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Sample records for concrete structures part

  1. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  2. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  3. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Takuro; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    When we evaluate the soundness of reinforced concrete structures, it is important to assess the chloride induced deterioration. We conducted the reinforcing steel corrosion tests of reinforced concrete specimens under simulated tidal environment of sea. Parameters of the tests were water cement ratio, cement type and crack width of concrete. Periods of the tests were eighty month. The obtained results were summarized at follows: (a) The chloride ion concentration at the initiation of reinforcing steel corrosion was about 3.0 kg/m 3 in case of reinforcing steel in non-crack concrete used ordinary cement. (b) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was almost constant at any cement type specimens after causing crack by reinforcing steel corrosion. (c) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in specimens, which caused cracks by bending load, increased as crack width. In the same type specimens, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in fly ash cement specimens was larger than that of ordinary cement specimens. In this case, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was evaluated about 0.18 mm/year. (author)

  4. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetta, Anna V.; Vitaliani, Renato V.

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented

  5. Particulate structure and microstructure evolution of concrete investigated by DEM : Part 2: Porosimetry in hydrating binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huan He, H.; Le, N.L.B.; Stroeven, P.

    2012-01-01

    Durability of concrete in engineering structures is becoming more and more of a major problem. Research into such problems is complicated and expensive, however. Developments in computer technology make it possible nowadays realistically simulating cementitious materials and studying its pore

  6. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  7. Offshore concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the offshore industry there are two possible materials for the construction of the hull of a structure; the steel and concrete, with the first one widely used until now, as in the rest of the shiphuidling industry of merchant ships, warships, etc. Materials such as aluminum, GRP or timber areused in small units with lengths lower than 100 m, and in less adverse conditions than in the offshore industry. Nevertheless, some ships/barges have been built of concrete in the past, but have been rather isolated cases which have not changed the practice in the industry. In the First and Second World War were built by the scarcity of materials, while the series of barges by Alfred A. Yee was a rare exception. Other units were also made in concrete, but almost anecdotal. Still, the behaviour of these concrete structures, especially in terms of maintenance, has been excellent. Therefore, the fact that the concrete has not had an adequate reception so far in shipbuilding, does not mean that in will not be the material best suited for the offshore industry in the future. The extra displacement and associated fuel costs in concrete ships have been found prohibitive in the past. But the loss of mobility of a concrete hull in relation to a steel hull can be perfectly offset by the advantages offered by the concrete, as the shipping and offshore industry have very different priorities. One of the main differences in these priorities is in terms of maintenance and resistance to fatigue, precisely where the concrete performs better. ships can easily be dry docked for maintenance and repair, while in the offshore platforms these works have to be done in situ so maintenance and fatigue are crucial to them. Besides these, the concrete has other advantages according to findings of several studies. And although they are interested in the conclusions that the makes as they came from people in the concrete industry, the fact that in recent years concrete offshore unit shave been built

  8. Teaching concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of concrete structures has been revised and a number of new approaches have been developed, implemented and evaluated. Inductive teaching, E-learning and “patches” have been found to be improvements and may be an inspiration and help for others development of the teaching and learning...

  9. Experimental studies on local damage of reinforced concrete structures by the impact of deformable missiles-Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Tachikawa, H.; Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kobayshi, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Structural damage induced by an accidental aircraft crash into a reinforced concrete structure includes local damage caused by the engine, the rigid portion of the aircraft, and the global elasto-plastic structural response caused by the entire aircraft. Local damage consists of spalling of concrete from the front face of the target together with missile penetration into the target, scabbing of concrete from the rear face of the target and perforation of the missile through the target. The engine is a soft missile that deforms during impact. An experimental research program has been planned and executed to establish a rational evaluation method of the local damage by the deformable engine missiles

  10. Model techniques for testing heated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental techniques are described which may be used in the laboratory to measure strains of model concrete structures representing to scale actual structures of any shape or geometry, operating at elevated temperatures, for which time-dependent creep and shrinkage strains are dominant. These strains could be used to assess the distribution of stress in the scaled structure and hence to predict the actual behaviour of concrete structures used in nuclear power stations. Similar techniques have been employed in an investigation to measure elastic, thermal, creep and shrinkage strains in heated concrete models representing to scale parts of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. (author)

  11. Structural Concrete, Science into Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeling, A.S.G.

    1987-01-01

    There is a need for a more rational and unified approach to all types of concrete structure, reinforced of prestressed. The first chapter explains in a historical review why the approach of reinforced concrete and that of prestressed concrete have hitherto been very different. In outlining the

