrations will be the same as in an EPR. Demonstrations of individual components of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and of monitoring, accountability and containment systems and of a maintenance methodology will be achieved at various times in the FY 1979-80 time span. Subsequent to the individual component demonstrations--which will proceed from tests with hydrogen (and/or deuterium) through tracer levels of tritium to full operational concentrations--a complete test and demonstration of the integrated fuel processing and tritium containment facility will be performed. This will occur near the middle of FY 1981. Two options were considered for the TSTF: (1) The modification of an existing building and (2) the construction of a new facility

  20. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brummond, W.; Celeste, J.; Steenhoven, J.

    1993-08-01

    The DOE has developed a National Mixed Waste Strategic Plan which calls for the construction of 2 to 9 mixed waste treatment centers in the Complex in the near future. LLNL is working to establish an integrated mixed waste technology development and demonstration system facility, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), to support the DOE National Mixed Waste Strategic Plan. The MWMF will develop, demonstrate, test, and evaluate incinerator-alternatives which will comply with regulations governing the treatment and disposal of organic mixed wastes. LLNL will provide the DOE with engineering data for design and operation of new technologies which can be implemented in their mixed waste treatment centers. MWMF will operate under real production plant conditions and process samples of real LLNL mixed waste. In addition to the destruction of organic mixed wastes, the development and demonstration will include waste feed preparation, material transport systems, aqueous treatment, off-gas treatment, and final forms, thus making it an integrated ''cradle to grave'' demonstration. Technologies from offsite as well as LLNL's will be tested and evaluated when they are ready for a pilot scale demonstration, according to the needs of the DOE

  2. The Torbay fog facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    A series of lighting sources are needed to help helicopters in their approaches to offshore oil platforms. The Torbay fog facility in Newfoundland was created in May 1998 and has been instrumental in studying different light sources. The facility has been used for fog characterization studies to determine the transmission of various light sources through fog up to a distance of 980 meters and correlating this with fog droplet size and concentration. The most cost effective method of increasing visibility is through high intensity searchlights. In this study, a 150 watt searchlight was set up on the south side of Torbay Bay and fog droplet size and concentration were measured. The main objective of the study was to characterize fog and precipitation (rain and snow) to enable daylight approaches to be made to the Hibernia platform in low visibility conditions. Different methods of measuring visibility were investigated to define a suitable sensor/detector which, when installed on the Hibernia platform, will allow a prediction of visibility to be made for flight operational purposes. 2 figs

  3. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  4. 9 CFR 3.126 - Facilities, indoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., vents, fans, or air-conditioning and shall be ventilated so as to minimize drafts, odors, and moisture condensation. (c) Lighting. Indoor housing facilities shall have ample lighting, by natural or artificial means...

  5. Facility Process Conditional Suspension in Domestic Violence Cases Against Women From The Change of Maria Da Penha Law : Why an Alternative Less Rigorous Based Reconciliation to face this evil

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Haydée Porto de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the conditional studies the conditional suspension of the penal process. This institute consist in the suspension of the procedural course by judicial decision for a certain period, provided accused, with the agreement of his defender, accept to fulfil some conditions, due to proposal from the public prosecutor if there are requirements established in the law and after finished the probation period, the process is archived. It shows that Brazilian Court Supreme forbidden ap...

  6. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  7. Bidding strategy for an energy storage facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Zareipour, Hamidreza; Rosehart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    to maximize its profit, while the market operator aims at maximizing the social welfare. In this case, the storage facility adapts its strategic behavior to take advantage of market conditions. To model the imperfectly competitive market, a bi-level optimization model is implemented to present......This paper studies operation decisions of energy storage facilities in perfectly and imperfectly competitive markets. In a perfectly competitive market, the storage facility is operated to maximize the social welfare. However, in a imperfectly competitive market, the storage facility operates...

  8. An Evaluation of Facility Maintenance and Repair Strategies of Select Companies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharp, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    ...) with the benefits derived from those facilities. This thesis documents how a selection of companies implemented that balance by determining their facilities requirements based on their chosen facility condition level and how they then allocated funds...

  9. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  10. Analysis of conditions to safety and radiological protection of Brazilian research particle accelerators facilities; Analise das condicoes de protecao e seguranca radiologicas das instalacoes com aceleradores de particulas na area de pesquisa no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, Manuel Jacinto Martins

    2010-07-01

    Eleven institutions of education and research in Brazil use particle accelerators, which fulfill different functions and activities. Currently, these institutions employ a total of fifteen accelerators. In this paper, the object of study is the radiological protection of occupationally exposed individuals, the general public and the radiation safety of particle accelerators. Research facilities with accelerators are classified in categories I and II according to the International Atomic Energy Agency or groups IX and X in accordance with the Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy. Of the 15 accelerators in use for research in Brazil, four belong to category I or group X and eleven belong to category II or group IX. The methodology presented and developed in this work was made through the inspection and assessment of safety and radiological protection of thirteen particle accelerators facilities, and its main purpose was to promote safer use of this practice by following established guidelines for safety and radiological protection. The results presented in this work showed the need to create a program, in our country, for the control of safety and radiological protection of this ionizing radiation practice. (author)

  11. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively

  12. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  13. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  14. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  15. Rocketball Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test facility offers the capability to emulate and measure guided missile radar cross-section without requiring flight tests of tactical missiles. This facility...

  16. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  17. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  18. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  19. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  20. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  1. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  2. Neighbourhood facilities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper these are referred to as ‘Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability’. Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability (NFS) are initiatives undertaken by individuals and communities to build local sustainable systems which not only improve...

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  4. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  5. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  6. Facility design: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of shielded chemical processing facilities for handling plutonium is discussed. The TRU facility is considered in particular; its features for minimizing the escape of process materials are listed. 20 figures

  7. Facility Process Conditional Suspension in Domestic Violence Cases Against Women From The Change of Maria Da Penha Law : Why an Alternative Less Rigorous Based Reconciliation to face this evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Haydée Porto de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the conditional studies the conditional suspension of the penal process. This institute consist in the suspension of the procedural course by judicial decision for a certain period, provided accused, with the agreement of his defender, accept to fulfil some conditions, due to proposal from the public prosecutor if there are requirements established in the law and after finished the probation period, the process is archived. It shows that Brazilian Court Supreme forbidden application of this institute to domestic violence against the woman cases in 2012. However, it defends that is important create a law establishing that is possible apply the conditional suspension of the process to this cases as an option to the formal punishment, when the victim is living with the accused or she is her friend, with the monitoring of the aggressor for considerable period, when his reeducation will be observed.

