WorldWideScience

Sample records for conditional moment closure

  1. Modelling of Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion of Hydrogen using Conditional Moment Closure Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, M M; Hairuddin, A Aziz; Wandel, Andrew P; Yusaf, T F

    2012-01-01

    Most of the electricity generation and energy for transport is still generated by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy by burning the fuels in the combustion chamber. Regulation for pollution and the demand for more fuel economy had driven worldwide researcher to focus on combustion efficiency. In order to reduce experimental cost, accurate modelling and simulation is very critical step. Taylor series expansion was utilised to reduce the error term for the discretization. FORTRAN code was used to execute the discretized partial differential equation. Hydrogen combustion was simulated using Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model. Combustion of hydrogen with oxygen was successfully simulated and reported in this paper.

  2. Moment Closure for the Stochastic Logistic Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Abhyudai; Hespanha, Joao P

    2006-01-01

    ..., which we refer to as the moment closure function. In this paper, a systematic procedure for constructing moment closure functions of arbitrary order is presented for the stochastic logistic model...

  3. Current status of NO{sub x} prediction by conditional moment closure method for turbulent non premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, K.Y. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang, (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) are one of the most strictly regulated atmospheric pollutants originating from industrial and automotive combustion processes, and the development of an accurate prediction method has become an urgent research goal in both academic and engineering communities. NO{sub x} emissions are sensitive to most design parameters and operating conditions of combustion devices, since they are controlled by both chemical kinesis and turbulent mixing. This paper presented a summary of the current status of NO{sub x} prediction by the conditional moment closure (CMC) method, as well as details of experiments conducted to validate the CMC method. Recent validation results of first and second order CMC were discussed. It was suggested that given proper information on mixture composition and boundary conditions, it is possible to make accurate predictions of NO{sub x} employing detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon oxidation and NO{sub x}, even in extreme cases with significant local extinction. Four test flames were analyzed in this experiment: piloted jet, simple jet, MILD combustion, and bluffbody flames. Results indicate that first order closure is accurate enough for most flames not far from equilibrium, while significant improvements can be made near ignition or extinction limits by second-order closure. The CMC method can be applied to predict NO{sub x} emission in many practical combustion systems involving complicated flow fields. Details of mixing calculations and turbulence models were discussed along with issues concerning flame structure determined by chemistry and scalar dissipation. It was concluded that the CMC method is more accurate than approaches based on unconditional averaging, and computationally more efficient than other transport methods. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Multivariate moment closure techniques for stochastic kinetic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, Eszter, E-mail: e.lakatos13@imperial.ac.uk; Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H., E-mail: m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, Centre for Integrative Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    Stochastic effects dominate many chemical and biochemical processes. Their analysis, however, can be computationally prohibitively expensive and a range of approximation schemes have been proposed to lighten the computational burden. These, notably the increasingly popular linear noise approximation and the more general moment expansion methods, perform well for many dynamical regimes, especially linear systems. At higher levels of nonlinearity, it comes to an interplay between the nonlinearities and the stochastic dynamics, which is much harder to capture correctly by such approximations to the true stochastic processes. Moment-closure approaches promise to address this problem by capturing higher-order terms of the temporally evolving probability distribution. Here, we develop a set of multivariate moment-closures that allows us to describe the stochastic dynamics of nonlinear systems. Multivariate closure captures the way that correlations between different molecular species, induced by the reaction dynamics, interact with stochastic effects. We use multivariate Gaussian, gamma, and lognormal closure and illustrate their use in the context of two models that have proved challenging to the previous attempts at approximating stochastic dynamics: oscillations in p53 and Hes1. In addition, we consider a larger system, Erk-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling, where conventional stochastic simulation approaches incur unacceptably high computational costs.

  5. Conditional Hyperbolic Quadrature Method of Moments for Kinetic Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Rodney,; Laurent, Frédérique; Vié, Aymeric

    2017-01-01

    The conditional quadrature method of moments (CQMOM) was introduced by Yuan and Fox [J. Comput. Phys. 230 (22), 8216–8246 (2011)] to reconstruct a velocity distribution function (VDF) from a finite set of its integer moments. The reconstructed VDF takes the form of a sum of weighted Dirac delta functions in velocity phase space, and provides a closure for the spatial flux term in the corresponding kinetic equation. The CQMOM closure for the flux leads to a weakly hyperbolic system of moment e...

  6. Flow simulation in piping system dead legs using second moment, closure and k-epsilon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Mechitoua, N.; Mattei, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with an industrial application of second moment closure turbulence model in in numerical simulation of 3D turbulent flows in piping system dead legs. Calculations performed with the 3D ESTET code are presented which contrast the performance of k-epsilon eddy viscosity model and second moment closure turbulence models. Coarse (100 000), medium (400 000) and fine (1 500 000) meshes were used. The second moment closure performs significantly better than eddy viscosity model and predicts with a good agreement the vortex penetration in dead legs provided to use sufficiently refined meshes. The results point out the necessity to be able to perform calculations using fine mesh before introducing refined physical models such as second moment closure turbulence model in a numerical code. This study illustrates the ability of second moment closure turbulence model to simulate 3D turbulent industrial flows. Reynolds stress model computation does not require special care, the calculation is carried on as simply as the k-ξ one. The CPU time needed is less that twice the CPU time needed using k-ξ model. (authors)

  7. Asymptotic theory of integrated conditional moment tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierens, H.J.; Ploberger, W.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we derive the asymptotic distribution of the test statistic of a generalized version of the integrated conditional moment (ICM) test of Bierens (1982, 1984), under a class of Vn-local alternatives, where n is the sample size. The generalized version involved includes neural network

  8. Monte Carlo closure for moment-based transport schemes in general relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, Francois

    2018-04-01

    General relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations are necessary to accurately model a number of astrophysical systems involving black holes and neutron stars. Photon transport plays a crucial role in radiatively dominated accretion discs, while neutrino transport is critical to core-collapse supernovae and to the modelling of electromagnetic transients and nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. However, evolving the full Boltzmann equations of radiative transport is extremely expensive. Here, we describe the implementation in the general relativistic SPEC code of a cheaper radiation hydrodynamic method that theoretically converges to a solution of Boltzmann's equation in the limit of infinite numerical resources. The algorithm is based on a grey two-moment scheme, in which we evolve the energy density and momentum density of the radiation. Two-moment schemes require a closure that fills in missing information about the energy spectrum and higher order moments of the radiation. Instead of the approximate analytical closure currently used in core-collapse and merger simulations, we complement the two-moment scheme with a low-accuracy Monte Carlo evolution. The Monte Carlo results can provide any or all of the missing information in the evolution of the moments, as desired by the user. As a first test of our methods, we study a set of idealized problems demonstrating that our algorithm performs significantly better than existing analytical closures. We also discuss the current limitations of our method, in particular open questions regarding the stability of the fully coupled scheme.

  9. Complete hierarchies of SIR models on arbitrary networks with exact and approximate moment closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Kieran J; Wilkinson, Robert R

    2015-06-01

    We first generalise ideas discussed by Kiss et al. (2015) to prove a theorem for generating exact closures (here expressing joint probabilities in terms of their constituent marginal probabilities) for susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) dynamics on arbitrary graphs (networks). For Poisson transmission and removal processes, this enables us to obtain a systematic reduction in the number of differential equations needed for an exact 'moment closure' representation of the underlying stochastic model. We define 'transmission blocks' as a possible extension of the block concept in graph theory and show that the order at which the exact moment closure representation is curtailed is the size of the largest transmission block. More generally, approximate closures of the hierarchy of moment equations for these dynamics are typically defined for the first and second order yielding mean-field and pairwise models respectively. It is frequently implied that, in principle, closed models can be written down at arbitrary order if only we had the time and patience to do this. However, for epidemic dynamics on networks, these higher-order models have not been defined explicitly. Here we unambiguously define hierarchies of approximate closed models that can utilise subsystem states of any order, and show how well-known models are special cases of these hierarchies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient algorithms and implementations of entropy-based moment closures for rarefied gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaerer, Roman Pascal, E-mail: schaerer@mathcces.rwth-aachen.de; Bansal, Pratyuksh; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    We present efficient algorithms and implementations of the 35-moment system equipped with the maximum-entropy closure in the context of rarefied gases. While closures based on the principle of entropy maximization have been shown to yield very promising results for moderately rarefied gas flows, the computational cost of these closures is in general much higher than for closure theories with explicit closed-form expressions of the closing fluxes, such as Grad's classical closure. Following a similar approach as Garrett et al. (2015) , we investigate efficient implementations of the computationally expensive numerical quadrature method used for the moment evaluations of the maximum-entropy distribution by exploiting its inherent fine-grained parallelism with the parallelism offered by multi-core processors and graphics cards. We show that using a single graphics card as an accelerator allows speed-ups of two orders of magnitude when compared to a serial CPU implementation. To accelerate the time-to-solution for steady-state problems, we propose a new semi-implicit time discretization scheme. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved with a Newton type method in the Lagrange multipliers of the dual optimization problem in order to reduce the computational cost. Additionally, fully explicit time-stepping schemes of first and second order accuracy are presented. We investigate the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical schemes for several numerical test cases, including a steady-state shock-structure problem.

  11. Efficient algorithms and implementations of entropy-based moment closures for rarefied gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaerer, Roman Pascal; Bansal, Pratyuksh; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    We present efficient algorithms and implementations of the 35-moment system equipped with the maximum-entropy closure in the context of rarefied gases. While closures based on the principle of entropy maximization have been shown to yield very promising results for moderately rarefied gas flows, the computational cost of these closures is in general much higher than for closure theories with explicit closed-form expressions of the closing fluxes, such as Grad's classical closure. Following a similar approach as Garrett et al. (2015) [13], we investigate efficient implementations of the computationally expensive numerical quadrature method used for the moment evaluations of the maximum-entropy distribution by exploiting its inherent fine-grained parallelism with the parallelism offered by multi-core processors and graphics cards. We show that using a single graphics card as an accelerator allows speed-ups of two orders of magnitude when compared to a serial CPU implementation. To accelerate the time-to-solution for steady-state problems, we propose a new semi-implicit time discretization scheme. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved with a Newton type method in the Lagrange multipliers of the dual optimization problem in order to reduce the computational cost. Additionally, fully explicit time-stepping schemes of first and second order accuracy are presented. We investigate the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical schemes for several numerical test cases, including a steady-state shock-structure problem.

  12. A variational approach to moment-closure approximations for the kinetics of biomolecular reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Leo; Koeppl, Heinz

    2018-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the chemical master equation and the chemical Fokker-Planck equation are an important tool in the analysis of biomolecular reaction networks. Previous studies have highlighted a number of problems with the moment-closure approach used to obtain such approximations, calling it an ad hoc method. In this article, we give a new variational derivation of moment-closure equations which provides us with an intuitive understanding of their properties and failure modes and allows us to correct some of these problems. We use mixtures of product-Poisson distributions to obtain a flexible parametric family which solves the commonly observed problem of divergences at low system sizes. We also extend the recently introduced entropic matching approach to arbitrary ansatz distributions and Markov processes, demonstrating that it is a special case of variational moment closure. This provides us with a particularly principled approximation method. Finally, we extend the above approaches to cover the approximation of multi-time joint distributions, resulting in a viable alternative to process-level approximations which are often intractable.

  13. A Necessary Moment Condition for the Fractional Central Limit Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the moment condition for the fractional functional central limit theorem (FCLT) for partial sums of x(t)=¿^{-d}u(t) , where -1/2classical condition is existence of q=2 and q>1/(d+1/2) moments...... of the innovation sequence. When d is close to -1/2 this moment condition is very strong. Our main result is to show that when -1/2conditions on u(t), the existence of q=1/(d+1/2) moments is in fact necessary for the FCLT for fractionally integrated processes and that q>1/(d+1....../2) moments are necessary for more general fractional processes. Davidson and de Jong (2000, Econometric Theory 16, 643-- 666) presented a fractional FCLT where onlyq>2 finite moments are assumed. As a corollary to our main theorem we show that their moment condition is not sufficient and hence...

  14. Comparison of maximum entropy and quadrature-based moment closures for shock transitions prediction in one-dimensional gaskinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante, Jérémie; Groth, Clinton P. T.

    2016-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) equations are conventionally used to model continuum flow near local thermodynamic equilibrium. In the presence of more rarefied flows, there exists a transitional regime in which the NSF equations no longer hold, and where particle-based methods become too expensive for practical problems. To close this gap, moment closure techniques having the potential of being both valid and computationally tractable for these applications are sought. In this study, a number of five-moment closures for a model one-dimensional kinetic equation are assessed and compared. In particular, four different moment closures are applied to the solution of stationary shocks. The first of these is a Grad-type moment closure, which is known to fail for moderate departures from equilibrium. The second is an interpolative closure based on maximization of thermodynamic entropy which has previously been shown to provide excellent results for 1D gaskinetic theory. Additionally, two quadrature methods of moments (QMOM) are considered. One method is based on the representation of the distribution function in terms of a combination of three Dirac delta functions. The second method, an extended QMOM (EQMOM), extends the quadrature-based approach by assuming a bi-Maxwellian representation of the distribution function. The closing fluxes are analyzed in each case and the region of physical realizability is examined for the closures. Numerical simulations of stationary shock structures as predicted by each moment closure are compared to reference kinetic and the corresponding NSF-like equation solutions. It is shown that the bi-Maxwellian and interpolative maximum-entropy-based moment closures are able to closely reproduce the results of the true maximum-entropy distribution closure for this case very well, whereas the other methods do not. For moderate departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium, the Grad-type and QMOM closures produced unphysical subshocks and were

  15. Hamiltonian fluid closures of the Vlasov-Ampère equations: From water-bags to N moment models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perin, M.; Chandre, C.; Tassi, E. [Aix-Marseille Université, Université de Toulon, CNRS, CPT UMR 7332, 13288 Marseille (France); Morrison, P. J. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1060 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Moment closures of the Vlasov-Ampère system, whereby higher moments are represented as functions of lower moments with the constraint that the resulting fluid system remains Hamiltonian, are investigated by using water-bag theory. The link between the water-bag formalism and fluid models that involve density, fluid velocity, pressure and higher moments is established by introducing suitable thermodynamic variables. The cases of one, two, and three water-bags are treated and their Hamiltonian structures are provided. In each case, we give the associated fluid closures and we discuss their Casimir invariants. We show how the method can be extended to an arbitrary number of fields, i.e., an arbitrary number of water-bags and associated moments. The thermodynamic interpretation of the resulting models is discussed. Finally, a general procedure to derive Hamiltonian N-field fluid models is proposed.

  16. Predictions for heat transfer characteristics in a natural draft reactor cooling system using a second moment closure turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, M.; Maekawa, I.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical study is performed on the natural draft reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). In the cooling system, buoyancy driven heated upward flow could be in the mixed convection regime that is accompanied by heat transfer impairment. Also, the heating wall condition is asymmetric with regard to the channel cross section. These flow regime and thermal boundary conditions may invalidate the use of design correlation. To precisely simulate the flow and thermal fields within the RCCS, the second moment closure turbulence model is applied. Two types of the RCCS channel geometry are selected to make a comparison: an annular duct with fins on the outer surface of the inner circular wall, and a multi-rectangular duct. The prediction shows that the local heat transfer coefficient on the RCCS with finned annular duct is less than 1/6 of that estimated with Dittus-Boelter correlation. Much portion of the natural draft airflow does not contribute cooling at all because mainstream escapes from the narrow gaps between the fins. This result and thus the finned annulus design are unacceptable from the viewpoint for structural integrity of the RCCS wall boundary. The performance of the multi-rectangular duct design is acceptable that the RCCS maximum temperature is less than 400 degree centigrade even when the flow rate is halved from the designed condition. (author)

  17. Development of high fidelity soot aerosol dynamics models using method of moments with interpolative closure

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Subrata P.

    2014-01-28

    The method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) for soot formation and growth provides a detailed modeling framework maintaining a good balance in generality, accuracy, robustness, and computational efficiency. This study presents several computational issues in the development and implementation of the MOMIC-based soot modeling for direct numerical simulations (DNS). The issues of concern include a wide dynamic range of numbers, choice of normalization, high effective Schmidt number of soot particles, and realizability of the soot particle size distribution function (PSDF). These problems are not unique to DNS, but they are often exacerbated by the high-order numerical schemes used in DNS. Four specific issues are discussed in this article: the treatment of soot diffusion, choice of interpolation scheme for MOMIC, an approach to deal with strongly oxidizing environments, and realizability of the PSDF. General, robust, and stable approaches are sought to address these issues, minimizing the use of ad hoc treatments such as clipping. The solutions proposed and demonstrated here are being applied to generate new physical insight into complex turbulence-chemistry-soot-radiation interactions in turbulent reacting flows using DNS. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical channel: a tool for second moment closure modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupu, V.; Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d`Hydraulique; Boudjemadi, E.; Le Quere, P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Orsay (France)

    1996-12-31

    Natural turbulent convection in a differentially heated infinite vertical slot is computed with a mixed finite differences/Fourier code. At a Rayleigh number of 10{sup 5}, in the case without mean stratification, periodic perturbations from the laminar solution develop and transition to a fully turbulent flow occurs. From then on, a database of one-point statistics is presented: mean velocity and temperature, Reynolds stress components, turbulent heat fluxes and variance of temperature, but also budgets of second moment equations. This database is then used for testing of a second moment closure based on the Launder-Reece-Rodi model on an elliptic relaxation for near wall effects on pressure redistribution. This level of modelling is required by the presence of counter gradient fluxes, which cannot be accounted for eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity assumptions. Furthermore, an algebraic third order moment closure was found necessary because of counter gradient turbulent transport terms which appear to mainly originate from the mean velocity and temperature gradient terms usually neglected in conventional transport models, such as the standard Daly-Harlow or Hanjalic-Launder models. (authors). 18 refs.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical channel: a tool for second moment closure modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupu, V.; Laurence, D.

    1996-01-01

    Natural turbulent convection in a differentially heated infinite vertical slot is computed with a mixed finite differences/Fourier code. At a Rayleigh number of 10 5 , in the case without mean stratification, periodic perturbations from the laminar solution develop and transition to a fully turbulent flow occurs. From then on, a database of one-point statistics is presented: mean velocity and temperature, Reynolds stress components, turbulent heat fluxes and variance of temperature, but also budgets of second moment equations. This database is then used for testing of a second moment closure based on the Launder-Reece-Rodi model on an elliptic relaxation for near wall effects on pressure redistribution. This level of modelling is required by the presence of counter gradient fluxes, which cannot be accounted for eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity assumptions. Furthermore, an algebraic third order moment closure was found necessary because of counter gradient turbulent transport terms which appear to mainly originate from the mean velocity and temperature gradient terms usually neglected in conventional transport models, such as the standard Daly-Harlow or Hanjalic-Launder models. (authors)

  20. Implementation of second moment closure turbulence model for incompressible flows in the industrial finite element code N3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pot, G.; Laurence, D.; Rharif, N.E.; Leal de Sousa, L.; Compe, C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper deals with the introduction of a second moment closure turbulence model (Reynolds Stress Model) in an industrial finite element code, N3S, developed at Electricite de France.The numerical implementation of the model in N3S will be detailed in 2D and 3D. Some details are given concerning finite element computations and solvers. Then, some results will be given, including a comparison between standard k-ε model, R.S.M. model and experimental data for some test case. (authors). 22 refs., 3 figs

  1. Towards realizable hyperbolic moment closures for viscous heat-conducting gas flows based on a maximum-entropy distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James G.; Groth, Clinton P. T.

    2013-09-01

    The ability to predict continuum and transition-regime flows by hyperbolic moment methods offers the promise of several advantages over traditional techniques. These methods offer an extended range of physical validity as compared with the Navier-Stokes equations and can be used for the prediction of many non-equilibrium flows with a lower expense than particle-based methods. Also, the hyperbolic first-order nature of the resulting partial differential equations leads to mathematical and numerical advantages. Moment equations generated through an entropy-maximization principle are particularly attractive due to their apparent robustness; however, their application to practical situations involving viscous, heat-conducting gases has been hampered by several issues. Firstly, the lack of closed-form expressions for closing fluxes leads to numerical expense as many integrals of distribution functions must be computed numerically during the course of a flow computation. Secondly, it has been shown that there exist physically realizable moment states for which the entropy-maximizing problem on which the method is based cannot be solved. Following a review of the theory surrounding maximum-entropy moment closures, this paper shows that both of these problems can be addressed in practice, at least for a simplified one-dimensional gas, and that the resulting flow predictions can be surprisingly good. The numerical results described provide significant motivations for the extension of these ideas to the fully three-dimensional case.

  2. Relativistic correction to the deuteron magnetic moment and angular condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Strikman, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    The relativistic correction (RC) to the deuteron magnetic moment μsub(d) is investigated using the light-cone dynamics. The restrictions imposed by the angular condition on the electromagnetic current operator of deuteron are discussed in detail. It is shown that the additive model for the current operator of interacting consistuencies is consistent with the angular condition only for the two first terms of expansion of the ''good'' electromagnetic current component jsub(+) in powers of the momentum transfer q. The RC into μsub(d) is calculated using the mattix element of the ''good'' component. The account of RC decreases essentially the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental values. The value of Δsub(μ) is determined for the Hamada-Johnston potential hard core potential (0.93x10 -2 ) for the Reid soft core potential (0.71x10 -2 ) and for the Paris potential (0.63x10 -2 )

  3. Second-order closure PBL model with new third-order moments: Comparison with LES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Minotti, F.; Ronchi, C.; Ypma, R. M.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains two parts. In the first part, a new set of diagnostic equations is derived for the third-order moments for a buoyancy-driven flow, by exact inversion of the prognostic equations for the third-order moment equations in the stationary case. The third-order moments exhibit a universal structure: they all are a linear combination of the derivatives of all the second-order moments, bar-w(exp 2), bar-w theta, bar-theta(exp 2), and bar-q(exp 2). Each term of the sum contains a turbulent diffusivity D(sub t), which also exhibits a universal structure of the form D(sub t) = a nu(sub t) + b bar-w theta. Since the sign of the convective flux changes depending on stable or unstable stratification, D(sub t) varies according to the type of stratification. Here nu(sub t) approximately equal to wl (l is a mixing length and w is an rms velocity) represents the 'mechanical' part, while the 'buoyancy' part is represented by the convective flux bar-w theta. The quantities a and b are functions of the variable N(sub tau)(exp 2), where N(exp 2) = g alpha derivative of Theta with respect to z and tau is the turbulence time scale. The new expressions for the third-order moments generalize those of Zeman and Lumley, which were subsequently adopted by Sun and Ogura, Chen and Cotton, and Finger and Schmidt in their treatments of the convective boundary layer. In the second part, the new expressions for the third-order moments are used to solve the ensemble average equations describing a purely convective boundary laye r heated from below at a constant rate. The computed second- and third-order moments are then compared with the corresponding Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results, most of which are obtained by running a new LES code, and part of which are taken from published results. The ensemble average results compare favorably with the LES data.

  4. Quadrature--based moment closures for non--equilibrium flows: hard--spheres collisions and approach to equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icardi, Matteo; Asinari, Pietro; Marchisio, Daniele; Izquierdo, Salvador; Fox, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Recently the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM) has been extended to solve several kinetic equations, in particular for gas-particle flows and rarefied gases. This method is usually coupled with simplified linear models for particle collisions. In this work QMOM is tested as a closure for the dynamics of high-order moments with a more realistic collision model namely the hard-spheres model in the Homogeneous Isotropic Boltzmann Equation. The behavior of QMOM far away and approaching the equilibrium is studied. Results are compared to other techniques such as the Lattice-Boltzmann (LBM) and the Grad's expansion (GM) methods. Comparison with a more accurate and computationally expensive model, based on the Discrete Velocity Method (DVM), is also carried out. Our results show that QMOM describes very well the evolution when it is far away from equilibrium, without the drawbacks of the GM and LBM or the computational costs of DVM but it is not able to accurately reproduce the equilibrium and the dynamics close to it. Corrections to cure this behavior are proposed and tested.

  5. Quadrature-based moment closures for non-equilibrium flows: Hard-sphere collisions and approach to equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icardi, M.; Asinari, P.; Marchisio, D. L.; Izquierdo, S.; Fox, R. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recently the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM) has been extended to solve several kinetic equations, in particular for gas-particle flows and rarefied gases in which the non-equilibrium effects can be important. In this work QMOM is tested as a closure for the dynamics of the Homogeneous Isotropic Boltzmann Equation (HIBE) with a realistic description for particle collisions, namely the hard-sphere model. The behaviour of QMOM far away and approaching the equilibrium is studied. Results are compared to other techniques such as the Grad's moment method (GM) and the off-Lattice Boltzmann Method (oLBM). Comparison with a more accurate and computationally expensive approach, based on the Discrete Velocity Method (DVM), is also carried out. Our results show that QMOM describes very well the evolution when it is far away from equilibrium, without the drawbacks of the GM and oLBM or the computational costs of DVM, but it is not able to accurately reproduce equilibrium and the dynamics close to it. Static and dynamic corrections to cure this behaviour are here proposed and tested.

  6. A well-balanced scheme for Ten-Moment Gaussian closure equations with source term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Asha Kumari; Kumar, Harish

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we consider the Ten-Moment equations with source term, which occurs in many applications related to plasma flows. We present a well-balanced second-order finite volume scheme. The scheme is well-balanced for general equation of state, provided we can write the hydrostatic solution as a function of the space variables. This is achieved by combining hydrostatic reconstruction with contact preserving, consistent numerical flux, and appropriate source discretization. Several numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the well-balanced property and resulting accuracy of the proposed scheme.

  7. Second-moment closures and length scales for weakly stratified turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Helmut; Peters, Hartmut

    2000-03-01

    For the special hydrodynamic situation of unbounded homogeneous shear layers, turbulence closure models of Mellor-Yamada type (MY) and k-ɛ type are put into a single canonical form. For this situation we show that conventional versions of MY and various k-ɛ versions lack a proper steady state, and are unable to simulate the most basic properties of stratified shear flows exemplified in, for example, the Rohr et al. [1988] experiments: exponential growth at sufficiently low gradient Richardson number (Rg), exponential decay at sufficiently large Rg, and a steady state in between. Proper choice of one special model parameter readily solves the problems. In the fairly general case of structural equilibrium (state of exponential evolution) in weakly to moderately stratified turbulence (Rg ≲ 0.25), the ratio between the Thorpe scale (or Ellison scale) and the Ozmidov scale varies like the gradient Richardson number (Rg) to the power 3/4, and the ratio of the Thorpe scale to the buoyancy scale varies like Rg1/2. Length scales predicted by our current model are consistent with laboratory measurements of Rohr et al. [1988], with large-eddy numerical simulations of Schumann and Gerz [1995], and with microstructure measurements from the 1987 Tropic Heat Experiment in the equatorial Pacific by Peters et al. [1995].

  8. Computing the Moments of Order Statistics from Truncated Pareto Distributions Based on the Conditional Expectation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Gökdere

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, closed form expressions for the moments of the truncated Pareto order statistics are obtained by using conditional distribution. We also derive some results for the moments which will be useful for moment computations based on ordered data.

  9. A necessary moment condition for the fractional functional central limit theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We discuss the moment condition for the fractional functional central limit theorem (FCLT) for partial sums of x_{t}=Delta^{-d}u_{t}, where d in (-1/2,1/2) is the fractional integration parameter and u_{t} is weakly dependent. The classical condition is existence of q>max(2,(d+1/2)^{-1}) moments...

  10. A Necessary Moment Condition for the Fractional Functional Central Limit Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We discuss the moment condition for the fractional functional central limit theorem (FCLT) for partial sums of x(t)=¿^(-d)u(t), where d ¿ (-1/2,1/2) is the fractional integration parameter and u(t) is weakly dependent. The classical condition is existence of q>max(2,(d+1/2)-¹) moments...... of the innovation sequence. When d is close to -1/2 this moment condition is very strong. Our main result is to show that under some relatively weak conditions on u(t), the existence of q=max(2,(d+1/2)-¹) is in fact necessary for the FCLT for fractionally integrated processes and that q>max(2,(d+1/2)-¹) moments...... are necessary and sufficient for more general fractional processes. Davidson and de Jong (2000) presented a fractional FCLT where only q>2 finite moments are assumed, which is remarkable because it is the only FCLT where the moment condition has been weakened relative to the earlier condition. As a corollary...

  11. Equivalent conditions of complete moment convergence for extended negatively dependent random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunying Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we study the equivalent conditions of complete moment convergence for sequences of identically distributed extended negatively dependent random variables. As a result, we extend and generalize some results of complete moment convergence obtained by Chow (Bull. Inst. Math. Acad. Sin. 16:177-201, 1988 and Li and Spătaru (J. Theor. Probab. 18:933-947, 2005 from the i.i.d. case to extended negatively dependent sequences.

  12. Field-scale water balance closure in seasonally frozen conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological water balance closure is a simple concept, yet in practice it is uncommon to measure every significant term independently in the field. Here we demonstrate the degree to which the field-scale water balance can be closed using only routine field observations in a seasonally frozen prairie pasture field site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Arrays of snow and soil moisture measurements were combined with a precipitation gauge and flux tower evapotranspiration estimates. We consider three hydrologically distinct periods: the snow accumulation period over the winter, the snowmelt period in spring, and the summer growing season. In each period, we attempt to quantify the residual between net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation and the change in field-scale storage (snow and soil moisture, while accounting for measurement uncertainties. When the residual is negligible, a simple 1-D water balance with no net drainage is adequate. When the residual is non-negligible, we must find additional processes to explain the result. We identify the hydrological fluxes which confound the 1-D water balance assumptions during different periods of the year, notably blowing snow and frozen soil moisture redistribution during the snow accumulation period, and snowmelt runoff and soil drainage during the melt period. Challenges associated with quantifying these processes, as well as uncertainties in the measurable quantities, caution against the common use of water balance residuals to estimate fluxes and constrain models in such a complex environment.

  13. Effects of counteracting external valgus moment on lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions and tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Duraisamy; Parween, Rizuwana; Lee, Yee Han Dave; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis that prevalently occurs at the medial compartment is a progressive chronic disorder affecting the articular cartilage of the knee joint, and lead to loss of joint functionality. Valgus braces have been used as a treatment procedure to unload the medial compartment for patients with medial osteoarthritis. Valgus braces through the application of counteracting external valgus moment shift the load from medial compartment towards the lateral compartment. Previous biomechanical studies focused only on the changes in varus moments before and after wearing the brace. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of opposing external valgus moment applied by knee braces on the lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions using a 3D finite element model of the knee joint. Finite element simulations were performed on the knee joint model without and with the application of opposing valgus moment to mimic the unbraced and braced conditions. Lateral tibial cartilage contact pressures and contact area, and tibial rotation (varus-valgus and internal-external) were estimated for the complete walking gait cycle. The opposing valgus moment increased the maximum contact pressure and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage compared to the normal gait moment. A peak contact pressure of 8.2 MPa and maximum cartilage loaded area of 28% (loaded cartilage nodes) on the lateral cartilage with the application of external valgus moment were induced at 50% of the gait cycle. The results show that the use of opposing valgus moment may significantly increase the maximum contact pressures and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage and increases the risk of articular cartilage damage on the lateral compartment.

  14. Moment-based boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann simulations of natural convection in cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2016-06-29

    We study a multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model for natural convection with moment-based boundary conditions. The unknown primary variables of the algorithm at a boundary are found by imposing conditions directly upon hydrodynamic moments, which are then translated into conditions for the discrete velocity distribution functions. The method is formulated so that it is consistent with the second order implementation of the discrete velocity Boltzmann equations for fluid flow and temperature. Natural convection in square cavities is studied for Rayleigh numbers ranging from 103 to 108. An excellent agreement with benchmark data is observed and the flow fields are shown to converge with second order accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  15. Nuclear moments and charge radii of argon isotopes between the neutron-shell closures N=20 and N=28

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K; Lassen, J; Lievens, P; Marinova, K; Neugart, R

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of optical isotope shifts for $^{40-44}\\!$Ar relative to $^{38}$Ar from which changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii across the 1$\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$ neutron shell are deduced. In addition, the hyperfine structure of $^{41\\!}$Ar and $^{43}$Ar yields the spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, in particular the spin $\\,\\scriptstyle\\textrm{I}$ = 5/2 for $\\,^{43}\\!$Ar. The investigations were carried out by fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy using highly sensitive detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization. Mean square charge radii are now known from $^{32}$Ar to $^{46}$Ar, covering sd-shell as well as $\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$-shell nuclei. They are discussed in the framework of spherical SGII Skyrme-type Hartree-Fock calculations, semi-empirically corrected for quadrupole core polarization. The Zamick-Talmi formula excellently describes the charge radii across the $\\scriptstyle{f}_{7/2}$ neutron shell, as it does for the...

  16. Moment inertia pump analysis used in the Rsg-Gas primary coolant loop under lofa condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarmono; Setiyanto; Dhandhang, P.; Dibyo, S.; Royadi

    1998-01-01

    The moment inertia of primary cooling system analysis under LOFA condition has been done. It is potentially one of limiting design constraints of the RSG-GAS safety because the coolant flow rate reduces very rapidly under LOFA condition due to the low inertia circulation pumps. If a loss of flow accident occurs, the mass flow will decrease rapidly and the heat transfer coefficient between cladding and coolant will also decreases. As a consequence the fuel and cladding temperature will increase. The whole core was represented by the 1/4 sector and divided into 19 subchannels and 40 axial nodes. In the present study, moment inertia of pump analysis for RSG-GAS reactor was performed with COBRA-IV-I subchannel code. As the DNB correlation, W-3 Correlation was selected for base case. The flow and power transients under pump trip accident were determined from experiments. The result above compared with the design data are 75 kg m 2 and 81 Kg m 2 respectively. The result shows that the RSG-GAS requires the inertia more than 75 kg m 2

  17. Application of conditional moment tests to model checking for generalized linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei

    2002-06-01

    Generalized linear models (GLMs) are increasingly being used in daily data analysis. However, model checking for GLMs with correlated discrete response data remains difficult. In this paper, through a case study on marginal logistic regression using a real data set, we illustrate the flexibility and effectiveness of using conditional moment tests (CMTs), along with other graphical methods, to do model checking for generalized estimation equation (GEE) analyses. Although CMTs provide an array of powerful diagnostic tests for model checking, they were originally proposed in the econometrics literature and, to our knowledge, have never been applied to GEE analyses. CMTs cover many existing tests, including the (generalized) score test for an omitted covariate, as special cases. In summary, we believe that CMTs provide a class of useful model checking tools.

  18. Containment closure time following loss of cooling under shutdown conditions of YGN units 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The YGN Units 3 and 4 plant conditions during shutdown operation were reviewed to identify the possible event scenarios following the loss of shutdown cooling. The thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for the five cases of RCS configurations under the worst event scenario, unavailable secondary cooling and no RCS inventory makeup, using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to investigate the plant behavior. From the analyses results, times to boil, times to core uncovery and times to core heat up were estimated to determine the containment closure time to prevent the uncontrolled release of fission products to atmosphere. These data provide useful information to the abnormal procedure to cope with the event. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  19. Improvement of storage conditions and closure of the radioactive waste repository - Rozan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, L.M.C.; Pacey, N.R.; Buckley, M.J.; Thomson, J.G.; Miller, W.; Barraclough, I.; Tomczak, W.; Mitrega, J.; Smietanski, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Rozan repository is a near-surface repository on the site of an ex-military fort, operated by Radioactive Waste Management Plant (RWMP). Solid or encapsulated waste is consigned to the repository. Low- and medium-activity waste produced in Poland is collected, processed, solidified and prepared for disposal at the Swierk facility. The waste is currently stored or disposed of within the fort structures, these have robust concrete walls, that provide both shielding and containment. The project, funded by the European Commission through the Phare Programme, aimed to improve the storage conditions and determine a strategy for closure achieving two key results; Stakeholder agreement to a strategy for the management and closure of the repository, and; Approval by the National Atomic Energy Agency of the safety case for the selected strategy. The strategy was selected using a multi-criteria analysis methodology at workshops that involved experts, regulators and other stakeholders. The selected strategy proposed that the waste in Facilities 3A and 8 should be left in situ and these facilities should continue to operate until the repository is closed. The waste in Rooms K7 to K9 of Facility 1 and in Facilities 2 and 3 should be retrieved, assayed, treated and packaged prior to redisposal. The short-lived waste that is retrieved from Rooms K7 to K9 of Facility 1 and Facilities 2 and 3 should be emplaced in Facility 8 subject to acceptance by the NAEA of the dose of 0.3mSv/y that might occur at long times in the future from a very unlikely scenario. When operations at the repository end, Facilities 3A and 8 should be covered with a multi-layer cap. Following selection of the strategy, assessment work was undertaken to support the production of the suite of safety cases. (author)

  20. Probing freeze-out conditions in heavy ion collisions with moments of charge fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the first four moments of baryon number, electric charge and strangeness fluctuations within the hadron resonance gas model. Different moments and their ratios as well as skewness and kurtosis are evaluated on the phenomenologically determined freeze-out curve in the temperature, baryon chemical potential plane. The model results and its predictions as well as relations between different moments are compared with the first data on net proton fluctuations in Au-Au collisions obtained at RHIC by the STAR Collaboration. We find good agreement between the model calculations and experimental results. We also point out that higher order moments should be more sensitive to critical behavior and will also distinguish hadron resonance gas model calculations from results obtained from lattice QCD.

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 481: Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 481 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard. CAU 481 is located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 12-42-05, Housekeeping Waste. CAU 481 closure activities were conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency from August 2007 through July 2008 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites. Closure activities included removal and disposal of construction debris and low-level waste. Drained fluids, steel, and lead was recycled as appropriate. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed.

  2. Healing and the human condition: scenes from the present moment in Navajoland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csordas, Thomas J

    2004-03-01

    The encounter of Navajo spirituality and healing practice with modernity in the present moment must be understood within an existential appreciation of temporality, tradition, domination, and immediacy. Examining the practical exigencies and experiential nuances in a performance of the Navajo Nightway ceremony allows us to elaborate this insight.

  3. An EMG-driven biomechanical model that accounts for the decrease in moment generation capacity during a dynamic fatigued condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric; Amarantini, David; Vigouroux, Laurent; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2010-07-01

    Although it is well known that fatigue can greatly reduce muscle forces, it is not generally included in biomechanical models. The aim of the present study was to develop an electromyographic-driven (EMG-driven) biomechanical model to estimate the contributions of flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment during a nonisokinetic functional movement (squat exercise) performed in nonfatigued and in fatigued conditions. A methodology that aims at balancing the decreased muscle moment production capacity following fatigue was developed. During an isometric fatigue session, a linear regression was created linking the decrease in force production capacity of the muscle (normalized force/EMG ratio) to the EMG mean frequency. Using the decrease in mean frequency estimated through wavelet transforms between dynamic squats performed before and after the fatigue session as input to the previous linear regression, a coefficient accounting for the presence of fatigue in the quadriceps group was computed. This coefficient was used to constrain the moment production capacity of the fatigued muscle group within an EMG-driven optimization model dedicated to estimate the contributions of the knee flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment. During squats, our results showed significant increases in the EMG amplitudes with fatigue (+23.27% in average) while the outputs of the EMG-driven model were similar. The modifications of the EMG amplitudes following fatigue were successfully taken into account while estimating the contributions of the flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment. These results demonstrated that the new procedure was able to estimate the decrease in moment production capacity of the fatigued muscle group.

  4. Diagnosing the Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Change Moment Charges (CMC) over Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Lizxandra Flores; Lang, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLE's) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning strokes that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection-networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma

  5. Boltzmann’s Six-Moment One-Dimensional Nonlinear System Equations with the Maxwell-Auzhan Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sakabekov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove existence and uniqueness of the solution of the problem with initial and Maxwell-Auzhan boundary conditions for nonstationary nonlinear one-dimensional Boltzmann’s six-moment system equations in space of functions continuous in time and summable in square by a spatial variable. In order to obtain a priori estimation of the initial and boundary value problem for nonstationary nonlinear one-dimensional Boltzmann’s six-moment system equations we get the integral equality and then use the spherical representation of vector. Then we obtain the initial value problem for Riccati equation. We have managed to obtain a particular solution of this equation in an explicit form.

  6. Evaluation of anterior chamber angle under dark and light conditions in angle closure glaucoma: An anterior segment OCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Habibeh; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Esmaeili, Alireza; Abolbashari, Fereshteh; Ahmadi Hosseini, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate changes of nasal and temporal anterior chamber angle (ACA) in subjects with angle closure glaucoma using Spectralis AS-OCT (SAS-OCT) under dark and light conditions. Based on dark-room gonioscopy, 24 subjects with open angles and 86 with narrow angles participated in this study. The nasal and temporal angle opening distance at 500 μm anterior to the scleral spur (AOD500), nasal and temporal ACA were measured using SAS-OCT in light and dark conditions. In 2 groups, ACA and AOD500 in nasal and temporal quadrants were significantly greater in light compared to dark (all with p=0.000). The AOD500 and ACA were significantly higher in nasal than temporal in measured conditions for 2 groups except the ACA and AOD500 of normal group measured in light. The difference between nasal and temporal in dark (29.07 ± 65.71 μm for AOD500 and 5.7 ± 4.07° for ACA) was greater than light (24.86 ± 79.85 μm for AOD500 and 2.09 ± 7.21° for ACA) condition. But the difference was only significant for ACA (p=0.000). The correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between AOD500 and pupil diameter in temporal and nasal quadrants (both with p=0.000). While temporal AOD500 difference correlated with spherical equivalent, temporal and asal gonioscopy, nasal AOD correlated with IOP, temporal and nasal gonioscopy. Clinically important changes in ACA structure could be detected with SAS-OCT in nasal and temporal quadrants under different illumination intensity. The results could help in improvement of examination condition for better and more accurate assessment of individuals with angle closure glaucoma. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultures, Conditions, and Cognitive Closure: Breaking Intelligence Studies’ Dependence on Security Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Crosston

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about how the conceptualization of ‘culture’ in intelligence studies has taken on too powerful a role, one that has become too restrictive in its impact on thinking about other intelligence communities, especially non-Western ones. This restriction brings about unintentional cognitive closure that damages intelligence analysis. The argument leans heavily in many ways on the fine work of Desch and Johnston in the discipline of Security Studies, who cogently brought to light over fifteen years ago how ultra-popular cultural theories were best utilized as supplements to traditional realist approaches, but were not in fact capable of supplanting or replacing realist explanations entirely. The discipline of Intelligence Studies today needs a similar ‘intellectual intervention’ as it has almost unknowingly advanced in the post-Cold War era on the coattails of Security Studies but has largely failed to apply the same corrective measures. This effort may be best accomplished by going back to Snyder in the 1970s who warned that culture should be used as the explanation of last resort for Security Studies.