  12. Response of reinforced concrete structures to macrocell corrosion of reinforcements. Part I: Before propagation of microcracks via an analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, Keivan; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Response of RC structures to macrocell corrosion of a rebar is studied analytically. ► The problem is solved prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. ► Suitable Love's potential functions are used to study the steel-rust-concrete media. ► The role of crucial factors on the time of onset of concrete cracking is examined. ► The effect of vital factors on the maximum radial stress of concrete is explored. - Abstract: Assessment of the macrocell corrosion which deteriorates reinforced concrete (RC) structures have attracted the attention of many researchers during recent years. In this type of rebar corrosion, the reduction in cross-section of the rebar is significantly accelerated due to the large ratio of the cathode's area to the anode's area. In order to examine the problem, an analytical solution is proposed for prediction of the response of the RC structure from the time of steel depassivation to the stage just prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. To this end, a circular cylindrical RC member under axisymmetric macrocell corrosion of the reinforcement is considered. Both cases of the symmetric and asymmetric rebar corrosion along the length of the anode zone are studied. According to the experimentally observed data, corrosion products are modeled as a thin layer with a nonlinear stress–strain relation. The exact expressions of the elastic fields associated with the steel, and concrete media are obtained using Love's potential function. By imposing the boundary conditions, the resulting set of nonlinear equations are solved in each time step by Newton's method. The effects of the key parameters which have dominating role in the time of the onset of concrete cracking and maximum radial stress field of the concrete have been examined.

  13. Fiber-reinforced concretes with a high fiber volume fraction — a look in future. Can a design determine the fiber amount in concrete in real time in every part of a structure in production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfers, R.

    2010-09-01

    In near future, when the control of the load-bearing capacity of fiber-only-reinforced concrete members will be safely guaranteed, the deletion of the ordinary continuous steel reinforcing bars might be possible. For the time being, it is difficult to change the fiber amount during the casting with today's techniques. Therefore, the fiber concentration has to be determined by the maximum tensile stress in concrete structural members, resulting in an unnecessary fiber addition in compressed zones. However, if the right amount of fibers could be regulated and added to concrete in real time at the pump outlet, a future vision could be to design and produce a structure by using FEM-controlled equipment. The signals from calculation results could be transmitted to a concrete casting system for addition of a necessary amount of fibers to take care of the actual tensile stresses in the right position in the structure. The casting location could be determined by using a GPS for positioning the pump outlet for targeting the casting location horizontally and a laser vertically. The addition of fibers to concrete at the outlet of a concrete pump and proportioning them there according to the actual needs of the stress situation in a structure, given by a FEM analysis in real time, is a future challenge. The FEM analysis has to be based on material properties of fiber-only-reinforced concrete. This means that the resistance and stiffness of different-strength concrete members with a varying fiber content has to be determined in tests and conveyed to the FEM analysis. The FEM analysis has to be completed before the casting and controlled. Then it can be used as the base for adding a correct amount of fibers to concrete in every part of the structure. Thus, a system for introducing a correct amount of fibers into concrete has to be developed. The fibers have to be added at the outlet of concrete pump. Maybe a system to shotcrete concrete with electronically controlled fiber

  14. Experimental studies on local damage of reinforced concrete structures by the impact deformable missiles-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esashi, Y.; Ohnuma, H.; Ito, C.; Shirai, K.

    1989-01-01

    In order to establish a rational method of determining the local damage to reinforced concrete structures due to the impact of aircraft engine missiles, three types of impact tests with different scales have been planned and executed. In this paper, results and discussion of the intermediate-scale tests are presented

  15. Deterioration of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Chloride ingress is a common cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete bridges. Concrete may be exposed to chloride by seawater or de-icing salts. The chloride initiates corrosion of the reinforcement, which through expansion disrupts the concrete. In addition, the corrosion reduces the cross...

  16. Evaluation of concrete structures affected by alkali-silica reaction and delayed ettringite formation - part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report details the results of a comprehensive research project aimed at evaluating the potential use of : non-destructive testing (NDT) to assess structures affected by ASR and/or DEF. This project was a : collaborative effort between the Univer...

  17. Effect of Piers Shape on the Dynamic Structural Responses of Prestressed Concrete Bridge: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadhil Naser

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pier of bridge is usually used as a general term for any type of substructure located between horizontal spans and foundations. Piers give vertical supports for spans at intermediate points and perform two main functions. The objective of this study is to inspect the effect of piers shape on the dynamic structural performance by adopting theoretical dynamic analysis. The results of dynamic analysis of 25 bridges models show that the maximum value of natural frequency is equal to 5.64Hz in two circles piers bridge model. Therefore, this type of model has good stiffness and bearing capacity. The two square piers model, the one circle pier model, and the two circles piers model appear good stiffness because of the natural frequencies (5.30Hz, 5.52Hz, and 5.64Hz are more than the maximum forced frequencies (4.52Hz, 5.45Hz, and 4.52Hz respectively. According to the comparison between all models results, the two circles piers model has the higher stiffness because of this model has the maximum value of natural frequency (5.64Hz and it is more than all forced vibration frequencies of all others models. Therefore, this study recommends that using the bridge model of two circles piers in the bridges construction that consists of three spans (30m+40m+30m with section of box girder.

