WorldWideScience

Sample records for conditioned pecking response

  1. Avian response to pine restoration at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Clawson; Carrie Steen; Kim Houf; Terry Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Midco Pine Flats is a 2,223-acre region of Peck Ranch Conservation Area (CA) that is classified as a pine-oak plains land type association. Extensive logging in the early 1900s removed most overstory shortleaf pine allowing oak to become the primary overstory component. In 2000, Missouri Department of Conservation staff initiated a pineoak woodland restoration project...

  2. Reaction to frustration in high and low feather pecking lines of laying hens from commercial or semi-natural rearing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Koene, P.; Spruijt, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of rearing conditions on feather pecking and reaction to frustration was studied in two lines of laying hens. From commercial rearing conditions (large group, no mother hen), seven birds from a high feather pecking line (HC birds) and eight birds from a low feather pecking line (LC birds)

  3. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Nielsen, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understood,

  4. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Haas, Elske N; Nielsen, Birte L; Buitenhuis, A J (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understood......, therefore we studied the behaviour of 16 birds from a high feather pecking (HFP) line and 16 birds from a low feather pecking (LFP) line at 35 weeks of age inside a plus-maze. Birds were from the 10th generation of selection for either high or low FP. First exposure to the maze was used to measure birds...... in the maze for 10 min during which they could choose to eat from all available food-items. When exposed for the first time in the maze HFP birds walked a longer distance, vocalized sooner and had more exploratory pecks compared to LFP birds who showed more wing-movements and defecations. When given a choice...

  5. Pecking and respiration rhythms of pigeons (Columba livia)

    OpenAIRE

    Hörster, Wolfgang; Xia, Li; Delius, Juan

    2003-01-01

    The production and coordination of rhythmic activities in birds is seldom investigated. Here we describe the pecking and breathing rhythms of pigeons under different conditions. When feeding from a heap of small grains, hungry pigeons pecked at regular intervals of about 0.3 s. The pecking rhythm was slightly slower in the afternoon. The pecking rhythm induced by the dopaminergic drug apomorphine was somewhat faster but some overt pecks were skipped. The mean respiratory cycle during a nonpec...

  6. Long term selection for reduced or increased pecking behaviour in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, A J; Kjaer, J B

    2008-01-01

    Feather pecking in laying hens is an important issue in animal welfare. Four studies in laying hens were selected which investigated increased or reduced pecking behaviour using direct or indirect measures of feather pecking behaviour. Direct comparison of the selected experiments is difficult......, as the selection criteria and even the selection procedures varied. Keeping these differences in mind, the results of the experiments showed that a) It is possible to change pecking behaviour in the desired direction using selection, b) Aggressive pecking is not related to feather pecking, c) There is no clear...... selection for reduced pecking behaviour changes the immune response. Feather pecking in laying hens is an important issue in animal welfare. Four studies in laying hens were selected which investigated increased or reduced pecking behaviour using direct or indirect measures of feather pecking behaviour...

  7. Reinforcer Magnitude Attenuates Apomorphine's Effects on Operant Pecking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Lamb, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    When given to pigeons, the direct-acting dopamine agonist apomorphine elicits pecking. The response has been likened to foraging pecking because it bears remarkable similarity to foraging behavior, and it is enhanced by food deprivation. On the other hand, other data suggest the response is not related to foraging behavior and may even interfere…

  8. A Screen-Peck Task for Investigating Cognitive Bias in Laying Hens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Deakin

    Full Text Available Affect-induced cognitive judgement biases occur in both humans and animals. Animals in a more negative affective state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than animals in a more positive state and vice versa. Investigating animals' responses to ambiguous cues can therefore be used as a proxy measure of affective state. We investigated laying hens' responses to ambiguous stimuli using a novel cognitive bias task. In the 'screen-peck' task, hens were trained to peck a high/low saturation orange circle presented on a computer screen (positive cue-P to obtain a mealworm reward, and to not peck when the oppositely saturated orange circle was presented (negative cue-N to avoid a one second air puff. Ambiguous cues were orange circles of intermediate saturation between the P and N cue (near-positive-NP; middle-M; near-negative-NN, and were unrewarded. Cue pecking showed a clear generalisation curve from P through NP, M, NN to N suggesting that hens were able to associate colour saturation with reward or punishment, and could discriminate between stimuli that were more or less similar to learnt cues. Across six test sessions, there was no evidence for extinction of pecking responses to ambiguous cues. We manipulated affective state by changing temperature during testing to either ~20°C or ~29°C in a repeated measures cross-over design. Hens have been shown to prefer temperatures in the higher range and hence we assumed that exposure to the higher temperature would induce a relatively positive affective state. Hens tested under warmer conditions were significantly more likely to peck the M probe than those tested at cooler temperatures suggesting that increased temperature in the ranges tested here may have some positive effect on hens, inducing a positive cognitive bias.

  9. [Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: August-October, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1940. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  10. A Screen-Peck Task for Investigating Cognitive Bias in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, William J.; Hodge, James J. L.; Paul, Elizabeth S.; Mendl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Affect-induced cognitive judgement biases occur in both humans and animals. Animals in a more negative affective state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than animals in a more positive state and vice versa. Investigating animals’ responses to ambiguous cues can therefore be used as a proxy measure of affective state. We investigated laying hens’ responses to ambiguous stimuli using a novel cognitive bias task. In the ‘screen-peck’ task, hens were trained to peck a high/low saturation orange circle presented on a computer screen (positive cue–P) to obtain a mealworm reward, and to not peck when the oppositely saturated orange circle was presented (negative cue–N) to avoid a one second air puff. Ambiguous cues were orange circles of intermediate saturation between the P and N cue (near-positive–NP; middle–M; near-negative–NN), and were unrewarded. Cue pecking showed a clear generalisation curve from P through NP, M, NN to N suggesting that hens were able to associate colour saturation with reward or punishment, and could discriminate between stimuli that were more or less similar to learnt cues. Across six test sessions, there was no evidence for extinction of pecking responses to ambiguous cues. We manipulated affective state by changing temperature during testing to either ~20°C or ~29°C in a repeated measures cross-over design. Hens have been shown to prefer temperatures in the higher range and hence we assumed that exposure to the higher temperature would induce a relatively positive affective state. Hens tested under warmer conditions were significantly more likely to peck the M probe than those tested at cooler temperatures suggesting that increased temperature in the ranges tested here may have some positive effect on hens, inducing a positive cognitive bias. PMID:27410229

  11. Pecking Order Behavior in Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Bruce; Gonenc, Halit

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the validity of the pecking order hypothesis in 23 emerging market countries. Emerging market countries would appear to be an ideal setting for the pecking order hypothesis to hold because of the presence of strong asymmetric information issues and agency costs. We observe,

  12. Resurgence of responding after the cessation of response-independent reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R; Skinner, B F

    1980-10-01

    In an autoshaping experiment, food-deprived pigeons pecked rapidly at a moving dot that preceded the delivery of food. When the moving dot and food were no longer correlated, the rate of pecking dropped nearly to zero. When, subsequently, no food was given, pecking reappeared at a high rate (nearly 200 pecks per min for each subject), the rate dropping again in subsequent sessions. In two other experiments, designed to clarify relevant variables, the effect was replicated. The data suggest that although response-independent reinforcement produces a decrement in responding, it does not reduce a tendency to respond under other conditions.

  13. Do Portuguese SMEs Follow Pecking Order Financing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jan; Mateus, Cesario; Olson, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    This paper tests for pecking order behavior in medium-sized private Portuguese firms. In contrast to the usual split between internal funds, debt, and external equity, we separate debt into four components – cheap trade credits (CTC), bank loans (BL), other loans, and expensive credits (EC). We use...... breakpoint tests to identify when firms switch between funding sources by examining the change in each funding source based on the financing deficit remaining after the previous pecking order funding source has been used. Our tests indicate that Portuguese companies generally move from lower cost to higher...... cost financing sources, but they do not exhaust each type of debt before moving on to the next funding source in the pecking order. Such behavior is consistent with a loose interpretation of pecking order financing, but not a strict interpretation of the theory. Instead, Portuguese firms may...

  14. Feather pecking in growers: a study with individually marked birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wechsler, B; Huber-Eicher, B; Nash, David Richard

    1998-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether individual birds specialise in feather pecking. Growers were individually marked and reared in groups of 30 or 31 in pens with a slatted floor. At an age of 4 to 6 weeks feather pecking was frequent in all pens. 2. On average 83% of all...... group members (10 groups, experiment 1) were recorded at least once as initiator of a feather pecking interaction. In each group 2 to 6 individuals feather pecked more than twice as often as the average for the group, and were defined as 'high rate peckers'. They initiated 39% of all recorded feather...... pecking interactions. 3. Every interaction was classified (with increasing intensity) as pecking, pinching, pulling or plucking. Compared to the others, 'high rate peckers' had more of their feather pecking classified as plucking and less classified as pecking. 4. There was no evidence that particular...

  15. Shock postponement reverses the effects of cocaine on the punished pecking of pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, T A; Gyorda, A M; Barrett, J E

    1994-06-01

    The effects of cocaine on punished and unpunished key peck responding of pigeons was examined before and after a history of treadle pressing maintained by shock postponement. In one schedule component, the first peck after 3 min produced grain. The alternate component was similar, but every 30 responses was also punished by a mild shock. Punished responding occurred at approximately 25% of the rate of unpunished responding. Cocaine (0.1-10.0 mg/kg IM) did not affect or decrease punished responding; unpunished responding was not systemically affected. Next, a foot treadle was installed and treadle presses postponed shocks for 25 s; shocks occurred every 5 s in the absence of pressing. The treadle was removed when shocks were reliably postponed. Next, the multiple schedule of key pecking was reinstated. At least one dose of cocaine now increased punished pecking; unpunished responding was not systematically altered. These results complement related findings with monkeys and show that pigeons are suitable subjects for studying the reversal of the effects of cocaine on punished responding by a history of postponing shock.

  16. Feather pecking and monoamines - a behavioral and neurobiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) remains one of the major welfare issues in laying hens. SFP is the pecking at and pulling out of feathers, inflicting damage to the plumage and skin of the recipient. The neurobiological profile determining the vulnerability of individual hens to develop into a severe

  17. Apical enlargement according to different pecking times at working length using reciprocating files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Paranjpe, Avina; Ha, Jung-Hong; Kim, Euiseong; Lee, WooCheol; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the apical preparation sizes resulting from repetitive pecking motions at the working length (WL) by using reciprocating files. Sixty simulated endodontic training blocks with a J-shaped root canal were instrumented using Reciproc R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany) or WaveOne Primary (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) (n = 30 each). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups based on the repetitive pecking times at the WL: 1, 2, and 4 times. All specimens were prepared by 1 operator who was competent in instrumenting canals with both file systems. All of the procedures, including the WL measurement, were performed under an operating microscope. The replica of the prepared canal was taken with silicone impression material. After 24 hours of allowing the impression to set, each sample was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope at the apical tip, and the apical preparation size (diameter) was measured at the D0 level of the impression. The data were analyzed statistically using 2-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test at P = .05. The mean diameter (μm) varied between 253 and 274 and between 258 and 277 for Reciproc and WaveOne, respectively, without significant differences. However, more repetitive pecking motions at the WL resulted in a significantly larger apical preparation size than the subgroups with less pecking times (P < .05). Under the conditions of this study, the results indicate that a greater number of repetitive pecking times at the WL may result in an apical preparation size that is larger than the actual file size. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feather-pecking and injurious pecking in organic laying hens in 107 flocks from eight European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestman, M.; Verwer, Cynthia; Brenninkmeyer, Christine

    2017-01-01

    and flock characteristics (age, genotype). Near the end of lay, 50 hens per flock were assessed for plumage condition and wounds. Potential influencing factors were screened and submitted to a multivariate model. The majority of the flocks (81%) consisted of brown genotypes and were found in six countries...... access to the free range (30% of the variation explained). For feather damage in white hens, no model could be made. Wounds in brown hens were associated with not having daily access to free range (14% of the variation explained). Wounds in white hens were explained by a model containing not topping......-up litter during the laying period (26% of the variation explained). These results suggest that better feeding management, daily access to the free-range area and improved litter management may reduce incidence of plumage damage and associated injurious pecking, hence enhancing the welfare of organic laying...

  19. The pecked cross symbol in ancient mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, A F; Hartung, H; Buckingham, B

    1978-10-20

    Attention is directed to a design, possibly of Teotihuacan origin, carved both in rock and in the floors of ceremonial buildings throughout ancient Mesoamerica. Consisting generally of a double circular pattern centered on a set of orthogonal axes, the so-called pecked cross or quartered circle figure is shown to exhibit a remarkable consistency in appearance throughout its 29 reported locations, thus suggesting that it was not perfunctory. The metric properties of the symbols gleaned from field surveys are delineated, and several interpretations of their possible functions are discussed. These symbols may have been intended as astronomical orientational devices, surveyor's bench marks, calendars, or ritual games. Evidence is presented which implies that more than one and perhaps all of these functions were employed simultaneously, a view which is shown to be consistent with the cosmological attitude of the pre-Columbian people.

  20. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...... as a labelled transition system. Exploration of the relationship between dynamic condition response structures and traditional models for concurrency, application to more complex scenarios, and further extensions of the model is left to future work....

  1. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: September - December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  2. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: January - April, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1957. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: January - April 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Pigeons use distinct stop phases to control pecking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Leslie M; Reid, Thomas; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2017-02-01

    Pecking at small targets requires accurate spatial coordination of the head. Planning of the peck has been proposed to occur in two distinct stop phases, but although this idea has now been around for a long time, the specific functional roles of these stop phases remain unsolved. Here, we investigated the characteristics of the two stop phases using high-speed motion capture and examined their functions with two experiments. In experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that the second stop phase is used to pre-program the final approach to a target and analyzed head movements while pigeons (Columba livia) pecked at targets of different size. Our results show that the duration of both stop phases significantly increased as stimulus size decreased. We also found significant positive correlations between stimulus size and the distances of the beaks to the stimulus during both stop phases. In experiment 2, we used a two-alternative forced choice task with different levels of difficulty to test the hypothesis that the first stop phase is used to decide between targets. The results indicate that the characteristics of the stop phases do not change with an increasing difficulty between the two choices. Therefore, we conclude that the first stop phase is not exclusively used to decide upon a target to peck at, but also contributes to the function of the second stop phase, which is improving pecking accuracy and planning the final approach to the target. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Analysis of severe feather pecking behavior in a high feather pecking selection line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labouriau, R; Kjaer, J B; Abreu, G C G

    2009-01-01

    Even though feather pecking (FP) in laying hens has been extensively studied, a good solution to prevent chickens from this behavior under commercial circumstances has not been found. Selection against FP behavior is possible, but for a more effective selection across different populations......, it is necessary to characterize the genetic mechanism associated with this behavior. In this study, we use a high FP selection line, which has been selected for 8 generations. We present evidence of the presence of a major dominant allele affecting the FP behavior by using an argument based on the presence...... of mixture in the distribution of the observed FP and by studying the evolution of the proportion of very high FP along the sequence of 8 generations. This hypothesis is further supported by the fact that the gene transcription profile of the birds performing high FP differs from the profile of the other...

  6. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exterior boundaries of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation is the program administered by the Assiniboine and... Tribes' program application: (a) Incorporation by reference. The requirements set forth in the Fort Peck... submitted as part of the Fort Peck Tribes' application. (d) Program Description. The Program Description...

  7. Nested Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2012-01-01

    We present an extension of the recently introduced declarative process model Dynamic Condition Response Graphs ( DCR Graphs) to allow nested subgraphs and a new milestone relation between events. The extension was developed during a case study carried out jointly with our industrial partner...... Exformatics, a danish provider of case and workflow management systems. We formalize the semantics by giving first a map from Nested to (flat) DCR Graphs with milestones, and then extending the previously given mapping from DCR Graphs to Buchi-automata to include the milestone relation....

  8. Shades of darkness : A pecking order of trading venues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menkveld, Albert J.; Yueshen, Bart Zhou; Zhu, Haoxiang

    2017-01-01

    We characterize the dynamic fragmentation of U.S. equity markets using a unique data set that disaggregates dark transactions by venue types. The “pecking order” hypothesis of trading venues states that investors “sort” various venue types, putting low-cost-low-immediacy venues on top and

  9. Testing static tradeoff theiry against pecking order models of capital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We test two models with the purpose of finding the best empirical explanation for corporate financing choice of a cross section of 27 Nigerian quoted companies. The models were developed to represent the Static tradeoff Theory and the Pecking order Theory of capital structure with a view to make comparison between ...

  10. Reduced Variance of Gene Expression at Numerous Loci in a Population of Chickens Selected for High Feather Pecking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, A L; Buitenhuis, A J

    2010-01-01

    Changes in gene expression in response to selection were studied by comparing microarray expression profiles among a population of domestic chickens selected for high feather pecking (FP) with a control population and a population selected for low FP. No transcripts showed significant differences...... and gentle FP were distinct, suggesting that very distinct underlying neural mechanisms underlie these 2 behaviors, with SFP showing more signs of an association with synaptic plasticity and with an immunosuppressive stress response...

  11. Comparison of individual and social feather pecking tests in two lines of laying hens at ten different ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Koene, P.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to select a suitable test to measure feather pecking in laying hens. Pecking behaviour in individual and social feather pecking tests was compared with pecking behaviour in the homepen. Two lines of laying hens were used that differ in their propensity to display

  12. Effects of different types of dark brooders on injurious pecking damage and production-related traits at rear and lay in layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, A B; Guzman, D A

    2017-01-01

    Injurious pecking (IP) remains one of the major welfare challenges in housing of laying hens worldwide due to the negative consequences it inflicts on animal welfare and economy. One potential solution to reduce IP is the use of dark brooders as the primary heat source during rearing. The objective...... plumage condition throughout the experiment (P wounds during lay (P

  13. Conditioned Reinforcement and Response Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in…

  14. Fearfulness and feather damage in laying hens divergently selected for high and low feather pecking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenburg, T Bas; de Haas, Elske N; Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) remains a major welfare and economic problem in laying hens. FP has been found to be related to other behavioural characteristics, such as fearfulness. There are indications that fearful birds are more likely to develop FP. Furthermore, FP can lead to increased fearfulness...... in the victims. To investigate further the relationship between FP and fearfulness, feather damage and behavioural fear responses were recorded in three White Leghorn lines of laying hens: a line selected for high FP (HFP line), a line selected for low FP (LFP line) and an unselected control line (10th...... in fear responses between the HFP and LFP lines were not found, neither in the TI-test, nor in the HA or NO test. As expected, birds from the HFP line had considerably more feather damage than birds from the LFP line and birds from the unselected control line were intermediate. Cages that withdrew from...

  15. Traumatic endophthalmitis following a crane pecking injury - An unusual mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Prabu; Ramakrishnan, Seema; Dhoble, Pankaja; Gubert, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of beta-hemolytic streptococcal endophthalmitis following crane-pecking injury. A twelve-year-old boy was brought to us by his father with history of crane beak injury in his right eye. On examination, his vision was 6/24 Snellen's acuity. Anterior segment examination showed a full thickness two mm corneo-limbal tear at 1 o'clock with iris prolapse. Pupil showed peaking through the wound with a clear crystalline lens. There was no evidence of hypopyon in the anterior chamber and B-scan ultrasonography showed acoustically clear vitreous with an attached retina. Left eye was within normal limits. Primary corneo-limbal tear repair was performed within 24 hours from the time of presentation. Intra-operatively, the corneal surgeon noted turbid aqueous with minimal hypopyon. In view of clinical suspicion of infection, an intravitreal tap for culture was taken during the primary repair, and prophylactic intravitreal antibiotics were given. The culture report showed beta-hemolytic streptococci. Pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotics was performed after 2 days as serial ultrasound scans showed appearance and worsening of endophthalmitis. A month after the surgery, his best corrected visual acuity improved to 6/12. Ocular injuries resulting from bird pecking are very rare. We treated a case of full thickness corneo-limbal tear with endophthalmitis caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci following a crane-pecking injury. We recommend that injecting intravitreal antibiotics along with primary globe repair in case of severe/contaminated injuries and early pars plana core-vitrectomy would result in better outcome like in our case.

  16. Applying chemical stimuli on feathers to reduce feather pecking in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harlander Matauschek, A.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that spraying a distasteful substance (quinine) on a bird's feather cover reduced short-term feather pecking. The present experiment evaluated if other substances offer similar or better protection against feather pecking. One hundred and twenty birds were divided into 12

  17. "Irrelevant" ground pecking in agonistic situations in burmese red junglefowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feekes, Francisca

    1971-01-01

    Threatening cocks may suddenly peck at the ground, pick up a food grain and swallow it. The occurrence of a feeding pattern during threat appears to be out of context and seems functionally irrelevant. Kruijt (1964), concluded from his data that ground pecking in threatening cocks is caused by

  18. Firms' debt-equity decisions when the static tradeoff theory and the pecking order theory disagree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.; Verbeek, M.; Verwijmeren, P.

    This paper tests the static tradeoff theory against the pecking order theory. We focus on an important difference in prediction: the static tradeoff theory argues that a firm increases leverage until it reaches its target debt ratio, while the pecking order yields debt issuance until the debt

  19. The fearful feather pecker : applying the principles to practice to prevent feather pecking in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.

    2014-01-01

    Billions of laying hens are kept worldwide. Severe feather pecking (SFP) is a behaviour which occurs with a high prevalence on commercial farms. SFP, the pecking and plucking of feathers of another bird, induces pain and stress and can ultimately lead to cannibalism. Moreover, SFP can occur if a

  20. The prevention and control of feather pecking: application to commercial systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicol, C.J.; Bestman, M.; Gilani, A.M.; Haas, de E.N.; Jong, de I.C.; Lampton, S.; Wagenaar, J.P.; Weeks, C.A.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of feather pecking in different commercial laying hen 23 systems and its welfare and economic impacts are reviewed in the following paper. 24 Current methods for controlling feather pecking include beak-trimming and alterations to light regimes, but these methods have

  1. Role of responsibility in conditional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesco; Gangemi, Amelia

    2002-08-01

    A series of recent studies showed that facilitation on the Wason Selection Task could be produced by perceived utilities. The present work was aimed at testing whether a similar factor could also be involved in human reasoning performance in the context of responsibility. We supposed that the motivation of the subject assuming responsibility is affected by normative goals. These goals prescribe the actions and the results to be achieved, also considering the different social roles. In this experiment the responses of different groups of subjects (N = 270) to a selection task were compared in two different conditions involving different responsibility contexts. The results show that the subjects' strategies in searching for possible violators depended on the condition (responsibility vs no responsibility). In particular, only in the context of responsibility were the performances elicited by conditional rules characterised by a falsification strategy.

  2. Classical Conditioning: Eliciting the Right Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    Classical conditioning is responsible for students' positive and negative feelings, whether directed toward subject matter, peers, teachers, or education in general. This article explains how educators can use classical conditioning principles (such as reinforcement, extinction, and paired stimuli) to create an anxiety-free learning environment.…

  3. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort Peck Reservation in Northeast Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Garry J. [Gradient Geophysics Inc., Missoula, MT (United States); Birkby, Jeff [Birkby Consulting LLC, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Tribal lands owned by Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, located in Northeastern Montana, overlie large volumes of deep, hot, saline water. Our study area included all the Fort Peck Reservation occupying roughly 1,456 sq miles. The geothermal water present in the Fort Peck Reservation is located in the western part of the Williston Basin in the Madison Group complex ranging in depths of 5500 to 7500 feet. Although no surface hot springs exist on the Reservation, water temperatures within oil wells that intercept these geothermal resources in the Madison Formation range from 150 to 278 degrees F.

  4. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  6. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: January, February, March, April 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. [Myofascial pain syndrome treated with sparrow-pecking moxibustion at trigger points: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Bu, He; Jia, Ji-rong; Liu, Zheng

    2014-11-01

    To compare the efficacy difference in treatment of myofasical pain syndrome between sparrow-pecking moxibustion and acupuncture at trigger points so as to provide the reference of the effective therapeutic method for myofascial pain syndrome. Ninety patients were randomized into a sparrow-pecking moxibustion group and an acupuncture group, 45 cases in each one. The trigger points were selected in pain areas in the two groups. In the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group, the sparrow-pecking moxibustion was applied, 30 min in each time. In the acupuncture group, the filiform needles were inserted obliquely at 45 degrees and retained for 40 min in each treatment. The treatment was given once a day and 10 treatments made one session in the two groups. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire was used as the observation index, and the changes in pain rating index (PRI), present pain intensity (PPI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after treatment were used for efficacy assessment. The results of PRI, PPI and VAS after treatment were reduced apparently as compared with those before treatment in the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group and the acupuncture group (all P0.05). The curative and remarkably effective rate was 80.0% (36/45) in the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group, which was better than 40.0% (18/45, Pmyofascial pain syndrome as compared with acupuncture at trigger points. This therapy is simpler in operation additionally.

  8. Postural responses explored through classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A D; Dakin, C J; Carpenter, M G

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the central nervous system (CNS) requires the sensory feedback generated by balance perturbations in order to trigger postural responses (PRs). In Experiment 1, twenty-one participants experienced toes-up support-surface tilts in two blocks. Control blocks involved unexpected balance perturbations whereas an auditory tone cued the onset of balance perturbations in Conditioning blocks. A single Cue-Only trial followed each block (Cue-Only(Control) and Cue-Only(Conditioning) trials) in the absence of balance perturbations. Cue-Only(Conditioning) trials were used to determine whether postural perturbations were required in order to trigger PRs. Counter-balancing the order of Control and Conditioning blocks allowed Cue-Only(Control) trials to examine both the audio-spinal/acoustic startle effects of the auditory cue and the carryover effects of the initial conditioning procedure. In Experiment 2, six participants first experienced five consecutive Tone-Only trials that were followed by twenty-five conditioning trials. After conditioning, five Tone-Only trials were again presented consecutively to first elicit and then extinguish the conditioned PRs. Surface electromyography (EMG) recorded muscle activity in soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA) and rectus femoris (RF). EMG onset latencies and amplitudes were calculated together with the onset latency, peak and time-to-peak of shank angular accelerations. Results indicated that an auditory cue could be conditioned to initiate PRs in multiple muscles without balance-relevant sensory triggers generated by balance perturbations. Postural synergies involving excitation of TA and RF and inhibition of SOL were observed following the Cue-Only(Conditioning) trials that resulted in shank angular accelerations in the direction required to counter the expected toes-up tilt. Postural synergies were triggered in response to the auditory cue even 15 min post-conditioning. Furthermore

  9. A novel conditioned nociceptive response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama-Kitamura, Mototaka; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-11

    Chronic pain tends to be intractable, regardless of whether the etiology has improved or is persistent. This intractability may be due, in part, to conditioning factors, but studies of the underlying mechanism are limited. We predicted that the body might learn pain sensation during sustained pain. In the present study, we sought to examine the prediction that nociceptive pain could be a conditioned response. After pre-exposing mice to the context box, we assessed hind-paw licking responses(s), an unconditioned nociceptive response (UCR), in the training phase for 30 min following each of two injections (24h apart) of formalin into the hind paws. Forty-eight hours later, in the test phase, we tested for a conditioned nociceptive response (CR) from paw injections of saline, with mice placed in either the same or a different visual context box. The results showed that the CR elicited in the same context box was significantly larger than one elicited in the different box. An audiovisual context, which is used in prototypical Pavlovian conditioning, augmented the CR. The CR diminished to baseline levels during repeated extinction procedures, in which saline alone was given in the same context box. However, the CR in animals injected with saline in their home cages was unchanged. Treatment with scopolamine, which has an antimuscarinic action, and thus induces an amnestic effect, did not affect the UCR, but reduced the CR. These results indicated that repeated nociceptive stimuli were sufficient to produce a CR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Classical conditioned responses to absent tones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häusler Udo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence for a tight coupling of sensorimotor processes in trained musicians led to the question of whether this coupling extends to preattentively mediated reflexes; particularly, whether a classically conditioned response in one of the domains (auditory is generalized to another (tactile/motor on the basis of a prior association in a second-order Pavlovian paradigm. An eyeblink conditioning procedure was performed in 17 pianists, serving as a model for overlearned audiomotor integration, and 14 non-musicians. Results: During the training session, subjects were conditioned to respond to auditory stimuli (piano tones. During a subsequent testing session, when subjects performed keystrokes on a silent piano, pianists showed significantly higher blink rates than non-musicians. Conclusion These findings suggest a tight coupling of the auditory and motor domains in musicians, pointing towards training-dependent mechanisms of strong cross-modal sensorimotor associations even on sub-cognitive processing levels.

  11. Flexible motor adjustment of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows but not in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The dextrous foraging skills of primates, including humans, are underpinned by flexible vision-guided control of the arms/hands and even tools as body-part extensions. This capacity involves a visuomotor conversion process that transfers the locations of the hands/arms and a target in retinal coordinates into body coordinates to generate a reaching/grasping movement and to correct online. Similar capacities have evolved in birds, such as tool use in corvids and finches, which represents the flexible motor control of extended body parts. However, the flexibility of avian head-reaching and bill-grasping with body-part extensions remains poorly understood. This study comparatively investigated the flexibility of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows and pigeons. Pecking performance and kinematics were examined when the bill extension was attached, and after its removal. The bill extension deteriorated pecking in pigeons in both performance and kinematics over 10 days. After the bill removal, pigeons started bill-grasping earlier, indicating motor adaptation to the bill extension. Contrastingly, pecking in crows was deteriorated transiently with the bill extension, but was recovered by adjusting pecking at closer distances, suggesting a quick adjustment to the bill extension. These results indicate flexible visuomotor control to extended body parts in crows but not in pigeons. PMID:28386435

  12. Can bread processing conditions alter glycaemic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Evelyn; Soong, Yean Yean; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2015-04-15

    Bread is a staple food that is traditionally made from wheat flour. This study aimed to compare the starch digestibility of western baked bread and oriental steamed bread. Four types of bread were prepared: western baked bread (WBB) and oriental steamed bread (OSB), modified baked bread (MBB) made with the OSB recipe and WBB processing, and modified steamed bread (MSB) made with the WBB recipe and OSB processing. MBB showed the highest starch digestibility in vitro, followed by WBB, OSB and MSB. A similar trend was observed for glycaemic response in vivo. MBB, WBB, OSB and MSB had a glycaemic index of 75±4, 71±5, 68±5 and 65±4, respectively. Processing differences had a more pronounced effect on starch digestibility in bread, and steamed bread was healthier in terms of glycaemic response. The manipulation of processing conditions could be an innovative route to alter the glycaemic response of carbohydrate-rich foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracting the dynamics of perceptual switching from 'noisy' behaviour: an application of hidden Markov modelling to pecking data from pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterpohl, J R; Haynes, J D; Emmert-Streib, F; Vetter, G; Pawelzik, K

    2000-01-01

    When studying animal perception, one normally has the chance of localizing perceptual events in time, that is via behavioural responses time-locked to the stimuli. With multistable stimuli, however, perceptual changes occur despite stationary stimulation. Here, the challenge is to infer these not directly observable perceptual states indirectly from the behavioural data. This estimation is complicated by the fact that an animal's performance is contaminated by errors. We propose a two-step approach to overcome this difficulty: First, one sets up a generative, stochastic model of the behavioural time series based on the relevant parameters, including the probability of errors. Second, one performs a model-based maximum-likelihood estimation on the data in order to extract the non-observable perceptual state transitions. We illustrate this methodology for data from experiments on perception of bistable apparent motion in pigeons. The observed behavioural time series is analysed and explained by a combination of a Markovian perceptual dynamics with a renewal process that governs the motor response. We propose a hidden Markov model in which non-observable states represent both the perceptual states and the states of the renewal process of the motor dynamics, while the observable states account for overt pecking performance. Showing that this constitutes an appropriate phenomenological model of the time series of observable pecking events, we use it subsequently to obtain an estimate of the internal (and thus covert) perceptual reversals. These may directly correspond to changes in the activity of mutually inhibitory populations of motion selective neurones tuned to orthogonal directions.

  14. Stimulus generalization of a positive conditioned reinforcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMAS, D R; WILLIAMS, J L

    1963-07-12

    Stimulus generalization has been observed for discriminative, eliciting, and emotional functions of stimuli. In our study, in order to investigate the generalization of the reinforcing function of stimuli, pigeons were trained in a Skinner box to peck at an unlighted key to obtain aperiodic, brief exposures of light at a wavelength of 550 mmicro, the positive conditioned reinforcer, which was immediately followed by food reward. Testing in extinction, we obtained generalization gradients for the number of responses and the time the pigeons expended to produce exposures on the unlighted key of 550 mmicro, 530 mmicro) 510 mmicro, or no light. This finding suggests that stimulus generalization occurs with all functions of stimuli.

  15. Chicks change their pecking behaviour towards stationary and mobile food sources over the first 12 weeks of life: improvement and discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Thomas J.; Kent, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) learn to peck soon after hatching and then peck in rapid bursts or bouts with intervals of non-pecking activity. The food sources may be static such as seeds and chick crumb, or mobile such as a mealworm. Here, changes with age in pecking toward chick crumb and a mealworm were measured. Chicks were reared in pairs and their pecking of crumb food was video recorded in their pair housed environment, from food presentation, every third day from day 8 (wk 2) to day 65 (wk 10). Peck rate at crumb food reached maximum levels at day 32 (wk 5), and then declined, fitting a quadratic model, with no sex, sex of cagemate, or box order effects. Within bouts the peck rate was higher and it increased to day 41 (wk 6) and then declined, and here males pecked faster than females. A change in dietary protein concentration from 22% to 18% at day 28 (wk 4) had no effect on subsequent peck rate. Pecking at and consumption of a mealworm in pair housed chicks were measured weekly from wks [5 to 12]. The latency to first worm peck and latency to swallow decreased to wk 8 and increased thereafter. The peck rate to first wormpeck and number of pecks to swallow increased to wk 8 and then declined paralleling the changes with crumb food. The increase in peck rate is coupled with an increase in efficiency in worm catching. The results are consistent with the view that the improvement in pecking ability and accuracy compliments change in nutritional requirement best served by an invertebrate food (IF) source requiring speed to achieve feeding success, especially with live prey. When this food source is no longer crucial these associated skill levels decline. An appreciation of the role of domestic fowl in controlling insect populations, at farm level, that are often vectors in disease spread is lacking. PMID:25374777

  16. Chicks change their pecking behaviour towards stationary and mobile food sources over the first 12 weeks of life: improvement and discontinuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Murphy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus learn to peck soon after hatching and then peck in rapid bursts or bouts with intervals of non-pecking activity. The food sources may be static such as seeds and chick crumb, or mobile such as a mealworm. Here, changes with age in pecking toward chick crumb and a mealworm were measured.Chicks were reared in pairs and their pecking of crumb food was video recorded in their pair housed environment, from food presentation, every third day from day 8 (wk 2 to day 65 (wk 10. Peck rate at crumb food reached maximum levels at day 32 (wk 5, and then declined, fitting a quadratic model, with no sex, sex of cagemate, or box order effects. Within bouts the peck rate was higher and it increased to day 41 (wk 6 and then declined, and here males pecked faster than females. A change in dietary protein concentration from 22% to 18% at day 28 (wk 4 had no effect on subsequent peck rate.Pecking at and consumption of a mealworm in pair housed chicks were measured weekly from wks [5 to 12]. The latency to first worm peck and latency to swallow decreased to wk 8 and increased thereafter. The peck rate to first wormpeck and number of pecks to swallow increased to wk 8 and then declined paralleling the changes with crumb food. The increase in peck rate is coupled with an increase in efficiency in worm catching.The results are consistent with the view that the improvement in pecking ability and accuracy compliments change in nutritional requirement best served by an invertebrate food (IF source requiring speed to achieve feeding success, especially with live prey. When this food source is no longer crucial these associated skill levels decline. An appreciation of the role of domestic fowl in controlling insect populations, at farm level, that are often vectors in disease spread is lacking.

  17. What drives security issuance decisions : Market timing, pecking order, or both?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, M.; Loncarski, I.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Veld, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    We study market timing and pecking order in a sample of debt and equity issues and share repurchases of Canadian firms from 1998 to 2007. We find that only when firms are not financially constrained is there evidence that firms issue (repurchase) equity when their shares are overvalued (undervalued)

  18. Shortleaf pine natural community restoration on Peck Ranch Conservation Area in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Tuttle; Kim J. Houf

    2007-01-01

    Oak decline has become a significantly increasing problem on Peck Ranch Conservation Area over the last several years. Most of the oak decline problems exist on past shortleaf pine sites. To address this issue, the area managers wrote a natural community restoration plan for 2,233 acres located on the Current-Eleven Point Oak-Pine Woodland Dissected Plain land type...

  19. Robert Newton Peck and Shaker Beliefs: A Day the Truth Would Die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Raises issues about the obligation of an author to depict ethnic or religious groups such as the Shakers in accurate terms. Takes issues with Robert Newton Peck's "A Day No Pigs Would Die," charging that it presents an almost libelous picture of the Shakers. Reviews Shaker history and culture. (TB)

  20. The pecking, resting and feeding behaviour of four broiler strains in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The birds were housed 15 per replicate pen and there were two replicates pens for each of the four strains. The birds were fed with commercial broiler starter from 0 - 6 weeks and finisher from 7 - 8 weeks. The criteria of measurements used were the number of birds pecking or resting, feed and water intakes and the weight ...

  1. Simulation of Fort Peck Lake Temperature Releases and Downstream Missouri River Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-09

    Poin t. Water Quality Modeling Repmt Fmt Peck Lake 15 U.S. Anny Corps of Engineers Omaha District 25...through the powerhouse utilizing the power generating capacity of the water releases. The following simulations evaluate the effectiveness of passing...the effectiveness of temperature release scenarios. Decreased generator efficiency and power generation or geotechnical stability of the spillway

  2. Control of Eurasian Water Milfoil, Fort Peck Project Area, Various Counties, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    spathula), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), cisco (Coregonus artedi) and spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius). The pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus...normal feeding , breeding, and sheltering. Recreational opportunities and activities at Fort Peck Project Area would likely be directly impacted if a...protected as native species thrive. Fish would be allowed to conduct their normal feeding , breeding, and sheltering absent the large stand of the noxious

  3. Benthic diatom response to changing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibic, Tamara; Comici, Cinzia; Bussani, Andrea; Del Negro, Paola

    2012-12-01

    In the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy) the benthic diatom community dynamics has been studied for seven years (1999-2005) at two sublittoral stations and related to variations of temperature, salinity, nutrient concentrations, freshwater inflow and mucilage. Bin-averaged temperature versus abundance of the main genera revealed that Nitzschia and Navicula presented a positive stepped trend with increasing temperature. An increase of ca. 860 ± 150 cells per cm3 per °C was calculated for Navicula and up to 590 ± 170 cells per cm3 per °C for Nitzschia. The genus Pleurosigma revealed a negative trend with increasing temperature, with a calculated decrease of ca. 140 ± 60 cells per cm3 per °C. A negative relation between Diploneis and temperature was found only in the shallower site. A peak of the tychopelagic genus Cylindrotheca was observed in correspondence with high salinity, but no significant results between bin-averaged salinity and benthic diatom abundance were found. Significant negative relations were obtained between bin-averaged abundance of Pleurosigma and H4SiO4 and NO3- at the deeper station and between the bin-averaged abundance of Gyrosigma and NH4+ at the coastal station. In this site the abundance of Gyrosigma showed a significant increasing trend over the study period. Navicula and Nitzschia seemed to suffer from the presence of mucilage events occurred in summer 2000 and 2004 whereas Diploneis occupied the ecological niche which remained temporarily uncovered by Navicula and Nitzschia. An exceptional freshwater plume with extremely high terrigenous input in November 2000 completely covered the benthic diatom community, causing a remarkable decrease in its total abundance in late autumn and winter 2000-01. The Gulf of Trieste may be considered a natural megacosm due to its geomorphologic characteristics and therefore the benthic diatom response to changing environmental conditions observed in this site could be extended beyond the

  4. Appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of female sexual response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Stephanie; Laan, Ellen; Spiering, Mark; Nilsson, Tove; Oomens, Sanne; Everaerd, Walter

    2008-01-01

    There is only limited evidence for appetitive classical conditioning of female sexual response, and to date modulation of female sexual response by aversive conditioning has not been studied. The aim of this article is to study appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of sexual responses in

  5. Are Purkinje Cell Pauses Drivers of Classically Conditioned Blink Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2016-08-01

    Several lines of evidence show that classical or Pavlovian conditioning of blink responses depends on the cerebellum. Recordings from cerebellar Purkinje cells that control the eyelid and the conditioned blink show that during training with a conditioning protocol, a Purkinje cell develops a pause response to the conditional stimulus. This conditioned cellular response has many of the properties that characterise the overt blink. The present paper argues that the learned Purkinje cell pause response is the memory trace and main driver of the overt conditioned blink and that it explains many well-known behavioural phenomena.

  6. Response moderation models for conditional dependence between response time and response accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, Jesper; Molenaar, Dylan

    2017-05-01

    It is becoming more feasible and common to register response times in the application of psychometric tests. Researchers thus have the opportunity to jointly model response accuracy and response time, which provides users with more relevant information. The most common choice is to use the hierarchical model (van der Linden, 2007, Psychometrika, 72, 287), which assumes conditional independence between response time and accuracy, given a person's speed and ability. However, this assumption may be violated in practice if, for example, persons vary their speed or differ in their response strategies, leading to conditional dependence between response time and accuracy and confounding measurement. We propose six nested hierarchical models for response time and accuracy that allow for conditional dependence, and discuss their relationship to existing models. Unlike existing approaches, the proposed hierarchical models allow for various forms of conditional dependence in the model and allow the effect of continuous residual response time on response accuracy to be item-specific, person-specific, or both. Estimation procedures for the models are proposed, as well as two information criteria that can be used for model selection. Parameter recovery and usefulness of the information criteria are investigated using simulation, indicating that the procedure works well and is likely to select the appropriate model. Two empirical applications are discussed to illustrate the different types of conditional dependence that may occur in practice and how these can be captured using the proposed hierarchical models. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of female sexual response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, S.; Laan, E.; Spiering, M.; Nilsson, T.; Oomens, S.; Everaerd, W.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is only limited evidence for appetitive classical conditioning of female sexual response, and to date modulation of female sexual response by aversive conditioning has not been studied. AIM: The aim of this article is to study appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of

  8. Key pecking during extinction after intermittent or continuous reinforcement as a function of the number of reinforcers delivered during training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcone, T J; Branch, M N; Hughes, C E; Pennypacker, H S

    1997-01-01

    Key pecking by 7 pigeons was established and maintained on a multiple variable-ratio variable-ratio (VR) schedule of food presentation. The schedule in one of the components was then changed to fixed-ratio (FR) 1 for a predetermined number of reinforcers. Both components were then changed to extinction (i.e., multiple extinction, extinction). This sequence was repeated a different number of times for each pigeon to determine the relation between the number of reinforcers delivered during each component of the multiple VR FR 1 schedule and the number of responses during extinction. For most pigeons, there were fewer responses during extinction in the presence of a stimulus recently correlated with FR 1, regardless of the number of reinforcers received. The ratio of the total responses in extinction in the former VR component to the total responses in the former FR 1 component increased as the number of reinforcers delivered during each component of the multiple schedule increased. Within-subject replications of the partial-reinforcement extinction effect generally occurred, and there were no overall reductions in the number of responses in extinction with repeated exposures to extinction. PMID:9037782

  9. Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

    1980-01-04

    This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater

  10. PENGUJIAN PECKING ORDER THEORY PADA EMITEN SYARIAH DI BURSA EFEK JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa Sutapa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test empirically whether capital structure decisionof Indonesian firms followed a hierarchy of sources of finance called Pecking Order. Samplesin this study were 29 firms listed in Jakarta Islamic Index (JII from 2001 to 2004. Variabelsused as proxy of Pecking Order Theory (POT were profitability, investment opportunity andfirm size. The results of this study were as follows: a. simultaneously, all proxies for POT couldexplain capital structure at Indonesian Capital Market, b. more profitable firms were lesslevered, c. bigger firms were more levered, d. result for investment opportunity did notsupport hypothesis. Firms listed at JII tended to follow POT in their financing decision. Part ofresults of this study was consistent with study of Wiwattanakantang (1999, Fama and French(2002, Benito (2003 and Mutamimah (2003.

  11. Appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of female sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Stephanie; Laan, Ellen; Spiering, Mark; Nilsson, Tove; Oomens, Sanne; Everaerd, Walter

    2008-06-01

    There is only limited evidence for appetitive classical conditioning of female sexual response, and to date modulation of female sexual response by aversive conditioning has not been studied. The aim of this article is to study appetitive and aversive classical conditioning of sexual responses in women. Vaginal pulse amplitude was assessed by vaginal photoplethysmography and ratings of affective value were obtained. Two differential conditioning experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, on appetitive conditioning, neutral pictures served as conditional stimuli (CSs) and genital vibrotactile stimulation as the unconditional stimulus (US). In Experiment 2, on aversive conditioning, erotic pictures served as CSs and a pain stimulus as US. In both experiments, only one CS (the CS+) was followed by the US during the acquisition phase. Conditioned responses were assessed during the extinction phase. In Experiment 1, during the extinction phase, as expected vaginal pulse amplitude was higher in response to the CS+ than during the CS-. Also, the CS+ was rated as marginally more positive than the CS-. In Experiment 2, during the extinction phase, as expected vaginal pulse amplitude was lower in response to the CS+ than during the CS-, and the CS+ was rated as more negative than the CS-. The results provide evidence for appetitive classical conditioning of sexual response in women, and are the first to show attenuation of sexual response in women by aversive conditioning.

  12. Conditional autonomy and responsible Action: A response to Yusef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yusef Waghid in his response to Martin Hall argues that Martin Hall offers a better way of making sense of some of the conceptual and pragmatic links between academic freedom and institutional autonomy. Nevertheless Waghid critiques Hall's uncritical treatment of prominent theoretical positions for his claims, which ...

  13. Changing CS Features Alters Evaluative Responses in Evaluative Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Christian; Stahl, Christoph; Forderer, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Evaluative conditioning (EC) refers to changes in people's evaluative responses toward initially neutral stimuli (CSs) by mere spatial and temporal contiguity with other positive or negative stimuli (USs). We investigate whether changing CS features from conditioning to evaluation also changes people's evaluative response toward these CSs. We used…

  14. Sensory Over-Responsivity in Adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Teresa; Miller, Lucy J.; Schoen, Sarah A.; Nielsen, Darci M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports and empirical evidence suggest that sensory processing issues are a key feature of autism spectrum conditions. This study set out to investigate whether adults with autism spectrum conditions report more sensory over-responsivity than adults without autism spectrum conditions. Another goal of the study was to identify whether…

  15. Imagining worlds: responsible engineering under conditions of epistemic opacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark; van der Poel, Ibo; Goldberg, David E.

    2010-01-01

    How must we understand the demand that engineering be morally responsible? Starting from the epistemic aspect of the problem, I distinguish between two approaches to moral responsibility. One ascribes moral responsibility to the self and to others under epistemic conditions of transparency, the

  16. Urban Great Tits (Parus major Show Higher Distress Calling and Pecking Rates than Rural Birds across Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Senar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental change associated with urbanization is considered one of the major threats to biodiversity. Some species nevertheless seem to thrive in the urban areas, probably associated with selection for phenotypes that match urban habitats. Previous research defined different “copying styles” in distress behavior during the handling of birds. These behaviors vary along a continuum from “proactive” to “reactive” copers. By studying avian distress behaviors we aimed to broaden our understanding of the relationship between coping styles and urbanization. Using a large-scale comparative study of seven paired rural and urban sites across Europe, we assayed distress behaviors during handling of urban and rural-dwelling populations of the great tit Parus major. We detected no consistent pairwise differences in breath rate between urban and rural habitats. However, urban great tits displayed more distress calling (fear screams and higher pecking rate (handling aggression than rural birds. These findings suggest that urban great tits have a more proactive coping strategy when dealing with stressful conditions. This finding is in line with previous studies implying that urban great tits are more explorative, less neophobic, and display shorter flight distances than their rural counterparts, representing further aspects of the same “proactive,” coping strategy. Future research should investigate whether reported differences in distress behavior are due to local adaption caused by natural selection or due to phenotypic plasticity.

  17. The Fragility of Individual-Based Explanations of Social Hierarchies: A Test Using Animal Pecking Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Ivan D; Lindquist, W Brent

    2016-01-01

    The standard approach in accounting for hierarchical differentiation in biology and the social sciences considers a hierarchy as a static distribution of individuals possessing differing amounts of some valued commodity, assumes that the hierarchy is generated by micro-level processes involving individuals, and attempts to reverse engineer the processes that produced the hierarchy. However, sufficient experimental and analytical results are available to evaluate this standard approach in the case of animal dominance hierarchies (pecking orders). Our evaluation using evidence from hierarchy formation in small groups of both hens and cichlid fish reveals significant deficiencies in the three tenets of the standard approach in accounting for the organization of dominance hierarchies. In consequence, we suggest that a new approach is needed to explain the organization of pecking orders and, very possibly, by implication, for other kinds of social hierarchies. We develop an example of such an approach that considers dominance hierarchies to be dynamic networks, uses dynamic sequences of interaction (dynamic network motifs) to explain the organization of dominance hierarchies, and derives these dynamic sequences directly from observation of hierarchy formation. We test this dynamical explanation using computer simulation and find a good fit with actual dynamics of hierarchy formation in small groups of hens. We hypothesize that the same dynamic sequences are used in small groups of many other animal species forming pecking orders, and we discuss the data required to evaluate our hypothesis. Finally, we briefly consider how our dynamic approach may be generalized to other kinds of social hierarchies using the example of the distribution of empty gastropod (snail) shells occupied in populations of hermit crabs.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence M. Monson

    2003-06-30

    Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon

  19. The Fragility of Individual-Based Explanations of Social Hierarchies: A Test Using Animal Pecking Orders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan D Chase

    Full Text Available The standard approach in accounting for hierarchical differentiation in biology and the social sciences considers a hierarchy as a static distribution of individuals possessing differing amounts of some valued commodity, assumes that the hierarchy is generated by micro-level processes involving individuals, and attempts to reverse engineer the processes that produced the hierarchy. However, sufficient experimental and analytical results are available to evaluate this standard approach in the case of animal dominance hierarchies (pecking orders. Our evaluation using evidence from hierarchy formation in small groups of both hens and cichlid fish reveals significant deficiencies in the three tenets of the standard approach in accounting for the organization of dominance hierarchies. In consequence, we suggest that a new approach is needed to explain the organization of pecking orders and, very possibly, by implication, for other kinds of social hierarchies. We develop an example of such an approach that considers dominance hierarchies to be dynamic networks, uses dynamic sequences of interaction (dynamic network motifs to explain the organization of dominance hierarchies, and derives these dynamic sequences directly from observation of hierarchy formation. We test this dynamical explanation using computer simulation and find a good fit with actual dynamics of hierarchy formation in small groups of hens. We hypothesize that the same dynamic sequences are used in small groups of many other animal species forming pecking orders, and we discuss the data required to evaluate our hypothesis. Finally, we briefly consider how our dynamic approach may be generalized to other kinds of social hierarchies using the example of the distribution of empty gastropod (snail shells occupied in populations of hermit crabs.

  20. Learning and Timing of Voluntary Blink Responses Match Eyeblink Conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rasmussen (Anders); Jirenhed, D.-A. (Dan-Anders)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCan humans produce well-Timed blink responses to a neutral stimulus voluntarily, without receiving any blink-eliciting, unconditional, stimulus? And if they can, to what degree does classical eyeblink conditioning depend on volition? Here we show that voluntary blink responses learned in

  1. Conditioned diminution of the unconditioned skin conductance response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David C; Lewis, Eleanor P; Wood, Kimberly H

    2011-08-01

    During Pavlovian conditioning the expression of a conditioned response typically serves as evidence that an association between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) has been learned. However, learning-related changes in the unconditioned response (UCR) produced by a predictable UCS can also develop. In the present study, we investigated learning-related reductions in the magnitude of the unconditioned skin conductance response (SCR). Healthy volunteers participated in a differential conditioning study in which one tone (CS+) was paired with a loud white-noise UCS and a second tone (CS-) was presented alone. In addition, probe trials that consisted of UCS presentations paired with the CS+ (CS + UCS) and CS- (CS - UCS), as well as presentations of the UCS alone were included to assess UCR diminution. SCR and participants' expectations of UCS presentation were monitored during conditioning. Greater diminution of the UCR was observed to the UCS when it followed the CS+ compared to when it followed the CS- or was presented alone. Further, UCR amplitude showed an inverse relationship with the participants' ratings of UCS expectancy. However, conditioned UCR diminution was also observed independent of differential UCS expectancies. Our findings demonstrate conditioned diminution of the unconditioned SCR. Further, these findings suggest that although UCR amplitude is modified by conscious expectations of the UCS, conditioned diminution of the UCR can be expressed independent of learning-related changes in these expectations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Biomechanical responses of aquatic plants to aerial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Elena; Puijalon, Sara

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands are impacted by changes in hydrological regimes that can lead to periods of low water levels. During these periods, aquatic plants experience a drastic change in the mechanical conditions that they encounter, from low gravitational and tensile hydrodynamic forces when exposed to flow under aquatic conditions, to high gravitational and bending forces under terrestrial conditions. The objective of this study was to test the capacity of aquatic plants to produce self-supporting growth forms when growing under aerial conditions by assessing their resistance to terrestrial mechanical conditions and the associated morpho-anatomical changes. Plastic responses to aerial conditions were assessed by sampling Berula erecta, Hippuris vulgaris, Juncus articulatus, Lythrum salicaria, Mentha aquatica, Myosotis scorpioides, Nuphar lutea and Sparganium emersum under submerged and emergent conditions. The cross-sectional area and dry matter content (DMC) were measured in the plant organs that bear the mechanical forces, and their biomechanical properties in tension and bending were assessed. All of the species except for two had significantly higher stiffness in bending and thus an increased resistance to terrestrial mechanical conditions when growing under emergent conditions. This response was determined either by an increased allocation to strengthening tissues and thus a higher DMC, or by an increased cross-sectional area. These morpho-anatomical changes also resulted in increased strength and stiffness in tension. The capacity of the studied species to colonize this fluctuating environment can be accounted for by a high degree of phenotypic plasticity in response to emersion. Further investigation is however needed to disentangle the finer mechanisms behind these responses (e.g. allometric relations, tissue make-up), their costs and adaptive value.

  3. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...... and show how to characterise the execution of DCR structures and the acceptance condition for infinite runs by giving a map to Bu ̈chi-automata. This is the first step towards automatic verification of processes specified as DCR structures....

  4. Selection method and early-life history affect behavioural development, feather pecking and cannibalism in laying hens: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Komen, J.; Ellen, E.D.; Uitdehaag, K.A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of selection method and early-life history on the behavioural development of laying hens. Especially in larger groups, laying hens often develop damaging behaviours, such as feather pecking and cannibalism, leading to impaired animal welfare. We

  5. Reinstatement of an Extinguished Fear Conditioned Response in Infant Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revillo, Damian A.; Trebucq, Gastón; Paglini, Maria G.; Arias, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Although it is currently accepted that the extinction effect reflects new context-dependent learning, this is not so clear during infancy, because some studies did not find recovery of the extinguished conditioned response (CR) in rodents during this ontogenetic stage. However, recent studies have shown the return of an extinguished CR in infant…

  6. Extinction of aversive classically conditioned human sexual response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, Mirte; Laan, Ellen; Everaerd, Walter; Spinhoven, Philip; Both, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that acquired subjective likes and dislikes are quite resistant to extinction. Moreover, studies on female sexual response demonstrated that diminished genital arousal and positive affect toward erotic stimuli due to aversive classical conditioning did not extinguish during an

  7. Cholesterol enhances classical conditioning of the rabbit heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Darwish, Deya S; Wang, Desheng; Burhans, Lauren B; Gonzales-Joekes, Jimena; Deci, Stephen; Stankovic, Goran; Sparks, D Larry

    2007-07-19

    The cholesterol-fed rabbit is a model of atherosclerosis and has been proposed as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. Feeding rabbits cholesterol has been shown to increase the number of beta amyloid immunoreactive neurons in the cortex. Addition of copper to the drinking water of cholesterol-fed rabbits can increase this number still further and may lead to plaque-like structures. Classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in cholesterol-fed rabbits is retarded in the presence of these plaque-like structures but may be facilitated in their absence. In a factorial design, rabbits fed 2% cholesterol or a normal diet (0% cholesterol) for 8 weeks with or without copper added to the drinking water were given trace classical conditioning using a tone and periorbital electrodermal stimulation to study the effects of cholesterol and copper on classical conditioning of heart rate and the nictitating membrane response. Cholesterol-fed rabbits showed significant facilitation of heart rate conditioning and conditioning-specific modification of heart rate relative to normal diet controls. Consistent with previous research, cholesterol had minimal effects on classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response when periorbital electrodermal stimulation was used as the unconditioned stimulus. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant increase in the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of the cholesterol-fed rabbits. Supplementation of drinking water with copper increased the number of beta amyloid positive neurons in the cortex of cholesterol-fed rabbits but did not produce plaque-like structures or have a significant effect on heart rate conditioning. The data provide additional support for our finding that, in the absence of plaques, dietary cholesterol may facilitate learning and memory.