  8. DNS of turbulent channel flow with conjugate heat transfer: Effect of thermal boundary conditions on the second moments and budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flageul, Cédric; Benhamadouche, Sofiane; Lamballais, Éric; Laurence, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DNS of a turbulent channel flow with a Robin boundary condition on the scalar. • Budgets of second-order moments for conjugate and non-conjugate heat-transfer. • Original theoretical analysis for compatibility conditions at the wall. - Abstract: Budgets of turbulent heat fluxes and temperature variance obtained from the Direct Numerical Simulation of an incompressible periodic channel flow with a Reynolds number of 150 (based on friction velocity) and a Prandtl number of 0.71 are presented and analysed for four cases: locally imposed temperature at the wall (constant Dirichlet), locally imposed heat flux (constant Neumann), heat exchange coefficient (Robin) and 3D conjugate heat transfer. The dissipation rate associated with the temperature variance is strongly impacted by the thermal boundary condition. For non-conjugate cases, a straightforward analytical analysis establishes the connection between the boundary condition, the temperature variance and the wall-normal part of the thermal dissipation rate at the wall. For the conjugate case, the two-point correlations of the thermal field in the solid domain confirms the existence of very large scale thermal structures.

  9. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  10. Compliance variations in the fatigue thresold regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Compliance variations in the threshold regime of a high strength ferritic steel tested under closure-free conditions at room temperature and in air are reported. In contrast to the Paris regime, and irrespective of whether the data during load shedding, at threshold or after postthreshold load increase are considered, it is found that comparatively compliance varies inconsistently in the threshold regime. Therefore, a 1:1 correlation between the averaged optical crack length and that inferred from compliance was not observed. This discrepancy is analyzed. The variations in compliance are utilized to infer the crack front behavior, and the results are discussed in terms of the microstructural impedance. (orig.) With 22 figs., 2 appendices [de

  11. Sealing behavior of Container Closure Systems under Frozen Storage Conditions: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Serum Rubber Stoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger

    2018-03-15

    There has been a growing interest in recent years in the assessment of suitable vial/stopper combinations for storage and shipment of frozen drug products. Considering that the glass transition temperature (Tg) of butyl rubber stoppers used in Container Closure Systems (CCS) is between -55°C to -65°C, a storage or shipment temperature of a frozen product below the Tg of the rubber stopper, may require special attention, since below the Tg the rubber becomes more plastic-like and loses its elastic (sealing) characteristics. Thus they risk maintaining Container Closure Integrity (CCI). Given that the rubber regains its elastic properties and reseals after rewarming to ambient temperature, leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are transient and the CCI methods used at room temperature conditions are unable to confirm CCI in the frozen state. Hence, several experimental methods have been developed in recent years in order to evaluate CCI at low temperatures. Finite Element (FE) simulations were applied in order to investigate the sealing behaviour of rubber stoppers for the drug product CCS under frozen storage conditions. FE analysis can help reducing the experimental design space and thus number of measurements needed, as they can be used as an ad-on to experimental testing. Several scenarios have been simulated including the effect of thermal history, rubber type, storage time, worst case CCS geometric tolerances and capping pressure. The results of these calculations have been validated with experimental data derived from laboratory experiments (CCI at low temperatures), and a concept for tightness has been developed. It has been concluded that FE simulations have the potential to become a powerful predictive tool towards a better understanding of the influence of cold storage on the rubber sealing properties (and hence on CCI) when dealing with frozen drug products. Copyright © 2018, Parenteral Drug Association.

  12. Performance of Link-To-Stub Bolted Connection in Column-Tree Moment Resisting Frames under Fire Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Yahyai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Column-tree moment resisting frames, as the efficient shop-welded and field-bolted structural systems, are used in many countries. Very limited research has been carried out on such systems under fire conditions. This paper presents experimental investigations of the behavior of beam and bolted splice connections in steel column-tree moment resisting frames exposed to fire. Two full-scale steel sub-frames with different splice connections were tested under ISO 834 standard fire. The flange splice plates were configured as a single plate with single shear bolts in first specimen, and as double plates with double shear bolts in second specimen. The observation of thermal and structural fire behaviors including temperature histories, temperature-deflection of the beam, temperature-rotation of splice connections and failure modes were investigated. The temperature-deflection and temperature-rotation curves remained in the elastic range until about 600°C. Beyond 600°C, the behavior would be highly nonlinear plastic. The beam splice connection failed due to shear fracture of top bolts at temperatures beyond 750°C. Consequently, stub beam web failed at those temperatures because of block-shear. Using double plates with double shear bolts for flange splices would enhance the temperature resistance and rotational capacity of the beam splice connections. Both tests results confirmed that specimens retain the capacity to support the design load when the average beam temperature does not exceed 600°C. This temperature limit confirms the temperature criteria provided by ASTM E119 and ANSI/UL 263 for a restrained beam, and can be used to specify the minimum fire resistance criteria for beams in column-tree MRFs. The measured time-deflection curves showed that the restrained fire resistance rating for both unprotected specimens obtained about 15 minutes in both tests.

  13. [Role of host in spontaneous recovery from viral hepatitis C: the body's condition at the moment of infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaguliants, M G; Ozeretskovskaia, N N; Znoĭko, O O; Tsyganova, E V

    2008-01-01

    The condition of the host at the moment of infection is that its immune competence largely determines the efficiency, kinetics, and profile (Thl/Th2) of a further specific immunity response and, accordingly, the outcome of penetration of hepatitis C virus (HCV) into the body and subsequent acute infection (if it occurs). The parameters determining immune competence may include age, traumatizing exposures (operations, burns, wounds, and fractures), immunosuppressive therapy, stresses, con-infections, and alcohol use. The highest rates of spontaneous convalescence from HCV infection are observed in children and adolescents. Other human conditions are much shorter, transient; their impact is difficult to determine in the retrospective review and therefore it has not been adequately studied. Previous operations, posttransplantation immune suppression, immune modulation after blood transfusion, alcohol-induced immune imbalance, drug and narcotic intoxication are poor predictors. Immunosuppression and immune imbalance caused by viral and parasitic infections are observed among the host's temporary conditions affecting the outcome of HCV infection. The authors have analyzed the sequels of superinfections in patients with chronic hepatitis C, other hepatotropic viruses and the common liver fluke Schistosoma mansoni. The interesting therapeutic activities against HCV and parasitic infection (contamination with Echinococcus granulosus in particular), which are shown in the treatment of co-infection patients with alpha-interferon preparations that ensure normalization of immune deficiency caused by each of the infections and their increased combination. A deeper insight into the correlation between the condition of the host and its ability to eliminate the virus may be one more step on the road to the prevention of the infection and to the designing an effective vaccine against HCV.

  14. Radiation closure under broken cloud conditions at the BSRN site Payerne: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Christine; Gröbner, Julian; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Vuilleumier, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Clouds have a substantial influence on the surface radiation budget and on the climate system. There are several studies showing the opposing effect of clouds on shortwave and longwave radiation and thus on the global energy budget. Wacker et al., 2013 show an agreement between radiation flux measurements and radiative transfer models (RTM) under clear sky conditions which is within the measurement uncertainty. Our current study combines radiation fluxes from surface-based observations with RTM under cloudy conditions. It is a case study with data from the BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) site Payerne (46.49˚ N, 6.56˚ E, 490 m asl). Observation data are retrieved from pyranometers and pyrgeometers and additional atmospheric parameters from radiosondes and a ceilometer. The cloud information is taken from visible all-sky cameras. In a first step observations and RTM are compared for cases with stratiform overcast cloud conditions. In a next step radiation fluxes are compared under broken cloud conditions. These analyses are performed for different cloud types. Wacker, S., J. Gröbner, and L. Vuilleumier (2014) A method to calculate cloud-free long-wave irradiance at the surface based on radiative transfer modeling and temperature lapse rate estimates, Theor. Appl. Climatol., 115, 551-561.

  15. Road Closures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This is an up to date map of current road closures in Montgomery County.This dataset is updated every few minutes from the Department of Transportation road closure...

  16. Private Moments

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Reed; Carol J. Cumber

    2000-01-01

    In October, 1996 Private Moments, an adult novelty store, opened for business in Huntsville, Texas. Huntsville had no ordinances in place to prevent the opening of this type of business. In fact, the local Small Business Development Center provided guidance and assistance to Edward Delagarza, the founder and owner of Private Moments. Many of the Huntsville citizens, unhappy with the opening of Private Moments, approached the City Council requesting that it be closed immediately and asked for ...

  17. Magnetic Moment of $^{59}$Cu

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Experiment IS358 uses the intense and pure beams of copper isotopes provided by the ISOLDE RILIS (resonance ionization laser ion source). The isotopes are implanted and oriented in the low temperature nuclear orientation set-up NICOLE. Magnetic moments are measured by $\\beta$-NMR. Copper (Z=29), with a single proton above the proton-magic nickel isotopes provides an ideal testground for precise shell model calculations of magnetic moments and their experimental verification. In the course of our experiments we already determined the magnetic moments of $^{67}$Ni, $^{67}$Cu, $^{68g}$Cu, $^{69}$Cu and $^{71}$Cu which provide important information on the magicity of the N=40 subshell closure. In 2001 we plan to conclude our systematic investigations by measuring the magnetic moment of the neutron-deficient isotope $^{59}$Cu. This will pave the way for a subsequent study of the magnetic moment of $^{57}$Cu with a complementary method.

  18. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  19. Comparison of the effect of 8 closures in controlled industrial conditions on the shelf life of a red wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The management of O2, CO2 and SO2 at bottling and the choice of the closure are two key factors of the shelf life of wine in bottles before bringing them to market. The impact of four screw caps, two synthetic and two technical corks was evaluated on a red wine of Merlot/Tannat. Methods and results: Analytical monitoring (O2, CO2, SO2, aphrometric pressure, L*, a*, b* was carried out during 538 days of storage at 20 °C. Two sensory analyses at 10 and 17 months completed the study. The wine was bottled with an average total oxygen content of 2 mg/L. The heterogeneity intra and inter procedure was controlled, including for the dissolved carbon dioxide content. Conclusion: Unlike closures with highest OTR, the two technical corks and the two screw caps with Saranex seal, harboring the lowest OTR, matched with the wines exhibiting a low total O2 content at equilibrium (from 4th to 18th month, with more free SO2 and less changed colour. However this OTR gradient (5 to 67 μg/d observed through the physicochemical analyses was not necessarily confirmed by both sensory analyses performed. Significance and impact of study: This study puts into perspective the impact of OTR closure on sensory characteristics evolution of wine consumed during the first two years, especially when the total oxygen at bottling exceeds 1.5 mg/L.

  20. Closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kube, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates generally to gas-cooled nuclear reactor systems and, more particularly, to an improved closure system for a pressure vessel in such a system wherein a penetration is provided for accommodating a heat exchanger. (author)

  1. Collaborative Moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Kirsten Blinkenberg

    2017-01-01

    as an experiment in real time, where insights gained intersubjectively gradually shape up as knowledge through analysis. This line of thought is brought to bear on a discussion of collaboration between anthropologists, archaeologists, and biologists in North West Greenland. Through actual experiences from...... the field, this article shows how knowledge generated on the edge of one’s familiar disciplinary territory may both expand and intensify the anthropological field. Collaborative moments are seen to make new anthropological insights emerge through the co-presence of several analytical perspectives...

  2. Basic functions and bilateral estimatesin the stability problems of elastic non-uniformly compressed rods expressed in terms of bending moments with additional conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupavtsev Vladimir Vladimirovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The method of two-sided evaluations is extended to the problems of stability of an elastic non-uniformly compressed rod, the variation formulations of which may be presented in terms of internal bending moments with uniform integral conditions. The problems are considered, in which one rod end is fixed and the other rod end is either restraint or pivoted, or embedded into a support which may be shifted in a transversal direction.For the substantiation of the lower evaluations determination, a sequence of functionals is constructed, the minimum values of which are the lower evaluations for the minimum critical value of the loading parameter of the rod, and the calculation process is reduced to the determination of the maximum eigenvalues of modular matrices. The matrix elements are expressed in terms of integrals of basic functions depending on the type of fixation of the rod ends. The basic functions, with the accuracy up to a linear polynomial, are the same as the bending moments arising with the bifurcation of the equilibrium of a rod with a constant cross-section compressed by longitudinal forces at the rod ends. The calculation of the upper evaluation is reduced to the determination of the maximum eigenvalue of the matrix, which almost coincides with one of the elements of the modular matrices. It is noted that the obtained upper bound evaluation is not worse thanthe evaluation obtained by the Ritz method with the use of the same basic functions.

  3. THE MOMENT OF UNSAFETY FOR DRIVING IN CONDITIONS OF POOR VISIBILITY TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE EVALUATION OF VEHICLE BRAKING EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarayev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at investigation of a car collision with a pedestrian under limited visibility condi-tions. For this purpose an expert has to analyze the accident details and determine the critical time at which the car driver must take an action to avoid the collision. The analysis is complicated due to the fact that the vehicle is equipped with an anti-blocking braking system and does not leave a braking trace on the pavement. In this case, a relevant expert analysis technique does not exist. The development of such techniques as the basis of this scientific work is given.

  4. Restaurant closures

    CERN Multimedia

    Novae Restauration

    2012-01-01

    Christmas Restaurant closures Please note that the Restaurant 1 and Restaurant 3 will be closed from Friday, 21 December at 5 p.m. to Sunday, 6 January, inclusive. They will reopen on Monday, 7 January 2013.   Restaurant 2 closure for renovation To meet greater demand and to modernize its infrastructure, Restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday, 17 December. On Monday, 14 January 2013, Sophie Vuetaz’s team will welcome you to a renovated self-service area on the 1st floor. The selections on the ground floor will also be expanded to include pasta and pizza, as well as snacks to eat in or take away. To ensure a continuity of service, we suggest you take your break at Restaurant 1 or Restaurant 3 (Prévessin).

  5. An experimental assessment of hysteresis in near-threshold fatigue crack propagation regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a high strength steel was investigated in laboratory air under closure-free testing conditions at R = 0.7 (= R eff ), and at two different K-gradients. Depending on the criterion assumed, the threshold value differed; the criterion of non-propagation gave a lower threshold value than that assumed by the propagation criterion. Nevertheless, the subsequent propagation following a load increase was discontinuous in both the cases, and da/dN vs ΔK curves obtained on the same specimen during the K-decreasing and the K-increasing test were not necessarily identical in the threshold regime. This behavior, hysteresis, is analyzed mainly from the experimental viewpoint, and it is shown that hysteresis is not an artifact. (orig.) With 13 figs., 3 appendices [de

  6. Cytoplasmic continuity revisited: closure of septa of the filamentous fungus Schizophyllum commune in response to environmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend F van Peer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycelia of higher fungi consist of interconnected hyphae that are compartmentalized by septa. These septa contain large pores that allow streaming of cytoplasm and even organelles. The cytoplasm of such mycelia is therefore considered to be continuous. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show by laser dissection that septa of Schizophyllum commune can be closed depending on the environmental conditions. The most apical septum of growing hyphae was open when this basidiomycete was grown in minimal medium with glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, the second and the third septum were closed in more than 50% and 90% of the cases, respectively. Interestingly, only 24 and 37% of these septa were closed when hyphae were growing in the absence of glucose. Whether a septum was open or closed also depended on physical conditions of the environment or the presence of toxic agents. The first septum closed when hyphae were exposed to high temperature, to hypertonic conditions, or to the antibiotic nourseothricin. In the case of high temperature, septa opened again when the mycelium was placed back to the normal growth temperature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, it is concluded that the septal pores of S. commune are dynamic structures that open or close depending on the environmental conditions. Our findings imply that the cytoplasm in the mycelium of a higher fungus is not continuous per se.

  7. Design of closure works

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Duivedijk, H.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter discusses the design aspects of estuary and river closures and those of reservoir dams and certain other hydraulic structures. The focus of this chapter is on closures, not on the situation after the closure has been completed.

  8. Evolution of chemical conditions and estimated solubility controls on radionuclides in the residual waste layer during post-closure aging of high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Millings, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  9. Dimensional reduction and moment maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Yasuyuki

    2002-03-01

    We give a unified viewpoint of moment maps in the case of symplectic, hyper-Kähler, quaternion-Kähler and holomorphic contact manifolds. The Higgs field can be regarded as a moment map under some additional conditions in each case. Using dimensional reductions and moment maps, we reduce the standard 1 instanton on HP 1≅S 4 to an SO(3) instanton on CP 1× CP 1 and the standard 1 instanton on HP n to the standard 1 instanton on Gr 2( Cn+1) .

  10. Water uptake by biomass burning aerosol at sub- and supersaturated conditions: closure studies and implications for the role of organics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Dusek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the CCN activity of freshly emitted biomass burning particles and their hygroscopic growth at a relative humidity (RH of 85%. The particles were produced in the Mainz combustion laboratory by controlled burning of various wood types. The water uptake at sub- and supersaturations is parameterized by the hygroscopicity parameter, κ (c.f. Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007. For the wood burns, κ is low, generally around 0.06. The main emphasis of this study is a comparison of κ derived from measurements at sub- and supersaturated conditionsG and κCCN, in order to see whether the water uptake at 85% RH can predict the CCN properties of the biomass burning particles. Differences in κGand κCCN can arise through solution non-idealities, the presence of slightly soluble or surface active compounds, or non-spherical particle shape. We find that κG and κCCN agree within experimental uncertainties (of around 30% for particle sizes of 100 and 150 nm; only for 50 nm particles is κCCN larger than κG by a factor of 2. The magnitude of this difference and its dependence on particle size is consistent with the presence of surface active organic compounds. These compounds mainly facilitate the CCN activation of small particles, which form the most concentrated solution droplets at the point of activation. The 50 nm particles, however, are only activated at supersaturations higher than 1% and are therefore of minor importance as CCN in ambient clouds. By comparison with the actual chemical composition of the biomass burning particles, we estimate that the hygroscopicity of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC fraction can be represented by a κWSOC value of approximately 0.2. The effective hygroscopicity of a typical wood burning particle can therefore be represented by a linear mixture of an inorganic component with κ ≅ 0.6, a WSOC

  11. Revisiting the Landau fluid closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced fluid models that are much closer to the full kinetic description than the usual magnetohydrodynamic description are a very useful tool for studying astrophysical plasmas and for interpreting solar wind observational data. The development of advanced fluid models that contain certain kinetic effects is complicated and has attracted much attention over the past years. Here we focus on fluid models that incorporate the simplest possible forms of Landau damping, derived from linear kinetic theory expanded about a leading-order (gyrotropic) bi-Maxwellian distribution function f_0, under the approximation that the perturbed distribution function f_1 is gyrotropic as well. Specifically, we focus on various Pade approximants to the usual plasma response function (and to the plasma dispersion function) and examine possibilities that lead to a closure of the linear kinetic hierarchy of fluid moments. We present re-examination of the simplest Landau fluid closures.

  12. Assembling Transgender Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greteman, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to assemble moments--scholarly, popular, and aesthetic--in order to explore the possibilities that emerge as moments collect in education's encounters with the needs, struggles, and possibilities of transgender lives and practices. Assembling moments, the author argues, illustrates the value of "moments"…

  13. Reconstruction of convex bodies from moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hörrmann, Julia; Kousholt, Astrid

    We investigate how much information about a convex body can be retrieved from a finite number of its geometric moments. We give a sufficient condition for a convex body to be uniquely determined by a finite number of its geometric moments, and we show that among all convex bodies, those which......- rithm that approximates a convex body using a finite number of its Legendre moments. The consistency of the algorithm is established using the stabil- ity result for Legendre moments. When only noisy measurements of Legendre moments are available, the consistency of the algorithm is established under...

  14. Stochastic Generalized Method of Moments

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Guosheng

    2011-08-16

    The generalized method of moments (GMM) is a very popular estimation and inference procedure based on moment conditions. When likelihood-based methods are difficult to implement, one can often derive various moment conditions and construct the GMM objective function. However, minimization of the objective function in the GMM may be challenging, especially over a large parameter space. Due to the special structure of the GMM, we propose a new sampling-based algorithm, the stochastic GMM sampler, which replaces the multivariate minimization problem by a series of conditional sampling procedures. We develop the theoretical properties of the proposed iterative Monte Carlo method, and demonstrate its superior performance over other GMM estimation procedures in simulation studies. As an illustration, we apply the stochastic GMM sampler to a Medfly life longevity study. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association.

  15. Full closure strategic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The full closure strategic analysis was conducted to create a decision process whereby full roadway : closures for construction and maintenance activities can be evaluated and approved or denied by CDOT : Traffic personnel. The study reviewed current...

  16. Sternal exploration or closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAC - vacuum-assisted closure - sternal wound; Sternal dehiscence; Sternal infection ... in the wound to look for signs of infection Remove dead or infected ... use a VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) dressing. It is a negative ...

  17. 40 CFR 265.113 - Closure; time allowed for closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 265.113 Closure; time allowed for closure. (a) Within 90... assessment required under RCRA section 3019, and closure and post-closure plans, and updated cost estimates... sludges to the extent practicable without impairing the integrity of the liner(s), if any. (3) Removal of...

  18. Organisational closure in biological organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossio, Matteo; Moreno, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    The central aim of this paper consists in arguing that biological organisms realize a specific kind of causal regime that we call "organisational closure"; i.e., a distinct level of causation, operating in addition to physical laws, generated by the action of material structures acting as constraints. We argue that organisational closure constitutes a fundamental property of biological systems since even its minimal instances are likely to possess at least some of the typical features of biological organisation as exhibited by more complex organisms. Yet, while being a necessary condition for biological organization, organisational closure underdetermines, as such, the whole set of requirements that a system has to satisfy in order to be taken as a paradigmatic example of organism. As we suggest, additional properties, as modular templates and control mechanisms via dynamical decoupling between constraints, are required to get the complexity typical of full-fledged biological organisms.

  19. Magnetic moments of baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The new experimental values of hyperon magnetic moments are compared with sum rules predicted from general quark models. Three difficulties are encountered which are not easily explained by simple models. The isovector contributions of nonstrange quarks to hyperon moments are smaller than the corresponding contribution to nucleon moments, indicating either appreciable configuration mixing present in hyperon wave functions and absent in nucleons or an additional isovector contribution beyond that of valence quarks; e.g. from a pion cloud. The large magnitude of the ω - moment may indicate that the strange quark contribution to the ω moments is considerably larger than the value μ(#betta#) predicted by simple models which have otherwise been very successful. The set of controversial values from different experiments of the μ - moment include a value very close to -(1/2)μ(μ + ) which would indicate that strange quarks do not contribute at all to the μ moments. (author)

  20. Solvents level dipole moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenkel; Li, Xiaosong; Dalton, Larry R; Robinson, Bruce H; Eichinger, Bruce E

    2011-11-03

    The dipole moments of highly polar molecules measured in solution are usually smaller than the molecular dipole moments that are calculated with reaction field methods, whereas vacuum values are routinely calculated in good agreement with available vapor phase data. Whether from Onsager's theory (or variations thereof) or from quantum mechanical methods, the calculated molecular dipoles in solution are found to be larger than those measured. The reason, of course, is that experiments measure the net dipole moment of solute together with the polarized (perturbed) solvent "cloud" surrounding it. Here we show that the reaction field charges that are generated in the quantum mechanical self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method give a good estimate of the net dipole moment of the solute molecule together with the moment arising from the reaction field charges. This net dipole is a better description of experimental data than the vacuum dipole moment and certainly better than the bare dipole moment of the polarized solute molecule.

  1. Abbreviated closure for remote damage control laparotomy in extreme environments: A randomized trial of sutures versus wound clamps comparing terrestrial and weightless conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; McKee, Jessica Lynn; Tien, Colonel Homer; LaPorta, Anthony J; Lavell, Kit; Leslie, Tim; McBeth, Paul B; Roberts, Derek J; Ball, Chad G

    2017-05-01

    Far-Forward Damage Control Laparotomies (DCLs) might provide direct-compression of visceral hemorrhage, however, suturing is a limiting factor, especially for non-physicians. We thus compared abbreviated skin closures comparing skin-suture (SS) versus wound-clamp (WC), on-board a research aircraft in weightlessness (0g) and normal gravity (1g). Surgeons conducted DCLs on a surgical-simulator; onboard the hangered-aircraft (1g), or during parabolic flight (0g), randomized to either WC or SS. Ten surgeons participated. Two (40%) surgeons randomized to suture in 0g were incapacitated with motion-sickness, and none were able to close in either 1 or 0g. With WC, two completely closed in 1g as did three in 0g, despite having longer incisions (p = 0.016). Overall skin-closure with WC was significantly greater in both 1g (p = 0.016) and 0g (p = 0.008). WC was more effective in 1g and particularly 0g. Future studies should address the utility of abbreviated WC abdominal closure to facilitate potential Far-Forward DCL. ID ISRCTN/77929274. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Closure The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Bolin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    If you're ready to use Closure to build rich web applications with JavaScript, this hands-on guide has precisely what you need to learn this suite of tools in depth. Closure makes it easy for experienced JavaScript developers to write and maintain large and complex codebases -- as Google has demonstrated by using Closure with Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Maps. Author and Closure contributor Michael Bolin has included numerous code examples and best practices, as well as valuable information not available publicly until now. You'll learn all about Closure's Library, Compiler, Templates, tes

  3. Social and macro economic impact of closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeliene, D.

    1999-01-01

    The social consequences of closure of Ignalina NPP will largely depend on the actions the Government takes. If it puts in place the conditions which enable the International Financial Institutions to assist Lithuania, both in providing loans and grants for decommissioning and (in the case of the EU) providing Structural Adjustment Funds for the regional economic development of the Visaginas area, then solutions to the problems of closure can be found. But if the Government delays putting into place the necessary conditions, then Lithuania will be left to solve the problems of - inter alia necessary - closure of Ignalina NPP on its own. (author)

  4. A new insole measurement system to detect bending and torsional moments at the human foot during footwear condition: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Thomas; Peikenkamp, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Stress occurring at the feet while wearing footwear is often determined using pressure measurement systems. However, other forms of stress, such as bending, torsional and shear loadings, cannot be detected in shoes during day-to-day activities. Nevertheless, the detection of these types of stresses would be helpful for understanding the mechanical aspects of various kinds of hard and soft tissue injuries. Therefore, we describe the development of a new measuring device that allows the reliable determination of bending and torsional load at the foot in shoes. The system consists of a measuring insole and an analogue device with Bluetooth interface. The specific shape of the insole base layer, the positions of the strain gauges, and the interconnections between them have all been selected in such a way so as to isolate bending and torsional moment detections in the medial and lateral metatarsal region. The system was calibrated using a classical two-point test procedure. A single case study was executed to evaluate the new device for practical use. This application consisted of one subject wearing neutral shoes walking on a treadmill. The calibration results (coefficients of determination R(2) > 0.999) show that bending and torsional load can be reliably detected using the measurement system presented. In the single case study, alternating bending and torsional load can be detected during walking, and the shape of the detected bending moments can be confirmed by the measurements of Arndt et al. (J Biomech 35:621-8, 2002). Despite some limitations, the presented device allows for the reliable determination of bending and torsional stresses at the foot in shoes.

  5. Lepton dipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Marciano, William J

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained description of the measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of the electron and muon, along with a discussion of the measurements of the fine structure constant, and the theory associated with magnetic and electric dipole moments. Also included are the searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron, muon, neutron and atomic nuclei. The related topic of the transition moment for lepton flavor violating processes, such as neutrinoless muon or tauon decays, and the search for such processes are included as well. The papers, written by many o

  6. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments

  7. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-03-29

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments.

  8. Electric dipole moments reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupertsberger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of elementary particles, atoms, molecules and their connection to the electric susceptibility are discussed for stationary states. Assuming rotational invariance it is emphasized that for such states only in the case of a parity and time reversal violating interaction the considered particles can obtain a nonvanishing expectation value for the electric dipole moment. 1 fig., 13 refs. (Author)

  9. Moment graphs and representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jens Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Moment graphs and sheaves on moment graphs are basically combinatorial objects that have be used to describe equivariant intersectiion cohomology. In these lectures we are going to show that they can be used to provide a direct link from this cohomology to the representation theory of simple Lie...

  10. Spins, moments and radii of Cd isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the wide range of systems covered by the roughly 3000 known nuclides leads to a multitude of effects observed in nuclear structure. Among the most prominent ones is the occurence of shell closures at so-called ''magic numbers'', which are explained by the nuclear shell model. Although the shell model already is on duty for several decades, it is still constantly extended and improved. For this process of extension, fine adjustment and verification, it is important to have experimental data of nuclear properties, especially at crucial points like in the vicinity of shell closures. This is the motivation for the work performed in this thesis: the measurement and analysis of nuclear ground state properties of the isotopic chain of 100-130 Cd by collinear laser spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted at ISOLDE/CERN using the collinear laser spectroscopy apparatus COLLAPS. This experiment is the continuation of a run on neutral atomic cadmium from A = 106 to A = 126 and extends the measured isotopes to even more exotic species. The required gain in sensitivity is mainly achieved by using a radiofrequency cooler and buncher for background reduction and by using the strong 5s 2 S 1/2 →5p 2 P 3/2 transition in singly ionized Cd. The latter requires a continuous wave laser system with a wavelength of 214.6 nm, which has been developed during this thesis. Fourth harmonic generation of an infrared titanium sapphire laser is achieved by two subsequent cavity-enhanced second harmonic generations, leading to the production of deep-UV laser light up to about 100 mW. The acquired data of the Z=48 Cd isotopes, having one proton pair less than the Z=50 shell closure at tin, covers the isotopes from N=52 up to N=82 and therefore almost the complete region between the neutron shell closures N=50 and N=82. The isotope shifts and the hyperfine structures of these isotopes have been recorded and the magnetic dipole moments

  11. The moment problem

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüdgen, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    This advanced textbook provides a comprehensive and unified account of the moment problem. It covers the classical one-dimensional theory and its multidimensional generalization, including modern methods and recent developments. In both the one-dimensional and multidimensional cases, the full and truncated moment problems are carefully treated separately. Fundamental concepts, results and methods are developed in detail and accompanied by numerous examples and exercises. Particular attention is given to powerful modern techniques such as real algebraic geometry and Hilbert space operators. A wide range of important aspects are covered, including the Nevanlinna parametrization for indeterminate moment problems, canonical and principal measures for truncated moment problems, the interplay between Positivstellensätze and moment problems on semi-algebraic sets, the fibre theorem, multidimensional determinacy theory, operator-theoretic approaches, and the existence theory and important special topics of multidime...

  12. Moment distributions of phase-type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2012-01-01

    -normal, Pareto and gamma distributions. We provide explicit representations for both the matrix-exponential class and for the phase-type distributions, where the latter class may also use the former representations, but for various reasons it is desirable to establish a phase-type representation when dealing......Both matrix-exponential and phase-type distributions have a number of important closure properties. Among those are the distributions of the age and residual life-time of a stationary renewal process with inter-arrivals of either type. In this talk we show that the spread, which is the sum...... of the age an residual life-time, is also phase-type distributed. Moreover, we give some explicit representations. The spread is known to have a first order moment distribution. If X is a positive random variable and ?i is its i'th moment, then the function fi(x) = xif(x)/?i is a density function...

  13. Biomechanics Strategies for Space Closure in Deep Overbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harryanto Wijaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Space closure is an interesting aspect of orthodontic treatment related to principles of biomechanics. It should be tailored individually based on patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan. Understanding the space closure biomechanics basis leads to achieve the desired treatment objective. Overbite deepening and losing posterior anchorage are the two most common unwanted side effects in space closure. Conventionally, correction of overbite must be done before space closure resulted in longer treatment. Application of proper space closure biomechanics strategies is necessary to achieve the desired treatment outcome. This cases report aimed to show the space closure biomechanics strategies that effectively control the overbite as well as posterior anchorage in deep overbite patients without increasing treatment time. Two patients who presented with class II division 1 malocclusion were treated with fixed orthodontic appliance. The primary strategies included extraction space closure on segmented arch that employed two-step space closure, namely single canine retraction simultaneously with incisors intrusion followed by enmasse retraction of four incisors by using differential moment concept. These strategies successfully closed the space, corrected deep overbite and controlled posterior anchorage simultaneously so that the treatment time was shortened. Biomechanics strategies that utilized were effective to achieve the desired treatment outcome.

  14. Measurement of excited state static moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergolle, Henri

    Electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole moments are defined from a classical description of the nucleus and a quantum expression is given for the operators. The principal characteristics of the moment interaction with an outer electric or magnetic field are recalled. The study of the perturbed angular distributions of nuclear reaction products allows half-lives of high spin isomer states to be measured (from a few ps to several hours). The decay gamma rays present, under certain conditions, a strong anisotropy; in principle only one detector is sufficient to observe the angular distribution; coincidences are unnecessary and a high counting rate becomes possible. The measurement of the Coulomb excitation probabilities give the electric (dynamic and static) moments and indirectly quadrupolar moments; two techniques are used: the analysis of elastically and inelastically scattered particles and measurement of the deexcitation γ rays in coincidence with the scattered ions. Quadrupole moments can be measured from the precession of the angular distribution [fr

  15. Quadrupole moments of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.

    1985-01-01

    In chiral bag model an expression is obtained for the quark wave functions with account of color and pion interaction of quarks. The quadrupole moments of nonstrange hadrons are calculated. Quadrupole moment of nucleon isobar is found to be Q(Δ)=-6.3x10 -28 esub(Δ)(cm)sup(2). Fredictions of the chiral bag model are in strong disagreement with the non-relativistic quark model

  16. An online visual loop closure detection method for indoor robotic navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhan, Can; Sariyanidi, Evangelos; Sencan, Onur; Temeltas, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an enhanced loop closure method* based on image-to-image matching relies on quantized local Zernike moments. In contradistinction to the previous methods, our approach uses additional depth information to extract Zernike moments in local manner. These moments are used to represent holistic shape information inside the image. The moments in complex space that are extracted from both grayscale and depth images are coarsely quantized. In order to find out the similarity between two locations, nearest neighbour (NN) classification algorithm is performed. Exemplary results and the practical implementation case of the method are also given with the data gathered on the testbed using a Kinect. The method is evaluated in three different datasets of different lighting conditions. Additional depth information with the actual image increases the detection rate especially in dark environments. The results are referred as a successful, high-fidelity online method for visual place recognition as well as to close navigation loops, which is a crucial information for the well known simultaneously localization and mapping (SLAM) problem. This technique is also practically applicable because of its low computational complexity, and performing capability in real-time with high loop closing accuracy.

  17. Effect of torsion moment on failure bending moment for circumferentially cracked pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Hasegawa, Kunio; Ida, Wataru; Hoang, Phuong H.; Bezensek, Bostjan

    2010-01-01

    When a crack is detected in a stainless steel pipe during in-service inspection, the limit load criterion given in the codes such as JSME Rules on Fitness-for-Service for Nuclear Power Plants or ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI can be applied to evaluate the integrity of the pipe. However, in the current codes, the limit load criterion is only provided considering pressure and bending moment. The torsion moment is not considered, although torsion moment does exist in the nuclear power piping system. In this paper, finite element analyses are carried out for stainless steel pipe containing a circumferential surface crack under the combination of bending moment and torsion moment, considering different pipe dimensions and flaw sizes. Based upon the analysis results, a plastic collapse estimation method is proposed considering the existence of the torsion moment and its magnitude, and this method make it possible to evaluate the integrity of the pipe for general loading conditions. (author)

  18. Conditional CAPM in the Brazilian Market: a study of the Moment, Size and Book to Market effects between 1995 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Valle e Flister

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the ability of the conditional CAPM to explain anomalous returns related to momentum, size and book-to-market effects using Lewellen and Nagel’s (2006 methodology in the Brazilian stock market. To this end we studied a sample of Bovespa’s stocks in a monthly basis from July 1995 to June 2008. The results indicate that only the book-to-market effect presents statistical significance. The conditional model, tested from time series of 12 months, also showed no significant gains in relation to the unconditional form. However, there are evidences that betas do vary over time, suggesting that the sample size on beta calculations may influence portfolio choices, i.e., the evidence of variation in betas over time means that analysis based on the CAPM should be cautious when using unconditional models.

  19. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  20. Tau magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sprinberg, G. A.; Vidal, J.

    2017-10-01

    The τ lepton magnetic moment theoretical predictions and measurements are reviewed. While it is believed that such a high mass particle is a good candidate to show up new physics, this is not the case up to now. The magnetic moment of elementary fermions, and in particular the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron, had an historical impact both in relativistic quantum mechanics and in quantum field theories. Besides, many new physics models were discarded when confronted with these magnitudes. More recently, the discrepancy of the experiments and the theoretical predictions for the muon anomalous magnetic moment is still an open issue. For the τ lepton, instead, while the theoretical prediction is well known for the standard model and some new physics models, the data are very far of determining even its sign or the first figure. We will discuss the most important theoretical aspects of the τ magnetic moment, and also the current accepted measurements and future perspectives, in particular related to B-factories.

  1. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  2. New Developments in the Moment-Based Representation of Atmospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, R.

    2002-05-01

    The Method of Moments (MOM) provides an accurate and efficient representation of aerosol evolution and microphysical properties suitable for incorporation in chemical transport models. The MOM does not provide the particle size distribution (PSD), but it tells you (almost) everything else you want to know about the aerosol through the moments of the PSD. Recent development of the quadrature method of moments (QMOM) has enabled closure of the moment evolution equations under general conditions for nucleation, particle growth through condensation and coagulation, and activation in clouds. Furthermore, the quadrature points obtained by the QMOM enable accurate estimation of aerosol physical and optical properties directly from the moments. This method is becoming sufficiently mature that it can be used in regional-scale simulations. Here we (1) compare the QMOM with benchmark discrete and analytic particle population balance models, (2) summarize application of the QMOM in a regional scale chemical transport model and comparison with observations (Yu et al., 2002), and (3) present new extensions of the QMOM to the simulation of internally-mixed and generally-mixed, multivariate, aerosol populations. Regional-scale comparisons with observations for sulfate are favorable, with the model capturing much of the synoptic-scale and diurnal variability of the observations. Improvements are needed in representing other key aerosol species. ----- S. Yu, P.S. Kasibhatla, D.L. Wright, S.E. Schwartz, R. McGraw, and A. Deng. Simulation of Microphysical Properties of Sulfate Aerosols in the Eastern United States: Model description, evaluation and regional analysis. In preparation for J. Geophys. Res., 2002

  3. Moment magnitude scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, T.C.; Kanamori, H.

    1979-05-10

    The nearly conincident forms of the relations between seismic moment M/sub o/ and the magnitudes M/sub L/, M/sub s/, and M/sub w/ imply a moment magnitude scale M=2/3 log M/sub o/-10.7 which is uniformly valid for 3< or approx. =M/sub L/< or approx. = 7, 5 < or approx. =M/sub s/< or approx. =7 1/2 and M/sub w/> or approx. = 7 1/2.

  4. Neutrino magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotsky, M.I.

    1990-03-01

    I would like to discuss the problem of a neutrino magnetic moment which is of interest since it deals with the probable time anticorrelation of the solar v flux with the Sun magnetic activity. (author). 19 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  5. Magnetic moments revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, I.S.; Khanna, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of core polarization, isobar currents and meson-exchange processes gives a satisfactory understanding of the ground-state magnetic moments in closed-shell-plus (or minus)-one nuclei, A = 3, 15, 17, 39 and 41. Ever since the earliest days of the nuclear shell model the understanding of magnetic moments of nuclear states of supposedly simple configurations, such as doubly closed LS shells +-1 nucleon, has been a challenge for theorists. The experimental moments, which in most cases are known with extraordinary precision, show a small yet significant departure from the single-particle Schmidt values. The departure, however, is difficult to evaluate precisely since, as will be seen, it results from a sensitive cancellation between several competing corrections each of which can be as large as the observed discrepancy. This, then, is the continuing fascination of magnetic moments. In this contribution, we revisit the subjet principally to identify the role played by isobar currents, which are of much concern at this conference. But in so doing we warn quite strongly of the dangers of considering just isobar currents in isolation; equal consideration must be given to competing processes which in this context are the mundane nuclear structure effects, such as core polarization, and the more popular meson-exchange currents

  6. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. B.; Swann, A.

    2012-01-01

    and third Lie algebra Betti numbers are zero. We show that these form a special class of solvable Lie groups and provide a structural characterisation. We provide many examples of multi-moment maps for different geometries and use them to describe manifolds with holonomy contained in G(2) preserved by a two...

  7. The Humanist Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In "The Humanist Moment," Chris Higgins sets out to recover a tenable, living humanism, rejecting both the version vilified by the anti-humanists and the one sentimentalized by the reactionary nostalgists. Rescuing humanism from such polemics is only the first step, as we find at least nine rival, contemporary definitions of humanism.…

  8. The verification of the Taylor-expansion moment method in solving aerosol breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ming-Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of the method of moment, characterizing the particle population balance, and the computational fluid dynamics has been an emerging research issue in the studies on the aerosol science and on the multiphase flow science. The difficulty of solving the moment equation arises mainly from the closure of some fractal moment variables which appears in the transform from the non-linear integral-differential population balance equation to the moment equations. Within the Taylor-expansion moment method, the breakage-dominated Taylor-expansion moment equation is first derived here when the symmetric fragmentation mechanism is involved. Due to the high efficiency and the high precision, this proposed moment model is expected to become an important tool for solving population balance equations.

  9. Force-closure grasping with two hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraza, Jose-Antonio Navarro

    1991-02-01

    This thesis addresses grasping of large (but not necessarily heavy) objects by using two hands. The objective is to determine force-closure grasps of rigid objects of unknown shape. A grasp is force-closure if it can completely constrain the movement of the object. In seeking force-closure conditions, the approach taken in this study is to establish useful sufficient conditions rather than necessary and sufficient conditions since the later requires the complete knowledge of the contact parameters. Based on the friction coefficient between hands and object, and on the grasp configuration (defined as the relative position and orientation of fingers and palms), a sufficient condition under which the two hands form a force-closure grasp has been established. The salient feature of this approach is that shape, orientation and location of the object, and contact points location are not assumed in this condition. This makes it possible to use simple sensors and algorithms. A configuration of two hands in contact with the object satisfying this condition is called force-closure grasp configuration (FCGC). The two hands in a FCGC are capable of picking up and moving the object by applying appropriate forces. The two-dimensional (2-D) case is initially studied. Later, the study is extended to the three-dimensional (3-D) case. The hands considered are either flat-surface palms or grippers with two angular-motion fingers. An algorithm has been developed to check the condition for FCGC in terms of the position and orientation of the hands. The algorithm was implemented on TRACS, an experimental multiagent robotic system developed at the GRASP Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania. The results obtained are readily applicable to grasping large but lightweight objects. The simplicity of the conditions and the practical assumptions make it feasible to implement these results in real time.

  10. Achieving closure at Fernald

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  11. Projective moment invariants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2004), s. 1364-1367 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/03/0675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : projective transform * moment invariants * object recognition Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 4.352, year: 2004 http://library.utia.cas.cz/prace/20040112.pdf

  12. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  13. Tank closure reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr 90 , the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel

  14. Distributions on unbounded moment spaces and random moment sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Dette, Holger; Nagel, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we define distributions on moment spaces corresponding to measures on the real line with an unbounded support. We identify these distributions as limiting distributions of random moment vectors defined on compact moment spaces and as distributions corresponding to random spectral measures associated with the Jacobi, Laguerre and Hermite ensemble from random matrix theory. For random vectors on the unbounded moment spaces we prove a central limit theorem where the centering vecto...