  18. Effect of Piers Shape on the Dynamic Structural Responses of Prestressed Concrete Bridge: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadhil Naser

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pier of bridge is usually used as a general term for any type of substructure located between horizontal spans and foundations. Piers give vertical supports for spans at intermediate points and perform two main functions. The objective of this study is to inspect the effect of piers shape on the dynamic structural performance by adopting theoretical dynamic analysis. The results of dynamic analysis of 25 bridges models show that the maximum value of natural frequency is equal to 5.64Hz in two circles piers bridge model. Therefore, this type of model has good stiffness and bearing capacity. The two square piers model, the one circle pier model, and the two circles piers model appear good stiffness because of the natural frequencies (5.30Hz, 5.52Hz, and 5.64Hz are more than the maximum forced frequencies (4.52Hz, 5.45Hz, and 4.52Hz respectively. According to the comparison between all models results, the two circles piers model has the higher stiffness because of this model has the maximum value of natural frequency (5.64Hz and it is more than all forced vibration frequencies of all others models. Therefore, this study recommends that using the bridge model of two circles piers in the bridges construction that consists of three spans (30m+40m+30m with section of box girder.

  19. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  20. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  1. Porous Structure of Road Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Пшембаев, М. К.; Гиринский, В. В.; Ковалев, Я. Н.; Яглов, В. Н.; Будниченко, С. С.

    2016-01-01

    Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such st...

  2. POROUS STRUCTURE OF ROAD CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such structural components as crystal intergrowth, tobermorite gel, incompletely hydrated cement grains and porous space. The most important technological factors that influence on formation of cement stone microstructure are chemical and mineralogical cement composition, its grinding fineness, water-cement ratio and curing condition. Specific cement stone microstructure is formed due to interrelation of these factors. Cement stone is a capillary-porous body that consists of various solid phases represented predominantly by sub-microcrystals of colloidal dispersion. The sub-microcrystals are able adsorptively, osmotically and structurally to withhold (to bind some amount of moisture. Protection of road concrete as a capillary-porous body is considered as one of the topical issues. The problem is solved with the help of primary and secondary protection methods. Methods of primary protection are used at the stage of designing, preparation and placing of concrete. Methods of secondary protection are applied at the operational stage of road concrete pavement. The paper considers structures of concrete solid phase and characteristics of its porous space. Causes of pore initiation, their shapes, dimensions and arrangement in the concrete are presented in the paper. The highest hazard for road concrete lies in penetration of aggressive liquid in it and moisture transfer in the cured concrete. Water permeability of concrete characterizes its filtration factor which

  3. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  4. Radiographic testing in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D. de

    1987-01-01

    The radiographic testing done in concrete structures is used to analyse the homogeneity, position and corrosion of armatures and to detect discontinuity in the concrete such as: gaps, cracks and segregations. This work develops a Image quality Indicator (IQI) with an adequated sensibility to detect discontinuites based on BS4408 norm. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Design bases - Concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Llanos Ros, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most suitable title for Section 2 is 'Design Bases', which covers not only calculation but also the following areas: - Structural design concepts. - Project criteria. - Material specifications. These concepts are developed in more detail in the following sections. The numbering in this document is neither complete nor hierarchical since, for easier cross referencing, it corresponds to the paragraphs of Eurocode 2 Part 1 (hereinafter 'EUR-2') which are commented on. (author)

  6. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  7. Nondestructive testing of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufino, Randy R.; Relunia, Estrella

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive testing of concrete is highly inhomogeneous which makes it cumbersome to setup experimental procedures and analyze experimental data. However, recent research and development activities have discovered the different methods of NDT, like the electromagnetic method, ultrasonic pulse velocity test, pulse echo/impact echo test, infrared thermography, radar or short pulse radar techniques, neutron and gamma radiometry, radiography, carbonation test and half-cell potential method available for NDT of concrete structures. NDT of concrete is emerging as a useful tool for quality control and assurance. This papers also describes the more common NDT methods discussed during the two-week course on 'Nondestructive Testing of Concrete Structures', held at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) in Malaysia, which was jointly organized by MINT and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  8. Design of joints in steel and composite structures Eurocode 3 : design of steel structures : part 1-8 : design of joints, Eurocode 4 : design of composite steel and concrete structures : part 1-1 : general rules and rules for buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Jaspart, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book details the basic concepts and the design rules included in Eurocode 3 Design of steel structures Part 1-8 Design of joints. Joints in composite construction are also addressed through references to Eurocode 4 Design of composite steel and concrete structures Part 1-1 General rules and rules for buildings. Attention has to be duly paid to the joints when designing a steel or composite structure, in terms of the global safety of the construction, and also in terms of the overall cost, including fabrication, transportation and erection. Therefore, in this book, the design of the joints themselves is widely detailed, and aspects of selection of joint configuration and integration of the joints into the analysis and the design process of the whole construction are also fully covered. Connections using mechanical fasteners, welded connections, simple joints, moment-resisting joints and lattice girder joints are considered. Various joint configurations are treated, including beam-to-column, beam-to-beam, ...