  8. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  9. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility is a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous chemicals. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releases, the Spill Test Facility (STF) can also accommodate hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The STF is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site near Mercury, Nevada, USA. Utilization of the Spill Test Facility provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. The Spill Test Facility is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids including wind tunnel testing under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on prevention, mitigation, clean-up, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous gaseous liquids. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, mitigation, and clean-up. Since 1986, the Spill Test Facility has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion, mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under US P.L 99-499, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and other regulations. The Spill Test Facility Program is managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy (FE) with the support and assistance of other divisions of US DOE and the US Government. DOE/FE serves as facilitator and business manager for the Spill Test Facility and site. This brief document is designed to acquaint a potential user of the Spill Test Facility with an outline of the procedures and policies associated with the use of the facility

  10. Facility or Facilities? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viso, M.

    2018-04-01

    The management of the martian samples upon arrival on the Earth will require a lot of work to ensure a safe life detection and biohazard testing during the quarantine. This will induce a sharing of the load between several facilities.

  11. Office of Science User Facilities Summary Report, Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science provides the Nation’s researchers with worldclass scientific user facilities to propel the U.S. to the forefront of science and innovation. A user facility is a federally sponsored research facility available for external use to advance scientific or technical knowledge under the following conditions: open, accessible, free, collaborative, competitive, and unique.

  12. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  13. Facility transition instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford, Inc. facility transition instruction was initiated in response to the need for a common, streamlined process for facility transitions and to capture the knowledge and experience that has accumulated over the last few years. The instruction serves as an educational resource and defines the process for transitioning facilities to long-term surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Generally, these facilities do not have identified operations missions and must be transitioned from operational status to a safe and stable configuration for long-term S and M. The instruction can be applied to a wide range of facilities--from process canyon complexes like the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility or B Plant, to stand-alone, lower hazard facilities like the 242B/BL facility. The facility transition process is implemented (under the direction of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office [RL] Assistant Manager-Environmental) by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. management, with input and interaction with the appropriate RL division and Hanford site contractors as noted in the instruction. The application of the steps identified herein and the early participation of all organizations involved are expected to provide a cost-effective, safe, and smooth transition from operational status to deactivation and S and M for a wide range of Hanford Site facilities

  14. NWFSC OA facility water chemistry - Ocean acidification species exposure experimental facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We have developed a unique facility for conducting high-quality experiments on marine organisms in seawater with controlled carbon chemistry conditions. The...

  15. Manual for operation of the multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Schuetz, H.; Pietruske, H.; Lenk, S.

    2004-07-01

    The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR) e. V. is constructing a new large-scale test facility, TOPFLOW, for thermalhydraulic single effect tests. The acronym stands for transient two phase flow test facility. It will mainly be used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The manual of the test facility must always be available for the staff in the control room and is restricted condition during operation of personnel and also reconstruction of the facility. (orig./GL)

  16. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  17. Study on HVAC system in nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeg, S. Y.; Song, W. S.; Oh, Y. O.; Ju, Y. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2003-01-01

    Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system in nuclear facility should be equipped and constructed more stable and allowable than that in common facility. The purpose of HVAC system is the maintenance of optimum working environment, the protection of worker against a contaminated air and the prevention of atmospheric contamination due to an outward ventilation, etc.. The basic scheme of a safety operation of nuclear facility is to prevent the atmospheric contamination even in low level. The adaptability of HVAC system which is in operation. In this study, the design requirements of HVAC system in nuclear facility and the HVAC systems in foreign countries are reviewed, and the results can be utilized in the design of HVAC system in nuclear facility

  18. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.J.; Sontag, S.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plant is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The UO 3 Plant is located in the south-central portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The plant consists of two primary processing buildings and several ancillary facilities. The purpose of the UO 3 Plant is to receive uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, concentrate it, convert the UNH to uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) powder by calcination and package it for offsite shipment. The UO 3 Plant has been placed in a standby mode. There are two liquid discharges, and three gaseous exhaust stacks, and seven building exhausters that are active during standby conditions

  19. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  20. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  1. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  2. Facility of aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G; Regnier, J

    1975-04-18

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator).

  3. Oxygen injection facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masamoto; Hirose, Yuki

    1998-01-01

    A compressor introduces air as a starting material and sends it to a dust removing device, a dehumidifying device and an adsorption/separation system disposed downstream. The facility of the present invention is disposed in the vicinity of an injection point and installed in a turbine building of a BWR type reactor having a pipeline of a feedwater system to be injected. The adsorbing/separation system comprises an adsorbing vessel and an automatic valve, and the adsorbing vessel is filled with an adsorbent for selectively adsorbing nitrogen. Zeolite is used as the adsorbent. Nitrogen in the air passing through the adsorbing vessel is adsorbed and removed under a pressurized condition, and a highly concentrated oxygen gas is formed. The direction of the steam of the adsorbed nitrogen is changed by an opening/closing switching operation of an automatic valve and released to the atmosphere (the pressure is released). Generated oxygen gas is stored under pressure in a tank, and injected to the pipeline of the feedwater system by an oxygen injection conduit by way of a flow rate control valve. In the adsorbing vessel, steps of adsorption, separation and storage under pressure are repeated successively. (I.N.)

  4. Sn-PILC: A novel Efficient and Recyclable Catalyst for One-pot Three Component Povarov’s Inverse-electron-demand Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction for a Facile Synthesis of Tetrahydropyranoquinoline Derivatives under Neat Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Rai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Povarov’s inverse-electron-demand hetero Diels–Alder one-pot three components reaction of aromatic aldehyde, aromatic amine with DHF has been developed using Sn-PILC as a catalyst under a neat condition which may helpful to society to get pharmacologically more active compounds. In the present study a novel series of tetrahydroquinoline 4(a-f were synthesized and characterized by IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR, Mass spectral analysis and elemental analysis. The synthetic details and characterization results are discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i3.801

  5. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  6. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  7. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  8. Mobile Solar Tracker Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. It incorporates meteorological instruments, a solar...