  15. Evaluation of the Momentum Closure Schemes in MPAS-Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shimei; Liu, Yudi; Liu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    In order to compare and evaluate the performances of the Laplacian viscosity closure, the biharmonic viscosity closure, and the Leith closure momentum schemes in the MPAS-Ocean model, a variety of physical quantities, such as the relative reference potential energy (RPE) change, the RPE time change rate (RPETCR), the grid Reynolds number, the root mean square (RMS) of kinetic energy, and the spectra of kinetic energy and enstrophy, are calculated on the basis of results of a 3D baroclinic periodic channel. Results indicate that: 1) The RPETCR demonstrates a saturation phenomenon in baroclinic eddy tests. The critical grid Reynolds number corresponding to RPETCR saturation differs between the three closures: the largest value is in the biharmonic viscosity closure, followed by that in the Laplacian viscosity closure, and that in the Leith closure is the smallest. 2) All three closures can effectively suppress spurious dianeutral mixing by reducing the grid Reynolds number under sub-saturation conditions of the RPETCR, but they can also damage certain physical processes. Generally, the damage to the rotation process is greater than that to the advection process. 3) The dissipation in the biharmonic viscosity closure is strongly dependent on scales. Most dissipation concentrates on small scales, and the energy of small-scale eddies is often transferred to large-scale kinetic energy. The viscous dissipation in the Laplacian viscosity closure is the strongest on various scales, followed by that in the Leith closure. Note that part of the small-scale kinetic energy is also transferred to large-scale kinetic energy in the Leith closure. 4) The characteristic length scale L and the dimensionless parameter D in the Leith closure are inherently coupled. The RPETCR is inversely proportional to the product of D and L. When the product of D and L is constant, both the simulated RPETCR and the inhibition of spurious dianeutral mixing are the same in all tests using the Leith

  16. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Hascoët, Sébastien; Baruteau, Julien; Boudjemline, Younes; Lambert, Virginie; Angel, Claude-Yves; Belli, Emre; Petit, Jérôme; Pass, Robert

    2014-02-01

    This review aims to describe the past history, present techniques and future directions in transcatheter treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Transcatheter PDA closure is the standard of care in most cases and PDA closure is indicated in any patient with signs of left ventricular volume overload due to a ductus. In cases of left-to-right PDA with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, closure may be performed under specific conditions. The management of clinically silent or very tiny PDAs remains highly controversial. Techniques have evolved and the transcatheter approach to PDA closure is now feasible and safe with current devices. Coils and the Amplatzer Duct Occluder are used most frequently for PDA closure worldwide, with a high occlusion rate and few complications. Transcatheter PDA closure in preterm or low-bodyweight infants remains a highly challenging procedure and further device and catheter design development is indicated before transcatheter closure is the treatment of choice in this delicate patient population. The evolution of transcatheter PDA closure from just 40 years ago with 18F sheaths to device delivery via a 3F sheath is remarkable and it is anticipated that further improvements will result in better safety and efficacy of transcatheter PDA closure techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  18. ROCKET PORT CLOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1963-02-12

    This invention provides a simple pressure-actuated closure whereby windowless observation ports are opened to the atmosphere at preselected altitudes. The closure comprises a disk which seals a windowless observation port in rocket hull. An evacuated instrument compartment is affixed to the rocket hull adjacent the inner surface of the disk, while the outer disk surface is exposed to the atmosphere through which the rocket is traveling. The pressure differential between the evacuated instrument compartment and the relatively high pressure external atmosphere forces the disk against the edge of the observation port, thereby effecting a tight seai. The instrument compartment is evacuated to a pressure equal to the atmospheric pressure existing at the altitude at which it is desiretl that the closure should open. When the rocket reaches this preselected altitude, the inwardly directed atmospheric force on the disk is just equaled by the residual air pressure force within the instrument compartment. Consequently, the closure disk falls away and uncovers the open observation port. The separation of the disk from the rocket hull actuates a switch which energizes the mechanism of a detecting instrument disposed within the instrument compartment. (AE C)

  19. Spins, moments and charge radii beyond $^{48}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Rajabali, M M; Hammen, M; Blaum, K; Froemmgen, N E; Garcia ruiz, R F; Kreim, K D; Budincevic, I

    Laser spectroscopy of $^{49-54}$Ca is proposed as a continuation of the experimental theme initiated with IS484 “Ground-state properties of K-isotopes from laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy” and expanded in INTC-I-117 “Moments, Spins and Charge Radii Beyond $^{48}$Ca.” It is anticipated that the charge radii of these isotopes can show strong evidence for the existence of a sub-shell closure at N=32 and could provide a first tentative investigation into the existence of a shell effect at N=34. Furthermore the proposed experiments will simultaneously provide model-independent measurements of the spins, magnetic moments and quadrupole moments of $^{51,53}$Ca permitting existing and future excitation spectra to be pinned to firm unambiguous ground states.

  20. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction in face ...

  1. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction ...

  2. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  3. Paul Callaghan luminous moments

    CERN Document Server

    Callaghan, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Acknowledged internationally for his ground-breaking scientific research in the field of magnetic resonance, Sir Paul Callaghan was a scientist and visionary with a rare gift for promoting science to a wide audience. He was named New Zealander of the Year in 2011. His death in early 2012 robbed New Zealand of an inspirational leader. Paul Callaghan: Luminous Moments brings together some of his most significant writing. Whether he describes his childhood in Wanganui, reflects on discovering the beauty of science, sets out New Zealand's future potential or discusses the experience of fa

  4. Application of the Fokker-Planck molecular mixing model to turbulent scalar mixing using moment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadi-Kandjani, E.; Fox, R. O.; Passalacqua, A.

    2017-06-01

    An extended quadrature method of moments using the β kernel density function (β -EQMOM) is used to approximate solutions to the evolution equation for univariate and bivariate composition probability distribution functions (PDFs) of a passive scalar for binary and ternary mixing. The key element of interest is the molecular mixing term, which is described using the Fokker-Planck (FP) molecular mixing model. The direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of Eswaran and Pope ["Direct numerical simulations of the turbulent mixing of a passive scalar," Phys. Fluids 31, 506 (1988)] and the amplitude mapping closure (AMC) of Pope ["Mapping closures for turbulent mixing and reaction," Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2, 255 (1991)] are taken as reference solutions to establish the accuracy of the FP model in the case of binary mixing. The DNSs of Juneja and Pope ["A DNS study of turbulent mixing of two passive scalars," Phys. Fluids 8, 2161 (1996)] are used to validate the results obtained for ternary mixing. Simulations are performed with both the conditional scalar dissipation rate (CSDR) proposed by Fox [Computational Methods for Turbulent Reacting Flows (Cambridge University Press, 2003)] and the CSDR from AMC, with the scalar dissipation rate provided as input and obtained from the DNS. Using scalar moments up to fourth order, the ability of the FP model to capture the evolution of the shape of the PDF, important in turbulent mixing problems, is demonstrated. Compared to the widely used assumed β -PDF model [S. S. Girimaji, "Assumed β-pdf model for turbulent mixing: Validation and extension to multiple scalar mixing," Combust. Sci. Technol. 78, 177 (1991)], the β -EQMOM solution to the FP model more accurately describes the initial mixing process with a relatively small increase in computational cost.

  5. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  6. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  7. SELECTION MOMENTS AND GENERALIZED METHOD OF MOMENTS FOR HETEROSKEDASTIC MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin ANGHELACHE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors describe the selection methods for moments and the application of the generalized moments method for the heteroskedastic models. The utility of GMM estimators is found in the study of the financial market models. The selection criteria for moments are applied for the efficient estimation of GMM for univariate time series with martingale difference errors, similar to those studied so far by Kuersteiner.

  8. Extension of moment projection method to the fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shaohua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Yapp, Edward K.Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore); Yang, Wenming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Kraft, Markus, E-mail: mk306@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2017-04-15

    The method of moments is a simple but efficient method of solving the population balance equation which describes particle dynamics. Recently, the moment projection method (MPM) was proposed and validated for particle inception, coagulation, growth and, more importantly, shrinkage; here the method is extended to include the fragmentation process. The performance of MPM is tested for 13 different test cases for different fragmentation kernels, fragment distribution functions and initial conditions. Comparisons are made with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), hybrid method of moments (HMOM) and a high-precision stochastic solution calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA) and advantages of MPM are drawn.

  9. Extension of moment projection method to the fragmentation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohua; Yapp, Edward K. Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian; Xu, Rong; Yang, Wenming; Kraft, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The method of moments is a simple but efficient method of solving the population balance equation which describes particle dynamics. Recently, the moment projection method (MPM) was proposed and validated for particle inception, coagulation, growth and, more importantly, shrinkage; here the method is extended to include the fragmentation process. The performance of MPM is tested for 13 different test cases for different fragmentation kernels, fragment distribution functions and initial conditions. Comparisons are made with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), hybrid method of moments (HMOM) and a high-precision stochastic solution calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA) and advantages of MPM are drawn.

  10. An 18 Moments Model for Dense Gases: Entropy and Galilean Relativity Principles without Expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Carrisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 14 moments model for dense gases, introduced in the last few years by Arima, Taniguchi, Ruggeri and Sugiyama, is here extended up to 18 moments. They have found the closure of the balance equations up to a finite order with respect to equilibrium; it is also possible to impose for that model the entropy and Galilean relativity principles up to whatever order with respect to equilibrium, but by using Taylor’s expansion. Here, the exact solution is found, without expansions, but a bigger number of moments has to be considered and reasons will be shown suggesting that this number is at least 18.

  11. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liang; Germaschewski, K.; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed

  12. Fatigue crack closure: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, R. M. J.

    1990-09-01

    The phenomenon of fatigue crack closure is now recognized as one of the most influential mechanisms operating during fatigue. This literature survey traces the development of research into fatigue crack closure and has been divided to present the two major approaches. The first part covers early work carried out between 1970 to 1980 which, broadly speaking, adopted a 'continuum' approach. The second part covers the period 1980 to 1988 when a mechanistic approach was widely adopted. The survey has highlighted, firstly, the critical nature of experimental technique in the achievement of a meaningful measurement of crack closure load and secondly, that a diversity of mechanisms may operate to produce closure. Particular attention has been given to crack closure in aluminum alloys and also to work relating crack closure to the corrosion fatigue situation.

  13. Delayed Macular Hole Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Distelmaier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The presented case raises questions regarding the favorable scheduling of planned postoperative care and the ideal observation interval to decide for reoperations in macular hole surgery. Furthermore a discussion about the use of short- and long-acting gas tamponades in macular hole surgery is encouraged. Methods: We present an interventional case report and a short review of the pertinent literature. Results: We report a case of spontaneous delayed macular hole closure after vitreoretinal surgery had been performed initially without the expected success. A 73-year-old male Caucasian patient presented at our clinic with a stage 2 macular hole in his left eye. He underwent 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling with a 20% C2F6-gas tamponade. Sixteen days after the procedure, an OCT scan revealed a persistent stage 2 macular hole, and the patient was scheduled for reoperation. Surprisingly, at the date of planned surgery, which was another 11 days later, the macular hole had resolved spontaneously without any further intervention. Conclusions: So far no common opinion exists regarding the use of short- or long-acting gas in macular hole surgery. Our case of delayed macular hole closure after complete resorption of the gas tamponade raises questions about the need and duration of strict prone positioning after surgery. Furthermore short-acting gas might be as efficient as long-acting gas. We suggest to wait with a second intervention at least 4 weeks after the initial surgery, since a delayed macular hole closure is possible.

  14. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    Heritage is a discourse that aims at closure. It fixates the narrative of the past through the celebration of specific material (or sometimes immaterial non-) ob-jects. It organizes temporality and construct events and freezes time. How does this unfold in the case of the UNESCO World Heritage site...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  15. 40 CFR 264.113 - Closure; time allowed for closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES..., and closure and post-closure plans, and updated cost estimates and demonstrations of financial..., and removing all hazardous sludges to the extent practicable without impairing the integrity of the...

  16. Tight closure and vanishing theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Tight closure has become a thriving branch of commutative algebra since it was first introduced by Mel Hochster and Craig Huneke in 1986. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that tight closure has deep connections with complex algebraic geometry as well, especially with those areas of algebraic geometry where vanishing theorems play a starring role. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce tight closure and to explain some of these connections with algebraic geometry. Tight closure is basically a technique for harnessing the power of the Frobenius map. The use of the Frobenius map to prove theorems about complex algebraic varieties is a familiar technique in algebraic geometry, so it should perhaps come as no surprise that tight closure is applicable to algebraic geometry. On the other hand, it seems that so far we are only seeing the tip of a large and very beautiful iceberg in terms of tight closure's interpretation and applications to algebraic geometry. Interestingly, although tight closure is a 'characteristic p' tool, many of the problems where tight closure has proved useful have also yielded to analytic (L2) techniques. Despite some striking parallels, there had been no specific result directly linking tight closure and L∼ techniques. Recently, however, the equivalence of an ideal central to the theory of tight closure was shown to be equivalent to a certain 'multiplier ideal' first defined using L2 methods. Presumably, deeper connections will continue to emerge. There are two main types of problems for which tight closure has been helpful: in identifying nice structure and in establishing uniform behavior. The original algebraic applications of tight closure include, for example, a quick proof of the Hochster-Roberts theorem on the Cohen-Macaulayness of rings of invariants, and also a refined version of the Brianqon-Skoda theorem on the uniform behaviour of integral closures of powers of ideals. More recent, geometric

  17. Spins, Electromagnetic Moments, and Isomers of 107-129Cd

    CERN Document Server

    Yordanov, D T; Bieron, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Budincevic, I; Fritzsche, S; Frommgen, N; Georgiev, G; Geppert, Ch; Hammen, M; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Krieger, A; Neugart, R; Nortershauser, W; Papuga, J; Schmidt, S

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-rich isotopes of cadmium up to the N=82 shell closure have been investigated by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Deep-UV excitation at 214.5 nm and radioactive-beam bunching provided the required experimental sensitivity. Long-lived isomers are observed in 127Cd and 129Cd for the first time. One essential feature of the spherical shell model is unambiguously confirmed by a linear increase of the 11/2- quadrupole moments. Remarkably, this mechanism is found to act well beyond the h11/2 shell.

  18. Guidance for closure of existing DOE LLW disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchfield, L.

    1987-01-01

    During FY 1986, a closure guidance document was developed. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in support of DOE Order 5820.2 to site operating contractors for the stabilization and closure of existing low-level waste (LLW) shallow land disposal sites at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Guidance is provided to aid operators in placing existing LLW sites in a closed conditions, i.e., a condition in which a nonoperational site meets postclosure performance requirements and can be shown, within a high degree of confidence, to perform as anticipated in the future, under the most cost-effective maintenance approach. Guidance is based on the philosophy that closure should be planned and performed using a systems approach. Plans for FY 1987 call for revision of the document to incorporate more information on closure of LLW sites also containing radioactive mixed waste and/or transuranic waste. 4 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. Closedure - Mine Closure Technologies Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Päivi; Kauppila, Tommi; Pasanen, Antti; Backnäs, Soile; Liisa Räisänen, Marja; Turunen, Kaisa; Karlsson, Teemu; Solismaa, Lauri; Hentinen, Kimmo

    2015-04-01

    Closure of mining operations is an essential part of the development of eco-efficient mining and the Green Mining concept in Finland to reduce the environmental footprint of mining. Closedure is a 2-year joint research project between Geological Survey of Finland and Technical Research Centre of Finland that aims at developing accessible tools and resources for planning, executing and monitoring mine closure. The main outcome of the Closedure project is an updatable wiki technology-based internet platform (http://mineclosure.gtk.fi) in which comprehensive guidance on the mine closure is provided and main methods and technologies related to mine closure are evaluated. Closedure also provides new data on the key issues of mine closure, such as performance of passive water treatment in Finland, applicability of test methods for evaluating cover structures for mining wastes, prediction of water effluents from mine wastes, and isotopic and geophysical methods to recognize contaminant transport paths in crystalline bedrock.

  20. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for closing the bore of a tube and releasably securing articles within the tube under longitudinal load. A latching member has a cylindrical section and several circumferentially-spaced elongated latches hanging down from one end of the cylinder. An elongated actuator has integral cam and spline and is partly located within the latch with the cam radially contacting the latches and the spline projecting into the circumferential spaces between the latches. The actuator is axially movable between a position in which the latches are locked to the tube walls and a position in which the latches are secured from contact with the tube walls. Means are provided for axially moving the actuator such that the cam positions the latches; and means are also provided for engaging the articles within the tube. The closure is particularly applicable to tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in reactors

  1. MNC Subsidiary Closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; Torres Preto, Miguel; de Faria, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    displacement model for foreign MNC subsidiaries that integrates insights from the labor economics and international business literatures. We argue that a new employer will pay higher wages when signals indicate that potential employees have valuable, foreign human capital (e.g., the closed subsidiary......We investigate the consequences of MNC subsidiary closures for employees who lose their jobs. In particular, we examine the extent to which the human capital that these employees acquired while employed by the MNC influences the wages they receive in their new jobs. We propose an employee...... was highly productive by host-country standards), and lower wages when signals indicate that potential employees have highly MNC-specific human capital (e.g., the employee had a long tenure in the closed subsidiary). We provide empirical evidence based on a sample of 110,133 displaced employees of closed MNC...

  2. Airport Movement Area Closure Planner, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR research develops an automation tool improving temporary and permanent runway closure management. The Movement Area Closure Planner (MACP) provides airport...

  3. Moment Magnitude discussion in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weginger, Stefan; Jia, Yan; Hausmann, Helmut; Lenhardt, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    We implemented and tested the Moment Magnitude estimation „dbmw" from the University of Trieste in our Antelope near real-time System. It is used to get a fast Moment Magnitude solutions and Ground Motion Parameter (PGA, PGV, PSA 0.3, PSA 1.0 and PSA 3.0) to calculate Shake and Interactive maps. A Moment Magnitude Catalogue was generated and compared with the Austrian Earthquake Catalogue and all available Magnitude solution of the neighbouring agencies. Relations of Mw to Ml and Ground Motion to Intensity are presented.

  4. Magnetic moment of 33Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuta, K.; Arimura, K.; Nagatomo, T.; Akutsu, K.; Iwakoshi, T.; Kudo, S.; Ogura, M.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Sumikama, T.; Minamisono, K.; Miyake, T.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Mihara, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Sasaki, M.; Kanazawa, M.; Torikoshi, M.; Suda, M.; Hirai, M.; Momota, S.; Nojiri, Y.; Sakamoto, A.; Saihara, M.; Ohtsubo, T.; Alonso, J.R.; Krebs, G.F.; Symons, T.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic moment of 33 Cl (Iπ=3/2+, T1/2=2.51s) has been re-measured precisely by β-NMR method. The obtained magnetic moment |μ|=0.7549(3)μN is consistent with the old value 0.7523(16)μN, but is 5 times more accurate. The value is well reproduced by the shell model calculation, μSM=0.70μN. Combined with the magnetic moment of the mirror partner 33 S, the nuclear matrix elements , , , and were derived

  5. Microbial hotspots and hot moments in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes within nano- to macroscales. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of input of labile organics by plants creates microbial hotspots over short periods of time - the hot moments. We define microbial hotspots as small soil volumes with much faster process rates and much more intensive interactions compared to the average soil conditions. Such hotspots are found in the rhizosphere, detritusphere, biopores (including drilosphere) and on aggregate surfaces, but hotspots are frequently of mixed origin. Hot moments are short-term events or sequences of events inducing accelerated process rates as compared to the averaged rates. Thus, hotspots and hot moments are defined by dynamic characteristics, i.e. by process rates. For this hotspot concept we extensively reviewed and examined the localization and size of hotspots, spatial distribution and visualization approaches, transport of labile C to and from hotspots, lifetime and process intensities, with a special focus on process rates and microbial activities. The fraction of active microorganisms in hotspots is 2-20 times higher than in the bulk soil, and their specific activities (i.e. respiration, microbial growth, mineralization potential, enzyme activities, RNA/DNA ratio) may also be much higher. The duration of hot moments in the rhizosphere is limited and is controlled by the length of the input of labile organics. It can last a few hours up to a few days. In the detritusphere, however, the duration of hot moments is regulated by the output - by decomposition rates of litter - and lasts for weeks and months. Hot moments induce succession in microbial communities and intense intra- and interspecific competition affecting C use efficiency, microbial growth and turnover. The faster turnover and lower C use efficiency in hotspots counterbalances the high C inputs, leading to the absence of strong

  6. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs)

  7. Fast computation of Krawtchouk moments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, B.; Flusser, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 1 (2014), s. 73-86 ISSN 0020-0255 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Krawtchouk polynomial * Krawtchouk moment * Geometric moment * Impulse response * Fast computation * Digital filter Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 4.038, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/flusser-0432452.pdf

  8. Moment Distributions of Phase Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2011-01-01

    Moment distributions of phase-type and matrix-exponential distributions are shown to remain within their respective classes. We provide a probabilistic phase-type representation for the former case and an alternative representation, with an analytically appealing form, for the latter. First order...... moment distributions are of special interest in areas like demography and economics, and we calculate explicit formulas for the Lorenz curve and Gini index used in these disciplines....

  9. Evaluation of Container Closure System Integrity for Frozen Storage Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Nikoloff, Jonas; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, drug product for parenteral administration is stored in a frozen state (e.g., -20 °C or -80 °C), particularly during early stages of development of some biotech molecules in order to provide sufficient stability. Shipment of frozen product could potentially be performed in the frozen state, yet possibly at different temperatures, for example, using dry ice (-80 °C). Container closure systems of drug products usually consist of a glass vial, rubber stopper, and an aluminum crimped cap. In the frozen state, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of commonly used rubber stoppers is between -55 and -65 °C. Below their Tg, rubber stoppers are known to lose their elastic properties and become brittle, and thus potentially fail to maintain container closure integrity in the frozen state. Leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are likely to be transient, yet, can possibly risk container closure integrity and lead to microbial contamination. After thawing, the rubber stopper is supposed to re-seal the container closure system. Given the transient nature of the possible impact on container closure integrity in the frozen state, typical container closure integrity testing methods (used at room temperature conditions) are unable to evaluate and thus confirm container closure integrity in the frozen state. Here we present the development of a novel method (thermal physical container closure integrity) for direct assessment of container closure integrity by a physical method (physical container closure integrity) at frozen conditions, using a modified He leakage test. In this study, different container closure systems were evaluated with regard to physical container closure integrity in the frozen state to assess the suitability of vial/stopper combinations and were compared to a gas headspace method. In summary, the thermal physical container closure integrity He leakage method was more sensitive in detecting physical container closure

  10. Ultrasound biomicroscopic features associated with angle closure in fellow eyes of acute primary angle closure after laser iridotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-qun; Wu, Ling-ling; Zhang, Chun; Wang, Xin

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the frequency of appositional angle closure and related anatomic characteristics in fellow eyes of Chinese subjects with acute primary angle closure (APAC) after laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI). Cross-sectional study. Consecutive subjects with APAC presenting from April 2006 to September 2006 at the Glaucoma Service of Peking University Eye Center, Peking University Third Hospital. Under dark conditions, fellow eyes were divided into 2 groups based on the detection of appositional angle closure by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). For all subjects, UBM parameters were measured to evaluate the different anatomic features between the 2 groups. Darkroom provocative tests (DRPTs) and gonioscopy were performed to investigate the relationship between angle closure and intraocular pressure. Central anterior chamber depth (ACD); angle opening distance(500) (AOD(500)); angle recess area(750) (ARA(750)); trabecular-iris angle (T-I angle); trabecular-ciliary process distance (TCPD); peripheral iris thickness (IT(1)); iris-zonule distance (IZD); and the position of the iris insertion. Thirty-four post-LPI fellow eyes of 34 patients with APAC (8 men, 26 women; mean +/- standard deviation age 66.3+/-7.2 years, range 54-83) were included. Peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS) were not observed in any subject. Appositional angle closure was observed in at least 1 quadrant in 13 (38.2%) of the 34 patients. Compared with eyes without appositional closure, eyes with appositional closure showed significantly lower AOD(500), ARA(750), and T-I angle in 4 quadrants; shorter TCPD in the inferior and temporal quadrants; and thicker IT(1) in the superior and nasal quadrants (PAPAC showed appositional angle closure after LPI. The anatomic findings indicate a narrower angle, a more anterior position of the ciliary body, and a thicker peripheral iris in fellow eyes of APAC after LPI may be associated with an increased risk for progressive angle closure.

  11. Closure report for N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule.

  12. Closure report for N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule

  13. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B

    2016-01-01

    Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  14. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Luiz Ulema Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. Objective: This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  15. Sequence Classification Using Third-Order Moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgaard, Rasmus; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2017-01-01

    . The proposed method provides lower computational complexity at classification time than the usual likelihood-based methods. In order to demonstrate the properties of the proposed method, we perform classification of both simulated data and empirical data from a human activity recognition study.......Model-based classification of sequence data using a set of hidden Markov models is a well-known technique. The involved score function, which is often based on the class-conditional likelihood, can, however, be computationally demanding, especially for long data sequences. Inspired by recent...... theoretical advances in spectral learning of hidden Markov models, we propose a score function based on third-order moments. In particular, we propose to use the Kullback-Leibler divergence between theoretical and empirical third-order moments for classification of sequence data with discrete observations...

  16. 2101-M pond closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment

  17. Borehole closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    Constitutive law parameters are determined from salt behavior characterization experiments. The results are applied to predict creep (time-dependent) closure of boreholes in salt specimens subjected to various loading configurations. Rheological models (linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and viscoplastic models), empirical models, and physical theory models have been formulated from the results of uniaxial creep tests, strain and stress rate controlled uniaxial tests, constant strain rate triaxial tests, cyclic loading tests, and seismic velocity measurements. Analytical solutions for a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal and external pressures and for a circular hole in an infinite plate subjected to a biaxial or uniaxial stressfield have been derived from each of the linear viscoelastic models and from one of the empirical laws. The experimental results indicate that the salt samples behave as an elastic-viscoplastic material. The elastic behavior tends to be linear and time-independent. The plastic deformation is time-dependent. The stress increment to strain rate increment ratio gradually decreases as the stress level increases. The transient potential creep law seems to give the simplest satisfactory governing equation describing the viscoplastic behavior of salt during the transient phase. 204 refs., 27 figs., 29 tabs

  18. Image Recognition Using Modified Zernike Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min HUANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zernike moments are complex moments with the orthogonal Zernike polynomials as kernel function, compared with other moments; Zernike moments have greater advantages in image rotation and low noise sensitivity. Because of the Zernike moments have image rotation invariance, and can construct arbitrary high order moments, it can be used for target recognition. In this paper, the Zernike moment algorithm is improved, which makes it having scale invariance in the processing of digital image. At last, an application of the improved Zernike moments in image recognition is given.

  19. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  20. The cranking moment of inertia in a static potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, R.; Hamamoto, I.; Ibarra, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Taking into account the self-consistency condition for the deformation, the authors estimate the cranking moment of inertia in the absence of pair-correlations for the Woods-Saxon potential and various versions of the modified oscillator potential. The authors investigate the expectation that in a static potential the moment of inertia is almost equal to the rigid-body moment of inertia at the self-consistent deformation. They examine especially the consequence of the presence of the l 2 term in the conventional modified oscillator potential. (Auth.)

  1. Anode and cathode joints and gap closure in a high current MITL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Hsing, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    Proto II successfully delivers up to 5 MA to an imploding plasma load through an MITL with gaps as small as 3.0 mm. The anode and the cathode have joints which, under some conditions, may cause gap closure. The authors postulate that the gap closure occurs due to acceleration of negative ions from the cathode joint to the anode. Inserting conducting material into the cathode joint eliminated MITL gap closure

  2. Characterizing flow fluctuations with moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev S. Bhalerao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a complete set of multiparticle correlation observables for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These include moments of the distribution of the anisotropic flow in a single harmonic and also mixed moments, which contain the information on correlations between event planes of different harmonics. We explain how all these moments can be measured using just two symmetric subevents separated by a rapidity gap. This presents a multi-pronged probe of the physics of flow fluctuations. For instance, it allows to test the hypothesis that event-plane correlations are generated by non-linear hydrodynamic response. We illustrate the method with simulations of events in A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT model.

  3. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  4. Static spacetimes with prescribed multipole moments: a proof of a conjecture by Geroch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberthson, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we give sufficient conditions on a sequence of multipole moments for a static spacetime to exist with precisely these moments. The proof is constructive in the sense that a metric having prescribed multipole moments up to a given order can be calculated. Since these sufficient conditions agree with already known necessary conditions, this completes the proof of a long standing conjecture due to Geroch.

  5. Method of moments in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Walton C

    2007-01-01

    Responding to the need for a clear, up-to-date introduction to the field, The Method of Moments in Electromagnetics explores surface integral equations in electromagnetics and presents their numerical solution using the method of moments (MOM) technique. It provides the numerical implementation aspects at a nuts-and-bolts level while discussing integral equations and electromagnetic theory at a higher level. The author covers a range of topics in this area, from the initial underpinnings of the MOM to its current applications. He first reviews the frequency-domain electromagnetic theory and t

  6. Quiet Moment around the Campfire

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-18

    Byron Breedlove reads his essay, "Quiet Moment around the Campfire," about the art of Frederic Remington and the transmission of pathogens as frontiers expand.  Created: 6/18/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/19/2014.

  7. Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Cañas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide an updated analysis of the neutrino magnetic moments (NMMs, discussing both the constraints on the magnitudes of the three transition moments Λi and the role of the CP violating phases present both in the mixing matrix and in the NMM matrix. The scattering of solar neutrinos off electrons in Borexino provides the most stringent restrictions, due to its robust statistics and the low energies observed, below 1 MeV. Our new limit on the effective neutrino magnetic moment which follows from the most recent Borexino data is 3.1×10−11μB at 90% C.L. This corresponds to the individual transition magnetic moment constraints: |Λ1|≤5.6×10−11μB, |Λ2|≤4.0×10−11μB, and |Λ3|≤3.1×10−11μB (90% C.L., irrespective of any complex phase. Indeed, the incoherent admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates present in the solar flux makes Borexino insensitive to the Majorana phases present in the NMM matrix. For this reason we also provide a global analysis including the case of reactor and accelerator neutrino sources, presenting the resulting constraints for different values of the relevant CP phases. Improved reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments will be needed in order to underpin the full profile of the neutrino electromagnetic properties.

  8. Moment methods and Lanczos methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to many of the speakers at this conference I am less interested in average properties of nuclei than in detailed spectroscopy. I will try to show, however, that the two are very closely connected and that shell-model calculations may be used to give a great deal of information not normally associated with the shell-model. It has been demonstrated clearly to us that the level spacing fluctuations in nuclear spectra convey very little physical information. This is true when the fluctuations are averaged over the entire spectrum but not if one's interest is in the lowest few states, whose spacings are relatively large. If one wishes to calculate a ground state (say) accurately, that is with an error much smaller than the excitation energy of the first excited state, very high moments, μ/sub n/, n approx. 200, are needed. As I shall show, we use such moments as a matter of course, albeit without actually calculating them; in fact I will try to show that, if at all possible, the actual calculations of moments is to be avoided like the plague. At the heart of the new shell-model methods embodied in the Glasgow shell-model program and one or two similar ones is the so-called Lanczos method and this, it turns out, has many deep and subtle connections with the mathematical theory of moments. It is these connections that I will explore here

  9. Moment Invariants in Image Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flusser, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2006), s. 196-201 ISSN 1305-5313 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/04/0155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : moment invariants * pattern recognition Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  10. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  11. Particle electric dipole-moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendlebury, J.M. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    The incentive to detect particle electric dipole-moments, as a window on time-reversal violation, remains undiminished. Efforts to improve the measurements for the neutron, the electron and some nuclei are still making rapid progress as more powerful experimental methods are brought to bear. A new measurement for the neutron at ILL is presented. (author). 7 refs.

  12. Stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks using binomial moment equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2012-09-01

    The stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks is a difficult problem because the number of microscopic states in such systems increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Direct integration of the master equation is thus infeasible and is most often replaced by Monte Carlo simulations. While Monte Carlo simulations are a highly effective tool, equation-based formulations are more amenable to analytical treatment and may provide deeper insight into the dynamics of the network. Here, we present a highly efficient equation-based method for the analysis of stochastic reaction networks. The method is based on the recently introduced binomial moment equations [Barzel and Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 150602 (2011)]. The binomial moments are linear combinations of the ordinary moments of the probability distribution function of the population sizes of the interacting species. They capture the essential combinatorics of the reaction processes reflecting their stoichiometric structure. This leads to a simple and transparent form of the equations, and allows a highly efficient and surprisingly simple truncation scheme. Unlike ordinary moment equations, in which the inclusion of high order moments is prohibitively complicated, the binomial moment equations can be easily constructed up to any desired order. The result is a set of equations that enables the stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks under a broad range of conditions. The number of equations is dramatically reduced from the exponential proliferation of the master equation to a polynomial (and often quadratic) dependence on the number of reactive species in the binomial moment equations. The aim of this paper is twofold: to present a complete derivation of the binomial moment equations; to demonstrate the applicability of the moment equations for a representative set of example networks, in which stochastic effects play an important role.

  13. Maximal Electric Dipole Moments of Nuclei with Enhanced Schiff Moments

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2011-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of heavy nuclei, such as 199Hg, 225Ra and 211Rn, can be enhanced by the Schiff moments induced by the presence of nearby parity-doublet states. Working within the framework of the maximally CP-violating and minimally flavour-violating (MCPMFV) version of the MSSM, we discuss the maximal values that such EDMs might attain, given the existing experimental constraints on the Thallium, neutron and Mercury EDMs. The maximal EDM values of the heavy nuclei are obtained with the help of a differential-geometrical approach proposed recently that enables the maxima of new CP-violating observables to be calculated exactly in the linear approximation. In the case of 225Ra, we find that its EDM may be as large as 6 to 50 x 10^{-27} e.cm.

  14. Fuel channel closure and adapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a mechanical closure/actuating ram combination particularly suited for use in sealing the ends of the pressure tubes when a CANDU-type reactor is refueled. It provides a cluster that may be inserted into a fuel channel end fitting to provide at least partial closing off of a pressure tube while permitting the disengagement of the fueling machine and its withdrawal from the closure for other purposes. The invention also provides a ram/closure combination wherein the application of loading force to a deformable sealing disk is regulated by a massive load bar component forming part of the fueling machine and being therefore accessible for maintenance or replacement

  15. Travel costs associated with flood closures of state highways near Centralia/Chehalis, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report discusses the travel costs associated with the closure of roads in the greater : Centralia/Chehalis, Washington region due to 100-year flood conditions starting on the Chehalis River. The costs : were computed for roadway closures on I-5,...

  16. Vacuum with mesh is a feasible temporary closure device after fascial dehiscence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Skarbye, Mona; Jensen, Kenneth Højsgaard

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The open abdomen is a challenging condition and a temporary abdominal closure device is required in order to protect the intra-abdominal viscera. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a recent device: vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) after f...

  17. Mefenamic acid-induced bilateral transient myopia, secondary angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwakarma Parag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced secondary angle closure is quite common and in the majority of cases simply stopping the medication leads to rapid reversal of the condition and resolution of glaucoma. We describe here a patient who presented with secondary angle closure glaucoma and myopia following mefenamic acid ingestion which was managed successfully by stopping the medication, symptomatic treatment and reassurance.

  18. Regularized κ-distributions with non-diverging moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, H.; Lazar, M.

    2017-12-01

    For various plasma applications the so-called (non-relativistic) κ-distribution is widely used to reproduce and interpret the suprathermal particle populations exhibiting a power-law distribution in velocity or energy. Despite its reputation the standard κ-distribution as a concept is still disputable, mainly due to the velocity moments M l which make a macroscopic characterization possible, but whose existence is restricted only to low orders l definition of the κ-distribution itself is conditioned by the existence of the moment of order l = 2 (i.e., kinetic temperature) satisfied only for κ > 3/2 . In order to resolve these critical limitations we introduce the regularized κ-distribution with non-diverging moments. For the evaluation of all velocity moments a general analytical expression is provided enabling a significant step towards a macroscopic (fluid-like) description of space plasmas, and, in general, any system of κ-distributed particles.

  19. Moments and mean square charge radii of short-lived argon isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, A; Georg, U; Keim, M; Lievens, P; Neugart, R; Neuroth, M; Silverans, R E; Vermeeren, L

    1996-01-01

    We report on the measurement of optical isotope shifts for $^{32-40}$Ar and for $^{46}$Ar from which the changes in mean square nuclear charge radii across the N = 20 neutron shell closure are deducted. The investigations were carried out by collinear laser spectroscopy in fast beams of neutral argon atoms. The ultra-sensitive detection combines optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and counting of $\\beta$-radioactivity. By reaching far into the sd-shell, the results add new information to the systematics of radii in the calcium region (Z $\\approx$ 20). Contrary to all major neutron shell closures with N $\\geq$ 28, the N = 20 shell closure causes no significant slope change in the development of the radii. Information from the hyperfine structure of the odd-A isotopes includes includes the magnetic moments of $^{33}$Ar (I=1/2) and $^{39}$Ar (I=7/2), and the quadrupole moments of $^{35}$Ar, $^{37}$Ar (I=3/2) and $^{39}$Ar. The electromagnetic moments are compared to shell-model predictions fo...

  20. Evaluation of an Online "Teachable Moment" Dietary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leah; Ogden, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an online "teachable moment" intervention to promote healthy eating for overweight and food intolerance symptoms. Design/methodology/approach: The study involves a 2×2 factorial design with two conditions: group (weight loss vs food intolerance) and condition (intervention vs control).…

  1. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... and post-closure care objectives of paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Type and amount of hazardous..., including amount, frequency, and pH of precipitation; (5) Geological and soil profiles and surface and...

  2. Outcome of colostomy closure with different skin closure techniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of colostomy closure were recorded, 70 in Group A and 81 in Group B. Results: Statistical analysis of the data showed no statistically significant difference in wound infection and anastomotic leak between the two groups. On postoperative follow-up, wound assessment showed significantly better cosmesis in the no drain ...

  3. Techniques for Abdominal Wall Closure after Damage Control Laparotomy: From Temporary Abdominal Closure to Early/Delayed Fascial Closure—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Open abdomen (OA has been an effective treatment for abdominal catastrophes in traumatic and general surgery. However, management of patients with OA remains a formidable task for surgeons. The central goal of OA is closure of fascial defect as early as is clinically feasible without precipitating abdominal compartment syndrome. Historically, techniques such as packing, mesh, and vacuum-assisted closure have been developed to assist temporary abdominal closure, and techniques such as components separation, mesh-mediated traction, bridging fascial defect with permanent synthetic mesh, or biologic mesh have also been attempted to achieve early primary fascial closure, either alone or in combined use. The objective of this review is to present the challenges of these techniques for OA with a goal of early primary fascial closure, when the patient’s physiological condition allows.

  4. Moment of truth for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    One of the first events reconstructed in the Muon Drift Tubes, the Hadron Calorimeter and elements of the Silicon Tracker (TK) at 3 Tesla. The atmosphere in the CMS control rooms was electric. Everbody was at the helm for the first full-scale testing of the experiment. This was a crunch moment for the entire collaboration. On Tuesday, 22 August the magnet attained almost its nominal power of 4 Tesla! At the same moment, in a tiny improvised control room, the physicists were keyed up to test the entire detector system for the first time. The first cosmic ray tracks appeared on their screens in the week of 15 August. The tests are set to continue for several weeks more until the first CMS components are lowered into their final positions in the cavern.

  5. Fetal endoscopic myelomeningocele closure preserves segmental neurological function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Renate J.; Heep, Axel; Maurits, Natalia M.; Cremer, Reinhold; Hoving, Eelco W.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Sival, Deborah A.

    AIM:   Our aim was to compare the effect of prenatal endoscopic with postnatal myelomeningocele closure (fetally operated spina bifida aperta [fSBA]) versus neonatally operated spina bifida aperta [nSBA]) on segmental neurological leg condition. METHOD:   Between 2003 and 2009, the fetal surgical

  6. 9 CFR 318.301 - Containers and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that will prevent soiling and damage that could affect the hermetic condition of the sealed container... minimized to avoid damage to the containers. (2) The maximum time lapse between closing and initiation of... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers and closures. 318.301...

  7. Vacuum assisted closure in coloproctology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure has earned its indications in coloproctology. It has been described with variable results in the treatment of large perineal defects after abdominoperineal excision, in the treatment of stoma dehiscence and perirectal abscesses. The most promising indication for

  8. An improvised wound closure system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapid, Oren

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin stretching harnesses the same viscoelastic properties of the skin as expansion, with the difference that the forces are applied externally and not internally. An improvised system for wound closure is presented. METHOD: The system is assembled using silicone vascular loops used as

  9. Abdominal wound closure: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams ZF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary F Williams, William W Hope Department of Surgery, South East Area Health Education Center, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: This review examines both early and late wound complications following laparotomy closure, with particular emphasis on technical aspects that reduce hernia formation. Abdominal fascial closure is an area of considerable variation within the field of general surgery. The formation of hernias following abdominal wall incisions continues to be a challenging problem. Ventral hernia repairs are among the most common surgeries performed by general surgeons, and despite many technical advances in the field, incisional hernia rates remain high. Much attention and research has been directed to the surgical management of hernias. Less focus has been placed on prevention of hernia formation despite its obvious importance. This review examines the effects of factors such as the type of incision, suture type and size, closure method, patient risk factors, and the use of prophylactic mesh. Keywords: incisional, abdominal, hernia, prevention, wound closure techniques 

  10. Telephone switchboard closure | 19 December

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Exceptionally, the telephone switchboard will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 19 December, instead of the usual time of 6 p.m., to allow time for closing all systems properly before the annual closure. Therefore, switchboard operator assistance to transfer calls from/to external lines will stop. All other phone services will run as usual.

  11. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  12. Citalopram associated with acute angle-closure glaucoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sabit

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute angle-closure glaucoma is a rare complication in patients receiving anti-depressant treatment. In the following case, we report the development of acute angle closure glaucoma in a patient who overdosed on Citalopram, an antidepressant, and discuss the possible etiological mechanisms for the condition. Case presentation We report a 54 year old, Caucasian lady, with depression and alcohol dependence syndrome, who developed acute angle-closure glaucoma after an overdose of Citalopram, along with alcohol. She was treated with medications and had bilateral Yag laser iridotomies to correct the glaucoma and has made complete recovery. In this case, the underlying cause for glaucoma appears to be related to the ingestion of Citalopram. Conclusion The patho-physiological basis for acute angle closure glaucoma in relation to antidepressant medications remains unclear. The authors suggest Citalopram may have a direct action on the Iris or Ciliary body muscle through serotonergic or anti-cholinergic mechanisms or both. This case highlights the importance of the awareness of the underlying risks, which may predispose an individual to develop acute angle-closure glaucoma, and reminds the clinicians the significance of history taking and examination of the eye before and after starting anti-depressants. This area needs to be further researched.