  8. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Leuko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  9. Eyelid squint response to asthenopia-inducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrisankaran, Sowjanya; Sheedy, James E; Hayes, John R

    2007-07-01

    To study the orbicularis oculi muscle response to asthenopia-inducing conditions. Twenty subjects (18-36 years) screened for 20/20 vision in each eye participated in the study. Subjects read passages under different asthenopia-inducing conditions. The inducing conditions were glare, low contrast, small font size, refractive error, up gaze, accommodative stress and convergence stress. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to study the orbicularis oculi response from the right eye. Palpebral fissure height was measured from recorded video images of the right eye. At the end of each condition subjects were asked to rate the severity and type of visual discomfort experienced. Outcome measures for the asthenopia-inducing conditions were compared with their respective nonstress controls. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Refractive error (p = 0.0001), glare (p = 0.0001), low contrast (p = 0.007), small font (p = 0.034), and up gaze (p = 0.001) resulted in a significant increase in EMG power. Refractive error (p = 0.0001) and glare (p = 0.0001) also caused significant reduction in aperture size. Reading a low contrast text caused a reduction in blink rate (p = 0.035), whereas refractive error (p = 0.005) and glare (p = 0.01) caused an increase in blink rate. All conditions induced significant visual discomfort (p EMG power, eyelid squint response and increased blink rate. Low contrast and small font, which reduce image quality but do not benefit from eyelid squint, resulted in increased EMG power without changes in aperture size and reduced blink rate (for low contrast). Accommodative and convergence stress (in subjects with normal accommodative and vergence abilities) did not cause changes in EMG power, aperture size or blink rate. These results suggest that contraction of the orbicularis oculi is a part of the asthenopia mechanism related to compromised image quality.

  10. Effect of repetitive pecking at working length for glide path preparation using G-file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Hong; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Abed, Rashid El; Chang, Seok-Woo; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-05-01

    Glide path preparation is recommended to reduce torsional failure of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments and to prevent root canal transportation. This study evaluated whether the repetitive insertions of G-files to the working length maintain the apical size as well as provide sufficient lumen as a glide path for subsequent instrumentation. The G-file system (Micro-Mega) composed of G1 and G2 files for glide path preparation was used with the J-shaped, simulated resin canals. After inserting a G1 file twice, a G2 file was inserted to the working length 1, 4, 7, or 10 times for four each experimental group, respectively (n = 10). Then the canals were cleaned by copious irrigation, and lubricated with a separating gel medium. Canal replicas were made using silicone impression material, and the diameter of the replicas was measured at working length (D0) and 1 mm level (D1) under a scanning electron microscope. Data was analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p = 0.05). The diameter at D0 level did not show any significant difference between the 1, 2, 4, and 10 times of repetitive pecking insertions of G2 files at working length. However, 10 times of pecking motion with G2 file resulted in significantly larger canal diameter at D1 (p length created an adequate lumen for subsequent apical shaping with other rotary files bigger than International Organization for Standardization (ISO) size 20, without apical transportation at D0 level.

  11. Effect of repetitive pecking at working length for glide path preparation using G-file

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hong Ha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Glide path preparation is recommended to reduce torsional failure of nickel-titanium (NiTi rotary instruments and to prevent root canal transportation. This study evaluated whether the repetitive insertions of G-files to the working length maintain the apical size as well as provide sufficient lumen as a glide path for subsequent instrumentation. Materials and Methods The G-file system (Micro-Mega composed of G1 and G2 files for glide path preparation was used with the J-shaped, simulated resin canals. After inserting a G1 file twice, a G2 file was inserted to the working length 1, 4, 7, or 10 times for four each experimental group, respectively (n = 10. Then the canals were cleaned by copious irrigation, and lubricated with a separating gel medium. Canal replicas were made using silicone impression material, and the diameter of the replicas was measured at working length (D0 and 1 mm level (D1 under a scanning electron microscope. Data was analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p = 0.05. Results The diameter at D0 level did not show any significant difference between the 1, 2, 4, and 10 times of repetitive pecking insertions of G2 files at working length. However, 10 times of pecking motion with G2 file resulted in significantly larger canal diameter at D1 (p < 0.05. Conclusions Under the limitations of this study, the repetitive insertion of a G2 file up to 10 times at working length created an adequate lumen for subsequent apical shaping with other rotary files bigger than International Organization for Standardization (ISO size 20, without apical transportation at D0 level.

  12. Cortico-amygdala circuits: role in the conditioned stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Sabina

    2005-12-01

    The amygdala plays a crucial role in the orchestration and modulation of the organism response to aversive, stressful events. This response could be conceived as the result of two interdependent components. The first is represented by sets of visceral and motor responses aimed at helping the organism to cope with the present event. The second is the acquisition and modulation of memories relative to the stressful stimulus and its context. This latter component contributes to the instatement of conditioned stress responses that are essential to the capability of the organism to predict future exposures to similar stimuli in order to avoid them or counteract them effectively. In the amygdala, these two components become fully integrated. Massive networks link the amygdala to the hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem. These networks convey visceral, humoral and nociceptive information to the amygdala and mediate its effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as well on autonomic and motor centers. On the other hand, interactions between the amygdala and interconnected cortical networks play a crucial role in acquisition, consolidation and extinction of learning relative to the stressful stimulus. Within the scope of this review, current evidence relative to the interaction between the amygdala and cortical networks will be considered in relationship to the integration of the conditioned response to stress.

  13. Towards Trustworthy Adaptive Case Management with Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Slaats, Tijs

    2013-01-01

    We describe how the declarative Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graphs process model can be used for trustworthy adaptive case management by leveraging the flexible execution, dynamic composition and adaptation supported by DCR Graphs. The dynamically composed and adapted graphs are verified...... for deadlock freedom and liveness in the SPIN model checker by utilizing a mapping from DCR Graphs to PROMELA code. We exemplify the approach by a small workflow extracted from a field study at a danish hospital....

  14. Response of Simple, Model Systems to Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Rodney C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lang, Maik [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-30

    The focus of the research was on the application of high-pressure/high-temperature techniques, together with intense energetic ion beams, to the study of the behavior of simple oxide systems (e.g., SiO2, GeO2, CeO2, TiO2, HfO2, SnO2, ZnO and ZrO2) under extreme conditions. These simple stoichiometries provide unique model systems for the analysis of structural responses to pressure up to and above 1 Mbar, temperatures of up to several thousands of kelvin, and the extreme energy density generated by energetic heavy ions (tens of keV/atom). The investigations included systematic studies of radiation- and pressure-induced amorphization of high P-T polymorphs. By studying the response of simple stoichiometries that have multiple structural “outcomes”, we have established the basic knowledge required for the prediction of the response of more complex structures to extreme conditions. We especially focused on the amorphous state and characterized the different non-crystalline structure-types that result from the interplay of radiation and pressure. For such experiments, we made use of recent technological developments, such as the perforated diamond-anvil cell and in situ investigation using synchrotron x-ray sources. We have been particularly interested in using extreme pressures to alter the electronic structure of a solid prior to irradiation. We expected that the effects of modified band structure would be evident in the track structure and morphology, information which is much needed to describe theoretically the fundamental physics of track-formation. Finally, we investigated the behavior of different simple-oxide, composite nanomaterials (e.g., uncoated nanoparticles vs. core/shell systems) under coupled, extreme conditions. This provided insight into surface and boundary effects on phase stability under extreme conditions.

  15. Bridge Condition Assessment based on Vibration Responses of Passenger Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Yabe, Akito

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of assessing the condition of existing short- and medium-span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges based on vibration monitoring data obtained from a public bus. This paper not only describes details of a prototype monitoring system that uses information technology and sensors capable of providing more accurate knowledge of bridge performance than conventional ways but also shows a few specific examples of bridge condition assessment based on vehicle vibrations measured by using an in-service public bus equipped with vibration measurement instrumentation. This paper also describes a sensitivity analysis of deteriorating bridges based on simulation of the acceleration response of buses conducted by the "substructure method" employing a finite element model to verify the above bridge performance results. The main conclusions obtained in this study can be summarized as follows: (1) Because the vibration responses of passenger vehicles, such as buses, have a good linear relationship with the vibration responses of the target bridges, the proposed system can be used as a practical monitoring system for bridge condition assessment. (2) The results of sensitivity analysis performed by the substructure method show that bus vibration responses are useful for evaluating target bridge performance. (3) The proposed method was applied to a network of real bridges in a local area to evaluate its effectiveness. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used to prioritize the repair/strengthening works of existing bridges based on various vibration information in order to help bridge administrators establish rational maintenance strategies.

  16. Bridge Condition Assessment based on Vibration Responses of Passenger Vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube (Japan); Yabe, Akito, E-mail: miya818@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp, E-mail: nagai@kke.co.jp [Seismic Engineering Department, KOZO KEIKAKU Engineering Inc. Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-19

    In this paper, we propose a new method of assessing the condition of existing short- and medium-span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges based on vibration monitoring data obtained from a public bus. This paper not only describes details of a prototype monitoring system that uses information technology and sensors capable of providing more accurate knowledge of bridge performance than conventional ways but also shows a few specific examples of bridge condition assessment based on vehicle vibrations measured by using an in-service public bus equipped with vibration measurement instrumentation. This paper also describes a sensitivity analysis of deteriorating bridges based on simulation of the acceleration response of buses conducted by the 'substructure method' employing a finite element model to verify the above bridge performance results. The main conclusions obtained in this study can be summarized as follows: (1) Because the vibration responses of passenger vehicles, such as buses, have a good linear relationship with the vibration responses of the target bridges, the proposed system can be used as a practical monitoring system for bridge condition assessment. (2) The results of sensitivity analysis performed by the substructure method show that bus vibration responses are useful for evaluating target bridge performance. (3) The proposed method was applied to a network of real bridges in a local area to evaluate its effectiveness. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used to prioritize the repair/strengthening works of existing bridges based on various vibration information in order to help bridge administrators establish rational maintenance strategies.

  17. Seqüência de estímulos durante o fortalecimento da resposta de bicar: efeitos sobre a aquisição de desempenhos em matching e oddity Stimuli sequencing during pecking responses build up: effects upon matching and oddity acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Damiani

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou o efeito da seqüência de apresentação de estímulos durante o fortalecimento da resposta (pré-treino de bicar em pombos, sobre a aquisição do matching de identidade (IMTS e oddity-from-sample (OFS com 3 cores como estímulos e 2 escolhas. O problema se remete à disparidade no desempenho inicial em OFS em relação aos níveis do acaso, reiteradamente relatado na literatura. Durante o pré-treino, apenas uma cor era apresentada em qualquer uma de 3 chaves de resposta. O sorteio da seqüência de estímulos nas tentativas foi realizado com a restrição de que a probabilidade de 2 estímulos iguais serem apresentados em tentativas consecutivas foi semelhante à probabilidade de 2 estímulos diferentes serem apresentados em tentativas consecutivas. Em seguida, os sujeitos foram submetidos ou ao treino IMTS ou ao OFS. Os resultados replicaram aqueles descritos na literatura, indicando que o controle realizado sobre a seqüência de tentativas no pré-treino não teve efeito sobre a aquisição do IMTS e OFS.This study was aimed to investigate the question why oddity-from-sample acquisition in animals always start at above chance level. A question was raised concerning the role of stimuli sequences and a possible bias introduced in responding. Thus, this study analyzed the effects of stimuli sequencing during response build up in the pigeon (pre-training upon the acquisition of identity matching (IMTS and oddity-from-sample (OFS with three color stimuli and two comparisons. During pre-training one color was presented at the time in any one of three response key. Color presentation was randomized but for the restriction that the probability of two like colors being presented consecutively was the same as the probability of two non-like colors being presented consecutively. This controlled for any sequencing bias effects upon responding. Following, subjects were submitted either to IMTS or to OFS training. Results

  18. Zgorzel pędow borówki wysokiej wywołana przez grzyb Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii (Peck. Groves [The canker of highbush blueberry caused by Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii (Peck. Groves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Borecki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusicoccum canker of highbush blueberry was first detected in 1973 in Poland. The diseases appeared on the shoots of variety Jersey in the collection of the Department of Pomology, Agricultural University, Warsaw-Ursyn6w. The disease was caused by the fungus Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii {Peck. Groves. The conidial stage is known as Topospora myrtilli (Felfch. Boermema syn. Fusicoccum putrefaciens Shear.

  19. SAP FLOW RESPONSE OF CHERRY TREES TO WEATHER CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. JUHÁSZ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sap flow response of cherry trees to weather condition. Themain goal of our study is to measure water-demand of cherry trees budded ontodifferent rootstocks by sapflow equipment and to study the sap flow response to themeteorological factors. The investigations are carried out in Soroksár in Hungary at‘Rita’ sweet cherry orchard. The pattern of sapflow was analyzed in relation ofsolar radiation, vapour pressure deficit and air temperature. Between solar radiationand sap flow was found a parabolic relation, daily pattern of sapflow is in closerelation (cubic also to vapour pressure deficit. No significant relationship existedbetween sapflow and air temperature. The sapflow performance of sweet cherrytrees on different rootstocks showed typical daily characters.

  20. Intermediate Conditions of Democratic Accountability: A Response to Electoral Skepticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Maloy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to respond to “democratic deficits” in modern constitutional republics must contend with the broad scholarly trend of electoral skepticism. While generally casting doubt on periodic competitive elections’ suitability as vehicles of accountability, electoral skepticism does not necessarily entail an absolute devaluation of elections. Some normative and empirical research responds to this trend by refocusing attention on values other than popular power, such as civil peace, which might be served by periodic competitive elections. Another response short of abandoning the value of popular power, however, is to draw out possibilities for institutional design from the restricted conditions under which previous study has found electoral accountability to be plausible or likely. This second task requires an empirically informed exercise in political theory. Pursuing it in a programmatic and policy-relevant way requires descending from the grand, systemic level of constitutional structures and electoral formulae to intermediate (or middle-range institutional conditions of accountability, such as rules about parties, campaigns, and election administration. My analysis reinterprets principal-agent models to develop four general types of crucial condition for electoral accountability, and then ramifies this scheme by reference to recent empirical research. The result is a “top ten” list of specific institutional factors that could be theoretically decisive in helping or hindering electoral accountability. These ten conditions could guide future research designs and reform proposals alike.

  1. Wind turbine aerodynamic response under atmospheric icing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, M.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the atmospheric ice accumulation on wind turbine blades and its effect on the aerodynamic performance and structural response. The role of eight atmospheric and system parameters on the ice accretion profiles was estimated using the 2D ice accumulation software lewice Twenty......-four hours of icing, with time varying wind speed and atmospheric icing conditions, was simulated on a rotor. Computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, was used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of the blade after icing. The results were also validated against wind tunnel measurements performed at LM...

  2. Physiological Response of Plants to Temporary Changes in Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Camilla; Mugnai, Sergio; Masi, Elisa; Azzarello, Elisa; Voigt, Boris; Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    Gravity is the main factor that influences the direction of growth of plant organs, and has also a direct effect on the plant metabolism. When an organ, mainly roots, is turned by between 0 (vertical) and 90 (horizontal), the change of orientation is perceived by its organs producing the so-called gravitropic reaction, which involves a strong metabolic response. In order to study these reaction in real microgravity conditions, some experiments have been set up during six ESA parabolic flight campaign. Oxygen concentration in the solution, in which roots of Zea mays were placed, have been constantly monitored during normal, hyper-and microgravity conditions. An evident burst in oxygen fluxes started just 2.0 0.5 s after the imposition of microgravity conditions. No significant changes were noticed neither in normal nor in hyper-gravity conditions. These measurements were done using oxymeters, that revealed the onset of long lasting oxygen bursts appearing only during microgravity. Although the chemical nature of these oxygen bursts is still unknown, they may implicate a strong generation of reactive oxygen species as they exactly match the microgravity situation. Thus, our data strongly sug-gest that the sensing mechanism is not related to a general mechano-stress, which was imposed also during hypergravity, but is very specific of the microgravity situation. Moreover, it is well-known that stress rapidly induces reactive oxygen bursts which are associated with oxygen influx and reactive oxygen efflux from stressed plant tissues. Accordingly, our data indicate that microgravity represents a stress situation for plants, especially for root apices, and these bursts, probably ROS, are initiating and integrating adaptive responses of plant roots which resemble other unrelated stress situations. To validate this hypothesis we added to our ex-perimental set-up two very sensitive selective microelectrodes for H2 O2 and NO, and, even if the parabolic flights are not

  3. Managing complexity in process digitalisation with dynamic condition response graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Debois, Søren; Slaats, Tijs

    2017-01-01

    Digitalisation of work and business processes with the aim to provide more efficient services at a higher and consistent quality is high on the agendas in many countries. In Denmark the push for digitalisation is witnessed by the national strategy for digitalisation published every four years....... Sadly, it is also witnessed by a number of expensive failed digitalisation projects. In this paper we point to two key problems in state-of-The art BPM technologies: 1) the use of rigid flow diagrams as the "source code" of process digitalisation is not suitable for managing the complexity of knowledge...... workflows and regulations and 2) insufficient support for continuous and agile end-user mapping and adaptation of processes. We report on research in progress on how the Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graph technology and collaborative process repository DCRGraphs.net could support agile and collaborative...

  4. Managing complexity in process digitalisation with dynamic condition response graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Debois, Søren; Slaats, Tijs

    2017-01-01

    Digitalisation of work and business processes with the aim to provide more efficient services at a higher and consistent quality is high on the agendas in many countries. In Denmark the push for digitalisation is witnessed by the national strategy for digitalisation published every four years....... Sadly, it is also witnessed by a number of expensive failed digitalisation projects. In this paper we point to two key problems in state-of-the art BPM technologies: 1) the use of rigid flow diagrams as the “source code” of process digitalisation is not suitable for managing the complexity of knowledge...... workflows and regulations and 2) insufficient support for continuous and agile end-user mapping and adaptation of processes. We report on research in progress on how the Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graph technology and collaborative process repository DCRGraphs.net could support agile and collaborative...

  5. Rapid amygdala responses during trace fear conditioning without awareness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L Balderston

    Full Text Available The role of consciousness in learning has been debated for nearly 50 years. Recent studies suggest that conscious awareness is needed to bridge the gap when learning about two events that are separated in time, as is true for trace fear conditioning. This has been repeatedly shown and seems to apply to other forms of classical conditioning as well. In contrast to these findings, we show that individuals can learn to associate a face with the later occurrence of a shock, even if they are unable to perceive the face. We used a novel application of magnetoencephalography (MEG to non-invasively record neural activity from the amygdala, which is known to be important for fear learning. We demonstrate rapid (∼ 170-200 ms amygdala responses during the stimulus free period between the face and the shock. These results suggest that unperceived faces can serve as signals for impending threat, and that rapid, automatic activation of the amygdala contributes to this process. In addition, we describe a methodology that can be applied in the future to study neural activity with MEG in other subcortical structures.

  6. Rapid amygdala responses during trace fear conditioning without awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderston, Nicholas L; Schultz, Douglas H; Baillet, Sylvain; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2014-01-01

    The role of consciousness in learning has been debated for nearly 50 years. Recent studies suggest that conscious awareness is needed to bridge the gap when learning about two events that are separated in time, as is true for trace fear conditioning. This has been repeatedly shown and seems to apply to other forms of classical conditioning as well. In contrast to these findings, we show that individuals can learn to associate a face with the later occurrence of a shock, even if they are unable to perceive the face. We used a novel application of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to non-invasively record neural activity from the amygdala, which is known to be important for fear learning. We demonstrate rapid (∼ 170-200 ms) amygdala responses during the stimulus free period between the face and the shock. These results suggest that unperceived faces can serve as signals for impending threat, and that rapid, automatic activation of the amygdala contributes to this process. In addition, we describe a methodology that can be applied in the future to study neural activity with MEG in other subcortical structures.

  7. Diverging Responses of Tropical Andean Biomes under Future Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%–17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for

  8. Biocrust spectral response as affected by changing climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Guirado, Emilio; Escribano, Paula; Reyes, Andres; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Drylands are characterized by scarce vegetation coverage and low rates of biological activity, both constrained by water scarcity. Under these conditions, biocrusts form key players of ecosystem functioning. They comprise complex poikilohydric communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and bryophytes together with heterotrophic bacteria, archaea and fungi, which cover the uppermost soil layer. Biocrusts can cope with prolonged phases of drought, being rapidly re-activated when water becomes available again. Upon reactivation, biocrusts almost immediately turn green, fixing atmospheric carbon and nitrogen and increasing ecosystem productivity. However, due to their inconspicuous growth they have only rarely been analysed and spatially and temporally continuous information on their response to water pulses is missing. These data are particularly important under changing climatic conditions predicting an increase in aridity and variations in precipitation patterns within most of the dryland regions. In the present study, we used multi-temporal series of NDVI obtained from LANDSAT images to analyze biocrust and vegetation response to water pulses within the South African Succulent Karoo and we predicted their future response under different climate change scenarios. The results showed that biocrust and vegetation greenness are controlled by aridity, solar radiation and soil water content, showing similar annual patterns, with minimum values during dry periods that increased within the rainy season and decreased again after the onset of drought. However, biocrusts responded faster to water availability and turned green almost immediately after small rains, producing a small NDVI peak only few days after rainfall, whereas more time was needed for vegetation to grow new green tissue. However, once the photosynthetic tissue of vegetation was restored, it caused the highest increase of NDVI values after the rain. Predicted changes in precipitation patterns and aridity

  9. Opioid suppression of conditioned anticipatory brain responses to breathlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayen, Anja; Wanigasekera, Vishvarani; Faull, Olivia K; Campbell, Stewart F; Garry, Payashi S; Raby, Simon J M; Robertson, Josephine; Webster, Ruth; Wise, Richard G; Herigstad, Mari; Pattinson, Kyle T S

    2017-04-15

    Opioid painkillers are a promising treatment for chronic breathlessness, but are associated with potentially fatal side effects. In the treatment of breathlessness, their mechanisms of action are unclear. A better understanding might help to identify safer alternatives. Learned associations between previously neutral stimuli (e.g. stairs) and repeated breathlessness induce an anticipatory threat response that may worsen breathlessness, contributing to the downward spiral of decline seen in clinical populations. As opioids are known to influence associative learning, we hypothesized that they may interfere with the brain processes underlying a conditioned anticipatory response to breathlessness in relevant brain areas, including the amygdala and the hippocampus. Healthy volunteers viewed visual cues (neutral stimuli) immediately before induction of experimental breathlessness with inspiratory resistive loading. Thus, an association was formed between the cue and breathlessness. Subsequently, this paradigm was repeated in two identical neuroimaging sessions with intravenous infusions of either low-dose remifentanil (0.7ng/ml target-controlled infusion) or saline (randomised). During saline infusion, breathlessness anticipation activated the right anterior insula and the adjacent operculum. Breathlessness was associated with activity in a network including the insula, operculum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the primary sensory and motor cortices. Remifentanil reduced breathlessness unpleasantness but not breathlessness intensity. Remifentanil depressed anticipatory activity in the amygdala and the hippocampus that correlated with reductions in breathlessness unpleasantness. During breathlessness, remifentanil decreased activity in the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex and sensory motor cortices. Remifentanil-induced reduction in breathlessness unpleasantness was associated with increased activity in the rostral anterior

  10. Mineral composition of different strains of edible medicinal mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Peck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Györfi, Júlia; Geösel, András; Vetter, János

    2010-12-01

    Agaricus subrufescens Peck is a well-known Basidiomycota fungus (Royal Sun Agaricus), with rising demand in consumption and production worldwide. This particular mushroom with high medical value has been used successfully in cancer therapy and in the treatment of some bacterial and viral diseases. Four strains of A. subrufescens (Si2.2, 853, 1105, and 2603) were cultivated, and 22 mineral elements of basidiomes (fruit bodies) were analyzed (caps and stipes separately). The data obtained about the mineral compositions were compared to the "reference" Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom) and to the average of wild growing Agaricus species. The mineral composition of A. subrufescens strains can be characterized by the following: (1) high levels of valuable macroelements, i.e., potassium (28-30,000 mg/kg of dry matter), phosphorus (7-11,000 mg/kg of dry matter), and calcium and magnesium (for both elements, 1,000-1,500 mg/kg of dry matter); (2) significantly higher level of copper (compared to A. bisporus, 70-150 mg/kg of dry matter) and zinc (140-250 mg/kg of dry matter); (3) low quantity of sodium (140-180 mg/kg of dry matter); (4) attention should paid to the detectable amount of cadmium (2-17 mg/kg of dry matter) in strain Si2.2; (5) low or undetectable concentrations of some other poisonous microelements like As, Cr, and V; and (6) the distribution of elements in caps and stipes is characteristic-the majority of beneficial elements have higher contents in caps than in stipes, but some other elements, such as Ca, Fe, and Na, appear in an inverse proportion. In conclusion, it can be said that the mineral composition of A. subrufescens is definitely positive, with the exception of the above-mentioned Cd level.

  11. Arctic hillslope hydrologic response to changing water storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushlow, C. R.; Godsey, S.

    2013-12-01

    Solute transport from terrestrial to aquatic environments depends on dynamics of water storage and flux. In the arctic, these dynamics are related to changes in permafrost and hydrological conditions that vary with climate across multiple scales. In order to predict the continued trajectory of arctic landscape and ecosystem evolution, observed changes to the hydrologic regime and riverine nutrient fluxes require properly scaled, mechanistic explanations. We address this issue at the hillslope scale by quantifying hydrologic response to changing storage as part of a collaborative effort to understand the coupled hydrology and biogeochemistry of arctic hillslopes. Hillslopes underlain by continuous permafrost experience gradual, summer-season increases in potential water storage through active layer thaw, as well as stochastic changes in available water storage as soil moisture conditions change due to storm events, evapotranspiration, and subsurface flow. Preferential flowpaths called water tracks are ubiquitous features draining arctic hillslopes and are the focus of our study. We predict that water track hydrologic response to precipitation is a function of snowmelt or storm characteristics and available storage. We hypothesize that ¬the ratio of runoff to precipitation will decrease as available storage increases, whether due to the seasonal increase in active layer thaw, or an extended dry period. Intensive snow and thaw depth surveys on a water track on the hillslopes of the Upper Kuparuk River watershed in northern Alaska during May to June 2013 reveal that snow persisted one week longer in a water track than the adjacent hillslope, and thus active layer thaw initiated earlier on the adjacent hillslope. Despite this earlier thaw timing, thaw depth in the water track exceeded that on the non-track hillslope within five days of being uncovered. Thaw, and thus subsurface storage, in water tracks remained greater than the rest of the hillslope for at least the

  12. First report of Gymnosporangium clavipes Cooke & Peck affecting Crataegus mexicana var. Chapeado and C. gracilior in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alvarado-Rosales

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The tejocote (Crataegus spp. is a tree considered to be native to Mexico. The aim of this study was to identify the causal agent of tejocote rust in the State of Puebla. Tejocote fruits were sampled in 2012 and 2013. The fungus was studied morphologically using light and scanning electron microscopy and molecularly using phylogenetic analysis of 18S and 28S rDNA genes. The fungus was identified as Gymnosporangium clavipes on tejocote fruits. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed report of Gymnosporangium clavipes Cooke & Peck affecting Crataegus mexicana var. Chapeado and C. gracilior in Puebla Mexico.

  13. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...... compared with the control and HP lines. Selection for or against FP, therefore, changes the number of white blood cells and the expression of MHC class I molecules on T and B cells, which may influence the health status of the birds...

  14. Assessment of stream biological responses under multiple-stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, Lise; Lek, Sovan; de Deckere, Eric; de Zwart, Dick; Gevrey, Muriel

    2010-09-01

    Due to the numerous anthropogenic stress factors that affect aquatic ecosystems, a better understanding of the adverse consequences on the biological community of combined pressures is needed to attain the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive. In this study we propose an innovative approach to assess the biological impact of toxicants under field conditions on a large spatial scale. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analyses, focusing on impacts at the community level, were carried out to identify the relative importance of environmental and toxic stress factors on the patterns observed in the aquatic invertebrate fauna from the Scheldt basin (Belgium). Our results show that the use of the backpropagation algorithm of the ANN is a promising method to highlight the relationship between environmental pollution and biological responses. This method allows the effects of chemical exposure to be distinguished from the effects caused by other stressors in running waters. Moreover, the use of an overall estimate for toxic pressure in predictive models enables the links between toxicants and community alterations in the field to be clarified. The ANN correctly predicts 74% of samples with an area under the curve of 0.89 and a Cohen's kappa coefficient of 0.64. Organic load, oxygen availability, water temperature and the nitrate concentration appeared important factors in predicting aquatic invertebrate assemblages. On the other hand, toxic pressure did not seem relevant for these assemblages, suggesting that the water quality characteristics were therefore more important than exposure to toxicants in the water phase for the aquatic invertebrate communities in the study area. However, we suggest that the high organic load encountered in the Scheldt basin may lead to an underestimation of the impact of toxicity.

  15. Response surface optimization of the process conditions for anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... shows the diagnostics case statistics with regard to the comparison between the actual response (experimental data) and the predicted response obtained by the design expert software employed for all 30 runs. Data were fitted by the following quadratic polynomial Equation (2):. Y = 79.32 - 12.93A - 7.48B ...

  16. Plant response to sunflower seeds to osmotic conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Santos Barros de Morais

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of seeds osmotic conditioning in seedlings emergence and plants performance of sunflower. Three lots of seeds sunflower (Catissol, was submited to osmotic conditioning with polyethylene glycol solution, –2,0 MPa in aerated system, under 15 ºC for 8 hour and then was evaluated for germination tests and vigour. Under filed conditions was conducted emergency evaluations of seedling, plants development as well as the productivity and seeds quality, and the accumulation of nutrients in the seeds. The osmotic conditioning improve the survival of seedling, the dry matter mass to aerial part of plants from 60 days after sowing and oil content, in lots with low seeds physiological quality. The osmotic conditioning not increase the seeds yield but promotes the vigour of seeds produced, regardless of the lot used for sowing seeds.

  17. Transcriptional profiles of Treponema denticola in response to environmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian McHardy

    Full Text Available The periodontal pathogen T. denticola resides in a stressful environment rife with challenges, the human oral cavity. Knowledge of the stress response capabilities of this invasive spirochete is currently very limited. Whole genome expression profiles in response to different suspected stresses including heat shock, osmotic downshift, oxygen and blood exposure were examined. Most of the genes predicted to encode conserved heat shock proteins (HSPs were found to be induced under heat and oxygen stress. Several of these HSPs also seem to be important for survival in hypotonic solutions and blood. In addition to HSPs, differential regulation of many genes encoding metabolic proteins, hypothetical proteins, transcriptional regulators and transporters was observed in patterns that could betoken functional associations. In summary, stress responses in T. denticola exhibit many similarities to the corresponding stress responses in other organisms but also employ unique components including the induction of hypothetical proteins.

  18. Statistical optimization of cultural conditions by response surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... its cultural conditions using statistical designs for maximal phenol degradation. MATERIALS AND ... Analytical methods. The residual phenol concentration in the culture medium was esti- mated colorimetrically using ..... Australian and New Zealand Environment and. Conservation Council, Australian water ...

  19. Conditions of Flexibility: Securing a More Responsive Higher Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    This report is the culmination of the "Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future" series of reports which have considered flexible learning from a range of perspectives. The report proposes fifteen conditions of flexibility to inject new thinking and new practices into an emerging new age. Flexible provision has the potential to…

  20. Behavioral accident avoidance science : understanding response in collision incipient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, P.A.; Ridder, S.N. de

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic accidents are the single greatest cause of fatality in the workplace and the primary cause of all accidental death in the U.S. to the age of seventy-eight. However, behavioral analysis of response in the final seconds and milliseconds before collision has been a most difficult

  1. Human volunteer head-Tl response for oblique impact conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Cappon, H.J.; Ratingen, M.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The development of modern smart restraint systems requires access to human surrogates with a biofidelic performance, which includes details on timing and local deformations. Therefore volunteer head neck responses for oblique impacts from the Naval BioDynamics Laboratory are re-analysed using a

  2. Serotonin release in the caudal nidopallium of adult laying hens genetically selected for high and low feather pecking behavior: An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, Marjolein S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341590649; Kjaer, Joergen B.; Güntürkün, Onur; Westphal, Koen G.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304839337; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A.H.; Olivier, Berend|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073067199; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Korte, S. Mechiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088952827

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (FP) is a detrimental behavior causing welfare problems in laying hens. Divergent genetic selection for FP in White Leghorns resulted in strong differences in FP incidences between lines. More recently, it was shown that the high FP (HFP) birds have increased locomotor

  3. A Multicultural Glimpse of Rural and Urban Adolescence in Robert Newton Peck's "A Day No Pigs Would Die" and Paul Zindel's "The Pigman."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Mary Frances Linden

    "A Day No Pigs Would Die" by Robert Newton Peck and "The Pigman" by Paul Zindel are 2 short novels that offer treasures in the form of many lessons in life to share in the language arts classroom. These two rich novels can serve as sources for multicultural understanding of rural and urban life, as well as for interpreting the…

  4. Thermal Responses to Exercise and Their Relationship to Physical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-14

    bonaa Tumor, f rowth , cyst, cancar Ruptura /hamla Pllaa or ractal diaaata Fraquant or painful urination Sad watting i lnea a«a 12 KIdnay stono or...P.O. and B. Saltin. Oxygen uptake during the first minutes of heavy muscular work. J. Appl. Physiol. 16: 971-976, 1961. o 6. Astrand, P.O. and K...Sweating: Its rapid response to muscular work. Science 144:643-646, 1963. 8. Beckman. Metabolic Measurement Cart (MMC) Operator’s training manual

  5. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) as explosives detectors: exploring proboscis extension reflex conditioned response to trinitrotolulene (TNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-mccabe, Kirsten J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wingo, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haarmann, Timothy K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We examined honey bee's associative learning response to conditioning with trinitrotolulene (TNT) vapor concentrations generated at three temperatures and their ability to be reconditioned after a 24 h period. We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension (PER) in honey bees using TNT vapors as the conditioned stimulus and sucrose as the unconditioned stimulus. We conducted fifteen experimental trials with an explosives vapor generator set at 43 C, 25 C and 5 C, producing three concentrations of explosives (1070 ppt, 57 ppt, and 11 ppt). Our objective was to test the honey bee's ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT vapors at all three concentrations by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees successfully exhibiting a conditioned response within each temperature group. Furthermore, we conducted eight experimental trials to test the honey bee's ability to retain their ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT after 24h period by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response TNT on the first day compared to the percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT on the second day. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT vapors between three temperature groups. There was a significant difference between the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response on the first day of training compared to the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response 24 h after training. Our experimental results indicate that honey bees can be trained to exhibit a conditioned response to a range of TNT concentrations via PER However, it appears that the honey bee's ability to retain the conditioned response to TNT vapors after 24h significantly decreases.

  6. Differential effect of conditioning regimens on cytokine responses during allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J; Heilmann, C; Jacobsen, N

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cytokine responses during conditioning in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) with the aim to identify which markers that may reliably reflect inflammatory activity during conditioning. We investigated inflammatory and anti...

  7. [Response of alfalfa seed to stress storage conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Wang, Yanrong; Zhu, Tingheng; Yu, Ling

    2002-08-01

    The seed germination rate, seed mortality, seedling length, and infection rate of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. 'Longdong') were measured at constant temperature 20 degrees C every 60 days during one year storage period after inoculated or no inoculated by Fusarium avenaceum under room temperature (RT), 35 degrees C, and 35 degrees C and +10% seed moisture content (SMC) conditions. Field emergence rates of seeds under above treatments were also observed, and seed-borne fungi were detected under the conditions mentioned above and controlled deterioration (CD) as well. The results showed that the percentage of isolated alfalfa seed-borne fungi was increased from 10% under room temperature and 35 degrees C to 29% under 35 degrees C + 10% SMC. Disease resistance was declined, and seed mortality and seedling infection rate under 35 degrees C + 10% SMC were significantly higher than those under room temperature and 35 degrees C respectively (P seed germination rate and field emergence rate were also decreased significantly (P seed-borne fungi isolated and field emergence were decreased, and that of seedling infection was increased with storage period extending from 60 to 360 days. Compared to no inoculated control, the percentage of seed germination, seedling shoot and root length were decreased, and seed mortality and seedling infection rate were increased after inoculated by F. avenaceum.

  8. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  9. Timing and Cue Competition in Conditioning of the Nictitating Membrane Response of the Rabbit ("Oryctolagus Cuniculus")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James; Ludvig, Elliot A.; Sutton, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Rabbits were classically conditioned using compounds of tone and light conditioned stimuli (CSs) presented with either simultaneous onsets (Experiment 1) or serial onsets (Experiment 2) in a delay conditioning paradigm. Training with the simultaneous compound reduced the likelihood of a conditioned response (CR) to the individual CSs ("mutual…

  10. Neurobiological responses of fish to altered gravity conditions: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf H.; Rahmann, Hinrich

    In vertebrates (including man), altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunctions of the inner ears, based on an irregular dislocation of the inner ear otoliths from the corresponding sensory epithelia. This dislocation leads to an illusionary tilt, since the otolithic inputs are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which results in an intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in the orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans, the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise, commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS). During the first days at weightlessness, the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear, since the brain develops a new compensatory interpretation of the available sensory data. The present review reports on the neurobiological responses — particularly of fish — observed at altered gravitational states, concerning behaviour and neuroplastic reactivities.

  11. Response of Buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus Trees to Drought Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansary Edris Moftah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Six-month-old buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus L. seedlings were grown in containers under different soil water potentials (Ψsoil. The objective of the work was: 1 to determine the minimum soil water potential at which Conocarpus trees can survive and grow fairly well, 2 to study the soil-plant water relationship at different irrigation regimes, and 3 to examine the capacity of Conocarpus seedlings for osmotic adjustment via solute accumulation. Seedling growth was not affected significantly at soil water potential above –0.1 MPa (between 40 and 30% Field Capacity (FC. At lowerΨsoil, plant height, leaf area and shoot and root dry weights became disrupted by water deficit. Water stress decreased the osmotic potential (Ψπ of leaves and roots. Leaves tended to osmoregulate their cell sap through osmotic adjustment processes as their content of soluble sugars increased. The positive survival under low Ψsoil could be related to increased osmotic adjustment. Ψsoil values were found to be more useful than FC values to estimate water requirements and use over an extended period of time, for plants grown under different soil types and different environmental conditions. Conocarpus seedlings can withstand reasonable water stress and can survive at moderately low water potential but, in contrast to other studies, this can not be classified as a high drought tolerant or resistant species.

  12. Social anxiety and cardiovascular responses to active coping conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARGIT GRAMER

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the influence of trait social anxiety on cardiovascular, emotional and behavioral responses to active performance situations representing social and cognitive demands. Thirty-six male and thirty-six female students categorized as either high or low in trait social anxiety performed a mental arithmetic task and two interpersonal tasks requiring persuasive behavior: Preparation and Performance of a Speech, Role-played Interpersonal Interactions. The cardiovascular effects of social anxiety varied over experimental stressors and appear to reflect differences in effort or task engagement rather than differential affective experiences. During Role-played Interactions high socially anxious subjects displayed lower increases in systolic blood pressure compared to low anxious participants. This effect was partially mediated by behavioral indicators of social competence and suggests a more inhibited coping approach of socially anxious participants. Findings for Mental Arithmetic were in the opposite direction, high socially anxious subjects displayed greater heart rate effects. In the absence of group differences in state anxiety this effect might result from stronger audience effects on effort or task motivation in socially anxious participants. These findings strengthen the view that active performance situations elicit cardiovascular effects that are largely attributable to differences in task engagement. The data also indicate the importance of considering situational factors in social anxiety research.

  13. Declarative Event-Based Workflow as Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2010-01-01

    We present Dynamic Condition Response Graphs (DCR Graphs) as a declarative, event-based process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing prime event structures. A dynamic condition response graph is a directed graph with nodes repr...

  14. Prefrontal Single-Neuron Responses after Changes in Task Contingencies during Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a role in mediating the expression of behavioral responses during tasks that require flexible changes in behavior. During trace eyeblink conditioning, evidence suggests that the mPFC provides the cerebellum with a persistent input to bridge the temporal gap between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Therefore, the mPFC is in a position to directly mediate the expression of trace conditioned responses. However, it is unknown whether persistent neural responses are associated with the flexible expression of behavior when task contingencies are changed during trace eyeblink conditioning. To investigate this, single-unit activity was recorded in the mPFC of rabbits during extinction and reacquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning, and during training to a different conditional stimulus. Persistent responses remained unchanged after full extinction, and also did not change during reacquisition training. During training to a different tone, however, the generalization of persistent responses to the new stimulus was associated with an animal's performance-when persistent responses generalized to the new tone, performance was high (>50% response rate). When persistent responses decreased to baseline rates, performance was poor (<50% response rate). The data suggest that persistent mPFC responses do not appear to mediate flexible changes in the expression of the original learning, but do appear to play a role in the generalization of that learning when the task is modified.

  15. Effects of dorsal hippocampal damage on conditioning and conditioned-response timing: A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shu K E; Jennings, Dómhnall J; Bonardi, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral findings suggest that the dorsal hippocampus (DHPC) plays a role in timing of appetitive conditioned responding. The present article explored the relationship between the extent of DHPC damage and timing ability, in a pooled analysis of three published studies from our laboratory. Initial analyses of variance confirmed our previous reports that DHPC damage reduced peak time (a measure of timing accuracy). However, the spread (a measure of timing precision) was unchanged, such that the coefficient of variation (spread/peak time) was significantly larger in DHPC-lesioned animals. This implies that, in addition to the well-established effect of DHPC lesions on timing accuracy, DHPC damage produced a deficit in precision of timing. To complement this analysis, different generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) were performed on the combined dataset, to examine which combinations of the different behavioral measures of timing were the best predictors of the degree of hippocampal damage. The results from the GLMM analysis suggested that the greater the DHPC damage, the greater the absolute difference between the observed peak time and reinforced duration. Nevertheless, this systematic relationship between damage and performance was not specific to the temporal domain: paradoxically the greater the damage the greater the magnitude of peak responding. We discuss these lesion effects in terms of scalar timing theory. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Classical Conditioning of Eyelid and Mystacial Vibrissae Responses in Conscious Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    The murine vibrissae sensorimotor system has been scrutinized as a target of motor learning through trace classical conditioning. Conditioned eyelid responses were acquired by using weak electrical whisker-pad stimulation as conditioned stimulus (CS) and strong electrical periorbital stimulation as unconditioned stimulus (US). In addition,…

  17. Failure of extinction of fear responses in posttraumatic stress disorder: evidence from second-order conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessa, Michèle; Flor, Herta

    2007-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by the re-experiencing of a traumatic event, although the trauma itself occurred in the past. The extinction of the traumatic response might be impeded if trauma reminders maintain fear responses by their association with the original trauma through second-order conditioning. A differential conditioning paradigm with a trauma-specific picture, used as an acquired unconditioned stimulus, and graphic representations, used as conditioned stimuli, were employed in 14 PTSD patients, 15 trauma-exposed subjects without PTSD, and 15 healthy comparison subjects. The authors used event-related potentials of electroencephalogram (EEG), self-report measures, skin conductance responses, heart rate, and startle modulation to assess the differential conditioned response among subjects. Trauma-exposed subjects with and without PTSD but not healthy comparison subjects showed successful differential conditioning to the trauma-relevant cue indicative of second-order conditioning. Only PTSD patients exhibited enhanced conditioned responses to the trauma reminder during acquisition and impaired extinction as evident in more negative evaluations of the conditioned stimuli associated with a trauma reminder as well as enhanced peripheral and brain responses. These findings suggest that PTSD may be maintained by second-order conditioning where trauma-relevant cues come to serve as unconditioned stimuli, thus generalizing enhanced emotional responses to many previously neutral cues and impeding extinction. The extinction deficit in PTSD patients observed in this study underlines the need for therapies focusing on the extinction of learned responses, such as behavioral treatment, with or without the addition of pharmacological substances that enhance the extinction of a learned response.

  18. Language conditioning, emotional instructions, and cognitions in conditioned responses to fear-relevant and fear-irrelevant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, G H; Schermelleh, K

    1985-06-01

    This study compared the effects of experimentally induced self-verbalizations (SV) on conditioned responses to fear-relevant (snakes) and fear-irrelevant (rabbits) stimuli. To extend the analysis of "preparedness theory" beyond its former reliance on physiological measures of fear, subjective and behavioral measures were also included. Using aversive tones (UCS) and slides of snakes or rabbits (CS), fear was classically conditioned in 44 volunteers. In 20 subsequent language conditioning trials without aversive tones, the same slides were paired with verbalizations referring either to positive features of the animals (stimulus-referent SV) or to approach behavior (response-referent SV). Skin conductance responses to fear-relevant stimuli were more readily acquired, of higher magnitude, and more resistant to extinction. Extinction was differentially affected by the two types of SV. Snakes were consistently evaluated more negatively than rabbits and approached less in a behavior test. Results are discussed in relation to preparedness theory and interpreted within Staats' social-behavioral learning paradigm.

  19. Retrieval of bindings between task-irrelevant stimuli and responses can facilitate behaviour under conditions of high response certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Aidan J

    2016-01-01

    Repetition priming can be driven by the encoding and retrieval of stimulus-response (S-R) bindings. When a previously encoded S-R binding is retrieved, and is congruent with the response currently required, it can bias response-selection processes towards selecting the retrieved response, resulting in facilitation. Previous studies have used classification tasks at retrieval. Here, two (or more) response options are competing, and it is likely that any evidence (e.g., an S-R binding) in favour of one option will be utilized to effect a decision. Thus, S-R effects are likely to be seen when using such a task. It is unclear whether such effects can be seen under conditions of higher response certainty, when participants are explicitly cued to make a response. Across two experiments, evidence for a modulating influence of S-R bindings is seen despite using a response cueing method at retrieval to minimize response uncertainty and despite stimuli being task irrelevant. Finally, the results suggest that responses within these S-R bindings are coded at the level of left versus right hand, and not a more fine-grained within-hand thumb versus index finger. The results underline the resilience of S-R effects, suggesting that they are present even under conditions where no explicit object-oriented decision is required.

  20. Response elimination, reinforcement rate and resurgence of operant behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Carlos R X; Lattal, Kennon A

    2013-11-01

    The effects of reinforcement rate of alternative responding on resurgence were studied in six experiments with pigeons. In Experiment 1A, key pecking was maintained on a multiple variable-interval (VI) VI schedule in the Training phase. In the Response-Elimination phase, a variable differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) schedule was in effect in each component. Reinforcement rates were equal and then, higher in one (rich) component, and lower in the other (lean), than in the Training phase. More resurgence occurred in the lean component, but this could have resulted from response-rate differences between components in the Training-phase. Experiment 1B was a replication of Experiment 1A, but with experimentally-naïve pigeons. Response-Elimination phase reinforcement rates were manipulated systematically in subsequent experiments: In Experiment 2, reinforcement rate was equal, in one component, and lower or higher in the other, than in the Training phase. In Experiment 3, reinforcers were discontinued before differential reinforcement rates were effected. In Experiment 4, reinforcement rates first were differential and, then, equal to those in the Training phase. In Experiments 5 and 6, differential reinforcement rates were arranged by using fixed-DROs and VIs for pecking a different key, respectively. Even though resurgence was not obtained with every pigeon, at least some small-magnitude resurgence occurred in each experiment and was not related systematically to reinforcement rates of alternative responding. Schedule differences, response topography, order of conditions and the length of each phase were not sufficient to account for these results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Information about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response in vicarious classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygge, S

    1976-06-01

    Four groups with 16 observers each participated in a differential, vicarious conditioning experiment with skin conductance responses as the dependent variable. The information available to the observer about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response was varied in a 2 X 2 factorial design. Results clearly showed that information about the model's unconditioned stimulus (a high or low dB level) was not necessary for vicarious instigation, but that information about the unconditioned response (a high or low emotional aversiveness) was necessary. Data for conditioning of responses showed almost identical patterns to those for vicarious instigation. To explain the results, a distinction between factors necessary for the development and elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was introduced, and the effectiveness of information about the model's response on the elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was considered in terms of an expansion of Bandura's social learning theory.

  2. Consistent haul road condition monitoring by means of vehicle response normalisation with Gaussian processes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal haul road management policies such as routine, periodic and urgent maintenance may result in unnecessary cost, both to roads and vehicles. A recent idea is to continually access haul road condition based on measured vehicle response...

  3. Chaotic living conditions and sleep problems associated with children's responses to academic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eleanor D; Low, Christine M

    2008-12-01

    The ecology of economic disadvantage includes chaotic living conditions that may disrupt children's regulatory functioning and undermine mastery oriented responses to challenge. The present study examined chaotic living conditions, sleep problems, and responses to academic challenge for 96 economically disadvantaged children enrolled in a Head Start preschool. Caregiver interviews provided information regarding chaotic living conditions of residential crowding, noise, and family instability, as well as child sleep problems. Tasks individually administered to children provided measures of responses to academic challenge. Chaotic living conditions statistically predicted helpless/hopeless responses to academic challenge, and sleep problems partially mediated this relationship. Implications concern pathways of ecological risk and diversity in the school functioning of economically disadvantaged children. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Differential modulation of auditory responses to attended and unattended speech in different listening conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Mullangi, Ala; Ding, Nai

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates how top-down attention modulates neural tracking of the speech envelope in different listening conditions. In the quiet conditions, a single speech stream was presented and the subjects paid attention to the speech stream (active listening) or watched a silent movie instead (passive listening). In the competing speaker (CS) conditions, two speakers of opposite genders were presented diotically. Ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured in each condition and cross-correlated with the speech envelope of each speaker at different time lags. In quiet, active and passive listening resulted in similar neural responses to the speech envelope. In the CS conditions, however, the shape of the cross-correlation function was remarkably different between the attended and unattended speech. The cross-correlation with the attended speech showed stronger N1 and P2 responses but a weaker P1 response compared to the cross-correlation with the unattended speech. Furthermore, the N1 response to the attended speech in the CS condition was enhanced and delayed compared with the active listening condition in quiet, while the P2 response to the unattended speaker in the CS condition was attenuated compared with the passive listening in quiet. Taken together, these results demonstrate that top-down attention differentially modulates envelope-tracking neural activity at different time lags and suggest that top-down attention can both enhance the neural responses to the attended sound stream and suppress the responses to the unattended sound stream. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extinction of Conditioned Responses to Methamphetamine-Associated Stimuli in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Joel S; Ruiz, Nicholas A; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-07-01

    Contextual stimuli present during drug experiences become associated with the drug through Pavlovian conditioning and are thought to sustain drug-seeking behavior. Thus, extinction of conditioned responses is an important target for treatment. To date, acquisition and extinction to drug-paired cues have been studied in animal models or drug-dependent individuals, but rarely in non-drug users. We have recently developed a procedure to study acquisition of conditioned responses after single doses of methamphetamine (MA) in healthy volunteers. Here, we examined extinction of these responses and their persistence after conditioning. Healthy adults (18-35 years; N = 20) received two pairings of audio-visual stimuli with MA (20 mg oral) or placebo. Responses to stimuli were assessed before and after conditioning, using three tasks: behavioral preference, attentional bias, and subjective "liking." Subjects exhibited behavioral preference for the drug-paired stimuli at the first post-conditioning test, but this declined rapidly on subsequent extinction tests. They also exhibited a bias to initially look towards the drug-paired stimuli at the first post-test session, but not thereafter. Subjects who experienced more positive subjective drug effects during conditioning exhibited a smaller decline in preference during the extinction phase. Further, longer inter-session intervals during the extinction phase were associated with less extinction of the behavioral preference measure. Conditioned responses after two pairings with MA extinguish quickly, and are influenced by both subjective drug effects and the extinction interval. Characterizing and refining this conditioning procedure will aid in understanding the acquisition and extinction processes of drug-related conditioned responses in humans.

  6. Differences of accommodative responses between two eyes under binocular viewing condition mediated by polarizing glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Qing Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To study the differences of accommodative responses between the two eyes under 3 different polarized viewing conditions. METHODS:Fifteen volunteers with emmetrope were recruited into this study(aged 18~38, 6 males and 9 females. Three different viewing conditions were set up by using polarizing glasses and liquid crystal display:(1right eye could see the visual target on the screen, but left eye cannot see it;(2left eye could see the visual target on the screen, but right eye cannot see it;(3both eyes could see the target. Accommodative responses were measured by infrared auto-refractor when fixating at the target at 5, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.33m under the above 3 viewing conditions. The differences of accommodative responses under different viewing conditions were compared by using variance analysis of repeated measuring and t test. RESULTS:Significant differences of accommodative responses between the two eyes were found under condition(1and(2at all the fixating distance. The accommodative responses in used eyes which can see the visual target were higher than in non-used eyes which cannot see the visual target(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION:Ciliary muscles in the used eyes were more relatively tonic than non-used eyes under binocular open viewing condition. The imbalance of accommodative responses between two eyes may be one of the risk factors resulting into the occurrence of myopia.

  7. Pretrial Hippocampal ?-State Differentiates Single-Unit Response Profiles during Rabbit Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J.; Darling, Ryan D.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning given in the explicit presence of hippocampal ? results in accelerated learning and enhanced multiple-unit responses, with slower learning and suppression of unit activity under non-? conditions. Recordings from putative pyramidal cells during ?-contingent training show that pretrial ?-state is linked to the probability of…

  8. Posterior predictive checks for conditional independence between response time and accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Conditional independence (CI) between response time and response accuracy is a fundamental assumption of many joint models for time and accuracy used in educational measurement. In this study, posterior predictive checks (PPCs) are proposed for testing this assumption. These PPCs are based on three

  9. Spectroscopic evidence of 'jumping and pecking' of cholinium and H-bond enhanced cation-cation interaction in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Anne; Fumino, Koichi; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-12-14

    The subtle energy-balance between Coulomb-interaction, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces governs the unique properties of ionic liquids. To measure weak interactions is still a challenge. This is in particular true in the condensed phase wherein a melange of different strong and directional types of interactions is present and cannot be detected separately. For the ionic liquids (2-hydroxyethyl)-trimethylammonium (cholinium) bis(trifluoro-methylsulfonyl)amide and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide which differ only in the 2-hydroxyethyl and the propyl groups of the cations, we could directly observe distinct vibrational signatures of hydrogen bonding between the cation and the anion indicated by 'jumping and pecking' motions of cholinium. The assignment could be confirmed by isotopic substitution H/D at the hydroxyl group of cholinium. For the first time we could also find direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions. The repulsive Coulomb interaction between the cations is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between the 2-hydroxyethyl functional groups of cholinium. This H-bond network is reflected in the properties of protic ionic liquids (PILs) such as viscosities and conductivities.

  10. Modification of persistent responses in medial prefrontal cortex during learning in trace eyeblink conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Persistent spiking in response to a discrete stimulus is considered to reflect the active maintenance of a memory for that stimulus until a behavioral response is made. This response pattern has been reported in learning paradigms that impose a temporal gap between stimulus presentation and behavioral response, including trace eyeblink conditioning. However, it is unknown whether persistent responses are acquired as a function of learning or simply represent an already existing category of response type. This fundamental question was addressed by recording single-unit activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rabbits during the initial learning phase of trace eyeblink conditioning. Persistent responses to the tone conditioned stimulus were observed in the mPFC during the very first training sessions. Further analysis revealed that most cells with persistent responses showed this pattern during the very first training trial, before animals had experienced paired training. However, persistent cells showed reliable decreases in response magnitude over the first training session, which were not observed on the second day of training or for sessions in which learning criterion was met. This modification of response magnitude was specific to persistent responses and was not observed for cells showing phasic tone-evoked responses. The data suggest that persistent responses to discrete stimuli do not require learning but that the ongoing robustness of such responses over the course of training is modified as a result of experience. Putative mechanisms for this modification are discussed, including changes in cellular or network properties, neuromodulatory tone, and/or the synaptic efficacy of tone-associated inputs. PMID:25080570

  11. Physiologic Systems and Their Responses to Conditions of Heat and Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    the effects of both heat stress and cold stress on physiologic responses and exercise capabilities. Human thermoregulation during exercise is...code) 2012 Book Chapter-ACSM’s Advanced Exercise Physiology Physiologic Systems and Their Responses to Conditions of Heat and Cold M.N. Sawka, J.W...although the effects of exercise training on physiologic responses during thermal (heat or cold ) stress are discussed. physiologic systems, heat

  12. Effect of lighting conditions on brain network complexity associated with response learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, Nélida M; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, Jorge L

    2013-10-25

    Several studies have reported the brain regions involved in response learning. However, there is discrepancy regarding the lighting conditions in the experimental setting (i.e. under dark or light conditions). In this regard, it would be relevant to know if the presence/absence of visual cues in the environment has any effect in the brain networks involved in a response learning task. Animals were trained in a water T-maze under two different lighting conditions (light versus dark). All subjects reached the learning criterion of 80% correct arm choices. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry was used as a metabolic brain mapping technique. Our results show that the ventral hippocampus and the parietal cortex are associated with the acquisition of a response learning task regardless of lighting conditions. In addition, when the same task is run in the dark, widespread recruitment of structures involving cortical, limbic and striatal regions was found. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Appeals to consumer responsibility and improving structural conditions as means to promote sustainable consumer behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    for their acts or (b) structural conditions determined by governments? In field experiments with large samples of ordinary consumers, the behavioral effects of perceptions of responsibility/personal moral norms and of altering an important structural condition are quantified by measuring a relevant behavior......-developed public transit service. The results suggest that there is often more to gain from changing structural conditions to be more facilitating for the desired behavior than from a campaign targeting consumer feelings of responsibility.......Environmental policy-makers increasingly emphasize consumers' responsibility for environmental side effects of their acts, but is this justified? This paper investigates which is the most important limiting factor for sustainable consumption: (a) the extent to which consumers assume responsibility...

  14. Sexual responsiveness is condition-dependent in female guppies, but preference functions are not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Robert

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in mate choice behaviour among females within a population may influence the strength and form of sexual selection, yet the basis for any such variation is still poorly understood. Condition-dependence may be an important source of variation in female sexual responsiveness and in the preference functions for male display traits that she expresses when choosing. We manipulated food intake of female guppies (Poecilia reticulata, and examined the effect on several measures of condition and various components of mate choice behaviour. Results Diet significantly influenced four measures of female condition: standard length, weight, reproductive status and somatic fat reserves. Diet also significantly affected female sexual responsiveness, but not preference functions: females in good and poor condition prefer the same males. Conclusions Variation in female condition within populations is therefore unlikely to influence the direction of sexual selection imposed by female choice. It may, however, influence the strength of sexual selection due to its effects on female responsiveness. The relative importance of female choice as a sexually selective force may also covary with female condition, however, because low responsiveness may result in sneak copulations being relatively more important as a determinant of the paternity of offspring. Differences among populations in mean condition may also influence geographic differences in the strength of sexual selection.