  9. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  10. Geospatial Data Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Geospatial application development, location-based services, spatial modeling, and spatial analysis are examples of the many research applications that this facility...

  11. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  12. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  13. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  14. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  15. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  16. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  17. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  18. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  19. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  20. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coobs, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of two programs that are concerned with the management of surplus facilities. The facilities in this program are those related to commercial activities, which include the three surplus experimental and test reactors [(MSRE, HRE-2, and the Low Intensity Test Reactor (LITR)] and seven experimental loops at the ORR. The program is an integral part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program, which is a national program administered for DOE by the Richland Operations Office. Very briefly reported here are routine surveillance and maintenance of surplus radioactively contaminated DOE facilities awaiting decommissioning

  1. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  2. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  3. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  4. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  5. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  6. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  7. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Tritium monitoring equipments for animal experiment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroo

    1980-01-01

    Animal experiment facilities using tritium are described with reference to laws and regulations concerning radiological safety. Usual breeding facilities and surrounding conditions at non-radioactive animal experiments are summarized on feasible and effective designs of tritium monitors. Characteristics and desirable arrangements of various kinds of tritium monitors such as ionization chambers, proportional counters and liquid scintillation detectors are discussed from the standpoint of monitoring for room, glove-box, stack, liquid waste and personnel. (J.P.N.)

  10. Building Condition and Suitability Evaluation Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MGT of America, Inc., Tallahassee, FL.

    This educational facility evaluation manual contains the overall building condition rating form and the supporting check sheets which have been field tested in several states and, where appropriate, modified for use in the Idaho School Facilities Needs Assessment. The exterior building condition form examines the foundation, structure, walls,…

  11. Data management facility for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, K.; Kurimoto, K.; Mochizuki, O.

    1983-01-01

    This study considers the Data Management Facility which is provided for unified management of various diagnostics data with JT-60 experiments. This facility is designed for the purpose of data access. There are about 30 kinds of diagnostic devices that are classified by diagnostic objects equipped for JT-60 facility. It gathers the diagnostic date about 10 Mega Byte per each discharge. Those diagnostic data are varied qualitatively and quantitatively by experimental purpose. Other fundamental information like discharge condition, adjustive value for diagnostic devices is required to process those gathered data

  12. Radiation sterilization facility for melon fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danno, A.

    1985-01-01

    The melon fly (Dacus cucurbitae Coquillett) has been observed in Amami Island since l975. Kagoshima Prefecture has had a melon fly eradication project underway since 1979. A mass-fearing facility and a radiation sterilization facility were constructed in Naze in March of l98l. In the early stages of the project, sterile insects were produced at the rate of 4 x l0/sup 6/ pupae/week. In the later stages, the activity of the project was enlarged by tenfold. The conditions for design of the radiation sterilization facility, which has been developed with a central control system for automated irradiation, are examined from an engineering standpoint

  13. Cognitive facilities of governance of transformations processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Reshetnichenko

    2014-03-01

    For example, each of levels of organization of the both realized and subconscious, facilities of cognition includes the dependent numerical, voice, coloured and concept facilities correlative. As for the system of the realized and subconscious facilities of transformations, their basis is made by the ascending and descending forms of organization of motion of matter, energy, information and organization of elements of life. Fixed in basis of research of mul’timodal’na logician allowed to expose dialectical nature of mechanisms of bifurcations, synthesis, freymuvannya and clusterizations as main condition of forming on principle of new control system by processes development of man, state and society, on the way of mastering of space.

  14. Hygiene Condition of Water Use and Sanitation Facilities at Urban Slums: Analysis of Port City Chittagong, Bangladesh / Wyposażenie Sanitarne W Slamsach Miejskich - Analiza Na Podstawie Miasta Portowego Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhit, I. B.; Chowdhury, S. Tasneem; Nahid, Nurangir; Zaman, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    Low income community development is the prerequisite for the overall development of a society. There are different kinds of parameters to widen community development, such as health, economic, social, a living pattern, etc. Sanitation condition is the crucial aspect that is directly or indirectly inter bond with all the parameters. To see the exact reasons behind brutal unhygienic sanitation conditions of water supply and latrine system in a low cost community, the Chittagong City Corporation area has been picked. Relevant data have been collected from field survey, consultancy with inhabitants, Chittagong City Corporation, Power Development Board, and WASA. To know the possible reasons behind the water supply and germ-infested sanitation, state of a low cost community, this paper attempts to shed some light on the tribulations behind the scarcity of safe drinking water, dirt free as well as sustainable latrine and drainage system and offensive water management. Obszary takie jak rozwój gospodarczy, bariery społeczne, standard życia i zdrowie, ściśle związane są ze stanem wyposażenia sanitarnego. W artykule dokonano analizy warunków sanitarnych związanych z zaopatrzeniem w wodę i odprowadzeniem ścieków dla społeczności o niskich dochodach w obszarze Chittagong City Corporation. Dane zostały zebrane podczas ankietowych badań terenowych, rozmów z mieszkańcami, z bazy Chittagong City Corporation, Power Development Board i WASA.

  15. 42 CFR 485.56 - Condition of participation: Governing body and administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIALIZED PROVIDERS Conditions of Participation: Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facilities § 485.56...: Institutional budget plan. The facility must have an institutional budget plan that meets the following...

  16. Green facility location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velázquez Martínez, J.C.; Fransoo, J.C.; Bouchery, Y.; Corbett, C.J.; Fransoo, J.C.; Tan, T.