  13. 27 CFR 27.62 - Affixing closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Closures for Containers of Distilled Spirits § 27.62 Affixing closures. Closures or other devices on containers of imported distilled spirits having a capacity of 1 gallon (3.785 liters) or less shall be...

  14. 75 FR 29322 - Base Closure and Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Base Closure and Realignment AGENCY: Office of...)(ii) of the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990. It provides a partial list of military installations closing or realigning pursuant to the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC) Report. It also...

  15. Multicentre study on capsular closure versus non-capsular closure during hip arthroscopy in Danish patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Kraemer, Otto; Lund, Bent

    2018-01-01

    in patients without additional risk factors for instability such as hypermobility or dysplasia of the hip. We hypothesised that capsular closure will lead to a superior outcome in hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) compared with non-capsular closure. METHODS AND ANALYSIS...... years and FAIS according to the Warwick agreement. Exclusion criteria are: previous hip surgery in either hip, previous conditions of Legg-Calvé-Perthes or slipped capital femoral epiphysis, malignant disease, recent hip or pelvic fractures, arthritis, Ehlers-Danlos or Marfan disease, recent (within 6...

  16. Wild bootstrap versus moment-oriented bootstrap

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerfeld, Volker

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the relative merits of a “moment-oriented” bootstrap method of Bunke (1997) in comparison with the classical wild bootstrap of Wu (1986) in nonparametric heteroscedastic regression situations. The “moment-oriented” bootstrap is a wild bootstrap based on local estimators of higher order error moments that are smoothed by kernel smoothers. In this paper we perform an asymptotic comparison of these two dierent bootstrap procedures. We show that the moment-oriented bootstrap is in ...

  17. Fatigue testing of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsgard, Cameron; Cohen, David J; Griffin, Lanny V

    2008-09-24

    Failure of a sternotomy closure because of closure system fatigue is a complication that may result in dehiscence and put the individual at risk for serious complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue performance of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques (figure-of-eight stainless-steel wires, figure-of-eight stainless-steel cables, or Pectofix Dynamic Sternal Fixation [DSF] stainless-steel plates) in order to quantify the potential risk of fatigue failure of these devices when subject to cyclic loads in physiologically relevant loading directions. All tests were conducted on polyurethane foam sternal models. A cardiothoracic surgeon divided each sternal model longitudinally and repaired it with a closure device. Tests were performed using a materials testing system that applied cyclic loading in a uniaxial direction until the test model catastrophically broke or data run-out occurred. For each loading direction (lateral distraction and longitudinal shear), five trials of each closure technique were tested. Life data and location of device failure (if present) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using regression with life data allowed for correlation between life data and the various closure techniques to develop risk assessment curves for each device. The data show that the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable and the DSF plate systems are considerably less likely to fail under both lateral distraction and longitudinal shear cyclic loading conditions as compared to the figure-of-eight stainless-steel wire system. Moreover, the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable system is the most resistant to failure, particularly for high cycle counts. This study in addition to Cohen and Griffin's earlier published biomechanical comparison of the ultimate strength of these same three closure techniques provide extensive experimental evidence regarding the mechanical differences among these three peristernal median

  18. Fatigue testing of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Lanny V

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure of a sternotomy closure because of closure system fatigue is a complication that may result in dehiscence and put the individual at risk for serious complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue performance of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques (figure-of-eight stainless-steel wires, figure-of-eight stainless-steel cables, or Pectofix Dynamic Sternal Fixation [DSF] stainless-steel plates in order to quantify the potential risk of fatigue failure of these devices when subject to cyclic loads in physiologically relevant loading directions. Study Design All tests were conducted on polyurethane foam sternal models. A cardiothoracic surgeon divided each sternal model longitudinally and repaired it with a closure device. Tests were performed using a materials testing system that applied cyclic loading in a uniaxial direction until the test model catastrophically broke or data run-out occurred. For each loading direction (lateral distraction and longitudinal shear, five trials of each closure technique were tested. Life data and location of device failure (if present were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using regression with life data allowed for correlation between life data and the various closure techniques to develop risk assessment curves for each device. Results The data show that the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable and the DSF plate systems are considerably less likely to fail under both lateral distraction and longitudinal shear cyclic loading conditions as compared to the figure-of-eight stainless-steel wire system. Moreover, the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable system is the most resistant to failure, particularly for high cycle counts. Conclusion This study in addition to Cohen and Griffin's earlier published biomechanical comparison of the ultimate strength of these same three closure techniques provide extensive experimental evidence regarding the

  19. On the interpretation of the support moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested by Winter (J. Biomech. 13 (1980) 923-927) that the 'support moment', the sum of the sagittal extension moments, shows less variability in walking than any of the joint moments separately. A simple model is put forward to explain this finding. It is proposed to reformulate the

  20. some deficiencies in using moment generating functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two deficiencies in using moment-generating functions are given and illustrated with examples. Many distributions do not have moment generating functions, but every distribution has a unique characteristic function. The use of characteristic functions is preferred to moment-generating functions. KEY WORDS: ...

  1. Adaptive wall treatment for a second moment closure in the industrial context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    CFD computations of turbulent flows always begin with a complex meshing process (upper plenum, fuel assembly in the nuclear industry for example). Geometrical constraints are the first ones to be satisfied (level of details, important zones to refine regarding 'user experiences'). One has however to satisfy constraints that are inherent to the RANS model (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) used for the computation. For example, if a 'High-Reynolds' (κ-ε standard, SSG,...) model is used one should only have wall cells with a dimensionless distance to the wall greater or equal to 20 to justify the use of the universal 'law of the wall'. On the other hand, if a 'Low-Reynolds' (BL-v 2 /k, EB-RSM,...) model is used, one should only find wall cells with a dimensionless distance to the wall below 1. If those models are used in an inappropriate way the results could be dramatic (computations can either diverge or give unphysical results). This thesis proposes the development of a new turbulence model with adaptive wall treatments that gives satisfactory results on all types of meshes. In particular, the model will be able to cope with meshes containing both 'High-Reynolds' and 'Low-Reynolds' wall cells. Given the complex flows encountered in the nuclear industry this thesis will use a model known for its good behavior: the EB-RSM model. This model is able to reproduce the anisotropy of the turbulence and give more satisfactory results than eddy viscosity models in different configurations. This model is available in Code Saturne, an open source code developed at EDF. All the developments are made in this code. (author)

  2. Nursing home closures: effects on capacity and reasons for closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Ann; Darton, Robin; Williams, Jacquetta

    2003-05-01

    to identify the rate of closure of nursing homes for older people, the types of homes closing and the reasons for closure. mixed method study including a census and telephone survey of registration and inspection units and interviews with independent providers. 81 of 96 health authority and joint registration and inspection unit managers in England completed the census and 39 managers participated in a further telephone survey. Twenty-five independent providers were interviewed. closures resulted in a net loss of 6% of nursing homes and 4.9% of nursing places during 2000-2001. Smaller homes were more likely to close and were increasingly seen as unviable. The majority of closed homes were reported to have provided good quality care. Shortages of nursing staff were of widespread concern. The dominant combination of factors identified by providers was low fees and concerns about the cost implications of the new care standards. Changes in demand were reflected in the placement of high dependency residents in residential rather than nursing homes. in the absence of policy interventions capacity will continue to reduce, with smaller homes most likely to disappear. There is an urgent need to address the supply and efficient use of nursing staff skills in care homes. While fee levels are the primary concern the effect of the proposed care standards was clearly having an effect. Even with subsequent amendment to these standards, unless authorities use capacity funding to raise fees and improve expectations, providers are likely to continue to exit the market.

  3. Electromagnetic moments of 22F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, M.; Matsuta, K.; Komurasaki, J.; Hirano, H.; Nishimura, D.; Momota, S.; Ohtsubo, T.; Izumikawa, T.; Shimbara, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kameda, D.; Zhou, Dongmei; Zheng, Yongnan; Yuan, Daqing; Zhu, Shengyun; Kitagawa, A.; Kanazawa, M.; Torikoshi, M.; Sato, S.; Nagatomo, T.; Matsumiya, R.; Ishikawa, D.; Fukuda, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Alonso, J. R.; Crebs, G. F.; Symons, T. J. M.

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic dipole (μ) and electric quadrupole (Q) moments of short-lived nucleus 22F (Iπ=4+, T=4.2s) have been measured for the first time by means of the β-NMR technique. A spin polarized 22F beam was produced through the charge exchange reaction of 22Ne and was implanted into single crysltals of NaF and MgF2 for μ and Q measurements, respectively. As a result, |μ(F22)|=(2.69443±0.00039)μ and |Q(F22)|=(3±2)mb was obtained. These values are well reproduced by the shell model calculations.

  4. Electric and Magnetic Dipole Moments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The stringent limit on the electric dipole moment of the neutron forced the issue on the strong CP-problem. The most elegant solution of which is the axion field proposed by Peccei and Quinn. The current limit on the QCD parameter theta coming from the limit on the neutron EDM is of order 10-10. I am going to describe the present status on the neutron EDM searches and further prospects on getting down to theta_qcd sensitivity of 10-13 with the new deuteron EDM in storage rings proposal. For completeness the current status and prospects of the muon g-2 experiment will also be given.

  5. Closure plan for the proposed Millennium Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, S.; Sisson, R.

    1999-01-01

    A $2.2 billion expansion of the current oil sands operation has been proposed by Suncor Energy Inc. The expansion would more than double the productive capacity of the present facility. As part of the application for this expansion, called Project Millennium, a comprehensive closure plan has been developed and filed by the Corporation. The Plan includes a systematic evaluation of the area to be developed, a description of the development activities planned, and the goals and objectives of the Corporation in re-establishing the landforms and ecosystems concurrently with running the operation. The Plan envisages surface contouring as early as practicable during the mine development, soil reconstruction, and re-establishment of vegetation, surface drainage and wetlands. The Corporation undertakes to monitor the performance of the reclaimed areas based on landform performance, the impact of chemical constituents on the landscape and ecosystem sustainability. An annual monitoring report assessing herbaceous vegetation growth, major species composition, tree and shrub survival and growth rate, groundwater conditions, amount of precipitation, the utility of constructed wetlands for treatment of reclamation area seepage and runoff waters, and wildlife population changes, will be prepared annually. A future research program associated with the Reclamation and Closure Plan will also examine the effectiveness of the reclamation drainage system as fish habitat, and the potential of the proposed end-pit lake to provide a viable aquatic ecosystem. 8 refs., 2 figs

  6. Long-term cavity closure in non-linear rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Jan; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel Walter

    2017-08-01

    -field deformation rate. The solution remains valid in the limit of ideal power-law fluid when \\overline M_s = 1/n. The solution is based on an approximation which transforms the non-linear isotropic constitutive law into a linear anisotropic one in the far field. The proposed approximate solution for closure velocity for general far-field load is based on the two end-member analytical solutions. They are additively combined after replacing the material threshold viscosity μ0 by the apparent background viscosity due to the far-field shear. Benchmarking the solution shows that there is a 50 per cent misfit at most between the analytical and the numerical solution for closure rate. Comparing the closure velocities obtained with a Carreau viscosity model with the ones from a power-law material shows an increase of several orders of magnitude for pressure loads smaller than 2{μ _0}D_{II}^*. Far field shear can also increase hole closure rate by several orders of magnitude. Compared with other available solutions, the approximate solution presented here ensures that both speed ups are taken into account making it well suited for actual underground conditions where both diffusion creep and shear stresses occur. The additional closure mechanisms considered here can potentially explain the fast closure rates observed underground without referring to transient mechanisms.

  7. Stomatal closure by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negash, L.; Björn, L.O.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation (UV) (255–325 nm) on stomatal closure was investigated on tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc) Trotter] in the presence of white light (ca 50 ·mol m −2 s −1 ). The action spectrum showed that UV (ca 2 ·mol m −2 s −1 , half band width about 10 nm) of 285 nm or shorter wavelengths was very efficient in causing stomatal closure. The effectiveness decreased sharply towards longer wavelengths. Radiation of 313 nm or longer wavelengths was practically without effect. Increasing UV intensity increased stomatal resistance. When stronger white light (5 to 9 times stronger than the one used during irradiation) was administered, stomates re-opened rapidly irrespective of whether the UV was on or off, although a subsequent gradual closing tendency was observed when the UV was on. (author)

  8. Self-assembly and flux closure studies of magnetic nanoparticle rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Alexander; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoremanent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can self-assemble into rings through dipolar interactions, when dispersed under appropriate conditions. Analysis of individual MNP rings and clusters by off-axis electron holography reveals bistable flux closure (FC) states at ambient temperatures...

  9. Predicting Robust Learning with the Visual Form of the Moment-by-Moment Learning Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.; Hershkovitz, Arnon; Rossi, Lisa M.; Goldstein, Adam B.; Gowda, Sujith M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for analyzing a student's learning over time for a specific skill: analysis of the graph of the student's moment-by-moment learning over time. Moment-by-moment learning is calculated using a data-mined model that assesses the probability that a student learned a skill or concept at a specific time during learning (Baker,…

  10. Influence of glottal closure configuration on vocal efficacy in young normal-speaking women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Berit; Bigenzahn, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    Posterior closure insufficiency of the glottis is often mentioned in connection with permanent voice disorders. Recently published studies have revealed that an incomplete closure of the glottis can be found also in normal-speaking voices, especially in women. However, the effect of glottal closure configuration on vocal efficacy is not sufficiently clarified. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of glottal closure configuration on singing and speaking voice characteristics. Overall, 520 young female normal-speaking subjects were examined by videostroboscopy for different phonation conditions in the combination of soft, loud, low, and/or high phonation and by voice range profile measurements. According to the videostroboscopic analysis, the subjects were subdivided into four groups: complete closure of the vocal folds already in soft phonation (group 1), closure of the vocal fold with increasing intensity (group 2), persistent closure insufficiencies despite increasing intensity (group 3), and hourglass-shaped closure in subjects with vocal nodules (group 4). Subjects in which the glottal closure could not be evaluated sufficiently were subclassified into group 5 (missing values). Selected criteria of the singing and speaking voice were evaluated and statistically processed according to the mentioned subclassification. Group 1 reached significantly the highest sound pressure levels (SPLmax) for the singing voice as well as for the shouting voice. Group 3 showed a limited capacity to increase the intensity of the singing and speaking voice. The results gathered in this study objectify the relationship of insufficient glottal closure and reduced vocal capabilities. As long as no conclusive data on long-term consequences of insufficient glottal closure are available, a prophylactic improvement of the laryngeal situation especially in female professional voice users by voice therapy should be recommended.

  11. 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon allo , uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gal containers) in the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility), located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040 (Ecology 1991). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The strategy for closure of the 304 Facility is presented in Section 6.0

  12. Ocular biometry in angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Banifatemi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    To compare ocular biometric parameters in primary angle closure suspects (PACS), primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) and acute primary angle closure (APAC). This cross-sectional study was performed on 113 patients including 33 cases of PACS, 45 patients with PACG and 35 subjects with APAC. Central corneal thickness (CCT), axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) were measured with an ultrasonic biometer. Lens-axial length factor (LAF), relative lens position, corrected ACD (CACD) and corrected lens position were calculated. The parameters were measured bilaterally but only data from the right eyes were compared. In the APAC group, biometric parameters were also compared between affected and unaffected fellow eyes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors. No statistically significant difference was observed in biometric parameters between PACS and PACG eyes, or between affected and fellow eyes in the APAC group (P>0.05 for all comparisons). However, eyes with APAC had thicker cornea (P=0.001), thicker lens (PAPAC. In the APAC group, LAF (PAPAC.

  13. On complete moment convergence for nonstationary negatively associated random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Hwa Ko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this paper is to establish the complete moment convergence for nonstationary negatively associated random variables satisfying the weak mean domination condition. The result is an improvement of complete convergence in Marcinkiewicz-Zygmund-type SLLN for negatively associated random variables in Kuczmaszewska (Acta Math. Hung. 128:116-130, 2010.

  14. Closure of army stand alone housing areas: An environmental adventure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    In October 1988, Congress passed the Defense Authorization Amendments and Base Closure and Realignment Act, Public Law 100-526. This legislation provided the framework for making decisions about military base closures and realignments. The overall objective of the legislation was to close and realign bases to maximize savings without impairing the Army's overall military mission. In December 1988, the Defense Secretary's ad hoc Commission on Base Realignment and Closure issued its final report nominating candidate installations. Among the installations affected by the commission's recommendations, which were subsequently approved by Congress, were 53 military housing areas. The paper recounts the process by which each of the 53 housing areas was assessed to determine if any environmental restoration was to be performed prior to property sale. Each phase of the program is addressed from the Enhanced Preliminary Assessment through the issuance of a 'Statement of Condition' which, in accordance with Army real property regulations, is required prior to property transfer. The unique challenges presented by the housing areas are high-lighted; where materials such as asbestos, radon and fuel oil predominated, as opposed to laboratory chemicals and hazardous waste from industrial operations. In addition, attention is given to the myriad disciplines which interface in preparing a housing area for closure. Forty-three Statements of Condition have been issued to date, with the remainder to be prepared upon completion of remediation activities at each site

  15. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment for quantifying water vapor absorption over the terrestrial and solar infrared – Part 3: Quantification of the mid- and near-infrared water vapor continuum in the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range under atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reichert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a first quantification of the near-infrared (NIR water vapor continuum absorption from an atmospheric radiative closure experiment carried out at the Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E; 2964 m a.s.l.. Continuum quantification is achieved via radiative closure using radiometrically calibrated solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR absorption spectra covering the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range. The dry atmospheric conditions at the Zugspitze site (IWV 1.4 to 3.3 mm enable continuum quantification even within water vapor absorption bands, while upper limits for continuum absorption can be provided in the centers of window regions. Throughout 75 % of the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range, the Zugspitze results agree within our estimated uncertainty with the widely used MT_CKD 2.5.2 model (Mlawer et al., 2012. In the wings of water vapor absorption bands, our measurements indicate about 2–5 times stronger continuum absorption than MT_CKD, namely in the 2800 to 3000 cm−1 and 4100 to 4200 cm−1 spectral ranges. The measurements are consistent with the laboratory measurements of Mondelain et al. (2015, which rely on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CDRS, and the calorimetric–interferometric measurements of Bicknell et al. (2006. Compared to the recent FTIR laboratory studies of Ptashnik et al. (2012, 2013, our measurements are consistent within the estimated errors throughout most of the spectral range. However, in the wings of water vapor absorption bands our measurements indicate typically 2–3 times weaker continuum absorption under atmospheric conditions, namely in the 3200 to 3400, 4050 to 4200, and 6950 to 7050 cm−1 spectral regions.

  16. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 minutes of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-minute training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  17. Mirtazapine-induced acute angle closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Kahraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute angle closure (AAC is an ocular emergency with symptoms including blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, vomiting and reddening of the eye those results from increased intraocular pressure. This clinical condition can lead to permanent damage in vision, thus causing blindness by generating progressive and irreversible optic neuropathy if left untreated. There are several reasons of AAC, including several types of local and systemic medications; mainly sympathomimetics, cholinergics, anti-cholinergics, mydriatics, anti-histamines, antiepileptics like topiramate, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, sulfa-based drugs and anticoagulants. Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, is an atypical antidepressant with a complex pharmacological profile. This case report describes a patient with major depressive disorder, who experienced AAC after the first dosage of mirtazapine treatment, and highlights the importance of close monitoring of individuals under antidepressant treatment particularly immediately after initiation of the drug.

  18. Harmonic moment dynamics in Laplacian growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchiner, Alexander; Thrasher, Matthew; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2010-01-01

    Harmonic moments are integrals of integer powers of z=x+iy over a domain. Here, the domain is an exterior of a bubble of air growing in an oil layer between two horizontal closely spaced plates. Harmonic moments are a natural basis for such Laplacian growth phenomena because, unlike other representations, these moments linearize the zero surface tension problem [S. Richardson, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 609 (1972)], so that all moments except the lowest one (the area of the bubble) are conserved in time. In our experiments, we directly determine the harmonic moments and show that for nonzero surface tension, all moments (except the lowest one) decay in time rather than exhibiting the divergences of other representations. Further, we derive an expression that relates the derivative of the kth harmonic moment Mk to measurable quantities (surface tension, viscosity, the distance between the plates, and a line integral over the contour encompassing the growing bubble). The laboratory observations are in good accord with the expression we derive for dMk/dt , which is proportional to the surface tension; thus in the zero surface tension limit, the moments (above k=0 ) are all conserved, in accord with Richardson’s theory. In addition, from the measurements of the time evolution of the harmonic moments we obtain a value for the surface tension that is within 20% of the accepted value. In conclusion, our analysis and laboratory observations demonstrate that an interface dynamics description in terms of harmonic moments is physically realizable and robust.

  19. τ dipole moments via radiative leptonic τ decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidelman, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS,Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University,Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Epifanov, D. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS,Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University,Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); The University of Tokyo,7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Fael, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Mercolli, L. [Federal Office of Public Health FOPH,CH-3003 Bern (Switzerland); Passera, M. [INFN - Sezione di Padova,I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-03-21

    We propose a new method to probe the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the τ lepton using precise measurements of the differential rates of radiative leptonic τ decays at high-luminosity B factories. Possible deviations of these moments from the Standard Model values are analyzed in an effective Lagrangian approach, thus providing model-independent results. Analytic expressions for the relevant non-standard contributions to the differential decay rates are presented. Earlier proposals to probe the τ dipole moments are examined. A detailed feasibility study of our method is performed in the conditions of the Belle and Belle II experiments at the KEKB and Super-KEKB colliders, respectively. This study shows that our approach, applied to the planned full set of Belle II data for radiative leptonic τ decays, has the potential to improve the present experimental bound on the τ anomalous magnetic moment. On the contrary, its foreseen sensitivity is not expected to lower the current experimental limit on the τ electric dipole moment.

  20. Angle closure glaucoma secondary to psychotropic medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ross Rocke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Psychotropic medications are commonly associated anticholinergic side-effects. In susceptible patients, this can result in angle closure induced permanent loss of vision Aims To review the mechanism of angle closure and which psychotropics are most likely to precipitate this complication. Methods Literature review surrounding the mechanism of angle closure and pharmacology of various psychotropics Results Mydriasis, forward-displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm and ciliary body swelling are the mechanisms by which angle closure occurs. Anticholinergic side effects of psychotropic medications are most implicated in causing this. Conclusion Screening patients for risk factors of angle closure and either having them formally assessed or choosing psychotropics with minimal anticholinergic effects may avoid inducing angle closure.

  1. Primary closure of equine laryngotomy incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, C.; Karlsson, L.; Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to report healing characteristics and complications after primary closure of equine laryngotomies and analyse factors potentially associated with complications. This retrospective case series of the medical records of horses (n = 180) undergoing laryngoplasty and laryngotomy...... after primary closure of equine laryngotomy incisions are infrequent and considered of minimal severity and can be performed safely when paying careful attention to the closure of the cricothyroid membrane....

  2. Storage shaft definitive closure plug and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardaine, M.

    1992-01-01

    A definitive closure plug system for radioactive waste storage at any deepness, is presented. The inherent weight of the closure materials is used to set in the plug: these materials display an inclined sliding surface in such a way that when the closure material rests on a stable surface of the shaft storage materials, the relative sliding of the different materials tends to spread them towards the shaft internal wall so as to completely occlude the shaft

  3. Solving moment hierarchies for chemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Smith, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The study of chemical reaction networks (CRN’s) is a very active field. Earlier well-known results (Feinberg 1987 Chem. Enc. Sci. 42 2229, Anderson et al 2010 Bull. Math. Biol. 72 1947) identify a topological quantity called deficiency, for any CRN, which, when exactly equal to zero, leads to a unique factorized steady-state for these networks. No results exist however for the steady states of non-zero-deficiency networks. In this paper, we show how to write the full moment-hierarchy for any non-zero-deficiency CRN obeying mass-action kinetics, in terms of equations for the factorial moments. Using these, we can recursively predict values for lower moments from higher moments, reversing the procedure usually used to solve moment hierarchies. We show, for non-trivial examples, that in this manner we can predict any moment of interest, for CRN’s with non-zero deficiency and non-factorizable steady states.

  4. Solving moment hierarchies for chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Smith, Eric

    2017-10-20

    The study of chemical reaction networks (CRN's) is a very active field. Earlier well-known results (Feinberg 1987 Chem. Enc. Sci . 42 2229, Anderson et al 2010 Bull. Math. Biol . 72 1947) identify a topological quantity called deficiency, for any CRN, which, when exactly equal to zero, leads to a unique factorized steady-state for these networks. No results exist however for the steady states of non-zero-deficiency networks. In this paper, we show how to write the full moment-hierarchy for any non-zero-deficiency CRN obeying mass-action kinetics, in terms of equations for the factorial moments. Using these, we can recursively predict values for lower moments from higher moments, reversing the procedure usually used to solve moment hierarchies. We show, for nontrivial examples, that in this manner we can predict any moment of interest, for CRN's with non-zero deficiency and non-factorizable steady states.

  5. Ocular Biometry in Angle Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Razeghinejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare ocular biometric parameters in primary angle closure suspects (PACS, primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG and acute primary angle closure (APAC. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 113 patients including 33 cases of PACS, 45 patients with PACG and 35 subjects with APAC. Central corneal thickness (CCT, axial length (AL, anterior chamber depth (ACD and lens thickness (LT were measured with an ultrasonic biometer. Lens-axial length factor (LAF, relative lens position, corrected ACD (CACD and corrected lens position were calculated. The parameters were measured bilaterally but only data from the right eyes were compared. In the APAC group, biometric parameters were also compared between affected and unaffected fellow eyes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed in biometric parameters between PACS and PACG eyes, or between affected and fellow eyes in the APAC group (P>0.05 for all comparisons. However, eyes with APAC had thicker cornea (P=0.001, thicker lens (P<0.0001, shallower ACD (P=0.009, shallower CACD (P=0.003 and larger LAF (P<0.0001. Based on ROC curve analysis, lower ACD, and larger LT, LAF and CCT values were associated with APAC. In the APAC group, LAF (P<0.0001 and CCT (P=0.001 were significant risk factors. Conclusion: This study revealed no significant difference in biometric characteristics in eyes with PACS and PACG. However, larger LAF and CCT were predictive of APAC.

  6. Muon Dipole Moment Experiments Interpretation and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, J L; Shadmi, Y; Feng, Jonathan L; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Shadmi, Yael

    2001-01-01

    We examine the prospects for discovering new physics through muon dipole moments. The current deviation in $g_{\\mu}-2$ may be due entirely to the muon's {\\em electric} dipole moment. We note that the precession frequency in the proposed BNL muon EDM experiment is also subject to a similar ambiguity, but this can be resolved by up-down asymmetry measurements. We then review the theoretical expectations for the muon's electric dipole moment in supersymmetric models.

  7. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the CO, HB, HF and LiH molecules are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. The possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment is discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the molecules CO, HB, HF and LiH are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. It is discussed the possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment. (Author) [pt

  9. Review on improved seismic imaging with closure phase

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-08-13

    The timing and amplitudes of arrivals recorded in seismic traces are influenced by velocity variations all along the associated raypaths. Consequently, velocity errors far from the target can lead to blurred imaging of the target body. To partly remedy this problem, we comprehensively reviewed inverting differential traveltimes that satisfied the closure-phase condition. The result is that the source and receiver statics are completely eliminated in the data and velocities far from the target do not need to be known. We successfully used the phase closure equation for traveltime tomography, refraction statics, migration, refraction tomography, and earthquake location, all of which demonstrated the higher resolution achievable by processing data with differential traveltimes rather than absolute traveltimes. More generally, the stationary version of the closure-phase equation is equivalent to Fermat’s principle and can be derived from the equations of seismic interferometry. In summary, the general closure-phase equation is the mathematical foundation for approximately redatuming sources and/or receivers to the target of interest without the need to accurately know the statics or the velocity model away from the target.

  10. MCO closure welding process parameter development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key elements in the SNF process is final closure of the MCO by welding. Fuel is loaded into the MCO (approximately 2 ft. in diameter and 13 ft. long) and a heavy shield plug is inserted into the top, creating a mechanical seal. The plug contains several process ports for various operations, including vacuum drying and inert-gas backfilling of the packaged fuel. When fully processed, the Canister Cover Assembly (CCA) is placed over the shield plug and final closure made by welding. The following reports the effort between the Amer Industrial Technology (AIT) and Fluor Hanford (FH) to develop and qualify the welding process for making the final closure--with primary emphasis on developing a set of robust parameters for deposition of the root pass. Work was carried out in three phases: (1) Initial welding process and equipment selection with subsequent field demonstration testing; (2) Development and qualification of a specific process technique and parameters; and (3) Validation of the process and parameters at the CSB under mock production conditions. This work establishes the process technique and parameters that provide a high level of confidence that acceptable MCO closure welds will be made on a consistent and repeatable basis

  11. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure

  12. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  13. Classification and closure properties of languages for describing concurrent system behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szijarto, M.

    1981-01-01

    The correspondence between sequential program schemes and formal languages is well known. The situation is more complicated in the case of parallel program schemes, and trace languages have been introduced to describe them. The author introduces the concept of the closure of a language on a so called independence relation on the alphabet of the language, and formulate several theorems about them and the trace languages. He investigates the closedness properties of Chomsky classes under closure on independence relations, and as a special case we derive a new necessary and sufficient condition for the regularity of the commutative closure of a language. 12 references.

  14. The neutron electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.G.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Pakvasa, S.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study was made of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of neutron D n in various models of CP violation. It was found that in the standard KM model with 3 families the neutron EDM is in the range 1.4x10 -33 ≤ D n ≤ 1.6x10 -31 ecm; that the two Higgs doublet model has approximately the same value of D n as the standard model; that D n in the Weinberg model is predicted to satisfy D n > 10 -25 ecm; that in a class of left-right symmetric models D n is of the order of 10 -26-11 ecm; that in supersymmetric models D n is of the order 10 -22 φ ecm with φ being the possible phase difference of the phases of gluino mass and the gluino-quark-smark mixing matrix and that the strong CP parameter θ is found to be θ -9 , using the present experimental limit that D n -25 ecm with 90% confidence. 65 refs., 10 figs

  15. Stereo Correspondence Using Moment Invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratne, Prashan; Safaei, Farzad

    Autonomous navigation is seen as a vital tool in harnessing the enormous potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and small robotic vehicles for both military and civilian use. Even though, laser based scanning solutions for Simultaneous Location And Mapping (SLAM) is considered as the most reliable for depth estimation, they are not feasible for use in UAV and land-based small vehicles due to their physical size and weight. Stereovision is considered as the best approach for any autonomous navigation solution as stereo rigs are considered to be lightweight and inexpensive. However, stereoscopy which estimates the depth information through pairs of stereo images can still be computationally expensive and unreliable. This is mainly due to some of the algorithms used in successful stereovision solutions require high computational requirements that cannot be met by small robotic vehicles. In our research, we implement a feature-based stereovision solution using moment invariants as a metric to find corresponding regions in image pairs that will reduce the computational complexity and improve the accuracy of the disparity measures that will be significant for the use in UAVs and in small robotic vehicles.

  16. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  17. Neck forces and moments and head accelerations in side impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Maiman, Dennis J; Philippens, Mat; Wismans, Jac

    2009-03-01

    Although side-impact sled studies have investigated chest, abdomen, and pelvic injury mechanics, determination of head accelerations and the associated neck forces and moments is very limited. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the temporal forces and moments at the upper neck region and head angular accelerations and angular velocities using postmortem human subjects (PMHS). Anthropometric data and X-rays were obtained, and the specimens were positioned upright on a custom-designed seat, rigidly fixed to the platform of the sled. PMHS were seated facing forward with the Frankfort plane horizontal, and legs were stretched parallel to the mid-sagittal plane. The normal curvature and alignment of the dorsal spine were maintained without initial torso rotation. A pyramid-shaped nine-accelerometer package was secured to the parietal-temporal region of the head. The test matrix consisted of groups A and B, representing the fully restrained torso condition, and groups C and D, representing the three-point belt-restrained torso condition. The change in velocity was 12.4 m/s for groups A and C, 17.9 m/s for group B, and 8.7 m/s for group D tests. Two specimens were tested in each group. Injuries were scored based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale. The head mass, center of gravity, and moment of inertia were determined for each specimen. Head accelerations and upper neck forces and moments were determined before head contact. Neck forces and moments and head angular accelerations and angular velocities are presented on a specimen-by-specimen basis. In addition, a summary of peak magnitudes of biomechanical data is provided because of their potential in serving as injury reference values characterizing head-neck biomechanics in side impacts. Though no skull fractures occurred, AIS 0 to 3 neck traumas were dependent on the impact velocity and restraint condition. Because specimen-specific head center of gravity and mass moment of inertia were determined

  18. Statistical Inference Based on L-Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Šimková

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome drawbacks of central moments and comoment matrices usually used to characterize univariate and multivariate distributions, respectively, their generalization, termed L-moments, has been proposed. L-moments of all orders are defined for any random variable or vector with finite mean. L-moments have been widely employed in the past 20 years in statistical inference. The aim of the paper is to present the review of the theory of L-moments and to illustrate their application in parameter estimating and hypothesis testing. The problem of estimating the three-parameter generalized Pareto distribution’s (GPD parameters that is generally used in modelling extreme events is considered. A small simulation study is performed to show the superiority of the L-moment method in some cases. Because nowadays L-moments are often employed in estimating extreme events by regional approaches, the focus is on the key assumption of index-flood based regional frequency analysis (RFA, that is homogeneity testing. The benefits of the nonparametric L-moment homogeneity test are implemented on extreme meteorological events observed in the Czech Republic.

  19. 6-quark contribution to nuclear magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic moments of nuclei with LS closed shell +/-1 particle are calculated. Core polarization and meson exchange current are treated realistically in order to single out the 6-quark contribution. Overall agreement with experimental values is quite good. It is shown that the 6-quark system contributes to the respective iso-vector and iso-scalar moments with reasonable magnitudes

  20. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps...

  1. Fixed-J moments: exact calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.

    1980-01-01

    We show that the two first fixed J moments of the Hamiltonian operator can be easily calculated over the whole fixed particle number shell model space as well as over configurations. The method may be extended to higher moments of H and to include the isotopic spin T

  2. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. B.; Swann, A.

    2013-01-01

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps are gu...

  3. Real object recognition using moment invariants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    contour-based shape descriptors and region-based shape descriptors (Kim & Sung 2000). Regular moment invariants are one of the most popular and widely used contour-based shape descriptors is a set of derived by Hu (1962). These geometrical moment invariants have been then extended to larger sets by Wong & Siu ...

  4. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  5. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino τ v l M using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a v l D , which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2) L x U(1) Y .

  6. Discrete objects, splitting closure and connectedness | Castellini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Notions of discrete and indiscrete classes with respect to a closure operator are introduced and studied. These notions are strongly related to splitting and cosplitting closure operators. By linking the above concepts, two Galois connections arise whose composition provides a third Galois connection that can be used as a ...

  7. Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    From 1975 to 1991 the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites (HPADS) were used for demolition events. These demolition events were a form of thermal treatment for spent or abandoned chemical waste. Because the HPADS will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the sites will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy closure requirements of WAC 173-303-680 and for the thermal treatment closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the HPADS, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the HPADS. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. Only dangerous constituents derived from HPADS operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i). The HPADS are actually two distinct soil closure areas within the Hanford Patrol Academy training area

  8. Spontaneous closure of traumatic tympanic membrane perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellinge, Marlene Ersgaard; Kristensen, S.; Larsen, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of traumatic tympanic membrane perforations varies in different investigations, ranging from observation to early surgical repair. The present study aimed to focus on the closure rate and the closure time in a group of patients treated with a watchful waiting policy. MET...

  9. Acute angle closure glaucoma following ileostomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Meirelles Lopes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Angle-closure glaucoma can be induced by drugs that may cause pupillary dilatation. We report a case of a patient that developed bilateral angle closure glaucoma after an ileostomy surgery because of systemic atropine injection. This case report highlights the importance of a fast ophthalmologic evaluation in diseases with ocular involvement in order to make accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatments.

  10. Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, K.B.; Goldstein, A.; Falge, E.; Aubinet, M.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Berbigier, P.; Bernhofer, C.; Ceulemans, R.; Dolman, A.J.; Field, C.; Grelle, A.; Ibrom, A.; Law, B.E.; Kowalski, A.; Meyers, T.; Monchieff, J.; Monson, R.; Oechel, W.; Tenhunen, J.; Valentini, R.; Verma, S.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure is performed across 22 sites and 50 site-years in FLUXNET, a network of eddy covariance sites measuring long-term carbon and energy fluxes in contrasting ecosystems and climates. Energy balance closure was evaluated by statistical regression of

  11. Blurred image recognition by legendre moment invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Shu, Huazhong; Han, Guo-Niu; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Processing blurred images is a key problem in many image applications. Existing methods to obtain blur invariants which are invariant with respect to centrally symmetric blur are based on geometric moments or complex moments. In this paper, we propose a new method to construct a set of blur invariants using the orthogonal Legendre moments. Some important properties of Legendre moments for the blurred image are presented and proved. The performance of the proposed descriptors is evaluated with various point-spread functions and different image noises. The comparison of the present approach with previous methods in terms of pattern recognition accuracy is also provided. The experimental results show that the proposed descriptors are more robust to noise and have better discriminative power than the methods based on geometric or complex moments. PMID:19933003

  12. Optimal inference in dynamic models with conditional moment restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Sørensen, Michael

    optimal estimator reduces to Newey's. Specification and hypothesis testing in our framework are introduced. We derive the theory of optimal instruments and the associated asymptotic dis- tribution theory for general cases including non-martingale estimating functions and general history dependence...

  13. Leaf-on canopy closure in broadleaf deciduous forests predicted during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Ayala, Andrea J.; Shickel, Madeline R.

    2015-01-01

    Forest canopy influences light transmittance, which in turn affects tree regeneration and survival, thereby having an impact on forest composition and habitat conditions for wildlife. Because leaf area is the primary impediment to light penetration, quantitative estimates of canopy closure are normally made during summer. Studies of forest structure and wildlife habitat that occur during winter, when deciduous trees have shed their leaves, may inaccurately estimate canopy closure. We estimated percent canopy closure during both summer (leaf-on) and winter (leaf-off) in broadleaf deciduous forests in Mississippi and Louisiana using gap light analysis of hemispherical photographs that were obtained during repeat visits to the same locations within bottomland and mesic upland hardwood forests and hardwood plantation forests. We used mixed-model linear regression to predict leaf-on canopy closure from measurements of leaf-off canopy closure, basal area, stem density, and tree height. Competing predictive models all included leaf-off canopy closure (relative importance = 0.93), whereas basal area and stem density, more traditional predictors of canopy closure, had relative model importance of ≤ 0.51.

  14. Watertight dural closure! An in vitro study to explore the myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipkumar Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The watertight closure of the dura mater is fundamental to intracranial supratentorial procedures in neurosurgery. Controversies exist claiming the superiority of one closure technique over another. But is ′Water-tight′ dural closure really achievable ? An in vitro study system was developed to test the pressures at which dural incisions, closed with sutures, leaked. Materials and Methods: Bovine dura was secured to the lower end of an open ended calibrated plastic cylinder. Multiple interrupted stitches were applied over a two 2 cm length of the dura without any incision. Similarly a 2 cm incision was made and closed with interrupted and continuous stitches. Cylinder was filled with colored saline gradually. Height of the water column at which sutured dura leaked was recorded. The tests were conducted with the dura both in lax and tense conditions. Inlay closure technique was also tested on the same model using a dural substitute. Results: Even without an incision, needle puncture sites over a dura, leak, at a very low hydrostatic pressure (30 < mm of H2O, though a continuous interlocking suture performs slightly better than an interrupted suture technique. If the needle puncture sites are closed with glue, both the suture techniques can achieve a watertight closure against a hydrostatic pressure of 240 mm of H2O. Conclusion : In the experimental model described, ′Water-tight′ dural closure appears to be impossible with suture closure of a dural defect.

  15. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low.

  16. Closure of Microcosm for refurbishment

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Since 1994, the Microcosm exhibition has given the opportunity to visitors of all ages and backgrounds to have a first glimpse into the secrets of physics.   To ensure that Microcosm can continue fulfilling its educational aims at the same level of quality for many years to come, it is closing for renovation work on 8 December 2014 and is expected to reopen during Summer 2015. During the closure, the “Fun with Physics” workshop will not take place, but the Universe of Particles exhibition in the Globe and the Passport to the Big Bang circuit will remain accessible to the public, free of charge and with no need to book in advance.  Guided tours of CERN are also available (advance booking required via this page).

  17. Moments of spectral functions: Monte Carlo evaluation and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predescu, Cristian

    2005-11-01

    The subject of the present study is the Monte Carlo path-integral evaluation of the moments of spectral functions. Such moments can be computed by formal differentiation of certain estimating functionals that are infinitely differentiable against time whenever the potential function is arbitrarily smooth. Here, I demonstrate that the numerical differentiation of the estimating functionals can be more successfully implemented by means of pseudospectral methods (e.g., exact differentiation of a Chebyshev polynomial interpolant), which utilize information from the entire interval . The algorithmic detail that leads to robust numerical approximations is the fact that the path-integral action and not the actual estimating functional are interpolated. Although the resulting approximation to the estimating functional is nonlinear, the derivatives can be computed from it in a fast and stable way by contour integration in the complex plane, with the help of the Cauchy integral formula (e.g., by Lyness' method). An interesting aspect of the present development is that Hamburger's conditions for a finite sequence of numbers to be a moment sequence provide the necessary and sufficient criteria for the computed data to be compatible with the existence of an inversion algorithm. Finally, the issue of appearance of the sign problem in the computation of moments, albeit in a milder form than for other quantities, is addressed.

  18. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Print this issue Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment ... When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts. Get to know ...