  15. Dietary Cholesterol Concentration and Duration Degrade Long-Term Memory of Classical Conditioning of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Wang, Desheng; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Burhans, Lauren B; Bell, Roger; Gonzalez-Joekes, Jimena

    2012-01-01

    .... We explored this issue by manipulating cholesterol concentration and duration following classical trace conditioning of the rabbit's nictitating membrane response and assessed conditioned responding...

  16. The rights and responsibilities of citizenship for service users: some terms and conditions apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, H P; Finlayson, M

    2015-11-01

    What is known about the subject? Citizenship is an important yet largely overlooked concept within psychiatric and mental health nursing practice Many service users are subject to legally mandated restrictions that place conditions on their rights and responsibilities as citizens. What this paper adds to existing knowledge? Even though service users have legal status as citizens, they continue to experience many conditions on their rights and responsibilities. Concerns about services users' trustworthiness and doubts about their levels of insight impact on their status as full citizens. What are the implications for practice? Nurses' understandings of the conditions placed on the citizenship rights and responsibilities of service users will ensure inclusive and less restrictive care and treatment Integration of the principles of therapeutic reciprocity and procedural justice within practice will help nurses balance both the rights of services users and legal restrictions on their liberty and autonomy Service users have long been lobbying for equal participation as citizens, yet citizenship is an important and largely overlooked concept within nursing education and practice. The study explored service users' understandings of their rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the conditions placed on these. A total of 17 service users participated in semi-structured interviews. Isin's theory of the content of citizenship was used to analyze the data using a framework approach. Service users experience conditional citizenship that includes barriers to their participation and their rights and responsibilities that others in society enjoy. When the world of the service user is constructed through the language of the biomedical model, nurses may unwittingly reinforce psychiatric labels and thus perpetuate the stereotype that service users lack the competence to fully enact their rights and responsibilities. When providing care, nurses should incorporate the notion of

  17. Equal pain – Unequal fear response: Enhanced susceptibility of tooth pain to fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lukas Meier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental fear conditioning in humans is widely used as a model to investigate the neural basis of fear learning and to unravel the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. It has been observed that fear conditioning depends on stimulus salience and subject vulnerability to fear. It is further known that the prevalence of dental-related fear and phobia is exceedingly high in the population. Dental phobia is unique as no other body part is associated with a specific phobia. Therefore, we hypothesized that painful dental stimuli exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to fear conditioning when comparing to equal perceived stimuli applied to other body sites. Differential susceptibility to pain-related fear was investigated by analyzing responses to an unconditioned stimulus (UCS applied to the right maxillary canine (UCS-c versus the right tibia (UCS-t. For fear conditioning, UCS-c and USC-t consisted of painful electric stimuli, carefully matched at both application sites for equal intensity and quality perception. UCSs were paired to simple geometrical forms which served as conditioned stimuli (CS+. Unpaired CS+ were presented for eliciting and analyzing conditioned fear responses. Outcome parameter were 1 skin conductance changes and 2 time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, thalamus, orbitofrontal cortex and medial prefrontal cortex.A preferential susceptibility of dental pain to fear conditioning was observed, reflected by heightened skin conductance responses and enhanced time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses in the fear network. For the first time, this study demonstrates fear-related neurobiological mechanisms that point towards a superior conditionability of tooth pain. Beside traumatic dental experiences our results offer novel evidence that might explain the high prevalence of dental-related fears in the population.

  18. Social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Kaori; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    In social species, the phenomenon in which the presence of conspecific animals mitigates stress responses is called social buffering. We previously reported that social buffering in male rats ameliorated behavioral fear responses, as well as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, elicited by an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). However, after social buffering, it is not clear whether rats exhibit fear responses when they are re-exposed to the same CS in the absence of another rat. In the present study, we addressed this issue using an experimental model of extinction. High stress levels during extinction training impaired extinction, suggesting that extinction is enhanced when stress levels during extinction training are low. Therefore, we hypothesized that rats that had received social buffering during extinction training would not show fear responses to a CS, even in the absence of another rat, because social buffering had enhanced the extinction of conditioned fear responses. To test this, we subjected male fear-conditioned rats to extinction training either alone or with a non-conditioned male rat. The subjects were then individually re-exposed to the CS in a recall test. When the subjects individually underwent extinction training, no responses were suppressed in the recall test. Conversely, when the subjects received social buffering during extinction training, freezing and Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and lateral amygdala were suppressed. Additionally, the effects of social buffering were absent when the recall test was conducted in a different context from the extinction training. The present results suggest that social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioural responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O; de Jong, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task to assess participants' motivation-to-eat the actual food items (conditioned stimuli, CS). Food items served as CS and film excerpts of a woman vomiting served as unconditioned stimuli (US). Following acquisition the CS+ (neutral CS paired with US disgust) was rated as more disgusting and less positive. Notably, the conditioned response was transferred to the actual food items as evidenced by participants' reported lowered willingness-to-eat. Participants also showed heightened EMG activity in response to the CS+ which seemed driven by the corrugator indexing a global negative affect. These findings suggest that classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning can be reliably observed in subjective but not in disgust-specific physiological responding.

  20. Classical and instrumental conditioning of eyeblink responses in Wistar-Kyoto and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricart, Thomas M; Jiao, Xilu; Pang, Kevin C H; Beck, Kevin D; Servatius, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, an animal model of anxiety vulnerability, acquire lever-press avoidance faster than outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Faster avoidance acquisition may reflect an inherent ability to acquire cue-outcome associations, response-outcome associations or both. To evaluate cue-outcome learning, acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblink response was compared in SD and WKY rats using a delay-type paradigm (500-ms conditioned stimulus (CS) coterminating with a 10-ms unconditional stimulus (US)). WKY rats demonstrated enhanced classical conditioning, with both faster acquisition and greater asymptotic performance in delay-type training than SD rats. To evaluate response-outcome learning, separate SD and WKY rats were given control over US delivery through imposition of an omission contingency into delay-type training (emitting a conditioned response (CR) prevented delivery of the US). The schedule of US delivery derived by these rats became the training regimen for a separate group of SD and WKY rats, yoked within strain. In SD rats, no differences in acquisition were detected between those given control over US delivery and those trained with the same partial reinforcement schedule. Acquisition rates of those WKY rats with control exceeded those trained with a yoked-schedule of US presentation. Collectively, WKY rats exhibit enhanced classical conditioning and sensitivity to schedules of reinforcement compared to outbred SD rats. Anxiety vulnerability, in particular inhibited temperament, may be traced to active processes in the prediction and control of aversive events. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Ice Storage Air-Conditioning System Simulation with Dynamic Electricity Pricing: A Demand Response Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chun Lo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal dispatch model of an ice storage air-conditioning system for participants to quickly and accurately perform energy saving and demand response, and to avoid the over contact with electricity price peak. The schedule planning for an ice storage air-conditioning system of demand response is mainly to transfer energy consumption from the peak load to the partial-peak or off-peak load. Least Squares Regression (LSR is used to obtain the polynomial function for the cooling capacity and the cost of power consumption with a real ice storage air-conditioning system. Based on the dynamic electricity pricing, the requirements of cooling loads, and all technical constraints, the dispatch model of the ice-storage air-conditioning system is formulated to minimize the operation cost. The Improved Ripple Bee Swarm Optimization (IRBSO algorithm is proposed to solve the dispatch model of the ice storage air-conditioning system in a daily schedule on summer. Simulation results indicate that reasonable solutions provide a practical and flexible framework allowing the demand response of ice storage air-conditioning systems to demonstrate the optimization of its energy savings and operational efficiency and offering greater energy efficiency.

  2. Positive responses of coastal dune plants to soil conditioning by the invasive Lupinus nootkatensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslin, Hans Martin; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Invasive nitrogen-fixing plants drive vegetation dynamics and may cause irreversible changes in nutrient-limited ecosystems through increased soil resources. We studied how soil conditioning by the invasive alien Lupinus nootkatensis affected the seedling growth of co-occurring native plant species in coastal dunes, and whether responses to lupin-conditioned soil could be explained by fertilisation effects interacting with specific ecological strategies of the native dune species. Seedling performance of dune species was compared in a greenhouse experiment using field-collected soil from within or outside coastal lupin stands. In associated experiments, we quantified the response to nutrient supply of each species and tested how addition of specific nutrients affected growth of the native grass Festuca arundinacea in control and lupin-conditioned soil. We found that lupin-conditioned soil increased seedling biomass in 30 out of 32 native species; the conditioned soil also had a positive effect on seedling biomass of the invasive lupin itself. Increased phosphorus mobilisation by lupins was the major factor driving these positive seedling responses, based both on growth responses to addition of specific elements and analyses of plant available soil nutrients. There were large differences in growth responses to lupin-conditioned soil among species, but they were unrelated to selected autecological indicators or plant strategies. We conclude that Lupinus nootkatensis removes the phosphorus limitation for growth of native plants in coastal dunes, and that it increases cycling of other nutrients, promoting the growth of its own seedlings and a wide range of dune species. Finally, our study indicates that there are no negative soil legacies that prevent re-establishment of native plant species after removal of lupins.

  3. Neural mechanisms underlying the conditioned diminution of the unconditioned fear response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kimberly H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Knight, David C

    2012-03-01

    Recognizing cues that predict an aversive event allows one to react more effectively under threatening conditions, and minimizes the reaction to the threat itself. This is demonstrated during Pavlovian fear conditioning when the unconditioned response (UCR) to a predictable unconditioned stimulus (UCS) is diminished compared to the UCR to an unpredictable UCS. The present study investigated the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal response associated with Pavlovian conditioned UCR diminution to better understand the relationship between individual differences in behavior and the neural mechanisms of the threat-related emotional response. Healthy volunteers participated in a fear conditioning study in which trait anxiety, skin conductance response (SCR), UCS expectancy, and the fMRI signal were assessed. During acquisition trials, a tone (CS+) was paired with a white noise UCS and a second tone (CS-) was presented without the UCS. Test trials consisted of the CS+ paired with the UCS, CS- paired with the UCS, and presentations of the UCS alone to assess conditioned UCR diminution. UCR diminution was observed within the dorsolateral PFC, dorsomedial PFC, cingulate cortex, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), anterior insula, and amygdala. The threat-related activity within the dorsolateral PFC, dorsomedial PFC, posterior cingulate cortex, and IPL varied with individual differences in trait anxiety. In addition, anticipatory (i.e. CS elicited) activity within the PFC showed an inverse relationship with threat-related (i.e. UCS elicited) activity within the PFC, IPL, and amygdala. Further, the emotional response (indexed via SCR) elicited by the threat was closely linked to amygdala activity. These findings are consistent with the view that the amygdala and PFC support learning-related processes that influence the emotional response evoked by a threat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth condition dependency is the major cause of non-responsiveness upon genetic perturbation.

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    Saman Amini

    Full Text Available Investigating the role and interplay between individual proteins in biological processes is often performed by assessing the functional consequences of gene inactivation or removal. Depending on the sensitivity of the assay used for determining phenotype, between 66% (growth and 53% (gene expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains show no defect when analyzed under a single condition. Although it is well known that this non-responsive behavior is caused by different types of redundancy mechanisms or by growth condition/cell type dependency, it is not known what the relative contribution of these different causes is. Understanding the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon genetic perturbation is extremely important for designing efficient strategies aimed at elucidating gene function and unraveling complex cellular systems. Here, we provide a systematic classification of the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon gene deletion. The overall contribution of redundancy to non-responsive behavior is estimated at 29%, of which approximately 17% is due to homology-based redundancy and 12% is due to pathway-based redundancy. The major determinant of non-responsiveness is condition dependency (71%. For approximately 14% of protein complexes, just-in-time assembly can be put forward as a potential mechanistic explanation for how proteins can be regulated in a condition dependent manner. Taken together, the results underscore the large contribution of growth condition requirement to non-responsive behavior, which needs to be taken into account for strategies aimed at determining gene function. The classification provided here, can also be further harnessed in systematic analyses of complex cellular systems.

  5. Growth condition dependency is the major cause of non-responsiveness upon genetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Saman; Holstege, Frank C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the role and interplay between individual proteins in biological processes is often performed by assessing the functional consequences of gene inactivation or removal. Depending on the sensitivity of the assay used for determining phenotype, between 66% (growth) and 53% (gene expression) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains show no defect when analyzed under a single condition. Although it is well known that this non-responsive behavior is caused by different types of redundancy mechanisms or by growth condition/cell type dependency, it is not known what the relative contribution of these different causes is. Understanding the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon genetic perturbation is extremely important for designing efficient strategies aimed at elucidating gene function and unraveling complex cellular systems. Here, we provide a systematic classification of the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon gene deletion. The overall contribution of redundancy to non-responsive behavior is estimated at 29%, of which approximately 17% is due to homology-based redundancy and 12% is due to pathway-based redundancy. The major determinant of non-responsiveness is condition dependency (71%). For approximately 14% of protein complexes, just-in-time assembly can be put forward as a potential mechanistic explanation for how proteins can be regulated in a condition dependent manner. Taken together, the results underscore the large contribution of growth condition requirement to non-responsive behavior, which needs to be taken into account for strategies aimed at determining gene function. The classification provided here, can also be further harnessed in systematic analyses of complex cellular systems. PMID:28257504

  6. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  7. Implicit misattribution of evaluative responses: contingency-unaware evaluative conditioning requires simultaneous stimulus presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, Mandy; Sweldens, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Recent research has shown that evaluative conditioning (EC) procedures can change attitudes without participants' awareness of the contingencies between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (Hütter, Sweldens, Stahl, Unkelbach, & Klauer, 2012). We present a theoretical explanation and boundary condition for the emergence of unaware EC effects based on the implicit misattribution of evaluative responses from unconditioned to conditioned stimuli. We hypothesize that such misattribution is only possible when conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are perceived simultaneously. Therefore we manipulate the simultaneity of the stimulus presentations and apply a process dissociation procedure to distinguish contingency-aware from contingency-unaware EC effects. A multinomial model indicates that with sequential presentations, EC effects do not occur without contingency awareness. However, unaware EC effects do occur with simultaneous presentations. The findings support dual-process theories of learning. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Sound Conditioning on Click Auditory Brainstem Response Threshold Shifts in Guinea Pigs

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    Masoud Motalebi Kashani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sound conditioning is exposure to a non-traumatic, moderate level of sound which increases inner ear resistance against further severe noise. In this study, we aimed to survey the effect of sound conditioning on auditory brainstem response (ABR threshold shifts using click stimulus, and the effect of the frequency of conditioning on hearing protection.Methods: Fifteen guinea pigs were randomly divided into 3 groups. Two conditioned groups were exposed to 1 kHz, and 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, respectively.On the sixth day, the animals were exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL, for 4 hours.The control group was exposed to intense noise, 4 kHz at 105 Db SPL for 4 hours (withoutconditioning. After exposure, ABR thresholds using click were recorded an hour, and 7 days after noise exposure.Results: The results of the ABR with click stimulus showed less thresold shifts in conditioned groups than control (p≤0.001. Comparison of the results of conditioned groups, showed less threshold shift by 4 kHz conditioning, however, this difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05.Conclusion: Electrophysiological data of our study showed that sound conditioning has a protective effect against subsequent intensive noise exposure, and the frequency of conditioning does not havesignificant effect on ABR threshold shifts when using click stimulus.

  9. Validity Inferences under High-Stakes Conditions: A Response from Language Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathryn; McNamara, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Those who work in second- and foreign-language testing often find Koretz's concern for validity inferences under high-stakes (VIHS) conditions both welcome and familiar. While the focus of the article is more narrowly on the potential for two instructional responses to test-based accountability, "reallocation" and "coaching,"…

  10. Savings and extinction of conditioned eyeblink responses in fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, A E; van der Geest, J N; Vellema, M

    2008-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome (FRAXA) is the most widespread heritable form of mental retardation caused by the lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). This lack has been related to deficits in cerebellum-mediated acquisition of conditioned eyelid responses in individuals...

  11. Classical Conditioning of Emotional Responses (Meaning, Attitudes, Values, Interests) and Effects on Social Behavior: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Arthur W.; Carlson, Carl G.

    This is a bibliography of 81 papers and books published in the years 1957-1970 relevant to the subject of verbally-elicited responses that are in accordance with principles of classical conditioning. Of these publications, 24 are by Staats--one of the bibliographers--and his associates. (MF)

  12. Repeated Acquisitions and Extinctions in Classical Conditioning of the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James

    2006-01-01

    The rabbit nictitating membrane (NM) response underwent successive stages of acquisition and extinction training in both delay (Experiment 1) and trace (Experiment 2) classical conditioning. In both cases, successive acquisitions became progressively faster, although the largest, most reliable acceleration occurred between the first and second…

  13. Is the Source of Reinforcement for Naming Multiple Conditioned Reinforcers for Observing Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longano, Jennifer M.; Greer, R. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Naming refers to the incidental acquisition of word-object relations as listener and speaker without explicit reinforcement. To investigate possible sources of reinforcement for naming, we examined the effects of a procedure for conditioning reinforcement for observing responses on the emergence of naming in children who previously lacked it. The…

  14. Effect of the foundation stiffness on the response of a seismically isolated tank under SSE conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Courage, W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study of a seismic isolated 120.000 m3 LNG tank. A simple model was used to evaluate the seismic response of the isolated tank under Safe Shutdown Earthquake conditions. The frequency dependent dynamic stiffness of the foundation was

  15. A estrutura de capital das maiores empresas brasileiras: análise empírica das teorias de pecking order e trade-off, usando panel data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Correa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisas sobre estrutura de capital das empresas são consideradas dentre as mais relevantes na área de finanças. Diversas abordagens teóricas têm sido discutidas e testadas na literatura financeira. Este estudo buscou analisar o nível de endividamento das maiores empresas brasileiras, à luz das duas principais teorias que versam sobre o assunto, a teoria de Pecking Order e a teoria de trade--off, testando seus determinantes. A teoria do Pecking Order sugere a existência de uma hierarquia no uso de fontes de recursos, enquanto a teoria de trade-off considera a existência de uma estrutura meta de capital que seria perseguida pela empresa. O estudo é uma adaptação do artigo de Gaud et al. (2005, cujo trabalho serviu como base e principal referência para a escolha das principais variáveis e dos testes econométricos realizados. Tal como Gaud et al. (2005, desenvolvemos as análises estatísticas utilizando a metodologia de Panel Data, que considera os dados da amostra em corte transversal e longitudinal. Além de testes estáticos, foram feitos testes dinâmicos, com o objetivo de analisar o processo de ajuste da estrutura de capital ao longo do tempo, em direção a um suposto nível-alvo ótimo. Os resultados demonstraram relação negativa entre o nível de endividamento das empresas e o grau de tangibilidade dos ativos e a rentabilidade, bem como relação positiva do endividamento com o risco. Demonstraram ainda que empresas de capital estrangeiro são mais endividadas que empresas nacionais. De um modo geral, os resultados sugerem que a teoria de Pecking Order é mais consistente do que a teoria de trade-off para explicar a estrutura de capital das companhias abertas brasileiras. Em especial, destacamos a relação negativa entre endividamento e rentabilidade, confirmando vários outros resultados de pesquisa obtidos na realidade brasileira. A análise dinâmica demonstrou baixa velocidade do processo de ajuste da estrutura de

  16. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • MBR under feed-induced stress conditions: starvation and changing feeding conditions. • High capacity of MBR to withstand high variations in feed loads. • Slow biofilm formation under starvation conditions during the first days. • Observed growth of P. putida for substrate to microorganism ratio higher than 0.6 g/g. • Maximum specific growth rate and growth yield values of around 37.5 h{sup −1} and 0.5 g/g. - Abstract: Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100–1100 mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15 mg/g h were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum Y{sub X/S} of 0.5 g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16 g/m{sup 2}.

  17. The effect of conditional probability of chord progression on brain response: an MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have explored how and where musical syntax in Western music is processed in the human brain. An inappropriate chord progression elicits an event-related potential (ERP component called an early right anterior negativity (ERAN or simply an early anterior negativity (EAN in an early stage of processing the musical syntax. Though the possible underlying mechanism of the EAN is assumed to be probabilistic learning, the effect of the probability of chord progressions on the EAN response has not been previously explored explicitly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, the empirical conditional probabilities in a Western music corpus were employed as an approximation of the frequencies in previous exposure of participants. Three types of chord progression were presented to musicians and non-musicians in order to examine the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the neuromagnetic response using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Chord progressions were found to elicit early responses in a negatively correlating fashion with the conditional probability. Observed EANm (as a magnetic counterpart of the EAN component responses were consistent with the previously reported EAN responses in terms of latency and location. The effect of conditional probability interacted with the effect of musical training. In addition, the neural response also correlated with the behavioral measures in the non-musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to reveal the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the corresponding neuromagnetic response. The current results suggest that the physiological response is a reflection of the probabilistic representations of the musical syntax. Moreover, the results indicate that the probabilistic representation is related to the musical training as well as the sensitivity of an individual.

  18. Grey Relational Analysis for Insulation Condition Assessment of Power Transformers Based Upon Conventional Dielectric Response Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiefeng Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dielectric response measurement techniques, for instance, recovery voltage measurement (RVM, frequency domain spectroscopy (FDS and polarization–depolarization current (PDC are effective nondestructive insulation monitoring techniques for oil-impregnated power transformers. Previous studies have focused mainly on some single type of dielectric measurement method. However, the condition of oil paper insulation in transformer is affected by many factors, so it is difficult to predict the insulation status by means of a single method. In this paper, the insulation condition assessment is performed by grey relational analysis (GRA technique after carefully investigating different dielectric response measurement data. The insulation condition sensitive parameters of samples with unknown insulation status are extracted from different dielectric response measurement data and then these are used to contrast with the standard insulation state vector models established in controlled laboratory conditions by using GRA technique for predicting insulation condition. The performance of the proposed approach is tested using both the laboratory samples and a power transformer to demonstrate that it can provide reliable and effective insulation diagnosis.

  19. Prevalence of Ventilatory Conditions for Dynamic Fluid Responsiveness Prediction in 2 Tertiary Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Pedro V; Rodrigues, Bruno N; Miranda, Leandro C; Zampieri, Fernando G; Queiroz, Eduardo L; Schettino, Guilherme; Azevedo, Luciano C; Park, Marcelo; Taniguchi, Leandro U

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic parameters for fluid responsiveness obtained from heart-lung interaction during invasive mechanical ventilation require specific conditions not always present in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of these conditions in critically ill patients. We conducted a prospective observational study in 2 medical-surgical ICUs. We evaluated whether it would be possible to measure dynamic indices of fluid responsiveness when fluid expansion was administered. We recorded whether the patients were in controlled invasive mechanical ventilation with tidal volume >8 mL/kg and without arrhythmias. The proportion of patients who fulfilled these conditions was recorded. A post hoc subgroup analyses by terciles of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS3) were performed. A total of 826 fluid challenges were undertaken in 424 patients during the study. The use of controlled mechanical ventilation with tidal volume > 8 mL/kg and without arrhythmias occurred in only 2.9% of the patients at the time of fluid challenge episodes. There was an increase in the prevalence of these conditions as the severity of the patients also increased: lower tercile of SAPS3 (0%), intermediate tercile (2%), and higher tercile (6.9%; P parameters for predicting fluid responsiveness in ICU may have restricted applicability in daily practice, even in more severe patients, due to low prevalence of required conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Road condition evaluation using the vibration response of ordinary vehicles and synchronously recorded movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tomonori; Miyajima, Akira; Kimura, Shunya; Shimada, Yuuki; Fujino, Yozo

    2013-04-01

    Frequent and quantitative assessment of road condition is important as the maintenance of the road infrastructure needs to be performed with a limited budget. Vehicle Intelligent Monitoring System (VIMS) has been developed to estimate an index of road ride comfort (International Roughness Index; IRI) by obtaining the acceleration responses of ordinary vehicles together with GPS position data. VIMS converts the vertical acceleration of the measurement vehicle to acceleration RMS of the sprung mass of the standard Quarter Car model, and then to IRI using an approximate expression. By driving over a hump of a known profile and comparing the responses with Quarter Car simulation responses, a variety of vehicles can be calibrated; a non-linear quarter car model equivalent to the vehicle is identified. By performing numerical simulation using the nonlinear vehicle model, the difference in driving speed can also be calibrated. The measurement results can be exported to maps to comprehend road condition in a geographical view and to other data base systems. In addition, smartphones which can record motions, GPS data, and movies synchronously are utilized to improve VIMS. Because practical installation locations of smartphones are limited and because angular velocity responses are less subjective to difference in installation locations, VIMS is extended to utilize the pitching angular velocity. Furthermore, high frequency components of acceleration responses are analyzed to distinguish local pavement damages or joints from rough road sections. The examination of synchronously recorded movies confirmed the capability to distinguish the local conditions.

  1. Electrical signals in avocado trees: responses to light and water availability conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarce, Patricio; Gurovich, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to environmental changes are associated with electrical excitability and signaling; automatic and continuous measurements of electrical potential differences (DeltaEP) between plant tissues can be effectively used to study information transport mechanisms and physiological responses that result from external stimuli on plants. The generation and conduction of electrochemical impulses within plant different tissues and organs, resulting from abiotic and biotic changes in environmental conditions is reported. In this work, electrical potential differences are monitored continuously using Ag/AgCl microelectrodes, inserted 5 mm deep into sapwood at two positions in the trunks of several Avocado trees. Electrodes are referenced to a non polarisable Ag/AgCl microelectrode installed 20 cm deep in the soil. Systematic patterns of DeltaEP during absolute darkness, day-night cycles and different conditions of soil water availability are discussed as alternative tools to assess early plant stress conditions.

  2. Creep response in shear of clayey geo-materials under saturated and unsaturated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazer Nor Shahidah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Translational slides in clays are often characterized by long-lasting intermittent movements associated with the fluctuations of pore-water pressure. Physically-based models designed to support hazard analysis of landslide movements and early warning systems require the integration of time-dependent (viscous constitutive models for the shear displacements because landslide movements are typically controlled by the viscous behaviour of the clay geo-material. This paper presents an investigation of the viscous response of a clay geo-material under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Creep and relaxation tests have been first carried out on saturated clay samples by means of direct shear box. To gain a conceptual understanding of the viscous response of the clay in shear, mechanical analogues were considered based on combinations of springs and dashpots. Preliminary tests on unsaturated samples were finally carried out to gain a first insight into the viscous response of the clay under unsaturated conditions.

  3. Learning by experience? Visceral pain-related neural and behavioral responses in a classical conditioning paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icenhour, A; Labrenz, F; Ritter, C; Theysohn, N; Forsting, M; Bingel, U; Elsenbruch, S

    2017-06-01

    Studies investigating mechanisms underlying nocebo responses in pain have mainly focused on negative expectations induced by verbal suggestions. Herein, we addressed neural and behavioral correlates of nocebo responses induced by classical conditioning in a visceral pain model. In two independent studies, a total of 40 healthy volunteers underwent classical conditioning, consisting of repeated pairings of one visual cue (CS High ) with rectal distensions of high intensity, while a second cue (CS Low ) was always followed by low-intensity distensions. During subsequent test, only low-intensity distensions were delivered, preceded by either CS High or CS Low . Distension intensity ratings were assessed in both samples and functional magnetic resonance imaging data were available from one study (N=16). As a consequence of conditioning, we hypothesized CS High -cued distensions to be perceived as more intense and expected enhanced cue- and distension-related neural responses in regions encoding sensory and affective dimensions of pain and in structures associated with pain-related fear memory. During test, distension intensity ratings did not differ depending on preceding cue. Greater distension-induced neural activation was observed in somatosensory, prefrontal, and cingulate cortices and caudate when preceded by CS High . Analysis of cue-related responses revealed strikingly similar activation patterns. We report changes in neural activation patterns during anticipation and visceral stimulation induced by prior conditioning. In the absence of behavioral effects, markedly altered neural responses may indicate conditioning with visceral signals to induce hypervigilance rather than hyperalgesia, involving altered attention, reappraisal, and perceptual acuity as processes contributing to the pathophysiology of visceral pain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Optimization of hydrolysis conditions for bovine plasma protein using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Eun-Young; Go, Gwang-Woong; Kim, Gap-Don; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish optimal conditions for the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Response surface methodology was used to model and optimize responses [degree of hydrolysis (DH), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and Fe(2+)-chelating activity]. Hydrolysis conditions, such as hydrolysis temperature (46.6-63.4 °C), hydrolysis time (98-502 min), and hydrolysis pH (6.32-9.68) were selected as the main processing conditions in the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Optimal conditions for maximum DH (%), DPPH radical-scavenging activity (%) and Fe(2+)-chelating activity (%) of the hydrolyzed bovine plasma protein, were respectively established. We discovered the following three conditions for optimal hydrolysis of bovine plasma: pH of 7.82-8.32, temperature of 54.1 °C, and time of 338.4-398.4 min. We consequently succeeded in hydrolyzing bovine plasma protein under these conditions and confirmed the various desirable properties of optimal hydrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Aversive Classical Conditioning on Sexual Response in Women With Dyspareunia and Sexually Functional Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Stephanie; Brauer, Marieke; Weijenborg, Philomeen; Laan, Ellen

    2017-05-01

    In dyspareunia-a somatically unexplained vulvovaginal pain associated with sexual intercourse-learned pain-related fear and inhibited sexual arousal are supposed to play a pivotal role. Based on research findings indicating that enhanced pain conditioning is involved in the etiology and maintenance of chronic pain, in the present study it was hypothesized that enhanced pain conditioning also might be involved in dyspareunia. To test whether learned associations between pain and sex negatively affect sexual response; whether women with dyspareunia show stronger aversive learning; and whether psychological distress, pain-related anxiety, vigilance, catastrophizing, and sexual excitation and inhibition were associated with conditioning effects. Women with dyspareunia (n = 36) and healthy controls (n = 35) completed a differential conditioning experiment, with one erotic picture (the CS + ) paired with a painful unconditional stimulus and one erotic picture never paired with pain (the CS - ). Genital sexual response was measured by vaginal photoplethysmography, and ratings of affective value and sexual arousal in response to the CS + and CS - were obtained. Psychological distress, pain cognitions, and sexual excitation and inhibition were assessed by validated questionnaires. The two groups showed stronger negative affect and weaker subjective sexual arousal to the CS + during the extinction phase, but, contrary to expectations, women with dyspareunia showed weaker differential responding. Controls showed more prominent lower genital response to the CS + during acquisition than women with dyspareunia. In addition, women with dyspareunia showed stronger expectancy for the unconditional stimulus in response to the safe CS - . Higher levels of pain-related fear, pain catastrophizing, and sexual inhibition were associated with weaker differential conditioning effects. Pairing of sex with pain negatively affects sexual response. The results indicate that a learned

  6. Investigation of electrical responses to acupuncture stimulation: the effect of electrical grounding and insulation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Heum; Ryu, Yeon-Hang; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-03-01

    Acupuncture in Oriental medicine has been widely used as a core therapeutic method due to its minimal side-effects and therapeutic efficacy. However, the electrical response to acupuncture stimulation (ERAS) has not been clearly studied under acupuncture conditions that might affect the efficacy of acupuncture therapy. In this study, the ERAS was objectively investigated by measuring meridian electric potentials (MEPs) when the electrical grounding conditions of the operator and subject were varied, and when the insulation conditions of acupuncture needle were varied. MEPs between Sang-geoheo (ST37) and Ha-geoheo (ST39) of the Stomach Meridian (ST) were measured by stimulating Jok-samni (ST36) with an acupuncture needle. For non-insulated acupuncture stimulation (NIAS), the average MEP peak was 148.6 +/- 20.6 when neither the operator nor the subject were electrically grounded, 23.1 +/- 8.8 when the subject only was electrically grounded, 348 +/- 76.8 when the operator only was electrically grounded, and 19.9 +/- 4.7 when both the operator and the subject were electrically grounded. The MEPs presented various magnitudes and patterns depending on the electrical grounding conditions. The MEP pattern was very similar to that of the charge and discharge of a capacitor. For insulated acupuncture stimulation (IAS), the average MEP peak was 20 +/- 4 in all electrical grounding conditions, which is not a significant electric response for acupuncture stimulation. In terms of electricity, this study verified that acupuncture therapy might be affected by acupuncture conditions such as (1) the electrical grounding condition of the operator and the subject and (2) the insulation condition of the acupuncture needle.

  7. Negatively-charged air conditions and responses of the human psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuaki; Otsuki, Takemi; Mase, Akinori; Kawado, Takashi; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Matsushima, Hiroki; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Miura, Yoshie; Murakami, Shuko; Maeda, Megumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Naoko; Shirahama, Takashi; Yoshimatsu, Michiharu; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2008-08-01

    Against increasing environmental adverse effects on human health such as those associated with water and ground pollution, as well as out- and indoor air conditions, trials were conducted to support and promote human health by improving the indoor air atmosphere. This study was performed to estimate the effect of negatively-charged air conditions on human biological markers related to the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune (PNEI) network. After construction of negatively-charged experimental rooms (NCRs), healthy volunteers were admitted to these rooms and control rooms (CTRs) and various biological responses were analyzed. NCRs were constructed using a fine charcoal coating and applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of walls and the ground. Various biological markers were monitored that related to general conditions, autonomic nervous systems, stress markers, immunological parameters and blood flow. Regarding the indoor environment, only negatively-charged air resulted in the difference between the CTR and NCR groups. The well-controlled experimental model-room to examine the biological effects of negatively-charged air was therefore established. Among the various parameters, IL-2, IL-4, the mean RR interval of the heart rate, and blood viscosity differed significantly between the CTR and NCR groups. In addition, the following formula was used to detect NCR-biological responses: Biological Response Value (BRV)=0.498+0.0005 [salivary cortisol]+0.072 [IL-2]+0.003 [HRM-SD]-0.013 [blood viscosity]-0.009 [blood sugar]+0.017 [pulse rate]. Negatively-charged air conditions activated the immune system slightly, smoothened blood flow and stabilized the autonomic nervous system. Although this is the first report to analyze negatively-charged air conditions on human biological responses, the long-term effects should be analyzed for the general use of these artificial atmospheres.

  8. Jatropha curcasand Ricinus communisdisplay contrasting photosynthetic mechanisms in response to environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Costa Lima Neto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher plants display different adaptive strategies in photosynthesis to cope with abiotic stress. In this study, photosynthetic mechanisms and water relationships displayed byJatropha curcasL. (physic nuts andRicinus communisL. (castor bean, in response to variations in environmental conditions, were assessed.R. communis showed higher CO2 assimilation, stomatal and mesophyll conductance thanJ. curcas as light intensity and intercellular CO2 pressure increased. On the other hand,R. communis was less effective in stomatal control in response to adverse environmental factors such as high temperature, water deficit and vapor pressure deficit, indicating lower water use efficiency. Conversely,J. curcas exhibited higher photosynthetic efficiency (gas exchange and photochemistry and water use efficiency under these adverse environmental conditions.R. communisdisplayed higher potential photosynthesis, but exhibited a lowerin vivo Rubisco carboxylation rate (Vcmax and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax. During the course of a typical day, in a semiarid environment, with high irradiation, high temperature and high vapor pressure deficit, but exposed to well-watered conditions, the two studied species presented similar photosynthesis. Losing potential photosynthesis, but maintaining favorable water status and increasing non-photochemical quenching to avoid photoinhibition, are important acclimation mechanisms developed byJ. curcas to cope with dry and hot conditions. We suggest thatJ. curcas is more tolerant to hot and dry environments thanR. communis but the latter species displays higher photosynthetic efficiency under well-watered and non-stressful conditions.

  9. Extinguished second-order conditioned fear responses are renewed but not reinstated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Nathan M; Cai, Stefanie Yuxuan; Lay, Belinda Po Pyn; Watts, Nicola R; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-10-01

    A series of experiments used rats to examine renewal and reinstatement of extinguished second-order conditioned fear (freezing) responses. The initial experiment demonstrated that freezing responses to a stimulus (S2) were contingent on its pairings with a second stimulus (S1) and on the prior pairings of S1 and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). Subsequent experiments showed that these freezing responses extinguished across S2 alone presentations, but were renewed when: S2-S1 pairings and S2 alone presentations occurred in the same context and testing of S2 occurred elsewhere; S2-S1 pairings and testing were in the same context and S2 alone presentations were elsewhere; and when S2-S1 pairings, S2 alone presentations and testing occurred in different contexts. Freezing responses to an extinguished S1 were reinstated by US alone presentations. However, these responses were not reinstated to an extinguished S2 by US or S1 alone presentations, and, conversely, freezing to a nonextinguished S2 was unaffected by extinction of S1. The results were interpreted to mean that S2-S1 pairings produced an association between S2 and the fear responses elicited by S1 and that extinction of this association is controlled by context. The failure to reinstate fear responses to S2 is discussed in terms of theories developed to explain reinstatement of S1.

  10. Response Load Extrapolation for Wind Turbines during Operation Based on Average Conditional Exceedance Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Naess, Arvid; Saha, Nilanjan

    2011-01-01

    within a hierarchical model where the variables that influence the loading are divided into ergodic variables and time-invariant non-ergodic variables. The presented method for statistical response load extrapolation was compared with the existing methods based on peak extrapolation for the blade out-of-plane...... bending moment and the tower mudline bending moment of a pitch-controlled wind turbine. In general, the results show that the method based on average conditional exceedance rates predicts the extrapolated characteristic response loads at the individual mean wind speeds well and results in more consistent...

  11. Teoría del Pecking Order versus teoría del Trade off para la empresa Coservicios S.A. E.S.P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Milena Zambrano Vargas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo pretende analizar el grado de aplicación de dos teorías de estructura de capital que han sido contradictorias y extensamente comparadas. Para la aplicación de la teoría del Trade Off se utilizan dos modelos, el primero propuesto por López y de Luna (2002 y el segundo es el propuesto por Cruz et al., (2003. Para la aplicación de la teoría del Pecking Order se analiza la forma como han sido manejadas las reservas, la deuda a largo plazo, el crecimiento de los activos operacionales netos, la tendencia que ha tenido la rentabilidad operacional de los activos y el EBITDA. Al final se encuentra que en los períodos analizados la teoría más usada ha sido la de Pecking Order la cual ha tenido más evidencia empírica en otras organizaciones, y de la teoría del Trade Off no se encontró aplicación.

  12. Autism and classical eyeblink conditioning: Performance changes of the conditioned response related to autism spectrum disorder diagnosis

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    John P Welsh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the timing performance of conditioned responses (CRs acquired during trace and delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC are presented for diagnostic subgroups of children having autism spectrum disorder (ASD aged 6-15 years. Children diagnosed with autistic disorder (AD were analyzed separately from children diagnosed with either Asperger’s syndrome or Pervasive-developmental disorder not-otherwise-specified (Asp/PDD and compared to an age- and IQ-matched group of children that were typically developing (TD. Within-subject and between-groups contrasts in CR performance on sequential exposure to trace and delay EBC were analyzed to determine whether any differences would expose underlying functional heterogeneities of the cerebral and cerebellar systems in ASD subgroups. The EBC parameters measured were percentage CRs, CR onset latency, and CR peak latency. Neither AD nor Asp/PDD groups were impaired in CR acquisition during trace or delay EBC. AD and Asp/PDD both altered CR timing, but not always in the same way. Although the AD group showed normal CR timing during trace EBC, the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 27 and 28 ms increase in CR onset and peak latency, respectively, during trace EBC. In contrast, the direction of the timing change was opposite during delay EBC, during which the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 29 ms decrease in CR onset latency and the AD group showed a larger 77 ms decrease in CR onset latency. Only the AD group showed a decrease in CR peak latency during delay EBC, demonstrating another difference between AD and Asp/PDD. The difference in CR onset latency during delay EBC for both AD and Asp/PDD was due to an abnormal prevalence of early onset CRs that were intermixed with CRs having normal timing, as observed both in CR onset histograms and mean CR waveforms. In conclusion, significant heterogeneity in EBC performance was apparent within diagnostic groups, and this may indicate that EBC performance can

  13. Experience of inundation or drought alters the responses of plants to subsequent water conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shu; Callaway, Ragan M.; Zhou, Dao-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The availability of water is often highly variable over the life of a plant in nature, and most plants experience episodic extremes in water scarcity and abundance. The importance of plant plasticity in coping with such experiences is widely recognized, but little is known about how plastic...... responses to current conditions are affected by prior environmental experiences. * Our objectives were to investigate the effects of early inundation or drought on the subsequent responses of plant species to the same, opposite or more favourable conditions. * To address these questions, we subjected four...... invasive and four native herbaceous perennial species from different habitats (xeric, mesic, hydric) to two rounds of hydrological treatments (drought, moderate water, inundation) and analysed the effects of the early treatments on survival and performance (total biomass and relative growth) of individuals...

  14. Olfactory aversive conditioning alters olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses

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    Max L Fletcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical organization of receptor neuron input into the olfactory bulb (OB allows odor information to be transformed into an odorant-specific spatial map of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning. While the mammalian OB has been shown to undergo experience-dependent plasticity at the glomerular level, it is still unclear if similar representational change occurs within mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor representations following learning. To address this, odorant-evoked glomerular activity patterns were imaged in mice expressing a GFP-based calcium indicator (GCaMP2 in OB mitral/tufted cells. Glomerular odor responses were imaged before and after olfactory associative conditioning to aversive foot shock. Following conditioning, we found no overall reorganization of the glomerular representation. Training, however, did significantly alter the amplitudes of individual glomeruli within the representation in mice in which the odor was presented together with foot shock. Further, the specific pairing of foot shock with odor presentations lead to increased responses primarily in initially weakly activated glomeruli. Overall, these results suggest that associative conditioning can enhance the initial representation of odors within the olfactory bulb by enhancing responses to the learned odor in some glomeruli.

  15. Classical conditioning of autonomic fear responses is independent of contingency awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Douglas H; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2010-10-01

    The role of contingency awareness in classical conditioning experiments using human subjects is currently under debate. This study took a novel approach to manipulating contingency awareness in a differential Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. Complex sine wave gratings were used as visual conditional stimuli (CS). By manipulating the fundamental spatial frequency of the displays, we were able to construct pairs of stimuli that varied in discriminability. One group of subjects was given an "easy" discrimination, and another was exposed to a "difficult" CS+ and CS-. A 3rd group was exposed to a stimulus that was paired with the unconditional stimulus (UCS) 50% of the time and served as a control. Skin conductance response (SCR) and continuous UCS expectancy data were measured concurrently throughout the experiment. Differential UCS expectancy was found only in the easy discrimination group. Differential SCRs were found in the easy discrimination group as well as in the difficult discrimination group, but not in the 50% contingency control. The difficult discrimination group did not exhibit differential UCS expectancy but did show clear differential SCR. These observations support a dual process interpretation of classical conditioning whereby conditioning on an implicit level can occur without explicit knowledge about the contingencies. The role of contingency awareness in classical conditioning experiments using human subjects is currently under debate. This study took a novel approach to manipulating contingency awareness in a differential Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. Complex sine wave gratings were used as visual conditional stimuli (CS). By manipulating the fundamental spatial frequency of the displays, we were able to construct pairs of stimuli that varied in discriminability. One group of subjects was given an "easy" discrimination, and another was exposed to a "difficult" CS+ and CS-. A 3rd group was exposed to a stimulus that was paired with the

  16. An algorithmic implementation of physical reflective boundary conditions in particle methods: Collision detection and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga Filho, Carlos Alberto Dutra

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a computational algorithmic implementation of physical reflective boundary conditions and applications, for use in particle methods. It is motivated by the lack of a straightforward study in the literature dedicated to the presentation of this reflective boundary condition, based on Newton's restitution law and the foundations of analytic geometry. Particular attention is given here to the procedures of collision detection and response. The importance of the consistency of input data and an appropriate temporal integration technique for use in the particle method is also discussed. Validation tests are performed, with the results of the algorithm verified using analytical results. Numerical simulations of static and dynamic problems are carried out. The analysis of the numerical results shows that the physical reflective boundary conditions are consistent and that the algorithm has been properly implemented.

  17. Phytoplankton responses to temperature increases are constrained by abiotic conditions and community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striebel, Maren; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Hodapp, Dorothee; Hingsamer, Peter; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    Effects of temperature changes on phytoplankton communities seem to be highly context-specific, but few studies have analyzed whether this context specificity depends on differences in the abiotic conditions or in species composition between studies. We present an experiment that allows disentangling the contribution of abiotic and biotic differences in shaping the response to two aspects of temperature change: permanent increase of mean temperature versus pulse disturbance in form of a heat wave. We used natural communities from six different sites of a floodplain system as well as artificially mixed communities from laboratory cultures and grew both, artificial and natural communities, in water from the six different floodplain lakes (sites). All 12 contexts (2 communities × 6 sites) were first exposed to three different temperature levels (12, 18, 24 °C, respectively) and afterward to temperature pulses (4 °C increase for 7 h day(-1)). Temperature-dependent changes in biomass and community composition depended on the initial composition of phytoplankton communities. Abiotic conditions had a major effect on biomass of phytoplankton communities exposed to different temperature conditions, however, the effect of biotic and abiotic conditions together was even more pronounced. Additionally, phytoplankton community responses to pulse temperature effects depended on the warming history. By disentangling abiotic and biotic effects, our study shows that temperature-dependent effects on phytoplankton communities depend on both, biotic and abiotic constraints.

  18. Myo-inositol oxygenase is required for responses to low energy conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon R Alford

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available myo-Inositol is a precursor for cell wall components, is used as a backbone of myo-inositol trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5P3 and phosphatidylinositol phosphate signaling molecules, and is debated about whether it is also a precursor in an alternate ascorbic acid synthesis pathway. Plants control inositol homeostasis by regulation of key enzymes involved in myo-inositol synthesis and catabolism. Recent transcriptional profiling data indicate up-regulation of the myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX genes under conditions in which energy or nutrients are limited. To test whether the MIOX genes are required for responses to low energy, we first examined MIOX2 and MIOX4 gene expression regulation by energy/nutrient conditions. We found that both MIOX2 and MIOX4 expression are suppressed by exogenous glucose addition in the shoot, but not in the root. Both genes were abundantly expressed during low energy/nutrient conditions. Loss-of-function mutants in MIOX genes contain alterations in myo-inositol levels and growth changes in the root. Miox2 mutants can be complemented with a MIOX2:green fluorescent protein fusion. Further we show here that MIOX2 is a cytoplasmic protein, while MIOX4 is present mostly in the cytoplasm, but also occasionally in the nucleus. Together, these data suggest that MIOX catabolism in the shoot may influence root growth responses during low energy/nutrient conditions.

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF PRETREATMENT CONDITIONS OF CARROTS TO MAXIMIZE JUICE RECOVERY BY RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. SHARMA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Carrot juice was expressed in a hydraulic press using a wooden set up. Carrot samples pretreated at different designed combinations, using Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD, Response Surface Methodology (RSM, of pH, temperature and time were expressed and juice so obtained was characterized for various physico-chemical parameters which involved yield, TSS and water content, reducing sugars, total sugars and color (absorbance. The study indicated that carrots exposed to the different pretreatment conditions resulted in increased amount of yield than that of the control. The responses were optimized by numerical method and were found to be 78.23% yield, 0.93% color (abs, 3.41% reducing sugars, 5.53% total sugars, 6.69obrix, and 90.50% water content. All the derived mathematical models for the various responses were found to be fit significantly to predict the data.

  20. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  1. Physiological and cytokine response to acute exercise under hypoxic conditions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Fábio S; Lemos, Valdir A; Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Dos Santos, Ronaldo V; Tufik, Sergio; Zagatto, Alessandro M; de Souza, Claudio T; Pimentel, Gustavo D; De Mello, Marco T

    2017-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that exercise in hypoxia situations induces a cytotoxicity effects. However, the cytokines participation in this condition is remaining unknown. Thus, the aim the present study was to evaluate physiological parameters and inflammatory profiles in response to acute exercise after five hours of hypoxic conditions. Fourteen healthy men were distributed randomly into two groups: normoxic exercise (N.=7) and hypoxic exercise (N.=7). All volunteers were blinded to the protocol. Initially, all subjects were submitted to chamber normobaric in a room fitted for altitude simulations of up to 4500 m, equivalent to a barometric pressure of 433 mmHg. All analyses began at 7:00 a.m. and was maintained for 5 hours; the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 13.5%. The groups began a 60-minute session of physical exercise starting at 11:00 a.m., at 50% of peak VO2 (50% VO2peak). Blood was collected for cytokine analysis in the morning upon waking, before the 60-minute exercise session and immediately thereafter. The heart rate during 60 minutes' exercise training was significantly increased in both exercise groups (P<0.05), and the oxygen saturation was reduced under hypoxic conditions during exercise (P<0.05). After exercise, significant increases were found for IL-1ra and IL-10 under hypoxic conditions (P<0.05) and for IL-6 for both groups (P<0.05). TNF-α was not altered under either environmental condition. Our data demonstrate that acute exercise performance in hypoxic conditions can promotes early inflammatory response, leads for immunosuppression state.

  2. [CO2 response process and its simulation of Prunus sibirica photosynthesis under different soil moisture conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qin; Zhang, Guang-Can; Pei, Bin; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Yu; Fang, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Taking the two-year old potted Prunus sibirica seedlings as test materials, and using CIRAS-2 photosynthetic system, this paper studied the CO2 response process of P. sibirica photosynthesis in semi-arid loess hilly region under eight soil moisture conditions. The CO2 response data of P. sibirica were fitted and analyzed by rectangular hyperbola model, exponential equation, and modified rectangular hyperbola model. Meanwhile, the quantitative relationships between the photosynthesis and the soil moisture were discussed. The results showed that the CO2 response process of P. sibirica photosynthesis had obvious response characteristics to the soil moisture threshold. The relative soil water content (RWC) required to maintain the higher photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of P. sibirica was in the range of 46.3%-81.9%. In this RWC range, the photosynthesis did not appear obvious CO2 saturated inhibition phenomenon. When the RWC exceeded this range, the photosynthetic capacity (P(n max)), CE, and CO2 saturation point (CSP) decreased evidently. Under different soil moisture conditions, there existed obvious differences among the three models in simulating the CO2 response data of P. sibirica. When the RWC was in the range of 46.3%-81.9%, the CO2 response process and the characteristic parameters such as CE, CO2 compensation point (see symbol), and photorespiration rate (R(p)) could be well fitted by the three models, and the accuracy was in the order of modified rectangular hyperbola model > exponential equation > rectangular hyperbola model. When the RWC was too high or too low, namely, the RWC was > 81.9% or process and the characteristic parameters. It was suggested that when the RWC was from 46.3% to 81.9%, the photosynthetic efficiency of P. sibirica was higher, and, as compared with rectangular hyperbola model and exponential equation, modified rectangular hyperbola model had more applicability to fit the CO2 response data of P. sibirica

  3. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  4. Responsiveness of five condition-specific and generic outcome assessment instruments for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verra Martin L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes of health and quality-of-life in chronic conditions are mostly small and require specific and sensitive instruments. The aim of this study was to determine and compare responsiveness, i.e. the sensitivity to change of five outcome instruments for effect measurement in chronic pain. Methods In a prospective cohort study, 273 chronic pain patients were assessed on the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS for pain, the Short Form 36 (SF-36, the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ. Responsiveness was quantified by effect size (ES and standardized response mean (SRM before and after a four week in-patient interdisciplinary pain program and compared by the modified Jacknife test. Results The MPI measured pain more responsively than the SF-36 (ES: 0.85 vs 0.72, p = 0.053; SRM: 0.72 vs 0.60, p = 0.027 and the pain NRS (ES: 0.85 vs 0.62, p Conclusion The MPI was most responsive in all comparable domains followed by the SF-36. The pain-specific MPI and the generic SF-36 can be recommended for comprehensive and specific bio-psycho-social effect measurement of health and quality-of-life in chronic pain.

  5. The influence of cycling intensity upon cognitive response during inferred practice and competition conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Clarke, Neil D; Cox, Martin; Smith, Mike

    2017-10-01

    In many sport and exercise situations, cognitive performance is required under conditions of high physiological load and high cognitive anxiety. However, few studies have assessed all these components in situ. The current study sought to address this issue. Fourteen adults (9 males, 5 females) completed 2 incremental exercise trials (perceived competition or perceived practice) in a counterbalanced order. Cognitive performance, via a test of visual discrimination, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR), blood lactate (Bla), and anxiety scores, was recorded at rest, 70% [Formula: see text] and 90% [Formula: see text]. Visual discrimination response times were faster at rest compared to 70% (P = 0.001) and 90% [Formula: see text] (P = 0.002) and at 70% compared to 90% [Formula: see text] (P = 0.04) in the competitive condition. HR post-instructions (P = 0.0001), at 70% (P = 0.001) and 90% [Formula: see text] (P = 0.0001), was significantly higher in competition compared to practice. RPE was higher in the competitive condition compared to the practice condition (P = 0.023). Cognitive anxiety intensity was significantly higher in the competitive condition, at 70% and 90% [Formula: see text] (P = 0.001). This study suggests that cognitive performance is more negatively affected when physiological arousal and cognitive anxiety are at their highest. Coaches and athletes should be mindful of such effects and seek to develop skills to offset such responses or to structure training to better represent competition.

  6. Exposures to conditioned flavours with different hedonic values induce contrasted behavioural and brain responses in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Clouard

    Full Text Available This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d. infusions of 15% glucose (F(Glu, lithium chloride (F(LiCl, or saline (control treatment, F(NaCl. One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three (18FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the F(LiCl than the F(NaCl or F(Glu meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the F(NaCl and F(Glu foods were significantly preferred over the F(LICl food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the F(NaCl food was also preferred over the F(Glu food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake.

  7. Enhanced periosteal and endocortical responses to axial tibial compression loading in conditional connexin43 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Grimston

    Full Text Available The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43 is involved in mechanotransduction in bone. Recent studies using in vivo models of conditional Cx43 gene (Gja1 deletion in the osteogenic linage have generated inconsistent results, with Gja1 ablation resulting in either attenuated or enhanced response to mechanical load, depending upon the skeletal site examined or the type of load applied. To gain further insights on Cx43 and mechanotransduction, we examined bone formation response at both endocortical and periosteal surfaces in 2-month-old mice with conditional Gja1 ablation driven by the Dermo1 promoter (cKO. Relative to wild type (WT littermates, it requires a larger amount of compressive force to generate the same periosteal strain in cKO mice. Importantly, cKO mice activate periosteal bone formation at a lower strain level than do WT mice, suggesting an increased sensitivity to mechanical load in Cx43 deficiency. Consistently, trabecular bone mass also increases in mutant mice upon load, while it decreases in WT. On the other hand, bone formation actually decreases on the endocortical surface in WT mice upon application of axial mechanical load, and this response is also accentuated in cKO mice. These changes are associated with increase of Cox-2 in both genotypes and further decrease of Sost mRNA in cKO relative to WT bones. Thus, the response of bone forming cells to mechanical load differs between trabecular and cortical components, and remarkably between endocortical and periosteal envelopes. Cx43 deficiency enhances both the periosteal and endocortical response to mechanical load applied as axial compression in growing mice.

  8. Adaptations in rod outer segment disc membranes in response to environmental lighting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Tatini; Senapati, Subhadip; Parmar, Vipul M; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Maeda, Akiko; Park, Paul S-H

    2017-10-01

    The light-sensing rod photoreceptor cell exhibits several adaptations in response to the lighting environment. While adaptations to short-term changes in lighting conditions have been examined in depth, adaptations to long-term changes in lighting conditions are less understood. Atomic force microscopy was used to characterize the structure of rod outer segment disc membranes, the site of photon absorption by the pigment rhodopsin, to better understand how photoreceptor cells respond to long-term lighting changes. Structural properties of the disc membrane changed in response to housing mice in constant dark or light conditions and these adaptive changes required output from the phototransduction cascade initiated by rhodopsin. Among these were changes in the packing density of rhodopsin in the membrane, which was independent of rhodopsin synthesis and specifically affected scotopic visual function as assessed by electroretinography. Studies here support the concept of photostasis, which maintains optimal photoreceptor cell function with implications in retinal degenerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of food availability, body condition and physiological stress response in breeding Black-legged Kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, John F.

    1999-01-01

    1. The seasonal dynamics of body condition (BC), circulating corticosterone levels (baseline, BL) and the adrenocortical response to acute stress (SR) were examined in long-lived Black-legged Kittiwakes, Rissa tridactyla, breeding at Duck (food-poor colony) and Gull (food-rich colony) Islands in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska. It was tested whether the dynamics of corticosterone levels reflect a seasonal change in bird physiological condition due to reproduction and/or variation in foraging conditions. 2. BC declined seasonally, and the decline was more pronounced in birds at the food-poor colony. BL and SR levels of corticosterone rose steadily through the reproductive season, and BL levels were significantly higher in birds on Duck island compared with those on Gull Island. During the egg-laying and chick-rearing stages, birds had lower SR on Duck Island than on Gull Island. 3. The results suggest that, in addition to a seasonal change in bird physiology during reproduction, local ecological factors such as food availability affect circulating levels of corticosterone and adrenal response to acute stress.

  10. Behavioral response of Corophium volutator relative to experimental conditions, physical and chemical disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellou, Jocelyne; Cheeseman, Kerri; Jouvenelle, Marie-Laure; Robertson, Sarah

    2005-12-01

    The preference/avoidance behavioral response of a widely used amphipod in toxicity tests, Corophium volutator, was investigated in relation to the presence of anthropogenic physical or chemical materials in sediments. Exposure conditions, including the density of amphipods, the depth of sediments, amount of overlying water, and exposure time, were examined for their influence on amphipods' preference for field sediments and avoidance of coarse sand. It was shown that these variables did not affect the response; thus, conditions similar to published standard toxicity tests were chosen. A gradient of sediments spiked with potential habitat disturbances that can be found on a beach or in contaminated sediments, such as those in harbors, were tested. These substances included sand, seaweed, burned wood, coal, crankcase oil, and diesel oil. To enhance the interpretation of results and decrease the variability observed when tests were conducted at different times over the summer, exposures were performed over a gradient of spike material in reference sediments. We conclude that physical obstacles added to reference sediments lead to less correlation with the behavioral response than observed with chemical interferences. Amphipods' behavior ranked harbor sediments similarly to previous studies concerning the health of intertidal mussels collected in proximity to the sediments sites. For five sites, preference of reference sediments was observed until the level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diluted harbor sediments reached the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment sediment quality guidelines.