    2017-01-01

    Transportation is one of the main contributing factors of global carbon emissions, and thus, when dealing with facility location models in a distribution context, transportation emissions may be substantially higher than the emissions due to production or storage. Because facility location models

  17. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Uiterwijk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

  18. Medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  19. Global Environment Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Ringtail lemur mom with two of paradise Nations rally to protect global environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Stockholm, Sweden birds-eye view Events GEF-7 Replenishment Trung Truong Son Landscapes

  20. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  1. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2002-03-01

    With starting DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment by using spent fuels, 1) operation and refurbishment for DFDF (DUPIC fuel development facility), and 2) operation and improvement of transportation equipment for radioactive materials between facilities became the objectives of this study. This report describes objectives of the project, necessities, state of related technology, R and D scope, R and D results, proposal for application etc

  2. Economics of reusable facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antia, D.D.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper some of the different economic development strategies that can be used for reusable facilities in the UK, Norway, Netherlands and in some production sharing contracts are outlined. These strategies focus on an integrated decision analysis approach which considers development phasing, reservoir management, tax planning and where appropriate facility purchase, leasing, or sale and leaseback decisions

  3. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  4. Outline of NUCEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Isao

    1996-01-01

    NUCEF is a multipurpose research facility in the field of safety and advanced technology of nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Various experiment facilities and its supporting installations, in which nuclear fuel materials, radio isotopes and TRU elements can be handled, are arranged in more than one hundred rooms of two experiment buildings. Its construction was completed in middle of 1994 and hot experiments have been started since then. NUCEF is located on the site (30,000 m 2 ) of southeastern part in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI facing to the Pacific Ocean. The base of Experiment Buildings A and B was directly founded on the rock existing at 10-15 m below ground level taking the aseismatic design into consideration. Each building is almost same sized and composed of one basement and three floors of which area is 17,500 m 2 in total. In the basement, there are exhaust facilities of ventilation system, treatment system of solution fuel and radioactive waste solution and storage tanks of them. Major experiment facilities are located on the first or the second floors in each building. An air-inlet facility of ventilation system for each building is equipped on the third floor. Most of experiment facilities for criticality safety research including two critical facilities: Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) are installed in Experiment Building A. Experiment equipments for research on advanced fuel reprocessing process and on TRU waste management, which are named BECKY (Back End Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility), are installed in laboratories and a-g cells in Experiment Building B. (J.P.N.)

  5. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J S; Choi, J W; Go, W I; Kim, H D; Song, K C; Jeong, I H; Park, H S; Im, C S; Lee, H M; Moon, K H; Hong, K P; Lee, K S; Suh, K S; Kim, E K; Min, D K; Lee, J C; Chun, Y B; Paik, S Y; Lee, E P; Yoo, G S; Kim, Y S; Park, J C

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  6. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs

  7. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  8. Energy solutions for sports facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, Paola; Santiangeli, Adriano [CIRPS: Inter-University Research Centre for Sustainable Development, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana, 18, Rome (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    The sports facilities are characterized by special energy needs different from any other user and they are characterized by high heat and electricity loads. For this reason, the aim of this work has been to propose a tool to provide a preliminary estimation of the power and energy required by the sports centres. In addition, the possibility to make the building self-energy sufficient has been considered, thanks to the exploitation of renewable energy sources (RES). The overall work has been performed following three steps: energy needs analysis; local RES availability analysis; energy balance of Sport Centres. Considering that each sport facility is characterized by different energy needs depending on the sport typology itself, the analysis started from the features established by the CONI (National Italian Olympic Committee) standardization. For calculations a program in LabVIEW has been developed to evaluate the energy requirements of the sports centre considering as inputs the sport halls, the playgrounds and the supporting rooms, the level of the sport activity (e.g. agonistic) and the climatic conditions of the area where the facilities are located. The locally available RES are evaluated in order to decide which one can be exploited to feed the Sport Centre. The proposed solution for the energy production refers to a combination of different and innovative technologies which involve, in particular, hydrogen technologies. The energy and costs analysis has been finally carried out for an application case in Dubai. (author)

  9. Safety guide data on radiation shielding in a reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Noboru; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1986-04-01

    In a reprocessing facility, various radiation sources are handled and have many geometrical conditions. To aim drawing up a safety guidebook on radiation shielding in order to evaluate shielding safety in a reprocessing facility with high reliability and reasonableness, JAERI trusted investigation on safety evaluation techniques of radiation shielding in a reprocessing facility to Nuclear Safety Research Association. This report is the collection of investigation results, and describes concept of shielding safety design principle, radiation sources in reprocessing facility and estimation of its strength, techniques of shielding calculations, and definite examples of shielding calculation in reprocessing facility. (author)

  10. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  11. WORKSHOPS: Hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    'Hadron facilities' – high intensity (typically a hundred microamps), medium energy (30-60 GeV) machines producing intense secondary beams of pions, kaons, etc., are being widely touted as a profitable research avenue to supplement what is learned through the thrust for higher and higher energies. This interest was reflected at an International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As well as invited talks describing the various projects being pushed in the US, Europe and Japan, the meeting included working groups covering linacs, beam dynamics, hardware, radiofrequency, polarized beams and experimental facilities

  12. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  13. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  14. Test and User Facilities | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities Our test and user facilities are available to | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant C Controllable Grid Interface Test System D Dynamometer Test Facilities

  15. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations

  16. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  17. Reliability study: maintenance facilities Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, B.E.; Sikorski, P.A.; Fankell, R.; Johnson, O.; Ferryman, D.S.; Miller, R.L.; Gearhart, E.C.; Rafferty, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    A reliability study of the maintenance facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been completed. The reliability study team analyzed test data and made visual inspections of each component contributing to the overall operation of the facilities. The impacts of facilities and equipment failures were given consideration with regard to personnel safety, protection of government property, health physics, and environmental control. This study revealed that the maintenance facilities are generally in good condition. After evaluating the physical condition and technology status of the major components, the study team made several basic recommendations. Implementation of the recommendations proposed in this report will help assure reliable maintenance of the plant through the year 2000

  18. Facility Modeling Capability Demonstration Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, Brian P.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Fallgren, Andrew James; Demuth, Scott Francis; Aleman, Sebastian E.; Almeida, Valmor F. de; Chiswell, Steven R.; Hamm, Larry; Tingey, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    A joint effort has been initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) office of Proliferation Detection, to develop and validate a flexible framework for simulating effluents and emissions from spent fuel reprocessing facilities. These effluents and emissions can be measured by various on-site and/or off-site means, and then the inverse problem can ideally be solved through modeling and simulation to estimate characteristics of facility operation such as the nuclear material production rate. The flexible framework called Facility Modeling Toolkit focused on the forward modeling of PUREX reprocessing facility operating conditions from fuel storage and chopping to effluent and emission measurements.