  19. The benefit of differential moment concept in managing posterior anchorage and avoiding bite deepening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harryanto Wijaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anchorage is one of the major concerns in orthodontic space closure. Various methods have been proposed to enhance posterior anchorage in space closure such as headgear, Nance holding appliance, and micro implant as temporary anchorage devices. However, several issues such as patient's compliance, appliance effectiveness, and cost of the device become many clinicians concern. The differential moment concept in segmented arch is a technique that requires no patient compliance but can effectively manage posterior anchorage and avoid bite deepening by careful application of forces and moments. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to show the use of differential moment concept in segmented arch technique to manage posterior anchorage and to avoid bite deepening. Case: A 21 years old female patient with protrusive teeth as her chief complaint was treated using fixed orthodontic appliance. Case management: The treatment included four first bicuspid extraction and space closure utilizing differential moment concept in segmented arch. Conclusion: It can be concluded that application of differential moment concept in segmented arch technique is a non invasive, compliance independent, effective, and cost efficient method to manage posterior anchorage and to avoid bite deepening.latar belakang: Penjangkaran merupakan salah satu aspek yang sering kali menjadi masalah dalam penutupan ruang pada perawatan ortodonti. Berbagai metode disarankan untuk memperkuat penjangkaran posterior dalam penutupan ruang seperti headgear, piranti penahan Nance, dan implan mikro sebagai alat penjangkar sementara. Namun demikian, beberapa hal seperti kerjasama pasien, efektivitas piranti, dan biaya dari alat-alat tersebut sering menjadi perhatian/pertimbangan bagi klinisi. Konsep momen diferensial pada segmented arch adalah suatu cara yang efektif untuk memperkuat penjangkaran dan menghindari pendalaman gigitan tanpa memerlukan kerjasama pasien. tujuan

  20. Qualitative evaluation of the iris and ciliary body by ultrasound biomicroscopy in subjects with angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Judy Y; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Park, Judy; Narayanaswamy, Arun K; Perera, Shamira A; Tun, Tin A; Kumar, Rajesh S; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin

    2014-12-01

    To qualitatively analyze anterior chamber structures imaged by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in primary angle-closure patients. Subjects diagnosed as primary angle-closure suspect (PACS), primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG), and previous acute primary angle closure (APAC) were recruited prospectively along with a group of normal controls. UBM was performed under standardized dark room conditions and qualitative assessment was carried out using a set of reference photographs of standard UBM images to categorize the various anatomic features related to angle configuration. These included overall and basal iris thicknesses, iris convexity, iris angulation, ciliary body size, and ciliary sulcus. A total of 60 PACS, 114 PACG, 41 APAC, and 33 normal controls were included. Patients were predominantly older Chinese females. After controlling the confounding effect of age and sex, eyes with overall thicker irides [medium odds ratio (OR) 3.58, thick OR 2.84] when compared with thin irides have a significantly higher likelihood of having PACS/PACG/APAC versus controls. Thicker basal iris component (medium OR 4.13, thick OR 3.39) also have higher likelihood of having angle closure when compared with thin basal iris thickness. Subjects with basal iris insertion, mild iris angulation, and large ciliary body have a higher OR of having angle closure. In contrast, the presence/absence of a ciliary sulcus did not influence the likelihood of angle closure. Eyes with thicker overall and basal iris thicknesses are more likely to have angle closure than controls. Other features that increase the likelihood of angle closure include basal iris insertion, mild iris angulation, and large ciliary body.

  1. Air quality impacts of a scheduled 36-h closure of a major highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, David C.; Zhang, Qunfang; Choi, Wonsik; He, Meilu; Paulson, Suzanne E.; Winer, Arthur M.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yifang

    2013-03-01

    Elevated concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs, pollutants at two fixed locations, one upwind and one downwind, and at various distances from I-405 using a mobile measurement platform (MMP) on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays before, during, and after closure. On the closure Saturday on July 16, I-405 traffic flow was reduced by ˜90% relative to non-closure Saturday observations. Downwind of I-405, fixed-site measurements showed the following reductions: 83% of particle number concentration (PNC), 36% of PM2.5, and 62% of black carbon. Fixed-site measurements showed daily average UFP size distributions were bimodal for non-closure conditions (nucleation modes ˜20 nm, accumulation modes ˜60 nm), but only showed an accumulation mode ˜50 nm during closure. Spatial measurements from the MMP confirmed no nucleation mode was detected at any location 0-300 m downwind during closure. In 2011, non-closure particle emission factors were 5.0, 2.7, and 3.4 × 1013 particles vehicle-1 km-1 for Friday through Sunday respectively. After accounting for instrumental and traffic flow differences, weekday PNC in 2011 was 60% lower than 2001 at the same study location. During the closure event, regional freeway traffic was reduced compared to four selected control Saturdays. Eight stationary monitoring stations throughout the South Coast Air Basin showed PM2.5 was reduced between 18 and 36% relative to the same control days. The outcome of this natural experiment during the I-405 closure confirms that substantial traffic reduction can improve local and regional air quality in sprawled urban regions such as Los Angeles, CA.

  2. Higher Moments of Underlying Event Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    We perform an Underlying Event analysis for real data sets from pp collisions at center of mass energy $ \\sqrt{s}=5 $ and 13 TeV and pPb collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ TeV at the LHC, together with the Monte Carlo data sets generated with Pythia8 and EPOS in the same conditions. The analysis is focused on the transverse region which is more sensitive to the Underlying Event, and performed as a function of the leading track transverse - momentum $p_t$ in each event. In our work, not only the average underlying event activity but also its fluctuation, namely its root mean square (RMS), Skewness and Kurtosis, are analyzed. We find that the particle density, energy density and their fluctuation magnitude (RMS) are suppressed at leading $p_t\\approx$ 5 GeV/c for all these cases, with EPOS having evident deviation of 10\\%-25\\%. The higher moments skewness and kurtosis decrease rapidly in low leading $p_t$ region, and follow an interesting Gaussian-like peak centered at leading $p_t\\approx$ 15 GeV/c.

  3. Blur invariants constructed from arbitrary moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsky, Jaroslav; Flusser, Jan

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with moment invariants with respect to image blurring. It is mainly a reaction to the works of Zhang and Chen , recently published in these Transactions. We present a general method on how to construct blur invariants from arbitrary moments and show that it is no longer necessary to separately derive the invariants for each polynomial basis. We show how to discard dependent terms in blur invariants definition and discuss a proper implementation of the invariants in orthogonal bases using recurrent relations. An example for Legendre moments is given. © 2011 IEEE

  4. Making Knowledge Actionable: Three Key Translation Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Austin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaders regularly experience pressure to move innovation and change initiatives through their organizations. They face the challenge of transforming organizational changes and innovations from ideas into sustained behavior. In this commentary, I argue that successful implementation requires leaders to engage in a translation process that contains three key translation “moments”. The challenges presented by these translation moments are magnified by the difficulty leaders often have in shifting from one moment to the next. Techniques for handling each translation moment are discussed.

  5. Factors associated with increasing nursing home closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John; Lave, Judith; Fisher, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    We determine the rate of nursing home closures for 7 years (1999-2005) and examine internal (e.g., quality), organizational (e.g., chain membership), and external (e.g., competition) factors associated with these closures. The names of the closed facilities and dates of closure from state regulators in all 50 states were obtained. This information was linked to the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data, which contains information on internal, organizational, and market factors for almost all nursing homes in the United States. One thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine facilities closed over this time period (1999-2005). The average annual rate of closure was about 2 percent of facilities, but the rate of closure was found to be increasing. Nursing homes with higher rates of deficiency citations, hospital-based facilities, chain members, small bed size, and facilities located in markets with high levels of competition were more likely to close. High Medicaid occupancy rates were associated with a high likelihood of closure, especially for facilities with low Medicaid reimbursement rates. As states actively debate about how to redistribute long-term care services/dollars, our findings show that they should be cognizant of the potential these decisions have for facilitating nursing home closures.

  6. Space Closure with Loop Mechanics for Treatment of Bimaxillary Protrusion: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, N; Rajesh, R N G; Scindia, Rajat; Ajith, Sreedevi D

    2015-01-01

    This case report intends to highlight the space closure with tear drop loop mechanics for bimaxillary protrusion. Loops can be fabricated in a sectional or full arch wire, and closing loops are usually used in loop mechanics for extraction space closure. The major advantage of loop mechanics is the lack of friction between the bracket and arch wire during space closure. An adult patient with bimaxillary protrusion reported to the clinic. The patient was treated successfully by maximum retraction of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth after extraction of all first premolars. Space closure was begun using a moment differential between posterior and anterior segments created by a Tear drop loop. Anterior teeth were moved with bodily movement, and no anchorage loss of the posterior segments was seen using a Tear drop loop spring. A stable result with normal over jet and overbite was achieved with retraction of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. With a Tear drop loop, individual biomechanical responses can be achieved, and it is possible to calculate force magnitude for every patient. PMID:26028908

  7. Complications of bladder closure in cloacal exstrophy: Do osteotomy and reoperative closure factor in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Daniel A; Di Carlo, Heather N; Sponseller, Paul D; Gearhart, John P

    2017-11-01

    The aims of surgical management in cloacal exstrophy (CE) have shifted to optimizing outcomes and quality of life while minimizing morbidity. This report reviews the single-institution experience of complications of bladder closure in CE. Patients with CE were identified from a prospectively-maintained bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex database. Operative and follow-up data were analyzed to compare complications and failure rates of bladder closure between closures performed with and without osteotomy and primary versus reoperative closures. Of 134 patients followed with CE, 112 met inclusion criteria. Median follow-up time was 3.05years. The failure rate among 112 primary closures (mean age 8.4months) was 31.3% versus 51.9% in reoperative closures (mean age 19.7months) (p=0.044). Complication rate among primary and reoperative closures was 17.9% and 33.3%, respectively (p=0.076). For closures with pelvic osteotomy, failure rate was 24.0% versus 45.9% without osteotomy (p=0.018). Among primary closures with osteotomy, the complication rate was 21.3% versus 10.8% without osteotomy (p=0.171). Complications of bladder closure are common in CE. Pelvic osteotomy reduces failure rates without a significant rise in complications, which are often minor. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between reoperative and primary closures. However, reoperative closures were more likely to fail, emphasizing the importance of a successful primary closure. II: retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vacuum with mesh is a feasible temporary closure device after fascial dehiscence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Skarbye, Mona; Jensen, Kenneth Højsgaard

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The open abdomen is a challenging condition and a temporary abdominal closure device is required in order to protect the intra-abdominal viscera. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a recent device: vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) after...... fascial dehiscence focusing on fascial closure rate, mortality and procedure-related complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective study on 18 patients treated with VAWCM after fascial dehiscence who were consecutively admitted to the Department of Surgery, Slagelse Hospital, between......, respectively, with a median of six (1-11) tightenings. One patient developed an intra-abdominal abscess. Three patients survived until discharge without having obtained delayed primary closure. In two of these patients, the fascial edges were adapted with a prosthetic mesh and one patient was left...

  9. Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschel Smartt; Arthur Watkins; David Pace; Rodney Bitsoi; Eric Larsen; Timothy McJunkin; Charles Tolle

    2006-04-01

    The current disposal path for high-level waste is to place the material into secure waste packages that are inserted into a repository. The Idaho National Laboratory has been tasked with the development, design, and demonstration of the waste package closure system for the repository project. The closure system design includes welding three lids and a purge port cap, four methods of nondestructive examination, and evacuation and backfill of the waste package, all performed in a remote environment. A demonstration of the closure system will be performed with a full-scale waste package.

  10. Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    shelton-davis; Colleen Shelton-Davis; Greg Housley

    2005-10-01

    The current disposal path for high-level waste is to place the material into secure waste packages that are inserted into a repository. The Idaho National Laboratory has been tasked with the development, design, and demonstration of the waste package closure system for the repository project. The closure system design includes welding three lids and a purge port cap, four methods of nondestructive examination, and evacuation and backfill of the waste package, all performed in a remote environment. A demonstration of the closure system will be performed with a full-scale waste package.

  11. [Non-invasive assessment of the perfusion of wounds using power Doppler imaging: vacuum assisted closure versus direct wound closure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungius, K P; Chilla, B K; Labler, L; Teodorovic, N; Marincek, B

    2006-10-01

    The goal of our study was to assess the perfusion in wounds treated by vacuum assisted closure (VAC) compared to primary wound closure. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) was carried out under standardised conditions in 15 VAC-treated and 10 primarily closed wounds as well as on altogether 25 intraindividual reference areas. All data were sent to a work station for post-processing to determine the perfused area. Statistical data analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney test. Both VAC-treated wounds and primarily closed wounds showed a significant increase of the perfusion when compared to the intraindividual reference area (p wounds, a markedly increased perfusion was measured compared to the wounds closed primarily (p wounds, an initial increase of the perfusion was observed. Both these wounds were grossly infected. PDUS allows the quantification of the differences in wound perfusion. This can be helpful in the detection of progressive local wound infections.

  12. On recursive relations and moment problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Wahbi, B.; Rachidi, M.; Zerouali, E.H.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate in this paper the link between the moment problem for sequences, the associated Jacobi matrices and the Pade approximants of the associated analytic functions. We generalize some classical results by providing simple proofs that use functional calculus. (author)

  13. Moments of inertia in a semiclassical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchein, K.

    1993-01-01

    Semiclassical calculations have been performed for 31 nuclei. As a result of preliminary non-fully self-consistent calculations, the moments of inertia in investigated nuclei abd spin degrees of freedom are found

  14. Moments of the very high multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechitailo, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    In experiment, the multiplicity distributions of inelastic processes are truncated due to finite energy, insufficient statistics, or special choice of events. It is shown that the moments of such truncated multiplicity distributions possess some typical features. In particular, the oscillations of cumulant moments at high ranks and their negative values at the second rank can be considered as ones most indicative of the specifics of these distributions. They allow one to distinguish between distributions of different type

  15. Affine Moment Invariants Generated by Graph Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 9 (2011), 2047 – 2056 ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/1593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Image moments * Object recognition * Affine transformation * Affine moment invariants * Pseudoinvariants * Graph representation * Irreducibility * Independence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/ZOI/suk-0359752.pdf

  16. Moment approach to tandem mirror radial transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, K.D.; Callen, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    A moment approach is proposed for the study of tandem mirror radial transport in the resonant plateau regime. The salient features of the method are described with reference to axisymmetric tokamak transport theory. In particular, the importance of momentum conservation to the establishment of the azimuthal variations in the electrostatic potential is demonstrated. Also, an ad hoc drift kinetic equation is solved to determine parallel viscosity coefficients which are required to close the moment system

  17. Flows, scaling, and the control of moment hierarchies for stochastic chemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric; Krishnamurthy, Supriya

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic chemical reaction networks (CRNs) are complex systems that combine the features of concurrent transformation of multiple variables in each elementary reaction event and nonlinear relations between states and their rates of change. Most general results concerning CRNs are limited to restricted cases where a topological characteristic known as deficiency takes a value 0 or 1, implying uniqueness and positivity of steady states and surprising, low-information forms for their associated probability distributions. Here we derive equations of motion for fluctuation moments at all orders for stochastic CRNs at general deficiency. We show, for the standard base case of proportional sampling without replacement (which underlies the mass-action rate law), that the generator of the stochastic process acts on the hierarchy of factorial moments with a finite representation. Whereas simulation of high-order moments for many-particle systems is costly, this representation reduces the solution of moment hierarchies to a complexity comparable to solving a heat equation. At steady states, moment hierarchies for finite CRNs interpolate between low-order and high-order scaling regimes, which may be approximated separately by distributions similar to those for deficiency-zero networks and connected through matched asymptotic expansions. In CRNs with multiple stable or metastable steady states, boundedness of high-order moments provides the starting condition for recursive solution downward to low-order moments, reversing the order usually used to solve moment hierarchies. A basis for a subset of network flows defined by having the same mean-regressing property as the flows in deficiency-zero networks gives the leading contribution to low-order moments in CRNs at general deficiency, in a 1 /n expansion in large particle numbers. Our results give a physical picture of the different informational roles of mean-regressing and non-mean-regressing flows and clarify the dynamical

  18. [Abdominal wall closure in laparotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellón-Caneiro, Juan M

    2005-03-01

    The midline laparotomy is among the most common ways of accessing the peritoneal cavity. This approach is not only used for surgery of the digestive tract but is also extensively applied in vascular, gynecology and urological surgery. When this surgical procedure is conducted in an emergency setting, and depending on the type of surgery (clean and /or contaminated), the incidence of complications may be particularly high, especially when acute dehiscence of the wall occurs (evisceration). Furthermore, the rate of herniation related to midline laparotomy is still high at approximately 16% of cases. Despite efforts to evaluate different suture techniques, suture threads (reabsorbable or non-reabsorbable) and general factors that may interfere with the repair process, the incidence of complications associated with this approach has not been reduced. After multiple studies including meta-analyses, the outcome of laparotomy closure has not essentially improved. We should therefore consider the use of new ways of closing the abdomen in selected patients that might somehow reinforce the surgical wound and notably reduce the incidence of short- and medium-term complications. One such method could perhaps be the use of a biomaterial to support and strengthen conventional sutures.

  19. Extender for securing a closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, II, Patrick A.

    2012-10-02

    An apparatus for securing a closure such as door or a window that opens and closes by movement relative to a fixed structure such as a wall or a floor. Many embodiments provide a device for relocating a padlock from its normal location where it secures a fastener (such as a hasp) to a location for the padlock that is more accessible for locking and unlocking the padlock. Typically an extender is provided, where the extender has a hook at a first end that is disposed through the eye of the staple of the hasp, and at an opposing second end the extender has an annulus, such as a hole in the extender or a loop or ring affixed to the extender. The shackle of the padlock may be disposed through the annulus and may be disposed through the eye of a second staple to secure the door or window in a closed or open position. Some embodiments employ a rigid sheath to enclose at least a portion of the extender. Typically the rigid sheath has an open state where the hook is exposed outside the sheath and a closed state where the hook is disposed within the sheath.

  20. Cyanoacrylate for Intraoral Wound Closure: A Possibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimala Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure is a part of any surgical procedure and the objective of laceration repair or incision closure is to approximate the edges of a wound so that natural healing process may occur. Over the years new biomaterials have been discovered as an alternate to conventional suture materials. Cyanoacrylate bioadhesives are one among them. They carry the advantages of rapid application, patient comfort, resistance to infection, hemostatic properties, and no suture removal anxiety. Hence this study was undertaken to study the effect of long chain cyanoacrylate as an adhesive for intraoral wound closure and also to explore its hemostatic and antibacterial effects. Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE was used as the adhesive in the study. In conclusion isoamyl cyanoacrylate can be used for intraoral wound closure, as an alternative to sutures for gluing the mucoperiosteum to bone, for example, after impaction removal, periapical surgeries, and cleft repair. Its hemostatic and antibacterial activity has to be further evaluated.

  1. Landfill closure with dredged materials - desktop analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This report describes a Rutgers University project for the New Jersey Department of : Transportation (NJDOT) designed to analyze the potential for closure of New Jersey : landfills using dredge material from existing Confined Disposal Facilities (CDF...

  2. 49 CFR 195.124 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, section VIII, Pressure Vessels, Division 1, and must have pressure and temperature ratings at least equal to those of the pipe to which the closure is...

  3. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base closure...

  4. Performance Evaluation of Moment Connections of Moment Resisting Frames Against Progressive Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmoudi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available When a primary structural element fails due to sudden load such as explosion, the building undergoes progressive collapse. The method for design of moment connections during progressive collapse is different to seismic design of moment connections. Because in this case, the axial force on the connections makes it behave differently. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance of a variety of moment connections in preventing progressive collapse in steel moment frames. To achieve this goal, three prequalified moment connections (BSEEP, BFP and WUP-W were designed according seismic codes. These moment connections were analyzed numerically using ABAQUS software for progressive collapse. The results show that the BFP connection (bolted flange plate has capacity much more than other connections because of the use of plates at the junction of beam-column.

  5. Exceptional closure of UNIQA office at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The UNIQA office at CERN will be closed from Wednesday 18 February to Friday 20 February due to painting work. During this closure, the Headquarters of UNIQA in Geneva will remain at the disposal of the members. See details https://cern.ch/chis/UNIQA_Offices.asp The CERN office will re-open on Monday 23 February according to the normal schedule. We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this closure.

  6. Possibility of space closure without initial alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Jain; Saugat Ray; Rajat Mitra; S S Chopra

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic space closure had always remained in focus due to complex biomechanics involved in almost all the treatment modalities. Although lot of efforts have been made from time to time to control the anchorage by complex wire bending or surgical methods like temporary anchorage devices (TAD′s), but all have some added inherent disadvantage. An effort has been made to do carry out orthodontic space closure without any complex archwire bending or any surgically assisted method including TAD...

  7. Factors affecting closure of a temporary stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire; Varma, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine time to reversal of a temporary ostomy, reasons for delayed closure, and patient satisfaction with the scheduling of their closure and related hospital care. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. The target population comprised patients who underwent creation of a temporary ostomy and reversal surgery within one National Health System Hospital Trust in the United Kingdom. The population served by this Trust are ethnically and socioeconomically diverse, predominantly living in urban areas around Greater London. Sixty-one persons who met inclusion criteria were identified. A two-step analytical process was undertaken. First, a literature review examining incidence and causes of delayed stoma closure was undertaken. Second, a postal survey of all patients who had had their stoma closed in 2009 was conducted. Respondents were allowed 2 weeks to complete and return the questionnaire. The survey instrument was developed locally and subjected to content validation using ostomy patients, surgical and nursing colleagues. It consisted of 9 questions querying time from original surgery to closure, reasons for delaying closure surgery beyond 12 weeks, and satisfaction with care. Twenty-seven patients returned their questionnaires, indicating they consented to participate; a response rate of 44%. Half of the respondents (n = 14 [52%]) underwent closure surgery within 6 months of stoma formation; the remaining 48% waited more than 6 months (median: 6.5 months, range: 1.5-26 months). Thirteen patients (48%) reported a delay in receiving their stoma closure; the main reason cited was the need for a course of adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy. Three quarters of respondents (22 [74%]) were satisfied with the overall care they received. Findings from this study suggest that stoma closure may be associated with fewest complications if performed before 12 weeks.

  8. Theater gateway closure: a strategic level barricade

    Science.gov (United States)

    logistical planners at the strategic level can anticipate or mitigate the effects of a theater gateway closure on military operations. Through two...the national elements of power was used to find the strategic level effects of the anomaly, that is an unexpected theater gateway closure. It was found...operations. A detailed analysis of the theater gateways location is critical to mitigate or anticipate the sustainment impacts on military operations

  9. Special closures for steel drum shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzon, L.L.; Otts, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop special lid closures for typical, steel drum, radioactive material shipping containers. Previous experience and testing had shown that the existing container was adequate to withstand the required environmental tests for certification, but that the lid and closure were just marginally effective. Specifically, the lid closure failed to consistently maintain a tight seal between the container and the lid after drop tests, thus causing the package contents to be vulnerable in the subsequent fire test. Recognizing the deficiency, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration requested the development of new closure(s) which would: (1) be as strong and resistant to a drop as the bottom of the container; (2) have minimal economic impact on the overall container cost; (3) maximize the use of existing container designs; (4) consider crush loads; and (5) result in less dependence on personnel and loading procedures. Several techniques were evaluated and found to be more effective than the standard closure mechanism. Of these, three new closure techniques were designed, fabricated, and proven to be structurally adequate to provide containment when a 454-kg drum was drop tested from 9.14-m onto an unyielding surface. The three designs were: (1) a 152-mm long lid extension or skirt welded to the standard drum lid, (2) a separate inner lid, with 152-mm long skirt and (3) C-clamps used at the container-lid interface. Based upon structural integrity, economic impact, and minimal design change, the lid extension is the recommended special closure

  10. Cross sections, multiplicity and moment distributions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggio, P.C. [Laboratório de Ciências Matemáticas, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, 28013-602, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Luna, E.G.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    The unitarity of the S-matrix requires that the absorptive part of the elastic scattering amplitude receives contributions from both the inelastic and the elastic channels. We explore this unitarity condition in order to describe, in a connected way, hadron–hadron observables like the total and elastic differential cross sections, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude and the inclusive multiplicity distributions in full phase space, over a large range of energies. We introduce non-perturbative QCD effects in the forward scattering amplitude by using the infrared QCD effective charge dependent on the dynamical gluon mass. In our analysis we pay special attention to the theoretical uncertainties in the predictions due to this mass scale variation. We also present quantitative predictions for the H{sub q} moments at high energies. Our results reproduce the moment oscillations observed in experimental data, and are consistent with the behavior predicted by QCD.

  11. The determinants of care home closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Stephen; Forder, Julien

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the causes of full closure of care homes in the English care home/nursing home market. We develop theoretical arguments about two causes for closure that are triggered by errors or external shocks: poor economic sustainability and regulatory action. Homes aiming to operate with lower quality in the market are argued for a number of reasons to be more susceptible to errors/shocks in setting quality, especially negative errors, leading to an empirical hypothesis that observed quality should negatively affect closure chance. In addition, given quality, homes facing relatively high levels of local competition should also have an increased chance of closure. We use a panel of care homes from 2008 and 2010 to examine factors affecting their closure status in subsequent years. We allow for the potential endogeneity of home quality and use multiple imputation to replace missing data. Results suggest that homes with comparatively higher quality and/or lower levels of competition have less chance of closure than other homes. We discuss that the results provide some support for the policy of regulators providing quality information to potential purchasers in the market. © 2015 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Improving Bending Moment Measurements on Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Nathan L.

    2016-03-15

    Full-scale fatigue testing of wind turbine blades is conducted using resonance test techniques where the blade plus additional masses is excited at its first resonance frequency to achieve the target loading amplitude. Because there is not a direct relationship between the force applied by an actuator and the bending moment, the blade is instrumented with strain gauges that are calibrated under static loading conditions to determine the sensitivity or relationship between strain and applied moment. Then, during dynamic loading the applied moment is calculated using the strain response of the structure. A similar procedure is also used in the field to measure in-service loads on turbine blades. Because wind turbine blades are complex twisted structures and the deflections are large, there is often significant cross-talk coupling in the sensitivity of strain gauges placed on the structure. Recent work has shown that a sensitivity matrix with nonzero cross terms must be employed to find constant results when a blade is subjected to both flap and lead-lag loading. However, even under controlled laboratory conditions, potential for errors of 3 percent or more in the measured moment exist when using the typical cross-talk matrix approach due to neglecting the influence of large deformations and torsion. This is particularly critical when considering a biaxial load as would be applied on the turbine or during a biaxial fatigue test. This presentation describes these results demonstrating errors made when performing current loads measurement practices on wind turbine blades in the lab and evaluating potential improvements using enhanced cross-talk matrix approaches and calibration procedures.

  13. The verification of the Taylor-expansion moment method for the nanoparticle coagulation in the entire size regime due to Brownian motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Mingzhou; Lin Jianzhong; Jin Hanhui; Jiang Ying

    2011-01-01

    The closure of moment equations for nanoparticle coagulation due to Brownian motion in the entire size regime is performed using a newly proposed method of moments. The equations in the free molecular size regime and the continuum plus near-continuum regime are derived separately in which the fractal moments are approximated by three-order Taylor-expansion series. The moment equations for coagulation in the entire size regime are achieved by the harmonic mean solution and the Dahneke’s solution. The results produced by the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), the Pratsinis’s log-normal moment method (PMM), the sectional method (SM), and the newly derived Taylor-expansion moment method (TEMOM) are presented and compared in accuracy and efficiency. The TEMOM method with Dahneke’s solution produces the most accurate results with a high efficiency than other existing moment models in the entire size regime, and thus it is recommended to be used in the following studies on nanoparticle dynamics due to Brownian motion.

  14. The verification of the Taylor-expansion moment method for the nanoparticle coagulation in the entire size regime due to Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingzhou; Lin, Jianzhong; Jin, Hanhui; Jiang, Ying

    2011-05-01

    The closure of moment equations for nanoparticle coagulation due to Brownian motion in the entire size regime is performed using a newly proposed method of moments. The equations in the free molecular size regime and the continuum plus near-continuum regime are derived separately in which the fractal moments are approximated by three-order Taylor-expansion series. The moment equations for coagulation in the entire size regime are achieved by the harmonic mean solution and the Dahneke's solution. The results produced by the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), the Pratsinis's log-normal moment method (PMM), the sectional method (SM), and the newly derived Taylor-expansion moment method (TEMOM) are presented and compared in accuracy and efficiency. The TEMOM method with Dahneke's solution produces the most accurate results with a high efficiency than other existing moment models in the entire size regime, and thus it is recommended to be used in the following studies on nanoparticle dynamics due to Brownian motion.

  15. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  16. A comparison between mass closure and layered closure of midline abdominal incisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally, a laparotomy wound is closed in layers co-opting the various layers anatomically. A new method of closure, namely single layer closure technique (mass closure technique has come into vogue. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the benefits or otherwise between single layer closure and layered closure after comparing it with studies available in literature. Settings and Design: This study was performed in a teaching institute in patients undergoing laparotomy, either planned or emergency. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 cases were selected at random and the study was carried out over a period of 2 years. The cases were equally divided into two groups of 40. In both groups, vertical midline incision was used. In the first group, abdomen was closed using the single layer closure technique. Continuous suturing with burial of the knots was done in 20 patients and interrupted mass closure was done in another 20 patients. In the other group, the abdomen was closed in layers. The patients were followed up for minimum 6 months. Patients who did not turn up for follow up were asked to notify the development of any wound complication through postal correspondence. Results: The time required for closure was considerably less when continuous suture technique was used. One patient in the mass closure group and four in the layered group developed post-operative wound infections. One patient in the layered closure group developed a stitch sinus. There were two cases of burst abdomen with the layered closure technique. Two patients in the layered closure group developed incisional hernias 6 months post-operatively. Conclusions: Single layer closure technique offers certain definite advantage over the layered closure technique with respect to the time required for closure of the incision, incidence of wound dehiscence and the incidence of incisional hernia. However, the true incidence of wound dehiscence (burst abdomen and incisional

  17. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  18. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management's (EM's) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE's 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM's accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document

  19. MOMENTS OF THE LENGTH OF LINE SEGMENTS IN HOMOGENEOUS PLANAR STIT TESSELLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Thäle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous planar tessellations stable under iteration (STIT tessellations are considered. Using recent results about the joint distribution of direction and length of the typical I-, K- and J-segment we prove closed formulas for the first, second and higher moments of the length of these segments given their direction. This especially leads to themean values and variances of these quantities andmean value relations as well as general moment relationships. Moreover, the relation between these mean values and certain conditional mean values (and also higher moments is discussed. The results are also illustrated for several examples.

  20. Electric multipole moments, topological multipole moment pumping, and chiral hinge states in crystalline insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benalcazar, Wladimir A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2017-12-01

    We extend the theory of dipole moments in crystalline insulators to higher multipole moments. As first formulated in Benalcazar et al. [Science 357, 61 (2017), 10.1126/science.aah6442], we show that bulk quadrupole and octupole moments can be realized in crystalline insulators. In this paper, we expand in great detail the theory presented previously [Benalcazar et al., Science 357, 61 (2017), 10.1126/science.aah6442] and extend it to cover associated topological pumping phenomena, and a class of three-dimensional (3D) insulator with chiral hinge states. We start by deriving the boundary properties of continuous classical dielectrics hosting only bulk dipole, quadrupole, or octupole moments. In quantum mechanical crystalline insulators, these higher multipole bulk moments manifest themselves by the presence of boundary-localized moments of lower dimension, in exact correspondence with the electromagnetic theory of classical continuous dielectrics. In the presence of certain symmetries, these moments are quantized, and their boundary signatures are fractionalized. These multipole moments then correspond to new symmetry-protected topological phases. The topological structure of these phases is described by "nested" Wilson loops, which we define. These Wilson loops reflect the bulk-boundary correspondence in a way that makes evident a hierarchical classification of the multipole moments. Just as a varying dipole generates charge pumping, a varying quadrupole generates dipole pumping, and a varying octupole generates quadrupole pumping. For nontrivial adiabatic cycles, the transport of these moments is quantized. An analysis of these interconnected phenomena leads to the conclusion that a new kind of Chern-type insulator exists, which has chiral, hinge-localized modes in 3D. We provide the minimal models for the quantized multipole moments, the nontrivial pumping processes, and the hinge Chern insulator, and describe the topological invariants that protect them.

  1. Immediate effect of valgus bracing on knee joint moments in meniscectomised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorning, Maria; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    knee brace on knee joint moments in patients following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. DESIGN: Within-participant design. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (age 35-55 years) who had undergone medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the previous 8-15 months completed three......OBJECTIVES: Patients undergoing medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy are at increased risk of developing and/or progressing knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial compartment load being a potential contributor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of a valgus unloader......-dimensional analysis of gait, forward lunge and one-leg rise during two conditions: with and without a valgus unloader knee brace. Outcome measures included the peak and impulse of the knee adduction moment and the peak knee flexion moment. RESULTS: The peak knee flexion moment increased during brace condition...

  2. Post-operative analgesic requirement in non-closure and closure of peritoneum during open appendectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.W.; Maqsood, R.; Saleem, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the mean post-operative analgesic requirement in non-closure and closure of peritoneum during open appendectomy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of General Surgery Combined Military Hospital Quetta, from 1st August 2014 to 30th April 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 60 patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups of 30 each. Patients in group A underwent open appendectomy with closure of peritoneum while patients in group B had non-closure of peritoneum during the same procedure. Post-operatively, pain severity was assessed on visual analogue scale (VAS) numeric pain distress scale. On presence of VAS numeric pain distress scale between 5 to 7, intramuscular (IM) diclofenac sodium was given and on score >7, intravascular (IV) tramadol was given. The final outcome was measured at day 0 and day 1. Results: Pain score and analgesic requirements were significantly less in non-closure group than closure group on day 0 and day 1, showing statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Mean post-operative analgesic requirement is significantly less in non-closure group as compared to closure group during open appendectomy. (author)

  3. Dipole moment dark matter at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, Vernon [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Keung, Wai-Yee [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Marfatia, Danny, E-mail: marfatia@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-22

    Monojet and monophoton final states with large missing transverse energy (E/{sub T}) are important for dark matter (DM) searches at colliders. We present analytic expressions for the differential cross sections for the parton-level processes, qq{sup Macron }(qg){yields}g(q){chi}{chi}{sup Macron} and qq{sup Macron }{yields}{gamma}{chi}{chi}{sup Macron }, for a neutral DM particle with a magnetic dipole moment (MDM) or an electric dipole moment (EDM). We collectively call such DM candidates dipole moment dark matter (DMDM). We also provide monojet cross sections for scalar, vector and axial-vector interactions. We then use ATLAS/CMS monojet+E/{sub T} data and CMS monophoton+E/{sub T} data to constrain DMDM. We find that 7 TeV LHC bounds on the MDM DM-proton scattering cross section are about six orders of magnitude weaker than on the conventional spin-independent cross section.

  4. The moments of inertia of mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bills, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The mean moment of inertia of Mars is, at present, very poorly constrained. The generally accepted value of 0.365 MR 2 is obtained by assuming that the observed second degree gravity field can be decomposed into a hydrostatic oblate spheroid and a nonhydrostatic prolate spheroid with an equatorial axis of symmetry. An alternative decomposition is advocated in the present analysis. If the nonhydrostatic component is a maximally triaxial ellipsoid (intermediate moment midway between greatest and least) the hydrostatic component is consistent with a mean moment of 0.345 MR 2 . The plausibility of this decomposition is supported by statistical arguments and comparison with the Earth, Moon and Venus. If confirmed, this new value would have significant implications for the inferred composition and climatic history of Mars. The Mars Observer mission may help resolve this issue

  5. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    This research monograph covers extensively the theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment and provides estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. The muon anomalous magnetic moment is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. In addition, quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. Perspectives fo...

  6. A corrector for spacecraft calculated electron moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Geach

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of a numerical method to correct electron moments calculated on-board spacecraft from the effects of potential broadening and energy range truncation. Assuming a shape for the natural distribution of the ambient plasma and employing the scalar approximation, the on-board moments can be represented as non-linear integral functions of the underlying distribution. We have implemented an algorithm which inverts this system successfully over a wide range of parameters for an assumed underlying drifting Maxwellian distribution. The outputs of the solver are the corrected electron plasma temperature Te, density Ne and velocity vector Ve. We also make an estimation of the temperature anisotropy A of the distribution. We present corrected moment data from Cluster's PEACE experiment for a range of plasma environments and make comparisons with electron and ion data from other Cluster instruments, as well as the equivalent ground-based calculations using full 3-D distribution PEACE telemetry.

  7. Baryon magnetic moments: Symmetries and relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parreno, Assumpta [University of Barcelona; Savage, Martin [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tiburzi, Brian [City College of New York, NY (United States); City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States); Wilhelm, Jonas [Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Giessen, Germany; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Orginos, Kostas [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the octet baryons are computed using lattice QCD in background magnetic fields, including the first treatment of the magnetically coupled Σ0- Λ system. Although the computations are performed for relatively large values of the up and down quark masses, we gain new insight into the symmetries and relations between magnetic moments by working at a three-flavor mass-symmetric point. While the spinflavor symmetry in the large Nc limit of QCD is shared by the naïve constituent quark model, we find instances where quark model predictions are considerably favored over those emerging in the large Nc limit. We suggest further calculations that would shed light on the curious patterns of baryon magnetic moments.

  8. Nuclear moments of nuclei near sphericity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hajjaji, O.

    1987-05-01

    Magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions are studied by means of low temperature nuclear orientation. The magnetic moment of the 149 Gd isotope and that of 151 Gd are determined. The values follow the same trend as literature values of neighbouring nuclei. The calculated moments of the 7/2 - states using the Mottelson-Nilsson model without configuration mixing are nearly independent of deformation. Thus we assign the decrease of the magnetic moment versus neutron number to many particle coupling in the f shell. The Moessbauer effect detection of nuclear orientation is discussed. Two series of experiences are performed with different finalities. In the first one we determined the electric quadrupole moments of 125m Te and 129 Te. The quadrupole moments confirm the nearly spherical shape of these nuclei. In the second series we describe the Moessbauer effect of the radiation emitted by the daigleter nucleus of 125 I, implanted in two semiconductor matrices, locally oriented at low temperature by the electric field gradient of impurity-vacancy coupling. Despite the difficulty of the cooling down of Te nuclei to lattice temperature, we have shown the existence of the electric field gradient of implanted I into Si and α-Sn and determined their signs. The level mixing resonance is applied on oriented nuclei technique to determine the weak prolate deformation of silver nuclei. Studying the Δm = 3 resonance of 107 Ag m , we etablished the quadrupole moment of this state, which is in good agreement with the theoretical estimations of Moeller and Nix [fr

  9. Frontal plane knee moments in golf: effect of target side foot position at address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Scott K; Noffal, Guillermo J

    2010-01-01

    Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR) and externally rotated (EXT) target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting) and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent). The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%); however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of attenuating these loads

  10. Scale invariants from Gaussian-Hermite moments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, B.; Kostková, Jitka; Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2017), s. 77-84 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Scale invariants * Gaussian–Hermite moments * Variable modulation * Normalization * Zernike moments Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/flusser-0466031.pdf

  11. Practical method for balancing airplane moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, H

    1924-01-01

    The present contribution is the sequel to a paper written by Messrs. R. Fuchs, L. Hopf, and H. Hamburger, and proposes to show that the methods therein contained can be practically utilized in computations. Furthermore, the calculations leading up to the diagram of moments for three airplanes, whose performance in war service gave reason for complaint, are analyzed. Finally, it is shown what conclusions can be drawn from the diagram of moments with regard to the defects in these planes and what steps may be taken to remedy them.

  12. Nuclear moments of inertia at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleplanque, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    The competition between collective motion and alignment at high spin can be evaluated by measuring two complementary dynamic moments of inertia. The first, I band, measured in γ-γ correlation experiments, relates to the collective properties of the nucleus. A new moment of inertia I/sub eff/ is defined here, which contains both collective and alignment effects. Both of these can be measured in continuum γ-ray spectra of rotational nuclei up to high frequencies. The evolution of γ-ray spectra for Er nuclei from mass 160 to 154 shows that shell effects can directly be observed in the spectra of the lighter nuclei

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Hernandez, J. M.; del Barco, E.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we review the work done on magnetic relaxation during the last 10 years on both single-domain particles and magnetic molecules and its contribution to the discovery of quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment (Chudnovsky and Tejada, Macroscopic Quantum tunneling of the Magnetic moment, Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 1998). We present first the theoretical expressions and their connection to quantum relaxation and secondly, we show and discuss the experimental results. Finally, we discuss very recent hysteresis data on Mn 12Ac molecules at extremely large sweeping rate for the external magnetic field which suggest the existence of quantum spin—phonon avalanches.

  14. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced......The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...

  15. The turbulent boundary layer and the closure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persen, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a proper phenomenological relation for turbulent flows are reviewed followed by a suggested approach to the problem in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. An attempt is made at showing the extreme flexibility that such a relation must exhibit if it is to account for effects of outside conditions and pre-history of the flow. By selecting proper 'inner variables' as parameters and properly characterizing the outer flow it is shown how a sufficiently general phenomenological relation can be established and how the closure problem may thus be considered in a different perspective.

  16. Charged point particles with magnetic moment in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, R.; Tiomno, J.

    1978-01-01

    Halbwachs Lagrangean formalism for the theory of charged point particles with spin (g = 2) is generalized and formulated in General Relativity for particles of arbitrary charge and magnetic moment. Equations are obtained, both corresponding to Frenkel's condition S sub(μν) x sup(ν)=0 and to Nakano's condition S sub(μν) P sup(ν)=0. With the later condition the exact equations are highly coupled and non linear. When linearized in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields they coincide with de Groot-Suttorp equations for vanishing gravitational field and with Dixon-Wald equations in the absence of electromagnetic field. The equations corresponding to Frenkel's condition, when linearized in S sub(μν), coincide with Papapetrou's and Frenkel's equations in the corresponding limits [pt

  17. Closure of shallow underground injection wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.; Grunewald, B.

    1993-01-01

    Shallow injection wells have long been used for disposing liquid wastes. Some of these wells have received hazardous or radioactive wastes. According to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, Class IV wells are those injection wells through which hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above an underground source of drinking water (USDW). These wells must be closed. Generally Class V wells are injection wells through which fluids that do not contain hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above a USDW. Class V wells that are responsible for violations of drinking water regulations or that pose a threat to human health must also be closed. Although EPA regulations require closure of certain types of shallow injection wells, they do not provide specific details on the closure process. This paper describes the regulatory background, DOE requirements, and the steps in a shallow injection well closure process: Identification of wells needing closure; monitoring and disposal of accumulated substances; filling and sealing of wells; and remediation. In addition, the paper describes a major national EPA shallow injection well enforcement initiative, including closure plan guidance for wells used to dispose of wastes from service station operations

  18. Stomal Closure: Strategies to Prevent Incisional Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon L. Harries

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Incisional hernias following ostomy reversal occur frequently. Incisional hernias at the site of a previous stoma closure can cause significant morbidity, impaired quality of life, lead to life-threatening hernia incarceration or strangulation and result in a significant financial burden on health care systems Despite this, the evidence base on the subject is limited. Many recognised risk factors for the development of incisional hernia following ostomy reversal are related to patient factors such as age, malignancy, diabetes, COPD, hypertension and obesity, and are not easily correctable. There is a limited amount of evidence to suggest that prophylactic mesh reinforcement may be of benefit to reduce the post stoma closure incisional hernia rate but a further large scale randomised controlled trial is due to report in the near future. There appears to be weak evidence to suggest that surgeons should favour circular, or “purse-string” closure of the skin following stoma closure in order to reduce the risk of SSI, which in turn may reduce incisional hernia formation. There remains the need for further evidence in relation to suture technique, skin closure techniques, mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotic prescription focusing on incisional hernia development as an outcome measure. Within this review, we discuss in detail the evidence base for the risk factors for the development of, and the strategies to prevent ostomy reversal site incisional hernias.