  11. Inflammatory responses of endothelial cells experiencing reduction in flow after conditioning by shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Nick M; McGettrick, Helen M; Salmon, Mike; Kissane, Steve; Vohra, Rajiv K; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2008-09-01

    Exposure of endothelial cells (EC) to shear stress reduces their response to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). We tested how shear-conditioned EC responded to reduction in flow, either by spontaneously binding leukocytes, or by increasing sensitivity to TNF. Human umbilical vein EC were exposed to shear stress of 2.0 Pa (20 dyn/cm(2)) for 24 h. Shear was then reduced to stasis (30 sec perfusion each hour to exchange medium) or 0.003 Pa (creeping flow). At chosen times, neutrophils were perfused over the EC at 0.1 Pa (effective reperfusion). EC developed an ability to capture flowing neutrophils that lasted from 1 to 3 h after flow reduction, which was reduced by antibody against P-selectin or pre-treatment of EC with an inhibitor of NADPH-oxidase. Adhesion of neutrophils to TNF-treated EC was greatly suppressed by shear-conditioning, remained suppressed immediately after cessation of flow and then took 48 h to approach the level in static cultures. Interestingly, the response to TNF remained suppressed in cultures switched to creeping flow. Gene array analysis confirmed that differently recovered cells had separate phenotypes. Thus, an acute response of EC to reduction in shear may contribute to leukocyte recruitment, along with hypoxia, in ischaemia and reperfusion. Prolonged cessation of flow may increase the sensitivity of EC to inflammatory stimuli, but this effect may be suppressed by residual flow.

  12. Optimization of osmotic dehydration conditions of peach slices in sucrose solution using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Baljeet Singh; Yadav, Ritika B; Jatain, Monika

    2012-10-01

    Osmotic dehydration (OD) conditions of peach slices were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) with respect to sucrose concentration (50-70°B), immersion time (2-4 h) and process temperature (35-55 °C) for maximum water loss (WL), minimum solute gain (SG) and maximum rehydration ratio (RR) as response variables. A central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used as experimental design. The models developed for all responses were significant. All model terms were significant in WL except the quadratic levels of sucrose concentration and temperature whereas in SG, linear terms of time and linear and quadratic terms of temperature were significant. All the terms except linear term of time and interaction term of time and sucrose concentration, were significant in RR. The optimized conditions were sucrose concentration = 69.9°B, time = 3.97 h and temperature = 37.63 °C in order to obtain WL of 28.42 (g/100 g of fresh weight), SG of 8.39 (g/100 g of fresh weight) and RR of 3.38.

  13. Experience-Dependent Effects of Cocaine Self-Administration/Conditioning on Prefrontal and Accumbens Dopamine Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Aiko; Olsen, Christopher M.; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the effects of cocaine self-administration and conditioning experience on operant behavior, locomotor activity, and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine (DA) responses. Sensory cues were paired with alternating cocaine and nonreinforcement during 12 (limited training) or 40 (long-term training) daily operant sessions. After limited training, NAcc DA responses to cocaine were significantly enhanced in the presence of cocaine-associated cues compared with nonreward cues and significantly depressed after cocaine-paired cues accompanied a nonreinforced lever response. PFC DA levels were generally nonresponsive to cues after the same training duration. However, after long-term training, cocaine-associated cues increased the magnitude of cocaine-stimulated PFC DA levels significantly over levels observed with nonreinforcement cues. Conversely, conditioned cues no longer influenced NAcc DA levels after long-term training. In addition, cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity was enhanced by cocaine-paired cues after long-term, but not after limited, training. Findings demonstrate that cue-induced cocaine expectation exerts a significant impact on dopaminergic and behavioral systems, progressing from mesolimbic to mesocortical regions and from latent to patent behaviors as cocaine and associative experiences escalate. PMID:17469929

  14. Activity in the rabbit somatosensory cortex reflects the active procedural memory trace of a classically conditioned eyeblink response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikgren, Jan; Ruusuvirta, Timo; Korhonen, Tapani

    2003-05-01

    Behavioral responses and neural responses in the somatosensory cortex were recorded in nine rabbits during the unpaired and paired treatments of classical eyeblink conditioning with a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and an airpuff unconditioned stimulus. During the unpaired treatment, neither the behavioral nor neural responses to the CS were observed. During the paired treatment, behavioral conditioned response (CR), accompanied by neural activity, was developed. In well-trained animals occasional failures to elicit the CR were accompanied by an absence of neural responses. Nevertheless, the CS modified the behavioral unconditioned response in paired trials, implying that the CR-failures could not reflect the inability of the CS to modulate the pathways triggering the behavior constituting the CR. Thus, a close link between CR elicitation and somatosensory cortical neural response was established. Our finding suggests that this neural activity to a tone CS during classical eyeblink conditioning reflects an efferent copy of the procedural memory trace.

  15. The multi-modal responses of a physical head model subjected to various blast exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, S.; Phillippens, M.

    2017-11-01

    The local and global biomechanical response of the body to a blast wave is the first step of a sequence that leads to the development of stresses and strains which can exceed the tolerance of brain tissue. These stresses and strains may then lead to neuro-physical changes in the brain and contribute to initiate a cascade of events leading to injury. The specific biomechanical pathways by which the blast energy is transmitted through the head structure are, however, not clearly understood. Multiple transmission mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of brain stresses following the impingement of a blast wave on the head. With the use of a physical head model, the work presented here aims at demonstrating that the proposed transmission mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. They are part of a continuum of head responses where, depending on the exposure conditions, a given mechanism may or may not dominate. This article presents the joint analysis of previous blast test results generated with the brain injury protection evaluation device (BIPED) headform under four significantly different exposure conditions. The focus of the analysis is to demonstrate how the nature of the recorded response is highly dependent on the exposure characteristics and consequently, on the method used to reproduce blast exposure in a laboratory environment. The timing and magnitude of the variations in intra-cranial pressures (ICP) were analysed relative to the external pressure field in order to better understand the wave dynamics occurring within the brain structure of the headform. ICP waveforms were also analysed in terms of their energy spectral density to better identify the energy partitioning between the different modes of response. It is shown that the BIPED response is multi-modal and that the energy partitioning between its different modes of response is greatly influenced by exposure characteristics such as external peak overpressure, impulse, blast wave

  16. Determination of Critical Conditions for Puncturing Almonds Using Coupled Response Surface Methodology and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mahmoodi-Eshkaftaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of seed moisture content, probe diameter and loading velocity (puncture conditions on some mechanical properties of almond kernel and peeled almond kernel is considered to model a relationship between the puncture conditions and rupture energy. Furthermore, distribution of the mechanical properties is determined. The main objective is to determine the critical values of mechanical properties significant for peeling machines. The response surface methodology was used to find the relationship between the input parameters and the output responses, and the fitness function was applied to measure the optimal values using the genetic algorithm. Two-parameter Weibull function was used to describe the distribution of mechanical properties. Based on the Weibull parameter values, i.e. shape parameter (β and scale parameter (η calculated for each property, the mechanical distribution variations were completely described and it was confirmed that the mechanical properties are rule governed, which makes the Weibull function suitable for estimating their distributions. The energy model estimated using response surface methodology shows that the mechanical properties relate exponentially to the moisture, and polynomially to the loading velocity and probe diameter, which enabled successful estimation of the rupture energy (R²=0.94. The genetic algorithm calculated the critical values of seed moisture, probe diameter, and loading velocity to be 18.11 % on dry mass basis, 0.79 mm, and 0.15 mm/min, respectively, and optimum rupture energy of 1.97·10-³ J. These conditions were used for comparison with new samples, where the rupture energy was experimentally measured to be 2.68 and 2.21·10-³ J for kernel and peeled kernel, respectively, which was nearly in agreement with our model results.

  17. Operant serial feature-positive conditional discrimination with composite features and different topography responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.O. Bueno

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In a serial feature-positive conditional discrimination procedure the properties of a target stimulus A are defined by the presence or not of a feature stimulus X preceding it. In the present experiment, composite features preceded targets associated with two different topography operant responses (right and left bar pressing; matching and non-matching-to-sample arrangements were also used. Five water-deprived Wistar rats were trained in 6 different trials: X-R®Ar and X-L®Al, in which X and A were same modality visual stimuli and the reinforcement was contingent to pressing either the right (r or left (l bar that had the light on during the feature (matching-to-sample; Y-R®Bl and Y-L®Br, in which Y and B were same modality auditory stimuli and the reinforcement was contingent to pressing the bar that had the light off during the feature (non-matching-to-sample; A- and B- alone. After 100 training sessions, the animals were submitted to transfer tests with the targets used plus a new one (auditory click. Average percentages of stimuli with a response were measured. Acquisition occurred completely only for Y-L®Br+; however, complex associations were established along training. Transfer was not complete during the tests since concurrent effects of extinction and response generalization also occurred. Results suggest the use of both simple conditioning and configurational strategies, favoring the most recent theories of conditional discrimination learning. The implications of the use of complex arrangements for discussing these theories are considered.

  18. Anticipatory symptoms and anticipatory immune responses in pediatric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: features of a classically conditioned response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhorst, U; Spennes-Saleh, S; Körholz, D; Göbel, U; Schneider, M E; Steingrüber, H J; Klosterhalfen, S

    2000-09-01

    There is considerable evidence from studies in adult patients that classical conditioning contributes to anticipatory nausea and/or vomiting (ANV) in cancer chemotherapy: The stimuli predicting the infusion serve as conditioned stimuli (CS). When reexposed to the CS, some patients experience ANV prior to infusion onset. In adult patients, anticipatory immunomodulation (AIM) has also been observed. The present study examines whether ANV and AIM occur in pediatric cancer patients and whether they show features of a conditioned response. Nineteen pediatric cancer patients (M = 10.1 years, > 2 previous chemotherapies) were studied over two consecutive cycles (A, B). In both cycles, self-reported symptoms, for example nausea and vomiting, were recorded from two days prior to the onset (Day -2), during infusion, and two days after the end of the infusion (Day +2). In Cycle B, blood was drawn at home at Day -2, and at Day 0 in the hospital prior to infusion onset, thus using a quasi-experimental variation of the CS content of the environment. Immune parameters valid for tumor defense and cytotoxic competence (natural killer cell activity [NKCA], plasma interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-2, IL-10, interferon [IFN]-gamma, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha) and cortisol were measured. ANV was reported by 7 patients in at least one cycle. In Cycle A, ANV was positively associated with emetogenity of chemotherapy. Features of ANV-duration and occurrence-tended to be positively associated with those of posttreatment nausea and vomiting. AN increased as infusion onset time approached. NKCA and IFN-gamma increased from home to hospital, independent from cortisol level. The NKCA increase was predominantly observed in patients with ANV. ANV in pediatric patients showed features of a CR. Immune parameters were sensitive to the CS content of the environment, predominantly in patients with ANV. This is consistent with the manifestation of multiple CRs. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Avian migrants adjust migration in response to environmental conditions en route

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Anders P; Thorup, Kasper; Rainio, Kalle

    2008-01-01

    The onset of migration in birds is assumed to be primarily under endogenous control in long-distance migrants. Recently, climate changes appear to have been driving a rapid change in breeding area arrival. However, little is known about the climatic factors affecting migratory birds during...... the migration cycle, or whether recently reported phenological changes are caused by plastic behavioural responses or evolutionary change. Here, we investigate how environmental conditions in the wintering areas as well as en route towards breeding areas affect timing of migration. Using data from 1984 to 2004...... covering the entire migration period every year from observatories located in the Middle East and northern Europe, we show that passage of the Sahara Desert is delayed and correlated with improved conditions in the wintering areas. By contrast, migrants travel more rapidly through Europe, and adjust...

  20. Heat Pump Water Heaters: Controlled Field Research of Impact on Space Conditioning and Demand Response Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Eklund, Ken; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg

    2015-10-05

    A new generation of heat pump water heaters (HPWH) has been introduced into the U.S. market that promises to provide significant energy savings for water heating. Many electric utilities are promoting their widespread adoption as a key technology for meeting energy conservation goals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. There is, however, considerable uncertainty regarding the space conditioning impact of an HPWH installed in a conditioned space. There is also uncertainty regarding the potential for deployment of HPWHs in demand response (DR) programs to help manage and balance peak utility loads in a similar manner as conventional electric resistance water heaters (ERWH). To help answer these uncertainties, controlled experiments have been undertaken over 30 months in a matched pair of unoccupied Lab Homes located on the campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

  1. BEHAVIOURAL RESPONSE TO DIFFERENT CLIMATIC CONDITIONS OF BEEF CATTLE IN INTENSIVE REARING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brscic

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the behaviour of beef cattle reared in intensive systems in northern Italy under different climatic conditions. In particular, it considered 3 levels of THI (Temperature-Humidity-Index in order to evaluate the coping response to heat stress conditions regarding changes of beef cattle nutritional and social behaviours, drinking frequency and resting time. Behavioural observations were carried out from July to October 2005, during hot (THI above 78, mild (THI 76 and cool (THI below 72 conditions, on 24 finishing French crossbred bulls. The animals were housed in 6 fully slatted floor group pens of 4 bulls each. Within each class of THI, behaviours were recorded in two sessions of 24 hours using a 5 minute interval scan sampling technique. A focal animal was chosen in order to count the number of visits at the waterer. Results showed that eating behaviour was maximum during the first 8 hours after fresh feed delivery. However, in the same interval, when THI was above 78, eating activity was penalized while an increase of ruminating was observed. The overall number of visits at the waterer was increased by the heat stress condition and they were mainly concentrated in the hottest hours of the day. Hot environment also affected beef cattle social behaviour increasing agonistic interactions and mounts among penmates. Since heat stress affected bulls behaviour impairing their welfare, the adoption of cooling devices should be recommended.

  2. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    KAUST Repository

    Boury-Jamot, B

    2015-10-27

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine.

  3. Water Age Responses to Weather Conditions in a Hyper-Eutrophic Channel Reservoir in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Du

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Channel reservoirs have the characteristics of both rivers and lakes, in which hydrodynamic conditions and the factors affecting the eutrophication process are complex and highly affected by weather conditions. Water age at any location in the reservoir is used as an indicator for describing the spatial and temporal variations of water exchange and nutrient transport. The hyper-eutrophic Changtan Reservoir (CTR in Southern China was investigated. Three weather conditions including wet, normal, and dry years were considered for assessing the response of water age by using the coupled watershed model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model Environmental Fluid Hydrodynamic Code (EFDC. The results showed that the water age in CTR varied tremendously under different weather conditions. The averaged water ages at the downstream of CTR were 3 d, 60 d, and 110 d, respectively in the three typical wet, normal, and dry years. The highest water ages at the main tributary were >70 d, >100 d, and >200 d, respectively. The spatial distribution of water ages in the tributaries and the reservoir were mainly affected by precipitation. This paper provides useful information on water exchange and transport pathways in channel reservoir, which will be helpful in understanding nutrient dynamics for controlling algal blooms.

  4. Physiological responses to ocean acidification and warming synergistically reduce condition of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, E Z; Briffa, M; Moens, T; Van Colen, C

    2017-09-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the common cockle Cerastoderma edule was investigated in a fully crossed laboratory experiment. Survival of the examined adult organisms remained high and was not affected by elevated temperature (+3 °C) or lowered pH (-0.3 units). However, the morphometric condition index of the cockles incubated under high pCO 2 conditions (i.e. combined warming and acidification) was significantly reduced after six weeks of incubation. Respiration rates increased significantly under low pH, with highest rates measured under combined warm and low pH conditions. Calcification decreased significantly under low pH while clearance rates increased significantly under warm conditions and were generally lower in low pH treatments. The observed physiological responses suggest that the reduced food intake under hypercapnia is insufficient to support the higher energy requirements to compensate for the higher costs for basal maintenance and growth in future high pCO 2 waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Grid Support Enabled PV Inverter Response to Abnormal Grid Conditions: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Austin; Martin, Gregory; Hurtt, James

    2017-05-08

    As revised interconnection standards for grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) inverters address new advanced grid support functions (GSFs), there is increasing interest in inverter performance in the case of abnormal grid conditions. The growth of GSF-enabled inverters has outpaced the industry standards that define their operation, although recently published updates to UL1741 with Supplement SA define test conditions for GSFs such as volt-var control, frequency-watt control, and volt-age/frequency ride-through, among others. A comparative experimental evaluation has been completed on four commercially available, three-phase PV inverters in the 24.0-39.8 kVA power range on their GSF capability and the effect on abnormal grid condition response. This study examines the impact particular GSF implementations have on run-on times during islanding conditions, peak voltages in load rejection overvoltage scenarios, and peak currents during single-phase and three-phase fault events for individual inverters. This report reviews comparative test data, which shows that GSFs have little impact on the metrics of interest in most tests cases.

  6. Optimisation of spray drying operating conditions of Morinda citrifolia L. fruit extract using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duduku Krishnaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A conventional solvent extract of Morinda citrifolia L. fruit was spray dried using adjuvant maltodextrin (5 wt.%. Spray drying was carried out according to the D-optimal design, and the independent variables selected were temperature and Mcore/Mwall. The spray drying process was optimised by using response surface methodology (RSM for four different responses: moisture content (MC, DPPH scavenging activity, total phenolic content (TPC, and total flavonoid (TF. The effects of temperature and of the core to wall material ratio were found to be significant for all responses. The optimal spray drying condition for maltodextrin as binding material was found to be 1:1.5 (Mcore/Mwall, volume ratio of M. citrifolia L. extract to additive solution at 95 °C. The experimental values of the response variables correspond well to the predicted values. The microparticles obtained in this study represent an interesting food additive for incorporation into functional foods due to the presence of antioxidants.

  7. The response of a simple welded structure under dynamic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, I.; Chapman, D.; Critchley, R.; Penny, N.; Proud, W.; Kulka, R.; Reynolds, M.

    2006-08-01

    The ability of simple structures to absorb impact energy has a number of applications particularly in mitigation systems. This paper describes integrated modelling and experimental work to characterise the impact response of simple aluminium spheres when empty and filled with water. The experimental work identified the deformation modes and their relationship to impact velocity over a range of velocities up to 200 m.s-1 and included studies of the impact of a single sphere against a rigid surface and the impact of a sphere on another sphere. The numerical modelling showed the importance of friction between the sphere and the impacting surfaces and the weld in controlling the deformation and failure modes. The weld controlled the onset and development of failure. The validation of the modelling studies in predicting the deformation response of the spheres allowed the construction of an iso-damage relationship to predict their response over a wide range of impact conditions. The inclusion of the water as a fill material provided a scaled impact vehicle to study hydraulic ram and the response of a range of fluid filled containers. This has particular relevance to pressure vessels containing volatile explosive liquids and gases.

  8. Timing in Trace Conditioning of the Nictitating Membrane Response of the Rabbit ("Oryctolagus Cuniculus"): Scalar, Nonscalar, and Adaptive Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James; Ludvig, Elliot A.; Sutton, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 125, 250, and 500 msec in trace conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane response, the offset times and durations of conditioned responses (CRs) were collected along with onset and peak latencies. All measures were proportional to the ISI, but only onset and peak latencies conformed to the criterion…

  9. Acute stress or corticosterone administration reduces responsiveness to nicotine: implications for a mechanism of conditioned tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiula, A R; Epstein, L H; Antelman, S M; Saylor, S; Knopf, S; Perkins, K A; Stiller, R

    1993-01-01

    We have shown that conditioned tolerance develops to some of the behavioral and endocrine effects of nicotine in rats. Other investigators have suggested that tolerance to multiple nicotine injections in mice may be due, in part, to elevated plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels, since repeated nicotine injections are associated with elevated CORT, chronically elevated CORT reduces nicotine responsiveness and adrenalectomy disrupts nicotine tolerance. Three experiments tested the feasibility of this hypothesis, as a mechanism for conditioned nicotine tolerance in rats, by determining whether acute administration of CORT or manipulations that increase adrenocortical activity reduce nicotine responsiveness. In experiment 1, male rats were injected IP with CORT (1 mg/kg), vehicle (ETOH + distilled water) or no injection 10 min before nicotine (0.75 mg/kg, SC) and tested for nicotine-induced analgesia every other day for 10 days. A significant reduction in withdrawal latencies was obtained for CORT pretreated rats compared to animals given only nicotine. A similar reduction was produced by the vehicle pretreatment, which itself induced an elevation of endogenous CORT. Experiments 2 and 3 established that similar effects could be produced by doses of CORT as low as 0.125 mg/kg or by exposure to a novel environment which also elevated CORT levels. Results also suggest that a conditioned release of endogenous CORT was triggered by stimuli associated with nicotine delivery. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a conditioned release of CORT could contribute to the development of tolerance to some of nicotine's effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Operant Conditioning in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.): The Cap Pushing Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I; Dinges, Christopher W; Wells, Harrington

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been an important model organism for studying learning and memory. More recently, the honey bee has become a valuable model to understand perception and cognition. However, the techniques used to explore psychological phenomena in honey bees have been limited to only a few primary methodologies such as the proboscis extension reflex, sting extension reflex, and free flying target discrimination-tasks. Methods to explore operant conditioning in bees and other invertebrates are not as varied as with vertebrates. This may be due to the availability of a suitable response requirement. In this manuscript we offer a new method to explore operant conditioning in honey bees: the cap pushing response (CPR). We used the CPR to test for difference in learning curves between novel auto-shaping and more traditional explicit-shaping. The CPR protocol requires bees to exhibit a novel behavior by pushing a cap to uncover a food source. Using the CPR protocol we tested the effects of both explicit-shaping and auto-shaping techniques on operant conditioning. The goodness of fit and lack of fit of these data to the Rescorla-Wagner learning-curve model, widely used in classical conditioning studies, was tested. The model fit well to both control and explicit-shaping results, but only for a limited number of trials. Learning ceased rather than continuing to asymptotically approach the physiological most accurate possible. Rate of learning differed between shaped and control bee treatments. Learning rate was about 3 times faster for shaped bees, but for all measures of proficiency control and shaped bees reached the same level. Auto-shaped bees showed one-trial learning rather than the asymptotic approach to a maximal efficiency. However, in terms of return-time, the auto-shaped bees' learning did not carry over to the covered-well test treatments.

  11. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  12. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. van Meeningen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur, European beech (Fagus sylvatica and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m−2 s−1, whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the

  13. Skin Conductance Responses and Neural Activations During Fear Conditioning and Extinction Recall Across Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Marie-France; Zsido, Rachel G; Song, Huijin; Lasko, Natasha B; Killgore, William D S; Rauch, Scott L; Simon, Naomi M; Milad, Mohammed R

    2017-06-01

    The fear conditioning and extinction neurocircuitry has been extensively studied in healthy and clinical populations, with a particular focus on posttraumatic stress disorder. Despite significant overlap of symptoms between posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety disorders, the latter has received less attention. Given that dysregulated fear levels characterize anxiety disorders, examining the neural correlates of fear and extinction learning may shed light on the pathogenesis of underlying anxiety disorders. To investigate the psychophysiological and neural correlates of fear conditioning and extinction recall in anxiety disorders and to document how these features differ as a function of multiple diagnoses or anxiety severity. This investigation was a cross-sectional, case-control, functional magnetic resonance imaging study at an academic medical center. Participants were healthy controls and individuals with at least 1 of the following anxiety disorders: generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobia, and panic disorder. The study dates were between March 2013 and May 2015. Two-day fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Skin conductance responses, blood oxygenation level-dependent responses, trait anxiety scores from the State Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Form, and functional connectivity. This study included 21 healthy controls (10 women) and 61 individuals with anxiety disorders (36 women). P values reported for the neuroimaging results are all familywise error corrected. Skin conductance responses during extinction recall did not differ between individuals with anxiety disorders and healthy controls (ηp2 = 0.001, P = .79), where ηp2 is partial eta squared. The anxiety group had lower activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) during extinction recall (ηp2 = 0.178, P = .02). A similar hypoactive pattern was found during early conditioning (ηp2 = 0.106, P = .009). The vmPFC hypoactivation

  14. Trade-off-theory vs. pecking order theory and the determinants of corporate leverage: Evidence from a panel data analysis upon French SMEs (2002–2010

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    Philippe Adair

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the assumptions of trade-off theory (TOT and pecking order theory (POT regarding corporate leverage. The dependent variable being the debt ratio, we apply a linear model upon a balanced panel data-set of 2,370 French SMEs over the period 2002–2010. In accordance to TOT, trade credit acts as a signal to creditors who have no private information about the firm and access to credit relies on guarantees. The relationship between corporate leverage and the profitability of SMEs as well as growth opportunities support POT. However, the relationship between corporate leverage and the age of SMEs, as well as their size, remains inconclusive with respect to both theories.

  15. Cadmium Accumulation and Metallothionein Response in the Freshwater Bivalve Corbicula fluminea Under Hydrodynamic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Nan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Qi, Ning; Ren, Lingxiao

    2015-06-01

    Freshwater bivalves such as Corbicula fluminea (Müller) are useful biomonitors for cadmium pollution because they absorb heavy metals and accumulate them in their tissues. We exposed C. fluminea in the laboratory to natural and cadmium (Cd)-spiked sediments below flowing water in order to evaluate the organisms' Cd accumulation and metallothionein (MT) response under hydrodynamic conditions. The accumulation of Cd and the induction of MT in C. fluminea were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 16, and 23 days. Hydrodynamic conditions, represented by a water flow rate of 14 or 3.2 cm/s, increased Cd accumulation in the visceral mass, gill, foot, and mantle of C. fluminea in the first 3 or 6 days in the natural sediment. Cd concentrations in the C. fluminea tissues kept increasing over time in the three treatments, and significant differences were observed in Cd accumulation after 6 (visceral mass), 10 (foot) and 16 (gill and mantle) days among the three groups. The MT concentrations were barely affected by hydrodynamic conditions and were significantly linearly related to the Cd concentration in the visceral mass in the natural sediment and binomially related to it in the Cd-spiked sediment. Hydrodynamic conditions enhanced the accumulation of Cd in the soft tissues of C. fluminea, especially in the Cd-spiked sediment, but stronger hydrodynamic forces did not increase Cd accumulation. MT may be considered an indicator for Cd accumulation in C. fluminea under hydrodynamic conditions, but only when the Cd concentrations in the tissue remain below the toxic threshold values.

  16. Stress responses and conditioning effects in mesothelial cells exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Lechner, Michael; Siehs, Christian; Lederhuber, Hans C; Rehulka, Pavel; Endemann, Michaela; Kasper, David C; Herkner, Kurt R; Mayer, Bernd; Rizzi, Andreas; Aufricht, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    Renal replacement therapy by peritoneal dialysis is frequently complicated by technical failure. Peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) cause injury to the peritoneal mesothelial cell layer due to their cytotoxicity. As only isolated elements of the involved cellular processes have been studied before, we aimed at a global assessment of the mesothelial stress response to PDF. Following single or repeated exposure to PDF or control medium, proteomics and bioinformatics techniques were combined to study effects in mesothelial cells (MeT-5A). Protein expression was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and significantly altered spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and MS2 techniques. The lists of experimentally derived candidate proteins were expanded by a next neighbor approach and analyzed for significantly enriched biological processes. To address the problem of an unknown portion of false positive spots in 2DGE, only proteins showing significant p-values on both levels were further interpreted. Single PDF exposure resulted in reduction of biological processes in favor of reparative responses, including protein metabolism, modification and folding, with chaperones as a major subgroup. The observed biological processes triggered by this acute PDF exposure mainly contained functionally interwoven multitasking proteins contributing as well to cytoskeletal reorganization and defense mechanisms. Repeated PDF exposure resulted in attenuated protein regulation, reflecting inhibition of stress responses by high levels of preinduced chaperones. The identified proteins were less attributable to acute cellular injury but rather to specialized functions with a reduced number of involved multitasking proteins. This finding agrees well with the concept of conditioning effects and cytoprotection. In conclusion, this study describes the reprogrammed proteome of mesothelial cells during recovery from PDF exposure and adaption to repetitive stress. A broad stress response with

  17. Effects of degraded optical conditions on behavioural responses to alarm cues in a freshwater fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Ranåker

    Full Text Available Prey organisms often use multiple sensory cues to gain reliable information about imminent predation threat. In this study we test if a freshwater fish increases the reliance on supplementary cues when the reliability of the primary cue is reduced. Fish commonly use vision to evaluate predation threat, but may also use chemical cues from predators or injured conspecifics. Environmental changes, such as increasing turbidity or water colour, may compromise the use of vision through changes in the optical properties of water. In an experiment we tested if changes in optical conditions have any effects on how crucian carp respond to chemical predator cues. In turbidity treatments we added either clay or algae, and in a brown water colour treatment we added water with a high humic content. We found that carp reduced activity in response to predator cues, but only in the turbidity treatments (clay, algae, whereas the response in the brown water treatment was intermediate, and not significantly different from, clear and turbid water treatments. The increased reliance on chemical cues indicates that crucian carp can compensate for the reduced information content from vision in waters where optical conditions are degraded. The lower effect in brown water may be due to the reduction in light intensity, changes in the spectral composition (reduction of UV light or to a change in chemical properties of the cue in humic waters.

  18. Acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of eyelid conditioning responses require de novo protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Mari Carmen; Delgado-García, José María; Carrión, Angel Manuel

    2005-02-23

    Memory, as measured by changes in an animal's behavior some time after learning, is a reflection of many processes. Here, using a trace paradigm, in mice we show that de novo protein synthesis is required for acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of classically conditioned eyelid responses. Two critical periods of protein synthesis have been found: the first, during training, the blocking of which impaired acquisition; and the second, lasting the first 4 h after training, the blocking of which impaired consolidation. The process of reconsolidation was sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition if anisomycin was injected before or just after the reactivation session. Furthermore, extinction was also dependent on protein synthesis, following the same temporal course as that followed during acquisition and consolidation. This last fact reinforces the idea that extinction is an active learning process rather than a passive event of forgetting. Together, these findings demonstrate that all of the different stages of memory formation involved in the classical conditioning of eyelid responses are dependent on protein synthesis.

  19. Application of Peleg's equation to describe creep responses of potatoes under constant and variable storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, W K; Jindal, V K

    2017-06-01

    The application of Peleg's equation to characterize creep behavior of potatoes during storage was investigated. Potatoes were stored at 25, 15, 5C, and variable (fluctuating) temperature for 16 or 26 weeks. The Peleg equation adequately described the creep response of potatoes during storage at all storage conditions (R 2  = .97to .99). Peleg constant k 1 exhibited a significant (p < .05) decreasing trend with storage time (t s ) for samples stored under the experimental conditions whereas the constant k 2 appeared to be unaffected much by t s except for samples stored at 25C. Under constant temperature storage, k 1 was found to be a linear function of t s (R 2  = .87 to .97). Also, the rate of change of k 1 appeared to be temperature dependent described by a linear relationship between the degradation rate constant for k 1 (α) and storage temperature (T). For the variable storage condition, a bulk mean temperature (T bm ) was calculated to account for a series combination of storage time and temperature which the potatoes were subjected to. It was possible to describe the changes in k 1 due to variable storage temperature in terms of T bm and t s using stepwise multiple regression (R 2  = . 94). Precise description of the changes in the rheological properties of raw potatoes during storage could help predict the associated effect on the texture of cooked potatoes. Easy and simple methods of describing creep responses during storage or processing will be potentially helpful to better understand the phenomenon. The model parameters from such model could be used to relate rheological properties of raw and cooked potatoes. Moreover, the model parameters could be used to establish relationship between instrumental and sensory attributes which will help in the prediction of sensory attributes from instrumental data. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The observed relationship between wave conditions and beach response, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how sandy beaches respond to storms is critical for effective sediment management and developing successful erosion mitigation efforts. However, only limited progress has been made in relating observed beach changes to wave conditions, with one of the major limiting factors being the lack of temporally dense beach topography and nearshore wave data in most studies. This study uses temporally dense beach topographic and offshore wave data to directly link beach response and wave forcing with generally good results. Ocean Beach is an open coast high-energy sandy beach located in San Francisco, CA, USA. From April 2004 through the end of 2008, 60 three-dimensional topographic beach surveys were conducted on approximately a monthly basis, with more frequent “short-term surveys during the winters of 2005-06 and 2006-07. Shoreline position data from the short-term surveys show good correlation with offshore wave height, period, and direction averaged over several days prior to the survey (mean R*=0.54 for entire beach). There is, however, considerable alongshore variation in model performance, with R- values ranging from 0.81 to 0.19 for individual sections of the beach. After wave height, the direction of wave approach was the most important factor in determining the response of the shoreline, followed by wave period. Our results indicate that an empirical predictive model of beach response to wave conditions at Ocean Beach is possible with frequent beach mapping and wave data, and that such a model could be useful to coastal managers. 

  1. Hydrological response to changing climate conditions: Spatial streamflow variability in the boreal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutschbein, Claudia; Grabs, Thomas; Karlsen, Reinert H.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Bishop, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that streamflow-generating processes are not only dependent on climatic conditions, but also affected by physical catchment properties such as topography, geology, soils and land cover. We hypothesize that these landscape characteristics do not only lead to highly variable hydrologic behavior of rather similar catchments under the same stationary climate conditions (Karlsen et al., 2014), but that they also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to a changing climate (Teutschbein et al., 2015). A multi-model ensemble based on 15 regional climate models was combined with a multi-catchment approach to explore the hydrologic sensitivity of 14 partially nested and rather similar catchments in Northern Sweden to changing climate conditions and the importance of small-scale spatial variability. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV model. As expected, projected increases in temperature and precipitation resulted in increased total available streamflow, with lower spring and summer flows, but substantially higher winter streamflow. Furthermore, significant changes in flow durations with lower chances of both high and low flows can be expected in boreal Sweden in the future. This overall trend in projected streamflow pattern changes was comparable among the analyzed catchments while the magnitude of change differed considerably. This suggests that catchments belonging to the same region can show distinctly different degrees of hydrological responses to the same external climate change signal. We reason that differences in spatially distributed physical catchment properties at smaller scales are not only of great importance for current streamflow behavior, but also play a major role as first-order control for the sensitivity of catchments to changing climate conditions. References Karlsen, R.H., T. Grabs, K. Bishop, H. Laudon, and J. Seibert (2014). Landscape controls on

  2. Extreme hypoxic conditions induce selective molecular responses and metabolic reset in detached apple fruit

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    Dubravka eCukrov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1,000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These

  3. Observed response of vulnerable forest ecosystems to ongoing site condition changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidló, András; Gulyás, Krisztina; Gálos, Borbála; Horváth, Adrienn

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, several symptoms of drought damages have been observed in the Hungarian forests (e.g. sparse canopy, leaf drop, top drying, fungal diseases). Forest responses are also influenced by other factors beyond climate (e.g. available water content, soil conditions, biotic damages, adaptive capacity, etc.). Our aim was to prepare a complex analysis of the change of all site conditions, that could lead to the observed health status decline of the forest tree species. For a case study region in Hungary (Keszthely Mountains, near to Lake Balaton) precipitation and temperature tendencies as well as the frequency of extreme dry summers have been determined for the period 1961-2100. Soil conditions have been investigated in 9 profiles and soil mapping analysis has been carried out including 100 sites with hand soil auger. For the investigation of the water-balance we used the modified Thornthwaite-type monthly model and determined water stress when the relative extractable water (REW) decreased below 40% (Granier et al., 1999). In the last 30 years three severe droughts have been detected when duration of extremely dry and hot periods exceeded 3-4 years. Not only orographic and microclimate conditions but also soil types show a large diversity within a relatively small distance in the case study area. On rendzina with shallow topsoil layer thickness, low water holding capacity, black pine was planted. Brown earth with medium and brown forest soils with deep topsoil layer thickness is favourable for oak (sessile or Turkey) and beech. These microscale differences between the three site condition types resulted different available water contents quantified by the modified Thornthwaite-type monthly water-balance model. Our results show the different sensitivity of the studied sites to water stress. It means that the local scale orographic and soil conditions can enhance the projected drought risk of the region. However, the favourable microclimatic effects of

  4. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giao N.; Rothstein, Steven J.; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed. PMID:26322069

  6. Responses of Soybean Mutant Lines to Aluminium under In Vitro and In Vivo Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliasti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main limited factors of soybean plants expansion in acid soil are Aluminium (Al toxicity and low pH. The best approach to solve this problem is by using Al tolerance variety. In vitro or in vivo selections using selective media containing AlCl3 and induced callus embryonic of mutant lines are reliable methods to develop a new variety. The objectives of this research are to evaluate response of soybean genotypes against AlCl3 under in vitro and in vivo condition. Addition of 15 part per million (ppm AlCl3 into in vitro and in vivo media severely affected plant growth. G3 soybean mutant line was identified as more tolerant than the control soybean cultivar Tanggamus. This mutant line was able to survive under more severe AlCl3 concentrations (15 ppm under in vitro conditions. Under in vivo conditions, G1 and G4 mutants were also identified as more tolerant than Tanggamus since they produced more pods and higher dry seed weigh per plant. Moreover, G4 mutant line also produced more dry seed weight per plant than Tanggamus when they were grown on soil containing high Al concentration 8.1 me/100gr = 81 ppm. Al+3

  7. Enterocyte glycosylation is responsive to changes in extracellular conditions: implications for membrane functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dayoung; Xu, Gege; Barboza, Mariana; Shah, Ishita M; Wong, Maurice; Raybould, Helen; Mills, David A; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial cells in the lining of the intestines play critical roles in maintaining homeostasis while challenged by dynamic and sudden changes in luminal contents. Given the high density of glycosylation that encompasses their extracellular surface, environmental changes may lead to extensive reorganization of membrane-associated glycans. However, neither the molecular details nor the consequences of conditional glycan changes are well understood. Here we assessed the sensitivity of Caco-2 and HT-29 membrane N-glycosylation to variations in (i) dietary elements, (ii) microbial fermentation products and (iii) cell culture parameters relevant to intestinal epithelial cell growth and survival. Based on global LC-MS glycomic and statistical analyses, the resulting glycan expression changes were systematic, dependent upon the conditions of each controlled environment. Exposure to short chain fatty acids produced significant increases in fucosylation while further acidification promoted hypersialylation. Notably, among all conditions, increases of high mannose type glycans were identified as a major response when extracellular fructose, galactose and glutamine were independently elevated. To examine the functional consequences of this discrete shift in the displayed glycome, we applied a chemical inhibitor of the glycan processing mannosidase, globally intensifying high mannose expression. The data reveal that upregulation of high mannose glycosylation has detrimental effects on basic intestinal epithelium functions by altering permeability, host-microbe associations and membrane protein activities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Dynamic Response of an Energy Harvesting Device Under Realistic Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Joseph; Revell, Alistair

    2017-11-01

    The need for reliable, cost-efficient, green energy alternatives has led to increased research in the area of energy harvesting. One approach to energy harvesting is to take advantage of self-sustaining flow-induced vibrations. Through the use of a piezoelectric flag, the mechanical strain from the flapping motion can be converted into electrical energy. While such devices show a lot of promise, the fluid-structure-electrical interactions are highly nonlinear and their response to off-design variations in flow conditions, such as those likely to be encountered upon deployment, is relatively unexplored. The purpose of the present work is to examine how a representative energy harvesting device performs in realistic atmospheric flow conditions involving wind gusts with spatial and temporal variations. A recently developed lattice-Boltzmann-immersed boundary-finite element model is used to perform fully-coupled 3D simulations of the fluid-structure system. For a range of unsteady flow conditions the resulting flow features and structural motion are examined and key behaviour modes are mapped out. The findings of this work will be particularly relevant for self-powered remote sensing networks, which often require deployment in unpredictable and varied environments.

  9. Calling phenology of a diverse amphibian assemblage in response to meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenderleith, T. Lynette; Stratford, Danial; Lollback, Gregory W.; Chapple, David G.; Reina, Richard D.; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2017-12-01

    The strong association between amphibian activity, breeding and recruitment with local environmental conditions raises concerns regarding how changes in climate may affect the persistence of species populations into the future. Additionally, in a highly diverse assemblage of anurans, competition for breeding sites affects the time and duration of activity, as species compete for limited resources such as water. Meteorological conditions are strong drivers of amphibian activity, so we assessed whether temperature, rainfall, atmospheric pressure and humidity were associated with the calling phenology of an assemblage of anurans in South East Queensland, Australia. We performed calling surveys and collected digital recordings at 45 ponds in an area known for high anuran diversity. We performed detection analyses to investigate the influence of 10 meteorological variables in detection of calling activity in 19 amphibian species. Our results suggest four breeding strategies in the assemblage: explosive summer breeders, prolonged breeders, opportunistic breeders and a winter breeder. Classifying these species into associations provides a framework for understanding how species respond to environmental conditions. Explosive breeders (i.e. species demonstrating short and highly synchronised breeding periods) were particularly responsive to temperature. Our findings help elucidate the breeding phenology of frogs and provide valuable information on their mating systems in native Australian forests. This study highlights the difficulties of surveying even common anurans. We highlight the importance of predictability and stability in climate and the vulnerability of species for which reproduction appears to require highly specific environmental cues.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF SESAME SEEDS OIL EXTRACTION OPERATING CONDITIONS USING THE RESPONSE SURFACE DESIGN METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAITHAM OSMAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies Response Surface Design (RSD to model the experimental data obtained from the extraction of sesame seeds oil using n-hexane, chloroform and acetone as solvents under different operating conditions. The results obtained revealed that n-hexane outperformed the extraction obtained using chloroform and acetone. The developed model predicted that n-hexane with a rotational speed of 547 rpm and a contact time between the solvent and seeds of 19.46 hours with solvent: seeds ratio of 4.93, yields the optimum oil extracted of 37.03 %, outperforming chloroform and acetone models that gave prediction for 4.75 and 4.21 respectively. While the maximum predictions yield for chloroform is 6.73 %, under the operating conditions of 602 rpm, and 24 hours contact time, with a ratio of solvent: seeds of 1.74. On the other hand the acetone maximum prediction is only 4.37 %, with operational conditions of 467 rpm, and 6.00 hours contact time, with a ratio of solvent: seeds of 1. It is has been found that the maximum oil extraction yield obtained from the chloroform (6.73 % and Acetone (4.37 % is much lower than that predicted by n-hexane 37.03 %.

  11. An integrative overview of the molecular and physiological responses of sugarcane under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Camilo Elber; Giordano, Andrea; de Almeida Soares, Eduardo; Rhys Williams, Thomas Christopher; Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; de Santana Lopes, Amanda; Pacheco, Túlio Gomes; Rogalski, Marcelo; de Oliveira Ramos, Humberto Josué; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers

    2017-08-01

    Drought is the main abiotic stress constraining sugarcane production. However, our limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the drought stress responses of sugarcane impairs the development of new technologies to increase sugarcane drought tolerance. Here, an integrated approach was performed to reveal the molecular and physiological changes in two closely related sugarcane cultivars, including the most extensively planted cultivar in Brazil (cv. RB867515), in response to moderate (-0.5 MPa) and severe (-1 MPa) drought stress at the transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. The results show common and cultivar exclusive changes in specific genes related to photosynthesis, carbohydrate, amino acid, and phytohormone metabolism. The novel phosphoproteomics and redox proteomic analysis revealed the importance of posttranslational regulation mechanisms during sugarcane drought stress. The shift to soluble sugar, secondary metabolite production, and activation of ROS eliminating processes in response to drought tolerance were mechanisms exclusive to cv. RB867515, helping to explain the better performance and higher production of this cultivar under these stress conditions.

  12. Responses of Two Invasive Plants Under Various Microclimate Conditions in the Seoul Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Uhram; Mun, Saeromi; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Lee, Eun Ju

    2012-06-01

    The possible consequences of global warming on plant communities and ecosystems have wide-ranging ramifications. We examined how environmental change affects plant growth as a function of the variations in the microclimate along an urban-suburban climate gradient for two allergy-inducing, invasive plants, Humulus japonicus and Ambrosia artemisiifolia var. elatior. The environmental factors and plant growth responses were measured at two urban sites (Gangbuk and Seongbuk) and two suburban sites (Goyang and Incheon) around Seoul, South Korea. The mean temperatures and CO2 concentrations differed significantly between the urban (14.8 °C and 439 ppm CO2) and suburban (13.0 °C and 427 ppm CO2) sites. The soil moisture and nitrogen contents of the suburban sites were higher than those at the urban sites, especially for the Goyang site. The two invasive plants showed significantly higher biomasses and nitrogen contents at the two urban sites. We conducted experiments in a greenhouse to confirm the responses of the plants to increased temperatures, and we found consistently higher growth rates under conditions of higher temperatures. Because we controlled the other factors, the better performance of the two invasive plants appears to be primarily attributable to their responses to temperature. Our study demonstrates that even small temperature changes in the environment can confer significant competitive advantages to invasive species. As habitats become urbanized and warmer, these invasive plants should be able to displace native species, which will adversely affect people living in these areas.

  13. Quantifying Preferences and Responsiveness of Marine Zooplankton to Changing Environmental Conditions using Microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Ramanathan

    Full Text Available Global environmental change significantly affects marine species composition. However, analyzing the impact of these changes on marine zooplankton communities was so far mostly limited to assessing lethal doses through mortality assays and hence did not allow a direct assessment of the preferred conditions, or preferendum. Here, we use a microfluidic device to characterize individual behavior of actively swimming zooplankton, and to quantitatively determine their ecological preferendum. For the annelid zooplankton model Platynereis dumerilii we observe a broader pH preferendum than for the copepod Euterpina acutifrons, and reveal previously unrecognized sub-populations with different pH preferenda. For Platynereis, the minimum concentration difference required to elicit a response (responsiveness is ~1 μM for H+ and ~13.7 mM for NaCl. Furthermore, using laser ablations we show that olfactomedin-expressing sensory cells mediate chemical responsiveness in the Platynereis foregut. Taken together, our microfluidic approach allows precise assessment and functional understanding of environmental perception on planktonic behaviour.

  14. Human postural responses to motion of real and virtual visual environments under different support base conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergner, T; Schweigart, G; Maurer, C; Blümle, A

    2005-12-01

    The role of visual orientation cues for human control of upright stance is still not well understood. We, therefore, investigated stance control during motion of a visual scene as stimulus, varying the stimulus parameters and the contribution from other senses (vestibular and leg proprioceptive cues present or absent). Eight normal subjects and three patients with chronic bilateral loss of vestibular function participated. They stood on a motion platform inside a cabin with an optokinetic pattern on its interior walls. The cabin was sinusoidally rotated in anterior-posterior (a-p) direction with the horizontal rotation axis through the ankle joints (f=0.05-0.4 Hz; A (max)=0.25 degrees -4 degrees ; v (max)=0.08-10 degrees /s). The subjects' centre of mass (COM) angular position was calculated from opto-electronically measured body sway parameters. The platform was either kept stationary or moved by coupling its position 1:1 to a-p hip position ('body sway referenced', BSR, platform condition), by which proprioceptive feedback of ankle joint angle became inactivated. The visual stimulus evoked in-phase COM excursions (visual responses) in all subjects. (1) In normal subjects on a stationary platform, the visual responses showed saturation with both increasing velocity and displacement of the visual stimulus. The saturation showed up abruptly when visually evoked COM velocity and displacement reached approximately 0.1 degrees /s and 0.1 degrees , respectively. (2) In normal subjects on a BSR platform (proprioceptive feedback disabled), the visual responses showed similar saturation characteristics, but at clearly higher COM velocity and displacement values ( approximately 1 degrees /s and 1 degrees , respectively). (3) In patients on a stationary platform (no vestibular cues), the visual responses were basically similar to those of the normal subjects, apart from somewhat higher gain values and less-pronounced saturation effects. (4) In patients on a BSR platform (no

  15. Social responsibility and work conditions: building a reference label, Démarche T®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biquand, Sylvain; Zittel, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is now considered in large and global companies and the recent publication of the ISO 26000 standard clarifies the targets. Based on our consultancy's experience for fifteen years in ergonomics mainly in French small and medium enterprises, we developed a label to coax and value efforts of companies in dealing with health and safety at the work place as required by ISO 26000 paragraph 6.4. The formal approach of ISO describes what should be achieved but gives no cue on how actual conditions of work should be improved. The label, called Démarche T (ie Process W where W stands for work) aims the management of work conditions as a process, giving visibility and credit to companies for their continuous involvement in the matter. We describe the items and processes that are part of our assessment. We first conduct an ergonomic diagnosis including the analysis of records on health, physical and psychological well-being, observations at the workplace and interviews with the workers. This diagnosis is followed by recommendations. The fulfillment of these is assessed yearly. Items under assessment include: - ergonomics, health and safety in the companies statements and their impact in actual project management; - relations with workers through the committee for health and safety; - actual results on health, safety and work conditions. On a local level, we give the companies passing the label a competitive edge in recruiting better candidates motivated by good work conditions, and help them fulfill ISO 26000 requirements, an increasingly decisive advantage to benefit from public regional and European support. Our paper describes the diagnosis and follow-up process.

  16. Hormonal and metabolic responses to repeated cycling sprints under different hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Michihiro; Nakagaki, Kohei; Ebi, Yoshiko; Nishiyama, Tetsunari; Russell, Aaron P

    2015-06-01

    Sprint exercise and hypoxic stimulus during exercise are potent factors affecting hormonal and metabolic responses. However, the effects of different hypoxic levels on hormonal and metabolic responses during sprint exercise are not known. Here, we examined the effect of different hypoxic conditions on hormonal and metabolic responses during sprint exercise. Seven male subjects participated in three experimental trials: 1) sprint exercise under normoxia (NSE); 2) sprint exercise under moderate normobaric hypoxia (16.4% oxygen) (HSE 16.4); and 3) sprint exercise under severe normobaric hypoxia (13.6% oxygen) (HSE 13.6). The sprint exercise consisted of four 30s all-out cycling bouts with 4-min rest between bouts. Glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), blood lactate, growth hormone (GH), epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and insulin concentrations in the HSE trials were measured before exposure to hypoxia (pre 1), 15 min after exposure to hypoxia (pre 2), and at 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min after the exercise performed in hypoxia. The blood samples in the NSE trial were obtained in normoxia at the same time points as the HSE trials. Circulating levels of glucose, FFA, lactate, GH, E, NE, and insulin significantly increased after all three exercise trials (P HSE 13.6 trial than in the NSE and HSE 16.4 trials (P < 0.05). A maximal increase in FFA concentration was observed at 180 min after exercise and was not different between trials. These findings suggest that severe hypoxia may be an important factor for the enhancement of GH response to all-out sprint exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-error slowing is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms. Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs. Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS. Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but post-error slowing did not take place immediately. Delayed post-error slowing was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to post-error slowing. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with post-error slowing and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater post-error slowing and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and post-error slowing did not occur quickly. Furthermore, post-error slowing and its neural correlate (N2 were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke

  18. A comparison of cytokine responses during prolonged cycling in normal and hot environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila M Cosio-Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ludmila M Cosio-Lima, Bhargav V Desai, Petra B Schuler, Lesley Keck, Logan ScheelerDepartment of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USAPurpose: Components of immune function are affected by physical activity in an adverse environment. The purpose of this study was to compare plasma differences in inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6, in addition to the stress hormone cortisol, during prolonged cycling under normal and hot environmental conditions in elite cyclists.Methods and design: Six trained elite male cyclists (27 ± 8 years; 75.5 ± 4 kg; maximum oxygen uptake [VO2max] = 66 ± 6 mL/kg/min, mean ± SD. The cyclists biked for 2.5 h at their prescribed 60% maximum exercise workload (Wmax or 75% VO2max either in an environmental chamber set at 15°C and 40% relative humidity (NEUTRAL or at 35°C and 40% relative humidity (HOT. The cyclists were given 4 mL of water/kg body weight every 15 min under both conditions.Results: Total cortisol concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05 immediately postexercise and 12 h postexercise in both the NEUTRAL and HOT conditions. TNF-α concentrations were only significantly (P = 0.045 elevated postexercise in HOT conditions. During the HOT conditions, a significant (P = 0.006 and 0.007, respectively difference in IL-6 was seen immediately after and 12 h postexercise. During the NEUTRAL condition, IL-6 was only significantly elevated postexercise (P < 0.05.Conclusions: Heat exposure during a long bout of exercise is sufficient to elicit stress response in elite cyclists. However, the degree of release of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines might be related to several factors that include the athlete’s fitness level, hydration status, exercise intensity, and length of exposure to hot environments.Keywords: cytokines, inflammation, heat, exercise, performance 

  19. Differential Genotypic Responses of String Wheat Early Seedling Growth to Limited Moisture Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubaker, M.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure the genotypic response of spring wheat seedling growth in a range of osmotic media and to determine which genotype could be identified as drought tolerant. Six durum wheat cultivars were subjected to moisture stress using polyethylene glycol PEG-9000. Aqueous solutions of 0, -3, -6 and -9 bars were prepared. For each cultivar 20 seeds were germinated in these solutions in a growth chamber. After 2 weeks, number of roots, leaf number, coleoptile length, seedling height, root length, first and second leaf length, and dry matter weight were measured. All traits measured were significantly influenced by water stress. The water stress treatments of -6 and -9 bars gave lower rates of seedling growth than the 0 and -3 bars treatments. The results suggest that good seedling vigor under water stress condition is a useful selection criterion. An ideotype for a drought tolerant wheat genotype should have good seedling vigor.

  20. Tissue responses to fractional transient heating with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Magdy A; El-Bary, Alaa A; Al-Sowayan, Noorah S

    2016-10-01

    A fractional model of Bioheat equation for describing quantitatively the thermal responses of skin tissue under sinusoidal heat flux conditions on skin surface is given. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the solution in a closed form. The resulting formulation is applied to one-dimensional application to investigate the temperature distribution in skin with instantaneous surface heating for different cases. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the fractional bioheat transfer equation has been constructed. Sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the thermal effects of various control parameters on tissue temperature. The comparisons are made with the results obtained in the case of the absence of time-fractional order. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Adaptations of the Secretome of Candida albicans in Response to Host-Related Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klis, Frans M; Brul, Stanley

    2015-12-01

    The wall proteome and the secretome of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans help it to thrive in multiple niches of the human body. Mass spectrometry has allowed researchers to study the dynamics of both subproteomes. Here, we discuss some major responses of the secretome to host-related environmental conditions. Three β-1,3-glucan-modifying enzymes, Mp65, Sun41, and Tos1, are consistently found in large amounts in culture supernatants, suggesting that they are needed for construction and expansion of the cell wall β-1,3-glucan layer and thus correlate with growth and might serve as diagnostic biomarkers. The genes ENG1, CHT3, and SCW11, which encode an endoglucanase, the major chitinase, and a β-1,3-glucan-modifying enzyme, respectively, are periodically expressed and peak in M/G1. The corresponding protein abundances in the medium correlate with the degree of cell separation during single-yeast-cell, pseudohyphal, and hyphal growth. We also discuss the observation that cells treated with fluconazole, or other agents causing cell surface stress, form pseudohyphal aggregates. Fluconazole-treated cells secrete abundant amounts of the transglucosylase Phr1, which is involved in the accumulation of β-1,3-glucan in biofilms, raising the question whether this is a general response to cell surface stress. Other abundant secretome proteins also contribute to biofilm formation, emphasizing the important role of secretome proteins in this mode of growth. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these observations to therapeutic intervention. Together, these data illustrate that C. albicans actively adapts its secretome to environmental conditions, thus promoting its survival in widely divergent niches of the human body. Copyright © 2015 Klis and Brul.

  2. Quantification of site-city interaction effects on the response of structure under double resonance condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Narayan, Jay Prakash

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the site-city interaction (SCI) effects on the response of closely spaced structures under double resonance condition (F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} = F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}}), where F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} and F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} are fundamental frequencies of 2-D structure and 2-D basin, respectively. This paper also presents the development of empirical relations to predict the F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} of elliptical and trapezoidal basins for both the polarizations of the S wave. Simulated results revealed that F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} of a 2-D basin very much depends on its geometry, shape ratio and polarization of the incident S wave. The obtained spectral amplification factor (SAF) at F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} of a standalone structure in a 2-D basin is greater than that in the 1-D case under double resonance condition. A considerable reduction of the fundamental resonance frequency of structures due to the SCI effects is observed for both the polarizations of the S wave. The SAFs at F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} of closely spaced structures due to SCI effects is larger in the case of SV than SH waves. A splitting of the fundamental-mode frequency bandwidth along with the drastic decrease of SAF due to the SCI effects is obtained. The findings of this paper raise the question concerning the validity of the predicted response of standalone structure based on soil-structure interaction for the design of structures in a 2-D small basin, in an urban environment.

  3. Broad-Scale Environmental Conditions Responsible for Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E. Marsh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem response to disturbance is influenced by environmental conditions at a number of scales. Changes in climate have altered fire regimes across the western United States, and have also likely altered spatio-temporal patterns of post-fire vegetation regeneration. Fire occurrence data and a vegetation index (NDVI derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR were used to monitor post-fire vegetation from 1989 to 2007. We first investigated differences in post-fire rates of vegetation regeneration between ecoregions. We then related precipitation, temperature, and elevation records at four temporal scales to rates of post-fire vegetation regeneration to ascertain the influence of climate on post-fire vegetation dynamics. We found that broad-scale climate factors are an important influence on post-fire vegetation regeneration. Most notably, higher rates of post-fire regeneration occurred with warmer minimum temperatures. Increases in precipitation also resulted in higher rates of post-fire vegetation growth. While explanatory power was slight, multiple statistical approaches provided evidence for real ecological drivers of post-fire regeneration that should be investigated further at finer scales. The sensitivity of post-disturbance vegetation dynamics to climatic drivers has important ramifications for the management of ecosystems under changing climatic conditions. Shifts in temperature and precipitation regimes are likely to result in changes in post-disturbance dynamics, which could represent important feedbacks into the global climate system.