  19. Construction of STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Onodera, Seiji; Hirose, Hideyuki

    1998-08-01

    Two critical assemblies, STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) and TRACY (Transient Experiment Critical Facility), were constructed in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) to promote researches on the criticality safety at a reprocessing facility. STACY aims at providing critical data of uranium nitrate solution, plutonium nitrate solution and their mixture while varying concentration of solution fuel, core tank shape and size and neutron reflecting condition. STACY achieved first criticality in February 1995, and passed the licensing inspection by STA (Science and Technology Agency of Japan) in May. After that a series of critical experiments commenced with 10 w/o enriched uranium solution. This report describes the outline of STACY at the end of FY 1996. (author)

  20. Facility Modeling Capability Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, Brian P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aleman, Sebastian E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chiswell, Steven R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    A joint effort has been initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) office of Proliferation Detection, to develop and validate a flexible framework for simulating effluents and emissions from spent fuel reprocessing facilities. These effluents and emissions can be measured by various on-site and/or off-site means, and then the inverse problem can ideally be solved through modeling and simulation to estimate characteristics of facility operation such as the nuclear material production rate. The flexible framework called Facility Modeling Toolkit focused on the forward modeling of PUREX reprocessing facility operating conditions from fuel storage and chopping to effluent and emission measurements.

  1. KONTEC 2013. 11{sup th} international symposium on 'Conditioning of radioactive operational and decommissioning waste' and 11{sup th} BMBF status report on 'Decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities'; KONTEC 2013. 11. internationales Symposium 'Konditionierung radioaktiver Betriebs- und Stilllegungsabfaelle' einschliesslich 11. Statusbericht des BMBF 'Stilllegung und Rueckbau kerntechnischer Anlagen'. Veranstaltungsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-06-15

    KONTEC 2013 was held in Dresden on 13 to 15 March 2013. The 11{sup th} event organized under this heading dealt with the subjects of 'Conditioning of Radioactive Operational and Decommissioning Waste' and 'Decommissioning and Demolition of Nuclear Facilities' including the R and D Status Report by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) on the same subject. The conference was attended by an international audience from 19 countries. The program included plenary sessions on these 4 key topics: - Disposal of Radioactive Residues from Nuclear Facilities' Operation and Decommissioning. - Decommissioning and Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities. - Facilities and Systems for the Conditioning of Operational and Decommissioning Wastes. - Transport, Interim and Final Storage of Non-heat Generating Wastes (i.e. Konrad). These sessions were accompanied by poster sessions and short presentations under the heading of 'Kontec Direct.' The best presentations of the categories Plenary Session Presentation, Poster Presentation and Kontec-Direct have been awarded. In detail, 'Dismantling of Russian nuclear powered submarines' by Detlef Mietann, 'Requalification of 'Old Packages' for the Konrad Repository Described for the Model Case of Packages from Storage Annex A and Repackaging of Containers Holding Compacts in Hall 2 of the GNS Plant' by Martina Koessler, Sebastian Schwall and Pascal Budriks, and 'Electrochemical process development for cleaning organic, C-14-labelled waste solutions' by Hans-Juergen Friedrich. (orig.)

  2. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  3. Aviation Flight Support Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility consists of a 75' x 200' hanger with two adjacent helicopter pads located at Felker Army Airfield on Fort Eustis. A staff of Government and contractor...

  4. Airborne & Field Sensors Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC facilities include an 800' x 60' paved UAV operational area, clearapproach/departure zone, concrete pads furnished with 208VAC, 3 phase,200 amp power, 20,000 sq...

  5. Field Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Field Research Facility (FRF) located in Duck, N.C. was established in 1977 to support the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' coastal engineering mission. The FRF is...

  6. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  7. Robotics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 60 feet x 100 feet structure on the grounds of the Fort Indiantown Gap Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) Base is a mixed-use facility comprising office space,...

  8. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  9. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  10. Climatic Environmental Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has an extensive suite of facilities for supporting MIL-STD-810 testing, toinclude: Temperature/Altitude, Rapid Decompression, Low/High Temperature,Temperature...

  11. HNF - Helmholtz Nano Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Helmholtz Nano Facility (HNF is a state-of-the-art cleanroom facility. The cleanroom has ~1100 m2 with cleanroom classes of DIN ISO 1-3. HNF operates according to VDI DIN 2083, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP and aquivalent to Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA standards. HNF is a user facility of Forschungszentrum Jülich and comprises a network of facilities, processes and systems for research, production and characterization of micro- and nanostructures. HNF meets the basic supply of micro- and nanostructures for nanoelectronics, fluidics. micromechanics, biology, neutron and energy science, etc.. The task of HNF is rapid progress in nanostructures and their technology, offering efficient access to infrastructure and equipment. HNF gives access to expertise and provides resources in production, synthesis, characterization and integration of structures, devices and circuits. HNF covers the range from basic research to application oriented research facilitating a broad variety of different materials and different sample sizes.

  12. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  13. Electra Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Electra Laser Facility is used to develop the science and technology needed to develop a reliable, efficient, high-energy, repetitively pulsed krypton...

  14. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  15. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  16. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  17. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  18. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  19. VT Telecommunication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The UtilityTelecom_TELEFAC data layer contains points which are intended to represent the location of telecommunications facilities (towers and/or...

  20. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  1. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  2. Advanced Microanalysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Microanalysis Facility fully integrates capabilities for chemical and structural analysis of electronic materials and devices for the U.S. Army and DoD....

  3. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  4. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  5. Pit Fragment Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility contains two large (20 foot high by 20 foot diameter) double walled steel tubs in which experimental munitions are exploded while covered with sawdust....

  6. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance ComputingThe ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  7. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  8. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  9. Space Power Facility (SPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Power Facility (SPF) houses the world's largest space environment simulation chamber, measuring 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft. high. In this chamber, large...

  10. Airborne Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — AFRL's Airborne Evaluation Facility (AEF) utilizes Air Force Aero Club resources to conduct test and evaluation of a variety of equipment and concepts. Twin engine...

  11. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers, Pool...

  12. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  13. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  14. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  15. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  16. Mass Properties Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is used to acquire accurate weight, 3 axis center of gravity and 3 axis moment of inertia measurements for air launched munitions and armament equipment.