  19. Stomal Closure: Strategies to Prevent Incisional Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Rhiannon L.; Torkington, Jared

    2018-01-01

    Incisional hernias following ostomy reversal occur frequently. Incisional hernias at the site of a previous stoma closure can cause significant morbidity, impaired quality of life, lead to life-threatening hernia incarceration or strangulation and result in a significant financial burden on health care systems Despite this, the evidence base on the subject is limited. Many recognised risk factors for the development of incisional hernia following ostomy reversal are related to patient factors such as age, malignancy, diabetes, COPD, hypertension and obesity, and are not easily correctable. There is a limited amount of evidence to suggest that prophylactic mesh reinforcement may be of benefit to reduce the post stoma closure incisional hernia rate but a further large scale randomised controlled trial is due to report in the near future. There appears to be weak evidence to suggest that surgeons should favour circular, or “purse-string” closure of the skin following stoma closure in order to reduce the risk of SSI, which in turn may reduce incisional hernia formation. There remains the need for further evidence in relation to suture technique, skin closure techniques, mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotic prescription focusing on incisional hernia development as an outcome measure. Within this review, we discuss in detail the evidence base for the risk factors for the development of, and the strategies to prevent ostomy reversal site incisional hernias. PMID:29670882

  20. Strategic Planning for Hot Cell Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LANGSTAFF, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor were remediating a large hot cell complex to mitigate the radiological hazard. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure unit was determined to be located within the complex. The regulator established a challenge to develop an acceptable closure plan on a short schedule (four months). The scope of the plan was to remove all excess equipment and mixed waste from the closure unit, establish the requirements of the legally binding Closure Plan and develop an acceptable schedule. The complex has several highly radioactive tanks, tank vaults, piping, and large hot cells containing complex chemical processing equipment. Driven by a strong need to develop an effective strategy to meet cleanup commitments, three principles were followed to develop an acceptable plan: (1) Use a team approach, (2) Establish a buffer zone to support closure, and (3) Use good practice when planning the work sequence. The team was composed of DOE, contractor, and Washington State Department of Ecology (Regulator) staff. The team approach utilized member expertise and fostered member involvement and communication. The buffer zone established an area between the unregulated parts of the building and the areas that were allegedly not in compliance with environmental standards. Introduction of the buffer zone provided simplicity, clarity, and flexibility into the process. Using good practice means using the DOE Integrated Safety Management Core Functions for planning and implementing work safely. Paying adequate attention to detail when the situation required contributed to the process credibility and a successful plan

  1. Data-driven non-Markovian closure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Dmitri; Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Ghil, Michael

    2015-03-01

    This paper has two interrelated foci: (i) obtaining stable and efficient data-driven closure models by using a multivariate time series of partial observations from a large-dimensional system; and (ii) comparing these closure models with the optimal closures predicted by the Mori-Zwanzig (MZ) formalism of statistical physics. Multilayer stochastic models (MSMs) are introduced as both a generalization and a time-continuous limit of existing multilevel, regression-based approaches to closure in a data-driven setting; these approaches include empirical model reduction (EMR), as well as more recent multi-layer modeling. It is shown that the multilayer structure of MSMs can provide a natural Markov approximation to the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of the MZ formalism. A simple correlation-based stopping criterion for an EMR-MSM model is derived to assess how well it approximates the GLE solution. Sufficient conditions are derived on the structure of the nonlinear cross-interactions between the constitutive layers of a given MSM to guarantee the existence of a global random attractor. This existence ensures that no blow-up can occur for a broad class of MSM applications, a class that includes non-polynomial predictors and nonlinearities that do not necessarily preserve quadratic energy invariants. The EMR-MSM methodology is first applied to a conceptual, nonlinear, stochastic climate model of coupled slow and fast variables, in which only slow variables are observed. It is shown that the resulting closure model with energy-conserving nonlinearities efficiently captures the main statistical features of the slow variables, even when there is no formal scale separation and the fast variables are quite energetic. Second, an MSM is shown to successfully reproduce the statistics of a partially observed, generalized Lotka-Volterra model of population dynamics in its chaotic regime. The challenges here include the rarity of strange attractors in the model's parameter

  2. Closure plan for the M-Area settling basin and vicinity at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colven, W.P.; Pickett, J.B.; Muska, C.F.; Boone, L.F.

    1988-03-01

    The closure plan for the M-Area settling basin and vicinity was originally submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Bureau of Solid and Hazardous Waste Management in September 1984. The plan was revised in July and November 1985 in response to SCDHEC comments. After public comment in April through July 1986, the closure plan was conditionally approved by SCDHEC in March 1987. The conditions included (1) providing a temporary wastewater treatment facility to process the water remaining in the basin, (2) using a burn box to limit ash emissions from burning in the basin, (3) obtaining SCDHEC approval prior to operating the leach field, and (4) completing all closure activities within three years of the startup date

  3. Relativistic expressions for current electric moments of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silenko, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Relativistic expressions for the operators of current electric moments caused by electromagnetic spin-orbit interaction are obtained. Formulas for the matrix elements of the current electric moments of nuclei are derived. The contributions of the current electric moments to the quadrupole moment of the deuteron and to its root-mean-square radius are calculated with allowance for relativistic effects

  4. Relativistic expressions for electric current moments of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silenko, A.Ya.

    2000-01-01

    The relativistic expressions for electric current moments operators, due to the electromagnetic spin-orbital interaction, are obtained. The formulae for matrix elements of nuclear electric current moments are deduced. The contributions of electric current moments to both quadrupole moment and root-mean-square radius of deuteron are calculated with the account of the relativistic effects [ru

  5. The effect of foot orthoses on joint moment asymmetry in male children with flexible flat feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarnezhadgero, AmirAli; Madadi Shad, Morteza; Ferber, Reed

    2018-01-01

    It has been widely postulated that structural and functional misalignments of the foot, such as flat foot, may cause mechanical deviations of the lower limb during walking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of foot orthoses on lower extremity joint moment asymmetry during the stance phase of walking in children with asymptomatic flexible flat feet. Fourteen volunteer male children, clinically diagnosed with flexible flat feet, participated in this study. Subjects completed 12 walking trials at a self-selected walking speed while 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected for two conditions: shod with no orthoses, and shod with orthoses. The gait asymmetry index for each variable for each subject was defined as: (1-(lesser moment/greater moment)) × 100. Results reveal no significant differences in ankle or knee joint moment asymmetry. However, the use of foot orthoses decreased asymmetry for the hip abduction moment (P = 0.04) compared to walking without orthoses and also resulted in subtle, non-significant increases in frontal plane subtalar and sagittal plane knee and hip joints moment asymmetry. We conclude that foot orthoses decrease frontal plane hip joint moment asymmetry, but have little effect on ankle and knee joint asymmetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Explanations pertaining to the Hip Joint Flexor Moment During the Stance Phase of Human Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different ...... activity but only in the swing phase. It is concluded that the hip flexor moment in question is largely generated by passive structures in the form of ligaments resisting hip joint extension.......A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different...... positions: normal, inclined and reclined. Net joint moments were calculated about the hip, knee and ankle joint. The peak hip joint flexor moment during late stance was significantly lower during inclined walking than in the two other conditions. During normal walking the iliacus muscle showed no or very...

  7. Thermophoresis of a spherical particle: Modeling through moment-based, macroscopic transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrino, Juan C.; Sprittles, James; Lockerby, Duncan

    2017-11-01

    Thermophoresis refers to the forces on and motions of objects caused by temperature gradients when these objects are exposed to rarefied gases. This phenomenon can occur when the ratio of the gas mean free path to the characteristic physical length scale (Knudsen number) is not negligible. In this work, we obtain the thermophoretic force on a rigid, heat-conducting spherical particle immersed in a rarefied gas resulting from a uniform temperature gradient imposed far from the sphere. To this end, we model the gas dynamics using the steady, linearized version of the so-called regularized 13-moment equations (R13). This set of equations, derived from the Boltzmann equation using the moment method, provides closures to the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws in the form of constitutive, transport equations for the stress and heat flux that extends the Navier-Stokes-Fourier model to include rarefaction effects. Integration of the pressure and stress on the surface of the sphere leads to the net force as a function of the Knudsen number, dimensionless temperature gradient, and particle-to-gas thermal conductivity ratio. Results from this expression are compared with predictions from other moment-based models as well as from kinetic models. Supported in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/N016602/1).

  8. Development of an arid site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Barnes, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the development of a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of an arid low-level waste disposal site. This plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed. A specific example is presented showing how the field-validated hydrologic models can be used to develop a final prototype closure plan. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

  10. Mine closures yield fields of green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup and reclamation of North America's defunct mines or those set for closure will be extremely costly, estimated to be over one trillion dollars within the next ten to twenty years. In Canada, mines are controlled by the provinces and British Columbia began reclamation of major coal mines and hard rock metal mines in 1969. Other provinces have followed suit and in 1991, Ontario ruled that new and existing mines and advanced exploration projects must be designed for closuer. Many US states are enacting similar laws and the EPA plans to require mines to submit closure plans with their permit applications. Cleanup includes the sale of usable equipment, salvage of the rest, dismantling buildings, treatment and disposal of process chemicals, hazardous materials and tainted soils as well as recontouring and revegetation of the sites. Currently, at Elliot Lake in Canada, three of Canada's largest underground uranium mines are undergoing the process of closure

  11. Biological constraints do not entail cognitive closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlerick, Michael

    2014-12-01

    From the premise that our biology imposes cognitive constraints on our epistemic activities, a series of prominent authors--most notably Fodor, Chomsky and McGinn--have argued that we are cognitively closed to certain aspects and properties of the world. Cognitive constraints, they argue, entail cognitive closure. I argue that this is not the case. More precisely, I detect two unwarranted conflations at the core of arguments deriving closure from constraints. The first is a conflation of what I will refer to as 'representation' and 'object of representation'. The second confuses the cognitive scope of the assisted mind for that of the unassisted mind. Cognitive closure, I conclude, cannot be established from pointing out the (uncontroversial) existence of cognitive constraints. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wonderful Life : Exploring Wonder in Meaningful Moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Goor, Marie Jacqueline; Sools, Anna Maria; Westerhof, Gerben Johan; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas

    In this article, we bring the study of meaning together with the emerging field of study focusing on the emotions of wonder: wonder, enchantment, awe, and being moved. It is in meaningful moments that these two meet, and in our empirical study, we used the emotions of wonder as a lens to investigate

  13. Real moments of the restrictive factor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 119; Issue 4. Real Moments of the Restrictive Factor. Andrew Ledoan Alexandru Zaharescu. Volume 119 Issue 4 September 2009 pp 559-566 ...

  14. Expert judgement combination using moment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisse, Bram; Bedford, Tim; Quigley, John

    2008-01-01

    Moment methods have been employed in decision analysis, partly to avoid the computational burden that decision models involving continuous probability distributions can suffer from. In the Bayes linear (BL) methodology prior judgements about uncertain quantities are specified using expectation (rather than probability) as the fundamental notion. BL provides a strong foundation for moment methods, rooted in work of De Finetti and Goldstein. The main objective of this paper is to discuss in what way expert assessments of moments can be combined, in a non-Bayesian way, to construct a prior assessment. We show that the linear pool can be justified in an analogous but technically different way to linear pools for probability assessments, and that this linear pool has a very convenient property: a linear pool of experts' assessments of moments is coherent if each of the experts has given coherent assessments. To determine the weights of the linear pool we give a method of performance based weighting analogous to Cooke's classical model and explore its properties. Finally, we compare its performance with the classical model on data gathered in applications of the classical model

  15. Inequalities and asymptotics for some moment integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Khuzam, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    For [Formula: see text], we obtain two-sided inequalities for the moment integral [Formula: see text]. These are then used to give the exact asymptotic behavior of the integral as [Formula: see text]. The case [Formula: see text] corresponds to the asymptotics of Ball's inequality, and [Formula: see text] corresponds to a kind of novel "oscillatory" behavior.

  16. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  17. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  18. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasserre, J.B.; Laurent, M.; Mourrain, B.; Rostalski, P.; Trébuchet, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming its complex (resp. real) variety is finite. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and semi-definite

  19. Using Aha! Moments to Understand Leadership Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lori L.; Lewis, Lauren J.

    2012-01-01

    As Huber (2002) noted, striving to understand how leadership is taught and learned is both a challenge and an opportunity facing leadership educators. This article describes the "Leadership Aha! Moment" assignment used in a leadership theory course to help students recognize the intersection of leadership theories and their daily lives while…

  20. Theory of anisotropic diamagnetism, local moment magnetization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory of anisotropic diamagnetism, local moment magnetization and carrier spin-polarization in Pb1-EuTe ... Gopalpur 761 002, India; Department of Physics, Jagannath Institute for Technology and Management, Parlakhemundi 761 211, India; Department of Physics, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760 007, India ...

  1. Magnitude of localized magnetic moments in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiwi, M.; Pestana, E.; Ramirez, R.

    1979-01-01

    The magnitude of the localized magnetic moment of a transition or rare earth element impurity in a metal is evaluated within the framework of the Anderson model. Rotational invariance is preserved throughout. Graphs of the magnitude of the magnetization as a function of the relevant parameters of the model are provided and discussed. (author)

  2. On the photon anomalous magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Rojas, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that, due to radioactive corrections, the photon exhibits a nonzero anomalous magnetic moment whenever it has a nonzero perpendicular momentum component to an external constant magnetic field. Its behaviour is discussed near the first threshold of pair creation. The results might be interesting due to its astrophysical consequenc

  3. The Doubling Moment: Resurrecting Edgar Allan Poe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnick, J. Bradley; Mergil, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article expands upon Jeffrey Wilhelm's and Brian Edmiston's (1998) concept of a doubling of viewpoints by encouraging middle level students to use dramatization to take on multiple perspectives, to pose interpretive questions, and to enhance critical inquiry from inside and outside of texts. The doubling moment is both the activation of…

  4. Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments ℓ up to rank 10 and of the linear polarizability of the H2 molecule in the condensed phase have been computed taking into account the effect of the intermolecular potential. Comparison with gas phase matrix elements shows that the effect of solid state interactions is ...

  5. Real object recognition using moment invariants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    associative memory was used to create a system, recognizing objects regardless of changes in rotation or scale by Wechsler & Zimmerman (1998) 3-D object simulations were ..... Hu M 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. Inf. Theor. IT-8: 179–187. Khotanzad A, Lu J-H 1990 Classification of ...

  6. Magnetic moment densities in selected UTX compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javorský, P.; Schweizer, J.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Diviš, M.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Sechovský, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 350, - (2004), e131-e134 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0550 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : uranium compound * polarized neutron scattering * magnetic moment Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2004

  7. Measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.; Perrin, P.; Miller, P.D.; Pendlebury, J.M.; Ramsey, N.F.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in view of improving the accuracy in measuring the electric dipole moment of the neutron (EDM). This EDM is written as eD where e is the electron charge and D the dipole length. The analysis of the data indicates that /D/ 24 cm with 90% confidence [fr

  8. Modeling elephant-mediated cascading effects of water point closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbers, Jelle P; Van Langevelde, Frank; Prins, Herbert H T; Grant, C C; Peel, Mike J S; Coughenour, Michael B; De Knegt, Henrik J; Slotow, Rob; Smit, Izak P J; Kiker, Greg A; De Boer, Willem F

    2015-03-01

    Wildlife management to reduce the impact of wildlife on their habitat can be done in several ways, among which removing animals (by either culling or translocation) is most often used. There are, however, alternative ways to control wildlife densities, such as opening or closing water points. The effects of these alternatives are poorly studied. In this paper, we focus on manipulating large herbivores through the closure of water points (WPs). Removal of artificial WPs has been suggested in order to change the distribution of African elephants, which occur in high densities in national parks in Southern Africa and are thought to have a destructive effect on the vegetation. Here, we modeled the long-term effects of different scenarios of WP closure on the spatial distribution of elephants, and consequential effects on the vegetation and other herbivores in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using a dynamic ecosystem model, SAVANNA, scenarios were evaluated that varied in availability of artificial WPs; levels of natural water; and elephant densities. Our modeling results showed that elephants can indirectly negatively affect the distributions of meso-mixed feeders, meso-browsers, and some meso-grazers under wet conditions. The closure of artificial WPs hardly had any effect during these natural wet conditions. Under dry conditions, the spatial distribution of both elephant bulls and cows changed when the availability of artificial water was severely reduced in the model. These changes in spatial distribution triggered changes in the spatial availability of woody biomass over the simulation period of 80 years, and this led to changes in the rest of the herbivore community, resulting in increased densities of all herbivores, except for giraffe and steenbok, in areas close to rivers. The spatial distributions of elephant bulls and cows showed to be less affected by the closure of WPs than most of the other herbivore species. Our study contributes to ecologically

  9. Trunk muscle activation. The effects of torso flexion, moment direction, and moment magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, S; Trafimow, J; Andersson, G B; Mayer, R S; Chen, I H

    1994-04-01

    This study was performed to quantify the electromyographic trunk muscle activities in response to variations in moment magnitude and direction while in forward-flexed postures. Recordings were made over eight trunk muscles in 19 subjects who maintained forward-flexed postures of 30 degrees and 60 degrees. In each of the two flexed postures, external moments of 20 Nm and 40 Nm were applied via a chest harness. The moment directions were varied in seven 30 degrees increments to a subject's right side, such that the direction of the applied load ranged from the upper body's anterior midsagittal plane (0 degree) to the posterior midsagittal plane (180 degrees). Statistical analyses yielded significant moment magnitude by moment-direction interaction effects for the EMG output from six of the eight muscles. Trunk flexion by moment-direction interactions were observed in the responses from three muscles. In general, the primary muscle supporting the torso and the applied load was the contralateral (left) erector spinae. The level of electromyographic activity in the anterior muscles was quite low, even with the posterior moment directions.

  10. Trunk muscle cocontraction: the effects of moment direction and moment magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, S A; Tsuang, Y H; Andersson, G B; Hafezi, A; Shin, C C

    1992-09-01

    This study investigated the cocontraction of eight trunk muscles during the application of asymmetric loads to the torso. External moments of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Nm were applied to the torso via a harness system. The direction of the applied moment was varied by 30 degrees increments to the subjects' right side between the sagittally symmetric orientations front and rear. Electromyographic (EMG) data from the left and right latissimus dorsi, erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominus were collected from 10 subjects. The normalized EMG data were tested using multivariate and univariate analyses of variance procedures. These analyses showed significant interactions between the moment magnitude and the moment direction for seven of the eight muscles. Most of the interactions could be characterized as due to changes in muscle recruitment with changes in the direction of the external moment. Analysis of the relative activation levels, which were computed for each combination of moment magnitude and direction, indicated large changes in muscle recruitment due to asymmetry, but only small adjustments in the relative activation levels due to increased moment magnitude.

  11. Hamiltonian closures in fluid models for plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    This article reviews recent activity on the Hamiltonian formulation of fluid models for plasmas in the non-dissipative limit, with emphasis on the relations between the fluid closures adopted for the different models and the Hamiltonian structures. The review focuses on results obtained during the last decade, but a few classical results are also described, in order to illustrate connections with the most recent developments. With the hope of making the review accessible not only to specialists in the field, an introduction to the mathematical tools applied in the Hamiltonian formalism for continuum models is provided. Subsequently, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of models based on the magnetohydrodynamics description, including those based on the adiabatic and double adiabatic closure. It is shown how Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems can be applied to impose the incompressibility closure on a magnetohydrodynamic model and how an extended version of barotropic magnetohydrodynamics, accounting for two-fluid effects, is amenable to a Hamiltonian formulation. Hamiltonian reduced fluid models, valid in the presence of a strong magnetic field, are also reviewed. In particular, reduced magnetohydrodynamics and models assuming cold ions and different closures for the electron fluid are discussed. Hamiltonian models relaxing the cold-ion assumption are then introduced. These include models where finite Larmor radius effects are added by means of the gyromap technique, and gyrofluid models. Numerical simulations of Hamiltonian reduced fluid models investigating the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection are illustrated. The last part of the review concerns recent results based on the derivation of closures preserving a Hamiltonian structure, based on the Hamiltonian structure of parent kinetic models. Identification of such closures for fluid models derived from kinetic systems based on the Vlasov and drift-kinetic equations are presented, and

  12. A kinematic view of loop closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsias, Evangelos A; Seok, Chaok; Jacobson, Matthew P; Dill, Ken A

    2004-03-01

    We consider the problem of loop closure, i.e., of finding the ensemble of possible backbone structures of a chain segment of a protein molecule that is geometrically consistent with preceding and following parts of the chain whose structures are given. We reduce this problem of determining the loop conformations of six torsions to finding the real roots of a 16th degree polynomial in one variable, based on the robotics literature on the kinematics of the equivalent rotator linkage in the most general case of oblique rotators. We provide a simple intuitive view and derivation of the polynomial for the case in which each of the three pair of torsional axes has a common point. Our method generalizes previous work on analytical loop closure in that the torsion angles need not be consecutive, and any rigid intervening segments are allowed between the free torsions. Our approach also allows for a small degree of flexibility in the bond angles and the peptide torsion angles; this substantially enlarges the space of solvable configurations as is demonstrated by an application of the method to the modeling of cyclic pentapeptides. We give further applications to two important problems. First, we show that this analytical loop closure algorithm can be efficiently combined with an existing loop-construction algorithm to sample loops longer than three residues. Second, we show that Monte Carlo minimization is made severalfold more efficient by employing the local moves generated by the loop closure algorithm, when applied to the global minimization of an eight-residue loop. Our loop closure algorithm is freely available at http://dillgroup. ucsf.edu/loop_closure/. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 25: 510-528, 2004

  13. Exploration of Learning Strategies Associated With Aha Learning Moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth W

    2016-01-01

    Educators recognize aha moments as powerful aspects of learning. Yet limited research has been performed regarding how to promote these learning moments. This article describes an exploratory study of aha learning moments as experienced and described by participants. Findings showed use of visuals, scenarios, storytelling, Socratic questions, and expert explanation led to aha learning moments. The findings provide guidance regarding the types of learning strategies that can be used to promote aha moments.

  14. Long-term outcomes after acute primary angle closure of Caucasian chronic angle closure glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fea, Antonio Maria; Dallorto, Laura; Lavia, Carlo; Pignata, Giulia; Rolle, Teresa; Aung, Tin

    2017-07-19

    There is a lack of information about long-term results of chronic angle closure glaucoma following an acute primary angle closure attack in Caucasian patients. The aim of the study was to report morphological and functional long-term data of chronic angle closure eyes following a monolateral primary angle closure attack and to provide a comparison with their fellow eyes. Observational retrospective case series. Fifty-seven consecutive patients (114 eyes) underwent long-term follow-up analysis. Patients underwent ophthalmic assessment more than 5 years since the angle closure attack. Intraocular pressure, best-corrected visual acuity, angle assessment, vertical C/D ratio and standard automated perimetry were the main outcome measures. Comparisons were made between angle closure attack eyes and fellow eyes and between phakic and pseudophakic eyes. Mean follow-up time was 5.86 ± 1.19 years. A significant greater damage in the angle closure eyes compared with fellow eyes in both structural (mean C/D 0.61 ± 0.16; P APAC attack to prevent potential glaucoma damage in both APAC and fellow eye. © 2017 The Authors Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  15. Experimental root mean square charge radii, isotope shifts, ground state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of experimental root-mean square radii, isotope shifts, ground-state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of nuclei 1≤A≤239 is presented. Shell, sub-subshell closures and changes in nuclear deformations discernible from data are displayed graphically. The nuclear charge distribution, for 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei deduced from Coulomb displacement energies is shown for comparison

  16. Reactor vessel closure head replacements in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome-Jeumont Industrie consortium have completed in 1997 28 reactor vessel (RV) closure head replacements, including five on 1300 MWe class PWR units. Framatome manages the operations and handles removal and reinstallation of equipment (not including the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM)) and the requalification tests, while JI, which manufactures the CRDMs, is involved in the CRDM cutting, re-machining and welding operations, using tools of original design, in order to optimize the RV closure head operation in terms of costs, schedule and dosage

  17. Straight line closure of congenital macrostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of patients operated on by Nepal Cleft Lip and Palate Association (NECLAPA surgeons for congenital macrostomia were prospectively studied between January 2000 and December 2002. There were four males and three females with a median age of 10 years. Three had an associated branchial arch syndrome. In all patients an overlapping repair of orbicularis oris was done. Six patients had a straight line closure with excellent cosmetic results and one a Z-plasty with a more obvious scar. All had a normal appearing commissure. Overlapping orbicularis repair with straight line skin closure for this rare congenital anomaly is recommended.

  18. Environmental considerations in mine closure planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricks, G.

    1997-01-01

    Mine closure planning considers the best ways to plan and manage the environmental changes and socio-economic effects associated with the closing of mines. While the criteria for judging successful closures may vary, it is particularly important for physical, chemical and biological stability to be achieved and for final land use to be appropriate. Trust funds are increasingly favoured as a practical means of fulfilling the requirement for a financial surety and of ensuring that financial provision is available at the end of the mine's life. (author)

  19. Possibility of space closure without initial alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic space closure had always remained in focus due to complex biomechanics involved in almost all the treatment modalities. Although lot of efforts have been made from time to time to control the anchorage by complex wire bending or surgical methods like temporary anchorage devices (TAD′s, but all have some added inherent disadvantage. An effort has been made to do carry out orthodontic space closure without any complex archwire bending or any surgically assisted method including TAD′s.

  20. Uncertainty Quantification of Multi-Phase Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-10-27

    In the ensemble-averaged dispersed phase formulation used for CFD of multiphase ows in nuclear reactor thermohydraulics, closures of interphase transfer of mass, momentum, and energy constitute, by far, the biggest source of error and uncertainty. Reliable estimators of this source of error and uncertainty are currently non-existent. Here, we report on how modern Validation and Uncertainty Quanti cation (VUQ) techniques can be leveraged to not only quantify such errors and uncertainties, but also to uncover (unintended) interactions between closures of di erent phenomena. As such this approach serves as a valuable aide in the research and development of multiphase closures. The joint modeling of lift, drag, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion|forces that lead to tranfer of momentum between the liquid and gas phases|is examined in the frame- work of validation of the adiabatic but turbulent experiments of Liu and Banko , 1993. An extensive calibration study is undertaken with a popular combination of closure relations and the popular k-ϵ turbulence model in a Bayesian framework. When a wide range of super cial liquid and gas velocities and void fractions is considered, it is found that this set of closures can be validated against the experimental data only by allowing large variations in the coe cients associated with the closures. We argue that such an extent of variation is a measure of uncertainty induced by the chosen set of closures. We also nd that while mean uid velocity and void fraction pro les are properly t, uctuating uid velocity may or may not be properly t. This aspect needs to be investigated further. The popular set of closures considered contains ad-hoc components and are undesirable from a predictive modeling point of view. Consequently, we next consider improvements that are being developed by the MIT group under CASL and which remove the ad-hoc elements. We use non-intrusive methodologies for sensitivity analysis and calibration (using

  1. Laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Siene; Ang, Ghee Soon; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2012-02-15

    Angle-closure glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Treatment is aimed at opening the anterior chamber angle and lowering the IOP with medical and/or surgical treatment (e.g. trabeculectomy, lens extraction). Laser iridotomy works by eliminating pupillary block and widens the anterior chamber angle in the majority of patients. When laser iridotomy fails to open the anterior chamber angle, laser iridoplasty may be recommended as one of the options in current standard treatment for angle-closure. Laser peripheral iridoplasty works by shrinking and pulling the peripheral iris tissue away from the trabecular meshwork. Laser peripheral iridoplasty can be used for crisis of acute angle-closure and also in non-acute situations.   To assess the effectiveness of laser peripheral iridoplasty in the treatment of narrow angles (i.e. primary angle-closure suspect), primary angle-closure (PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in non-acute situations when compared with any other intervention. In this review, angle-closure will refer to patients with narrow angles (PACs), PAC and PACG. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 5 January 2012. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this review. Patients with narrow angles, PAC or PACG were eligible. We excluded studies that included only patients with acute presentations

  2. Closure properties of Watson-Crick grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkufli, Nurul Liyana binti Mohamad; Turaev, Sherzod; Tamrin, Mohd Izzuddin Mohd; Azeddine, Messikh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we define Watson-Crick context-free grammars, as an extension of Watson-Crick regular grammars and Watson-Crick linear grammars with context-free grammar rules. We show the relation of Watson-Crick (regular and linear) grammars to the sticker systems, and study some of the important closure properties of the Watson-Crick grammars. We establish that the Watson-Crick regular grammars are closed under almost all of the main closure operations, while the differences between other Watson-Crick grammars with their corresponding Chomsky grammars depend on the computational power of the Watson-Crick grammars which still need to be studied.

  3. Method of moments for the dilute granular flow of inelastic spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumendo, Matteo; Canu, Paolo

    2002-10-01

    Some peculiar features of granular materials (smooth, identical spheres) in rapid flow are the normal pressure differences and the related anisotropy of the velocity distribution function f((1)). Kinetic theories have been proposed that account for the anisotropy, mostly based on a generalization of the Chapman-Enskog expansion [N. Sela and I. Goldhirsch, J. Fluid Mech. 361, 41 (1998)]. In the present paper, we approach the problem differently by means of the method of moments; previously, similar theories have been constructed for the nearly elastic behavior of granular matter but were not able to predict the normal pressures differences. To overcome these restrictions, we use as an approximation of the f((1)) a truncated series expansion in Hermite polynomials around the Maxwellian distribution function. We used the approximated f((1)) to evaluate the collisional source term and calculated all the resulting integrals; also, the difference in the mean velocity of the two colliding particles has been taken into account. To simulate the granular flows, all the second-order moment balances are considered together with the mass and momentum balances. In balance equations of the Nth-order moments, the (N+1)th-order moments (and their derivatives) appear: we therefore introduced closure equations to express them as functions of lower-order moments by a generalization of the "elementary kinetic theory," instead of the classical procedure of neglecting the (N+1)th-order moments and their derivatives. We applied the model to the translational flow on an inclined chute obtaining the profiles of the solid volumetric fraction, the mean velocity, and all the second-order moments. The theoretical results have been compared with experimental data [E. Azanza, F. Chevoir, and P. Moucheront, J. Fluid Mech. 400, 199 (1999); T. G. Drake, J. Fluid Mech. 225, 121 (1991)] and all the features of the flow are reflected by the model: the decreasing exponential profile of the solid

  4. Improving Boundary-layer Turbulence and Cloud Processes in CAM with a Higher-order Turbulence Closure Scheme and ASR Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Cheng, Anning [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt), and vertical velocity (w) to represent any skewed turbulence circulation. The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and gridmean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy term and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments, i.e., the triple moments of θl, qt, and w, are predicted in IPHOC.

  5. Ankle taping can reduce external ankle joint moments during drop landings on a tilted surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Hopper, Luke S; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-09-20

    Ankle taping is commonly used to prevent ankle sprains. However, kinematic assessments investigating the biomechanical effects of ankle taping have provided inconclusive results. This study aimed to determine the effect of ankle taping on the external ankle joint moments during a drop landing on a tilted surface at 25°. Twenty-five participants performed landings on a tilted force platform that caused ankle inversion with and without ankle taping. Landing kinematics were captured using a motion capture system. External ankle inversion moment, the angular impulse due to the medio-lateral and vertical components of ground reaction force (GRF) and their moment arm lengths about the ankle joint were analysed. The foot plantar inclination relative to the ground was assessed. In the taping condition, the foot plantar inclination and ankle inversion angular impulse were reduced significantly compared to that of the control. The only component of the external inversion moment to change significantly in the taped condition was a shortened medio-lateral GRF moment arm length. It can be assumed that the ankle taping altered the foot plantar inclination relative to the ground, thereby shortening the moment arm of medio-lateral GRF that resulted in the reduced ankle inversion angular impulse.

  6. Explanations pertaining to the hip joint flexor moment during the stance phase of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild ί; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2012-11-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different positions: normal, inclined and reclined. Net joint moments were calculated about the hip, knee and ankle joint. The peak hip joint flexor moment during late stance was significantly lower during inclined walking than in the two other conditions. During normal walking the iliacus muscle showed no or very weak activity and first at the transition from stance to swing. When walking reclined, a clear but rather low activity level of the iliacus muscle was seen in the first half of the stance phase, which could contribute to the hip moment. In the inclined condition the iliacus showed much increased activity but only in the swing phase. It is concluded that the hip flexor moment in question is largely generated by passive structures in the form of ligaments resisting hip joint extension.

  7. Closure Strategy Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the strategy for closure of part of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The Area 5 RWMS is in the northern part of Frenchman Flat, approximately 14 miles north of Mercury. The Area 5 RWMS encompasses 732 acres subdivided into quadrants, and is bounded by a 1,000-foot (ft)-wide buffer zone. The northwest and southwest quadrants have not been developed. The northeast and southeast quadrants have been used for disposal of unclassified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and indefinite storage of classified materials. This paper focuses on closure of the 38 waste disposal and classified material storage units within the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 RWMS, called the ''92-Acre Area''. The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is currently planning to close the 92-Acre Area by 2011. Closure planning for this site must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. For ease of discussion, the 92-Acre Area has been subdivided into six closure units defined by waste type, location, and similarity in regulatory requirements. Each of the closure units contains one or more waste disposal units; waste disposal units are also called waste disposal cells. The paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues for the 92-Acre Area, recommends actions to address the issues, and provides the National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), schedule for closure.

  8. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos

  9. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  10. Development of a 'Coupling-by-Closure' approach between CFD and system thermal-hydraulics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadinu, Francesco; Kudinov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The variety of scenarios in nuclear reactor safety analysis creates a diversity of approaches to the problem of coupling Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and System Thermal-Hydraulics (STH) codes. In this paper, we focus on the development of a 'Coupling by Closure' (CC) technique. In this approach, a CFD code is used to provide closures as an input into an STH code. The STH solution defines the 'macrostate' conditions where the CFD-generated closure is needed. This technique aims to provide a solution for a class of problems where the standard closure used in STH is not valid (e.g. because of their transient nature). The water hammer phenomenon is a typical example of a transient where unsteady friction (or heat transfer) plays an important role. We demonstrate different aspects of the 'Coupling by Closure' technique on a test problem: the transient laminar flow through a sudden expansion driven by a time-dependent gradient of pressure. Unsteadiness, with its effect on friction, and the presence of 3D effects are some features this flow shares with many reactor transients. Furthermore, despite being conceptually simple, this transient cannot be reliably simulated by a STH code because of the lack of appropriate closures (unsteady loss coefficient). We show that it is possible to get around this difficulty by complementing the STH analysis with CFD simulations. By developing the CC methodology, we achieve the goal of calculating the correct mass flow rate through the system as a function of time, at a much lower computational cost than the one required by a full transient CFD simulation. Starting point of our coupling strategy is the analysis of the interplay between mass flow rate and loss coefficient in a transient flow. We show how to identify time intervals, during the transient, when no expensive unsteady CFD closure is required because the solution is not sensitive to the loss coefficient or because the latter can be calculated by steady state CFD

  11. A closed set of conservation laws and the evolution of the electron magnetic moment in the collisionless solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.

    1993-01-01

    A hydromagnetic equation system for the interplanetary collisionless solar wind is used to derive a set of conservation laws for that medium. It is found that every equation of the original system, including the closure relation, is related to one conservation law. The set that has been derived does not only include the traditional laws, but also a new one for the magnetic moment of the electrons. The conservation set is then used to obtain the space constants for the solar coronal expansion. The new law yields a constant that has not been predicted by other models

  12. Moment-to-Moment Optimal Branding in TV Commercials: Preventing Avoidance by Pulsing

    OpenAIRE

    Thales S. Teixeira; Michel Wedel; Rik Pieters

    2010-01-01

    We develop a conceptual framework about the impact that branding activity (the audiovisual representation of brands) and consumers' focused versus dispersed attention have on consumer moment-to-moment avoidance decisions during television advertising. We formalize this framework in a dynamic probit model and estimate it with Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Data on avoidance through zapping, along with eye tracking on 31 commercials for nearly 2,000 participants, are used to calibrate the mo...

  13. Opening up closure. Semiotics across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic emergence of new levels of organization in complex systems is related to the semiotic reorganization of discrete/continuous variety at the level below as continuous/discrete meaning for the level above. In this view both the semiotic and the dynamic closure of system levels is reopened to allow the development and evolution of greater complexity.

  14. VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE IN DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Moganakannan; `Prema; Arun Sundara Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Comparision of vacuum assisted closure vs conventional dressing in management of diabetic foot patients. 30 patients were taken in that 15 underwent vacuum therapy and remaining 15 underwent conventional dressing.They were analysed by the development of granulation tissue and wound healing.The study showed Vac therapy is the best modality for management of diabetic foot patients.

  15. Spontaneous closure of traumatic CSF otorrhoea following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a 40 year-old male who sustained a head injury with left cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea following a road traffic accident. Plain radiograph revealed a defect in the temporal bone extending in to the tympanomastoid area. Patient was managed conservatively with closure of the fistula and resolution of the leakage ...

  16. School choice, segregation, and forced school closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, C.; de Witte, K.

    2014-01-01

    We exploit the forced closure of three segregated primary schools in Amsterdam to establish the determinants of school choice of ethnic minority pupils. The schools were closed due to mismanagement and poor assessment from the Education Inspectorate. Most of the affected students were of socially

  17. Transcatheter Device Closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, M.; Ullah, M.; Sadiq, N.; Akhtar, K.; Akbar, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy, safety and immediate complications encountered during percutaneous device closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatric Cardiology, AFIC/NIHD, Rawalpindi, from January 2005 to December 2010. Methodology: Consecutive 500 patients who underwent attempted transcatheter PDA device closure were included in the study. Device type position, success of closure and complications were described as frequency percentage. Results: In 491 cases (98.2%), PDA was successfully occluded including 4 cases (0.8%) where devices were dislodged but retrieved and redeployed in Cath laboratory. PDA occluder devices used in 448 cases (91%) while coils (single or multiple) were used in 42 cases (8.5%) and in one case (0.2%) ASD occluder device was used to occlude the PDA. There were 09 (1.8%) unsuccessful cases, 06 (1.2%) were abandoned as ducts were considered unsuitable for device closure, 02 (0.4%) devices dislodged and needed surgical retrieval and one case (0.2%) was abandoned due to faulty equipment. The narrowest PDA diameter ranged from 0.5 - 14 mm with mean of 4.5 +- 2.4 mm. There was a single (0.2%) mortality. Conclusion: Transcatheter occlusion of PDA by coil or occluder device is an effective therapeutic option with high success rate. Complication rate is low in the hands of skilled operators yet paediatric cardiac surgical back-up cover is mandatory. (author)

  18. Synthesis of azaphenanthridines via anionic ring closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette Møller; Lysén, M.; Begtrup, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new and convergent synthesis of azaphenanthridines via an anionic ring closure is reported. Ortho-lithiation/in situ borylation of cyanopyridines produces the corresponding cyanopyridylboronic esters, which undergo a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling to give the key intermediates. Addition of lithium...

  19. Flower opening and closure: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Meeteren, van U.

    2003-01-01

    Flower opening and closure are traits of a reproductive syndrome, as it allows pollen removal and/or pollination. Various types of opening can be distinguished such as nocturnal and diurnal and single or repetitive. Opening is generally due to cell expansion. Osmotic solute levels increase by the

  20. RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2008-02-01

    The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

  1. Complementary techniques of percutaneous closure of ductus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is a common cardiac malformation whose treatment locally has been surgical ligation via a lateral thoracotomy. Device closure of the ductus was first performed at the Mater hospital in 1999 in a ten year old male using a five millilitre detachable cook coil. In 2000 the Amplatzer ...

  2. Hexone Storage and Treatment Facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The HSTF is a storage and treatment unit subject to the requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure is being conducted under interim status and will be completed pursuant to the requirements of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and WAC 173-303-640. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. The known hazardous/dangerous waste remaining at the site before commencing other closure activities consists of the still vessels, a tarry sludge in the storage tanks, and residual contamination in equipment, piping, filters, etc. The treatment and removal of waste at the HSTF are closure activities as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and WAC 173-303

  3. Biomechanics Strategies for Space Closure in Deep Overbite

    OpenAIRE

    Harryanto Wijaya; Isnani Jenie; Himawan Halim

    2013-01-01

    Space closure is an interesting aspect of orthodontic treatment related to principles of biomechanics. It should be tailored individually based on patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan. Understanding the space closure biomechanics basis leads to achieve the desired treatment objective. Overbite deepening and losing posterior anchorage are the two most common unwanted side effects in space closure. Conventionally, correction of overbite must be done before space closure resulted in longer tre...

  4. Periodic Closures as Adaptive Coral Reef Management in the Indo-Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Cinner

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the social, economic, and ecological context within which communities in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia use adaptive coral reef management. We tested whether periodic closures had positive effects on reef resources, and found that both the biomass and the average size of fishes commonly caught in Indo-Pacific subsistence fisheries were greater inside areas subject to periodic closures compared to sites with year-round open access. Surprisingly, both long-lived and short-lived species benefited from periodic closures. Our study sites were remote communities that shared many socioeconomic characteristics; these may be crucial to the effectiveness of adaptive management of reef resources through periodic closures. Some of these factors include exclusive tenure over marine resources, a body of traditional ecological knowledge that allows for the rapid assessment of resource conditions, social customs that facilitate compliance with closures, relatively small human populations, negligible migration, and a relatively low dependence on fisheries. This dynamic adaptive management system, in which communities manage their resources among multiple social and ecological baselines, contrasts with western fisheries management practices, centered on maintaining exploited populations at stable levels in which net production is maximized.

  5. Modeling Carbonation of High-Level Waste Tank Integrity and Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeussen J.C.L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP is focused on reducinguncertainties in current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performanceand increasing the consistency and transparency in the assessment process. Oneimportant set of US Department of Energy challenges is assessing the integrity andclosure of the high-level waste (HLW tanks that currently store millions of gallons ofhighly radioactive wastes. Many of these tanks are decades past their design lives, haveleaked or been overfilled, and must be emptied and closed to satisfy regulatoryagreements. Carbonation-induced corrosion has been identified as a primary degradationand possible failure mechanism for the HLW tanks prior to closure. After closure theimpact of carbonation (and concurrent oxidation may be to increase the release andshort-range transport of contaminants of concern. HLW tanks may be significantlyempty for many years (and possibly decades prior to closure; the performance of theclosed tank over centuries, if not millennia, must be assessed to evaluate the potentialrelease of residual radionuclides to the environment. CBP is developing models to evaluate a representative HLW tank closure scenarioincluding the potential impacts of carbonation on waste tanks prior to and post closure.CBP modeling tools, including LeachXS™/ORCHESTRA, are being used to simulatewaste tank carbonation, major constituent leaching, and contaminant releases to evaluatethe source term and near-field conditions. Simulations presented here include sensitivityanalysis for uncracked concrete to varying input parameters including composition,effective diffusivities, and thermodynamic parameters.