  4. Response of Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation Cables Exposed to Fire Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report presents the results of instrumentation cable tests sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The goal of the tests was to assess thermal and electrical response behavior under fire-exposure conditions for instrumentation cables and circuits. The test objective was to assess how severe radiant heating conditions surrounding an instrumentation cable affect current or voltage signals in an instrumentation circuit. A total of thirty-nine small-scale tests were conducted. Ten different instrumentation cables were tested, ranging from one conductor to eight-twisted pairs. Because the focus of the tests was thermoset (TS) cables, only two of the ten cables had thermoplastic (TP) insulation and jacket material and the remaining eight cables were one of three different TS insulation and jacket material. Two instrumentation cables from previous cable fire testing were included, one TS and one TP. Three test circuits were used to simulate instrumentation circuits present in nuclear power plants: a 4–20 mA current loop, a 10–50 mA current loop and a 1–5 VDC voltage loop. A regression analysis was conducted to determine key variables affecting signal leakage time.

  5. Ballistic Impact Response of Kevlar 49 and Zylon under Conditions Representing Jet Engine Fan Containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    A ballistic impact test program was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situation. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  6. Response of different lines and cultivars of rice subjected to low temperatures under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra H Díaz Solís

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is the most important food crop in the world and primary source of food for more than a third of the population. The low temperatures are among the main abiotic stresses that affect the yield of this cereal. The objective of this work was to determinate the response of different lines and cultivars of rice in seedling state to low temperature stress under controlled conditions. 172 lines and cultivars were studied. It were subjected to 5 0C for 24 hours, when the plants were about three to four leaves. The evaluations were conducted by measured of chlorophyll fluorescence and visually. A wide range of response was obtained, which indicated a high allelic diversity for the low temperatures sensitivity in the studied germplasm. A group of 30 cultivars responded more favorably to the cold and the most prominent cultivars showed Fv/Fm values between 0.80 and 0.89. A significant relationship between visual evaluation and chlorophyll fluorescence was found. The correlation coefficient revealed a moderately strong relationship between both variables. Tolerant plant materials were more consistently identified. However, the dispersion between methods increased to more susceptible cultivars.   Keywords: cold tolerance, chlorophyll fluorescence, Oryza sativa, visual evaluation

  7. Attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to leaf tissue in response to infiltration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Christopher W; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Nitin, N

    2014-01-01

    Transient expression of recombinant proteins in plant tissues following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is a promising technique for rapid protein production. However, transformation rates and transient expression levels can be sub-optimal depending on process conditions. Attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plant cells is an early, critical step in the gene transfer pathway. Bacterial attachment levels and patterns may influence transformation and, by extension, transient expression. In this study, attachment of A. tumefaciens to lettuce leaf tissue was investigated in response to varying infiltration conditions, including bacterial density, surfactant concentration, and applied vacuum level. Bacterial density was found to most influence attachment levels for the levels tested (10(8) , 10(9) , and 10(10) CFU/mL), with the relationship between bacterial density and attachment levels following a saturation trend. Surfactant levels tested (Break-Thru S240: 1, 10, 100, and 1,000 µL/L) also had a significant positive effect on bacterial attachment while vacuum level (5, 25, and 45 kPa) did not significantly affect attachment in areas exposed to bacteria. In planta transgene transient expression levels were measured following infiltration with 10(8) , 10(9) , and 10(10) CFU/mL bacterial suspension. Notably, the highest attachment level tested led to a decrease in transient expression, suggesting a potential link between bacterial attachment levels and downstream phenomena that may induce gene silencing. These results illustrate that attachment can be controlled by adjusting infiltration conditions and that attachment levels can impact transgene transient expression in leaf tissue. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Modulation of Radiation responses by pre-exposure to irradiated Cell conditioned medium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maguire, Paula

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure of HPV-G cells to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) could induce an adaptive response if the cells were subsequently challenged with a higher ICCM dose. Clonogenic survival and major steps in the cascade leading to apoptosis, such as calcium influx and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, were examined to determine whether these events could be modified by giving a priming dose of ICCM before the challenge dose. Clonogenic survival data indicated an ICCM-induced adaptive response in HPV-G cells "primed" with 5 mGy or 0.5 Gy ICCM for 24 h and then exposed to 0.5 Gy or 5 Gy ICCM. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were found to be involved in the bystander-induced cell death. Calcium fluxes varied in magnitude across the exposed cell population, and a significant number of the primed HPV-G cells did not respond to the challenge ICCM dose. No significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed when HPV-G cells were exposed to 0.5 Gy ICCM for 24 h followed by exposure to 5 Gy ICCM for 6 h. Exposure of HPV-G cells to 5 mGy ICCM for 24 h followed by exposure to 0.5 Gy ICCM for 18 h caused a significant increase in mitochondrial mass and a change in mitochondrial location, events associated with the perpetuation of genomic instability. This study has shown that a priming dose of ICCM has the ability to induce an adaptive response in HPV-G cells subsequently exposed to a challenge dose of ICCM.

  9. Modeling the Hydrologic Response to Changes in Groundcover Conditions Caused by Fire Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikinzon, E.; Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Middleton, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change and fire suppression increase wildfire activity, which alters ecosystem functions and can significantly impact hydrological response. Both wildfire and prescribed burns reduce groundcover, affect top layers of subsurface, and change the structure of overland flow pathways. To understand respective effects on surface and subsurface hydrology, it is imperative to accurately represent surface-subsurface interface pre and post-fire, and to model physical processes in groundcover components. We show mechanistic models used to describe physics in two key types of groundcover, litter and duff, in Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS). Litter is considered to be a part of vegetative canopy covering the surface. It has associated water storage capacity, which allows simulating interception and drainage, and its thickness is used to evaluate surface roughness with potential effect of slowing overland flow compared to bare soil. Duff on the other hand is incorporated into the subsurface, thus requiring meshing and discretization capability to support complex geometries including pinchouts, which is necessary both for achieving desired mesh resolution and portraying bare soil patches without adversely affecting the time scale. As part of the subsurface, duff has its own hydrologic and water retention properties used to resolve infiltration and saturation limited runoff generation, run on, and infiltration processes. This enables the use of ATS for fine scale modeling of integrated hydrology with adequate representation of groundcover influence. To isolate the impact of changing groundcover, we consider a simple hill slope and study the hydrological response to varying amount and geometries of groundcover. To cover landscape characteristics produced by a wide variety of fire conditions, from high intensity to low intensity fire impacts, we simulate hydrologic response to precipitation events over a number of typical geometries and with fine control over amounts of

  10. De novo assembly and comparative transcriptome analysis of Euglena gracilis in response to anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuta; Tomiyama, Takuya; Maruta, Takanori; Tomita, Masaru; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Arakawa, Kazuharu

    2016-03-03

    The phytoflagellated protozoan, Euglena gracilis, has been proposed as an attractive feedstock for the accumulation of valuable compounds such as β-1,3-glucan, also known as paramylon, and wax esters. The production of wax esters proceeds under anaerobic conditions, designated as wax ester fermentation. In spite of the importance and usefulness of Euglena, the genome and transcriptome data are currently unavailable, though another research group has recently published E.gracilis transcriptome study during our submission. We herein performed an RNA-Seq analysis to provide a comprehensive sequence resource and some insights into the regulation of genes including wax ester metabolism by comparative transcriptome analysis of E.gracilis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The E.gracilis transcriptome analysis was performed using the Illumina platform and yielded 90.3 million reads after the filtering steps. A total of 49,826 components were assembled and identified as a reference sequence of E.gracilis, of which 26,479 sequences were considered to be potentially expressed (having FPKM value of greater than 1). Approximately half of all components were estimated to be regulated in a trans-splicing manner, with the addition of protruding spliced leader sequences. Nearly 40 % of 26,479 sequences were annotated by similarity to Swiss-Prot database using the BLASTX program. A total of 2080 transcripts were identified as differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to anaerobic treatment for 24 h. A comprehensive pathway enrichment analysis using the KEGG pathway revealed that the majority of DEGs were involved in photosynthesis, nucleotide metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism. We successfully identified a candidate gene set of paramylon and wax esters, including novel β-1,3-glucan and wax ester synthases. A comparative expression analysis of aerobic- and anaerobic-treated E.gracilis cells indicated that gene expression changes in these

  11. Optimization of meat level and processing conditions for development of chicken meat noodles using response surface methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khare, Anshul Kumar; Biswas, Asim Kumar; Balasubramanium, S; Chatli, Manish Kumar; Sahoo, Jhari

    ... from experiments simultaneously. In present study optimum meat level and processing conditions for development of shelf stable chicken meat noodles was determined using central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM...

  12. Combination of a Stressor-Response Model with a Conditional Probability Analysis Approach for Developing Candidate Criteria from MBSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    I show that a conditional probability analysis using a stressor-response model based on a logistic regression provides a useful approach for developing candidate water quality criteria from empirical data, such as the Maryland Biological Streams Survey (MBSS) data.

  13. Wild trout responses to a stress experience following confinement conditions during the spawning season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Forneris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmo (trutta marmoratus is an endemic specie in the North of Italy, subjected to hybridization with domesticated strains of trout. Native populations are managed by supportive release in the rivers. Wild breeders are captured, confined in facility for short periods and then released in the river after artificial fertilization. Premature mortality during confinement and post release mortality in river have been observed in breeders supporting the view that confinement stress could be the cause. Twenty-six adult individuals of trout were captured from a river by electrofishing and stocked in two tanks, the first one (RF provided with artificial refuges to simulate the natural environment and covered by dark panels; the second tank (TR was only partially covered by dark panels and without artificial refuges. All the other conditions were identical and animals were fed ad libitum with natural food collected in the same river. After 50 days, from a third group of 8 trout (WD captured in the same river by a 5 minute electrofishing session, blood samples were sequentially collected for the assessment of serum cortisol response to serial repeated handlings. With the same sequential method, individuals of the RF and TR experimental groups were sampled. Cortisol levels were compared between groups by ANOVA. Biomass densities decreased during the experiment due to premature mortality of the largest individuals in both the RF (7.69% and TR (30.77% groups. At the end of the experiment, data clearly demonstrated that after a stressing confinement, the TR group shown a reduced poststress response to the successive serial handlings. Vice versa the group RF, that experienced a more careful confinement, responded to the second serial acute stressing manipulation in conformity as the group WD that was not confined. Cortisol data support the hypothesis of impaired cortisol response as a consequence of oversecretion due to uneasiness during the short

  14. Renewal and reinstatement of the conditioned but not the unconditioned response following habituation of the unconditioned stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storsve, Andreas Berg; McNally, Gavan P; Richardson, Rick

    2012-05-01

    Research on the inhibition of learned fear currently relies almost exclusively on one specific procedure, namely extinction of the conditioned stimulus (CS). Importantly, however, learned fear responses can be reduced by a number of other procedures, including habituation of the unconditioned stimulus (US). We recently demonstrated that reductions in learned fear following US habituation, like CS extinction, were subject to both renewal and reinstatement (Storsve et al., 2010). The present study further investigates the associative and non-associative processes shared between habituation and extinction. Given that habituation is typically context-independent (Mackintosh, 1987), in the present study we directly compared renewal and reinstatement of both a conditioned response (CR; freezing) and an unconditioned response (UR; startle) following habituation. It was found that the reduction in conditioned freezing resulting from habituation was context specific (i.e., a change in context led to a renewal of the conditioned fear response; Experiment 1) and was attenuated when a pre-test shock was given (i.e., reinstatement of conditioned fear was observed; Experiment 2). In contrast, habituation of an unconditioned response elicited by the US (i.e., a startle response) was unaffected by either a change in test context or administration of a pre-test shock. This dissociation in the effects of habituation on learned and unlearned responses is discussed in relation to theories of fear extinction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Conditioned Neuroendocrine and Cardiovascular Stress Responsiveness Accompanying Behavioral Passivity and Activity in Aged and in Young Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; Buwalda, B.; Bouws, G.A.H.; Koolhaas, J.M.; Maes, F.W.; Bohus, B.

    1992-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), plasma epinephrine (E), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and plasma corticosterone (CORT) were measured in 3-month- and 24-month-old male Wistar rats exposed to a conditioned emotional stress response (CER) paradigm and a conditioned defensive burying (CDB)

  16. Combination of a Stresor-Response Model with a Conditional Probability Anaylsis Approach to Develop Candidate Criteria from Empirical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    We show that a conditional probability analysis that utilizes a stressor-response model based on a logistic regression provides a useful approach for developing candidate water quality criterai from empirical data. The critical step in this approach is transforming the response ...

  17. Dissociation of temporal dynamics of heart rate and blood pressure responses elicited by conditioned fear but not acoustic startle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tovote, P.; Meyer, M.; Pilz, P.K.D.; Ronnenberg, A.; Ögren, S.O.; Stiedl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Fear-inducing stimuli were hypothesized to elicit fast heart rate (HR) responses but slow mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) responses and thus were studied in auditory fear conditioning and acoustic startle at high temporal resolution in freely moving mice and rats. Fear-induced instantaneous

  18. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  19. Geophysical Responses of Hydrocarbon-impacted Zones at the Various Contamination Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.; Ko, K.; Son, J.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    One controlled experiment and two field surveys were conducted to investigate the geoelectrical responses of hydrocarbon-contaminated zones, so called smeared zone, on the geophysical data at the hydrocarbon- contaminated sites with various conditions. One controlled physical model experiment with GPR using fresh gasoline and two different 3-D electrical resistivity investigations at the aged sites. One field site (former military facilities for arms maintenance) was mainly contaminated with lubricating oils and the other (former gas station) was contaminated with gasoline and diesel, respectively. The results from the physical model experiment show that GPR signals were enhanced when LNAPL was present as a residual saturation in the water-saturated system due to less attenuation of the electromagnetic energy through the soil medium of the hydrocarbon-impacted zone (no biodegradation), compared to when the medium was saturated with only water (no hydrocarbon impaction). In the former gas station site, 3-D resistivity results demonstrate that the highly contaminated zones were imaged with low resistivity anomalies since the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons has been undergone for many years, causing the drastic increase in the TDS at the hydrocarbon-impacted zones. Finally, 3-D resistivity data obtained from the former military maintenance site show that the hydrocarbon-contaminated zones show high resistivity anomalies since the hydrocarbons such as lubricating oils at the contaminated soils were not greatly influenced by microbial degradation and has relatively well kept their original physical properties of high electrical resistivity. The results of the study illustrated that the hydrocarbon-impacted zones under various contamination conditions yielded various geophysical responses which include (1) enhanced GPR amplitudes at the fresh LNAPL (Gasoline to middle distillates) spill sites, (2) low electrical resistivity anomalies due to biodegradation at the

  20. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  1. Enhanced conditioned eyeblink response acquisition and proactive interference in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Jacqueline L; Trivedi, Payal; Myers, Catherine E; Servatius, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    In classical conditioning, proactive interference may arise from experience with the conditioned stimulus (CS), the unconditional stimulus (US), or both, prior to their paired presentations. Interest in the application of proactive interference has extended to clinical populations as either a risk factor for disorders or as a secondary sign. Although the current literature is dense with comparisons of stimulus pre-exposure effects in animals, such comparisons are lacking in human subjects. As such, interpretation of proactive interference over studies as well as its generalization and utility in clinical research is limited. The present study was designed to assess eyeblink response acquisition after equal numbers of CS, US, and explicitly unpaired CS and US pre-exposures, as well as to evaluate how anxiety vulnerability might modulate proactive interference. In the current study, anxiety vulnerability was assessed using the State/Trait Anxiety Inventories as well as the adult and retrospective measures of behavioral inhibition (AMBI and RMBI, respectively). Participants were exposed to 1 of 4 possible pre-exposure contingencies: 30 CS, 30 US, 30 CS, and 30 US explicitly unpaired pre-exposures, or Context pre-exposure, immediately prior to standard delay training. Robust proactive interference was evident in all pre-exposure groups relative to Context pre-exposure, independent of anxiety classification, with CR acquisition attenuated at similar rates. In addition, trait anxious individuals were found to have enhanced overall acquisition as well as greater proactive interference relative to non-vulnerable individuals. The findings suggest that anxiety vulnerable individuals learn implicit associations faster, an effect which persists after the introduction of new stimulus contingencies. This effect is not due to enhanced sensitivity to the US. Such differences would have implications for the development of anxiety psychopathology within a learning framework.

  2. Enhanced conditioned eyeblink response acquisition and proactive interference in anxiety vulnerable individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline L Holloway

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In classical conditioning, proactive interference may arise from experience with the conditioned stimulus (CS, the unconditional stimulus (US, or both, prior to their paired presentations. Interest in the application of proactive interference has extended to clinical populations as either a risk factor for disorders or as a secondary sign. Although the current literature is dense with comparisons of stimulus pre-exposure effects in animals, such comparisons are lacking in human subjects. As such, interpretation of proactive interference over studies as well as its generalization and utility in clinical research is limited. The present study was designed to assess eyeblink response acquisition after equal numbers of CS, US, and explicitly unpaired CS and US pre-exposures, as well as to evaluate how anxiety vulnerability might modulate proactive interference. In the current study, anxiety vulnerability was assessed using the State/Trait Anxiety Inventories as well as the adult and retrospective measures of behavioural inhibition (AMBI and RMBI, respectively. Participants were exposed to 1 of 4 possible pre-exposure contingencies: 30 CS, 30 US, 30 CS and 30 US explicitly unpaired pre-exposures, or context pre-exposure, immediately prior to standard delay training. Robust proactive interference was evident in all pre-exposure groups relative to context pre-exposure, independent of anxiety classification, with CR acquisition attenuated at similar rates. In addition, trait anxious individuals were found to have enhanced overall acquisition as well as greater proactive interference relative to non-vulnerable individuals. The findings suggest that anxiety vulnerable individuals learn implicit associations faster, an effect which persists after the introduction of new stimulus contingencies. This effect is not due to enhanced sensitivity to the US. Such differences would have implications for the development of anxiety psychopathology within a learning

  3. Response of Benthic Macrofauna to Eutrophication in a Mesocosm Experiment: Ecosystem Resilience Prevents Hypoxic Conditions

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    Panagiotis D. Dimitriou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A benthic-pelagic mesocosm experiment was performed to study how the benthic macrofaunal community responds to a eutrophication gradient. The novel experimental setup allowed the induction of an eutrophication gradient in the water column and the detailed documentation of the response of the benthos in terms of biodiversity and ecosystem processes. Nine mesocosms were deployed in the facilities of the Hellenic Center for Marine Research in Crete in the eastern Mediterranean. The mesocosms were 4 m deep, contained 1.5 m3 coastal water, and included 85 liters of undisturbed sediment at the bottom. No water or sediment exchange was allowed. The experimental design included a Control and two eutrophication levels (Low and High for the 58-day duration of the experiment. Macrofaunal samples were collected at the end of the experiment from each mesocosm and compared to the ones collected at the beginning of the experiment from the sediment collection area. Results show that the High eutrophication treatment differed significantly from the Control and Low treatments in terms of macrofaunal species composition, diversity, ecological status and ecosystem processes. The increased availability of organic matter in the sediment caused differences in macrofaunal community structure by favoring deposit-feeding species with high bioturbation ability, which significantly increased their abundance. The increased bioturbation potential of the new community combined with the high organic matter consumption contributed to the oxygenation of the sediment within the mesocosm, preventing the creation of hypoxic conditions in the sediment and maintaining ecosystem health despite the highly eutrophic conditions and significant changes in sediment geochemical variables. In the oligotrophic eastern Mediterranean, healthy benthic ecosystems may use existing ecosystem processes to “buffer” the negative effects caused by eutrophication.

  4. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

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    Floris M van Beest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer. We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in

  5. Condition Help: A Patient- and Family-Initiated Rapid Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Elizabeth L; Rack, Laurie L; Chen, Ling-Wan; Bump, Gregory M

    2017-03-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) help in delivering safe, timely care. Typically they are activated by clinicians using specific parameters. Allowing patients and families to activate RRTs is a novel intervention. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center developed and implemented a patient- and family-initiated rapid response system called Condition Help (CH). When the CH system is activated, a patient care liaison or an on-duty administrator meets bedside with the unit charge nurse to address the patient's concerns. In this study, we collected demographic data, call reasons, call designations (safety or nonsafety), and outcome information for all CH calls made during the period January 2012 through June 2015. Two hundred forty patients/family members made 367 CH calls during the study period. Most calls were made by patients (76.8%) rather than family members (21.8%). Of the 240 patients, 43 (18%) made multiple calls; their calls accounted for 46.3% of all calls (170/367). Inadequate pain control was the reason for the call in most cases (48.2%), followed by dissatisfaction with staff (12.5%). The majority of calls involved nonsafety issues (83.4%) rather than safety issues (11.4%). In 41.4% of cases, a change in care was made. Patient- and family-initiated RRTs are designed to engage patients and families in providing safer care. In the CH system, safety issues are identified, but the majority of calls involve nonsafety issues. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:157-161.

  6. Growth Responses of Fish During Chronic Exposure of Metal Mixture under Laboratory Conditions

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    Saima Naz and Muhammad Javed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth responses of five fish species viz. Catla catla, Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala, Ctenopharyngodon idella and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix were determined, separately, under chronic exposure of binary mixture of metals (Zn+Ni at sub-lethal concentrations (1/3rd of LC50 for 12 weeks. Randomized complete block design (RCBD was followed to conduct this research work. The groups (10 fish each of Catla catla, Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala, Ctenopharyngodon idella and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix having almost similar weights were investigated for their growth responses and metals bioaccumulation patterns in their body organs during chronic exposure of Zn+Ni mixture. The bioaccumulation of metals in the fish body organs viz. gills, liver, kidney, fins, bones, muscle and skin were also determined before and after growth trails under the stress of metals mixture. The exposure of fish to sub-lethal concentrations of mixture caused significant impacts on the average wet weight increments of five fish species. Ctenopharyngodon idella and Labeo rohita attained significantly higher weights, followed by that of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla. However, the growth of metals mixture exposed fish species was significantly lesser than that of control fish (un-stressed. Significantly variable condition factor values reflected the degree of fish well-beings that correlated directly with fish growth and metal exposure concentration. Any significant change in feed intake, due to stress, is reflected in terms of fish growth showing the impacts of metal mixture on fish growth were either additive or antagonist / synergistic. Accumulation of all the metals in fish body followed the general order: liver>kidney>gills> skin >muscle> fins >bones.

  7. Neuromuscular Responses to Conditioned Soccer Sessions Assessed Via GPS-Embedded Accelerometers: Insights Into Tactical Periodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Lacome, Mathieu; Cholley, Yannick; Simpson, Ben M

    2017-09-05

    To 1) examine the reliability of field-based running-specific measures of neuromuscular function assessed via GPS-embedded accelerometers and 2) examine their responses to three typical conditioned sessions (i.e., Strength, Endurance and Speed) in elite soccer players. Before and immediately after each session, vertical jump (CMJ) and adductors squeeze strength (Groin) performances were recorded. Players also performed a 4-min run at 12 km/h followed by 4 ~60-m runs (run =12 s, r =33 s). GPS (15-Hz) and accelerometer (100 Hz) data collected during the four runs + the recovery periods excluding the last recovery period were used to derive vertical stiffness (K), peak loading force (peak force over all the foot-strikes, Fpeak) and propulsion efficiency (i.e., ratio between velocity and force loads, Vl/Fl). Typical errors were small (CMJ, Groin, K and Vl/Fl) and moderate (Fpeak), with moderate (Fpeak), high (K and Vl/Fl) and very high ICC (CMJ and Groin). After all sessions, there were small decreases in Groin and increases in K, while changes in F were all unclear. In contrast, the CMJ and Vl/Fl ratio responses were session-dependent: small increase in CMJ after Speed and Endurance, but unclear changes after Strength; the Vl/Fl ratio increased largely after Strength, while there was a small and a moderate decrease after the Endurance and Speed, respectively. Running-specific measures of neuromuscular function assessed in the field via GPS-embedded accelerometers show acceptable levels of reliability. While the three sessions examined may be associated with limited neuromuscular fatigue, changes in neuromuscular performance and propulsion-efficiency are likely session objective-dependent.

  8. Lesions of basolateral amygdala impair extinction of CS motivational value, but not of explicit conditioned responses, in Pavlovian appetitive second-order conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, John L; Gallagher, Michela; Holland, Peter C

    2003-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is important for the modification of the motivational significance of events through associative learning. In previous work, we found that BLA was critical for the acquisition of conditioned reinforcement value to a visual conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with food. Unlike normal rats, rats with neurotoxic lesions of the BLA failed to acquire Pavlovian second-order conditioning to an auditory stimulus paired with the first-order visual CS in the absence of food. In this experiment, we examined the role of BLA in the extinction of the previously acquired conditioned reinforcement value of a Pavlovian CS. Rats received first-order visual CS-food pairings prior to either BLA- or sham-lesions. Subsequent CS-alone extinction training reduced the ability of the visual CS to reinforce second-order conditioning of an auditory stimulus in the sham-lesioned rats, but not in the BLA-lesioned rats. Despite this persistence of the conditioned reinforcement value of the visual first-order CS in the BLA-lesioned rats, no effects of the lesions were observed on extinction of the explicit behavioural conditioned responses elicited by that CS.

  9. Effect of feeding silages or carrots as supplements to laying hens on production performance, nutrient digestibility, gut structure, gut microflora and feather pecking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenfeldt, S; Kjaer, J B; Engberg, R M

    2007-08-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to examine the suitability of using maize silage, barley-pea silage and carrots as foraging materials for egg-laying hens. Production performance, nutrient digestibility, gastrointestinal characteristics, including the composition of the intestinal microflora as well as feather pecking behaviour were the outcome variables. 2. The protein content of the foraging material (g/kg DM) was on average 69 g in carrots, 94 g in maize silage and 125 g in barley-pea silage. The starch content was highest in the maize silage (312 g/kg DM), and the content of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) varied from 196 to 390 g/kg, being lowest in carrots. Sugars were just traceable in the silages, whereas carrots contained on average 496 g/kg DM. 3. Egg production was highest in hens fed either carrots or maize silage, whereas hens fed barley-pea silage produced less (219 vs. 208). Although the consumption of foraging material was high (33, 35 and 48% of the total feed intake on 'as fed' basis for maize silage, barley-pea silage and carrots, respectively) only a minor effect on nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AME(n)) and apparent digestibility was seen. At 53 weeks of age, hens fed maize silage had AME(n) and apparent digestibility values close to the control group (12.61 and 12.82, respectively), whereas access to barley-pea silage and carrots resulted in slightly lower values (12.36 and 12.42, respectively). Mortality was reduced dramatically in the three groups given supplements (0.5 to 2.5%) compared to the control group (15.2%). 4. Hens receiving silage had greater relative gizzard weights than the control or carrot-fed groups. At 53 weeks of age, the gizzard-content pH of hens receiving silage was about 0.7 to 0.9 units lower than that of the control or carrot-fed hens. Hens fed both types of silage had higher concentrations of lactic acid (15.6 vs. 3.2 micromoles/g) and acetic acid (3.6 vs. 6.1 micromoles/g) in the gizzard contents

  10. The growth response of plants to elevated CO2 under non-optimal environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorter, Hendrik; Pérez-Soba, Marta

    2001-09-01

    Under benign environmental conditions, plant growth is generally stimulated by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. When environmental conditions become sub- or supra-optimal for growth, changes in the biomass enhancement ratio (BER; total plant biomass at elevated CO2 divided by plant biomass at the current CO2 level) may occur. We analysed literature sources that studied CO2×environment interactions on the growth of herbaceous species and tree seedlings during the vegetative phase. For each experiment we calculated the difference in BER for plants that were grown under 'optimal' and 'non-optimal' conditions. Assuming that interactions would be most apparent if the environmental stress strongly diminished growth, we scaled the difference in the BER values by the growth reduction due to the stress factor. In our compilation we found a large variability in CO2×environment interactions between experiments. To test the impact of experimental design, we simulated a range of analyses with a plant-to-plant variation in size common in experimental plant populations, in combination with a number of replicates generally used in CO2×environment studies. A similar variation in results was found as in the compilation of real experiments, showing the strong impact of stochasticity. We therefore caution against strong inferences derived from single experiments and suggest rather a reliance on average interactions across a range of experiments. Averaged over the literature data available, low soil nutrient supply or sub-optimal temperatures were found to reduce the proportional growth stimulation of elevated CO2. In contrast, BER increased when plants were grown at low water supply, albeit relatively modestly. Reduced irradiance or high salinity caused BER to increase in some cases and decrease in others, resulting in an average interaction with elevated CO2 that was not significant. Under high ozone concentrations, the relative growth enhancement by elevated CO2 was

  11. Modeling regeneration responses of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) to abiotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems dominated by big sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata Nuttall (Asteraceae), which are the most widespread ecosystems in semiarid western North America, have been affected by land use practices and invasive species. Loss of big sagebrush and the decline of associated species, such as greater sage-grouse, are a concern to land managers and conservationists. However, big sagebrush regeneration remains difficult to achieve by restoration and reclamation efforts and there is no regeneration simulation model available. We present here the first process-based, daily time-step, simulation model to predict yearly big sagebrush regeneration including relevant germination and seedling responses to abiotic factors. We estimated values, uncertainty, and importance of 27 model parameters using a total of 1435 site-years of observation. Our model explained 74% of variability of number of years with successful regeneration at 46 sites. It also achieved 60% overall accuracy predicting yearly regeneration success/failure. Our results identify specific future research needed to improve our understanding of big sagebrush regeneration, including data at the subspecies level and improved parameter estimates for start of seed dispersal, modified wet thermal-time model of germination, and soil water potential influences. We found that relationships between big sagebrush regeneration and climate conditions were site specific, varying across the distribution of big sagebrush. This indicates that statistical models based on climate are unsuitable for understanding range-wide regeneration patterns or for assessing the potential consequences of changing climate on sagebrush regeneration and underscores the value of this process-based model. We used our model to predict potential regeneration across the range of sagebrush ecosystems in the western United States, which confirmed that seedling survival is a limiting factor, whereas germination is not. Our results also suggested that modeled

  12. Tracking Biological and Ecosystem Responses to Changing Environmental Conditions in the Pacific Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Cooper, L. W.; Frey, K. E.; Moore, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Changing seasonal sea ice conditions and seawater temperatures strongly influence biological processes and marine ecosystems at high latitudes. In the Pacific Arctic, persistent regions termed "hotspots", are localized areas with high benthic macroinfaunal biomass that have been documented over four decades (see Figure). These regions are now being more formally tracked to relate physical forcing and ecosystem response as an Arctic Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) supported by the US National Ocean Policy Implementation Plan and international partners. These hotspots are important foraging areas for upper trophic level benthic feeders, such as marine mammals and seabirds. South of St. Lawrence Island (SLI) in the northern Bering Sea, benthic feeding spectacled eiders, bearded seals and walruses are important winter consumers of infauna, such as bivalves and polychaetes. Gray whales have historically been a major summer consumer of benthic amphipods in the Chirikov Basin to the north of SLI, although summertime sightings of gray whales declined in the Chirikov from the 1980s up until at least 2002. The SE Chukchi Sea hotspot, as are the other hotspots, is maintained by export of high chlorophyll a that is produced locally as well as advected by water masses transiting northward through the system. Both walrus and gray whales are known to forage in this hotspot seasonally on high biomass levels of benthic prey. Notably the center of the highest benthic biomass regions has shifted northward in three of the DBO hotspots in recent years. This has coincided with changing sediment grain size, an indicator of current speed, and is also likely a response to changes in primary production in the region. Studies of these broad biological responses to changing physical drivers have been facilitated through development of the DBO cooperative effort by both US and international scientists. The DBO includes a series of coordinated, multi-trophic level observations that

  13. Both Trace and Delay Conditioning of Evaluative Responses Depend on Contingency Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattner, Florian; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Tavakoli, Paniz

    2012-01-01

    Whereas previous evaluative conditioning (EC) studies produced inconsistent results concerning the role of contingency knowledge, there are classical eye-blink conditioning studies suggesting that declarative processes are involved in trace conditioning but not in delay conditioning. In two EC experiments pairing neutral sounds (conditioned…

  14. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  15. Herbaceous peony in warm climate: Modelling stem elongation and growers profit responses to dormancy conditions

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    Menashe Cohen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the data collected for herbaceous peony cultivated in a warm climate region and stored in winter under three constant chilling temperatures. We used the quadratic regression model to describe the stem elongation responses to winter dormancy conditions, and the logistic function to describe the weekly stems elongation. The predicted maximal stem length from the first model was used as the input parameter for the second model. More than 4000 data for various (a chilling constant temperatures during dormancy, (b dormancy duration, and (c germination duration, were used. The models were applied to determine the optimal number of chill units. For this purpose, two criteria were used in different versions of the model: the maximal stem length and the maximal profit of farmers. For the two chilling temperatures of 2 °C and 6 °C, the optimal values of chill units (in the models of a maximal stem length and maximal profit of farmers are close to one another, and the values of a maximal stem length and maximal profit are significantly different. In the case of the third chilling temperature of 10 °C, the model failed to determine the optimal number of chill units. The method of inverse confidence intervals for testing the significance of the optimal number of chill units was used.

  16. Physiological response of gmelina (Gmelina arborea Roxb. to hydric conditions of the colombian Caribbean

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    Rojas Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Gmelina is an important forest species because of its adaptability to different tropical environments, rapid growth and high quality wood for many uses. Although the species thrives in lowlands, both wet and dry, water availability is the main limiting factor for production in the latter. The transpiration rate, stomatal resistance, water potential and chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments content were monitored for three climatic seasons (rainy, transitional and dry and three ages (seedling (2-10 months, juvenile (10-16 months and adult (48-60 months, in order to observe the physiological response of gmelina to conditions in northern Colombia. Transpiration rates decreased with the age of the trees and the critical value of leaf water potential, that generates stomatal closure, was observed below -2.6 MPa. The dry season resulted in increased carotenoid content, in contrast to the content of chlorophyll A, B and total.

  17. Physiological Responses and Performance Analysis Difference between Official and Simulated Karate Combat Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabène, Helmi; Mkaouer, Bessem; Franchini, Emerson; Souissi, Nafaa; Selmi, Mohamed Amine; Nagra, Yassine; Chamari, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare physiological responses and time-motion analysis between official and simulated karate combat. Methods Ten high-level karatekas participated in this study, which included official and simulated karate combat. Results Karatekas used more upper-limb attack techniques during official combat compared to simulated ones (6±3 vs 3±1; P=0.05, respectively). For official and simulated karate matches, the numbers of high-intensity actions (i.e. offensive and defensive fighting activity) were 14±6 and 18±5, respectively (P>0.05), lasting from karate match, the activity and rest duration were 10.0±3.4s and 16.2±4.1s, respectively (E:R ratio 1:1.5), while high-intensity actions were 1.5±0.3s, resulting in an E:R ratio of 1:11. Blood lactate concentration was higher during official (11.14±1.82 mmol.l-1) compared to simulated karate combat (7.80±2.66 mmol.l-1) (Pkarate combat condition. Conclusion Official and simulated matches differ considerably, therefore coaches should create new strategies during training sessions to achieve the same effort and pause profile of competitive matches and/or that athletes should be submitted to frequent competitions to adapt themselves to the profile of this event. PMID:24868428

  18. Response of cowpea genotypes to water stress in temperate climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Borivoj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitigation of global climate change impact on the agricultural production is the major priorities in future research. Cowpea as a drought tolerant plant is interesting for growing in semi-arid climate of the Vojvodina region. The effect of water stress on yield of cultivated plants can be obtained by calculating the yield response factor (Ky which represents the ratio between the relative evapotranspiration deficit (1-ETa/ETm and the relative decline in yield (1-Ya/Ym. The values of Ky ranged from 0.91 to 1.17 for genotype G1 and G2 respectively. Genotype G1, with a value lower than 1 of Ky, shows a good tolerance to water deficit, on the contrary, genotype G2, with a greater Ky than 1, expresses some sensitivity to water stress. Obtained results will be used in breeding programs to develop cowpea cultivars tolerant to stressful conditions, primarily to water stress, as well as more productive in water use. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 031016 i br. 31030

  19. Additive Dose Response Models: Explicit Formulation and the Loewe Additivity Consistency Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Lederer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput techniques allow for massive screening of drug combinations. To find combinations that exhibit an interaction effect, one filters for promising compound combinations by comparing to a response without interaction. A common principle for no interaction is Loewe Additivity which is based on the assumption that no compound interacts with itself and that two doses from different compounds having the same effect are equivalent. It then should not matter whether a component is replaced by the other or vice versa. We call this assumption the Loewe Additivity Consistency Condition (LACC. We derive explicit and implicit null reference models from the Loewe Additivity principle that are equivalent when the LACC holds. Of these two formulations, the implicit formulation is the known General Isobole Equation (Loewe, 1928, whereas the explicit one is the novel contribution. The LACC is violated in a significant number of cases. In this scenario the models make different predictions. We analyze two data sets of drug screening that are non-interactive (Cokol et al., 2011; Yadav et al., 2015 and show that the LACC is mostly violated and Loewe Additivity not defined. Further, we compare the measurements of the non-interactive cases of both data sets to the theoretical null reference models in terms of bias and mean squared error. We demonstrate that the explicit formulation of the null reference model leads to smaller mean squared errors than the implicit one and is much faster to compute.

  20. Estímulo discriminativo de extinção produzido por respostas de observação em pombos Discriminative stimulus of extinction produced by observing responses in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Yukio Tomanari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pombos privados de comida foram expostos a tentativas que podiam terminar com ou sem a apresentação de comida independentemente de qualquer resposta. Durante uma tentativa, bicadas podiam mudar a cor do disco de resposta de branco para verde (S+ ou vermelho (S- a depender do acionamento (ou não do comedouro. Em linha de base, bicadas produziam ambas as cores em intervalos médios variáveis de 15 s. Em duas condições experimentais distintas, tandem VI DRH foi empregado na produção, ora de S+, ora de S-. Resultados mostraram que o esquema tandem levou a uma diminuição geral na freqüência de estímulos discriminativos produzidos, marcadamente na de S+, mas não na de S-. Esses dados fornecem suporte para o modelo de reforçamento condicionado baseado na redução da incerteza.Food-deprived pigeons were given a series of trials in which half ended with response- independent food presentation and half without it. During a trial, pecking the key could change its color from white to green (S+ or red (S-, depending on whether food was programmed or not. In baseline conditions, pecks produced both stimuli (colors on a 15-s variable-interval schedule. In two different conditions, tandem VI DRH was applied to produce either S+ or S-. Results showed that the tandem contingency resulted in a general decrease in the discriminative stimulus production, markedly to S+, but not to S-. The findings are consistent with the uncertainty-reduction model of conditioned reinforcement.

  1. Insula and inferior frontal triangularis activations distinguish between conditioned brain responses using emotional sounds for basic BCI communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda evan der Heiden

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to enable communication through a brain-computer interface (BCI, it is necessary to discriminate between distinct brain responses. As a first step, we probed the possibility to discriminate between affirmative (yes and negative (no responses using a semantic classical conditioning paradigm, within an fMRI setting.Subjects were presented with congruent and incongruent word-pairs as conditioned stimuli (CS, respectively eliciting affirmative and negative responses. Incongruent word-pairs were associated to an unpleasant unconditioned stimulus (scream, US1 and congruent word-pairs were associated to a pleasant unconditioned stimulus (baby-laughter, US2, in order to elicit emotional conditioned responses (CR. The aim was to discriminate between affirmative and negative responses, enabled by their association with the positive and negative affective stimuli. In the late acquisition phase, when the US were not present anymore, there was a strong significant differential activation for incongruent and congruent word-pairs in a cluster comprising the left insula and the inferior frontal triangularis. This association was not found in the habituation phase. These results suggest that the difference in affirmative and negative brain responses was established as an effect of conditioning, allowing to further investigate the possibility of using this paradigm for a binary choice BCI.

  2. Water Quality Conditions Monitored at the Corps’ Fort Peck Project in Montana during the 3-Year Period 2004 through 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    standards. As such, the reservoir is to be maintained suitable for drinking, culinary , and food processing purposes, after conventional treatment; bathing...to the Montana/North Dakota state line. Both B-2 and B-3 waters are to be maintained suitable for drinking, culinary and food processing purposes...QUAL-W2 is a “state-of-the- art ” water quality model that can greatly facilitate addressing reservoir water quality management issues. CE-QUAL-W2 is a

  3. Photosynthetic acclimation responses of maize seedlings grown under artificial laboratory light gradients mimicking natural canopy conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eHirth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed the ability of the C4 plant maize to perform long-term photosynthetic acclimation in an artificial light quality system previously used for analysing short-term and long-term acclimation responses (LTR in C3 plants. We aimed to test if this light system could be used as a tool for analysing redox-regulated acclimation processes in maize seedlings. Photosynthetic parameters obtained from maize samples harvested in the field were used as control. The results indicated that field grown maize performed a pronounced LTR with significant differences between the top and the bottom levels of the plant stand corresponding to the strong light gradients occurring in it. We compared these data to results obtained from maize seedlings grown under artificial light sources preferentially exciting either photosystem II or photosystem I. In C3 plants, this light system induces redox signals within the photosynthetic electron transport chain which trigger state transitions and differential phosphorylation of light harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII. The LTR to these redox signals induces changes in the accumulation of plastid psaA transcripts, in chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence values Fs/Fm, in Chl a/b ratios and in transient starch accumulation in C3 plants. Maize seedlings grown in this light system exhibited a pronounced ability to perform both short-term and long-term acclimation at the level of psaA transcripts, Chl fluorescence values Fs/Fm and Chl a/b ratios. Interestingly, maize seedlings did not exhibit redox-controlled variations of starch accumulation probably because of its specific differences in energy metabolism. In summary, the artificial laboratory light system was found to be well-suited to mimic field light conditions and provides a physiological tool for studying the molecular regulation of the LTR of maize in more detail.

  4. Growth Responses of Acacia mangium and Paraserianthes falcataria Seedlings on Different Soil Origin under Nursery Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirtha Ayu Paramitha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to examine the growth responses of Acacia mangium (mangium and Paraserianthes falcataria (sengon seedlings growing on different soil origin under nursery condition. This study was started in September 2012 and terminated in March 2013.  The seedlings were grown from seeds sown in a plastic box filled with sterilized sands. One week after sowing, the seedlings were transplanted into polybags contained sterilized soils originated from secondary forest, Imperata cylindrica grassland and ex-coal mining. The number of all seedlings were 180 seedlings consisted of 3 different soils, 2 species of seedlings with 10 seedlings replicated 3 times. Assessment was conducted one week after transplanting, then subsequently monitored every 2 weeks, except dry weighing and counting nodules were performed at the end of the study. A completely randomized design was used in this study. The data was analyzed using Costat software. The study resulted that the different of soil origin influenced on all growth variables of mangium and sengon of 4.5 months old. The survival rate of seedlings, height and diameter increments, dry weight and root nodules were better in both species of seedlings growing on soil originated from secondary forest and Imperata grassland compared with the soil from ex-coal mining. But the survival rates of sengon seedlings were higher than that of mangium on these three soils. The highest dry weight of sengon seedlings was achieved on soil originated from secondary forest. In the present study, soil originated from secondary forest increased more in weight of shoot than root, so that the shoot-root ratio was unbalanced more than one. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that soil from secondary forest and Imperata grassland can be used as growing media for mangium and sengon seedlings in the nursery.

  5. Differential effect of conditioning regimens on cytokine responses during allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J; Heilmann, C; Jacobsen, N

    2006-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators in plasma samples drawn daily during the conditioning of 20 patients. Soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I (sTNFRI) increased during the conditioning reflecting the type of conditioning given. Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was the most potent inducer of sTNFRI (288% increase (median) P=0...

  6. The principal components of response strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, P R; Hall, S S

    2001-03-01

    As Skinner (1938) described it, response strength is the "state of the reflex with respect to all its static properties" (p. 15), which include response rate, latency, probability, and persistence. The relations of those measures to one another was analyzed by probabilistically reinforcing, satiating, and extinguishing pigeons' key pecking in a trials paradigm. Reinforcement was scheduled according to variable-interval, variable-ratio, and fixed-interval contingencies. Principal components analysis permitted description in terms of a single latent variable, strength, and this was validated with confirmatory factor analyses. Overall response rate was an excellent predictor of this state variable.

  7. Actual measurement, hygrothermal response experiment and growth prediction analysis of microbial contamination of central air conditioning system in Dalian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Hu, Guangyao; Wang, Chunyang; Yuan, Wenjie; Wei, Shanshan; Gao, Jiaoqi; Wang, Boyuan; Song, Fangchao

    2017-04-03

    The microbial contamination of central air conditioning system is one of the important factors that affect the indoor air quality. Actual measurement and analysis were carried out on microbial contamination in central air conditioning system at a venue in Dalian, China. Illumina miseq method was used and three fungal samples of two units were analysed by high throughput sequencing. Results showed that the predominant fungus in air conditioning unit A and B were Candida spp. and Cladosporium spp., and two fungus were further used in the hygrothermal response experiment. Based on the data of Cladosporium in hygrothermal response experiment, this paper used the logistic equation and the Gompertz equation to fit the growth predictive model of Cladosporium genera in different temperature and relative humidity conditions, and the square root model was fitted based on the two environmental factors. In addition, the models were carried on the analysis to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the established model equation.

  8. Relationship between the Physical and Psychosocial Conditions of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Cancer Patients and their Responses to an Informational Material

    OpenAIRE

    Michiyo Mizuno; Jun Kataoka; Fumiko Oishi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Postoperative patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer have multiple adaptation tasks and care needs to improve their quality of life (QOL). Whether their supportive care needs differ according to their physical and psychosocial conditions is unclear. This study investigated patients' (1) physical and psychosocial conditions (QOL, fatigue, anxiety, cognitive plight, and resilience) and (2) responses to an informational booklet describing cancer patients' problems and adaptation t...

  9. Proteometabolomic response of Deinococcus radiodurans exposed to UVC and vacuum conditions: Initial studies prior to the Tanpopo space mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Emanuel; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Kölbl, Denise; Chaturvedi, Palak; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Milojevic, Tetyana

    2017-01-01

    The multiple extremes resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is able to withstand harsh conditions of simulated outer space environment. The Tanpopo orbital mission performs a long-term space exposure of D. radiodurans aiming to investigate the possibility of interplanetary transfer of life. The revealing of molecular machinery responsible for survivability of D. radiodurans in the outer space environment can improve our understanding of underlying stress response mechanisms. In this paper, we have evaluated the molecular response of D. radiodurans after the exposure to space-related conditions of UVC irradiation and vacuum. Notably, scanning electron microscopy investigations showed that neither morphology nor cellular integrity of irradiated cells was affected, while integrated proteomic and metabolomic analysis revealed numerous molecular alterations in metabolic and stress response pathways. Several molecular key mechanisms of D. radiodurans, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the DNA damage response systems, ROS scavenging systems and transcriptional regulators responded in order to cope with the stressful situation caused by UVC irradiation under vacuum conditions. These results reveal the effectiveness of the integrative proteometabolomic approach as a tool in molecular analysis of microbial stress response caused by space-related factors.

  10. Proteometabolomic response of Deinococcus radiodurans exposed to UVC and vacuum conditions: Initial studies prior to the Tanpopo space mission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Ott

    Full Text Available The multiple extremes resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is able to withstand harsh conditions of simulated outer space environment. The Tanpopo orbital mission performs a long-term space exposure of D. radiodurans aiming to investigate the possibility of interplanetary transfer of life. The revealing of molecular machinery responsible for survivability of D. radiodurans in the outer space environment can improve our understanding of underlying stress response mechanisms. In this paper, we have evaluated the molecular response of D. radiodurans after the exposure to space-related conditions of UVC irradiation and vacuum. Notably, scanning electron microscopy investigations showed that neither morphology nor cellular integrity of irradiated cells was affected, while integrated proteomic and metabolomic analysis revealed numerous molecular alterations in metabolic and stress response pathways. Several molecular key mechanisms of D. radiodurans, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the DNA damage response systems, ROS scavenging systems and transcriptional regulators responded in order to cope with the stressful situation caused by UVC irradiation under vacuum conditions. These results reveal the effectiveness of the integrative proteometabolomic approach as a tool in molecular analysis of microbial stress response caused by space-related factors.

  11. Physiological Responses to Firefighting in Extreme Temperatures Do Not Compare to Firefighting in Temperate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Windisch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine physiological responses to two different simulated firefighting exercises: a firefighting exercise with flashovers, smoke, poor visibility and extreme temperatures (300° in a burning container and a standard firefighting exercise in temperate conditions. Furthermore, a second purpose of the study was to find out if the contribution of strength and endurance capacities to firefighting performance changes when the demands of the firefighting exercise change.Methods: Sixteen professional firefighters performed a maximum treadmill test, strength testing, a standard simulated firefighting exercise (SFE without heat and flashovers and a firefighting exercise with a simulation of the flashover phenomenon in a burning container (FOT. The treadmill testing was used to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak, ventilatory threshold (VT1 and respiratory compensation point (RCP. Three intensity zones were identified according to heart rate (HR values corresponding to VT1 and RCP: zone 1–HR below VT1, zone 2-HR between VT1 and RCP, zone 3–HR above RCP. Firefighting performance was determined by a simple time-strain-air depletion model (TSA taking the sum of z-transformed parameters of time to finish the exercise, strain in terms of mean heart rate, and air depletion from the breathing apparatus. Correlations were then established between TSA based firefighting performance parameters and fitness variables representing strength and endurance.Results: HR was significantly lower during SFE (79.9 ± 6.9%HRmax compared to FOT (85.4 ± 5.2%HRmax. During SFE subjects spent 24.6 ± 30.2% of time in zone 1, 65.8 ± 28.1% in zone 2 and 9.7 ± 16.6% in zone 3. During FOT subjects spent 16.3 ± 12.8% in zone 1, 50.4 ± 13.2% in zone 2 and 33.3 ± 16.6% in zone 3. Out of all correlations, relative VO2peak showed the highest relation to mean HR during SFE (−0.593 as well as FOT (−0.693.Conclusions: Endurance in terms of

  12. Conditions and Strategies of Creating Company Value on the Basis of Corporate Social Responsibility – Synthetic Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Doś

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of an enterprise is to increase its value. This growth can be achieved if initiated socially responsible activities improve the value drivers. The company’s specificity, type of its environment and their mutual reactions create conditions conducive to improvement of the driving forces of value by being socially responsible. Bearing this observation in mind we can formulate five strategies of creating value based on social responsibility. These are strategies of perfection, positive selection, surroundings modification, transformation and transposition.

  13. Action plan for responses to abnormal conditions in Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks with high organic content. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-07-01

    This action plan describes the criteria and the organizational responsibilities required for ensuring that waste storage tanks with high organic contents are maintained in a safe condition at the Hanford Site. In addition, response actions are outlined for (1) prevention or mitigation of excessive temperatures; or (2) a material release from any waste tank with high organic content. Other response actions may be defined by Westinghouse Hanford Company Systems Engineering if a waste tank parameter goes out of specification. Trend analysis indicates the waste tank parameters have seasonal variations, but are otherwise stable.

  14. Dopamine efflux in nucleus accumbens shell and core in response to appetitive classical conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J. J.; de Bruin, J. P. C.; Feenstra, M. G. P.

    2003-01-01

    Dopamine transmission within the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in associative reinforcement learning. We investigated the effect of appetitive classical conditioning on dopamine efflux in the rat nucleus accumbens shell and core, as dopamine may be differentially activated by conditioned and

  15. Classical Conditioning and Retention of the Infant's Eyelid Response: Effects of Age and Interstimulus Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Arlene H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reports that lengthy interstimulus interval facilitates classical conditioning in very young infants. Infants trained in a single session at 20 days of age exhibited reliable retention of the conditioned eyelid reflex 10 days later, but infants 10 days of age did not. (Author)

  16. Plastic Growth response of European beech provenances to dry site conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojnic, S.; Sass, U.G.W.; Orlovic, S.; Matovic, B.; Eilmann, B.

    2013-01-01

    Due to projected global warming, there is a great concern about the ability of European beech to adapt to future climate conditions. Provenance trials provide an excellent basis to assess the potential of various provenances to adjust to given climate conditions. In this study we compared the

  17. The growth response of plants to elevated CO2 under non-optimal environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, H.; Pérez-Soba, M.

    2001-01-01

    Under benign environmental conditions, plant growth is generally stimulated by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. When environmental conditions become sub- or supra-optimal for growth, changes in the biomass enhancement ratio (BER; total plant biomass at elevated CO2 divided by plant biomass

  18. Response of mangroves to drought and non-tidal conditions in St ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a prolonged closed-mouth state on the condition of mangrove habitats was studied in May 2010 at St Lucia Estuary, KwaZulu-Natal. The mouth had been closed to the sea since 2002 as a result of artificial mouth closure and drought, which had resulted in non-tidal, dry and hypersaline aquatic conditions.

  19. Responses to Positive Affect Predict Mood Symptoms in Children under Conditions of Stress: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijttebier, Patricia; Raes, Filip; Vasey, Michael W.; Feldman, Gregory C.

    2012-01-01

    Rumination to negative affect has been linked to the onset and maintenance of mood disorders in adults as well as children. Responses to positive affect have received far less attention thus far. A few recent studies in adults suggest that responses to positive affect are involved in the development of both depressive and hypomanic symptoms, but…

  20. Optimization of processing conditions for the sterilization of retorted short-rib patties using the response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su-Hee; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimum sterilization conditions for short-rib patties in retort trays by considering microbiological safety, nutritive value, sensory characteristics, and textural properties. In total, 27 sterilization conditions with various temperatures, times, and processing methods were tested using a 3(3) factorial design. The response surface methodology (RSM) and contour analysis were applied to find the optimum sterilization conditions for the patties. Quality attributes were significantly affected by the sterilization temperature, time, and processing method. From RSM and contour analysis, the final optimum sterilization condition of the patties that simultaneously satisfied all specifications was determined to be 119.4°C for 18.55min using a water-cascading rotary mode. The findings of the present study suggest that using optimized sterilization conditions will improve the microbial safety, sensory attributes, and nutritional retention for retorted short-rib patties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of weather data aggregation on regional crop simulation for different crops, production conditions, and response variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Gang; Hoffmann, Holger; Bussel, Van L.G.J.; Enders, Andreas; Specka, Xenia; Sosa, Carmen; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh; Tao, Fulu; Constantin, Julie; Raynal, Helene; Teixeira, Edmar; Grosz, Balázs; Doro, Luca; Zhao, Zhigan; Nendel, Claas; Kiese, Ralf; Eckersten, Henrik; Haas, Edwin; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Wang, Enli; Kuhnert, Matthias; Trombi, Giacomo; Moriondo, Marco; Bindi, Marco; Lewan, Elisabet; Bach, Michaela; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Rötter, Reimund; Roggero, Pier Paolo; Wallach, Daniel; Cammarano, Davide; Asseng, Senthold; Krauss, Gunther; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the weather data aggregation effect (DAE) on the simulation of cropping systems for different crops, response variables, and production conditions. Using 13 processbased crop models and the ensemble mean, we simulated 30 yr continuous cropping systems for 2 crops (winter wheat and

  2. Effects of social conditions during early development on stress response and personality traits in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naguib, M.; Floercke, C.; Oers, van K.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions during early development play a crucial role in shaping an organism's phenotype. To test how social group size affects stress response and behavioral characteristics, we used great tits (Parus major) from selection lines for exploratory behavior, a proxy for an avian

  3. Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships among Older Husbands Caring for Wives with Progressive Dementia and Other Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Sara; Power, James

    2009-01-01

    Men are playing greater roles in the provision of care for older adults with chronic health conditions. Husbands, in particular, encounter many role transformations as they witness their wives grow in levels of dependence as a result of their illnesses. This qualitative study examines the changes that occurred in the roles, responsibilities, and…

  4. Epiallelic changes in known stress-responsive genes under extreme drought conditions in Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Vishal, Parivartan; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, Manoj K

    2017-01-01

    Under severe drought conditions, Brassica juncea shows differential methylation and demethylation events, such that certain epialleles are silenced and some are activated. The plant employed avoidance strategy by delaying apoptosis through the activation of several genes. Harsh environmental conditions pose serious threat to normal growth and development of crops, sometimes leading to their death. However, plants have developed an essential mechanism of modulation of gene activities by epigenetic modifications. Brassica juncea is an important oilseed crop contributing effectively to the economy of India. In the present investigation, we studied the changes in the methylation level of various stress-responsive genes of B. juncea variety RH30 by methylation-dependent immune-precipitation-chip in response to severe drought. On the basis of changes in the number of differential methylation regions in response to drought, the promoter regions were designated as hypermethylated and hypomethylated. Gene body methylation increased in all the genes, whereas promoter methylation was dependent on the function of the gene. Overall, the genes responsible for delaying apoptosis were hypomethylated and many genes responsible for normal routine activities were hypermethylated at promoter regions, thereby suggesting that these may be suspending the activities under harsh conditions.

  5. Disconnection of the basolateral amygdala complex and nucleus accumbens impairs appetitive pavlovian second-order conditioned responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Barry; Holland, Peter C; Gallagher, Michela

    2002-04-01

    There is considerable evidence that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (ABL) is involved in learning about the motivational value of otherwise neutral stimuli. The authors examined the role in this function of the ABL and one of its major efferent structures. the nucleus accumbens. Male Long-Evans rats received either sham, ipsilaterally, or contralaterally placed unilateral lesions of the ABL and accumbens and were trained in an appetitive Pavlovian second-order conditioning task. Sham-lesioned and ipsilaterally lesioned rats acquired the task normally, but contralaterally lesioned rats, in which the ABL and accumbens were functionally disconnected, failed to acquire second-order conditioned responses (although they did acquire second-order conditioned orienting responses). The results suggest that the ABL and accumbens are part of a system critical for processing information about learned motivational value.

  6. Modeling of the effect of freezer conditions on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream by using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Ochi, H; Taketsuka, M; Saito, H; Sakurai, K; Ichihashi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S

    2008-05-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out by using response surface methodology to create a quantitative model of the synergistic effects of conditions in a continuous freezer [mix flow rate (L/h), overrun (%), cylinder pressure (kPa), drawing temperature ( degrees C), and dasher speed (rpm)] on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream [rate of fat destabilization (%), mean air cell diameter (mum), and mean ice crystal diameter (mum)]. A central composite face-centered design was used for this study. Thirty-one combinations of the 5 above-mentioned freezer conditions were designed (including replicates at the center point), and ice cream samples were manufactured and examined in a continuous freezer under the selected conditions. The responses were the 3 variables given above. A quadratic model was constructed, with the freezer conditions as the independent variables and the ice cream characteristics as the dependent variables. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) were greater than 0.9 for all 3 responses, but Q(2), the index used here for the capability of the model for predicting future observed values of the responses, was negative for both the mean ice crystal diameter and the mean air cell diameter. Therefore, pruned models were constructed by removing terms that had contributed little to the prediction in the original model and by refitting the regression model. It was demonstrated that these pruned models provided good fits to the data in terms of R(2), Q(2), and ANOVA. The effects of freezer conditions were expressed quantitatively in terms of the 3 responses. The drawing temperature ( degrees C) was found to have a greater effect on ice cream characteristics than any of the other factors.