  17. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  18. Powder Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The facility is uniquely equipped as the only laboratory within DA to conduct PM processing of refractory metals and alloys as well as the processing of a wide range...

  19. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  20. Dialysis Facility Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Dialysis Facility Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data...

  1. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  2. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  3. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  4. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  5. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials

  6. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  7. The DOE/EM facility transition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixby, W.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of EM-60 is to plan, implement, and manage receipt of surplus facilities resulting from downsizing of the DOE Weapons Complex facilities and DOE operating program offices to EM, and to ensure prompt deactivation of such facilities in order to reach a minimum surveillance and maintenance condition. The revised organizational structure of EM-60 into four offices (one at headquarters, and the other three at field sites), reflects increased operating functions associated with deactivation, surveillance, and maintenance of facilities. EM-60's deactivation and transition role concerns technical, socioeconomic, institutional, and administrative issues. The primary objective of the deactivation process is to put facilities in the lowest surveillance and maintenance condition safely and quickly by driving down the open-quotes mortgageclose quotes costs of maintaining them until final disposition. EM-60's three key activities are: (1) Inventory of surplus facilities - The 1993 Surplus Facility Inventory and Assessment (SFIA) serves as a planning tool to help the Department and EM-60 determine optimal transition phasing, with safety and cost-effectiveness remaining a priority. (2) Management of accelerated facility life cycle transition - Transitions currently underway illustrate site issues. These include addressing the interests of federal and state regulatory agencies as well as interests of local stakeholders, safe management of large amounts of production residues, and options for treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal. Of equal importance in the transition process is planning the optimal transition of the labor force. (3) Economic development - to address the socio-economic impacts on affected communities of the severe and rapid downsizing of the DOE Weapons Complex, DOE is pursuing an approach that uses the land, equipment, technology assets, and highly skilled local workforces as a basis for alternative economic development

  8. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  9. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  10. The CUTLASS database facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, P.; Rutter, P.

    1988-09-01

    The enhancement of the CUTLASS database management system to provide improved facilities for data handling is seen as a prerequisite to its effective use for future power station data processing and control applications. This particularly applies to the larger projects such as AGR data processing system refurbishments, and the data processing systems required for the new Coal Fired Reference Design stations. In anticipation of the need for improved data handling facilities in CUTLASS, the CEGB established a User Sub-Group in the early 1980's to define the database facilities required by users. Following the endorsement of the resulting specification and a detailed design study, the database facilities have been implemented as an integral part of the CUTLASS system. This paper provides an introduction to the range of CUTLASS Database facilities, and emphasises the role of Database as the central facility around which future Kit 1 and (particularly) Kit 6 CUTLASS based data processing and control systems will be designed and implemented. (author)

  11. Deactivation and Storage Issues Shared by Fossil and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas S. LaGuardia

    1998-01-01

    The deactivation of a power plant, be it nuclear or fossil fueled, requires that the facility be placed in a safe and stable condition to prevent unacceptable exposure of the public or the environment to hazardous materials until the facility can be decommissioned. The conditions at two Texas plants are examined. These plants are fossil fueled, but their conditions might be duplicated at a nuclear plant

  12. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    this report is intended to provide a convenient summary of the world's major nuclear physics accelerator facility with emphasis on those facilities supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Previous editions of this report have contained only DOE facilities. However, as the extent of global collaborations in nuclear physics grows, gathering summary information on the world's nuclear physics accelerator facilities in one place is useful. Therefore, the present report adds facilities operated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as the leading foreign facilities, with emphasis on foreign facilities that have significant outside user programs. The principal motivation for building and operating these facilities is, of course, basic research in nuclear physics. The scientific objectives for this research were recently reviewed by the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, who developed a long range plan, Nuclei, Nucleons, and Quarks -- Nuclear Science in the 1990's. Their report begins as follows: The central thrust of nuclear science is the study of strongly interacting matter and of the forces that govern its structure and dynamics; this agenda ranges from large- scale collective nuclear behavior through the motions of individual nucleons and mesons, atomic nuclei, to the underlying distribution of quarks and gluons. It extends to conditions at the extremes of temperature and density which are of significance to astrophysics and cosmology and are conducive to the creation of new forms of strongly interacting matter; and another important focus is on the study of the electroweak force, which plays an important role in nuclear stability, and on precision tests of fundamental interactions. The present report provides brief descriptions of the accelerator facilities available for carrying out this agenda and their research programs

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NREL's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) is a working laboratory for interconnection and systems integration testing. This state-of-the-art facility...

  14. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993

  15. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  16. Investigating walking environments in and around assisted living facilities: a facility visit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhipeng

    2010-01-01

    This study explores assisted living residents' walking behaviors, locations where residents prefer to walk, and walking environments in and around assisted living facilities. Regular walking is beneficial to older adults' physical and psychological health. Yet frail older residents in assisted living are usually too sedentary to achieve these benefits. The physical environment plays an important role in promoting physical activity. However, there is little research exploring this relationship in assisted living settings. The researcher visited 34 assisted living facilities in a major Texas city. Methods included walk-through observation with the Assisted Living Facility Walking Environment Checklist, and interviews with administrators by open- and close-ended questions. The data from 26 facilities were analyzed using descriptive statistics (for quantitative data) and content analysis (for qualitative data). The results indicate that (a) residents were walking both indoors and outdoors for exercise or other purposes (e.g., going to destinations); (b) assisted living facility planning and design details-such as neighborhood sidewalk conditions, facility site selection, availability of seating, walking path configuration (e.g., looped/nonlooped path), amount of shading along the path, presence of handrails, existence of signage, etc.-may influence residents' walking behaviors; and (c) current assisted living facilities need improvement in all aspects to make their environments more walkable for residents. Findings of the study provide recommendations for assisted living facilities to improve the walkability of environments and to create environmental interventions to promote regular walking among their residents. This study also implies several directions for future research.