  6. Neural tube closure depends on expression of Grainyhead-like 3 in multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Sandra C P; Hirst, Caroline S; Savery, Dawn; Rolo, Ana; Lickert, Heiko; Andersen, Bogi; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2018-03-15

    Failure of neural tube closure leads to neural tube defects (NTDs), common congenital abnormalities in humans. Among the genes whose loss of function causes NTDs in mice, Grainyhead-like3 (Grhl3) is essential for spinal neural tube closure, with null mutants exhibiting fully penetrant spina bifida. During spinal neurulation Grhl3 is initially expressed in the surface (non-neural) ectoderm, subsequently in the neuroepithelial component of the neural folds and at the node-streak border, and finally in the hindgut endoderm. Here, we show that endoderm-specific knockout of Grhl3 causes late-arising spinal NTDs, preceded by increased ventral curvature of the caudal region which was shown previously to suppress closure of the spinal neural folds. This finding supports the hypothesis that diminished Grhl3 expression in the hindgut is the cause of spinal NTDs in the curly tail, carrying a hypomorphic Grhl3 allele. Complete loss of Grhl3 function produces a more severe phenotype in which closure fails earlier in neurulation, before the stage of onset of expression in the hindgut of wild-type embryos. This implicates additional tissues and NTD mechanisms in Grhl3 null embryos. Conditional knockout of Grhl3 in the neural plate and node-streak border has minimal effect on closure, suggesting that abnormal function of surface ectoderm, where Grhl3 transcripts are first detected, is primarily responsible for early failure of spinal neurulation in Grhl3 null embryos. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary closure after carotid endarterectomy is not inferior to other closure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Chaer, Rabih A; Naddaf, Abdallah; El-Shazly, Omar M; Marone, Luke; Makaroun, Michel S

    2016-09-01

    Primary closure after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been much maligned as an inferior technique with worse outcomes than in patch closure. Our purpose was to compare perioperative and long-term results of different CEA closure techniques in a large institutional experience. A consecutive cohort of CEAs between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, was retrospectively analyzed. Closure technique was used to divide patients into three groups: primary longitudinal arteriotomy closure (PRC), patch closure (PAC), and eversion closure (EVC). End points were perioperative events, long-term strokes, and restenosis ≥70%. Multivariate regression models were used to assess the effect of baseline predictors. There were 1737 CEA cases (bilateral, 143; mean age, 71.4 ± 9.3 years; 56.2% men; 35.3% symptomatic) performed during the study period with a mean clinical follow-up of 49.8 ± 36.4 months (range, 0-155 months). More men had primary closure, but other demographic and baseline symptoms were similar between groups. Half the patients had PAC, with the rest evenly distributed between PRC and EVC. The rate of nerve injury was 2.7%, the rate of reintervention for hematoma was 1.5%, and the length of hospital stay was 2.4 ± 3.0 days, with no significant differences among groups. The combined stroke and death rate was 2.5% overall and 3.9% and 1.7% in the symptomatic and asymptomatic cohort, respectively. Stroke and death rates were similar between groups: PRC, 11 (2.7%); PAC, 19 (2.2%); EVC, 13 (2.9%). Multivariate analysis showed baseline symptomatic disease (odds ratio, 2.4; P = .007) and heart failure (odds ratio, 3.1; P = .003) as predictors of perioperative stroke and death, but not the type of closure. Cox regression analysis demonstrated, among other risk factors, no statin use (hazard ratio, 2.1; P = .008) as a predictor of ipsilateral stroke and severe (glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) renal insufficiency (hazard ratio, 2.6; P

  8. Hybrid approach for closure of muscular ventricular septal defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Chojnicki, Maciej; Jaworski, Radoslaw; Steffek, Mariusz; Juscinski, Jacek; Sroka, Mariusz; Fiszer, Roland; Sendrowska, Aneta; Gierat-Haponiuk, Katarzyna; Maruszewski, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of ventricular septal defects in early infancy led to development of new mini-invasive techniques based on collaboration of cardiac surgeons with interventional cardiologists, called hybrid procedures. Hybrid therapies aim to combine the advantages of surgical and interventional techniques in an effort to reduce the invasiveness. The aim of this study was to present our approach with mVSD patients and initial results in the development of a mini-invasive hybrid procedure in the Gdansk Hybrid Heartlink Programme (GHHP) at the Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Pomeranian Centre of Traumatology in Gdansk, Poland. Material/Methods The group of 11 children with mVSDs was enrolled in GHHP and 6 were finally qualified to hybrid trans-ventricular mVSD device closure. Mean age at time of hybrid procedure was 8.22 months (range: from 2.7 to 17.8 months, SD=5.1) and mean body weight was 6.3 kg (range: from 3.4 to 7.5 kg, SD=1.5). Results The implants of choice were Amplatzer VSD Occluder and Amplatzer Duct Occluder II (AGA Med. Corp, USA). The position of the implants was checked carefully before releasing the device with both transesophageal echocardiography and epicardial echocardiography. All patients survived and their general condition improved. No complications occurred. The closure of mVSD was complete in all children. Conclusions Hybrid procedures of periventricular muscular VSD closure appear feasible and effective for patients with septal defects with morphology unsuitable for classic surgical or interventional procedures. The modern strategy of joint cardiac surgical and interventional techniques provides the benefits of close cooperation between cardiac surgeon and interventional cardiologist for selected patients in difficult clinical settings. PMID:23892911

  9. Evaluation of proposed panel closure modifications at WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Lawrence E.; Silva, Matthew K.; Channell, James K.; Abel, John F.; Morgan, Dudley R.

    2001-12-31

    A key component in the design of the WIPP repository is the installation of concrete structures as panel seals in the intake and exhaust drifts after a panel has been filled with waste containers. As noted in the EPA final rule, the panel seal closure system is intended to block brine flow between the waste panels at the WIPP. On April 17, 2001, the DOE proposed seven modifications to the EPA concerning the design of the panel closure system. EPA approval of these modifications is necessary since the details of the panel design are specified in EPA’s final rule as a condition for WIPP certification. However, the EPA has not determined whether a rulemaking would be required for these proposed design modifications. On September 4, 2001, the DOE withdrew the request, noting that it would be resubmitted on a future date. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) contracted with two engineers, Dr. John Abel and Dr. Rusty Morgan, to evaluate the proposed modifications. The EEG has accepted the conclusions and recommendations from these two experts: 1) replacement of Salado Mass Concrete with a generic salt-based concrete; 2) replacement of the explosion wall with a construction wall; 3) replacement of freshwater grouting with salt-based grouting; 4) option to allow surface or underground mixing; and 5) option to allow up to one year for completion of closure. The proposed modification to allow local carbonate river rock as aggregate is acceptable pending demonstration that no problems will exist in the resulting concrete. The proposed modification to give the contractor discretion in removal of steel forms is not supported. Instead, several recommendations are made to specifically reduce the number of forms left, thereby reducing potential migration pathways.

  10. Modified dark room provocative test for primary angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejiao; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Bingsong; Wang, Tao; Jonas, Jost B

    2012-03-01

    To examine the diagnostic value of a modified dark room provocative test (DRPT) in detecting primary closure of the anterior chamber angle. The cross-sectional observational prospective clinical study included suspects of primary angle closure. Using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), we measured the anterior chamber angle configuration at room light and after 3 minutes of dark adaptation. Gonioscopy and Perkin's applanation tonometry were performed in room light conditions at baseline and after 1.5 hours of dark adaptation. The number of closed angle quadrants assessed on AS-OCT images and upon gonioscopy were recorded. The DRPT was positive, if intraocular pressure increased by ≥8 mm Hg after 1.5 hours of dark adaptation. The study included 76 subjects (76 eyes). Among 32 (42%) eyes with a positive DRPT, the number of eyes with an increased number of closed angle quadrants was significantly higher for the OCT examination at 3 minutes of dark adaptation than for gonioscopy at 1.5 hours of dark adaptation [29 (91%) eyes vs 21 (66%) eyes; P=0.01]. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between increased closed angle quadrants obtained both after 3 minutes of dark adaptation (κ=0.44; Pdark room test (κ=0.45; Pdark room test. A modified DRPT with an anterior chamber angle assessment by OCT at 3 minutes of dark adaptation as compared with a gonioscopic angle assessment after 1.5 hours of dark adaptation had a higher diagnostic precision in predicting primary angle closure.

  11. Solar wind velocity and geomagnetic moment variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, Yu.D.; Rozanova, T.S.

    1982-01-01

    The mean year values of the solar wind velocity have been calculated from the mean-year values of a geomagnetic activity index am according to the Svalgard equation of regression for the pe-- riod from 1930 to 1960. For the same years the values of the geomagnetic moment M and separately of its ''inner'' (causes of which'' are inside the Earth) and ''external'' (causes of which are outside the Earth) parts have been calculated from the mean year data of 12 magnetic observatories. The proof of the presence of the 11-year variation in the moment M has been obtained. It is concluded that the 11-year variations in M result from the variations of the solar wind velocity

  12. Glueball masses from an infrared moment problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudal, D; Guimaraes, M S; Sorella, S P

    2011-02-11

    We set up an infrared-based moment problem to obtain estimates of the masses of the scalar, pseudoscalar, and tensor glueballs in Euclidean Yang-Mills theories using the refined Gribov-Zwanziger (RGZ) version of the Landau gauge, which takes into account nonperturbative physics related to gauge copies. Employing lattice input for the mass scales of the RGZ gluon propagator, the lowest order moment problem approximation gives the values m(0++) ≈ 1.96 GeV, m(2++) ≈ 2.04 GeV, and m(0-+) ≈ 2.19 GeV in the SU(3) case, all within a 20% range of the corresponding lattice values. We also recover the mass hierarchy m(0++) < m(2++) < m(0-+).

  13. Matrix elements from moments of correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia Cheng [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bouchard, Chris [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Orginos, Konstantinos [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Momentum-space derivatives of matrix elements can be related to their coordinate-space moments through the Fourier transform. We derive these expressions as a function of momentum transfer Q2 for asymptotic in/out states consisting of a single hadron. We calculate corrections to the finite volume moments by studying the spatial dependence of the lattice correlation functions. This method permits the computation of not only the values of matrix elements at momenta accessible on the lattice, but also the momentum-space derivatives, providing {\\it a priori} information about the Q2 dependence of form factors. As a specific application we use the method, at a single lattice spacing and with unphysically heavy quarks, to directly obtain the slope of the isovector form factor at various Q2, whence the isovector charge radius. The method has potential application in the calculation of any hadronic matrix element with momentum transfer, including those relevant to hadronic weak decays.

  14. Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Griffith

    2011-12-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

  15. 10 CFR 60.51 - License amendment for permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false License amendment for permanent closure. 60.51 Section 60.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Permanent Closure § 60.51 License amendment for permanent closure. (a) DOE...

  16. Weighted abdominal traction for assistance in abdominal closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Jo Svetanoff

    2018-02-01

    Discussion: One of the concerns with temporary abdominal closure is retraction of the fascia. We report three cases where the fascia and abdominal wall were placed on weighted traction, which allowed for retention of abdominal domain and delayed primary closure without grafts or mesh. This approach adds to the options available to aid in closure of the complex abdomen.

  17. The potential migration effect of rural hospital closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Fyhn Lykke

    2008-01-01

    Rural hospital closures are high on the current health care agenda in Denmark. One raised concern is that rural hospital closures may further decrease population numbers in rural areas, as closures may induce some residents to move away from affected areas, i.e. closer to health care services els...

  18. Delayed physeal closure associated with castration in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, C.; Bennett, D.; Downham, D.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Radiographs of 152 cats under four years of age were examined for evidence of physeal closure. Radiographic closure was compared between entire male, castrated male, and female (neutered and entire] cats. Physeal closure in castrated males was delayed when compared to that of entire males

  19. Comparison of fasciotomy wound closures using traditional dressing changes and the vacuum-assisted closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannis, John; Angobaldo, Jeff; Marks, Malcolm; DeFranzo, Anthony; David, Lisa; Molnar, Joseph; Argenta, Louis

    2009-04-01

    Fasciotomy wounds can be a major contributor to length of stay for patients as well as a difficult reconstructive challenge. Once the compartment pressure has been relieved and stabilized, the wound should be closed as quickly and early as possible to avoid later complications. Skin grafting can lead to morbidity and scarring at both the donor and fasciotomy site. Primary closure results in a more functional and esthetic outcome with less morbidity for the patient, but can often be difficult to achieve secondary to edema, skin retraction, and skin edge necrosis. Our objective was to examine fasciotomy wound outcomes, including time to definitive closure, comparing traditional wet-to-dry dressings, and the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. This retrospective chart review included a consecutive series of patients over a 10-year period. This series included 458 patients who underwent 804 fasciotomies. Of these fasciotomy wounds, 438 received exclusively VAC. dressings, 270 received only normal saline wet-to-dry dressings, and 96 were treated with a combination of both. Of the sample, 408 patients were treated with exclusively VAC therapy or wet-to-dry dressings and 50 patients were treated with a combination of both. In comparing all wounds, there was a statistically significant higher rate of primary closure using the VAC versus traditional wet-to-dry dressings (P lower extremities and P extremities). The time to primary closure of wounds was shorter in the VAC. group in comparison with the non-VAC group. This study has shown that the use of the VAC for fasciotomy wound closure results in a higher rate of primary closure versus traditional wet-to-dry dressings. In addition, the time to primary closure of wounds or time to skin grafting is shorter when the VAC was employed. The VAC used in the described settings decreases hospitalization time, allows for earlier rehabilitation, and ultimately leads to increased patient satisfaction.

  20. 3D rotation invariants by complex moments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan; Boldyš, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 11 (2015), s. 3516-3526 ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-29225S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Complex moment * spherical harmonic * group representation theory * 3D rotation invariant Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 3.399, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/ZOI/suk-0445882.pdf

  1. A big measurement of a small moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Sauer, B.; Devlin, J. A.; Rabey, I. M.

    2017-07-01

    A beam of ThO molecules has been used to make the most precise measurement of the electron’s electric dipole moment (EDM) to date. In their recent paper, the ACME collaboration set out in detail their experimental and data analysis techniques. In a tour-de-force, they explain the many ways in which their apparatus can produce a signal which mimics the EDM and show how these systematic effects are measured and controlled.

  2. Some special moments from last month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Integration of the three shells into the ATLAS pixel barrel last month. Lowering of the first sector of the MDT Muon Big Wheel on side C in the ATLAS cavern in December 2006. Some intense moment during the first ATLAS integration run from the main ATLAS control room. Muriel was one of the 20000 ATLAS cavern visitors in 2006 to enjoy herself during her visit.

  3. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  4. Kairos time at the moment of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Smythe, Elizabeth; Spence, Deb

    2015-04-01

    there is something extraordinary in the lived experience of being there at the time of birth. Yet the meaning and significance of this special time, named Kairos time in this paper, have received little attention. to describe the lived-experience of Kairos time at birth and surface its meaning. this is an interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology study informed by the writings of Heidegger and Gadamer. 14 in-depth interviews with mothers, birth partners, midwives and obstetricians were transcribed and stories from the data were hermeneutically analysed. there is a time, like no other, at the moment of birth that is widely known and valued. This paper reveals and names this phenomenon Kairos time. This is a felt-time that is lineal, process and cyclic time and more. Kairos time describes an existential temporal experience that is rich in significant sacred meaning; a time of emergent insight rarely spoken about in practice yet touches everyone present. The notion of Kairos time in relation to the moment of birth is introduced as a reminder of something significant that matters. Kairos time is revealed as a moment in and beyond time. It has a temporal enigmatic mystery involving spiritual connectedness. Kairos time is a time of knowing and remembrance of our shared natality. In this time life is disclosed as extraordinary and beyond everyday personal and professional concerns. It is all this and more. Kairos time at birth is precious and powerful yet vulnerable. It needs to be safeguarded to ensure its presence continues to emerge. This means maternity care providers and others at birth need to shelter and protect Kairos time from the sometimes harsh realities of birth and the potentially insensitive ways of being there at the moments of birth. Those who find themselves at birth need to pause and allow the profundity of its meaning to surface and inspire their actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Moments, positive polynomials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, Jean Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Many important applications in global optimization, algebra, probability and statistics, applied mathematics, control theory, financial mathematics, inverse problems, etc. can be modeled as a particular instance of the Generalized Moment Problem (GMP) . This book introduces a new general methodology to solve the GMP when its data are polynomials and basic semi-algebraic sets. This methodology combines semidefinite programming with recent results from real algebraic geometry to provide a hierarchy of semidefinite relaxations converging to the desired optimal value. Applied on appropriate cones,

  6. Electric dipole moment of light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Afnan, I R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

  7. Breakthrough curve moments scaling in hyporheic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, A.; Tonina, D.; Marzadri, A.

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between stream flow and bed forms creates an uneven distribution of near-bed energy heads, which is the driving force of hyporheic exchange. Owing to the large disparity of advection characteristic times in the stream and within the hyporheic zone, solute mass exchange is often modeled by considering the latter as an immobile region. In a recent contribution Gónzalez-Pinzón et al. (2013) showed that existing models employing this hypothesis are structurally inconsistent with the scaling revealed by the analysis of 384 breakthrough curves collected in 44 streams across five continents. Motivated by this result, we analyze the scaling characteristics of a model that we recently developed by combining the analytical solution of the advective flow within the hyporheic zone with a Lagrangian solute transport model. Results show that similarly to the experimental data our model predicts breakthrough curves with a constant skewness, irrespective of the stream size, and that the scaling of the first three moments observed by Gónzalez-Pinzón et al. (2013) is also respected. Moreover, we propose regression curves that relate the first three moments of the residence time distribution with the alternate bar dimensionless depth (YBM*), a quantity that is easily measurable in the field. The connection between BTC moments and YBM* opens new possibilities for modeling transport processes at the catchment scale.

  8. Nuclear moments of /sup 9/Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, F.D.; Madansky, L.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Sunier, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    The ground-state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of the ..beta.. emitter /sup 9/Li (J/sup ..pi../ = (3/2)/sup -/, T/sub 1/2/ = 0.176 s) have been measured for the first time. Polarized /sup 9/Li nuclei were produced in the /sup 7/Li(t,p) reaction, using 5--6 MeV polarized tritons. The recoiling /sup 9/Li nuclei were stopped either in Au foils or in LiNbO/sub 3/ single crystals, and their polarization was detected by measuring the ..beta..-decay asymmetry. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to depolarize the nuclei, and the resonant frequencies were deduced from changes in the asymmetry. The /sup 9/Li dipole moment was deduced from the measured Larmor frequency in Au; the result, including corrections for diamagnetic shielding and the Knight shift, is Vertical Bar..mu..Vertical Bar = 3.4391(6) ..mu../sub N/. The ratio of the /sup 9/Li quadrupole moment to that of /sup 7/Li was derived from their respective quadrupole couplings in LiNbO/sub 3/; the value is Vertical BarQ( /sup 9/Li)/Q( /sup 7/Li)Vertical Bar = 0. 88 +- 0.18. Both results are in agreement with shell model predictions.

  9. Relativistic dynamics of point magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Johann; Formanek, Martin; Steinmetz, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The covariant motion of a classical point particle with magnetic moment in the presence of (external) electromagnetic fields is revisited. We are interested in understanding extensions to the Lorentz force involving point particle magnetic moment (Stern-Gerlach force) and how the spin precession dynamics is modified for consistency. We introduce spin as a classical particle property inherent to Poincaré symmetry of space-time. We propose a covariant formulation of the magnetic force based on a `magnetic' 4-potential and show how the point particle magnetic moment relates to the Amperian (current loop) and Gilbertian (magnetic monopole) descriptions. We show that covariant spin precession lacks a unique form and discuss the connection to g-2 anomaly. We consider the variational action principle and find that a consistent extension of the Lorentz force to include magnetic spin force is not straightforward. We look at non-covariant particle dynamics, and present a short introduction to the dynamics of (neutral) particles hit by a laser pulse of arbitrary shape.

  10. On the multipole moments of charge distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    There are two different standard methods for showing the equivalence of a charge distribution in a small volume tau surrounding a point O, to the superposition of a monopole, a dipole, a quadrupole and poles of higher moments at the point O: (a) to show that the electrostatic potential due to the charge distribution at an outside point is the same as due to these superposed multipoles (including a monopole). (b) to show that the energy of interaction of an external field with the charge distribution is the same as with the superposed equivalent monopole and multipoles. Neither of these methods gives a physical picture of the equivalence of a charge distribution to the superposition of different multipoles. An attempt is made to interpret in physical terms the emergence of the multipoles of different order, that are equivalent to a charge distribution and to show that the magnitudes of the moments of these multipoles are in agreement with the results of both the approaches (a) and (b). This physical interpretation also helps to understand, in a simple manner, some of the wellknown properties of the multipole moments of atoms and nuclei. (K.B.)

  11. Moments of the Wigner delay times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkolaiko, Gregory; Kuipers, Jack

    2010-01-01

    The Wigner time delay is a measure of the time spent by a particle inside the scattering region of an open system. For chaotic systems, the statistics of the individual delay times (whose average is the Wigner time delay) are thought to be well described by random matrix theory. Here we present a semiclassical derivation showing the validity of random matrix results. In order to simplify the semiclassical treatment, we express the moments of the delay times in terms of correlation functions of scattering matrices at different energies. In the semiclassical approximation, the elements of the scattering matrix are given in terms of the classical scattering trajectories, requiring one to study correlations between sets of such trajectories. We describe the structure of correlated sets of trajectories and formulate the rules for their evaluation to the leading order in inverse channel number. This allows us to derive a polynomial equation satisfied by the generating function of the moments. Along with showing the agreement of our semiclassical results with the moments predicted by random matrix theory, we infer that the scattering matrix is unitary to all orders in the semiclassical approximation.

  12. The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. The muon anomalous magnetic moment amy is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. A major part of the book is devoted to the theory of the anomalous magnetic moment and to estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. After the overview of theory, the exper...

  13. The Koszul complex of a moment map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbig, Hans-Christian; Schwarz, Gerald W.

    2013-01-01

    Let $K\\to\\U(V)$ be a unitary representation of the compact Lie group $K$. Then there is a canonical moment mapping $\\rho\\colon V\\to\\liek^*$. We have the Koszul complex ${\\mathcal K}(\\rho,\\mathcal C^\\infty(V))$ of the component functions $\\rho_1,\\dots,\\rho_k$ of $\\rho$. Let $G=K_\\C$, the complexif......Let $K\\to\\U(V)$ be a unitary representation of the compact Lie group $K$. Then there is a canonical moment mapping $\\rho\\colon V\\to\\liek^*$. We have the Koszul complex ${\\mathcal K}(\\rho,\\mathcal C^\\infty(V))$ of the component functions $\\rho_1,\\dots,\\rho_k$ of $\\rho$. Let $G......$ be a moment mapping and consider the Koszul complex given by the component functions of $\\rho$. We show that the Koszul complex is a resolution of the smooth functions on $Z=\\rho\\inv(0)$ if and only if the complexification of each symplectic slice representation at a point of $Z$ is $1$-large....

  14. On moments-based Heisenberg inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozor, Steeve; Portesi, Mariela; Sanchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesus S.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we revisit the quantitative formulation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The primary version of this principle establishes the impossibility of refined simultaneous measurement of position x and momentum u for a (1-dimensional) quantum particle in terms of variances: ⩾1/4. Since this inequality applies provided each variance exists, some authors proposed entropic versions of this principle as an alternative (employing Shannon's or Rényi's entropies). As another alternative, we consider moments-based formulations and show that inequalities involving moments of orders other than 2 can be found. Our procedure is based on the Rényi entropic versions of the Heisenberg relation together with the search for the maximal entropy under statistical moments' constraints ( and ). Our result improves a relation proposed very recently by Dehesa et al.. [1] where the same approach was used but starting with the Shannon version of the entropic uncertainty relation. Furthermore, we show that when a =b, the best bound we can find with our approach coincides with that of Ref. [1] and, in addition, for a = b = 2 the variance-based Heisenberg relation is recovered. Finally, we illustrate our results in the cases of d-dimensional hydrogenic systems.

  15. Tools for Closure Project and Contract Management: Development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, C. M.; Sheppard, F. R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper details the development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline - an innovative project management effort undertaken to ensure proactive management of the Rocky Flats Closure Contract in support of the Department's goal for achieving the safe closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in December 2006. The accelerated closure of RFETS is one of the most prominent projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management program. As the first major former weapons plant to be remediated and closed, it is a first-of-kind effort requiring the resolution of multiple complex technical and institutional challenges. Most significantly, the closure of RFETS is dependent upon the shipment of all special nuclear material and wastes to other DOE sites. The Department is actively working to strengthen project management across programs, and there is increasing external interest in this progress. The development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline represents a groundbreaking and cooperative effort to formalize the management of such a complex project across multiple sites and organizations. It is original in both scope and process, however it provides a useful precedent for the other ongoing project management efforts within the Environmental Management program

  16. Spins, moments and radii of Cd isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hammen, Michael

    The complex nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the wide range of systems covered by the roughly 3000 known nuclides leads to a multitude of effects observed in nuclear structure. Among the most prominent ones is the occurence of shell closures at so-called ”magic numbers”, which are explained by the nuclear shell model. Although the shell model already is on duty for several decades, it is still constantly extended and improved. For this process of extension, fine adjustment and verification, it is important to have experimental data of nuclear properties, especially at crucial points like in the vicinity of shell closures. This is the motivation for the work performed in this thesis: the measurement and analysis of nuclear ground state properties of the isotopic chain of $^{100−130}$Cd by collinear laser spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted at ISOLDE/CERN using the collinear laser spectroscopy apparatus COLLAPS. This experiment is the continuation of a run on neutral atomic cadmium f...

  17. Effect of wastewater treatment facility closure on endocrine disrupting chemicals in a Coastal Plain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insight into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The U.S. Geological Survey assessed the fate of select endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and streambed sediment one year before and one year after closure of a long-term WWTF located within the Spirit Creek watershed at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Sample sites included a WWTF-effluent control located upstream from the outfall, three downstream effluent-impacted sites located between the outfall and Spirit Lake, and one downstream from the lake's outfall. Prior to closure, the 2.2-km stream segment downstream from the WWTF outfall was characterized by EDC concentrations significantly higher (α = 0.05) than at the control site; indicating substantial downstream transport and limited in-stream attenuation of EDC, including pharmaceuticals, estrogens, alkylphenol ethoxylate (APE) metabolites, and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFR). Wastewater-derived pharmaceutical, APE metabolites, and OPFR compounds were also detected in the outflow of Spirit Lake, indicating the potential for EDC transport to aquatic ecosystems downstream of Fort Gordon under effluent discharge conditions. After the WWTF closure, no significant differences in concentrations or numbers of detected EDC compounds were observed between control and downstream locations. The results indicated EDC pseudo-persistence under preclosure, continuous supply conditions, with rapid attenuation following WWTF closure. Low concentrations of EDC at the control site throughout the study and comparable concentrations in downstream locations after WWTF closure indicated additional, continuing, upstream contaminant sources within the Spirit Creek watershed. 

  18. Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Aly, Alaa; Kozak, Matthew; Mehta, Sunil; Connelly, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federal requirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA is being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residual wastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the

  19. Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.

    2013-11-11

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federal requirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA is being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residual wastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the

  20. Improved results of the vacuum assisted closure and Nitinol clips sternal closure after postoperative deep sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Maria Pia; Costantino, Alberto; Ballardini, Milva; D'Andrea, Claudio; Masala, Marcello; Merico, Eusebio; Mosillo, Luigi; Sordini, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Postoperative deep sternal wound infection is a severe complication of cardiac surgery, with a high mortality rate and a high morbidity rate. The objective of this prospective study is to report our experience with the vacuum assisted closure (VAC) system for the management of deep wound infection. We also devised an innovative closure technique post VAC therapy using thermo reactive clips. The advantage of this technique is that the posterior face of the sternum does not have to be separated from the mediastinal structures thus minimising the risk of damage. From October 2006 to October 2008, we prospectively evaluated 21 patients affected by mediastinitis after sternotomy. Nineteen patients had sternotomy for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), one patient for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and another one for ascending aortic replacement (AAR). All patients were treated with the VAC system at the time of infection diagnosis. When the wound tissue appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the chest was closed using the most suitable procedure for the patient in question; nine patients were closed using pectoralis flaps, nine patients using Nitinol clips, one patient with a combined technique (use of Nitinol clips and muscle flap), one patient with a direct wound closure and another patient, who needed AAR with a homograft performed in another institution, was closed using sternal wires. We had no mortality; wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. In more than 50% of the patients, the VAC therapy allowed direct sternal resynthesis. The average duration of the vacuum therapy was 26 days (range 14-37 days). VAC is a safe and effective option in the treatment of post-sternotomy mediastinitis, with excellent survival and immediate improvement of local wound conditions; furthermore, the use of Nitinol clips after VAC therapy demonstrated to be a safe and non-invasive option for sternal resynthesis. After VAC therapy, a

  1. Improved moment scaling estimation for multifractal signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Veneziano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in the analysis of multifractal processes is to estimate the scaling exponent K(q of moments of different order q from data. Conventional estimators use the empirical moments μ^rq=⟨ | εr(τ|q of wavelet coefficients εr(τ, where τ is location and r is resolution. For stationary measures one usually considers "wavelets of order 0" (averages, whereas for functions with multifractal increments one must use wavelets of order at least 1. One obtains K^(q as the slope of log( μ^rq against log(r over a range of r. Negative moments are sensitive to measurement noise and quantization. For them, one typically uses only the local maxima of | εr(τ| (modulus maxima methods. For the positive moments, we modify the standard estimator K^(q to significantly reduce its variance at the expense of a modest increase in the bias. This is done by separately estimating K(q from sub-records and averaging the results. For the negative moments, we show that the standard modulus maxima estimator is biased and, in the case of additive noise or quantization, is not applicable with wavelets of order 1 or higher. For these cases we propose alternative estimators. We also consider the fitting of parametric models of K(q and show how, by splitting the record into sub-records as indicated above, the accuracy of standard methods can be significantly improved.

  2. Temporary Closure of the Open Abdomen: A Systematic Review on Delayed Primary Fascial Closure in Patients with an Open Abdomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele van Hensbroek, Pieter; Wind, Jan; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was designed to systematically review the literature to assess which temporary abdominal closure (TAC) technique is associated with the highest delayed primary fascial closure (FC) rate. In some cases of abdominal trauma or infection, edema or packing precludes fascial closure

  3. FRONTAL PLANE KNEE MOMENTS IN GOLF: EFFECT OF TARGET SIDE FOOT POSITION AT ADDRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott K. Lynn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR and externally rotated (EXT target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent. The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%; however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of

  4. The relationship between local and moment magnitude in Greece during the period 2008-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, K. I.; Melis, N. S.

    2018-03-01

    We perform a systematic comparison between local and moment magnitudes in Greece for the period 2008-2016 when both magnitudes have been determined using waveform data recorded by the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN). Differences between the two magnitudes scales on average do not exceed ± 0.2 units as has been found in other regions worldwide. A recalculation of local magnitude using magnitude residuals for each HUSN station shows that station site conditions have very little influence on the difference between local and moment magnitude. It is therefore more likely that wave propagation effects and in rare cases, anomalous source properties are dominant factors in shaping this difference. General orthogonal regression is applied to the whole dataset and also to subsets covering different areas of Greece or different time period to calibrate the one magnitude scale against the other using a linear model. The resulting relationships differ very little, suggesting that there is no significant regional/temporal variation between local and moment magnitudes. While these relationships predict that local magnitude is very close to moment magnitude if both are determined using HUSN data, the comparison with Global CMT moment magnitude (with M w in the range 4.5-6.2) shows that it is larger than local magnitude by 0.18 units. These results are particularly important for converting local magnitudes to equivalent moment magnitudes and thus homogenize the Greek earthquake catalog.

  5. Rapid objective measurement of gamma camera resolution using statistical moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hander, T A; Lancaster, J L; Kopp, D T; Lasher, J C; Blumhardt, R; Fox, P T

    1997-02-01

    An easy and rapid method for the measurement of the intrinsic spatial resolution of a gamma camera was developed. The measurement is based on the first and second statistical moments of regions of interest (ROIs) applied to bar phantom images. This leads to an estimate of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of a line spread function (LSF). Bar phantom images were acquired using four large field-of-view (LFOV) gamma cameras (Scintronix, Picker, Searle, Siemens). The following factors important for routine measurements of gamma camera resolution with this method were tested: ROI placement and shape, phantom orientation, spatial sampling, and procedural consistency. A 0.2% coefficient of variation (CV) between repeat measurements of MTF was observed for a circular ROI. The CVs of less than 2% were observed for measured MTF values for bar orientations ranging from -10 degrees to +10 degrees with respect to the x and y axes of the camera acquisition matrix. A 256 x 256 matrix (1.6 mm pixel spacing) was judged sufficient for routine measurements, giving an estimate of the FWHM to within 0.1 mm of manufacturer-specified values (3% difference). Under simulated clinical conditions, the variation in measurements attributable to procedural effects yielded a CV of less than 2% in newer generation cameras. The moments method for determining MTF correlated well with a peak-valley method, with an average difference of 0.03 across the range of spatial frequencies tested (0.11-0.17 line pairs/mm, corresponding to 4.5-3.0 mm bars). When compared with the NEMA method for measuring intrinsic spatial resolution, the moments method was found to be within 4% of the expected FWHM.

  6. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles.Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System.There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables, while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84. No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables, indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames.The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan for the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information on the closure of the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility. Topics discussed include: facility description; closure history; closure performance standard; partial closure; maximum waste inventory; closure activities; schedule; and postclosure care

  8. Evolutionary Conservation of ABA Signaling for Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Franks, Peter J.; Nevo, Eviatar; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Xue, Dawei; Zhang, Guoping; Pogson, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-driven stomatal regulation reportedly evolved after the divergence of ferns, during the early evolution of seed plants approximately 360 million years ago. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the stomata of certain fern species are unresponsive to ABA, but exhibit passive hydraulic control. However, ABA-induced stomatal closure was detected in some mosses and lycophytes. Here, we observed that a number of ABA signaling and membrane transporter protein families diversified over the evolutionary history of land plants. The aquatic ferns Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata have representatives of 23 families of proteins orthologous to those of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and all other land plant species studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the key ABA signaling proteins indicates an evolutionarily conserved stomatal response to ABA. Moreover, comparative transcriptomic analysis has identified a suite of ABA-responsive genes that differentially expressed in a terrestrial fern species, Polystichum proliferum. These genes encode proteins associated with ABA biosynthesis, transport, reception, transcription, signaling, and ion and sugar transport, which fit the general ABA signaling pathway constructed from Arabidopsis and Hordeum vulgare. The retention of these key ABA-responsive genes could have had a profound effect on the adaptation of ferns to dry conditions. Furthermore, stomatal assays have shown the primary evidence for ABA-induced closure of stomata in two terrestrial fern species P. proliferum and Nephrolepis exaltata. In summary, we report, to our knowledge, new molecular and physiological evidence for the presence of active stomatal control in ferns. PMID:28232585

  9. Calculation of the atomic electric dipole moment of Pb2+ induced by nuclear Schiff moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, S. M.; Latha, K. V. P.; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2017-07-01

    We report the atomic electric dipole moment induced by the P, T violating interactions in the nuclear/sub-nuclear level, for 207Pb2+ and 207Pb, owing to the recent interest in the ferroelectric crystal PbTiO3 as one of the candidates for investigating macroscopic P, T-odd effects. In this paper, we calculate the atomic electric dipole moments of 207Pb and Pb2+, parametrized in terms of the P, T-odd coupling parameter, the nuclear Schiff moment (NSM), S, in the frame-work of the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock theory. We estimate the Schiff moment of Pb2+ using the experimental result of a system, which is electronically similar to the Pb2+ ion. We present the dominant contributions of the electric dipole moment (EDM) matrix elements and the important correlation effects contributing to the atomic EDM of Pb2+. Our results provide the first ever calculated EDM of the Pb2+ ion, and an estimate of its NSM from which the P, T-odd energy shift in a PbTiO3 crystal can be evaluated.

  10. Full Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.

    2009-01-01

    The full Coulomb collision operator and its moments including nonlinear terms are analytically calculated in the moment expansion. In coupling nonlinear terms, the product formula which expresses a product of two harmonic tensors as a series of single harmonic tensors is derived. The collision operators and moments are written in explicit formulas for arbitrary moments and for arbitrary temperature and mass ratios. These expressions easily reduce to formulas for the small mass-ratio approximation or for like species.

  11. Targeting estimation of CCC-GARCH models with infinite fourth moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard

    As an alternative to quasi-maximum likelihood, targeting estimation is a much applied estimation method for univariate and multivariate GARCH models. In terms of variance targeting estimation recent research has pointed out that at least finite fourth-order moments of the data generating process...... is required if one wants to perform inference in GARCH models relying on asymptotic normality of the estimator,see Pedersen and Rahbek (2014) and Francq et al. (2011). Such moment conditions may not be satisfied in practice for financial returns highlighting a large drawback of variance targeting estimation....... In this paper we consider the large-sample properties of the variance targeting estimator for the multivariate extended constant conditional correlation GARCH model when the distribution of the data generating process has infinite fourth moments. Using non-standard limit theory we derive new results...

  12. Moment-ration imaging of seismic regions for earthquake prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    1993-10-01

    An algorithm for predicting large earthquakes is proposed. The reciprocal ratio (mri) of the residual seismic moment to the total moment release in a region is used for imaging seismic moment precursors. Peaks in mri predict recent major earthquakes, including the 1985 Michoacan, 1985 central Chile, and 1992 Eureka, California earthquakes.

  13. Numerical Research of the Viscous Effect of the Bilge Keel on the Damping Moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Rui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bilge keels are effective passive devices in mitigating the rolling motion, and the usage of them covers almost all the sea going vessels. This paper focuses on the viscous effect of the bilge keel, ignored the effect of the free surface and the effect of the ship hull, for the general viscous characteristic of the bilge keel. In order to investigate the viscous effect of the bilge keel on the total damping moment, a special 2 dimensional numerical model, which includes a submerged cylinder with and without bilge keels, is designed for the simulation of forced rolling. Three important factors such as bilge keels width, rolling periods, as well as maximal rolling angles are taken into account, and the viscous flow field around the cylinder is simulated by some codes based on the viscous method in different conditions, in which the three factors are coupled. Verification and validation based on the ITTC method are performed for the cylinder without bilge keels in the conditions of different rolling periods and maximal rolling angles. The primary calculation of damping moment induced by the cylinder with 0mm, 4mm, and 10mm width bilge keels shows some interesting results, and a systematic analysis is conducted. The analysis of the damping moment components suggests there is phase difference between the damping moment induced by the cylinder and the bilge keels, and when the bilge keels width reaches a special size, the total damping moment is mitigated. The calculation of the damping moments induced by the cylinder with some larger bilge keels are also performed, and the results suggest that, the damping moment induced by the bilge keels is increased rapidly and becomes the dominant part in the total damping moment while the width of the bilge keels are increased, but the damping moment induced by the cylinder is not changed significantly. Some illustration of the vortices formation and shedding is included, which is the mechanism of the damping

  14. Application of electron closures in extended MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Eric; Adair, Brett; Taylor, Trevor

    2017-10-01

    Rigorous closure of the extended MHD equations in plasma fluid codes includes the effects of electron heat conduction along perturbed magnetic fields and contributions of the electron collisional friction and stress to the extended Ohms law. In this work we discuss application of a continuum numerical solution to the Chapman-Enskog-like electron drift kinetic equation using the NIMROD code. The implementation is a tightly-coupled fluid/kinetic system that carefully addresses time-centering in the advance of the fluid variables with their kinetically-computed closures. Comparisons of spatial accuracy, computational efficiency and required velocity space resolution are presented for applications involving growing magnetic islands in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. The reduction in parallel heat conduction due to particle trapping in toroidal geometry is emphasized. Work supported by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FC02-08ER54973 and DE-FG02-04ER54746.

  15. Evaluation of bending moment and deflection of cantilever supported excavations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Yasrebi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In many conditions, because of several restrictions, cantilever walls are the only way to stabilize the excavations. It is no doubt that one of the most important parameters in design of such walls is wall stiffness. Therefore, in this study, a large number of case histories are collected and the most commonly used range of wall thickness and stiffness are determined based on this database. In addition, validation of limit equilibrium method (LEM in granular soils showed that this method can only estimate bending moment of rigid walls. Therefore, for more accurate estimating, a new equation is presented for the most commonly used range of wall stiffness and various types of granular soils. Moreover, LEM based equation is replaced with a modified version. The new equation was successfully validated using 70 numerical models and results lied in range of 85% to 115% times the predicted values obtained from FEM. According to the results, in loose and very loose soils, the common cantilever walls can only stabilize the excavations with depth less than 10 m. While if depth is more than 15 m, soil type should be dense or very dense with “E” more than about 70 MPa. The results also show that the effect of wall stiffness is negligible in bending moments less than 2000 kN.m.

  16. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  17. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  18. Effective gluon operators and neutron dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigi, I.; Ural'tsev, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the purely gluon CP odd six-dimension effective arising in various CP-breaking models is discussed. This operators of most interest in the nonminimal Higgs sector models, the right W models and supersymmetric theories, where it may induce the neutron dipole moment at the level of the experimental restriction. The method for evaluating the magnitude d n is proposed and the reasons are given in favor that the original Weiberg's estimate based on the naive Dimensional Analysis is overdone significantly. The Peccei -Quinn mechanism, impact on the magnitude of d n , which generally may be very essential, is discussed

  19. Electric dipole moment of 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.; Fabre de la Ripelle, M.

    1986-01-01

    The contribution of a CP-nonconserving nucleon-nucleon interaction to the electric dipole moment of 3 He is evaluated in view of a recent proposal for its experimental detection. We use two models of CP-nonconserving interactions in combination with a Reid soft-core strong nucleon-nucleon interaction. In the Kobayashi-Maskawa model of CP nonconservation the order of magnitude is 10 -30 eX while the presence of the theta term in the QCD Langrangian contributes an order of magnitude 10 -16 theta-bar e cm

  20. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment on the Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Boram

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For the neutron to have an electric dipole moment (EDM, the theory of nature must have T, or equivalently CP, violation. Neutron EDM is a very good probe of novel CP violation in beyond the standard model physics. To leverage the connection between measured neutron EDM and novel mechanism of CP violation, one requires the calculation of matrix elements for CP violating operators, for which lattice QCD provides a first principle method. In this paper, we review the status of recent lattice QCD calculations of the contributions of the QCD Θ-term, the quark EDM term, and the quark chromo-EDM term to the neutron EDM.

  1. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan

    2018-03-01

    For the neutron to have an electric dipole moment (EDM), the theory of nature must have T, or equivalently CP, violation. Neutron EDM is a very good probe of novel CP violation in beyond the standard model physics. To leverage the connection between measured neutron EDM and novel mechanism of CP violation, one requires the calculation of matrix elements for CP violating operators, for which lattice QCD provides a first principle method. In this paper, we review the status of recent lattice QCD calculations of the contributions of the QCD Θ-term, the quark EDM term, and the quark chromo-EDM term to the neutron EDM.