  7. Intercomparison of fast response commercial gas analysers for nitrous oxide flux measurements under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannik, Ü.; Haapanala, S.; Shurpali, N. J.; Mammarella, I.; Lind, S.; Hyvönen, N.; Peltola, O.; Zahniser, M.; Martikainen, P. J.; Vesala, T.

    2015-01-01

    Four gas analysers capable of measuring nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration at a response time necessary for eddy covariance flux measurements were operated from spring until winter 2011 over a field cultivated with reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea, L.), a perennial bioenergy crop in eastern Finland. The instruments were TGA100A (Campbell Scientific Inc.), CW-TILDAS-CS (Aerodyne Research Inc.), N2O / CO-23d (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and QC-TILDAS-76-CS (Aerodyne Research Inc.). The period with high emissions, lasting for about 2 weeks after fertilization in late May, was characterized by an up to 2 orders of magnitude higher emission, whereas during the rest of the campaign the N2O fluxes were small, from 0.01 to 1 nmol m-2 s-1. Two instruments, CW-TILDAS-CS and N2O / CO-23d, determined the N2O exchange with minor systematic difference throughout the campaign, when operated simultaneously. TGA100A produced the cumulatively highest N2O estimates (with 29% higher values during the period when all instruments were operational). QC-TILDAS-76-CS obtained 36% lower fluxes than CW-TILDAS-CS during the first period, including the emission episode, whereas the correspondence with other instruments during the rest of the campaign was good. The reasons for systematic differences were not identified, suggesting further need for detailed evaluation of instrument performance under field conditions with emphasis on stability, calibration and any other factors that can systematically affect the accuracy of flux measurements. The instrument CW-TILDAS-CS was characterized by the lowest noise level (with a standard deviation of around 0.12 ppb at 10 Hz sampling rate) as compared to N2O / CO-23d and QC-TILDAS-76-CS (around 0.50 ppb) and TGA100A (around 2 ppb). We identified that for all instruments except CW-TILDAS-CS the random error due to instrumental noise was an important source of uncertainty at the 30 min averaging level and the total stochastic error was frequently

  8. Linear response theory and optimal control for a molecular system under non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a straightforward generalisation of the linear response theory on a finite time-horizon to systems in non-equilibrium that are subject to external forcing. We briefly revisit the standard linear response result for equilibrium systems, where we consider Langevin dynamics as a special case, and then give an alternative derivation using a change-of-measure argument that does not rely on any stationarity or reversibility assumption. This procedure easily enables us to calculate the second-order correction to the linear response formula (which may or may not be useful in practice). Furthermore, we outline how the novel non-equilibrium linear response formula can be used to compute optimal controls of molecular systems for cases in which one wants to steer the system to maximise a certain target expectation value. We illustrate our approach with simple numerical examples.

  9. Responsible aquaculture in 2050: Valuing local conditions and human innovations will be key to success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diana, J.S.; Egna, H.S.; Chopin, T.; Peterson, M.S.; Cao, L.; Pomeroy, R.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Slack, W.T.; Bondad-Reantaso, M.G.; Cabello, F.

    2013-01-01

    As aquaculture production expands, we must avoid mistakes made during increasing intensification of agriculture. Understanding environmental impacts and measures to mitigate them is important for designing responsible aquaculture production systems. There are four realistic goals that can make

  10. Seismic site coefficients and acceleration design response spectra based on conditions in South Carolina : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The simplified procedure in design codes for determining earthquake response spectra involves : estimating site coefficients to adjust available rock accelerations to site accelerations. Several : investigators have noted concerns with the site coeff...

  11. Spring phenological responses of marine and freshwater plankton to changing temperature and light conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, Monika; Berger, Stella A.; Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Aberle, Nicole; Lengfellner, Kathrin; Sommer, Ulrich; Diehl, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the timing and magnitude of the spring plankton bloom in response to climate change have been observed across a wide range of aquatic systems. We used meta-analysis to investigate phenological responses of marine and freshwater plankton communities in mesocosms subjected to experimental manipulations of temperature and light intensity. Systems differed with respect to the dominant mesozooplankton (copepods in seawater and daphnids in freshwater). Higher water temperatures advanced t...

  12. Evidence of trace conditioning in comatose patients revealed by the reactivation of EEG responses to alerting sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Elsa; Nguepnjo Nguissi, Nathalie Ata; Tzovara, Athina; Viceic, Dragana; Rusca, Marco; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O; De Lucia, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    Trace conditioning refers to a learning process occurring after repeated presentation of a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS+) and a salient unconditioned stimulus (UCS) separated by a temporal gap. Recent studies have reported that trace conditioning can occur in humans in reduced levels of consciousness by showing a transfer of the unconditioned autonomic response to the CS+ in healthy sleeping individuals and in vegetative state patients. However, no previous studies have investigated the neural underpinning of trace conditioning in the absence of consciousness in humans. In the present study, we recorded the EEG activity of 29 post-anoxic comatose patients while presenting a trace conditioning paradigm using neutral tones as CS+ and alerting sounds as UCS. Most patients received therapeutic hypothermia and all were deeply unconscious according to standardized clinical scales. After repeated presentation of the CS+ and UCS couple, learning was assessed by measuring the EEG activity during the period where the UCS is omitted after CS+ presentation. Specifically we assessed the 'reactivation' of the neural response to UCS omission by applying a decoding algorithm derived from the statistical model of the EEG activity in response to the UCS presentation. The same procedure was used in a group of 12 awake healthy controls. We found a reactivation of the UCS response in absence of stimulation in eight patients (five under therapeutic hypothermia) and four healthy controls. Additionally, the reactivation effect was temporally specific within trials since it manifested primarily at the specific latency of UCS presentation and significantly less before or after this period. Our results show for the first time that trace conditioning may manifest as a reactivation of the EEG activity related to the UCS and even in the absence of consciousness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Responses of NBT-II bladder carcinoma cells to conditioned medium from normal fetal urogenital sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, D R; Tindall, D J

    1987-06-01

    In vitro studies were conducted to determine whether conditioned medium from rat fetal urogenital sinus explants would affect phenotypic characteristics of NBT-II urinary bladder carcinoma cells in culture. NBT-II cells were exposed to medium (30%, v/v) conditioned for 48 h by intact urogenital sinus explants derived from 18-day fetal rats. Upon exposure for 23 h the [3H]thymidine incorporation by NBT-II cells was decreased by 40.3% relative to control cultures. This effect was paralleled by a similar decrease in proliferation. NBT-II cultures decreased in cell number by 32.1 and 45.8% on days 2 and 4, respectively, after exposure to conditioned medium. Although cell proliferation was inhibited, conditioned medium acted to induce an increase in protein secretion. An increase of 18.6% was observed in the incorporation of [35S]methionine into newly synthesized, secreted proteins by NBT-II cells exposed to conditioned medium for 23 h. Morphologically the NBT-II cells exposed to conditioned medium were larger, more spread out, and exhibited a greater array of lamellipodia and filopodia, although [35S]methionine incorporation into cellular proteins was decreased by 11.1%. These results suggest that diffusable factors produced by fetal urogenital sinus explants can induce changes in proliferation, protein synthesis, protein secretion, and phenotypic morphology of NBT-II carcinoma cells in culture.

  14. Unusual Volumetric Response of Human Red Blood Cells under Low Ionic Strength Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Rudenko, PhD¹

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human red blood cells (RBCs when suspended in a Low Ionic Strength medium (LIS demonstrate characteristic triphasic shape changes (morphological response, MR and become reduced in volume. Tahitian Tabari Noni juice (Tb, after being given during the terminal phase of MR, was shown to initiate an unusual cell response. This response can be described as a volumetric four-phasic response including first a shrinking phase, attributed to the initial sucrose-induced shrinkage during typical MR, a rapid first swelling phase, induced by application of the juice, followed spontaneously by the occurrence of a more prolonged second shrinking phase, which culminated in the swelling and hemolysis of the cells. All the phases of volumetric response can be independently regulated by chloride, DIDS, cations Ca2+, Ag+, Hg2+ or plasma. The second shrinking phase is not inhibited by clotrimazole, a known inhibitor of Gardos channels, and can be replicated by a mixture of two ionophores (valinomycin and CCCP, suggesting the involvement of the putative K+/H+ exchanger as a mechanism of this phase. We suggest that the erythrocyte membrane is equipped with additional molecular systems, poorly characterized at present, that regulate the cell shape and volume. The cell should, therefore, be considered as an “active” responsive system instead of a “passive” osmometer-like structure.

  15. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels during manual restraint in chicks from a high and low feather pecking line of laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, M.; Beuving, G.; Ruesink, W.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Neurosympathetic and adrenal responsivity to manual restraint was studied in two White Leghorn chicken lines which differ in their tendency to feather peek. Blood samples were taken from freely moving cannulated birds during resting conditions and during manual restraint (placing the bird on its

  16. Abnormal topography and altered acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in a rodent model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Amy C; Green, John T

    2008-02-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has been suggested as a possible animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Reductions in the volume of the cerebellum and impairments in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning have been observed in ADHD, prompting investigation into whether SHRs also exhibit eyeblink conditioning impairments. In Experiment 1, SHRs and a control strain, Wistar, were trained on a long-delay eyeblink conditioning task in which a tone conditioned stimulus was paired with a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (750-ms delay paradigm). SHRs exhibited faster acquisition of eyeblink conditioned responses (CRs) and displayed mistimed (early onset and peak latency) and larger CRs in comparison with Wistar rats. In subsequent extinction training, SHRs were slower to extinguish CRs. The authors conducted Experiment 2 using separate rats to rule out the possibility that the results of Experiment 1 were due to nonassociative responding. SHRs and Wistar rats were presented with explicitly unpaired tone and periorbital stimulation stimuli. There was no evidence of conditioning in either group, nor were there differences between the groups in terms of the number of eyeblink responses elicited by the tone. The current results support the hypothesis of cerebellar abnormalities in this rodent model of ADHD. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. The GroupHouseNet COST Action: exploiting European synergy to reduce feather pecking in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Berk, J; Dimitrov, I.

    2017-01-01

    by the three working groups: 1) Genetics and damaging behaviour, 2) Effects of development on damaging behaviour, and 3) Relationships between health and damaging behaviour. For the work on genetics, we focus on developing new techniques to measure relevant phenotypes (e.g. sensor technology) and investigate...... methods to link these sensor data to genomic data. Regarding development, the network will review the effects of parental conditions on offspring behaviour. Further, the role of incubation conditions (light, noise, temperature) and early-life environment in the development of damaging behaviour...... and brain. Taken together, the network aims to provide new knowledge that can be applied to further develop production systems where laying hens with intact beaks can be optimally managed and damaging behaviour can be controlled....

  18. Re?establishing the pecking order: Niche models reliably predict suitable habitats for the reintroduction of red?billed oxpeckers

    OpenAIRE

    Kalle, Riddhika; Combrink, Leigh; Ramesh, Tharmalingam; Downs, Colleen T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Distributions of avian mutualists are affected by changes in biotic interactions and environmental conditions driven directly/indirectly by human actions. The range contraction of red?billed oxpeckers (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) in South Africa is partly a result of the widespread use of acaracides (i.e., mainly cattle dips), toxic to both ticks and oxpeckers. We predicted the habitat suitability of red?billed oxpeckers in South Africa using ensemble models to assist the ongoing reint...

  19. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  20. Southern California coastal response to CMIP5 projected 21st century wave conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegermiller, C.; Erikson, L. H.; Barnard, P.; Adams, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    Recent projections of 21st century Eastern North Pacific deep-water wave conditions under climate change scenarios predict slightly decreased significant wave heights, increased peak wave periods, and more southerly wave directions offshore of Southern California relative to historical conditions. Combined dynamical and statistical efforts were employed to project wave climate-driven changes in local erosion and accretion patterns along the Southern California coast based on these deep-water wave projections. The numerical wave model SWAN was forced with USACE WIS hindcast bulk wave parameters and reanalysis near-surface winds to generate nearshore wave conditions at the 5 m contour from 1980-2010. A nontraditional lookup table was created to establish the functional relationship between deep-water wave conditions defined by the ERA-Interim wave reanalysis and nearshore wave conditions simulated with SWAN. Historical and future deep-water wave time series were translated to the nearshore via the lookup table. Refraction across the continental shelf reduces the difference between projected and historical nearshore wave angles. Never the less, changes in gradients in longshore transport, resulting from long-term changes in wave angle, create new hot spots for erosion and accretion. This work identifies potentially vulnerable areas on which to focus protection and mitigation efforts and provides an approach for assessing how the future evolution of the wave climate due to climate change may affect coastal processes and hazards.

  1. Behavioral and life history responses to extreme climatic conditions: Studies on a migratory songbird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Møller

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral responses to environmental change are the mechanisms that allow for rapid phenotypic change preventing temporary or permanent damage and hence preventing reductions in fitness. Extreme climatic events are by definition rare, although they are predicted to increase in amplitude and frequency in the coming years. However, our current knowledge about behavioral responses to such extreme events is scarce. Here I analyze two examples of the effects of extreme weather events on behavior and life history: (1 A comparison of behavior and life history during extremely warm and extremely cold years relative to normal years; and (2 a comparison of behavior before and after the extremely early snowfall in fall 1974 when numerous birds died in the Alps during September-October. Behavioral and life history responses of barn swallows Hirundo rustica to extremely cold and extremely warm years were positively correlated, with particularly large effect sizes in cold years. Extreme mortality in barn swallows during fall migration 1974 in the Alps eliminated more than 40% of the breeding population across large areas in Central and Northern Europe, and this affected first arrival date, changes in timing and extent of reproduction and changes in degree of breeding sociality supposedly as a consequence of correlated responses to selection. Finally, I provide directions for research that will allow us to better understand behavior and life history changes in response to extreme climate change [Current Zoology 57 (3: 351–362, 2011].

  2. A threshold theory account of psychometric functions with response confidence under the balance condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Fong; Doble, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    The study of thresholds for discriminability has been of long-standing interest in psychophysics. While threshold theories embrace the concept of discrete-state thresholds, signal detection theory discounts such a concept. In this paper we concern ourselves with the concept of thresholds from the discrete-state modelling viewpoint. In doing so, we find it necessary to clarify some fundamental issues germane to the psychometric function (PF), which is customarily constructed using psychophysical methods with a binary-response format. We challenge this response format and argue that response confidence also plays an important role in the construction of PFs, and thus should have some impact on threshold estimation. We motivate the discussion by adopting a three-state threshold theory for response confidence proposed by Krantz (1969, Psychol. Rev., 76, 308-324), which is a modification of Luce's (1963, Psychol. Rev., 70, 61-79) low-threshold theory. In particular, we discuss the case in which the practice of averaging over order (or position) is enforced in data collection. Finally, we illustrate the fit of the Luce-Krantz model to data from a line-discrimination task with response confidence. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Optimisation of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Conditions for Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity from Euphorbia tirucalli Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan V. Vuong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Euphorbia tirucalli (E. tirucalli is now widely distributed around the world and is well known as a source of traditional medicine in many countries. This study aimed to utilise response surface methodology (RSM to optimise ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE conditions for total phenolic compounds (TPC and antioxidant capacity from E. tirucalli leaf. The results showed that ultrasonic temperature, time and power effected TPC and antioxidant capacity; however, the effects varied. Ultrasonic power had the strongest influence on TPC; whereas ultrasonic temperature had the greatest impact on antioxidant capacity. Ultrasonic time had the least impact on both TPC and antioxidant capacity. The optimum UAE conditions were determined to be 50 °C, 90 min. and 200 W. Under these conditions, the E. tirucalli leaf extract yielded 2.93 mg GAE/g FW of TPC and exhibited potent antioxidant capacity. These conditions can be utilised for further isolation and purification of phenolic compounds from E. tirucalli leaf.

  4. Contingency awareness shapes acquisition and extinction of emotional responses in a conditioning model of pain-related fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eLabrenz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As a fundamental learning process, fear conditioning promotes the formation of associations between predictive cues and biologically-significant signals. In its application to pain, conditioning may provide important insight into mechanisms underlying pain-related fear, although knowledge especially in interoceptive pain paradigms remains scarce. Furthermore, while the influence of contingency awareness on excitatory learning is subject of ongoing debate, its role in pain-related acquisition is poorly understood and essentially unknown regarding extinction as inhibitory learning. Therefore, we addressed the impact of contingency awareness on learned emotional responses to pain- and safety-predictive cues in a combined dataset of two pain-related conditioning studies.In total, 75 healthy participants underwent differential fear acquisition, during which rectal distensions as interoceptive unconditioned stimuli (US were repeatedly paired with a predictive visual cue (conditioned stimulus; CS+ while another cue (CS- was presented unpaired. During extinction, both CS were presented without US. CS valence, indicating learned emotional responses, and CS-US contingencies were assessed on visual analogue scales. Based on an integrative measure of contingency accuracy, a median-split was performed to compare groups with low versus high contingency accuracy regarding learned emotional responses. To investigate predictive value of contingency accuracy, regression analyses were conducted. Highly accurate individuals revealed more pronounced negative emotional responses to CS+ and increased positive responses to CS- when compared to participants with low contingency accuracy. Following extinction, highly accurate individuals had fully extinguished pain-predictive cue properties, while exhibiting persistent positive emotional responses to safety signals. In contrast, individuals with low accuracy revealed equally positive emotional responses to both, CS+ and

  5. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds -pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity......, the compounds -pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response....... Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds -pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all...

  6. Multi-scale modeling of Arabidopsis thaliana response to different CO2 conditions: From gene expression to metabolic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Shen, Fangzhou; Xin, Changpeng; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale investigation from gene transcript level to metabolic activity is important to uncover plant response to environment perturbation. Here we integrated a genome-scale constraint-based metabolic model with transcriptome data to explore Arabidopsis thaliana response to both elevated and low CO2 conditions. The four condition-specific models from low to high CO2 concentrations show differences in active reaction sets, enriched pathways for increased/decreased fluxes, and putative post-transcriptional regulation, which indicates that condition-specific models are necessary to reflect physiological metabolic states. The simulated CO2 fixation flux at different CO2 concentrations is consistent with the measured Assimilation-CO2intercellular curve. Interestingly, we found that reactions in primary metabolism are affected most significantly by CO2 perturbation, whereas secondary metabolic reactions are not influenced a lot. The changes predicted in key pathways are consistent with existing knowledge. Another interesting point is that Arabidopsis is required to make stronger adjustment on metabolism to adapt to the more severe low CO2 stress than elevated CO2 . The challenges of identifying post-transcriptional regulation could also be addressed by the integrative model. In conclusion, this innovative application of multi-scale modeling in plants demonstrates potential to uncover the mechanisms of metabolic response to different conditions. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Phenotypic Plasticity Conditions the Response of Soybean Seed Yield to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Etsushi; Aoki, Naohiro; Masuya, Yusuke; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Selection for cultivars with superior responsiveness to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is a powerful option for boosting crop productivity under future eCO2. However, neither criteria for eCO2 responsiveness nor prescreening methods have been established. The purpose of this study was to identify traits responsible for eCO2 responsiveness of soybean (Glycine max). We grew 12 Japanese and U.S. soybean cultivars that differed in their maturity group and determinacy under ambient CO2 and eCO2 for 2 years in temperature gradient chambers. CO2 elevation significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude varied widely among the cultivars (from 0% to 62%). The yield increase was best explained by increased aboveground biomass and pod number per plant. These results suggest that the plasticity of pod production under eCO2 results from biomass enhancement, and would therefore be a key factor in the yield response to eCO2, a resource-rich environment. To test this hypothesis, we grew the same cultivars at low planting density, a resource-rich environment that improved the light and nutrient supplies by minimizing competition. Low planting density significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude ranged from 5% to 105% among the cultivars owing to increased biomass and pod number per plant. The yield increase due to low-density planting was significantly positively correlated with the eCO2 response in both years. These results confirm our hypothesis and suggest that high plasticity of biomass and pod production at a low planting density reveals suitable parameters for breeding to maximize soybean yield under eCO2. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Auditory event-related responses to diphthongs in different attention conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson; Steinmetzger, Kurt; Tøndering, John

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of auditory event-related potentials (ERP) by attention generally results in larger amplitudes when stimuli are attended. We measured the P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex elicited with synthetic overt (second formant, F2 = 1000 Hz) and subtle (F2 = 100 Hz) diphthongs, while subjects....... Multivariate analysis of ERP components from the rising F2 changes showed main effects of attention on P2 amplitude and latency, and N1-P2 amplitude. P2 amplitude decreased by 40% between the attend and ignore conditions, and by 60% between the attend and divert conditions. The effect of diphthong magnitude...

  9. Lack of renewal effect in extinction of naturally acquired conditioned eyeblink responses, but possible dependency on physical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, J; Mazilescu, L; Thieme, A; Bracha, V; Timmann, D

    2016-01-01

    Context dependency of extinction is well known and has extensively been studied in fear conditioning, but has rarely been assessed in eyeblink conditioning. One way to demonstrate context dependency of extinction is the renewal effect. ABA paradigms are most commonly used to show the renewal effect of extinguished learned fear: if acquisition takes place in context A, and extinction takes place in context B (extinction phase), learned responses will recover in subsequent extinction trials presented in context A (renewal phase). The renewal effect of the visual threat eyeblink response (VTER), a conditioned eyeblink response, which is naturally acquired in early infancy, was examined in a total of 48 young and healthy participants with two experiments using an ABA paradigm. Twenty paired trials were performed in context A (baseline trials), followed by 50 extinction trials in context B (extinction phase) and 50 extinction trials in context A (renewal phase). In 24 participants, contexts A and B were two different rooms, and in the other 24 participants, two different background colors (orange and blue) and noises were used. To rule out spontaneous recovery, an AAA design was used for comparison. There were significant effects of extinction in both experiments. No significant renewal effects were observed. In experiment 2, however, extinction was significantly less using orange background during extinction compared to the blue background. The present findings suggest that extinction of conditioned eyeblinks depends on the physical context. Findings add to the animal literature that context can play a role in the acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses. Future studies, however, need to be performed to confirm the present findings. Lack of renewal effect may be explained by the highly overlearned character of the VTER.

  10. Use of response surface methodology to optimise environmental stress conditions on Penicillium glabrum, a food spoilage mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Laurent; Vasseur, Valérie; Debaets, Stella; Barbier, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous microorganisms often associated with spoilage and biodeterioration of a large variety of foods and feedstuffs. Their growth may be influenced by temporary changes in intrinsic or environmental factors such as temperature, water activity, pH, preservatives, atmosphere composition, all of which may represent potential sources of stress. Molecular-based analyses of their physiological responses to environmental conditions would help to better manage the risk of alteration and potential toxicity of food products. However, before investigating molecular stress responses, appropriate experimental stress conditions must be precisely defined. Penicillium glabrum is a filamentous fungus widely present in the environment and frequently isolated in the food processing industry as a contaminant of numerous products. Using response surface methodology, the present study evaluated the influence of two environmental factors (temperature and pH) on P. glabrum growth to determine 'optimised' environmental stress conditions. For thermal and pH shocks, a large range of conditions was applied by varying factor intensity and exposure time according to a two-factorial central composite design. Temperature and exposure duration varied from 30 to 50 °C and from 10 min to 230 min, respectively. The effects of interaction between both variables were observed on fungal growth. For pH, the duration of exposure, from 10 to 230 min, had no significant effect on fungal growth. Experiments were thus carried out on a range of pH from 0.15 to 12.50 for a single exposure time of 240 min. Based on fungal growth results, a thermal shock of 120 min at 40 °C or a pH shock of 240 min at 1.50 or 9.00 may therefore be useful to investigate stress responses to non-optimal conditions. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatic scavenging of oxygen dissolved in water: Application of response surface methodology in optimization of conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Afzal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, removal of dissolved oxygen in water through reduction by glucose, which was catalyzed by glucose oxidase – catalase enzyme, was studied. Central composite design (CCD technique was applied to achieve optimum conditions for dissolved oxygen scavenging. Linear, square and interactions between effective parameters were obtained to develop a second order polynomial equation. The adequacy of the obtained model was evaluated by the residual plots, probability-value, coefficient of determination, and Fisher’s variance ratio test. Optimum conditions for activity of two enzymes in water deoxygenation were obtained as follows: pH=5.6, T=40°C, initial substrate concentration [S] = 65.5 mmol/L and glucose oxidase activity [E] = 252 U/Lat excess amount of catalase. The deoxygenation process during 30 seconds, in the optimal conditions, was predicted 98.2%. Practical deoxygenation in the predicted conditions was achieved to be 95.20% which was close to the model prediction.

  12. Response of the photosynthetic system to altered protein composition and changes in environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tóth, T.

    2014-01-01

    The photosynthetic thylakoid membrane has a hierarchically ordered structure containing pigment-protein complexes that capture solar radiation and convert it into chemical energy. Its highly dynamic structure is capable to continuously respond to the altered environmental conditions, e.g., light

  13. The impact of weather conditions on response of sorghum genotypes to anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineola) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainfall is a major climatic factor influencing anthracnose development and in this study, 68 sorghum accessions were evaluated for anthracnose resistance under dry and wet growing conditions at the Texas A&M Agricultural Experiment Station, near College Station, Texas. Accessions, planted in a ran...

  14. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioral responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C.; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task

  15. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioural responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O; de Jong, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task

  16. Growth ring response in shortleaf pine following glaze icing conditions in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas J. Stevenson; Thomas B. Lynch; James M. Guldin

    2013-01-01

    Width reduction in growth rings in shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) following glaze ice conditions produces a characteristic pattern dependent on live-crown ratio and extent of crown loss. Ring widths of 133 trees for 3 years preceding and 7 years following the December 2000 ice storm (Bragg and others 2002) in western Arkansas and eastern...

  17. A method to explore social response for water management strategies under changing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, Astrid; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Valkering, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Society aims at sustainable water management, which means that it is effective (meeting targets for people, planet and profit), robust (able to cope with uncertainties) and flexible (easily adaptable to changing conditions). The past has demonstrated that extreme weather events and their impacts are

  18. Chronic disease in elderly couples - Are women more responsive to their spouses' health condition than men?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagedoorn, M.; Sanderman, R.; Ranchor, A.V; Brilman, E.I; Kempen, G.I J M; Ormel, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to increase knowledge regarding associations between couples' health condition and psychological distress in both spouses considering gender as well as patient/spouse status. Method: We examined a community-based sample of 995 elderly couples in which

  19. Thermal responses and perceptions under distinct ambient temperature and wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Wind conditions are widely recognized to influence the thermal states of humans. In this study, we investigated the relationship between wind conditions and thermal perception and energy balance in humans. The study participants were exposed for 20 min to 3 distinct ambient temperatures, wind speeds, and wind angles. During the exposure, the skin temperatures as a physiological reaction and mental reactions of the human body were measured and the energy balance was calculated based on the human thermal-load method. The results indicate that the human thermal load is an accurate indicator of human thermal states under all wind conditions. Furthermore, wind speed and direction by themselves do not account for the human thermal experience. Because of the thermoregulation that occurs to prevent heat loss and protect the core of the body, a low skin temperature was maintained and regional differences in skin temperature were detected under cool ambient conditions. Thus, the human thermal load, which represents physiological parameters such as skin-temperature change, adequately describes the mixed sensation of the human thermal experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptations of the secretome of Candida albicans in response to host-related environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, F.M.; Brul, S.

    2015-01-01

    The wall proteome and the secretome of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans help it to thrive in multiple niches of the human body. Mass spectrometry has allowed researchers to study the dynamics of both subproteomes. Here we discuss some major responses of the secretome to host-related

  1. Acts of Construction: The Conditions of Collaboration. A Response to Vassiliki Papatsiba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    This response to Vassiliki Papatsiba's article on collaboration draws attention to structural barriers to collaborative research: for example, increased competition for scarce resources, increased steering of research, and the casualisation of research workers. It draws on experience of collaborative work in a large, EU-funded project to…

  2. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  3. Differences in Attitudinal Responses Under Conditions of Implicity Manipulated Group Salience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Robert W.; Centers, Richard

    1970-01-01

    Describes males' responses to questionnaire items on feminist propositions in terms of the sexual composition of the group answering the questionnaire. Since the degree of chauvinism or chivalry is affected by the group's makeup, the implications for research methodology are noted. Tables, graph, and bibliography. (RW)

  4. Sustainable Ergonomic Program - Basic Condition for Implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Petra; Beňo, Rastislav; Hatiar, Karol

    2012-12-01

    Gradually increasing pressure on companies to start to behave socially responsible is a response to social, environmental and economic requirements. The society faces a period of changes that have occurred since the beginning of the crisis and revealing weaknesses in the economy. We become witnesses of rapid changes and challenges posed by globalization, lack of resources, demographic structure and innovation. Objective necessity becomes a corporate social responsibility (CSR) already at the companies’ level, which is supported by the approach of the EU institutions and the Slovak Republic. One of the possible appliance through which we can contribute to the sustainability of CSR are sustainable ergonomic programs. When we want to talk about sustainable ergonomic program is important to focus on three key areas. The first area is the Impact of technic and technology to employees at work, the second area is the Importance and impact of socially responsible HR in ergonomics and last area is the Creation of the work environment in relation to environmental sustainability. Ergonomic programs sustainability requires to apply appropriate methods for evaluation of their cost benefit and health effect.

  5. 40 CFR 300.130 - Determinations to initiate response and special conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... excluded from CERCLA and NCP requirements. (g) Removal actions involving nuclear weapons should be... Response to Nuclear Incidents and Nuclear Weapons Significant Incidents (January 8, 1981). (h) If the... nuclear incidents subject to requirements for financial protection established by the Nuclear Regulatory...

  6. Revisiting olfactory classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response in honey bees: a step toward standardized procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Menzel, Randolf; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The honey bee Apis mellifera has emerged as a robust and influential model for the study of classical conditioning thanks to the existence of a powerful Pavlovian conditioning protocol, the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER). In 2011, the olfactory PER conditioning protocol celebrated its 50 years since it was first introduced by Kimihisa Takeda in 1961. In this protocol, individually harnessed honey bees are trained to associate an odor with sucrose solution. The resulting olfactory learning is fast and induces robust olfactory memories that have been characterized at the behavioral, neuronal and molecular levels. Despite the success of this protocol for studying the bases of learning and memory at these different levels, innumerable procedural variants have arisen throughout the years, which render comparative analyses of behavioral performances difficult. Moreover, because even slight variations in conditioning procedures may introduce significant differences in acquisition and retention performances, we revisit olfactory PER conditioning and define here a standardized framework for experiments using this behavioral protocol. To this end, we present and discuss all the methodological steps and details necessary for successful implementation of olfactory PER conditioning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An evil face? Verbal evaluative multi-CS conditioning enhances face-evoked mid-latency magnetoencephalographic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghöfer, Markus; Rehbein, Maimu Alissa; Maitzen, Julius; Schindler, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Humans have a remarkable capacity for rapid affective learning. For instance, using first-order US such as odors or electric shocks, magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies of multi-CS conditioning demonstrate enhanced early (<150 ms) and mid-latency (150–300 ms) visual evoked responses to affectively conditioned faces, together with changes in stimulus evaluation. However, particularly in social contexts, human affective learning is often mediated by language, a class of complex higher-order US. To elucidate mechanisms of this type of learning, we investigate how face processing changes following verbal evaluative multi-CS conditioning. Sixty neutral expression male faces were paired with phrases about aversive crimes (30) or neutral occupations (30). Post conditioning, aversively associated faces evoked stronger magnetic fields in a mid-latency interval between 220 and 320 ms, localized primarily in left visual cortex. Aversively paired faces were also rated as more arousing and more unpleasant, evaluative changes occurring both with and without contingency awareness. However, no early MEG effects were found, implying that verbal evaluative conditioning may require conceptual processing and does not engage rapid, possibly sub-cortical, pathways. Results demonstrate the efficacy of verbal evaluative multi-CS conditioning and indicate both common and distinct neural mechanisms of first- and higher-order multi-CS conditioning, thereby informing theories of associative learning. PMID:28008078

  8. Failure responses of a dental porcelain having three surface treatments under three stressing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yang-Jin; Kelly, J Robert

    2011-12-01

    Surface conditions are of interest in all-ceramic restorations since they can control both bonding and strength. Tensile testing methods are commonly used to evaluate surface conditions of ceramics. This work evaluated tensile properties of a feldspathic ceramic as-finished, sandblasted and etched under three stressing conditions: (1) biaxial flexure; (2) monotonic mastication loading, dry; and, (3) cyclic mastication loading, wet. Feldspathic CAD/CAM blocks were sliced into Tabs 1mm thick, n=135 specimens were divided into 3 groups assigned to as-finished (600 grit SiC; control), sandblasted, and etched. Of the 45 specimens per group, 35 specimens were used for bonded tests and 10 specimens for biaxial flexure testing. Pin-on-three ball biaxial testing was performed per ISO 6872. 35 specimens were bonded to dentin-analog bases and loaded to radial crack pop-in beneath a 3mm diameter piston. 20 specimens were tested dry with failure determined by acoustic emission methods. 15 specimens, bonded to bases having micro-channels for water transport, were cyclically loaded beneath the 3mm piston under water at 15Hz for 500,000 cycles. Biaxial flexure distinguished among all three surface conditions (p<0.05, ANOVA). Monotonic testing could not distinguish among groups. Cyclic testing could not distinguish between sandblasted and etched groups but both were weaker than as-finished. Mastication loading of bonded specimens creates a different stress state than simple flexure due to contributions of the cement-ceramic interface. Water adds a damage accumulation effect. Tensile stress conditions need to be chosen with the desired outcomes considered. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Humans, Fish, and Whales: How Right Whales Modify Calling Behavior in Response to Shifting Background Noise Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Groch, Karina; Flores, Paulo; Sousa-Lima, Renata; Urazghildiiev, Ildar R

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of behavioral plasticity in the variation of sound production of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in response to changes in the ambient background noise conditions. Data were collected from southern right whales in Brazilian waters in October and November 2011. The goal of this study was to quantify differences in right whale vocalizations recorded in low background noise as a control, fish chorus noise, and vessel noise. Variation in call parameters were detected among the three background noise conditions and have implications for future studies of noise effects on whale sound production.

  10. Aftereffects of the surprising presentation and omission of appetitive reinforcers on key-pecking performance in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Steven C; Muzio, Rubén N; Boughner, Robert L; Papini, Mauricio R

    2002-07-01

    The reinforcement-omission effect (ROE), also known as frustration effect, refers to greater response strength immediately after nonreinforcement (N) than reinforcement (R). The ROE was traditionally interpreted as transient invigoration after N induced by primary frustration. Pigeons demonstrate similar ROEs whether outcomes are surprising (partial R) or expected (discrimination training) in runway (Experiment 1) and Skinner box situations (Experiments 2-3). Variations in the interval between N and the opportunity to respond indicate that the ROE results from an aftereffect of food consumption (Experiment 4). Increasing reinforcer magnitude increased the after-R effect, without modifying the after-N function (Experiment 5). These results are reviewed in the context of comparative research on spaced-trial successive negative contrast and related phenomena that have failed to appear in experiments involving nonmammalian vertebrates.

  11. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  12. Physiological Responses of Jatropha to Drought Stress in Coastal Sandy Land Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Djadmo Kertonegoro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L., an important tropical biofuel crop, is reputed for its drought resistance, however, its ability to perform in dry conditions has still hardly been investigated. Changes in leaf water status, chlorophyll content, leaf surface temperature, stomatal conductance, proline and abcisic acid (ABA content, transpiration and photosynthetic rate were studied in four Jatropha genotypes (IP-1A, IP-2M, Local superior and Yellow leaf and subjected to drought stress in coastal sandy land conditions in Central Java, Indonesia. Drought stress significantly decreased the leaf water status, leaf chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthetic rate, and increased leaf temperature, proline and ABA content. Resistant genotypes (IP-1A and IP-2M had significantly higher leaf water status, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate than susceptible genotypes (Local superior and Yellow leaf. There were no differences between the Jatropha genotypes on leaf temperature, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate.

  13. Responsiveness of emulsions stabilized by lactoferrin nano-particles to simulated intestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshulam, Dafna; Lesmes, Uri

    2014-01-01

    There is an upsurge of interest in the use of nano-particles to fabricate emulsions and modulate their functionality, with particular emphasis on modulating emulsion digestive fate. Food grade nano-particles formed through controlled processing and electrostatic biopolymer interactions are yet to be systematically studied for their ability to stabilize emulsions and modulate emulsion digestibility. This study focused on the responsiveness of emulsions stabilized by lactoferrin (LF) nano-particles (NPs) and dietary fibers to key digestive parameters. Compared to native LF, LF-NPs comprised emulsion exhibited elevated creaming rates as evident from accelerated stability tests performed by analytical centrifugation. The electrostatic deposition of alginate or carrageenan onto the LF-NPs significantly improved the stability of the corresponding emulsions. Further, the use of various nano-particles showed to have both beneficial and deleterious effects on emulsion responsiveness to pH (2.0 nano-particles to tweak emulsion behavior during digestion.

  14. Utility Theory for Evaluation of Optimal Process Condition of SAW: A Multi-Response Optimization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saurav; Biswas, Ajay; Bhaumik, Swapan; Majumdar, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Multi-objective optimization problem has been solved in order to estimate an optimal process environment consisting of optimal parametric combination to achieve desired quality indicators (related to bead geometry) of submerged arc weld of mild steel. The quality indicators selected in the study were bead height, penetration depth, bead width and percentage dilution. Taguchi method followed by utility concept has been adopted to evaluate the optimal process condition achieving multiple objective requirements of the desired quality weld.

  15. High-latitude ionospheric response to a sudden impulse event during northward IMF conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Ridley, A.J.; Engebretson, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A high-density structure under northward interplanetary magnetic field B-z conditions is identified at the Wind and IMP 8 satellites, both in the solar wind on August 22, 1995. A compression of the magnetosphere is observed by the GOES 7 magnetometer within a few minutes of the pressure increase ...... the interpretation as events of traveling convection vortices, as has been suggested by past studies....

  16. Effects of wearing aircrew protective clothing on physiological and cognitive responses under various ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerevik, Hilde; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo

    2003-06-20

    Heat stress can be a significant problem for pilots wearing protective clothing during flights, because they provide extra insulation which prevents evaporative heat loss. Heat stress can influence human cognitive activity, which might be critical in the flying situation, requiring efficient and error-free performance. This study investigated the effect of wearing protective clothing under various ambient conditions on physiological and cognitive performance. On several occasions, eight subjects were exposed for 3 h to three different environmental conditions; 0 degrees C at 80% RH, 23 degrees C at 63% RH and 40 degrees C at 19% RH. The subjects were equipped with thermistors, dressed as they normally do for flights (including helmet, two layers of underwear and an uninsulated survival suit). During three separate exposures the subjects carried out two cognitive performance tests (Vigilance test and DG test). Performance was scored as correct, incorrect, missed reaction and reaction time. Skin temperature, deep body temperature, heart rate, oxygen consumption, temperature and humidity inside the clothing, sweat loss, subjective sensation of temperature and thermal comfort were measured. Rises in rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate and body water loss indicated a high level of heat stress in the 40 degrees C ambient temperature condition in comparison with 0 degrees C and 23 degrees C. Performance of the DG test was unaffected by ambient temperature. However, the number of incorrect reactions in the Vigilance test was significantly higher at 40 degrees C than at 23 degrees C (p = 0.006) or 0 degrees C (p = 0.03). The effect on Vigilance performance correlated with changes in deep-body temperature, and this is in accordance with earlier studies that have demonstrated that cognitive performance is virtually unaffected unless environmental conditions are sufficient to change deep body temperature.

  17. Response surface modeling of hydrothermal treatment conditions on color changes, strength, and durability properties of rubberwood

    OpenAIRE

    Taweesin Wongprot; Nirundorn Matan; Narumol Matan; Wanchart Preechatiwong; Buhnnum Kyokong

    2013-01-01

    The effect of hydrothermal treatment at various temperatures (100 to 160 °C) and treatment times (30 to 720 minutes) on color changes (ΔE*), equilibrium moisture content (EMC), tensile strength (TS), shear strength (SS), brown-rot fungal decay mass loss (FML), and termite attack score (TAS) of rubberwood was examined. Response surface methodology (RSM) with a two-factor, four level (42) full factorial was employed. The mathematical models describing those properties as functions of treatmen...

  18. Effects of Affective-evaluative Response to CSs on Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    細羽, 竜也; 生和, 秀敏; 岩永, 誠

    1993-01-01

    The preparedness theory of phobia holds that humans are biologically prepared to learn to fear ohjects and situations that threatened the human species throughout its evolutonary history (Seligman, 1971). Biological preparedness is postulated to be responsible for the rapid acquition of fear, a resistance to the influence of cognitive factors, resistance to extinction, and belongingness. Because of some difficulties, many reseachers suggest that preparedness effects may be produced by cogniti...

  19. Demand Response Management For Power Throttling Air Conditioning Loads In Residential Smart Grids

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Yawar Ismail; Hassan, Naveed Ul; Yuen, Chau; Huang, Shisheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we develop an algorithm for peak load reduction to reduce the impact of increased air conditioner usage in a residential smart grid community. We develop Demand Response Management (DRM) plans that clearly spell out the maximum duration as well as maximum severity of inconvenience. We model the air conditioner as a power throttling device and for any given DRM plan we study the impact of increasing the number of power states on the resulting peak load reduction. Through simulati...

  20. The response of substance use disorder treatment providers to changes in macroeconomic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Jonathan; Stoller, Kenneth B; Saloner, Brendan

    2017-10-01

    To study how substance use disorder (SUD) treatment providers respond to changes in economic conditions. 2000-2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) which contains detailed information on specialty SUD facilities in the United States. We use fixed-effects regression to study how changes in economic conditions, proxied by state unemployment rates, impact treatment setting, accepted payment forms, charity care, offered services, special programs, and use of pharmacotherapies by specialty SUD treatment providers. Secondary data analysis in the N-SSATS. Our findings suggest a one percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate is associated with a 2.5% reduction in outpatient clients by non-profit providers and a 1.8% increase in the acceptance of private insurance as a form of payment overall. We find no evidence that inpatient treatment, the provision of charity care, offered services, or special programs are impacted by changes in the state unemployment rate. However, a one percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate leads to a 2.5% increase in the probability that a provider uses pharmacotherapies to treat addiction. Deteriorating economic conditions may increase financial pressures on treatment providers, prompting them to seek new sources of revenue or to change their care delivery models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MECHANICAL STRENGTH RESPONSES OF POLED LEAD ZIRCONATE TITANATE UNDER EXTREME ELECTRIC FIELD AND VARIOUS TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Matsunaga, Tadashi [ORNL; Zhang, Kewei [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    PZT (lead zirconate titanate), particularly PZT-5A, is used in a variety of critical actuation and sensing systems because of its high Curie temperature and large piezoelectric coefficients. However, PZT is susceptible to mechanical failure. The evaluation of the mechanical strength of the material under the target working conditions is very important. This study presents part of the recent experimental developments in mechanical testing and evaluation of PZT materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ball-on-ring and four-point bending testing setups were used, with modifications made to account for testing requirements from high-level electric field and elevated temperature. The poled PZT-5A or equivalent material was tested under various specimen and testing conditions. The parameters of the distribution of strengths (characteristic strength and Weibull modulus) are discussed in relation to the testing conditions. Fractographic results based on scanning electron microscopy are also presented and discussed. The related data can serve as input for the design of piezoceramic devices, not only those used in energy systems like fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines, but also those used in structural health monitoring, energy harvesting, and other critical systems in aerospace and civil engineering.

  2. Lettuce and rhizosphere microbiome responses to growth promoting Pseudomonas species under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Matheus A P; Lupatini, Manoeli; Lopes-Santos, Lucilene; da Silva, Márcio J; Roesch, Luiz F W; Destéfano, Suzete A L; Freitas, Sueli S; Kuramae, Eiko E

    2016-12-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are well described and recommended for several crops worldwide. However, one of the most common problems in research into them is the difficulty in obtaining reproducible results. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated plant growth promotion and soil microbial community composition resulting from bacterial inoculation under field conditions. Here we evaluated the effect of 54 Pseudomonas strains on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth. The 12 most promising strains were phylogenetically and physiologically characterized for plant growth-promoting traits, including phosphate solubilization, hormone production and antagonism to pathogen compounds, and their effect on plant growth under farm field conditions. Additionally, the impact of beneficial strains on the rhizospheric bacterial community was evaluated for inoculated plants. The strains IAC-RBcr4 and IAC-RBru1, with different plant growth promoting traits, improved lettuce plant biomass yields up to 30%. These two strains also impacted rhizosphere bacterial groups including Isosphaera and Pirellula (phylum Planctomycetes) and Acidothermus, Pseudolabrys and Singusphaera (phylum Actinobacteria). This is the first study to demonstrate consistent results for the effects of Pseudomonas strains on lettuce growth promotion for seedlings and plants grown under tropical field conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AS CONDITION OF INCLUDING UKRAINE IN EUROPE AND WORLD ECONOMIC SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lytvynenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The thesis that companies’ activities for introduction of corporate social responsibility stimulates the speed of to the processes of the technical upgrade, modernization of company’s activity and increase of its profitability is proved within the article. Those Ukrainian companies, which have high index of activities transparency, are also the most profitable. However, we can’t observe any significant increment of number of companies joining the Global agreement. One of the explanations we could name is the unproved idea supported by some politicians and economists about a shadow (‘black’ market that allegedly allows creating workplaces and taking off social tension in society on the certain stage. Insignificant values of index of citizens’ trust to activity of industries holds on the development socially of responsible business. Trust considered as a part of the general social capital. The Government of Ukraine must support initiative of companies to introduce social responsibility of business, as many European governments do it. It is also important to inform society of advantages of CSR.

  4. Sweating responses and the muscle metaboreflex under mildly hyperthermic conditions in sprinters and distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Koga, Shunsaku; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kondo, Narihiko

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the effects of different training methods on nonthermal sweating during activation of the muscle metaboreflex, we compared sweating responses during postexercise muscle occlusion in endurance runners, sprinters, and untrained men under mild hyperthermia (ambient temperature, 35°C; relative humidity, 50%). Ten endurance runners, nine sprinters, and ten untrained men (maximal oxygen uptakes: 57.5 ± 1.5, 49.3 ± 1.5, and 36.6 ± 1.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively; P sprinters than in untrained men (32.2 ± 4.4 vs. 17.3 ± 2.6 mmHg, respectively; P sprinters and untrained men (0.38 ± 0.07, 0.19 ± 0.03, and 0.11 ± 0.04 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively; P sprinters and untrained men. Our results suggest that the specificity of training modalities influences the sweating response during activation of the muscle metaboreflex. In addition, these results imply that a greater activation of the muscle metaboreflex does not cause a greater sweating response in sprinters.

  5. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A; Meyer, Andreas J; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  6. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+/2GSH and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  7. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  8. Increased skin conductance responses and neural activity during fear conditioning are associated with a repressive coping style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKlucken

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of individual differences in coping styles in response to fear conditioning is an important issue for a better understanding of the etiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. It has been assumed that an avoidant (repressive coping style is characterized by increased emotion regulation efforts in context of fearful stimuli as compared to a more vigilant coping style. However, no study so far has investigated the neural correlates of fear conditioning of repressors and sensitizers.In the present fMRI study, 76 participants were classified as repressors or as sensitizers and were exposed to a fear conditioning paradigm, in which the CS+ predicted electrical stimulation, while another neutral stimulus (CS- did not. In addition, skin conductance responses (SCRs were measured continuously.As the main findings, we found increased neural activations in repressors as compared to sensitizers in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex during fear conditioning. In addition, elevated activity to the CS+ in amygdala, insula, occipital, and orbitofrontal cortex as well as conditioned SCRs were found in repressors.The present results demonstrate increased neural activations in structures linked to emotion down-regulation mechanisms like the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which may reflect the increased coping effort in repressors. At the same time, repressors showed increased activations in arousal and evaluation-associated structures like the amygdala, the occipital cortex, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which is also mirrored in increased SCRs. The present results support recent assumptions about a two-process model of repression postulating a fast vigilant response to fearful stimuli, but also a second emotion down-regulating process.

  9. The boundary conditions for simulations of a shake-table experiment on the seismic response of 3D slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Cong, Shengyi; Ling, Xianzhang; Ju, Nengpan

    2017-01-01

    Boundary conditions can significantly affect a slope's behavior under strong earthquakes. To evaluate the importance of boundary conditions for finite element (FE) simulations of a shake-table experiment on the slope response, a validated three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear FE model is presented, and the numerical and experimental results are compared. For that purpose, the robust graphical user-interface "SlopeSAR", based on the open-source computational platform OpenSees, is employed, which simplifies the effort-intensive pre- and post-processing phases. The mesh resolution effect is also addressed. A parametric study is performed to evaluate the influence of boundary conditions on the FE model involving the boundary extent and three types of boundary conditions at the end faces. Generally, variations in the boundary extent produce inconsistent slope deformations. For the two end faces, fixing the y-direction displacement is not appropriate to simulate the shake-table experiment, in which the end walls are rigid and rough. In addition, the influence of the length of the 3D slope's top face and the width of the slope play an important role in the difference between two types of boundary conditions at the end faces (fixing the y-direction displacement and fixing the ( y, z) direction displacement). Overall, this study highlights that the assessment of a comparison between a simulation and an experimental result should be performed with due consideration to the effect of the boundary conditions.

  10. Optimization of fermentation conditions for 1,3-propanediol production by marine Klebsiella pneumonia HSL4 using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Zhou, Sheng; Ji, Huasong; Gao, Ren; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-09-01

    The industrially important organic compound 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) is mainly used as a building block for the production of various polymers. In the present study, response surface methodology protocol was followed to determine and optimize fermentation conditions for the maximum production of 1,3-PDO using marine-derived Klebsiella pneumoniae HSL4. Four nutritional supplements together with three independent culture conditions were optimized as follows: 29.3 g/L glycerol, 8.0 g/L K2 HPO4, 7.6 g/L (NH4)2 SO4, 3.0 g/L KH2 PO4, pH 7.1, cultivation at 35°C for 12 h. Under the optimal conditions, a maximum 1,3-PDO concentration of 14.5 g/L, a productivity of 1.21 g/(L·h) and a conversion of glycerol of 0.49 g/g were obtained. In comparison with the control conditions, fermentation under the optimized conditions achieved an increase of 38.8% in 1,3-PDO concentration, 39.0% in productivity and 25.7% in glycerol conversion in flask. This enhancement trend was further confirmed when the fermentation was conducted in a 5-L fermentor. The optimized fermentation conditions could be an important basis for developing lowcost, large-scale methods for industrial production of 1,3-PDO in the future.

  11. An Outbreak of Aspergillus Species in Response to Environmental Conditions in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Lević

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and incidence of A. flavus and A. niger on barley, maize, soybean, sunflowerand wheat grain, the abundance of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis mothsand their interaction depending on weather conditions in the 2008-2012 period were studied.Under the agroecological conditions of Serbia, the species A. niger is more frequentthan A. flavus, and concerning the crop species, its frequency is highest in kernels of sunflower,than soybean, maize, barley and wheat. A. flavus was extremely dominant on allplant species in 2012 regarding its frequency: 100% on soybean, 95.3% on maize, 65.2% onbarley, 57.1% on sunflower and 45.8% on wheat. Furthermore, the incidence of A. flavus washigher in 2012 than in previous years. The uncommonly high frequency and incidence of A.flavus infestation of maize grain in 2012 were caused by extremely stressful agrometeorologicalconditions, high temperatures and drought over the period from flowering to waxymaturity of maize. The precipitation factor (Pf = precipitation sum / average monthly temperatureshowed that 2012 was extremely arid in June (Pf = 0.57, July (Pf = 1.45, August (Pf= 0.15 and September (Pf = 1.42. European corn borer (ECB was a second factor causingintensive occurrence of A. flavus on maize grain in 2012. The maximum flight of ECB mothswas recorded as early as in July (5,149 and, as a result of this, high damage and numerousinjuries were detected at harvest. Those injuries were covered by visible olive-green powderycolonies typical of A. flavus. In the chronology of A. flavus occurrence, these are thefirst data on its very high frequency and incidence under the agroecological conditions ofSerbia. As intensive infections with A. flavus were rare in the past 50 years, the level of aflatoxinsin maize grain was low.

  12. Contrasting responses of male and female foraging effort to year-round wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sue; Phillips, Richard A; Burthe, Sarah J; Wanless, Sarah; Daunt, Francis

    2015-11-01

    There is growing interest in the effects of wind on wild animals, given evidence that wind speeds are increasing and becoming more variable in some regions, particularly at temperate latitudes. Wind may alter movement patterns or foraging ability, with consequences for energy budgets and, ultimately, demographic rates. These effects are expected to vary among individuals due to intrinsic factors such as sex, age or feeding proficiency. Furthermore, this variation is predicted to become more marked as wind conditions deteriorate, which may have profound consequences for population dynamics as the climate changes. However, the interaction between wind and intrinsic effects has not been comprehensively tested. In many species, in particular those showing sexual size dimorphism, males and females vary in foraging performance. Here, we undertook year-round deployments of data loggers to test for interactions between sex and wind speed and direction on foraging effort in adult European shags Phalacrocorax aristotelis, a pursuit-diving seabird in which males are c. 18% heavier. We found that foraging time was lower at high wind speeds but higher during easterly (onshore) winds. Furthermore, there was an interaction between sex and wind conditions on foraging effort, such that females foraged for longer than males when winds were of greater strength (9% difference at high wind speeds vs. 1% at low wind speeds) and when winds were easterly compared with westerly (7% and 4% difference, respectively). The results supported our prediction that sex-specific differences in foraging effort would become more marked as wind conditions worsen. Since foraging time is linked to demographic rates in this species, our findings are likely to have important consequences for population dynamics by amplifying sex-specific differences in survival rates. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the British Ecological Society.

  13. Influence of cabin conditions on placement and response of contaminant detection sensors in a commercial aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sagnik; Chen, Qingyan

    2008-01-01

    Potential causalities due to airborne disease transmission and risk of chem-bio terrorism in commercial airliner cabins can be reduced by fast responses. Fast responses are only possible by using sensors at appropriate locations in the cabins. Cost, size and weight factors restrict the number of sensors that could be installed inside a cabin. Since release locations and seating patterns of passengers can impact airborne contaminant transports, this study first addressed this impact by using a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program in a four-row mockup of twin-aisle airliner cabin. It was observed that occupancy patterns and release locations have little influence on longitudinal contaminant transports though localized variations of contaminant concentrations may exist. The results show that response time of the sensors is considerably reduced with the increase in number of sensors. If only a single sensor is available across a cabin cross-section then it should be placed at the middle of the ceiling. A cabin model of a fully occupied twin-aisle airliner with 210 seats was also build to study the diverse contaminant distribution trends along cabin length. The results reveal that seating arrangements can make cross-sectional airflow pattern considerably asymmetrical. Similar airflow patterns make the longitudinal contaminant transport in the business and economy classes alike. The presence of galleys greatly affected the longitudinal transport of contaminants in a particular cabin section. The effects due to galleys were less significant if a multipoint sampling system was used. The multipoint sampling system can also reduce the number of sensors required in a cabin.

  14. Groundwater decline and tree change in floodplain landscapes: Identifying non-linear threshold responses in canopy condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater decline is widespread, yet its implications for natural systems are poorly understood. Previous research has revealed links between groundwater depth and tree condition; however, critical thresholds which might indicate ecological ‘tipping points’ associated with rapid and potentially irreversible change have been difficult to quantify. This study collated data for two dominant floodplain species, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum and E. populnea (poplar box from 118 sites in eastern Australia where significant groundwater decline has occurred. Boosted regression trees, quantile regression and Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis were used to investigate the relationship between tree condition and groundwater depth. Distinct non-linear responses were found, with groundwater depth thresholds identified in the range from 12.1 m to 22.6 m for E. camaldulensis and 12.6 m to 26.6 m for E. populnea beyond which canopy condition declined abruptly. Non-linear threshold responses in canopy condition in these species may be linked to rooting depth, with chronic groundwater decline decoupling trees from deep soil moisture resources. The quantification of groundwater depth thresholds is likely to be critical for management aimed at conserving groundwater dependent biodiversity. Identifying thresholds will be important in regions where water extraction and drying climates may contribute to further groundwater decline.

  15. Optimizing conditions of polysaccharide extraction from Shiitake mushroom using response surface methodology and its regulating lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Nie, Ping; Liang, Yongkang; Wang, Bing

    2013-06-20

    Process conditions (extraction time, extraction temperature, water/solid ratio and incubation time) of Shiitake mushroom polysaccharides (SMP) were optimized by conducting experiments at three different levels using the response surface method (RSM). A second-order polynomial response surface equation was developed indicating the effect of variables on polysaccharides yield. Contour maps generated using the response surface equation showed that all the experimental variables significantly affected the yield. The effect of SMP on oxidative damage in mice fed by high cholesterol diet (HCD) was done in vivo. Results showed that SMP can decreased serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL-c) levels, and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL-c) levels in HCD mice. Treatment with SMP reduced blood, liver lipid peroxidation level and increased antioxidant enzymes activities. Thus it can be concluded that SMP can improve lipid metabolism and decreased oxidative damage in HCD mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Response Analysis of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Under Atmospheric Icing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, Mahmoud; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, Torgeir

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges for the development of wind energy in offshore cold-climate regions is atmospheric icing. This paper examines the effects of atmospheric icing on power production, overall performance, and extreme loads of a 5-MW spar-type floating offshore wind turbine during power production......, normal and emergency rotor shutdown, extreme gusts, and survival conditions. Atmospheric icing is simulated by using the ice accretion simulation code LEWICE. A CFD method is used to estimate the blade aerodynamic degradation due to icing. The effects of icing on one, two, or three blades are compared......, as are the effects of atmospheric icing on land-based and offshore wind turbines....