  9. Concrete structures under projectile impact

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Qin

    2017-01-01

    In this book, the authors present their theoretical, experimental and numerical investigations into concrete structures subjected to projectile and aircraft impacts in recent years. Innovative approaches to analyze the rigid, mass abrasive and eroding projectile penetration and perforation are proposed. Damage and failure analyses of nuclear power plant containments impacted by large commercial aircrafts are numerically and experimentally analyzed. Ultra-high performance concrete materials and structures against the projectile impact are developed and their capacities of resisting projectile impact are evaluated. This book is written for the researchers, engineers and graduate students in the fields of protective structures and terminal ballistics.

  10. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The planned research will indicate, whether fibre reinforced concrete has better or worse durability than normal concrete. Durability specimens will be measured on cracked as well as uncracked specimens. Also the pore structure in the concrete will be characterized.Keywords: Fibre reinforced...... concrete, durability, pore structure, mechanical load...

  11. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  12. Production and quality control of concrete for the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station - [Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Roy, P.K.; Sukhtankar, K.D.; Prasad, K.

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of the production and quality control of concrete and concrete materials used in the construction of twin-reactor Rajasthan Atomic Power Station are discussed : (1) relationship between strength of cubes and cylinders made of concrete used for the prestressed dome (2) temperature control during pouring of concrete (3) thermal conductivity of heavy concrete (4) various types of grouting procedures used for different structures forming part of reactors (5) quality control of normal and heavy concrete and (6) leakage through form ties. Typical concrete mixes used for grouts are also given. (M.G.B.)

  13. Prevention of concrete structures from collapsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cechmanek R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the 20th century requirements on using electrical properties of building materials emerged for application in heating of trafficable surfaces, grounding of electrostatic charges in floors, shielding of electro-magnetic fields and diagnosis of concrete structure state in the course of time. For this reason, it was necessary to design special fibre-cement elements able to transfer any mechanical impulse to an electricallymeasured signal detected as a change in electrical resistance with computer outputs. Regarding previous research studies, it was concluded that special fibre-cement composites are able to conduct electric current under specific conditions. This property is ensured by using of various kinds of carbon materials. Though carbon fibres are less conductive than metal fibres, composites with carbon fibres were evaluated as better current conductors than the composites with metal fibres. By means of various kinds of carbon particles and fibres it is possible to design cement composites with an ability to monitor changes in electrical conductivity of concretes. The designed composites are assembled with conductive wires and connected with a special electronic equipment for monitoring of changes in alternate voltage passing through the tensometer within mechanical loading of a concrete element in which the composite is integrated. The tensometers are placed preferably into parts of the concrete elements subjected to compression, such as simple reinforced columns or upper parts of longitudinal beams. Several tests of repeated loading and simultaneous monitoring of vertical as well as horizontal prefabricated concrete elements were carried out and evaluated.

  14. Prediction of concrete strength in massive structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Makino, H.; Nakane, S.; Kawaguchi, T.; Ohike, T.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures of a nuclear power plant are mostly of mass concrete with cross-sectional dimensions larger than 1.0 m. The temperature of concrete inside after placement rises due to heat of hydration of cement. It is well known that concrete strengths of mass concrete structure subjected to such temperature hysteresis are generally not equal to strengths of cylinders subjected to standard curing. In order to construct a mass concrete structure of high reliability in which the specified concrete strength is satisfied by the specified age, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of the strength gain property of concrete in the structure and its relationships with the water-cement ratio of the mix, strength of standard-cured cylinders and the internal temperature hysteresis. This report describes the result of studies on methods of controlling concrete strength in actual construction projects

  15. Conservation of concrete structures according to fib Model Code 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, S.; Bigaj-Van Vliet, A.; Ueda, T.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of concrete structures forms an essential part of the fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010 (fib Model Code 2010). In particular, Chapter 9 of fib Model Code 2010 addresses issues concerning conservation strategies and tactics, conservation management, condition surveys, condition