  17. The Importance of Place: Facility Conditions and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lance W.; Edgerton, Jason D.; Peter, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    Schools are central, public institutions. On any given day, about 20 percent of the Canadian population spends at least part of its day in a school building. By age 18, students will typically have spent about 15 percent of their lives in schools. Administrators and teachers in contemporary schools face significant challenges. Globalization…

  18. New Hampshire Public Schools Facilities Adequacy and Condition Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This report presents New Hampshire survey data, methodology, and the survey instrument used to measure a school's physical quality and educational effectiveness. The survey instrument collects data in the following categories: school site; building; building systems; building maintenance; building safety and security; space adequacy; and building…

  19. Comprehensive facilities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  20. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Marino, S.A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hall, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which can be used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology and radiological physics. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL), and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy. RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, with priorities based on the recommendations of a Scientific Advisory Committee. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This chapter presents a brief description of current experiments being carried out at RARAF and of the operation of the Facility from January through June, 1986. Operation of the Facility for all of 1985 was described in the 1985 Progress Report for RARAF. The experiments described here were supported by various Grants and Contracts from NIH and DOE and by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut of Sweden

  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, B.

    1985-01-01

    How a European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has developed into a detailed proposal recently accepted as the basis for construction of the facility at Grenoble is discussed. In November 1977, the General Assembly of the European Science Foundation (ESF) approved the report of the ESF working party on synchrotron radiation entitled Synchrotron Radiation - a Perspective View for Europe. This report contained as one of its principal recommendations that work should commence on a feasibility study for a European synchrotron radiation laboratory having a dedicated hard X-ray storage ring and appropriate advanced instrumentation. In order to prepare a feasibility study the European Science Foundation set up the Ad-hoc Committee on Synchrotron Radiation, which in turn formed two working groups: one for the machine and another for instrumentation. This feasibility study was completed in 1979 with the publication of the Blue Book describing in detail the so called 1979 European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The heart of the facility was a 5 GeV electron storage ring and it was assumed that mainly the radiation from bending magnets will be used. The facility is described

  2. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  3. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  4. ORNL 150 keV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Kim, J.; Menon, M.M.; Schilling, G.

    1977-01-01

    The 150 keV neutral beam test facility provides for the testing and development of neutral beam injectors and beam systems of the class that will be needed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and The Next Step (TNS). The test facility can simulate a complete beam line injection system and can provide a wide range of experimental operating conditions. Herein is offered a general description of the facility's capabilities and a discussion of present system performance

  5. National Low-Temperature Neutron-Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Young, F.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    The Materials Sciences Division of the United States Department of Energy will establish a National Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) which will utilize the Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility will provide high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions for qualified experiments at no cost to users. This report describes the planned experimental capabilities of the new facility

  6. Miscellaneous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Hoffman, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on numerous conditions (systemic diseases, metabolic diseases, etc.) that may also affect the foot and ankle. In many cases, imaging of the foot and ankle is not performed for primary diagnostic purposes. However, radiographic changes do occur with these conditions. Therefore, it is important to be aware of radiographic abnormalities that these diseases may cause in the foot and ankle

  7. Legal regime of water management facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jožef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the legal regime of water management facilities in the light of Serbian, foreign and European law. Different divisions of water management facilities are carried out (to public and private ones, natural and artificial ones, etc., with determination of their legal relevance. Account is taken of the issue of protection from harmful effects of waters to such facilities, as well. The paper points also to rules on the water management facilities, from acts of planning, to individual administrative acts and measures for maintenance of required qualitative and quantitative condition of waters, depending on their purpose (general use or special, commercial use o waters. Albeit special rules on water management facilities exist, due to the natural interlocking between all the components of the environment (water, air and soil, a comprehensive approach is required. A reference is made to other basic principles of protection of water management facilities as well, such as the principle of prevention, principle of sustainable development and the principle "polluter pays". The last one represents the achievement of contemporary law, which deviates from the idea accepted in the second half of 20th century that supported the socialization of risk from harmful effects of waters.

  8. Kauai Test Facility hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swihart, A

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55003A requires facility-specific hazards assessment be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Kauai Test Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The Kauai Test Facility`s chemical and radiological inventories were screened according to potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance to the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 4.2 kilometers. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency at the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} and a Site Area Emergency at the Kokole Point Launch Site. The Emergency Planning Zone for the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} is 5 kilometers. The Emergency Planning Zone for the Kokole Point Launch Site is the Pacific Missile Range Facility`s site boundary.

  9. Employee influenza vaccination in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel T

    2014-03-01

    The organizational literature on infection control in residential care facilities is limited. Using a nationally representative dataset, we examined the organizational factors associated with implementing at least 1 influenza-related employee vaccination policy/program, as well as the effect of vaccination policies on health care worker (HCW) influenza vaccine uptake in residential care facilities. The study was a cross-sectional study using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to address the study's objectives. Facility size, director's educational attainment, and having a written influenza pandemic preparedness plan were significantly associated with the implementation of at least 1 influenza-related employee vaccination policy/program, after controlling for other facility-level factors. Recommending vaccination to employees, providing vaccination on site, providing vaccinations to employees at no cost, and requiring vaccination as a condition of employment were associated with higher employee influenza vaccination rates. Residential care facilities can improve vaccination rates among employees by adopting effective employee vaccination policies. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Practical design of gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Sen-ichi

    1976-01-01

    In this report, it is intended to describe mainly the multi-purpose irradiation facilities which carry out the consigned irradiation for the sterilization of medical apparatuses, which is most of the demand of gamma irradiation in Japan. Gamma irradiation criterion is summed up to that ''Apply the specified dose properly and uniformly to product cases and be economic.'' Though the establishment of the design standard for irradiation facilities is not easy and is not solve simply, the factors to be considered in the design are as follows: (1) mechanism safety, (2) multipurpose irradiation structure, (3) irradiation criteria and practice, (4) efficiency of radiation source utilization and related problems, and (5) economical merit. Irradiation facilities are generally itemized as follows: irradiation equipments, radiation source-storing facility, package carrier, radiation source-driving equipments, facilities for safety and operational management and others. Examples and their characteristics are reported for the facilities of Japan Radio-isotope Irradiation Cooperative Association and Radie Industries Ltd. Expenses for construction, processing and radiation sources are shown on the basis of a few references, and the cost trially calculated under a certain presumptive condition is given. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. UHV facility at pelletron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Hattangadi, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the important requirements of a heavy ion accelerator is the maintenance of a clean, ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment in the accelerating tubes as well as in the beamlines. This becomes necessary in order to minimise transmission losses of the ion beam due to charge exchange or scattering during collisions with the residual gas atoms. In view of these considerations, as an essential ancillary facility, a UHV laboratory with all required facilities has been set up for the pelletron accelerator and the work done in this laboratory is described. First the pelletron accelerator vacuum system is described in brief. The UHV laboratory facilities are described. Our operational experience with the accelerator vacuum system is discussed. The development of accelerator components carried out by the UHV laboratory is also discussed. (author)