  17. Dynamic response sensitivity of an offshore wind turbine for varying subsoil conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    and damping ratios are random with probability distributions and cannot be fixed on deterministic values due to physical and statistical uncertainties related to the soil properties. In this paper, a comprehensive study is performed on the dynamic response of an offshore wind turbine installed on a monopile......-hydro-elastic simulations are conducted in the nonlinear multi-body code HAWC2. Correlation of wind speeds and waves is derived on basis of wind–wave scatter diagrams from the North Sea. Slight changes of the soil stiffness, the soil damping and the presence of sediment transportation at seabed are shown to be critical...

  18. Electrochemical response of flexible disordered host matrices under different insertion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakarin, E.V., E-mail: eduard.vakarin@upmc.f [LECIME (UMR 7575), CNRS-ENSCP, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Cedex 05, Paris (France); Badiali, J.P. [LECIME (UMR 7575), CNRS-ENSCP, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Cedex 05, Paris (France)

    2011-04-01

    Electrochemical response (insertion isotherms or capacitances) of disordered host matrices (porous, amorphous, i.e., conductive polymers) under different kind guest-induced deformation mechanisms is studied. The deformation is translated into a change in the distribution of the host site energies as a function of the applied potential or the concentration of the guest species. It is shown that the insertion-induced transformations of the host matrices are well detectable in the form of characteristic peaks, minima and plateaus appearing in the capacitance curves. The role of these features in the characterization of the matrix statistics and the guest thermodynamics is discussed.

  19. RESPONSES OF EGGPLANT (SOLANUM MELONGENA L. TO DIFFERENT RATES OF NITROGEN UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad HOSSEIN AMINIFARD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on growth and yield of eggplant (Solanum melongena L. under field conditions. Nitrogen was applied in four rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 Kg/ha. Average plant height, lateral stem number, leaf chlorophyll content, flower number, fruit weight and plant yield were determined , Increasing rates of Nitrogen significantly affected plant vegetative growth (plant height, lateral stem number, and leaf chlorophyll content.The highest lateral stem number and leaf chlorophyll content were obtained in plants receiving 150 Kg N ha -1. Nitrogen fertilizer affected flower number and the days to first flowering. Nitrogen application decreased the days to first flowering and treated plants flowered early than control. It was observed that fertilization with 100 Kg N ha-1 resulted in the highest average fruit weight and fruit yield. Our results showed that nitrogen fertilization has strongly influenced vegetative and reproductive growth of eggplant plants grown under field conditions.

  20. Physiological and hematological responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus to different anesthetics during simulated transport conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diana Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimization of stress during the transportation of live fish is essential in maintaining the welfare and performance of the animals. In order to test the hypothesis that stress during transport of fingerlings of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus can be reduced with the aid of the anesthetics menthol, eugenol or benzocaine, we have assessed the effects of these agents at various concentrations on the physiological parameters and survival rates of fish subjected to conditions simulating those normally used in transportation. Fingerlings (N = 1200 were fasted for 24 hours and distributed in 20 L polyethylene bags (N = 50 per bag containing 5 L of water and an anesthetic at the appropriate concentration. Fingerlings treated with menthol at 75 mg L-1, or eugenol or benzocaine at 20 mg L-1, maintained levels of plasma cortisol and glucose that were lower than those of the stressed but untreated controls and within the physiological limits of the baseline values for this species. Under these conditions, the survival rate was 100%, suggesting that stress was substantially reduced despite dense consignment. Treatments involving higher doses of the studied agents induced significant anesthetic toxicity.

  1. Using Magnetically Responsive Tea Waste to Remove Lead in Waters under Environmentally Relevant Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Yeo, Siang Yee

    2013-06-20

    We report the use of a simple yet highly effective magnetite-waste tea composite to remove lead(II) (Pb2+) ions from water. Magnetite-waste tea composites were dispersed in four different types of water–deionized (DI), artificial rainwater, artificial groundwater and artificial freshwater–that mimic actual environmental conditions. The water samples had varying initial concentrations (0.16–5.55 ppm) of Pb2+ ions and were mixed with the magnetite-waste tea composite for at least 24 hours to allow adsorption of the Pb2+ ions to reach equilibrium. The magnetite-waste tea composites were stable in all the water samples for at least 3 months and could be easily removed from the aqueous media via the use of permanent magnets. We detected no significant leaching of iron (Fe) ions into the water from the magnetite-waste tea composites. The percentage of Pb adsorbed onto the magnetite-waste tea composite ranged from ~70% to 100%; the composites were as effective as activated carbon (AC) in removing the Pb2+ ions from water, depending on the initial Pb concentration. Our prepared magnetite-waste tea composites show promise as a green, inexpensive and highly effective sorbent for removal of Pb in water under environmentally realistic conditions.

  2. Native soil organic matter conditions the response of microbial communities to organic inputs with different stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardaǧ, Ibrahim H.; Zornoza, Raúl; Bastida, Felipe; Büyükkiliç-Yanardaǧ, Asuman; Acosta, Jose A.; García, Carlos; Faz, Ángel; Mermut, Ahmet R.

    2017-04-01

    The response of soil microbial communities from soils with different soil organic matter (SOM) content to organic inputs with different stability is still poorly understood. Thus, an incubation experiment was designed to study how the addition of pig slurry (PS), its manure (M) and its biochar (BC) affect soil microbial community and activity in three soils differing in SOM content (Regosol, Luvisol and Kastanozem). The evolution of different C and N fractions, microbial biomass C and N, enzyme activities and microbial community structure by the use of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was assessed for 60 days. Results showed that the different amendments had different effect on microbial properties depending on the soil type. The addition of M caused the highest increase in all microbial properties in the three soils, followed by PS. These changes were more intense in the soil with the lowest SOM (Regosol). The addition of M and PS caused changes in the microbial community structure in all soils, which were more related to the presence of available sources of N than to the labile fractions of C. The addition of BC was followed by increases in the proportions of fungi and Gram positive bacteria in the Regosol, while enhanced the proportion of actinobacteria in all soil types, related to increments in pH and soil C recalcitrance. Thus, native SOM determined the response of microbial communities to external inputs with different stability, soils with low SOM being more prone to increase microbial biomass and activity and change microbial community structure.

  3. Physiological response of invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) submitted to transport and experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, N I S; Andrade, J T M; Montresor, L C; Luz, D M R; Araújo, J M; Martinez, C B; Pinheiro, J; Vidigal, T H D A

    2017-03-01

    Successful animal rearing under laboratory conditions for commercial processes or laboratory experiments is a complex chain that includes several stressors (e.g., sampling and transport) and incurs, as a consequence, the reduction of natural animal conditions, economic losses and inconsistent and unreliable biological results. Since the invasion of the bivalve Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) in South America, several studies have been performed to help control and manage this fouling pest in industrial plants that use raw water. Relatively little attention has been given to the laboratory rearing procedure of L. fortunei, its condition when exposed to a stressor or its acclimation into laboratory conditions. Considering this issue, the aims of this study are to (i) investigate L. fortunei physiological responses when submitted to the depuration process and subsequent air transport (without water/dry condition) at two temperatures, based on glycogen concentrations, and (ii) monitor the glycogen concentrations in different groups when maintained for 28 days under laboratory conditions. Based on the obtained results, depuration did not affect either of the groups when they were submitted to approximately eight hours of transport. The variation in glycogen concentration among the specimens that were obtained from the field under depurated and non-depurated conditions was significant only in the first week of laboratory growth for the non-depurated group and in the second week for the depurated group. In addition, the tested temperature did not affect either of the groups that were submitted to transport. The glycogen concentrations were similar to those of the specimens that were obtained from the field in third week, which suggests that the specimens acclimated to laboratory conditions during this period of time. Thus, the results indicate that the air transport and acclimation time can be successfully incorporated into experimental studies of L. fortunei. Finally

  4. A NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 impairs consolidating extinction of auditory conditioned fear responses in a Pavlovian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In auditory fear conditioning, repeated presentation of the tone in the absence of shock leads to extinction of the acquired fear responses. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR is thought to be involved in the extinction of the conditioned fear responses, but its detailed role in initiating and consolidating or maintaining the fear extinction memory is unclear. Here we investigated this issue by using a NMDAR antagonist, MK-801. METHODS/MAIN FINDINGS: The effects of immediate (beginning at 10 min after the conditioning and delayed (beginning at 24 h after conditioning extinctions were first compared with the finding that delayed extinction caused a better and long-lasting (still significant on the 20(th day after extinction depression on the conditioned fear responses. In a second experiment, MK-801 was intraperitoneally (i.p. injected at 40 min before, 4 h or 12 h after the delayed extinction, corresponding to critical time points for initiating, consolidating or maintaining the fear extinction memory. i.p. injection of MK-801 at either 40 min before or 4 h after delayed extinction resulted in an impairment of initiating and consolidating fear extinction memory, which caused a long lasting increased freezing score that was still significant on the 7th day after extinction, compared with extinction group. However, MK-801 administered at 12 h after the delayed extinction, when robust consolidation has been occurred and stabilized, did not affect the established extinction memory. Furthermore, the changed freezing behaviors was not due to an alteration in general anxiety levels, since MK-801 treatment had no effect on the percentage of open-arm time or open-arm entries in an Elevated Plus Maze (EPM task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggested that the activation of NMDARs plays important role in initiation and consolidation but not maintenance of fear extinction memory. Together with the fact that NMDA receptor is

  5. The Responses of Youth to a Cash Transfer Conditional on Schooling: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the effect of cash transfers given to youth conditional on high school attendance on the labor supply decisions and academic performance of youth. We exploit differences in the size of the total transfer received based on timing of birth to identify the causal effects of interest....... Specifically, individuals born late in a quarter receive a larger total transfer than comparable individuals born early in the following quarter. We find that the transfer increases the labor market participation of youth and the number of months worked. The estimated effect is larger for individuals from low......-income families. The results suggest that some youths are borrowing constrained. Since we find no evidence of corresponding effects on academic performance, alleviating the constraint appears only to affect consumption decisions and not human capital investment....

  6. Acupuncture induces a pro-inflammatory immune response intensified by a conditioning-expectation effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, M.; Schneidewind, D.; Scheinchen, D.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous study it has been shown that acupuncture activates the respiratory burst (RB) of neutrophils as measured by the differences to baseline of the mean channel number of fluorescence intensity (mfi) in volunteers. Since this result could have been affected by a placebo effect......, a study has been designed that controls for the different facets of placebo mechanisms such as expectancy, suggestibility, and conditioning. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 60 healthy volunteers were randomized either to acupuncture of the acupoint Large Intestine 11 (LI 11) (groups 1 and 2) or relaxation...... (group 3) twice a week for 4 weeks. Only acupuncture group 1 and the relaxation group were provided with the additional suggestion that the treatment may strengthen the immune system. RESULTS: The repeated measurement analysis for differences of follow-ups to baseline showed significantly different...

  7. Acupuncture Induces a Pro-Inflammatory Immune Response Intensified by a Conditioning-Expectation Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, M; Schneidewind, D; Schneinichen, D

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous study it has been shown that acupuncture activates the respiratory burst (RB) of neutrophils as measured by the differences to baseline of the mean channel number of fluorescence intensity (mfi) in volunteers. Since this result could have been affected by a placebo effect......, a study has been designed that controls for the different facets of placebo mechanisms such as expectancy, suggestibility, and conditioning. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 60 healthy volunteers were randomized either to acupuncture of the acupoint Large Intestine 11 (LI 11) (groups 1 and 2) or relaxation...... (group 3) twice a week for 4 weeks. Only acupuncture group 1 and the relaxation group were provided with the additional suggestion that the treatment may strengthen the immune system. RESULTS: The repeated measurement analysis for differences of follow-ups to baseline showed significantly different...

  8. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for two weeks to freshwater (1 ‰ salinity), brackish water (11 ‰) or full strength seawater (35 ‰) under normoxic conditions...... (water Po2 = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po2 = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po2. Plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation....... Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25 % decrease in branchial Na+/K+-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant...

  9. Response Analysis of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Under Atmospheric Icing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, Mahmoud; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, Torgeir

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges for the development of wind energy in offshore cold-climate regions is atmospheric icing. This paper examines the effects of atmospheric icing on power production, overall performance, and extreme loads of a 5-MW spar-type floating offshore wind turbine during power producti......, as are the effects of atmospheric icing on land-based and offshore wind turbines.......One of the challenges for the development of wind energy in offshore cold-climate regions is atmospheric icing. This paper examines the effects of atmospheric icing on power production, overall performance, and extreme loads of a 5-MW spar-type floating offshore wind turbine during power production......, normal and emergency rotor shutdown, extreme gusts, and survival conditions. Atmospheric icing is simulated by using the ice accretion simulation code LEWICE. A CFD method is used to estimate the blade aerodynamic degradation due to icing. The effects of icing on one, two, or three blades are compared...

  10. RESPONSE OF SEVERAL APPLE VARIETIES TO POWDERY MILDEW (PODOSPHAERA LEUCOTRICHA ATTACK IN CENTRAL TRANSYLVANIA CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R SESTRAS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of apple cultivars to powdery mildew attack – Podosphaera leucotricha (Ell. et Everh. Salm. – on leaves and shoots, for seven years (1990-1996, emphasised a large variability for this character existing within 75 apple varieties tested in an experimental field at the Fruit Research Station in Cluj-Napoca, Central Transylvania, Romania. The experimental results confirmed that the cultivars of the Jonathan group are highly susceptible to powdery mildew (e.g. Jonathan, Jonne Spur, Jonathan Smith, Black John, Jonathan Watson, Nüred Jonathan, Delia, Aromat de vară, Roşu de Cluj. Cultivars Gloster, Starkrimson and Prima were registered with a low attack degree. None of the tested cultivars were included in the category “No attack”. Out of all varieties, 21 of them representing 28.0% were registered with a very high attack, both on leaves and shoots.

  11. Analysis of molecular responses in plants under the conditions of excess-aluminium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Yoshikuni; Arakawa, Yusuke; Asanuma, Shuichi [Kyushu National Agricultural Experiment Station, Kumamoto (Japan)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    Recent soil environments in Kyushu and Okinawa regions have a possibility to impair agricultural products because elution of aluminum (Al) from the soil has been progressing because of its elution by soil acidification. In this study, {sup 26}Al-tracing method using tandem accelerator mass spectroscopy was applied to investigate the effects of aluminum in the soil on a few plants. The results showed that Al accumulation in mitochondria was several times of higher in Dayton, a Al-resistant strain of barley than kearney, a sensitive one. It was thus suggested that mitochondria, which has been known to participates in respiration and cell death (apoptosis), has also an important role in the physiological functions of Al. The growth of barley on the soil of pH 5.0 was significantly inhibited with Al and such growth inhibition was also observed in barley grown in hydroponics, especially, the growth of kearney was markedly inhibited. When the effects of 1 mM Al were compared between Dayton and kearney strains, there were large differences in the growth of their leaves. Then, the correlative resistance to Al and barley leaf stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) was examined in these two barley strains. The virus concentration in kearney leaves 30 days after an inoculation of BSMV was similar to that in Dayton ones. Under stress conditions with a low level Al, both strains infected with BSMW developed necrotic damages, whereas under the stress condition at a high level Al (100 {mu}M), they developed severe necrosis even without inoculation with BSMW. As an increase of the amount of absorbed Al, the phosphate concentration in the cell was decreased and the decrease was marked in the resistant strain, Dayton. (M.N.)

  12. Biological responses of the marine diatom Chaetoceros socialis to changing environmental conditions: A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefeng; Roevros, Nathalie; Dehairs, Frank; Chou, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major group of phytoplankton, accounting for ~20% of the world's primary production. It has been shown that iron (Fe) can be the limiting factor for phytoplankton growth, in particular, in the HNLC (High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll) regions. Iron plays thus an essential role in governing the marine primary productivity and the efficiency of biological carbon pump. Oceanic systems are undergoing continuous modifications at varying rates and magnitudes as a result of changing climate. The objective of our research is to evaluate how changing environmental conditions (dust deposition, ocean warming and acidification) can affect marine Fe biogeochemistry and diatom growth. Laboratory culture experiments using a marine diatom Chaetoceros socialis were conducted at two temperatures (13°C and 18°C) and under two pCO2 (carbon dioxide partial pressure) (400 μatm and 800 μatm) conditions. The present study clearly highlights the effect of ocean acidification on enhancing the release of Fe upon dust deposition. Our results also confirm that being a potential source of Fe, dust provides in addition a readily utilizable source of macronutrients such as dissolved phosphate (PO4) and silicate (DSi). However, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may also have an adverse impact on diatom growth, causing a decrease in cell size and possible further changes in phytoplankton composition. Meanwhile, ocean warming may lead to the reduction of diatom production and cell size, inducing poleward shifts in the biogeographic distribution of diatoms. The changing climate has thus a significant implication for ocean phytoplankton growth, cell size and primary productivity, phytoplankton distribution and community composition, and carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), silicon (Si) and Fe biogeochemical cycles in various ways.

  13. Biological responses of the marine diatom Chaetoceros socialis to changing environmental conditions: A laboratory experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Li

    Full Text Available Diatoms constitute a major group of phytoplankton, accounting for ~20% of the world's primary production. It has been shown that iron (Fe can be the limiting factor for phytoplankton growth, in particular, in the HNLC (High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll regions. Iron plays thus an essential role in governing the marine primary productivity and the efficiency of biological carbon pump. Oceanic systems are undergoing continuous modifications at varying rates and magnitudes as a result of changing climate. The objective of our research is to evaluate how changing environmental conditions (dust deposition, ocean warming and acidification can affect marine Fe biogeochemistry and diatom growth. Laboratory culture experiments using a marine diatom Chaetoceros socialis were conducted at two temperatures (13°C and 18°C and under two pCO2 (carbon dioxide partial pressure (400 μatm and 800 μatm conditions. The present study clearly highlights the effect of ocean acidification on enhancing the release of Fe upon dust deposition. Our results also confirm that being a potential source of Fe, dust provides in addition a readily utilizable source of macronutrients such as dissolved phosphate (PO4 and silicate (DSi. However, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may also have an adverse impact on diatom growth, causing a decrease in cell size and possible further changes in phytoplankton composition. Meanwhile, ocean warming may lead to the reduction of diatom production and cell size, inducing poleward shifts in the biogeographic distribution of diatoms. The changing climate has thus a significant implication for ocean phytoplankton growth, cell size and primary productivity, phytoplankton distribution and community composition, and carbon (C, nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, silicon (Si and Fe biogeochemical cycles in various ways.

  14. Systemic to Microscale Response of Orbicella faveolata to Future Ocean CO2 Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, A.; Hall, E. R.; Blackwelder, P. L.; Fogarty, N. D.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most economically important ecosystems on the planet, supplying roughly $30 billion USD annually into world economies from the goods and services they provide. Despite their great contributions, anthropogenic influence via carbon dioxide emissions is leading to unprecedented changes in the tropical oceans with concerns about subsequent negative impacts on reefs. Surface ocean pH has dropped 0.1 units in the past century, representing a thirty percent increase in hydrogen ion concentration. In spite of this rapid shift in oceanic chemistry, it is unclear how adult corals and their new recruits will be impacted. In this experiment we examined the relationship between CO2-induced seawater acidification, net calcification, and physiological parameters in Orbicella faveolata adults and new recruits under ambient (465 ± 5.52 ppm), and high (1451 ± 6.51 ppm) CO2 conditions. These treatments represented current and end of the century CO2 values predicted under the RCP8.5 scenario developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Electron microscopy (TEM/SEM) was used to examine coral cellular ultrastructure and newly formed aragonite skeletal crystal structures. Orbicella faveolata exhibited no significant difference in skeletal deposition rates under control and high CO2 conditions; however, crystal formations for both adult and juvenile O. faveolata were statistically longer in the high CO2 treatment. No significant differences were seen in photosynthesis or respiration rates. These results suggest that the addition of CO2 may cause a shift in the overall energy budgets causing a modification of skeletal aragonite crystal structures, rather than inhibiting skeletal crystal formation. Consequential to this energy shift, Orbicella faveolata belongs in the category of Scleractinian corals that exhibit a low sensitivity to ocean acidification and existing colonies may continue to calcify and build reefs in the face of ocean

  15. Analysis of transcriptional responses of normalizing genes on Crassostrea brasiliana under different experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gabrielle do Amaral E Silva; de Lima, Daína; Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Piazza, Rômi Sharon; Lüchmann, Karim Hahn; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Schlenk, Daniel; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2017-08-01

    Bivalves show remarkable plasticity to environmental changes and have been proposed as sentinel organisms in biomonitoring. Studies related to transcriptional analysis using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in these organisms have notably increased, imposing a need to identify and validate adequate reference genes for an accurate and reliable analysis. In the present study, 9 reference genes were selected from transcriptome data of Crassostrea brasiliana to identify their suitability as qRT-PCR normalizer genes. The transcriptional patterns were analyzed in gills of oysters under 3 different conditions: different temperatures (18, 24, or 32 °C) and phenanthrene (100 µg L(-1) ) combined exposure; different salinities (10, 25, or 35‰) and phenanthrene combined exposure; and 10% of diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction (diesel-WAF) exposure. Reference gene stability was calculated using 5 algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, ΔCt, RefFinder). Transcripts of ankyrin-like (ANK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-like (GAPDH), and α-tubulin-like (TUBA) genes showed minor changes in different temperature/phenanthrene treatment. Transcripts of ANK, β-actin-like, and β-tubulin-like genes showed better stability at salinity/phenanthrene treatment, and ANK, TUBA, and 28S ribosomal protein-like genes showed the most stable transcription pattern in oysters exposed to diesel-WAF exposure. The present study constitutes the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in C. brasiliana. These genes could be employed in studies using qRT-PCR analysis under similar experimental conditions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2190-2198. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  16. Seasonally asymmetric transition of the Asian monsoon in response to ice age boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Hiroaki; Kuroki, Harumitsu; Kamae, Youichi [University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohba, Masamichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Abiko (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Modulation of a monsoon under glacial forcing is examined using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM) following the specifications established by Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 2 (PMIP2) to understand the air-sea-land interaction under different climate forcing. Several sensitivity experiments are performed in response to individual changes in the continental ice sheet, orbital parameters, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: 21 ka) to evaluate the driving mechanisms for the anomalous seasonal evolution of the monsoon. Comparison of the model results in the LGM with the pre-industrial (PI) simulation shows that the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal are characterized by enhancement of pre-monsoon convection despite a drop in the SST encompassing the globe, while the rainfall is considerably suppressed in the subsequent monsoon period. In the LGM winter relative to the PI, anomalies in the meridional temperature gradient (MTG) between the Asian continents minus the tropical oceans become positive and are consistent with the intensified pre-monsoon circulation. The enhanced MTG anomalies can be explained by a decrease in the condensation heating relevant to the suppressed tropical convection as well as positive insolation anomalies in the higher latitude, showing an opposing view to a warmer future climate. It is also evident that a latitudinal gradient in the SST across the equator plays an important role in the enhancement of pre-monsoon rainfall. As for the summer, the sensitivity experiments imply that two ice sheets over the northern hemisphere cools the air temperature over the Asian continent, which is consistent with the reduction of MTG involved in the attenuated monsoon. The surplus pre-monsoon convection causes a decrease in the SST through increased heat loss from the ocean surface; in other words, negative ocean feedback is also responsible for the subsequent weakening of summer

  17. Transcriptional Responses of Chilean Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) Under Water Deficit Conditions Uncovers ABA-Independent Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Andrea; Zurita-Silva, Andres; Maldonado, Jonathan; Silva, Herman

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS R49 genotype displayed best performance on selected physiological parameters and highest tolerance to drought.R49 drought over-represented transcripts has exhibited 19% of genes (306 contigs) that presented no homology to published databases.Expression pattern for canonical responses to drought such as ABA biosynthesis and other genes induced in response to drought were assessed by qPCR. Global freshwater shortage is one of the biggest challenges of our time, often associated to misuse, increased consumption demands and the effects of climate change, paralleled with the desertification of vast areas. Chenopodium quinoa (Willd.) represents a very promising species, due to both nutritional content and cultivation under water constraint. We characterized drought tolerance of three Chilean genotypes and selected Genotype R49 (Salares ecotype) based upon Relative Water Content (RWC), Electrolyte Leakage (EL) and maximum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) after drought treatment, when compared to another two genotypes. Exploratory RNA-Seq of R49 was generated by Illumina paired-ends method comparing drought and control irrigation conditions. We obtained 104.8 million reads, with 54 million reads for control condition and 51 million reads for drought condition. Reads were assembled in 150,952 contigs, were 31,523 contigs have a reading frame of at least 300 nucleotides (100 aminoacids). BLAST2GO annotation showed a 15% of genes without homology to NCBI proteins, but increased to 19% (306 contigs) when focused into drought-induced genes. Expression pattern for canonical drought responses such as ABA biosynthesis and other genes induced were assessed by qPCR, suggesting novelty of R49 drought responses.

  18. Does prolactin mediate parental and life-history decisions in response to environmental conditions in birds? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Tartu, Sabrina; Chastel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". In vertebrates, adjustments of physiology and behavior to environmental changes are often mediated by central physiological mechanisms, and more specifically by hormonal mechanisms. As a consequence, these mechanisms are thought to orchestrate life-history decisions in wild vertebrates. For instance, investigating the hormonal regulation of parental behavior is relevant to evaluate how parents modulate their effort according to specific environmental conditions. Surprisingly and despite being classically known as the 'parental hormone', prolactin has been overlooked in birds relative to this context. Our aim is to review evidence that changes in prolactin levels can mediate, at least to some extent, the response of breeding birds to environmental conditions. To do so, we first examine current evidence and limits for the role of prolactin in mediating parental behavior in birds. Second, we emphasize the influence of environmental conditions and stressors on circulating prolactin levels. In addition, we review to what extent prolactin levels are a reliable predictor of breeding success in wild birds. By linking environmental conditions, prolactin regulation, parental behavior, and breeding success, we highlight the potential role of this hormone in mediating parental decisions in birds. Finally, we also review the potential role of prolactin in mediating other life history decisions such as clutch size, re-nesting, and the timing of molt. By evaluating the influence of stressors on circulating prolactin levels during these other life-history decisions, we also raise new hypotheses regarding the potential of the prolactin stress response to regulate the orchestration of the annual cycle when environmental changes occur. To sum up, we show in this review that prolactin regulation has a strong potential to allow ecological physiologists to better understand how individuals adjust their life-history decisions

  19. Growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinity: development and function of shoot hydraulic systems require saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa T; Stanton, Daniel E; Schmitz, Nele; Farquhar, Graham D; Ball, Marilyn C

    2015-02-01

    Halophytic eudicots are characterized by enhanced growth under saline conditions. This study combines physiological and anatomical analyses to identify processes underlying growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinities ranging from fresh- to seawater conditions. Following pre-exhaustion of cotyledonary reserves under optimal conditions (i.e. 50% seawater), seedlings of A. marina were grown hydroponically in dilutions of seawater amended with nutrients. Whole-plant growth characteristics were analysed in relation to dry mass accumulation and its allocation to different plant parts. Gas exchange characteristics and stable carbon isotopic composition of leaves were measured to evaluate water use in relation to carbon gain. Stem and leaf hydraulic anatomy were measured in relation to plant water use and growth. Avicennia marina seedlings failed to grow in 0-5% seawater, whereas maximal growth occurred in 50-75% seawater. Relative growth rates were affected by changes in leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) along the salinity gradient, with NAR generally being more important. Gas exchange characteristics followed the same trends as plant growth, with assimilation rates and stomatal conductance being greatest in leaves grown in 50-75% seawater. However, water use efficiency was maintained nearly constant across all salinities, consistent with carbon isotopic signatures. Anatomical studies revealed variation in rates of development and composition of hydraulic tissues that were consistent with salinity-dependent patterns in water use and growth, including a structural explanation for low stomatal conductance and growth under low salinity. The results identified stem and leaf transport systems as central to understanding the integrated growth responses to variation in salinity from fresh- to seawater conditions. Avicennia marina was revealed as an obligate halophyte, requiring saline conditions for development of the transport systems

  20. Response of Microbial Community Function to Fluctuating Geochemical Conditions within a Legacy Radioactive Waste Trench Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsela, Andrew S.; Bligh, Mark W.; Harrison, Jennifer J.; Payne, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the 1960s, small quantities of radioactive materials were codisposed with chemical waste at the Little Forest Legacy Site (Sydney, Australia) in 3-meter-deep, unlined trenches. Chemical and microbial analyses, including functional and taxonomic information derived from shotgun metagenomics, were collected across a 6-week period immediately after a prolonged rainfall event to assess the impact of changing water levels upon the microbial ecology and contaminant mobility. Collectively, results demonstrated that oxygen-laden rainwater rapidly altered the redox balance in the trench water, strongly impacting microbial functioning as well as the radiochemistry. Two contaminants of concern, plutonium and americium, were shown to transition from solid-iron-associated species immediately after the initial rainwater pulse to progressively more soluble moieties as reducing conditions were enhanced. Functional metagenomics revealed the potentially important role that the taxonomically diverse microbial community played in this transition. In particular, aerobes dominated in the first day, followed by an increase of facultative anaerobes/denitrifiers at day 4. Toward the mid-end of the sampling period, the functional and taxonomic profiles depicted an anaerobic community distinguished by a higher representation of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and methanogenesis pathways. Our results have important implications to similar near-surface environmental systems in which redox cycling occurs. IMPORTANCE The role of chemical and microbiological factors in mediating the biogeochemistry of groundwaters from trenches used to dispose of radioactive materials during the 1960s is examined in this study. Specifically, chemical and microbial analyses, including functional and taxonomic information derived from shotgun metagenomics, were collected across a 6-week period immediately after a prolonged rainfall event to assess how changing water levels influence microbial

  1. Physiological response of Pinus halepensis needles under ozone and water stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, Fausto; Donato, Eugenio; Vitale, Marcello

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how physiological processes of potted Pinus halepensis plants, grown under controlled conditions, were affected by ozone (O3) and/or water stress, integrating the gas exchange and biochemical data with fluorescence OJIP polyphasic transient data. Plants submitted to only water stress (T1) and with ozone (T3) showed a strong decrease in stomatal conductance and gas exchange, coinciding with a reduction of maximum yield of photochemistry (varphipo) and very negative values of leaf water potential. Simultaneously, a great increase of both PSII antenna size, indicated by absorption per reaction centre, and electron transport per reaction centre were found. The reduction of photosynthesis in the O3-treated plants (T2) by a slowing down of the Calvin cycle was supported by the increase of related fluorescence parameters such as relative variable fluorescence, heat de-excitation constant, energy de-excitation by spillover, and the decrease of varphipo. We suggest an antagonistic effect between the two stresses to explain the delayed ozone-induced decrease of stomatal conductance values for T3 with respect to T1 plants, by an alteration of the physiological mechanisms of stomatal opening, which involve the increase of intra-cellular free-calcium induced by ABA under co-occurring water shortage. We emphasise the importance of considering the intensity of the individual stress factor in studies concerning the interaction of stresses.

  2. Plant response to environmental conditions: assessing potential production, water demand and negative effects of water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eTardieu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews methods for analyzing plant performance and its genetic variability under a range of environmental conditions. Biomass accumulation is linked every day to available light in the PAR domain, multiplied by the proportion of light intercepted by plants and by the radiation use efficiency. Total biomass is cumulated over the duration of the considered phase (e.g. plant cycle or vegetative phase. These durations are essentially constant for a given genotype provided that time is corrected for temperature (thermal time. Several ways of expressing thermal time are reviewed. Two alternative equations are presented, based either on the effect of transpiration, or on yield components. Their comparative interests and drawbacks are discussed. The genetic variability of each term of considered equations affects yield under water deficit, via mechanisms at different scales of plant organisation and time. The effect of any physiological mechanism on yield of stressed plants acts via one of these terms, although the link is not always straightforward. Finally, I propose practical ways to compare of the productivity of genotypes in field environments, and a ‘minimum dataset’ of environmental data and traits that should be recorded for that.

  3. Response of Soybean Genotypes to Alecta vogelii Infestation under Natural Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamara, AY.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted in 1995 and 1996 in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria to determine the response of 22 soybean genotypes to Alectra infestation. Significant differences were observed amongst soybean genotypes in number of Alectra shoots that emerged at 9 and 10 weeks after sowing and days to first Alectra emergence. Alectra emergence occurred later in early maturing soybean genotypes [54 days after sowing (DAS] while with most late maturing genotypes, Alectra emergence started at 50 DAS. Result revealed that sixteen genotypes supported few or no Alectra shoots while six were susceptible. Soybean genotypes that supported high numbers of Alectra shoots recorded lower grain yields than those with fewer Alectra shoots. However, soybean genotypes, SAMSOY2 and TGX1485-1D that significantly supported high numbers of Alectra recorded grain yields similar to those of genotypes that supported few or no Alectra. These findings may be due to three possible mechanisms of resistance of soybean genotypes to Alectra parasitism. The sixteen genotypes, which supported few or no Alectra shoots, may have produced lower amounts of root exudates required for stimulation of germination of Alectra. They may also have prevented the initiation, attachment, and penetration of haustorium from Alectra plants to the roots of the hosts. These mechanism were however, not investigated in this study. Further studies may therefore be necessary to confirm our speculations. Soybean genotypes, SAMSOY2 and TGX1485-1D, which recorded high yield irrespective of high infestation with Alectra may exhibit tolerance to the parasite.

  4. Walrus distributional and foraging response to changing ice and benthic conditions in the Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Chadwick V.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Fischbach, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Arctic species such as the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are facing a rapidly changing environment. Walruses are benthic foragers and may shift their spatial patterns of foraging in response to changes in prey distribution. We used data from satellite radio-tags attached to walruses in 2009-2010 to map walrus foraging locations with concurrent sampling of benthic infauna to examine relationships between distributions of dominant walrus prey and spatial patterns of walrus foraging. Walrus foraging was concentrated offshore in the NE Chukchi Sea, and coastal areas of northwestern Alaska when sea ice was sparse. Walrus foraging areas in August-September were coincident with the biomass of two dominant bivalve taxa (Tellinidae and Nuculidae) and sipunculid worms. Walrusforaging costs associated with increased travel time to higher biomass food patches from land may be significantly higher than the costs from sea ice haul-outs and result in reduced energy storesin walruses. Identifying what resources are selected by walruses and how those resources are distributed in space and time will improve our ability to forecast how walruses might respond to a changing climate.

  5. Speed response of brushless DC motor using fuzzy PID controller under varying load condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Varshney

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing trend towards usage of precisely controlled, high torque, efficient and low noise motors for dedicated applications has attracted the attention of researcher in Brushless DC (BLDC motors. BLDC motors can act as an acceptable alternative to the conventional motors like Induction Motors, Switched Reluctance Motors etc. This paper presents a detailed study on the performance of a BLDC motor supplying different types of loads, and at the same time, deploying different control techniques. An advance Fuzzy PID controller is compared with the commonly used PID controller. The load variations considered are of the most common types, generally encountered in practice. A comparison has been carried out in this paper by observing the dynamic speed response of motor at the time of application as well as at the time of removal of the load. The BLDC motors suffer from a major drawback of having jerky behaviour at the time of load removal. The study reveals that irrespective of the type of controller used, the gradual load variation produces better results as against sudden load variations. It is further observed that in addition to other dynamic features, the jerks produced at the time of load removal also get improved to a large extent with Fuzzy PID controller.The speed torque characteristics unraveled the fact that the jerks are minimum at the time of gradual load removal with Fuzzy PID controller in place. An attempt has been made to define these jerks by ‘Perturbation Window’.

  6. Leuconostoc strains isolated from dairy products: Response against food stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Luisa; Cicotello, Joaquín; Zago, Miriam; Guglielmotti, Daniela; Quiberoni, Andrea; Suárez, Viviana

    2017-09-01

    A systematic study about the intrinsic resistance of 29 strains (26 autochthonous and 3 commercial ones), belonging to Leuconostoc genus, against diverse stress factors (thermal, acidic, alkaline, osmotic and oxidative) commonly present at industrial or conservation processes were evaluated. Exhaustive result processing was made by applying one-way ANOVA, Student's test (t), multivariate analysis by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Matrix Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. In addition, heat adaptation on 4 strains carefully selected based on previous data analysis was assayed. The strains revealed wide diversity of resistance to stress factors and, in general, a clear relationship between resistance and Leuconostoc species was established. In this sense, the highest resistance was shown by Leuconostoc lactis followed by Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains, while Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides and Leuconostoc citreum strains revealed the lowest resistance to the stress factors applied. Heat adaptation improved thermal cell survival and resulted in a cross-resistance against the acidic factor. However, all adapted cells showed diminished their oxidative resistance. According to our knowledge, this is the first study regarding response of Leuconostoc strains against technological stress factors and could establish the basis for the selection of "more robust" strains and propose the possibility of improving their performance during industrial processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Response agronomic of the pepper crops ( Capsicum annuum L. under drought conditions with Biobrás-Plus application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanitza Meriño Hernández

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research was done in two towns of Granma in order to evaluate the agronomic response of pepper cultivars, “Spanish” variety, under drought stress conditions and with the application brassinosteroids (Biobrás - Plus. In the town of Jiguaní the research was done at Las Marianas market garden, and in the town of Guisa the research was done at Río de Guisa market garden. The biostimulant was applied to foliage 15 days after being planted and at bloom initiation, early in the morning. The growth rate was evaluated every 10 days, and at harvest the yield and their components were evaluated. In order to assess the response of the variables, an analysis of the main components was carried out. Among the variables that had a better response to the treatments were: the total number of the fruits per plant, polar and equatorial diameter of fruits and average weight, average mesocarp thickness and the yield of the cultivar. The results showed that the biostimulant utilized had a high anti stress effect, the best results were achieved when applied to plants that were under drought stress conditions.

  8. Insight into fiber Bragg sensor response at 100-MHz interrogation rates under various dynamic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Mielke, Chuck H.; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Azad, Abul; Sandberg, Richard L.; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M.; Henson, Bryan F.; Smilowitz, Laura; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Sandoval, Tom

    2015-05-01

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain, pressure, and shock position sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber was used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor were detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals were recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 25 GHz bandwidth digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing of magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts were used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO3. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10-4) in the material. A second application to FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. Then, as final demonstration, we use a chirped FBG (CFBG) to resolve shock propagation dynamics in 1-D from an explosive detonation that produces fragmentation in an inert confinement vessel. These applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.

  9. The resistance response of sunflower genotypes to black stem disease under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza DARVISHZADEH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Phoma black stem, caused by Phoma macdonaldii, is one of the most important diseases of sunflower in the world. The sources of resistance to Phoma black stem were investigated. A total of 184 genotypes, including some recombinant inbred lines (RILs, several M6 mutant lines obtained by gamma irradiation of seed of the genotype AS 613, and other genotypes from different countries, were evaluated against an aggressive French isolate (MP6 in controlled conditions. The study was carried out in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Each replicate consisted of 10–12 seedlings. Twenty μL of spore suspension (106 pycnidiospores mL-1 were deposited on the intersection of the cotyledon petiole and the hypocotyl of sunflower plantlets at the two-leaf stage. The percentage of the area exhibiting disease symptoms was scored on the two cotyledon petioles of each of the plantlets three, five and seven days after inoculation. The disease progress rate (rd, as the slope of the regression line for disease severity against time, was also calculated. Analysis of variance detected significant differences among sunflower genotypes for disease severity 7 days after inoculation,as well as for the disease progress rate. A strong correlation (r=0.96, P<0.01 was found between disease severity 7 days after inoculation and the disease progress rate. The inbred lines F1250/03 (origin: Hungary, M5-54-1, M6-862-1 (mutant lines, SDR 18 (origin: USA and two wild Helianthus accessions, 1012 Nebraska and 211 Illinois, (wild type were highly resistant to Phoma black stem. These findings will assist breeders in choosing parent plants for breeding durable resistance to Phoma black stem.

  10. Physiological response of Pinus halepensis needles under ozone and water stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manes, F.; Donato, E. [Univ. of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Dept. of Plant Biology, Rome (Italy); Vitale, M. [Univ. of Molise, Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Isernia (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how physiological processes of potted Pinus halepensis plants, grown under controlled conditions, were affected by ozone (O{sub 3}) and/or water stress, integrating the gas exchange and biochemical data with fluorescence OJIP polyphasic transient data. Plants submitted to only water stress (T{sub 1}) and with ozone (T{sub 3}) showed a strong decrease in stomatal conductance and gas exchange, coinciding with a reduction of maximum yield of photochemistry ({rho}{sub po}) and very negative values of leaf water potential. Simultaneously, a great increase of both PSII antenna size, indicated by absorption per reaction centre, and electron transport per reaction centre were found. The reduction of photosynthesis in the O{sub 3}-treated plants (T{sub 2}) by a slowing down of the Calvin cycle was supported by the increase of related fluorescence parameters such as relative variable fluorescence, heat de-excitation constant, energy de-excitation by spillover, and the decrease of {rho}{sub po}. We suggest an antagonistic effect between the two stresses to explain the delayed ozone-induced decrease of stomatal conductance values for T{sub 3} with respect to T{sub 1} plants, by an alteration of the physiological mechanisms of stomatal opening, which involve the increase of intra-cellular free-calcium induced by ABA under co-occurring water shortage. We emphasise the importance of considering the intensity of the individual stress factor in studies concerning the interaction of stresses. (au)

  11. Evaluation of immune responses in dogs to oral rabies vaccine under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Todd G; Millien, Max; Vos, Ad; Fracciterne, Franso A; Crowdis, Kelly; Chirodea, Cornelius; Medley, Alexandra; Chipman, Richard; Qin, Yunlong; Blanton, Jesse; Wallace, Ryan

    2017-10-17

    During the 20th century parenteral vaccination of dogs at central-point locations was the foundation of successful canine rabies elimination programs in numerous countries. However, countries that remain enzootic for canine rabies have lower infrastructural development compared to countries that have achieved elimination, which may make traditional vaccination methods less successful. Alternative vaccination methods for dogs must be considered, such as oral rabies vaccine (ORV). In 2016, a traditional mass dog vaccination campaign in Haiti was supplemented with ORV to improve vaccination coverage and to evaluate the use of ORV in dogs. Blisters containing live-attenuated, vaccine strain SPBNGAS-GAS were placed in intestine bait and distributed to dogs by hand. Serum was collected from 107 dogs, aged 3-12 months with no reported prior rabies vaccination, pre-vaccination and from 78/107 dogs (72.9%) 17 days post-vaccination. The rapid florescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) was used to detect neutralizing antibodies and an ELISA to detect rabies binding antibodies. Post-vaccination, 38/41 (92.7%) dogs that received parenteral vaccine had detectable antibody (RFFIT >0.05 IU/mL), compared to 16/27 (59.3%, p 40% blocking, p 0.05 IU/mL) were detected in 10/107 reportedly vaccine-naïve dogs (9.3%). Parenteral vaccination remains the most reliable method for ensuring adequate immune response in dogs, however ORV represents a viable strategy to supplement existing parental vaccination campaigns in hard-to-reach dog populations. The hand-out model reduces the risk of unintended contact with ORV through minimizing vaccine blisters left in the community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Simulating the vegetation response in western Europe to abrupt climate changes under glacial background conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-N. Woillez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last glacial period has been punctuated by two types of abrupt climatic events, the Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO and Heinrich (HE events. These events, recorded in Greenland ice and in marine sediments, involved changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC and led to major changes in the terrestrial biosphere. Here we use the dynamical global vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the response of vegetation to abrupt changes in the AMOC strength. We force ORCHIDEE offline with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 general circulation model, in which the AMOC is forced to change by adding freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic. We investigate the impact of a collapse and recovery of the AMOC, at different rates, and focus on Western Europe, where many pollen records are available for comparison. The impact of an AMOC collapse on the European mean temperatures and precipitations simulated by the GCM is relatively small but sufficient to drive an important regression of forests and expansion of grasses in ORCHIDEE, in qualitative agreement with pollen data for an HE event. On the contrary, a run with a rapid shift of the AMOC to a hyperactive state of 30 Sv, mimicking the warming phase of a DO event, does not exhibit a strong impact on the European vegetation compared to the glacial control state. For our model, simulating the impact of an HE event thus appears easier than simulating the abrupt transition towards the interstadial phase of a DO. For both a collapse or a recovery of the AMOC, the vegetation starts to respond to climatic changes immediately but reaches equilibrium about 200 yr after the climate equilibrates, suggesting a possible bias in the climatic reconstructions based on pollen records, which assume equilibrium between climate and vegetation. However, our study does not take into account vegetation feedbacks on the atmosphere.

  13. Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Pressure Pulses Under Northward IMF Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancements of aurora and auroral electrojets in response to sudden compression of the magnetosphere by shocks/pressure pulses are well known and have been attributed by some to compression-enhanced magnetic field reconnection. To examine such a view, we analyze a fortuitous event that is comprised of a series of pressure pulses (< 20 min on November 8, 2000. These pressure pulses were preceded by a large, northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF that lasted more than 15 hours such that effects from reconnection can be minimized. Auroral images acquired by ultraviolet imager on board the Polar satellite clearly show intensifications of the aurora that occurred first near local noon and progressively extended from dayside to nightside. The area-integrated global auroral power reached ~30 gigawatts (GW. It is also found that the global auroral power is well correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (correlation coefficient r ~0.90, rather than the change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. In-situ measurements of particle data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite indicate that the magnetospheric source for the pressure-enhanced auroras is most likely the central plasma sheet. Other ionospheric parameters such as the auroral electrojet (AE index, magnetic storm index (Sym-H, and the cross polarcap potential drop also show a one-to-one correspondence to the pressure pulses. In one instance the auroral electrojets AE index reached more than 200 nT, the cross polar-cap potential drop (ÎŚpc inferred from the SuperDARN radar network ionospheric plasma convection increased to ~60 kV. The observed increases in the auroral emissions, AE, and polar cap potential were not associated with substorms. Our result strongly suggests that solar wind pressure pulses are an important source of geomagnetic activity during northward IMF periods.

  14. Development of an ultra low noise, miniature signal conditioning device for vestibular evoked response recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaragamage, Chathura L; Lithgow, Brian J; Moussavi, Zahra

    2014-01-27

    Inner ear evoked potentials are small amplitude (signals that require a low noise signal acquisition protocol for successful extraction; an existing such technique is Electrocochleography (ECOG). A novel variant of ECOG called Electrovestibulography (EVestG) is currently investigated by our group, which captures vestibular responses to a whole body tilt. The objective is to design and implement a bio-signal amplifier optimized for ECOG and EVestG, which will be superior in noise performance compared to low noise, general purpose devices available commercially. A high gain configuration is required (>85 dB) for such small signal recordings; thus, background power line interference (PLI) can have adverse effects. Active electrode shielding and driven-right-leg circuitry optimized for EVestG/ECOG recordings were investigated for PLI suppression. A parallel pre-amplifier design approach was investigated to realize low voltage, and current noise figures for the bio-signal amplifier. In comparison to the currently used device, PLI is significantly suppressed by the designed prototype (by >20 dB in specific test scenarios), and the prototype amplifier generated noise was measured to be 4.8 nV/Hz @ 1 kHz (0.45 μVRMS with bandwidth 10 Hz-10 kHz), which is lower than the currently used device generated noise of 7.8 nV/Hz @ 1 kHz (0.76 μVRMS). A low noise (noise contribution from the pre-amplifier, while maintaining the required bandwidth in high impedance measurements. Validation of the prototype device was conducted for actual ECOG recordings on humans that showed an increase (p Signal-to-Noise ratio (SNR), and for EVestG recordings using a synthetic ear model that showed a ~4% improvement (p noise and miniaturized bio-signal amplifier tailored for EVestG and ECOG. The increase in SNR for the implemented amplifier will reduce variability associated with bio-features extracted from such recordings; hence sensitivity and specificity measures associated with disease

  15. Response to storm conditions of two different beaches at the Mediterranean coast of Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mrini, Aldelmounim; Anfuso, Giorgio; Nachite, Driss; Taaouati, Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    In recent decades the increased demand for the recreational use of beaches has resulted in the uptake of studies on the morphodynamic processes which are acting on beaches. This knowledge is fundamental for appropriate coastal erosion management, suitable tourist use of littoral and for the design and shape of human construction. The Mediterranean sectors of Moroccan littoral investigated in this study, Ksar Rimal and Cabo Negro beaches, are respectively located north and south of Cabo Negro promontory and, over recent years, have been subject to increasing tourist activity. This has consisted mainly of the construction of two tourist ports (Marina Smir and Kabila), residential developments, hotels and a motorway which runs parallel to the coast, affecting the dune ridges and two lagoons which are of great ecological interest. In detail, the dunes located in the backshore at Ksar Rimal beach, are nowadays occupied by summer houses threaten by coastal retreat. A wide, partially urbanized, backshore is observed at Cabo Negro beach. With the intention of characterize the morphodynamic and seasonal behavior and the response of the studied beaches to storm impact, a beach monitoring program was carried out in the period 2006-2008, with special attention to the February-March 2008 stormy period. On analyzing the information obtained, it was possible to characterize the morphology and sedimentology of the studied beaches, and to calculate beach volumetric variations. Ksar Rimal is an open, exposed beach characterized by an intermediate slope (tan β = 0.10) with medium-coarse sands. The beach showed a reflective beach state characterized by plunging breakers. Small morphological seasonal changes were observed, most important morphological and volumetric variations (about 20 m3/m) taking place after winter storms which usually gave rise to a more dissipative beach profile (tan β = 0.05) characterized by spilling breakers. Beach recovery was quite rapid, usually lasting 2

  16. Genome-wide Differences in DNA Methylation Changes in Two Contrasting Rice Genotypes in Response to Drought Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Differences in drought stress tolerance within diverse rice genotypes have been attributed to genetic diversity and epigenetic alterations. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that influences diverse biological processes, but its effects on rice drought stress tolerance are poorly understood. In this study, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing and an Affymetrix GeneChip rice genome array were used to profile the DNA methylation patterns and transcriptomes of the drought-tolerant introgression line DK151 and its drought-sensitive recurrent parent IR64 under drought and control conditions. The introgression of donor genomic DNA induced genome-wide DNA methylation changes in DK151 plants. A total of 1190 differentially methylated regions (DMRs were detected between the two genotypes under normal growth conditions, and the DMR-associated genes in DK151 plants were mainly related to stress response, programmed cell death, and nutrient reservoir activity, which are implicated to constitutive drought stress tolerance. A comparison of the DNA methylation changes in the two genotypes under drought conditions indicated that DK151 plants have a more stable methylome, with only 92 drought-induced DMRs, than IR64 plants with 506 DMRs. Gene ontology analyses of the DMR-associated genes in drought-stressed plants revealed that changes to the DNA methylation status of genotype-specific genes are associated with the epigenetic regulation of drought stress responses. Transcriptome analysis further helped to identify a set of 12 and 23 DMR-associated genes that were differentially expressed in DK151 and IR64, respectively, under drought stress compared with respective controls. Correlation analysis indicated that DNA methylation has various effects on gene expression, implying that it affects gene expression directly or indirectly through diverse regulatory pathways. Our results indicate that drought-induced alterations to DNA

  17. Field Measurement of Wind Speeds and Wind-Induced Responses atop the Shanghai World Financial Center under Normal Climate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Quan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Field measurement data on wind velocities and wind-induced acceleration responses at the top of the 492 m high Shanghai World Financial Center (SWFC under normal climate conditions are studied. Characteristics of the mean wind speeds and turbulence intensities, gust factors, power spectral densities, and turbulence integral scales of the fluctuating wind speed are analyzed in different observation time intervals. Power spectral densities of wind-induced acceleration are also investigated. The basic natural frequencies and structural damping ratios of the building are identified based on Hilbert-Huang transform method and random decrement method. The field measurement results of wind-induced responses of the SWFC are finally compared with those from the corresponding high-frequency force balance wind tunnel test study.

  18. Relationship between serum adiponectin concentration, body condition score, and peripheral tissue insulin response of dairy cows during the dry period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Urh, C; Hostens, M; Van den Broeck, W; Sauerwein, H; Opsomer, G

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and peripheral tissue insulin response in dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS) during the dry period. Cows were selected at the beginning of the dry period based on BCS (BCS 3.75, n = 5). Animals were followed from the beginning of the dry period by weekly blood sampling and assessment of BCS and backfat thickness. Weekly blood samples were analyzed for adiponectin concentration using a bovine specific ELISA. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp tests were performed at the end of the dry period to measure peripheral tissue insulin response. Insulin dose response curves were established for both glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Regression analysis revealed that the serum concentrations of adiponectin dropped at the end of the dry period (P < 0.05) and were negatively associated with BCS (P < 0.05). At the level of the glucose metabolism, serum concentrations of adiponectin were positively correlated with insulin responsiveness (reflecting the maximal effect of insulin; r = 0.76, P < 0.05), but not with insulin sensitivity (reflecting the insulin concentration needed to achieve halfmaximal effect; r = -0.54, P = 0.13). At the level of the fatty acid metabolism, greater adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with lower NEFA levels during the HEC test reflecting the insulin responsiveness of the NEFA metabolism (r = -0.61, P = 0.08), whereas there was no association with the insulin sensitivity of the NEFA metabolism (r = -0.16, P = 0.67). In conclusion, serum concentrations of adiponectin were negatively associated with the BCS of dairy cows during the dry period and positively associated with insulin responsiveness of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28

    To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted

  20. Dietary Cholesterol Concentration and Duration Degrade Long-Term Memory of Classical Conditioning of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Wang, Desheng; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Burhans, Lauren B; Bell, Roger; Gonzalez-Joekes, Jimena

    2012-01-01

    A rabbit model of Alzheimer's disease based on feeding a cholesterol diet for eight weeks shows sixteen hallmarks of the disease, including learning and memory changes. Although we have shown 2% cholesterol and copper in water can retard learning, other studies show feeding dietary cholesterol before learning can improve acquisition whereas feeding cholesterol after learning can degrade long-term memory. We explored this issue by manipulating cholesterol concentration and duration following classical trace conditioning of the rabbit's nictitating membrane response and assessed conditioned responding after eight weeks on cholesterol. First, rabbits given trace classical conditioning followed by 0.5%, 1%, or 2% cholesterol for eight weeks showed body weight and serum cholesterol levels that were a function of dietary cholesterol. Although all concentrations of cholesterol showed some sign of retarding long-term memory, the level of memory retardation was correlated with serum cholesterol levels. Second, rabbits given trace conditioning followed by different durations of a 2% cholesterol diet combined with different durations of a 0% control diet for 8 weeks showed duration and timing of a 2% cholesterol diet were important in affecting recall. The data support the idea that dietary cholesterol may retard long-term memory.

  1. Rules and mechanisms of punishment learning in honey bees: the aversive conditioning of the sting extension response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedjakumala, Stevanus Rio; Giurfa, Martin

    2013-08-15

    Honeybees constitute established model organisms for the study of appetitive learning and memory. In recent years, the establishment of the technique of olfactory conditioning of the sting extension response (SER) has yielded new insights into the rules and mechanisms of aversive learning in insects. In olfactory SER conditioning, a harnessed bee learns to associate an olfactory stimulus as the conditioned stimulus with the noxious stimulation of an electric shock as the unconditioned stimulus. Here, we review the multiple aspects of honeybee aversive learning that have been uncovered using Pavlovian conditioning of the SER. From its behavioral principles and sensory variants to its cellular bases and implications for understanding social organization, we present the latest advancements in the study of punishment learning in bees and discuss its perspectives in order to define future research avenues and necessary improvements. The studies presented here underline the importance of studying honeybee learning not only from an appetitive but also from an aversive perspective, in order to uncover behavioral and cellular mechanisms of individual and social plasticity.

  2. Optimization of conditions for probiotic curd formulation by Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 with probiotic properties using response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Goveas, Louella Concepta; Prakash, Maya; Halami, Prakash M.; Narayan, Bhaskar

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 possessing potential probiotic properties as well as enterocin producing ability was used as starter culture. Effect of time (12–24 h) and inoculum level (3–7 % v/v) on cell growth, bacteriocin production, antioxidant property, titrable acidity and pH of curd was studied by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized conditions were 26.48 h and 2.17%v/v inoculum and the second order model validated. Co cultivation studies revealed that the formulated produ...

  3. Carotenoids modulate the effect of coccidian infection on the condition and immune response in moulting house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Péter László; Vágási, Csongor István; Czirják, Gábor Arpád; Titilincu, Adriana; Pintea, Adela; Barta, Zoltán

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, we experimentally manipulated coccidian parasitism and dietary carotenoid availability in a fully factorial experiment in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus Linnaeus), and tested whether carotenoid supplementation reduces the cost of parasitism in terms of condition, moult and immune responses. We found that coccidians have a significant but transient negative effect on body mass, which can be reduced if birds have access to carotenoid supplementation in their diet. Experimental manipulation had no significant effect on the moulting parameters of the birds measured following coccidian infestation and during the whole moulting period. Carotenoid supplementation increased the plasma carotenoid concentration in both infested and medicated birds treated with a coccidiostatic drug; however, after two months exposure to parasites, plasma carotenoid concentration increased only in the carotenoid-supplemented and medicated group whereas no difference was observed between the carotenoid-supplemented and infested and non-supplemented groups. On the contrary, coccidian infestation was not affected by carotenoid supplementation. Experimental infestation decreased the antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), although no significant effect was observed in the capacity of the birds to respond to a mitogenic challenge with phytohemagglutinin. Within the experimentally infested groups birds with carotenoid-supplemented food tended to have an increased anti-SRBC humoral immune response. The positive correlation between coccidian infestation and the strength of the humoral immune response against SRBCs in the non-supplemented and infested groups indicates that this part of the immune system plays an important role in defence against these parasites.