  16. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  17. Concrete structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The detailed requirements for the design and fabrication of the concrete structures for nuclear facilities and for the documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are given in the guide. It also sets the requirements for the inspection of concrete structures during the construction and operation of facilities. The requirements of the guide primarily apply to new construction. As regards the repair and modification of nuclear facilities built before its publication, the guide is followed to the extent appropriate. The regulatory activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety during a nuclear facility's licence application review and during the construction and operation of the facility are summarised in the guide YVL 1.1

  18. Probabilistic design of fibre concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukl, R.; Novák, D.; Sajdlová, T.; Lehký, D.; Červenka, J.; Červenka, V.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced computer simulation is recently well-established methodology for evaluation of resistance of concrete engineering structures. The nonlinear finite element analysis enables to realistically predict structural damage, peak load, failure, post-peak response, development of cracks in concrete, yielding of reinforcement, concrete crushing or shear failure. The nonlinear material models can cover various types of concrete and reinforced concrete: ordinary concrete, plain or reinforced, without or with prestressing, fibre concrete, (ultra) high performance concrete, lightweight concrete, etc. Advanced material models taking into account fibre concrete properties such as shape of tensile softening branch, high toughness and ductility are described in the paper. Since the variability of the fibre concrete material properties is rather high, the probabilistic analysis seems to be the most appropriate format for structural design and evaluation of structural performance, reliability and safety. The presented combination of the nonlinear analysis with advanced probabilistic methods allows evaluation of structural safety characterized by failure probability or by reliability index respectively. Authors offer a methodology and computer tools for realistic safety assessment of concrete structures; the utilized approach is based on randomization of the nonlinear finite element analysis of the structural model. Uncertainty of the material properties or their randomness obtained from material tests are accounted in the random distribution. Furthermore, degradation of the reinforced concrete materials such as carbonation of concrete, corrosion of reinforcement, etc. can be accounted in order to analyze life-cycle structural performance and to enable prediction of the structural reliability and safety in time development. The results can serve as a rational basis for design of fibre concrete engineering structures based on advanced nonlinear computer analysis. The presented

  19. Surface Chloride Levels in Colorado Structural Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This project focused on the chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in structural concrete. The primary goal of this project is to analyze the surface chloride concentration level of the concrete bridge decks throughout Colorado. The study in...

  20. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 6. An estimation method of threshold value in performance verification taking reinforcing steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses applicability of material degradation model due to reinforcing steel corrosion for RC box-culverts with corroded reinforcement and an estimation method for threshold value in performance verification reflecting reinforcing steel corrosion. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain arising from reinforcing steel corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete were considered. The full-scale loading tests using corroded RC box-culverts were numerically analyzed. As a result, the analyzed crack patterns and load-strain relationships were in close agreement with the experimental results within the maximum corrosion ratio 15% of primary reinforcement. Then, we showed that this modeling could estimate the load carrying capacity of corroded RC box-culverts. Second, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts with various sizes, reinforcement ratios and levels of steel corrosion, etc. Furthermore, as an application of analytical results and various experimental investigations, we suggested allowable degradation ratios for a modification of the threshold value, which corresponds to the chloride induced deterioration progress that is widely accepted in maintenance practice for civil engineering reinforced concrete structures. Finally, based on these findings, we developed two estimation methods for threshold value in performance verification: 1) a structural analysis method using nonlinear FEM included modeling of material degradation, 2) a practical method using a threshold value, which is determined by structural analyses of RC box-culverts in sound condition, is multiplied by the allowable degradation ratio. (author)

  1. Concrete structures protection, repair and rehabilitation

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2009-01-01

    The success of a repair or rehabilitation project depends on the specific plans designed for it. Concrete Structures: Protection, Repair and Rehabilitation provides guidance on evaluating the condition of the concrete in a structure, relating the condition of the concrete to the underlying cause or causes of that condition, selecting an appropriate repair material and method for any deficiency found, and using the selected materials and methods to repair or rehabilitate the structure. Guidance is also provided for engineers focused on maintaining concrete and preparing concrete investigation r

  2. Multi-physical and multi-scale deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete part II: Coupling corrosion and damage at the structural scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepech, Michael; Rao, Anirudh; Kiremidjian, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Deterioration of reinforced concrete infrastructure such as bridges, tunnels, and buildings represents one of the major challenges currently facing developed countries. This deterioration leads to economic costs for maintenance and replacement, environmental impacts such increased global warming...... potential as a result of cement production and traffic emissions, and social costs related to traffic congestion and human health concerns. While engineering tools and methods for structural modelling and design of new reinforced concrete infrastructure are mature, the methods and tools for modelling...

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet in the United States as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtime, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of both known and new forms of degradation. A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. The size and complexity of nuclear power plant containment structures and the heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. This paper examines the benefits of using time-frequency analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). By using wavelet packet decomposition, the original ultrasound signals are decomposed into various frequency bands that facilitates highly selective analysis of the signal’s frequency content and can be visualized using the familiar SAFT image reconstruction algorithm.