  2. Electric dipole moment: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, E.

    2002-01-01

    There are 2 motivations for studying electric dipole moments (EDM): 1) EDM is deeply connected to CP violation (since it violates T symmetry) and to the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, and 2) EDM is effectively zero in standard model but big enough to measure in non-standard models and serves as a direct test of physics beyond the standard model. In this series of slides the author reviews various experiments concerning EDM: the mercury EDM experiment, the neutron EDM experiment, the thallium EDM experiment and the ytterbium EDM experiment, and considers the implications of their results on supersymmetry

  3. Precise calculations of the deuteron quadrupole moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Franz L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Recently, two calculations of the deuteron quadrupole moment have have given predictions that agree with the measured value to within 1%, resolving a long-standing discrepancy. One of these uses the covariant spectator theory (CST) and the other chiral effective field theory (cEFT). In this talk I will first briefly review the foundations and history of the CST, and then compare these two calculations with emphasis on how the same physical processes are being described using very different language. The comparison of the two methods gives new insights into the dynamics of the low energy NN interaction.

  4. EDM: Neutron electric dipole moment measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fierlinger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An electric dipole moment (EDM of the neutron would be a clear sign of new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The search for this phenomenon is considered one of the most important experiments in fundamental physics and could provide key information on the excess of matter versus antimatter in the universe. With high measurement precision, this experiment aims to ultimately achieve a sensitivity of 10-28 ecm, a 100-fold improvement in the sensitivity compared to the state-of-the-art. The EDM instrument is operated by an international collaboration based at the Technische Universität München.

  5. Multipole moments using extended coupled cluster method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sayali P.; Vaval, Nayana

    2013-05-01

    Using analytic extended coupled cluster (ECC) response approach quadrupole moments, dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities and dipole polarizabilities are studied. In the current implementation of the functional we have included all the double linked terms within (CCSD) approximation. These terms will be important for the accurate description of properties at the stretched geometries. We report the properties for carbon monoxide and hydrogen fluoride molecules, as a function of bond distance and compare our results for carbon monoxide with the full CI results. We have also reported the properties of methane, tetrafluoromethane, acetylene, difluoroacetylene, water and ammonia.

  6. New discrete orthogonal moments for signal analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, Barmak; Flusser, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2017), s. 57-73 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Orthogonal polynomials * Moment functions * Z-transform * Rodrigues formula * Hypergeometric form Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/ZOI/flusser-0475248.pdf

  7. The Magnetic Moment of the Lambda Hyperon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schachinger, Lindsay Carol [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1978-10-01

    The magnetic moment of the lambda hyperon has been measured to be· -0.613S±0.0047 nuclear magneton. The experiment was performed in the neutral hyperon beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Three million $\\Lambda^0 \\to p \\pi^-$ decays were detected in a multi-wire proportional chamber spectrometer. The lambda sample, produced inclusively by 400 Gev protons, had an. average momentum of 114 Gev / c and an average polarization of 0.085. This polarization was precessed through angles as large as 153 degrees

  8. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, F.J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical survey of the measurements of the gyromagnetic ratio g of the muon. A brief introduction is given to the theory of the 'anomalous magnetic moment' a equivalent to 1/2(g-2) and its significance is explained. The main part of the review concerns the successive (g-2) experiments to measure a directly, with gradually increasing accuracy. At present experiment and theory agree to (13+-29) parts in 10 9 in g, and the muon still obeys the rules of quantum electrodynamics for a structureless point charge. (author)

  9. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2)

  10. Searches for the electron electric dipole moment and nuclear anapole moments in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Sushkov, O.P.; Cadogan, J.M.; Dzuba, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We consider effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets. Our estimates show that the experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. It is also possible to probe for nuclear anapole moments in a solid state experiment. We suggest such NMR-type experiment and perform estimates of the expected results

  11. Automatic computation of moment magnitudes for small earthquakes and the scaling of local to moment magnitude

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Benjamin; Allmann, Bettina; Fäh, Donat; Clinton, John

    2017-01-01

    Moment magnitudes (MW) are computed for small and moderate earthquakes using a spectral fitting method. 40 of the resulting values are compared with those from broadband moment tensor solutions and found to match with negligible offset and scatter for available MW values of between 2.8 and 5.0. Using the presented method, MW are computed for 679 earthquakes in Switzerland with a minimum ML= 1.3. A combined bootstrap and orthogonal L1 minimization is then used to produce a scaling relation bet...

  12. Age-dependent modulation of the somatosensory network upon eye closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodoehl, Stefan; Klingner, Carsten; Witte, Otto W

    2016-02-01

    Eye closure even in complete darkness can improve somatosensory perception by switching the brain to a uni-sensory processing mode. This causes an increased information flow between the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex while decreasing modulation by the visual cortex. Previous work suggests that these modulations are age-dependent and that the benefit in somatosensory performance due to eye closing diminishes with age. The cause of this age-dependency and to what extent somatosensory processing is involved remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to characterize the underlying age-dependent modifications in the interaction and connectivity of different sensory networks caused by eye closure. We performed functional MR-imaging with tactile stimulation of the right hand under the conditions of opened and closed eyes in healthy young and elderly participants. Conditional Granger causality analysis was performed to assess the somatosensory and visual networks, including the thalamus. Independent of age, eye closure improved the information transfer from the thalamus to and within the somatosensory cortex. However, beyond that, we found an age-dependent recruitment strategy. Whereas young participants were characterized by an optimized information flow within the relays of the somatosensory network, elderly participants revealed a stronger modulatory influence of the visual network upon the somatosensory cortex. Our results demonstrate that the modulation of the somatosensory and visual networks by eye closure diminishes with age and that the dominance of the visual system is more pronounced in the aging brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An approach for the design of closure bolts of spent fuel elements transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar Neto, Miguel; Miranda, Carlos A.J.; Fainer, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The spent fuel elements transportation packages must be designed for severe conditions including significant fire and impact loads corresponding to hypothetical accident conditions. In general, these packages have large flat lids connected to cylindrical bodies by closure bolts that can be the weak link in the containment system. The bolted closure design depends on the geometrical characteristics of the flat lid and the cylindrical body, including their flanges, on the type of the gaskets and their dimensions, and on the number, strength, and tightness of the bolts. There are well established procedures for the closure bolts design used in pressure vessels and piping. They can not be used directly in the bolts design applied to transportation packages. Prior to the use of these procedures, it is necessary consider the differences in the main loads (pressure for the pressure vessels and piping and impact loads for the transportation packages) and in the geometry (large flat lids are not used in pressure vessels and piping). So, this paper presents an approach for the design of the closure bolts of spent fuel elements transportation packages considering the impact loads and the typical geometrical configuration of the transportation packages. (author)

  14. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Rogowski

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2. An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  15. Distribution functions and moments in the theory of coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pich, J.

    1990-04-01

    Different distribution functions and their moments used in the Theory of coagulation are summarized and analysed. Relations between the moments of these distribution functions are derived and the physical meaning of individual moments is briefly discussed. The time evolution of the moment of order zero (total number concentration) during the coagulation process is analysed for the general kernel of the Smoluchowski equation. On this basis the time evolution of certain physically important quantities related to this moment such as mean particle size, surface and volume as well as surface concentration is described. Equations for the half time of coagulation for the general collision frequency factor are derived. (orig.) [de

  16. Fractional-moment CAPM with loss aversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yahao; Wang Xiaotian; Wu Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new fractional-order value function which generalizes the value function of Kahneman and Tversky [Kahneman D, Tversky A. Prospect theory: an analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 1979;47:263-91; Tversky A, Kahneman D. Advances in prospect theory: cumulative representation of uncertainty. J. Risk Uncertainty 1992;4:297-323], and give the corresponding fractional-moment versions of CAPM in the cases of both the prospect theory [Kahneman D, Tversky A. Prospect theory: an analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 1979;47:263-91; Tversky A, Kahneman D. Advances in prospect theory: cumulative representation of uncertainty. J. Risk Uncertainty 1992;4:297-323] and the expected utility model. The models that we obtain can be used to price assets when asset return distributions are likely to be asymmetric stable Levy distribution during panics and stampedes in worldwide security markets in 2008. In particular, from the prospect theory we get the following fractional-moment CAPM with loss aversion: E(R i -R 0 )=(E[(W-W 0 ) + -0.12 (R i -R 0 )]+2.25E[(W 0 -W) + -0.12 (R i -R 0 )])/ (E[(W-W 0 ) + -0.12 (W-R 0 )]+2.25E[(W 0 -W) + -0.12 (W-R 0 )]) .E(W-R 0 ), where W 0 is a fixed reference point distinguishing between losses and gains.

  17. Quadrupole moments measured by nuclear orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchta, H.

    1985-01-01

    Quadrupole interactions between the nuclei and solids have been studied with the low temperature nuclear orientation technique. The first series of measurements have been effected on the orientation of 195H g m and 197 Hg m , long lived daughter states in the 195 Au and 197 Au decay. The lifetimes of these states are of the same order as the spin-lattice relaxation time. The reorientation of the intermediate states has been taken into account extending the dipole relaxation mechanism to non-equidistant relaxing substates. The experimental nuclear quadrupole moments, thus deduced are slightly different from theoretical estimations. A new high precision method accessible to levels with 100 ns to 1 m lifetimes, the level mixing resonance on oriented nuclei (LMR/ON) has been elaborated in collaboration with LEUVEN university (Belgium). In this technique the nucleus is subject to a non colinear electric plus magnetic combined interaction. The quadrupole interaction of Ag[7/2, = 40 s] isomer with the electric field gradient in zinc has been established to better than 1% observing its level mixing resonances; and also the ratio of electric field gradients of silver in zinc to cadmium. The electric quadrupole moments of 106 Ag m , 107 Ag m and 109 Ag m have been established combining the level mixing resonances with classical low temperature quadrupole alignment measurements. The experimental values are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on a semi-microscopical model using Yukawa potential [fr

  18. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. II. Attenuation of the boundary layers via double-Λ bounce-back flux scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Impact of the unphysical tangential advective-diffusion constraint of the bounce-back (BB) reflection on the impermeable solid surface is examined for the first four moments of concentration. Despite the number of recent improvements for the Neumann condition in the lattice Boltzmann method-advection-diffusion equation, the BB rule remains the only known local mass-conserving no-flux condition suitable for staircase porous geometry. We examine the closure relation of the BB rule in straight channel and cylindrical capillary analytically, and show that it excites the Knudsen-type boundary layers in the nonequilibrium solution for full-weight equilibrium stencil. Although the d2Q5 and d3Q7 coordinate schemes are sufficient for the modeling of isotropic diffusion, the full-weight stencils are appealing for their advanced stability, isotropy, anisotropy and anti-numerical-diffusion ability. The boundary layers are not covered by the Chapman-Enskog expansion around the expected equilibrium, but they accommodate the Chapman-Enskog expansion in the bulk with the closure relation of the bounce-back rule. We show that the induced boundary layers introduce first-order errors in two primary transport properties, namely, mean velocity (first moment) and molecular diffusion coefficient (second moment). As a side effect, the Taylor-dispersion coefficient (second moment), skewness (third moment), and kurtosis (fourth moment) deviate from their physical values and predictions of the fourth-order Chapman-Enskog analysis, even though the kurtosis error in pure diffusion does not depend on grid resolution. In two- and three-dimensional grid-aligned channels and open-tubular conduits, the errors of velocity and diffusion are proportional to the diagonal weight values of the corresponding equilibrium terms. The d2Q5 and d3Q7 schemes do not suffer from this deficiency in grid-aligned geometries but they cannot avoid it if the boundaries are not parallel to the coordinate lines. In order

  19. Sum rules and systematics for baryon magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The new experimental values of hyperon magnetic moments are compared with sum rules predicted from general quark models. Three difficulties encountered are not easily explained by simple models. The isovector contributions of nonstrange quarks to hyperon moments are smaller than the corresponding contribution to nucleon moments, indicating either appreciable configuration mixing in hyperon wave functions and absent in nucleons or an additional isovector contribution beyond that of valence quarks, e.g. from a pion cloud. The large magnitude of the Ψ - moment may indicate that the strange quark contribution to the Ψ moments is considerably larger than the value μ(Λ) predicted by simple models which have otherwise been very successful. The set of controversial values from different experiments of the Σ - moment include a value very close to -1/2μ(Σ + ) which would indicate that strange quarks do not contribute at all to the Σ moments. (orig.)

  20. Sum rules and systematics for baryon magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-11-01

    The new experimental values of hyperon magnetic moments are compared with sum rules predicted from general quark models. Three difficulties encountered are not easily explained by simple models. The isovector contributions of nonstrange quarks to hyperon moments are smaller than the corresponding contribution to nucleon moments, indicating either appreciable configuration mixing in hyperon wave functions and absent in nucleons or an additional isovector contribution beyond that of valence quarks; e.g. from a pion cloud. The large magnitude of the THETA - moment may indicate that the strange quark contribution to the THETA moments is considerably larger than the value μ(Λ) predicted by simple models which have otherwise been very successful. The set of controversial values from different experiments of the Σ - moment include a value very close to -(1/2)μ(Σ + ) which would indicate that strange quarks do not contribute at all to the Σ moments. (author)

  1. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater‑facility-impacted stream reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Barber, Larry B.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Duris, Joseph W.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Givens, Carrie E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Journey, Celeste; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  2. The problem of moments and the meaning of perturbation expansions in quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horzela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The methods of the classical moment theory are used to give the interpretation of the divergent perturbation expansions. The expansions with factorially growing coefficients are proved to be mathematically well defined objects which may be resummed using the Borel and Pade methods. The problem of uniqueness of the resummation is analysed and some conditions of the uniqueness are obtained

  3. Moving the Weber fraction: the perceptual precision for moment of inertia increases with exploration force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debats, N.B.; Kingma, I.; Beek, P.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    How does the magnitude of the exploration force influence the precision of haptic perceptual estimates? To address this question, we examined the perceptual precision for moment of inertia (i.e., an object's "angular mass") under different force conditions, using the Weber fraction to quantify

  4. Investigation of moment of friction and leakage by testing P/M materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Tolstrup

    1996-01-01

    A comparison is made between forged steel and sintered material with respect to wear, moment of friktion and leakage between the two parts in a friktion test.The investigation have been performed with loading conditions at the same level as used under practical circumstances.Results are presented...

  5. Algorithm Indicating Moment of P-Wave Arrival Based on Second-Moment Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Sokolowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The moment of P-wave arrival can provide us with many information about the nature of a seismic event. Without adequate knowledge regarding the onset moment, many properties of the events related to location, polarization of P-wave, and so forth are impossible to receive. In order to save time required to indicate P-wave arrival moment manually, one can benefit from automatic picking algorithms. In this paper two algorithms based on a method finding a regime switch point are applied to seismic event data in order to find P-wave arrival time. The algorithms are based on signals transformed via a basic transform rather than on raw recordings. They involve partitioning the transformed signal into two separate series and fitting logarithm function to the first subset (which corresponds to pure noise and therefore it is considered stationary, exponent or power function to the second subset (which corresponds to nonstationary seismic event, and finding the point at which these functions best fit the statistic in terms of sum of squared errors. Effectiveness of the algorithms is tested on seismic data acquired from O/ZG “Rudna” underground copper ore mine with moments of P-wave arrival initially picked by broadly known STA/LTA algorithm and then corrected by seismic station specialists. The results of proposed algorithms are compared to those obtained using STA/LTA.

  6. New Third-Order Moments for the PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Turbulent convection is inherently non-local and a primary condition for a successful treatment of the PBL is a reliable model of non-locality. In the dynamic equations governing the convective flux, turbulent kinetic energy, etc, non-locality enters through the third-order moments, TOMs. Since the simplest form, the so-called down gradient approximation (DGA , severely underestimates the TOMs (by up to an order of magnitude), a more physical model is needed. In 1994, an analytical model was presented which was derived directly from the dynamical equations for the TOMs. It considerably improved the DGA but was a bit cumbersome to use. Here, we present a new analytic expression for the TOMs which is considerably simpler than the 1994 expression and which at the same time yields a much better fit to the LES data.

  7. Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Percutaneous Closure Using a Starclose Closure Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare Louise; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Starclose (Abbott Vascular Devices, Redwood City, CA) is a new arterial closure device that seals a femoral puncture site with an extravascular star-shaped nitinol clip. The clip projects small tines into the arterial wall which fold inward, causing the arterial wall to pucker, producing a purse-string-like seal closing the puncture site. The case history is that of a 76-year-old female patient who underwent day-case percutaneous diagnostic coronary angiography. A Starclose femoral artery closure device was used to achieve hemostasis with subsequent femoral artery stenosis.

  8. Estimation of Ship Long-term Wave-induced Bending Moment using Closed-Form Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    A semi-analytical approach is used to derive frequency response functions and standard deviations for the wave-induced bending moment amidships for mono-hull ships. The results are given as closed-form expressions and the required input information for the procedure is restricted to the main......-empirical closed-form expression for the skewness. The effect of whipping is included by assuming that whipping and wave-induced responses are conditionally independent given Hs. The procedure is simple and can be used to make quick estimates of the design wave bending moment at the conceptual design phase...

  9. Numerical aspects of direct quadrature-based moment methods for solving the population balance equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct-quadrature generalized moment based methods were analysed in terms of accuracy, computational cost and robustness for the solution of the population balance problems in the [0,∞ and [0,1] domains. The minimum condition number of the coefficient matrix of their linear system of equations was obtained by global optimization. An heuristic scaling rule from the literature was also evaluated. The results indicate that the methods based on Legendre generalized moments are the most robust for the finite domain problems, while the DQMoM formulation that solves for the abscissas and weights using the heuristic scaling rule is the best for the infinite domain problems.

  10. Second-moment budgets in cloud topped boundary layers: A large-eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Rieke; Mironov, Dmitrii; Raasch, Siegfried

    2015-06-01

    A detailed analysis of second-order moment budgets for cloud topped boundary layers (CTBLs) is performed using high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES). Two CTBLs are simulated—one with trade wind shallow cumuli, and the other with nocturnal marine stratocumuli. Approximations to the ensemble-mean budgets of the Reynolds-stress components, of the fluxes of two quasi-conservative scalars, and of the scalar variances and covariance are computed by averaging the LES data over horizontal planes and over several hundred time steps. Importantly, the subgrid scale contributions to the budget terms are accounted for. Analysis of the LES-based second-moment budgets reveals, among other things, a paramount importance of the pressure scrambling terms in the Reynolds-stress and scalar-flux budgets. The pressure-strain correlation tends to evenly redistribute kinetic energy between the components, leading to the growth of horizontal-velocity variances at the expense of the vertical-velocity variance which is produced by buoyancy over most of both CTBLs. The pressure gradient-scalar covariances are the major sink terms in the budgets of scalar fluxes. The third-order transport proves to be of secondary importance in the scalar-flux budgets. However, it plays a key role in maintaining budgets of TKE and of the scalar variances and covariance. Results from the second-moment budget analysis suggest that the accuracy of description of the CTBL structure within the second-order closure framework strongly depends on the fidelity of parameterizations of the pressure scrambling terms in the flux budgets and of the third-order transport terms in the variance budgets. This article was corrected on 26 JUN 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  11. In-Situ Testing and Performance Assessment of a Redesigned WIPP Panel Closure - 13192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Thomas; Patterson, Russell; Camphouse, Chris; Herrick, Courtney; Kirchner, Thomas; Malama, Bwalya; Zeitler, Todd; Kicker, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    There are two primary regulatory requirements for Panel Closures at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the nation's only deep geologic repository for defense related Transuranic (TRU) and Mixed TRU waste. The Federal requirement is through 40 CFR 191 and 194, promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The state requirement is regulated through the authority of the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) under the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA), New Mexico Statutes Annotated (NMSA) 1978, chap. 74-4-1 through 74-4-14, in accordance with the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (HWMR), 20.4.1 New Mexico Annotated Code (NMAC). The state regulations are implemented for the operational period of waste emplacement plus 30 years whereas the federal requirements are implemented from the operational period through 10,000 years. The 10,000 year federal requirement is related to the adequate representation of the panel closures in determining long-term performance of the repository. In Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking for 40 CFR Part 194, the EPA required a specific design for the panel closure system. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has requested, through the Planned Change Request (PCR) process, that the EPA modify Condition 1 via its rulemaking process. The DOE has also requested, through the Permit Modification Request (PMR) process, that the NMED modify the approved panel closure system specified in Permit Attachment G1. The WIPP facility is carved out of a bedded salt formation 655 meters below the surface of southeast New Mexico. Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking specifies that the waste panels be closed using Option D which is a combination of a Salado mass concrete (SMC) monolith and an isolation/explosion block wall. The Option D design was also accepted as the panel closure of choice by the NMED. After twelve years of waste handling

  12. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  13. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references

  14. Exotic fermions and electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshipura, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The contributions of mirror fermions to the electric dipole moments (EDM's) of leptons and neutrons are studied using the available limits on the mixing of the relevant fermions to their mirror partners. These limits imply EDM's several orders of magnitude larger than the current experimental bounds in the case of the electron and the neutron if the relevant CP-violating phases are not unnaturally small. If these phases are large, then the bounds on the EDM's can be used to improve upon the limits on mixing between the ordinary (f) and the mirror (F) fermions. In the specific case of the latter mixing angle being given by (m f /M F ) 1/2 , one can obtain the electron and the neutron EDM's close to experimental bounds

  15. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-08

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  16. Fractional-moment CAPM with loss aversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yahao [Dep. of Math., South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang Xiaotian [Dep. of Math., South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)], E-mail: swa001@126.com; Wu Min [Dep. of Math., South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-11-15

    In this paper, we present a new fractional-order value function which generalizes the value function of Kahneman and Tversky [Kahneman D, Tversky A. Prospect theory: an analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 1979;47:263-91; Tversky A, Kahneman D. Advances in prospect theory: cumulative representation of uncertainty. J. Risk Uncertainty 1992;4:297-323], and give the corresponding fractional-moment versions of CAPM in the cases of both the prospect theory [Kahneman D, Tversky A. Prospect theory: an analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 1979;47:263-91; Tversky A, Kahneman D. Advances in prospect theory: cumulative representation of uncertainty. J. Risk Uncertainty 1992;4:297-323] and the expected utility model. The models that we obtain can be used to price assets when asset return distributions are likely to be asymmetric stable Levy distribution during panics and stampedes in worldwide security markets in 2008. In particular, from the prospect theory we get the following fractional-moment CAPM with loss aversion: E(R{sub i}-R{sub 0})=(E[(W-W{sub 0}){sub +}{sup -0.12}(R{sub i}-R{sub 0})]+2.25E[(W{sub 0}-W){sub +}{sup -0.12}(R{sub i}-R{sub 0})])/ (E[(W-W{sub 0}){sub +}{sup -0.12} (W-R{sub 0})]+2.25E[(W{sub 0}-W){sub +}{sup -0.12}(W-R{sub 0})]) .E(W-R{sub 0}), where W{sub 0} is a fixed reference point distinguishing between losses and gains.

  17. The perfect message at the perfect moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanam, Kirthi; Zweben, Monte

    2005-11-01

    Marketers planning promotional campaigns ask questions to boost the odds that the messages will be accepted: Who should receive each message? What should be its content? How should we deliver it? The one question they rarely ask is, when should we deliver it? That's too bad, because in marketing, timing is arguably the most important variable of all. Indeed, there are moments in a customer's relationship with a business when she wants to communicate with that business because something has changed. If the company contacts her with the right message in the right format at the right time, there's a good chance of a warm reception. The question of "when" can be answered by a new computer-based model called "dialogue marketing," which is, to date, the highest rung on an evolutionary ladder that ascends from database marketing to relationship marketing to one-to-one marketing. Its principle advantages over older approaches are that it is completely interactive, exploits many communication channels, and is "relationship aware": that is, it continuously tracks every nuance of the customer's interaction with the business. Thus, dialogue marketing responds to each transition in that relationship at the moment the customer requires attention. Turning a traditional marketing strategy into a dialogue-marketing program is a straightforward matter. Begin by identifying the batch communications you make with customers, then ask yourself what events could trigger those communications to make them more timely. Add a question or call to action to each message and prepare a different treatment or response for each possible answer. Finally, create a series of increasingly urgent calls to action that kick in if the question or call to action goes unanswered by the customer. As dialogue marketing proliferates, it may provide the solid new footing that Madison Avenue seeks.

  18. Overview of mine closure in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Castro,Maíra Fonseca Moreira; Lima,Hernani Mota de; Flôres,José Cruz do Carmo

    2011-01-01

    Despite closure regulations being recent in Brazil, many mining companies are attempting to adopt best practice and are facing the challenge of closing their mines properly instead of simply complying with current legislation or abandoning the mine site. This paper summarizes mine closure according to both the Brazilian legislation and the "Deliberação Normativa" COPAM Nº 127, that establishes the directives and procedures for environmental assessment at the mine closure stage. Even with the ...

  19. Unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic moment in URu2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faak, B.; Flouquet, J.; Lejay, P.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the sample quality on the magnetic properties of the heavy-fermion superconductor URu 2 Si 2 has been studied by elastic neutron scattering. Two single crystals prepared under identical conditions received different heat treatments. The as-grown crystal shows an unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic Bragg peak intensity. The annealed sample behaves normally. The low-temperature magnetic moment is identical for the two samples, showing that the small moment of 0.023 (3) μ B is intrinsic. By varying the instrumental resolution, we show that the ordered moment as well as the limited correlation length (200-400 A) are of static origin. The finite correlation length appears related to defects. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  20. Moment Analysis Theory for Size Exclusion Capillary Electrochromatography with Chemical Reaction of Intermolecular Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Kanji; Suzuki, Nozomu

    2017-01-01

    New moment equations were developed for size exclusion capillary electrochromatography (SECEC), in which intermolecular chemical reactions simultaneously took place. They explain how the first absolute and second central moments of elution peaks are correlated with some fundamental equilibrium and kinetic parameters of mass transfer and chemical reaction in SECEC column. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the moment equations, they were used to predict chromatographic behavior under hypothetical SECEC conditions. It was quantitatively studied how the association and dissociation rate constants of intermolecular interaction affected the position and spreading of elution peaks. It was indicated that both the intermolecular reaction kinetics and axial dispersion of solute molecules in a capillary column had a predominant contribution to the band broadening.

  1. Effect of a lateral wedge on joint moments during gait in subjects with recurrent ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihana, Wataru; Torii, Suguru; Akai, Masami; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Fukano, Mako; Naito, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    This study assessed the biomechanic effects of wearing a lateral wedge on the subtalar joint moment during gait in athletes with and without an unstable lateral ankle. A crossover design was applied whereby 50 collegiate males walked with two different wedges: a 0 degrees control wedge and a 6 degrees lateral wedge. We investigated frontal plane angles and moments at the subtalar joint and the knee joint, as well as ground reaction forces and center of pressure excursion. Moments were derived using a three-dimensional inverse dynamics model of the lower extremity. The 6 degrees lateral wedge significantly increased the subtalar joint valgus moment (P knee joint varus moment (P < 0.001) when compared with no wedge. The differences between wedge conditions were associated with a laterally shifted location of the center of pressure during stance phase. However, there were diverse, sometimes reversed effects with the wedge among the athletes with an unstable lateral ankle. These results indicate that biomechanical indications and limitations of lateral wedges in unstable lateral ankles should be analyzed in more detail, possibly leading to new guidelines for the use of such foot orthoses.

  2. Relationships between moment magnitude and fault parameters: theoretical and semi-empirical relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyun; Tao, Xiaxin

    2003-12-01

    Fault parameters are important in earthquake hazard analysis. In this paper, theoretical relationships between moment magnitude and fault parameters including subsurface rupture length, downdip rupture width, rupture area, and average slip over the fault surface are deduced based on seismological theory. These theoretical relationships are further simplified by applying similarity conditions and an unique form is established. Then, combining the simplified theoretical relationships between moment magnitude and fault parameters with seismic source data selected in this study, a practical semi-empirical relationship is established. The seismic source data selected is also to used to derive empirical relationships between moment magnitude and fault parameters by the ordinary least square regression method. Comparisons between semi-empirical relationships and empirical relationships show that the former depict distribution trends of data better than the latter. It is also observed that downdip rupture widths of strike slip faults are saturated when moment magnitude is more than 7.0, but downdip rupture widths of dip slip faults are not saturated in the moment magnitude ranges of this study.

  3. Combination therapy accelerates diabetic wound closure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Allen

    Full Text Available Non-healing foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic amputation and hospitalization amongst diabetics in the developed world. Impaired wound neovascularization perpetuates a cycle of dysfunctional tissue repair and regeneration. Evidence implicates defective mobilization of marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs as a fundamental cause of impaired diabetic neovascularization. Currently, there are no FDA-approved therapies to address this defect. Here we report an endogenous PC strategy to improve diabetic wound neovascularization and closure through a combination therapy of AMD3100, which mobilizes marrow-derived PCs by competitively binding to the cell surface CXCR4 receptor, and PDGF-BB, which is a protein known to enhance cell growth, progenitor cell migration and angiogenesis.Wounded mice were assigned to 1 of 5 experimental arms (n = 8/arm: saline treated wild-type, saline treated diabetic, AMD3100 treated diabetic, PDGF-BB treated diabetic, and AMD3100/PDGF-BB treated diabetic. Circulating PC number and wound vascularity were analyzed for each group (n = 8/group. Cellular function was assessed in the presence of AMD3100. Using a validated preclinical model of type II diabetic wound healing, we show that AMD3100 therapy (10 mg/kg; i.p. daily alone can rescue diabetes-specific defects in PC mobilization, but cannot restore normal wound neovascularization. Through further investigation, we demonstrate an acquired trafficking-defect within AMD3100-treated diabetic PCs that can be rescued by PDGF-BB (2 μg; topical supplementation within the wound environment. Finally, we determine that combination therapy restores diabetic wound neovascularization and accelerates time to wound closure by 40%.Combination AMD3100 and PDGF-BB therapy synergistically improves BM PC mobilization and trafficking, resulting in significantly improved diabetic wound closure and neovascularization. The success of this endogenous, cell-based strategy to

  4. Vacuum assisted closure in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beno, M; Martin, J; Sager, P

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum assisted closure (VAC-therapy) is a well established method in nearly all surgical disciplines. The aim is to present the efficiency of vacuum assisted closure in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds in patients admitted in the department of vascular surgery. Within the year 2008 there were 59 patients (44 men, 15 women) treated with VAC therapy in our Department of Vascular surgery (Landshut, Germany). VAC was used 22x (37.28 %) in therapy of ulcus cruris (venous, arterial, mixed genesis), 15x (25.42%) in patients with diabetic foot syndrome, 12x (20.33%) in secondary healing wounds and infected wounds, 5x (8.47%) in wounds after several injuries and soft skin tissue infections and 5x (8.47%) in wound infections connected with vascular graft infections after vascular revascularization. VAC therapy seems to be very effective in the management of patients with venous ulcers, especially after a proper surgical treatment (100%), patients with soft skin tissue infections (100%) and secondary healing wounds (100%) especially in combination with MESH-Grafting. In patients with diabetic foot syndrome (80%) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (72.7%), an evaluation of peripheral blood perfusion and revascularization prior to VAC therapy is often necessary. Although VAC was used 5x in the therapy of infected vascular grafts, successful preservation of infected graft material was observed in only one case (infection of PTFE femoro-popliteal bypass graft). Vacuum assisted closure in vascular surgery proved to be simple and efficient method in therapy of acute and chronic wounds. The efficiency of VAC systems in therapy of infected graft material after revascularization needs further studies (Tab. 3, Ref. 10).

  5. Economic and financial aspects of mine closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, James R.; Franceschi, Dina; Curi, Adilson; Vale, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    Today, mine reclamation is a key component to a successful mine plan. Most of the industrialized nations have recognized the need to make mining activities relatively environmentally friendly, if they want to continue to benefit from the economic gains from mineral resource development. Countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia and South Africa are leaders in the field and have implemented relatively sophisticated legislation to ensure environmentally correct mine closure. These countries rely on a combination of strict control strategies and economic penalties to ensure compliance. Yet, from the firm's perspective, reclamation activities are counterproductive as they cut into properties. In order to attract economic development and earn much needed economic capital, most of the rest of the world, particularly the developing countries, lack effective mine closure legislation. The traditional command and control type of legislation that is sometimes used is either vague and therefore avoided, or not enforced appropriately, resulting in an undesirable level of environmental degradation. With the use of case studies from Brazil, this article shows that direct controls are effective in some instances and not in others. It proposes that economic and financial tools may be more effective than the traditional direct controls in getting firms to comply with environmental standards, particularly in developing countries where environmental compliance is more difficult to achieve. It explains the use of performance bonding as one type of economic incentive that has proven to be an effective environmental policy in mine planning and closure. The authors additionally push beyond the typical style of performance bonds to introduce a flexible bonding and insurance system that allows governments to maintain strict environmental standards but limits firms financial exposure during the mining process. Such a system learns from the successes of the industrialized

  6. The congenitally missing upper lateral incisor. A retrospective study of orthodontic space closure versus restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertsson, S; Mohlin, B

    2000-12-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with uni- or bilateral congenitally missing lateral incisors is a challenge to effective treatment planning. The two major alternatives, orthodontic space closure or space opening for prosthetic replacements, can both compromise aesthetics, periodontal health, and function. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine treated patients who had congenitally missing lateral incisors and to compare their opinion of the aesthetic result with the dentists' opinions of occlusal function and periodontal health. In this sample, 50 patients were identified. Thirty had been treated with orthodontic space closure, and 20 by space opening and a prosthesis (porcelain bonded to gold and resin bonded bridges). The patient's opinion of the aesthetic result was evaluated using the Eastman Esthetic Index questionnaire and during a structured interview. The functional status, dental contact patterns, periodontal condition, and quality of the prosthetic replacement was evaluated. In general, subjects treated with orthodontic space closure were more satisfied with the appearance of their teeth than those who had a prosthesis. No significant differences in the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) were found. However, patients with prosthetic replacements had impaired periodontal health with accumulation of plaque and gingivitis. The conclusion of this study is that orthodontic space closure produces results that are well accepted by patients, does not impair temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function, and encourages periodontal health in comparison with prosthetic replacements.

  7. Transcatheter closure of the patent foramen ovale in children: intermediate-term follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Kutay; Aykan, Hakan H; Duman, Derya; Aypar, Ebru; Özkutlu, Süheyla; Alehan, Dursun; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2017-10-01

    The patent foramen ovale is almost a normal anatomical hole between the atria with ~30% incidence in the general population. It has been suggested that the patent foramen ovale is the cause of some neurological events, which is explained by paradoxical embolism. Transcatheter closure of the patent foramen ovale is a common procedure in adult patients with cerebral ischaemic events, but there are limited data investigating the results in children. Between January, 2005 and February, 2014, 17 patients' patent foramen ovales were closed by the transcatheter approach in our department. The indications for closure were transient ischaemic attack in 10 patients, stroke in four patients, and migraine in three patients. The mean age and mean weight at the time of the procedure were 11.1±3.7 years and 42.1±15.4 kg, respectively. We asked our patients whether their previous ailments continued. All patients responded to the study survey. In 15 patients, ailments did not continue after patent foramen ovale closure and they significantly decreased in two of them. We suggest that under the right conditions device closure of the patent foramen ovale is a safe solution for these cryptogenic ischaemic events and migraine.

  8. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  9. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D

  10. Premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononetz, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    The premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant is discussed in outline form. The topics discussed include: an overview of Trojan; events leading to shutdown decision; Trojan's lifetime O ampersand M performance; Trojan's Regulatory performance; historical Trojan regulatory versus economic performance; applicable Oregon law; least-cost planning process; 1992 least cost plan; 1993 LCP update; LCP limitations; comparative performance analysis; management assessments; Trojan O ampersand M analysis; steam generator issues; quantification of deficiencies; quantification of impact of steam generator degradation; 'net benefits' test; conclusions from net benefits analysis; total disallowances; and conclusions and ramifications

  11. Multiple coil closure of isolated aortopulmonary collateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhi Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-month-old girl was diagnosed to have large aortopulmonary collateral during evaluation for congestive heart failure. There was no other evidence of cardiopulmonary disease. The collateral was successfully closed with multiple coils delivered sequentially. We describe the issues associated during closure of the aortopulmonary collateral in this case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of large aortopulmonary collateral presenting with heart failure in an otherwise structurally normal heart that was closed successfully with multiple coils delivered sequentially.

  12. Post Closure Safety of the Morsleben Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, J.; Eilers, G.; Mauke, R.; Moeller-Hoeppe, N.; Engelhardt, H.-J.; Kreienmeyer, M.; Lerch, C.; Schrimpf, C.

    2002-01-01

    After the completion of detailed studies of the suitability the twin-mine Bartensleben-Marie, situated in the Federal State of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany), was chosen in 1970 for the disposal of low and medium level radioactive waste. The waste emplacement started in 1978 in rock cavities at the mine's fourth level, some 500 m below the surface. Until the end of the operational phase in 1998 in total about 36,800 m 3 of radioactive waste was disposed of. The Morsleben LLW/ILW repository (ERAM) is now under licensing for closure. After completing the licensing procedure the repository will be sealed and backfilled to exclude any undue future impact onto man or the environment. The main safety objective is to protect the biosphere from the harmful effects of the disposed radionuclides. Furthermore, classical or conventional requirements call for ruling out or minimizing other unfavorable environmental effects. The ERAM is an abandoned rock salt and potash mine. As a consequence it has a big void volume, however small parts of the cavities are backfilled with crushed salt rocks. Other goals of the closure concept are therefore a long-term stabilization of the cavities to prevent a dipping or buckling of the ground surface. In addition, groundwater protection shall be assured. For the sealing of the repository a closure concept was developed to ensure compliance with the safety protection objectives. The concept anticipates the backfilling of the cavities with hydraulically setting backfill materials (salt concretes). The reduction of the remaining void volume in the mine causes in the case of brine intrusions a limitation of the leaching processes of the exposed potash seams. However, during the setting process the hydration heat of the concrete will lead to an increase of the temperature and hence to thermally induced stresses of the concrete and the surrounding rocks. Therefore, the influence of these stresses and deformations on the stability of the salt body and the

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, M.F.

    1991-08-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility of the Savannah River Plant received hazardous and solid low level radioactive wastes from 1972 until 1986. Because this facility did not have a permit to receive hazardous wastes, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure was performed between 1987 and 1990. This closure consisted of dynamic compaction of the waste trenches and placement of a 3-foot clay cap, a 2-foot soil cover, and a vegetative layer. Operations of the waste disposal facility, tests performed to complete the closure design, and the construction of the closure cap are discussed herein

  14. U.S. Small Business HUBZone Base Closure Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — HUBZone Qualitified Base Closure Areas - the lands within the boundaries of a military installation that was closed through a privatization process under the Federal...

  15. Simulating school closure policies for cost effective pandemic decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz Ozgur M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around the globe, school closures were used sporadically to mitigate the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. However, such closures can detrimentally impact economic and social life. Methods Here, we couple a decision analytic approach with a mathematical model of influenza transmission to estimate the impact of school closures in terms of epidemiological and cost effectiveness. Our method assumes that the transmissibility and the severity of the disease are uncertain, and evaluates several closure and reopening strategies that cover a range of thresholds in school-aged prevalence (SAP and closure durations. Results Assuming a willingness to pay per quality adjusted life-year (QALY threshold equal to the US per capita GDP ($46,000, we found that the cost effectiveness of these strategies is highly dependent on the severity and on a willingness to pay per QALY. For severe pandemics, the preferred strategy couples the earliest closure trigger (0.5% SAP with the longest duration closure (24 weeks considered. For milder pandemics, the preferred strategies also involve the earliest closure trigger, but are shorter duration (12 weeks for low transmission rates and variable length for high transmission rates. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of obtaining early estimates of pandemic severity and provide guidance to public health decision-makers for effectively tailoring school closures strategies in response to a newly emergent influenza pandemic.

  16. Simulating school closure policies for cost effective pandemic decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Ozgur M; Damien, Paul; Paltiel, David A; Burke, Sean; van de Geijn, Bryce; Galvani, Alison; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2012-06-18

    Around the globe, school closures were used sporadically to mitigate the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. However, such closures can detrimentally impact economic and social life. Here, we couple a decision analytic approach with a mathematical model of influenza transmission to estimate the impact of school closures in terms of epidemiological and cost effectiveness. Our method assumes that the transmissibility and the severity of the disease are uncertain, and evaluates several closure and reopening strategies that cover a range of thresholds in school-aged prevalence (SAP) and closure durations. Assuming a willingness to pay per quality adjusted life-year (QALY) threshold equal to the US per capita GDP ($46,000), we found that the cost effectiveness of these strategies is highly dependent on the severity and on a willingness to pay per QALY. For severe pandemics, the preferred strategy couples the earliest closure trigger (0.5% SAP) with the longest duration closure (24 weeks) considered. For milder pandemics, the preferred strategies also involve the earliest closure trigger, but are shorter duration (12 weeks for low transmission rates and variable length for high transmission rates). These findings highlight the importance of obtaining early estimates of pandemic severity and provide guidance to public health decision-makers for effectively tailoring school closures strategies in response to a newly emergent influenza pandemic.

  17. Digital signal processing of data from borehole creep closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Patrick, W.C.; Duplancic, N.

    1987-01-01

    Digital signal processing, a technique commonly used in the fields of electrical engineering and communication technology, has been successfully used to analyze creep closure data obtained from a 0.91 m diameter by 5.13 deep borehole in bedded salt. By filtering the ''noise'' component of the closure data from a test borehole, important data trends were made more evident and average creep closure rates were able to be calculated. This process provided accurate estimates of closure rates that are used in the design of lined boreholes in which heat-generating transuranic nuclear wastes are emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  18. Waste disposal facility closure concept and post-closure institutional control considerations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    Considerations of a waste repository concept in the Federal Republic of Germany are explained on the basis of the planned Konrad repository, a final disposal facility in a deep geological formation. The necessity of institutional control and surveillance in the post-closure phase as well as the marking of a waste repository in deep geological formations are discussed. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs

  19. Interim status of closure/post-closure plan for 183-H solar evaporation basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report describes a plan for decommissioning several solar evaporation basins on the Hanford reservation. The document describes procedures for sampling during decommissioning and a plan for certification of the resulting completed landfill. Additional plans deal with the training, security of the site, and post-closure monitoring

  20. Numeric simulation model for long-term orthodontic tooth movement with contact boundary conditions using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ryo; Yamaoka, Satoshi; Anh, Tuan Nguyen; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Although many attempts have been made to simulate orthodontic tooth movement using the finite element method, most were limited to analyses of the initial displacement in the periodontal ligament and were insufficient to evaluate the effect of orthodontic appliances on long-term tooth movement. Numeric simulation of long-term tooth movement was performed in some studies; however, neither the play between the brackets and archwire nor the interproximal contact forces were considered. The objectives of this study were to simulate long-term orthodontic tooth movement with the edgewise appliance by incorporating those contact conditions into the finite element model and to determine the force system when the space is closed with sliding mechanics. We constructed a 3-dimensional model of maxillary dentition with 0.022-in brackets and 0.019 × 0.025-in archwire. Forces of 100 cN simulating sliding mechanics were applied. The simulation was accomplished on the assumption that bone remodeling correlates with the initial tooth displacement. This method could successfully represent the changes in the moment-to-force ratio: the tooth movement pattern during space closure. We developed a novel method that could simulate the long-term orthodontic tooth movement and accurately determine the force system in the course of time by incorporating contact boundary conditions into finite element analysis. It was also suggested that friction is progressively increased during space closure in sliding mechanics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.