  12. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Recently we have been confronted with difficulties concerning services which are part of a new contract for facilities management. Please see below for some information about this contract. Following competitive tendering and the Finance Committee decision, the contract was awarded to the Swiss firm 'Facilities Management Network (FMN)'. The owners of FMN are two companies 'M+W Zander' and 'Avireal', both very experienced in this field of facilities management. The contract entered into force on 1st July 2002. CERN has grouped together around 20 different activities into this one contract, which was previously covered by separate contracts. The new contract includes the management and execution of many activities, in particular: Guards and access control; cleaning; operation and maintenance of heating plants, cooling and ventilation equipment for buildings not related to the tunnel or the LHC; plumbing; sanitation; lifts; green areas and roads; waste disposal; and includes a centralised helpdesk for these act...

  13. The ORION Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Robert

    2003-01-01

    ORION will be a user-oriented research facility for understanding the physics and developing the technology for future high-energy particle accelerators, as well as for research in related fields. The facility has as its centerpiece the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The NLCTA will be modified with the addition of a new, high-brightness photoinjector, its drive laser, an S-band rf power system, a user laser room, a low-energy experimental hall supplied with electron beams up to 60 MeV in energy, and a high-energy hall supplied with beams up to 350 MeV. The facility design and parameters are described here along with highlights from the 2nd ORION Workshop held in February 2003

  14. Ice condenser testing facility and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Ross, B.A.; Eschbach, E.J.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    A facility is being constructed to experimentally validate the ICEDF computer code. The code was developed to estimate the extent of fission product retention in the ice compartments of pressurized water reactor ice condenser containment systems during severe accidents. The design and construction of the facility is based on a test design that addresses the validation needs of the code for conditions typical of those expected to occur during severe pressurized water reactor accidents. Detailed facility design has followed completion of a test design (i.e., assembled test cases each involving a different set of aerosol and thermohydraulic flow conditions). The test design was developed with the aid of statistical test design software and was scrutinized for applicability with the aid of ICEDF simulations. The test facility will incorporate a small section of a prototypic ice condenser (e.g., a cross section comprising the equivalent of four 1-ft-diameter ice baskets to their full prototypic height of 48 ft). The development of the test design, the detailed facility design, and the construction progress are described in this paper

  15. Preliminary design for a maglev development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, H.T.; He, J.L.; Chang, S.L.; Bouillard, J.X.; Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Hoppie, L.O.; Lottes, S.A.; Rote, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Zhang, Z.Y. (Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Myers, G.; Cvercko, A. (Sterling Engineering, Westchester, IL (United States)); Williams, J.R. (Alfred Benesch and Co., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    A preliminary design was made of a national user facility for evaluating magnetic-levitation (maglev) technologies in sizes intermediate between laboratory experiments and full-scale systems. A technical advisory committee was established and a conference was held to obtain advice on the potential requirements of operational systems and how the facility might best be configured to test these requirements. The effort included studies of multiple concepts for levitating, guiding, and propelling maglev vehicles, as well as the controls, communications, and data-acquisition and -reduction equipment that would be required in operating the facility. Preliminary designs for versatile, dual 2-MVA power supplies capable of powering attractive or repulsive systems were developed. Facility site requirements were identified. Test vehicles would be about 7.4 m (25 ft) long, would weigh form 3 to 7 metric tons, and would operate at speeds up to 67 m/s (150 mph) on a 3.3-km (2.05-mi) elevated guideway. The facility would utilize modular vehicles and guideways, permitting the substitution of levitation, propulsion, and guideway components of different designs and materials for evaluation. The vehicle would provide a test cell in which individual suspension or propulsion components or subsystems could be tested under realistic conditions. The system would allow economical evaluation of integrated systems under varying weather conditions and in realistic geometries.

  16. Applications of microtron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    An 8 MeV Microtron accelerator installed and commissioned in Mangalore University to strengthen research activities in the area of Radiation Physics and allied sciences is also being used extensively for coordinated research programs in basic and applied areas of science and technology involving researchers from national laboratories and sister universities of the region. The electron accelerator with its versatile features extends energetic electrons, intense photons and neutrons of moderate flux to cater to the needs of the users of the facility. A brief view of this 'first of its kind' facility in the country and the R and D programs with some sample results is presented. (author)

  17. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  18. Line facilities outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    This book deals with line facilities. The contents of this book are outline line of wire telecommunication ; development of line, classification of section of line and theory of transmission of line, cable line ; structure of line, line of cable in town, line out of town, domestic cable and other lines, Optical communication ; line of optical cable, transmission method, measurement of optical communication and cable of the sea bottom, Equipment of telecommunication line ; telecommunication line facilities and telecommunication of public works, construction of cable line and maintenance and Regulation of line equipment ; regulation on technique, construction and maintenance.

  19. Robotics for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Akira; Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kubo, Katsumi

    1988-01-01

    It is highly desirable that automatic or remotely controlled machines perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear facilities. Toshiba has been working to develop multi-functional robots, with one typical example being a master-slave manipulator for use in reprocessing facilities. At the same time, the company is also working on the development of multi-purpose intelligent robots. One such device, an automatic inspection robot, to be deployed along a monorail, performs inspection by means of image processing technology, while and advanced intelligent maintenance robot is equipped with a special wheel-locomotion mechanism and manipulator and is designed to perform maintenance tasks. (author)

  20. Next generation storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    With diminishing requirements for plutonium, a substantial quantity of this material requires special handling and ultimately, long-term storage. To meet this objective, we at Los Alamos, have been involved in the design of a storage facility with the goal of providing storage capabilities for this and other nuclear materials. This paper presents preliminary basic design data, not for the structure and physical plant, but for the container and arrays which might be configured within the facility, with strong emphasis on criticality safety features