  4. VISCOELASTIC STRUCTURAL MODEL OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bogomolov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viscoelastic rheological model of asphalt concrete based on the generalized Kelvin model is offered. The mathematical model of asphalt concrete viscoelastic behavior that can be used for calculation of asphalt concrete upper layers of non-rigid pavements for strength and rutting has been developed. It has been proved that the structural model of Burgers does not fully meet all the requirements of the asphalt-concrete.

  5. Numerical Limit Analysis of Precast Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen

    Precast concrete elements are widely used in the construction industry as they provide a number of advantages over the conventional in-situ cast concrete structures. Joints cast on the construction site are needed to connect the precast elements, which poses several challenges. Moreover, the curr...... problems are solved efficiently using state-of-the-art solvers. It is concluded that the framework and developed joint models have the potential to enable efficient design of precast concrete structures in the near future......., the current practice is to design the joints as the weakest part of the structure, which makes analysis of the ultimate limit state behaviour by general purpose software difficult and inaccurate. Manual methods of analysis based on limit analysis have been used for several decades. The methods provide...... of the ultimate limit state behaviour. This thesis introduces a framework based on finite element limit analysis, a numerical method based on the same extremum principles as the manual limit analysis. The framework allows for efficient analysis and design in a rigorous manner by use of mathematical optimisation...

  6. Radiation shielding structure for concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Crack inducing members for inducing cracks in a predetermined manner are buried in a concrete structure. Namely, a crack-inducing member comprises integrally a shielding plate and extended plates situated at the center of a wall and inducing plates vertically disposed to the boundary portion between them with the inducing plates being disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. There are disposed integrally a pair of the inducing plate spaced at a predetermined horizontal distance on both sides of the shielding plate so as to form a substantially crank-shaped cross section and extended plates formed in the extending direction of the shielding plate, and the inducing plates are disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. Then, cracks generated when stresses are exerted can be controlled, and generation of cracks passing through the concrete structure can be prevented reliably. The reliability of a radiation shielding effect can be enhanced remarkably. (N.H.)

  7. STRUCTURAL AND THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF HARDENING CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasulina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and thermophysical properties of thermally treated concrete have been studied in the paper. The paper demonstrates regularities of changes in structural and thermophysical properties of concrete during heat treatment process. It is established that stabilization of coefficient values for heat- and temperature conductivity of concrete corresponds to completion of the process pertaining to intensive formation of the material pore structure and indicates the possibility of transition from the stage of isothermal extraction to the stage of temperature decrease. The obtained results are confirmed by studies of strength growth kinetics of concrete samples.

  8. A study on the water permeability of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loadsman, R.V.C.; Acres, D.H.; Stokes, C.J.; Wadeson, L.

    1988-03-01

    This report forms part of the DoE's research programme on the disposal of nuclear waste. The information available on the permeability of concrete and the effects of various factors on this value are reviewed. The effect of defects on the overall permeability of concrete structures is examined and the recorded performance of a range of existing concrete structures is considered with identification of some of the factors that are significant in practice. Deficiencies in the information available on this subject are identified and recommendations for further work are made including a list of structures suitable for future monitoring. (author)

  9. Strengthening method of concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inge, Wewin; Audrey; Nugroho, Sofie; Njo, Helen

    2018-03-01

    Building extension in Indonesia is not favored, and not many people know the advantages of the method because architects and engineers tend to lack the knowledge and experience. The aim of this paper is to explain a method on how to strengthen a concrete building structure that people can use/learn as a better way to cut potential cost and save time. The strengthening method explained in this paper is steel jacketing, providing a case study of this method in the extension of a restaurant located in Medan, Indonesia. In this study, engineers calculated that the tensile stress of the existing RC column and beam is not strong enough to reinforce the building extension applied load. Therefore, the steel jacketing method can be applied to improve the column and beam strength and ductility. The result of the case study proves that this is one of the best methods for building extension applied in Indonesia.

  10. Maintenance and Repair of Concrete Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijen, J.M.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1987 and 1988 a series of articles was published in the Dutchjournal "Cement" about maintenance and repair of concrete structures. The series was written to promote the transfer of know-how concerning maintenance and repair of concrete structures. Use has been made of know-how developed in the

  11. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1998-01-01

    structure are made on specimens drilled or sawed from beams after unloading (mechanical load). The pore structure of the concretes will be studied by microscopy, sorption and suction curves. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities (water-cement ratios). Both steel fibres (ZP...