  4. Response characteristics of HPR1000 primary circuit under different working conditions of the atmospheric relief system after SBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Danting, E-mail: suidanting@163.com [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Lu, Daogang [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Shang, Changzhong; Wei, Yuanyuan [China Nuclear Power Design Co., ltd (ShenZhen), Shenzhen (China); Zhang, Xianjie [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Response of HPR1000 under different VDA conditions after SBLOCA was investigated. • Activation of VDA can trigger ACCU SI earlier with a critical point exists. • VDA capability design should compromise the critical point with reactivity feedback. - Abstract: To cope with SBLOCA in absence of High-Head Safety Injection (HHSI) from design of HPR1000, atmospheric relief system (originally named as VDA in French) is uniquely designed to help to trigger Middle Head Safety Injection (MHSI) or Low Head Safety Injection (LHSI) earlier through cooling primary system quickly after SBLOCA. To make the best use of VDA decay heat removal capability, primary and secondary system of HPR1000 was modeled with RELAP5/SCDAP computer code. After steady-state initialization, a cold leg 30 mm break SBLOCA was simulated with six simulation conditions and five additional cases including availability of ACCU, different VDA discharge locations and area. Response characteristics of primary loop under different VDA working conditions are investigated. Pressurizer pressure decreases rapidly to lower level to trigger the reactor scram, VDA activation and accumulator safety injection sequently. Peak cladding temperature is 899.45 K occurring at 222 s, which is far below the safety limit. Activation of VDA can trigger ACCU SI earlier with a critical point, while positive reactivity will be introduced due to negative moderator temperature effect and Doppler effect. Larger VDA discharge capability will introduce larger reactivity feedback, as well as induce lower core level and SG level. It's suggested that VDA discharge condition should be chosen before the critical point, with the compromise with reactivity feedback introduced due to the negative moderator temperature effect.

  5. Volitional control of anticipatory ocular pursuit responses under stabilised image conditions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G; Goodbody, S; Collins, S

    1995-01-01

    Ocular pursuit responses have been examined in humans in three experiments in which the pursuit target image has been fully or partially stabilised on the fovea by feeding a recorded eye movement signal back to drive the target motion. The objective was to establish whether subjects could volitionally control smooth eye movement to reproduce trajectories of target motion in the absence of a concurrent target motion stimulus. In experiment 1 subjects were presented with a target moving with a triangular waveform in the horizontal axis with a frequency of 0.325 Hz and velocities of +/- 10-50 degrees/s. The target was illuminated twice per cycle for pulse durations (PD) of 160-640 ms as it passed through the centre position; otherwise subjects were in darkness. Subjects initially tracked the target motion in a conventional closed-loop mode for four cycles. Prior to the next target presentation the target image was stabilised on the fovea, so that any target motion generated resulted solely from volitional eye movement. Subjects continued to make anticipatory smooth eye movements both to the left and the right with a velocity trajectory similar to that observed in the closed-loop phase. Peak velocity in the stabilised-image mode was highly correlated with that in the prior closed-loop phase, but was slightly less (84% on average). In experiment 2 subjects were presented with a continuously illuminated target that was oscillated sinusoidally at frequencies of 0.2-1.34 Hz and amplitudes of +/- 5-20 degrees. After four cycles of closed-loop stimulation the image was stabilised on the fovea at the time of peak target displacement. Subjects continued to generate an oscillatory smooth eye velocity pattern that mimicked the sinusoidal motion of the previous closed-loop phase for at least three further cycles. The peak eye velocity generated ranged from 57-95% of that in the closed-loop phase at frequencies up to 0.8 Hz but decreased significantly at 1.34 Hz. In experiment 3

  6. Neural responses in songbird forebrain reflect learning rates, acquired salience, and stimulus novelty after auditory discrimination training

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Brittany A.; Phan, Mimi L.; Vicario, David S.

    2014-01-01

    How do social interactions form and modulate the neural representations of specific complex signals? This question can be addressed in the songbird auditory system. Like humans, songbirds learn to vocalize by imitating tutors heard during development. These learned vocalizations are important in reproductive and social interactions and in individual recognition. As a model for the social reinforcement of particular songs, male zebra finches were trained to peck for a food reward in response t...

  7. The roles of the nucleus accumbens core, dorsomedial striatum, and dorsolateral striatum in learning: performance and extinction of Pavlovian fear-conditioned responses and instrumental avoidance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Etieli; Gaspar, Jessica C C; Ferreira, Tatiana L; Barbiero, Janaína K; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F; Blaha, Charles D; Winn, Philip; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the effects of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the nucleus accumbens core (NAc-co), dorsomedial striatum (DMS) or dorsolateral striatum (DLS) of rats on the learning and extinction of Pavlovian and instrumental components of conditioned avoidance responses (CARs). None of the lesions caused sensorimotor deficits that could affect locomotion. Lesions of the NAc-co, but not DMS or DLS, decreased unconditioned and conditioned freezing. The NAc-co and DLS lesioned rats learned the 2-way active avoidance task more slowly. These results suggest: (i) CARs depend on both Pavlovian and instrumental learning; (ii) learning the Pavlovian component of CARs depends on the NAc-co; learning the instrumental component of CARs depends on the DLS, NAc and DMS; (iii) although the NAc-co is also needed for learning the instrumental component, it is not clear whether it plays a role in learning the instrumental component per se or if it simply allows learning of the Pavlovian component which is a pre-condition for learning the instrumental component; (iv) we did not find evidence that the DMS and DLS play the same roles in habit and goal-directed aspects of the instrumental component of CARs as observed in appetitive motivated instrumental responding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling individual differences in the form of Pavlovian conditioned approach responses: a dual learning systems approach with factored representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Lesaint

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement Learning has greatly influenced models of conditioning, providing powerful explanations of acquired behaviour and underlying physiological observations. However, in recent autoshaping experiments in rats, variation in the form of Pavlovian conditioned responses (CRs and associated dopamine activity, have questioned the classical hypothesis that phasic dopamine activity corresponds to a reward prediction error-like signal arising from a classical Model-Free system, necessary for Pavlovian conditioning. Over the course of Pavlovian conditioning using food as the unconditioned stimulus (US, some rats (sign-trackers come to approach and engage the conditioned stimulus (CS itself - a lever - more and more avidly, whereas other rats (goal-trackers learn to approach the location of food delivery upon CS presentation. Importantly, although both sign-trackers and goal-trackers learn the CS-US association equally well, only in sign-trackers does phasic dopamine activity show classical reward prediction error-like bursts. Furthermore, neither the acquisition nor the expression of a goal-tracking CR is dopamine-dependent. Here we present a computational model that can account for such individual variations. We show that a combination of a Model-Based system and a revised Model-Free system can account for the development of distinct CRs in rats. Moreover, we show that revising a classical Model-Free system to individually process stimuli by using factored representations can explain why classical dopaminergic patterns may be observed for some rats and not for others depending on the CR they develop. In addition, the model can account for other behavioural and pharmacological results obtained using the same, or similar, autoshaping procedures. Finally, the model makes it possible to draw a set of experimental predictions that may be verified in a modified experimental protocol. We suggest that further investigation of factored representations in

  9. Delayed N2 response in Go condition in a visual Go/Nogo ERP study in children who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piispala, Johanna; Kallio, Mika; Bloigu, Risto; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the attentional and inhibitory abilities and their underlying processes of children who stutter by using behavioural measurement and event-related potentials (ERP) in a visual Go/Nogo paradigm. Participants were 11 children who stutter (CWS; mean age 8.1, age range 6.3-9.5 years) and 19 typically developed children (TDC; mean age 8.1, age range 5.8-9.6 years). They performed a visual Go/Nogo task with simultaneous EEG recording to obtain ERP responses. Results showed that CWS had longer N2 and P3 latencies in the Go condition compared to the TDC. In contrast, the groups did not differ significantly in the Nogo condition or behavioural measures. Our findings did not confirm less efficient inhibitory control in CWS but suggest atypical attentional processing such as stimulus evaluation and response selection. The reader will be able to (a) describe recent findings on attention and inhibitory control in children who stutter, (b) describe the measurement of attentional processing, including inhibitory control, and (c) describe the findings on attentional processing in children who stutter as indexed by the event-related potentials in a visual Go/Nogo paradigm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of BCAA, arginine and carbohydrate combined drink on post-exercise biochemical response and psychological condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Chich; Chien, Kuei-Yu; Hsu, Cheng-Chen; Chung, Chia-Jung; Chan, Kuei-Hui; Su, Borcherng

    2011-04-30

    This study investigated the effects of BCAA, arginine and carbohydrate combined beverage (BCAA Drink) on biochemical responses and psychological conditions during recovery after a single bout of exhaustive exercise. Fourteen healthy males were assigned to drink either BCAA Drink (BA trial) or placebo (PL trial) on two sessions separated by 2 weeks. Blood samples of each subject were collected before exercise, 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 120 min and 24 h after exercise. No significant differences in the levels of lactate, ammonia, creatine kinase and glycerol between the two groups were observed at any of the time points. However, the levels of glucose and insulin were significantly higher in the BA trial as compared to those in the PL trial at the 40 and 60 min recovery points. Furthermore, the testosterone-to-cortisol ratio at the 120 min recovery point was significantly higher in the BA trial as compared to that in the PL trial. The results indicate the occurrence of anabolic response during the recovery period. The benefit of BCAA Drink was also performed by Profile of Mood States to assess the psychological condition. Fatigue score increased immediately at exhaustion in both groups, but the decrease in the fatigue score at 120 min recovery point was significant only in BA trial. These data indicate that a single bout of exhaustive exercise enhanced the feeling of fatigue. The detrimental consequence was reduced by an ingestion of BCAA Drink.

  11. Modeling of the effect of freezer conditions on the hardness of ice cream using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Ochi, H; Habara, K; Taketsuka, M; Saito, H; Ichihashi, N; Iwatsuki, K

    2009-12-01

    The effect of conventional continuous freezer parameters [mix flow (L/h), overrun (%), drawing temperature ( degrees C), cylinder pressure (kPa), and dasher speed (rpm)] on the hardness of ice cream under varying measured temperatures (-5, -10, and -15 degrees C) was investigated systematically using response surface methodology (central composite face-centered design), and the relationships were expressed as statistical models. The range (maximum and minimum values) of each freezer parameter was set according to the actual capability of the conventional freezer and applicability to the manufacturing process. Hardness was measured using a penetrometer. These models showed that overrun and drawing temperature had significant effects on hardness. The models can be used to optimize freezer conditions to make ice cream of the least possible hardness under the highest overrun (120%) and a drawing temperature of approximately -5.5 degrees C (slightly warmer than the lowest drawing temperature of -6.5 degrees C) within the range of this study. With reference to the structural elements of the ice cream, we suggest that the volume of overrun and ice crystal content, ice crystal size, and fat globule destabilization affect the hardness of ice cream. In addition, the combination of a simple instrumental parameter and response surface methodology allows us to show the relation between freezer conditions and one of the most important properties-hardness-visually and quantitatively on the practical level.

  12. Oxygen response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 grown under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceituno, Felipe F; Orellana, Marcelo; Torres, Jorge; Mendoza, Sebastián; Slater, Alex W; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Discrete additions of oxygen play a critical role in alcoholic fermentation. However, few studies have quantitated the fate of dissolved oxygen and its impact on wine yeast cell physiology under enological conditions. We simulated the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations that occur after a pump-over during the winemaking process by sparging nitrogen-limited continuous cultures with oxygen-nitrogen gaseous mixtures. When the dissolved oxygen concentration increased from 1.2 to 2.7 μM, yeast cells changed from a fully fermentative to a mixed respirofermentative metabolism. This transition is characterized by a switch in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and an activation of NADH shuttling from the cytosol to mitochondria. Nevertheless, fermentative ethanol production remained the major cytosolic NADH sink under all oxygen conditions, suggesting that the limitation of mitochondrial NADH reoxidation is the major cause of the Crabtree effect. This is reinforced by the induction of several key respiratory genes by oxygen, despite the high sugar concentration, indicating that oxygen overrides glucose repression. Genes associated with other processes, such as proline uptake, cell wall remodeling, and oxidative stress, were also significantly affected by oxygen. The results of this study indicate that respiration is responsible for a substantial part of the oxygen response in yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. This information will facilitate the development of temporal oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations.

  13. Physiological response of wild rainbow trout to angling: Impact of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Julie M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate physiological response of wild rainbow trout to catch-and-release angling in the Alagnak River, southwest Alaska. Information was recorded on individual rainbow trout (n = 415) captured by angling including landing time and the time required to remove hooks (angling duration), the time to anesthetize fish in clove oil and withdraw blood, fish length and weight, and water temperature at capture locations. Plasma cortisol, glucose, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), and lactate were analyzed to determine the effects of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature. Levels of plasma ions did not change significantly during the observed physiological response and levels of plasma glucose were sometimes influenced by length (2000, 2001), body condition (2001), or temperature (2001). Levels of plasma cortisol and lactate in extended capture fish (angling duration greater than 2 min) were significantly higher than levels in rapid capture fish (angling duration less than 2 min). Rapid capture fish were significantly smaller than extended capture fish, reflecting that fish size influenced landing and handling times. Fish size was related to cortisol and lactate in 2002, which corresponded to the year when larger fish were captured and there were longer landing times. Body condition (i.e., weight/length regression residuals index), was significantly related to lactate in 2000 and 2001. Water temperatures were higher in 2001 (mean temperature ± S.E., 13 ± 2oC) than in 2002 (10 ± 2oC), and fish captured in 2001 had significantly higher cortisol and lactate concentrations than fish captured in 2002. The pattern of increase in plasma cortisol and lactate was due to the amount of time fish were angled, and the upper limit of the response was due to water temperature. The results of this study indicate the importance of minimizing the duration of angling in order to reduce the sublethal physiological disturbances in wild

  14. Evaluation of the general conditions and inflammatory response of antibiotics combined with fat-soluble vitamin therapy for pediatric pneumonia

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    Qiao-Li Chai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the general conditions and inflammatory response of antibiotics combined with fat-soluble vitamin therapy for pediatric pneumonia. Methods: A total of 350 children with pneumonia who were treated in our hospital between January 2014 and January 2017 were collected and divided into control group and observation group according to the random number table, 175 cases in each group. Control group received azithromycin therapy, and observation group received azithromycin combined with fat-soluble vitamin therapy. The differences in the systemic and inflammatory responses before and after treatment were compared between the two groups of patients. Results: Before treatment, differences in blood routine index levels as well as serum contents of oxidative stress indexes and inflammatory factors were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After treatment, white blood cell count, neutrophil ratio as well as serum CRP, PCT, IL-6 and TNF-α contents of both groups were lower than those before treatment while lymphocyte ratio as well as serum IgA, IgG and IgM contents were higher than those before treatment, and white blood cell count, neutrophil ratio as well as serum CRP, PCT, IL-6 and TNF-α contents of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group while lymphocyte ratio as well as serum IgA, IgG and IgM contents was higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Antibiotics combined with fat-soluble vitamin therapy for pediatric pneumonia can effectively optimize the patient's general conditions and reduce the inflammatory response.

  15. The fertility response to the Great Recession in Europe and the United States: Structural economic conditions and perceived economic uncertainty

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    Chiara Ludovica Comolli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study further develops Goldstein et al.'s (2013 analysis of the fertility response to the Great Recession in western economies. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the fertility reaction to different indicators of the crisis. Beyond the structural labor market conditions, I investigate the dependence of fertility rates on economic policy uncertainty, government financial risk, and consumer confidence. Methods: Following Goldstein et al. (2013, I use log-log models to assess the elasticity of age-, parity-, and education-specific fertility rates to an array of indicators. Besides the inclusion of a wider set of explanatory variables, I include more recent data (2000−2013 and I enlarge the sample to 31 European countries plus the United States. Results: Fertility response to unemployment in some age- and parity-specific groups has been, in more recent years, larger than estimated by Goldstein et al. (2013. Female unemployment has also been significantly reducing fertility rates. Among uncertainty measures, the drop in consumer confidence is strongly related to fertility decline and in Southern European countries the fertility response to sovereign debt risk is comparable to that of unemployment. Economic policy uncertainty is negatively related to TFR even when controlling for unemployment. Conclusions: Theoretical and empirical investigation is needed to develop more tailored measures of economic and financial insecurity and their impact on birth rates. Contribution: The study shows the nonnegligible influence of economic and financial uncertainty on birth rates during the Great Recession in Western economies, over and above that of structural labor market conditions.

  16. Relationship between the physical and psychosocial conditions of postoperative gastrointestinal cancer patients and their responses to an informational material

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    Michiyo Mizuno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Postoperative patients with gastrointestinal (GI cancer have multiple adaptation tasks and care needs to improve their quality of life (QOL. Whether their supportive care needs differ according to their physical and psychosocial conditions is unclear. This study investigated patients' (1 physical and psychosocial conditions (QOL, fatigue, anxiety, cognitive plight, and resilience and (2 responses to an informational booklet describing cancer patients' problems and adaptation tasks, and examined the association between the two factors. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted to postoperative patients with GI cancer. Results: The mean age of the 69 respondents was 63 years; 59.4% of the respondents were men. Nine patients who did not read the booklet showed high fatigue and cognitive plight and low QOL. The patients (36.2% who chose “I vaguely understood the content” showed low scores for resilience and cognitive plight while those (8.5% who chose “I will deal with my tasks as described in the scenarios” showed high scores for both of these variables. Conclusions: The condition of some patients continued to be highly affected by their cancer. In terms of understanding the contents of the booklet, resilience was significant, and cognitive plight did not necessarily have a negative impact. The provision of information by means of a booklet might not be suitable for patients who are highly affected by their cancer. Patients may need additional support to be able to make good use of the information provided in such a booklet.

  17. Optimization of the Conditions for Extraction of Serine Protease from Kesinai Plant (Streblus asper Leaves Using Response Surface Methodology

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    Md. Zaidul Islam Sarker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM using a central composite design (CCD was employed to optimize the conditions for extraction of serine protease from kesinai (Streblus asper leaves. The effect of independent variables, namely temperature (42.5,47.5, X1, mixing time (2–6 min, X2, buffer content (0–80 mL, X3 and buffer pH (4.5–10.5, X4 on specific activity, storage stability, temperature and oxidizing agent stability of serine protease from kesinai leaves was investigated. The study demonstrated that use of the optimum temperature, mixing time, buffer content and buffer pH conditions protected serine protease during extraction, as demonstrated by low activity loss. It was found that the interaction effect of mixing time and buffer content improved the serine protease stability, and the buffer pH had the most significant effect on the specific activity of the enzyme. The most desirable conditions of 2.5 °C temperature, 4 min mixing time, 40 mL buffer at pH 7.5 was established for serine protease extraction from kesinai leaves.

  18. Relationship between the Physical and Psychosocial Conditions of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Cancer Patients and their Responses to an Informational Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Michiyo; Kataoka, Jun; Oishi, Fumiko

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer have multiple adaptation tasks and care needs to improve their quality of life (QOL). Whether their supportive care needs differ according to their physical and psychosocial conditions is unclear. This study investigated patients' (1) physical and psychosocial conditions (QOL, fatigue, anxiety, cognitive plight, and resilience) and (2) responses to an informational booklet describing cancer patients' problems and adaptation tasks, and examined the association between the two factors. A questionnaire survey was conducted to postoperative patients with GI cancer. The mean age of the 69 respondents was 63 years; 59.4% of the respondents were men. Nine patients who did not read the booklet showed high fatigue and cognitive plight and low QOL. The patients (36.2%) who chose "I vaguely understood the content" showed low scores for resilience and cognitive plight while those (8.5%) who chose "I will deal with my tasks as described in the scenarios" showed high scores for both of these variables. The condition of some patients continued to be highly affected by their cancer. In terms of understanding the contents of the booklet, resilience was significant, and cognitive plight did not necessarily have a negative impact. The provision of information by means of a booklet might not be suitable for patients who are highly affected by their cancer. Patients may need additional support to be able to make good use of the information provided in such a booklet.

  19. Response of phytoplankton photophysiology to varying environmental conditions in the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Frontal Zone.

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    Wee Cheah

    Full Text Available Climate-driven changes are expected to alter the hydrography of the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ and Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ south of Australia, in which distinct regional environments are believed to be responsible for the differences in phytoplankton biomass in these regions. Here, we report how the dynamic influences of light, iron and temperature, which are responsible for the photophysiological differences between phytoplankton in the SAZ and PFZ, contribute to the biomass differences in these regions. High effective photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F'(q/F'(m0.4, maximum photosynthesis rate (P(B(max, light-saturation intensity (E(k, maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport (1/[Symbol: see text]PSII, and low photoprotective pigment concentrations observed in the SAZ correspond to high chlorophyll a and iron concentrations. In contrast, phytoplankton in the PFZ exhibits low F'(q/F'(M (~ 0.2 and high concentrations of photoprotective pigments under low light environment. Strong negative relationships between iron, temperature, and photoprotective pigments demonstrate that cells were producing more photoprotective pigments under low temperature and iron conditions, and are responsible for the low biomass and low productivity measured in the PFZ. As warming and enhanced iron input is expected in this region, this could probably increase phytoplankton photosynthesis in this region. However, complex interactions between the biogeochemical processes (e.g. stratification caused by warming could prevent mixing of nutrients, which control phytoplankton biomass and productivity, remain uncertain.

  20. Validation of Shoulder Response of Human Body Finite-Element Model (GHBMC) Under Whole Body Lateral Impact Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwansik; Kim, Taewung; Panzer, Matthew B; Crandall, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    In previous shoulder impact studies, the 50th-percentile male GHBMC human body finite-element model was shown to have good biofidelity regarding impact force, but under-predicted shoulder deflection by 80% compared to those observed in the experiment. The goal of this study was to validate the response of the GHBMC M50 model by focusing on three-dimensional shoulder kinematics under a whole-body lateral impact condition. Five modifications, focused on material properties and modeling techniques, were introduced into the model and a supplementary sensitivity analysis was done to determine the influence of each modification to the biomechanical response of the body. The modified model predicted substantially improved shoulder response and peak shoulder deflection within 10% of the observed experimental data, and showed good correlation in the scapula kinematics on sagittal and transverse planes. The improvement in the biofidelity of the shoulder region was mainly due to the modifications of material properties of muscle, the acromioclavicular joint, and the attachment region between the pectoralis major and ribs. Predictions of rib fracture and chest deflection were also improved because of these modifications.

  1. Optimization of Manufacturing Conditions for Improving Storage Stability of Coffee-Supplemented Milk Beverage Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung-Il; Park, Jun-Hong; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Oh, Duk-Geun; Kim, Moojoong; Chung, Donghwa; Jhoo, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gur-Yoo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at optimizing the manufacturing conditions of a milk beverage supplemented with coffee, and monitoring its physicochemical and sensory properties during storage. Raw milk, skim milk powder, coffee extract, and emulsifiers were used to manufacture the beverage. Two sucrose fatty acid esters, F110 and F160, were identified as suitable emulsifiers. The optimum conditions for the beverage manufacture, which can satisfy two conditions at the same time, determined by response surface methodology (RSM), were 5,000 rpm primary homogenization speed and 0.207% sucrose fatty acid emulsifier addition. The particle size and zeta-potential of the beverage under the optimum condition were 190.1 nm and - 25.94±0.06 mV, respectively. In comparison study between F110 added group (GF110) and F160 added group (GF160) during storage, all samples maintained its pH around 6.6 to 6.7, and there was no significant difference ( p <0.05). In addition, GF110 showed significantly higher zeta-potential than GF160 ( p <0.05). The particle size of GF110 and GF160 were approximately 190.1 and 223.1 nm, respectively at initial. However, size distribution of the GF160 tended to increase during storage. Moreover, increase of the particle size in GF160 was observed in microphotographs of it during storage. The L* values gradually decreased within all groups, whereas the a* and b* values did not show significant variations ( p <0.05). Compared with GF160, bitterness, floating cream, and rancid flavor were more pronounced in the GF110. Based on the result obtained from the present study, it appears that the sucrose fatty acid ester F110 is more suitable emulsifier when it comes to manufacturing this beverage than the F160, and also contributes to extending product shelf-life.

  2. tRNAHis 5-methylcytidine levels increase in response to several growth arrest conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Melanie A; D'Silva, Sonia; Kon, Yoshiko; Phizicky, Eric M

    2013-02-01

    tRNAs are highly modified, each with a unique set of modifications. Several reports suggest that tRNAs are hypomodified or, in some cases, hypermodified under different growth conditions and in certain cancers. We previously demonstrated that yeast strains depleted of tRNA(His) guanylyltransferase accumulate uncharged tRNA(His) lacking the G(-1) residue and subsequently accumulate additional 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) at residues C(48) and C(50) of tRNA(His), due to the activity of the m(5)C-methyltransferase Trm4. We show here that the increase in tRNA(His) m(5)C levels does not require loss of Thg1, loss of G(-1) of tRNA(His), or cell death but is associated with growth arrest following different stress conditions. We find substantially increased tRNA(His) m(5)C levels after temperature-sensitive strains are grown at nonpermissive temperature, and after wild-type strains are grown to stationary phase, starved for required amino acids, or treated with rapamycin. We observe more modest accumulations of m(5)C in tRNA(His) after starvation for glucose and after starvation for uracil. In virtually all cases examined, the additional m(5)C on tRNA(His) occurs while cells are fully viable, and the increase is neither due to the GCN4 pathway, nor to increased Trm4 levels. Moreover, the increased m(5)C appears specific to tRNA(His), as tRNA(Val(AAC)) and tRNA(Gly(GCC)) have much reduced additional m(5)C during these growth arrest conditions, although they also have C(48) and C(50) and are capable of having increased m(5)C levels. Thus, tRNA(His) m(5)C levels are unusually responsive to yeast growth conditions, although the significance of this additional m(5)C remains unclear.

  3. Response time variability under slow and fast-incentive conditions in children with ASD, ADHD and ASD+ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Charlotte; Johnson, Katherine A; Kelly, Simon P; Asherson, Philip; Kuntsi, Jonna; Ashwood, Karen L; Azadi, Bahare; Bolton, Patrick; McLoughlin, Gráinne

    2016-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show significant behavioural and genetic overlap. Both ADHD and ASD are characterised by poor performance on a range of cognitive tasks. In particular, increased response time variability (RTV) is a promising indicator of risk for both ADHD and ASD. However, it is not clear whether different indices of RTV and changes to RTV according to task conditions are able to discriminate between the two disorders. Children with ASD (n = 19), ADHD (n = 18), ASD + ADHD (n = 29) and typically developing controls (TDC; n = 26) performed a four-choice RT task with slow-baseline and fast-incentive conditions. Performance was characterised by mean RT (MRT), standard deviation of RT (SD-RT), coefficient of variation (CV) and ex-Gaussian distribution measures of Mu, Sigma and Tau. In the slow-baseline condition, categorical diagnoses and trait measures converged to indicate that children with ADHD-only and ASD + ADHD demonstrated increased MRT, SD-RT, CV and Tau compared to TDC and ASD-only. Importantly, greater improvement in MRT, SD-RT and Tau was demonstrated in ADHD and ASD + ADHD from slow-baseline to fast-incentive conditions compared to TDC and ASD-only. Slower and more variable RTs are markers of ADHD compared to ASD and typically developing controls during slow and less rewarding conditions. Energetic factors and rewards improve task performance to a greater extent in children with ADHD compared to children with ASD. These findings suggest that RTV can be distinguished in ASD, ADHD and ASD + ADHD based on the indices of variability used and the conditions in which they are elicited. Further work identifying neural processes underlying increased RTV is warranted, in order to elucidate disorder-specific and disorder-convergent aetiological pathways. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for

  4. The effects of extended nap periods on cognitive, physiological and subjective responses under simulated night shift conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Jonathan; Göbel, Matthias

    2017-11-16

    Extended nap opportunities have been effective in maintaining alertness in the context of extended night shifts (+12 h). However, there is limited evidence of their efficacy during 8-h shifts. Thus, this study explored the effects of extended naps on cognitive, physiological and perceptual responses during four simulated, 8-h night shifts. In a laboratory setting, 32 participants were allocated to one of three conditions. All participants completed four consecutive, 8-h night shifts, with the arrangements differing by condition. The fixed night condition worked from 22h00 to 06h00, while the nap early group worked from 20h00 to 08h00 and napped between 00h00 and 03h20. The nap late group worked from 00h00 to 12h00 and napped between 04h00 and 07h20. Nap length was limited to 3 hours and 20 minutes. Participants performed a simple beading task during each shift, while also completing six to eight test batteries roughly every 2 h. During each shift, six test batteries were completed, in which the following measures were taken. Performance indicators included beading output, eye accommodation time, choice reaction time, visual vigilance, simple reaction time, processing speed and object recognition, working memory, motor response time and tracking performance. Physiological measures included heart rate and tympanic temperature, whereas subjective sleepiness and reported sleep length and quality while outside the laboratory constituted the self reported measures. Both naps reduced subjective sleepiness but did not alter the circadian and homeostatic-related changes in cognitive and physiological measures, relative to the fixed night condition. Additionally, there was evidence of sleep inertia following each nap, which resulted in transient reductions in certain perceptual cognitive performance measures. The present study suggested that there were some benefits associated with including an extended nap during 8-h night shifts. However, the effects of sleep inertia

  5. Influence of space allowance and housing conditions on the welfare, immune response and production performance of dairy ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Annicchiarico, Giovanni; Schena, Laura; Muscio, Antonio; Migliore, Raffaella; Sevi, Agostino

    2009-02-01

    The experiment used 45 Comisana ewes, divided into 3 groups of 15. The aim was to determine the effects of two different stocking densities and two different housing conditions on welfare, and on production performance of dairy ewes. The stocking densities tested were: high stocking density (1 x 5 m2/ewe, HD group) and low stocking density (3 m2/ewe, LD group); the two housing conditions tested were: ewes housed indoors (LD group, 3 m2/ewe) and ewes allowed to use an outdoor area (LDP group, 3 m2/ewe divided into 1 x 5 m2/ewe indoors and 1 x 5 m2/ewe outdoors). At the beginning of the experiment, and then every 2 months, the cell-mediated immune status of sheep was evaluated. One month after the beginning of the experiment, and 20 d later, the ewes were injected with chicken egg albumin (OVA) to assess their humoural immune responses. Starting from the beginning of the experiment and then monthly, behavioural activities of ewes were monitored using 15-min scans. After lamb weaning, milk yield from individual ewes was measured and milk composition analysed weekly. Housing conditions (low density reared ewes indoors v. low density reared ewes with free access to an outdoor area) affected cell-mediated response, which was higher in LDP than in LD ewes. Concentrations of anti-OVA IgG were mainly influenced by space allowance, with higher antibody titres in LD than in HD ewes throughout the experiment. Both housing conditions and space allowance affected sheep behavioural activities: a greater proportion of LDP ewes displayed standing and drinking behaviours than LD ewes, and a greater proportion of LD ewes was observed walking than HD ewes. Ewes allowed access to the outdoor area had a higher protein content and lower somatic cell count in their milk, whereas reduced space allowance led to a reduction in milk yield and an increase in somatic cell count of milk. Results indicate that both increased space allowance and availability of outdoor area can improve the welfare

  6. Compositional differences of phenolic compounds between black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) cultivars and their response to latitude and weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Yang, Baoru; Ruusunen, Ville; Laaksonen, Oskar; Tahvonen, Risto; Hellsten, Jorma; Kallio, Heikki

    2012-07-04

    Phenolic compounds in black currants of three Finnish cultivars and their response to growth latitude and weather conditions were analyzed over a six-year period. 'Melalahti' had lower contents of total phenolic compounds (31.4% and 29.2% lower than 'Mortti' and 'Ola', respectively), total anthocyanins (32.6% and 30.5%), and total hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (23.1% and 23.8%) (p 0.05) but increased as the latitude increased in 'Mortti' and 'Ola' (p < 0.05). Temperature and radiation were the major weather variables influencing the composition of phenolic compounds. Delphinidin-3-O-glucoside, delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside, and myricetin-3-O-glucoside content showed positive correlations with temperature and radiation in all three cultivars. The study gives important guidelines for the selection of raw materials and growth sites as well as for the berry cultivation for commercial exploitation of black currant berries.

  7. Measurement of Behavioral Taste Responses in Mice: Two-Bottle Preference, Lickometer, and Conditioned Taste-Aversion Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Dany; Stratford, Jennifer M

    2016-12-01

    The natural like and dislike of foods based on taste is one of the most easily observed behaviors in animals. Animals eat palatable foods and reject aversive foods, which makes measurement of taste perception possible using various behavioral techniques. Three different methods to accurately measure taste behavior are described here. First, two-bottle preference tests evaluate whether a taste compound (tastant) is preferred over water. Second, lickometer tests quantify the like and dislike for multiple concentrations of the same tastant or multiple tastants at the same time. Finally, conditioned taste aversion tests accurately determine the perceived taste threshold for palatable tastants. Together, these diverse methods enable researchers to observe and measure behavioral taste responses in mice to any tastant. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows across a range of body condition scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Hostens, M; Van Eetvelde, M; Hermans, K; Moerman, S; Bogaert, H; Depreester, E; Van den Broeck, W; Opsomer, G

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present research was to determine the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS). Ten pregnant Holstein Friesian dairy cows (upcoming parity 2 to 5) were selected based on BCS at the beginning of the study (2mo before expected parturition date). During the study, animals were monitored weekly for BCS and backfat thickness and in the last 2wk, blood samples were taken for determination of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration. Animals underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test in the third week before the expected parturition date. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test consisted of 4 consecutive insulin infusions with increasing insulin doses: 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 5mIU/kg per minute. For each insulin infusion period, a steady state was defined as a period of 30min where no or minor changes of the glucose infusion were necessary to keep the blood glucose concentration constant and near basal levels. During the steady state, the glucose infusion rate [steady state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR) in µmol/kg per minute] and NEFA concentration [steady state NEFA concentration (SSNEFA) in mmol/L] were determined and reflect the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Dose response curves were created based on the insulin concentrations during the steady state and the SSGIR or SSNEFA. The shape of the dose response curves is determined by the concentration of insulin needed to elicit the half maximal effect (EC50) and the maximal SSGIR or the minimal SSNEFA for the glucose or fatty acid metabolism, respectively. The maximal SSGIR was negatively associated with variables reflecting adiposity of the cows (BCS, backfat thickness, NEFA concentration during the dry period, and absolute weight of the different adipose depots determined after euthanasia and dissection of the different depots), whereas the EC50 of the glucose metabolism was

  9. Optimization of synthesis conditions of PbS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yücel, Ersin, E-mail: dr.ersinyucel@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mustafa Kemal University, 31034 Hatay (Turkey); Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mustafa Kemal University, 31034 Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • For the first time, RSM and CCD used for optimization of PbS thin film. • Tri-sodium citrate, deposition time and temperature were independent variables. • PbS thin film band gap value was 2.20 eV under the optimum conditions. • Quality of the film was improved after chemometrics optimization. - Abstract: In this study, PbS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD) under different deposition parameters. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize synthesis parameters including amount of tri-sodium citrate (0.2–0.8 mL), deposition time (14–34 h) and deposition temperature (26.6–43.4 °C) for deposition of the films. 5-level-3-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to evaluate effects of the deposition parameters on the response (optical band gap of the films). The significant level of both the main effects and the interaction are investigated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV–visible spectrophotometer. The optimum amount of tri-sodium citrate, deposition time and deposition temperature were found to be 0.7 mL, 18.07 h and 30 °C respectively. Under these conditions, the experimental band gap of PbS was 2.20 eV, which is quite good correlation with value (1.98 eV) predicted by the model.

  10. INTUBATIONS CONDITIONS AND HOMODYNAMIC RESPONSES UNDER ANESTHESIA INDUCTION WITH THREE COMBINATION DRUGS: ALFENTANIL- MIDAZOLAM, ALFENTANIL- THIOPENTAL AND ALFENTANIL- KETAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SOLTANI NEZHAD

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Administration of alfentanil followed by propofol intravenously (IV without neuromuscular blockage for induction of anesthesia provides adaquate conditions for tracheal intubation. Other hypnotic drugs have not been thoroughly investigated in this regard. The aim of the present study was comparison of intubation conditions and hemodynamic responses of anesthesia induction with alfentanil/midazolam, alfentanil/Na thiopental and alfentanil/ ketamine. Methods. In a clinical trial study one hundred and twenty children were randomly allocated to four groups. Medication in these groups were alfentanil 40 µg/kg+ midazolam 200 µg/kg,alfentanil 40 µg/kg+Na thiopental 6 µg/kg, alfentanil 40 µg/kg+ketamin 2 mg/kg & Na thipental 6 mg/kg+suxamethonium 2 mg/kg (as control group. In all patients the ease of ventilation via face mask, jaw mobility, degree of exposure and position of vocal cords, patient's response to tracheal intubation, duration of time was needed for intubation and hemodynamic changes after intubation were assessed and recorded. Findings. There are significant differences between first three groups (interventional groups for jaw mebility, ventilation, vocal cord visuality, vocal cord position, patient movement during laryngoscopy and mean laryngoscopy time, (P < 0.05. There is significant difference between all groups of nesdonal+alfentanil except for patient movement. There is significant difference between mean SBP and PR before and after intubation in first and third group. Conclusion. Results represent that the group of Alfentanil plus Nesdonal had a better quality of ventilation rather than two other groups. It is recommended that administration of alfentanil plus thiopental combination is preferred in cases that using muscle relaxant is contraindicated.

  11. Characterization of Melanogenesis Inhibitory Constituents of Morus alba Leaves and Optimization of Extraction Conditions Using Response Surface Methodology

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    Ji Yeon Jeong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanin is a natural pigment that plays an important role in the protection of skin, however, hyperpigmentation cause by excessive levels of melatonin is associated with several problems. Therefore, melanogenesis inhibitory natural products have been developed by the cosmetic industry as skin medications. The leaves of Morus alba (Moraceae have been reported to inhibit melanogenesis, therefore, characterization of the melanogenesis inhibitory constituents of M. alba leaves was attempted in this study. Twenty compounds including eight benzofurans, 10 flavonoids, one stilbenoid and one chalcone were isolated from M. alba leaves and these phenolic constituents were shown to significantly inhibit tyrosinase activity and melanin content in B6F10 melanoma cells. To maximize the melanogenesis inhibitory activity and active phenolic contents, optimized M. alba leave extraction conditions were predicted using response surface methodology as a methanol concentration of 85.2%; an extraction temperature of 53.2 °C and an extraction time of 2 h. The tyrosinase inhibition and total phenolic content under optimal conditions were found to be 74.8% inhibition and 24.8 μg GAE/mg extract, which were well-matched with the predicted values of 75.0% inhibition and 23.8 μg GAE/mg extract. These results shall provide useful information about melanogenesis inhibitory constituents and optimized extracts from M. alba leaves as cosmetic therapeutics to reduce skin hyperpigmentation.

  12. Farm to abattoir conditions, animal factors and their subsequent effects on cattle behavioural responses and beef quality — A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonela Zifikile Njisane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current review seeks to highlight the concerns that have been raised on pre-slaughter stress, contributing factors and its consequent effects on cattle behavioural responses and the quality of beef; inter-linking the activities involved from birth to slaughter. Such information is crucial in light of the consumer concerns on overall animal welfare, quality of meat and food security. Slaughter animals are exposed to different conditions during production and transportation to abattoirs on a daily basis. However; the majority of studies that have been done previously singled out different environments in the meat production chain, while conclusions have been made that the welfare of slaughter animals and the quality of meat harvested from them is dependent on the whole chain. Behaviour is a critical component used to evaluate the animals’ wellbeing and it has been reported to have an effect on product quality. Apart from the influence of on-farm, transportation and abattoir conditions, the genetic background of the animal also affects how it perceives and responds to certain encounters. Stress activates the animals’ hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity, triggering release of various stress hormones such as catecholamines and cortisol, thus glycogen depletion prior slaughter, elevated ultimate pH and poor muscle-meat conversion. Pre-slaughter stress sometimes results to cattle attaining bruises, resulting to the affected parts of the carcass being trimmed and condemned for human consumption, downgrading of the carcass and thus profit losses.

  13. Optimization of conditions for probiotic curd formulation by Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 with probiotic properties using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Goveas, Louella Concepta; Prakash, Maya; Halami, Prakash M; Narayan, Bhaskar

    2014-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5695 possessing potential probiotic properties as well as enterocin producing ability was used as starter culture. Effect of time (12-24 h) and inoculum level (3-7 % v/v) on cell growth, bacteriocin production, antioxidant property, titrable acidity and pH of curd was studied by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized conditions were 26.48 h and 2.17%v/v inoculum and the second order model validated. Co cultivation studies revealed that the formulated product had the ability to prevent growth of foodborne pathogens that affect keeping quality of the product during storage. The results indicated that application of E. faecium MTCC 5695 along with usage of optimized conditions attributed to the formation of highly consistent well set curd with bioactive and bioprotective properties. Formulated curd with potential probiotic attributes can be used as therapeutic agent for the treatment of foodborne diseases like Traveler's diarrhea and gastroenteritis which thereby help in improvement of bowel health.

  14. A highly unstable transcript makes CwlO D,L-endopeptidase expression responsive to growth conditions in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, David; Salzberg, Letal I; Botella, Eric; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Devine, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis cell wall is a dynamic structure, composed of peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, that is continually remodeled during growth. Remodeling is effected by the combined activities of penicillin binding proteins and autolysins that participate in the synthesis and turnover of peptidoglycan, respectively. It has been established that one or the other of the CwlO and LytE D,L-endopeptidase-type autolysins is essential for cell viability, a requirement that is fulfilled by coordinate control of their expression by WalRK and SigI RsgI. Here we report on the regulation of cwlO expression. The cwlO transcript is very unstable, with its degradation initiated by RNase Y cleavage within the 187-nucleotide leader sequence. An antisense cwlO transcript of heterogeneous length is expressed from a SigB promoter that has the potential to control cellular levels of cwlO RNA and protein under stress conditions. We discuss how a multiplicity of regulatory mechanisms makes CwlO expression and activity responsive to the prevailing growth conditions.

  15. Recent advances in modeling and simulation of the exposure and response of tungsten to fusion energy conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Jaime; Becquart, Charlotte S.; Domain, Christophe; Dudarev, Sergei L.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Mason, Daniel R.; Nordlund, Kai; Sand, Andrea E.; Snead, Lance L.; Suzudo, Tomoaki; Wirth, Brian D.

    2017-09-01

    Under the anticipated operating conditions for demonstration magnetic fusion reactors beyond ITER, structural and plasma-facing materials will be exposed to unprecedented conditions of irradiation, heat flux, and temperature. While such extreme environments remain inaccessible experimentally, computational modeling and simulation can provide qualitative and quantitative insights into materials response and complement the available experimental measurements with carefully validated predictions. For plasma-facing components such as the first wall and the divertor, tungsten (W) has been selected as the leading candidate material due to its superior high-temperature and irradiation properties, as well as for its low retention of implanted tritium. In this paper we provide a review of recent efforts in computational modeling of W both as a plasma-facing material exposed to He deposition as well as a bulk material subjected to fast neutron irradiation. We use a multiscale modeling approach—commonly used as the materials modeling paradigm—to define the outline of the paper and highlight recent advances using several classes of techniques and their interconnection. We highlight several of the most salient findings obtained via computational modeling and point out a number of remaining challenges and future research directions.

  16. A new, simple method for the production of meat-curing pigment under optimised conditions using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2012-12-01

    The production of cured meat pigment using nitrite and ascorbate in acidic conditions was evaluated. HCl, ascorbate and nitrite concentrations were optimised at three levels using the response surface method (RSM). The effects of process variables on the nitrosoheme yield, the wavelength of maximum absorbance (λ(max)), and L*, a* and b* values were evaluated. The response surface equations indicate that variables exerted a significant effect on all dependent factors. The optimum combinations for the reaction were HCl=-0.8, ascorbate=0.46 and nitrite=1.00 as coded values for conversion of 1mM hemin to nitrosoheme, by which a pigment yield of 100%, which was similar to the predicted value of 99.5%, was obtained. Likewise, the other parameters were not significantly different from predicted values as the λ(max), L*, a* and b* values were 558 nm, 47.03, 45.17 and 17.20, respectively. The structure of the pigment was identified using FTIR and ESI/MS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of response to backtest and housing condition on cell-mediated and humoral immunity in adult pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geverink, N A; Parmentier, H K; de Vries Reilingh, G; Schouten, W G P; Gort, G; Wiegant, V M

    2004-01-01

    Several recent studies in juvenile pigs demonstrated a relationship between the degree of resistance displayed early in life in a so-called "backtest" and parameters of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Some of the immune characteristics were reported to depend on the interaction between backtest classification and housing system. In the present study, the effects of backtest classification and housing condition on immune reactivity in adult gilts were examined. At 10 and 17 days of age, female piglets were subjected to the backtest. In this test, each piglet is restrained on its back for 1 min and the number of escape attempts is scored. Pigs classified as high resisting (HR) or low resisting (LR) were selected and housed in groups of six gilts. At 7 months of age, half of the gilts were housed in individual stalls. At 12 months of age, gilts were challenged by immunization with DNP-KLH. Control gilts were treated similarly with a placebo. Blood samples were drawn prior to immunization (Day 0) and weekly thereafter until Day 28. No significant effects of backtest type on cellular and humoral responses against KLH were found. Furthermore, being housed in stalls as compared to groups had no consequences for the immune response and did not induce differences between HR and LR gilts. Differences in behavior and physiology found previously between HR and LR gilts, particularly in gilts in stall housing, may thus be of relatively little importance for immune-related health.

  18. Stochastic Unit Commitment of Wind-Integrated Power System Considering Air-Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a result of extensive penetration of wind farms into electricity grids, power systems face enormous challenges in daily operation because of the intermittent characteristics of wind energy. In particular, the load peak-valley gap has been dramatically widened in wind energy-integrated power systems. How to quickly and efficiently meet the peak-load demand has become an issue to practitioners. Previous literature has illustrated that the demand response (DR is an important mechanism to direct customer usage behaviors and reduce the peak load at critical times. This paper introduces air-conditioning loads (ACLs as a load shedding measure in the DR project. On the basis of the equivalent thermal parameter model for ACLs and the state-queue control method, a compensation cost calculation method for the ACL to shift peak load is proposed. As a result of the fluctuation and uncertainty of wind energy, a two-stage stochastic unit commitment (UC model is developed to analyze the ACL users’ response in the wind-integrated power system. A simulation study on residential and commercial ACLs has been performed on a 10-generator test system. The results illustrate the feasibility of the proposed stochastic programming strategy and that the system peak load can be effectively reduced through the participation of ACL users in DR projects.

  19. Physiological responses of juvenile rainbow trout to fasting and swimming activity: Effects on body composition and condition indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The physiological traits that allow fish to survive periods of limited food resources are poorly understood. We assessed changes in proximate body composition, relative organ mass, blood metabolites, and relative weight (Wr) of sedentary and actively swimming (15 cm/s) juvenile rainbow trout (154-182 mm total length) over 147 d of fasting. Fasting caused measurable responses that were augmented when fish were swimming. Lipids and plasma triacylglycerides declined over time. Proteins were catabolized simultaneously with lipid reserves, but ammonia concentrations in plasma did not increase. The liver somatic index (LSI) did not change substantially over 105 d, suggesting that gluconeogenesis maintained blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen reserves for a substantial period of fasting. The gut somatic index (GSI) and Wr declined linearly during fasting, but the LSI did not decline until after 105 d of fasting. Consequently, the use of different body condition indices could lead to different conclusions about the condition of juvenile rainbow trout. Swimming activity caused fish to have lower lipid and protein reserves than those of sedentary fish. No mortalities were observed among sedentary fish, but mortalities occurred among actively swimming fish after 97 d of fasting when 3.2% or less lipid remained in their bodies. Body condition indices did not account for differences in proximate body composition between sedentary and actively swimming fish and were relatively poor predictors of lipid content and risk of mortality. The probability of mortality was most accurately predicted by percent lipid content. Therefore, we suggest that fisheries scientists consider using percent lipid content when evaluating the physiological status and risk of mortality due to starvation among juvenile rainbow trout.

  20. Effects of seasonal differences in testosterone and cortisol levels on pain responses under resting and anxiety conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Chan; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Myung-il; Seo, Sang Min; Lim, Hyun Kyo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether hormones and pain perception are associated with exam anxiety, and also whether exam anxiety is affected by seasonal differences in testosterone and cortisol levels. Forty-six healthy males were recruited from a medical college. Anxiety was induced by having participants perform the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Pressure was applied to the participants to induce pain. Pain thresholds, pain ratings, anxiety ratings, blood pressure, heart rate, salivary testosterone and cortisol levels were measured under resting and anxiety conditions in the spring and summer. Data were collected from 46 participants during the spring (n=25) and summer (n=21). Pain thresholds and testosterone levels were significantly lower under anxiety than at rest for all participants (n=46), while cortisol levels, pain ratings, and anxiety ratings were significantly higher under anxiety than at rest. In the spring (n=25), testosterone levels were significantly higher at rest than under anxiety, while there was no difference in cortisol levels between resting and anxiety conditions. In the summer (n=21), cortisol levels were significantly higher under anxiety than at rest, while there was no difference in testosterone levels between resting and anxiety conditions. There were no significant seasonal differences in pain and anxiety ratings and pain threshold. These results indicate that seasonal differences in testosterone and cortisol levels under anxiety and at rest may affect pain responses. These results also suggest that acute clinical pain may be relieved by managing anxiety that is related to a decrease of testosterone in spring and a large increase of cortisol in summer.

  1. Thyroid Allostasis–Adaptive Responses of Thyrotropic Feedback Control to Conditions of Strain, Stress, and Developmental Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Chatzitomaris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid feedback control is a dynamic, adaptive system. In situations of illness and deprivation of energy representing type 1 allostasis, the stress response operates to alter both its set point and peripheral transfer parameters. In contrast, type 2 allostatic load, typically effective in psychosocial stress, pregnancy, metabolic syndrome, and adaptation to cold, produces a nearly opposite phenotype of predictive plasticity. The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS or thyroid allostasis in critical illness, tumors, uremia, and starvation (TACITUS, commonly observed in hospitalized patients, displays a historically well-studied pattern of allostatic thyroid response. This is characterized by decreased total and free thyroid hormone concentrations and varying levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH ranging from decreased (in severe cases to normal or even elevated (mainly in the recovery phase TSH concentrations. An acute versus chronic stage (wasting syndrome of TACITUS can be discerned. The two types differ in molecular mechanisms and prognosis. The acute adaptation of thyroid hormone metabolism to critical illness may prove beneficial to the organism, whereas the far more complex molecular alterations associated with chronic illness frequently lead to allostatic overload. The latter is associated with poor outcome, independently of the underlying disease. Adaptive responses of thyroid homeostasis extend to alterations in thyroid hormone concentrations during fetal life, periods of weight gain or loss, thermoregulation, physical exercise, and psychiatric diseases. The various forms of thyroid allostasis pose serious problems in differential diagnosis of thyroid disease. This review article provides an overview of physiological mechanisms as well as major diagnostic and therapeutic implications of thyroid allostasis under a variety of developmental and straining conditions.

  2. Role of Listeria monocytogenes sigma(B) in survival of lethal acidic conditions and in the acquired acid tolerance response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Adriana; Sue, David; O'Byrne, Conor P; Boor, Kathryn J

    2003-05-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can acquire enhanced resistance to lethal acid conditions through multiple mechanisms. We investigated contributions of the stress-responsive alternative sigma factor, sigma(B), which is encoded by sigB, to growth phase-dependent acid resistance (AR) and to the adaptive acid tolerance response in L. monocytogenes. At various points throughout growth, we compared the relative survival of L. monocytogenes wild-type and DeltasigB strains that had been exposed to either brain heart infusion (pH 2.5) or synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5) with and without prior acid adaptation. Under these conditions, survival of the DeltasigB strain was consistently lower than that of the wild-type strain throughout all phases of growth, ranging from 4 orders of magnitude less in mid-log phase to 2 orders of magnitude less in stationary phase. Survival of both DeltasigB and wild-type L. monocytogenes strains increased by 6 orders of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase, demonstrating that the L. monocytogenes growth phase-dependent AR mechanism is sigma(B) independent. sigma(B)-mediated contributions to acquired acid tolerance appear to be greatest in early logarithmic growth. Loss of a functional sigma(B) reduced the survival of L. monocytogenes at pH 2.5 to a greater extent in the presence of organic acid (100 mM acetic acid) than in the presence of inorganic acid alone (HCl), suggesting that L. monocytogenes protection against organic and inorganic acid may be mediated through different mechanisms. sigma(B) does not appear to contribute to pH(i) homeostasis through regulation of net proton movement across the cell membrane or by regulation of pH(i) buffering by the GAD system under the conditions examined in this study. In summary, a functional sigma(B) protein is necessary for full resistance of L. monocytogenes to lethal acid treatments.

  3. Microbial Activity Response to Solar Radiation across Contrasting Environmental Conditions in Salar de Huasco, Northern Chilean Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Klaudia L.; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse M.; Dorador, Cristina; Menschel, Eduardo J.; Molina, Verónica; Remonsellez, Francisco; Hengst, Martha B.; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2016-01-01

    In high altitude environments, extreme levels of solar radiation and important differences of ionic concentrations over narrow spatial scales may modulate microbial activity. In Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude wetland in the Andean mountains, the high diversity of microbial communities has been characterized and associated with strong environmental variability. Communities that differed in light history and environmental conditions, such as nutrient concentrations and salinity from different spatial locations, were assessed for bacterial secondary production (BSP, 3H-leucine incorporation) response from short-term exposures to solar radiation. We sampled during austral spring seven stations categorized as: (a) source stations, with recently emerged groundwater (no-previous solar exposure); (b) stream running water stations; (c) stations connected to source waters but far downstream from source points; and (d) isolated ponds disconnected from ground sources or streams with a longer isolation and solar exposure history. Very high values of 0.25 μE m-2 s-1, 72 W m-2 and 12 W m-2 were measured for PAR, UVA, and UVB incident solar radiation, respectively. The environmental factors measured formed two groups of stations reflected by principal component analyses (near to groundwater sources and isolated systems) where isolated ponds had the highest BSP and microbial abundance (35 microalgae taxa, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, and bacteria) plus higher salinities and PO43- concentrations. BSP short-term response (4 h) to solar radiation was measured by 3H-leucine incorporation under four different solar conditions: full sun, no UVB, PAR, and dark. Microbial communities established in waters with the longest surface exposure (e.g., isolated ponds) had the lowest BSP response to solar radiation treatments, and thus were likely best adapted to solar radiation exposure contrary to ground source waters. These results support our light history (solar exposure) hypothesis

  4. Microbial activity response to solar radiation across contrasting environmental conditions in Salar de Huasco, Northern Chilean Altiplano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Liliana Hernández

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In high altitude environments, extreme levels of solar radiation and important differences of ionic concentrations over narrow spatial scales may modulate microbial activity. In Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude wetland in the Andean mountains, the high diversity of microbial communities has been characterized and associated with strong environmental variability. Communities that differed in light history and environmental conditions, such as nutrient concentrations and salinity from different spatial locations, were assessed for bacterial secondary production (3H-leucine incorporation, BSP response from short-term exposures to solar radiation. We sampled during austral spring seven stations categorized as: a source stations, with recently emerged groundwater (no-previous solar exposure; b stream running water stations; c stations connected to source waters but far downstream from source points; and d isolated ponds disconnected from ground sources or streams with a longer isolation and solar exposure history. Very high values of 0.25 µE m-2 s-1, 72 W m-2 and 12 Wm-2 were measured for PAR, UVA, and UVB incident solar radiation, respectively. The environmental factors measured formed two groups of stations reflected by PCA analyses (near to groundwater sources and isolated systems where isolated ponds had the highest BSP and microbial abundance (35 microalgae taxa, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates and bacteria plus higher salinities and PO43- concentrations. BSP short-term response (4 h to solar radiation was measured by 3H-Leucine incorporation under four different solar conditions: full sun, no UVB, PAR, and dark. Microbial communities established in waters with the longest surface exposure (e.g. isolated ponds had the lowest BSP response to solar radiation treatments, and thus were likely best adapted to solar radiation exposure contrary to ground source waters. These results support our light history (solar exposure hypothesis where the more

  5. Microbial Activity Response to Solar Radiation across Contrasting Environmental Conditions in Salar de Huasco, Northern Chilean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Klaudia L; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse M; Dorador, Cristina; Menschel, Eduardo J; Molina, Verónica; Remonsellez, Francisco; Hengst, Martha B; Jeffrey, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    In high altitude environments, extreme levels of solar radiation and important differences of ionic concentrations over narrow spatial scales may modulate microbial activity. In Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude wetland in the Andean mountains, the high diversity of microbial communities has been characterized and associated with strong environmental variability. Communities that differed in light history and environmental conditions, such as nutrient concentrations and salinity from different spatial locations, were assessed for bacterial secondary production (BSP, 3 H-leucine incorporation) response from short-term exposures to solar radiation. We sampled during austral spring seven stations categorized as: (a) source stations, with recently emerged groundwater (no-previous solar exposure); (b) stream running water stations; (c) stations connected to source waters but far downstream from source points; and (d) isolated ponds disconnected from ground sources or streams with a longer isolation and solar exposure history. Very high values of 0.25 μE m -2 s -1 , 72 W m -2 and 12 W m -2 were measured for PAR, UVA, and UVB incident solar radiation, respectively. The environmental factors measured formed two groups of stations reflected by principal component analyses (near to groundwater sources and isolated systems) where isolated ponds had the highest BSP and microbial abundance (35 microalgae taxa, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, and bacteria) plus higher salinities and PO 4 3- concentrations. BSP short-term response (4 h) to solar radiation was measured by 3 H-leucine incorporation under four different solar conditions: full sun, no UVB, PAR, and dark. Microbial communities established in waters with the longest surface exposure (e.g., isolated ponds) had the lowest BSP response to solar radiation treatments, and thus were likely best adapted to solar radiation exposure contrary to ground source waters. These results support our light history (solar exposure

  6. Selecting Populations for Non-Analogous Climate Conditions Using Universal Response Functions: The Case of Douglas-Fir in Central Europe