  12. Non-Destructive Testing for Concrete Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengku Sarah Tengku Amran; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) is a technique to determine the integrity of a material, component or structure. It is essential in the inspection of alteration, repair and new construction in the building industry. There are a number of non-destructive testing techniques that can be applied to determine the integrity of concrete in a completed structure. Each has its own advantages and limitations. For concrete, these problems relate to strength, cracking, dimensions, delamination, and inhomogeneities. NDT is reasonably good and reliable tool to measure the property of concrete which also gives the fair indication of the compressive strength development. This paper discussed the concrete inspection using combined methods of NDT. (author)

  13. Ageing management of concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthipan, P.; Ramaprasad, G.S.; Senthil, R.

    2006-01-01

    It is a generally accepted fact that while designing a concrete structure the durability parameters of construction materials should be evaluated as carefully as possible like other properties such as mechanical, physical and chemical properties. No material is inherently durable as result of environmental interaction with microstructure and consequently, the properties of the materials change with time due to weathering action, chemical attack, abrasion or any mode of degradation. The main cause of ageing on structure, water, which is primary for both creation and destruction on many natural materials. In porous materials, water creates different types of physical and chemical process of degradation. The water movement through porous materials are controlled by the permeability of the respective materials. The rate of deterioration is affected by type of concentration of ions present in the water and chemical deposition of materials. Controlling weathering action, chemical attack, abrasion and selecting good quality construction material and methods of construction can increase the service life of the structure. (author)

  14. Fatigue design of steel and composite structures Eurocode 3 : design of steel structures, part 1-9 fatigue ; Eurocode 4 : design of composite steel and concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nussbaumer, Alain; Davaine, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    This volume addresses the specific subject of fatigue, a subject not familiar to many engineers, but still relevant for proper and good design of numerous steel structures. It explains all issues related to the subject: Basis of fatigue design, reliability and various verification formats, determination of stresses and stress ranges, fatigue strength, application range and limitations. It contains detailed examples of applications of the concepts, computation methods and verifications.

  15. Behaviour of concrete structures in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a "state-of-the-art" review of research into the effects of high temperature on concrete and concrete structures, extending to a range of forms of construction, including novel developments. The nature of concrete-based structures means that they generally perform very well in fire. However, concrete is fundamentally a complex material and its properties can change dramatically when exposed to high temperatures. The principal effects of fire on concrete are loss of compressive strength, and spalling - the forcible ejection of material from the surface of a member. Though a lot of information has been gathered on both phenomena, there remains a need for more systematic studies of the effects of thermal exposures. The response to realistic fires of whole concrete structures presents yet greater challenges due to the interactions of structural elements, the impact of complex small-scale phenomena at full scale, and the spatial and temporal variations in exposures, including the cooling phase of the fire. Progress has been made on modeling the thermomechanical behavior but the treatment of detailed behaviors, including hygral effects and spalling, remains a challenge. Furthermore, there is still a severe lack of data from real structures for validation, though some valuable insights may also be gained from study of the performance of concrete structures in real fires. .

  16. Structural behavior of reinforced concrete structures at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, N.; Yamazaki, M.; Mochida, T.; Mutoh, A.; Miyashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Hirakawa, K.; Kikuchi, R.; Hiramoto, M.; Saito, K.

    1995-01-01

    To establish a method to predict the behavior of reinforced concrete structures subjected simultaneously to high temperatures and external loads, this paper presents the results obtained in several series of tests carried out recently in Japan. This paper reports on the material properties of concrete and steel bars under high temperatures. It also considers the heat transfer properties of thick concrete walls under transient high temperatures, and the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams subjected to high temperatures. In the tests, data up to 800 C were obtained for use in developing a computational method to estimate the non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete structures exposed to high temperatures. (orig.)

  17. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits

  18. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  19. Building Of Training Program Of Non-Destructive Testing For Concrete Structures (Part 1: Radiographic testing; Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurement; Nuclear moisture-density gauge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Le Son; Phan Chanh Vu; Pham The Hung; Vu Huy Thuc

    2007-01-01

    Non-destructive testing methods (NDT) have been identified as a strong candidate for remote sensing of concrete structures over recent years. This has accelerated the powerful development of the NDT techniques in Vietnam. Hence, there is an urgent need to promote the awareness of NDT methods which could give an improved estimate of the condition concrete. Building of training program of non-destructive testing for concrete structures is a necessary duty, in aiming to build a unified training program, possibly satisfying the requirements on training as well as researching. Under the framework of the basic VAEC project (CS/07/02-03), a training program for the first 03 NDT methods: 1. Radiographic testing; 2. Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurement; 3. Nuclear moisture- density gauge was prepared. The main products of this project include: 1. Set out 03 training notes for 03 methods; 2. Set out the practical exercises to train for 03 methods; 3. Editing a set of examination questions in aiming to familiarize with various questions in 03 trained methods; 4. Fabricating practical test specimens to demonstrate for 03 techniques. (author)

  20. Volume changes in unrestrained structural lightweight concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-08-01

    In this study a comparator-type measuring system was developed to accurately determine volume change characteristics of one structural lightweight concrete. The specific properties studied were the coefficient of linear thermal expansion and unrestra...

  1. Doubling the Life of Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesic, Batric [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Raja, Krishnan [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Xi, Yumping [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Jun, Jiheon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Overall objective of the project was to study the fundamental properties of concrete (with and without steel reinforcement) with respect to chemical and physical parameters that can influence its structural integrity.

  2. Doubling the Life of Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, Batric; Raja, Krishnan; Xi, Yumping; Jun, Jiheon

    2017-01-01

    Overall objective of the project was to study the fundamental properties of concrete (with and without steel reinforcement) with respect to chemical and physical parameters that can influence its structural integrity.

  3. Advanced concrete structures for thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerna, W.

    1982-01-01

    The author begins with an overview on the various types of power plants depending on the fuel used in them and then in particular deals with the reinforced concrete structures. Especially for reactor buildings and prestressed concrete pressure vessels concrete is the appropriate material. The methods of construction are described as a function of load and operation. Safety requirements brought new load types for such structures as e.g. airplane crash, internal pressure caused by pipe rupture. Dimensioning is done by means of nonlinear dynamical methods of calculation accounting for plasticizing. These methods are explained. Further the constructional principles of high natural-draft cooling towers are mentioned. (orig.) [de

  4. Alkali aggregate reactivity in concrete structures in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.R.; Empey, D.

    1989-01-01

    In several regions of Canada, particularly parts of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, research, testing and evaluation of aged concrete structures in the field has shown that alkali aggregate reactivity can give rise to pronounced concrete deterioration, particularly in hydraulic structures subjected to saturation or alternate wetting and drying such as locks, dams, canals, etc. Concrete deterioration is mainly caused by alkali-silica reactions and alkali-carbonate reactions, but a third type of deterioration involves slow/late expanding alkali-silicate/silica reactivity. The alkalies NaOH and KOH in the concrete pore solutions are mainly responsible for attack on expansive rocks and minerals in concrete. Methods for evaluating alkali-aggregate reaction potential in aggregates, and field and laboratory methods for detecting deterioration are discussed. Examples of alkali-aggregate reactions in structures is western Canada are detailed, including a water reservoir at Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack in British Columbia, the Oldman River diversion and flume, the Lundbreck Falls Bridge, and the St Mary's Reservoir spillway, all in southern Alberta. Mitigative measures include avoidance of use of suspect aggregates, but if this cannot be avoided it is recommended to keep the total alkalies in the concrete as low as possible and minimize opportunities for saturation of concrete by moisture. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  5. A new concept for the targeted cutting of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Steffen; Gentes, Sascha; Weidemann, Roman; Geimer, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    The decontamination and crushing of reinforced concrete is a main part during deconstruction of nuclear facilities. The selective treatment of contaminated or activated material is of special interest, since the non-contaminated material can be transferred into the normal reprocessing cycle. In the frame of a project concerning the innovative cutting of massive reinforced concrete structures an all-purpose system for spatially restricted and defined cutting of strongly reinforced concrete including packaging suitable for final disposal was developed. Due to the remote handling of the machine the dose rate for personnel can be reduced significantly. Main part of the system is the tool that can cut highly reinforced concrete without system or component replacement. The authors describe preliminary tests of these tools, further experiments and process optimization are necessary before the tools can be integrated into the new system.

  6. Structure formation control of foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya; Syrkin, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The process of predetermined foam concrete structure formation is considered to be a crucial issue from the point of process control and it is currently understudied thus defining the need for additional research. One of the effective ways of structure formation control in naturally hardening foam concrete is reinforcement with dispersed fibers or introduction of plasticizers. The paper aims at studying the patterns of influence of microreinforcing and plasticizing additives on the structure and performance properties of foam concrete. Preparation of foam concrete mix has been conducted using one-step technology. The structure of modified foam concrete has been studied by means of electron microscopy. The cellular structure of foam concrete samples with the additives is homogeneous; the pores are uniformly distributed over the total volume. It has been revealed that introduction of the Neolas 5.2 plasticizer and microreinforcing fibers in the foam concrete mixture in the amount of 0.4 - 0.1 % by weight of cement leads to reduction of the average pore diameter in the range of 45.3 to 30.2 microns and the standard deviation of the pore average diameter from 23.6 to 9.2 in comparison with the sample without additive. Introduction of modifying additives has stimulated formation of a large number of closed pores. Thus porosity of conditionally closed pores has increased from 16.06 % to 34.48 %, which has lead to increase of frost resistance brand of foam concrete from F15 to F50 and to reduction of its water absorption by weight by 20 %.

  7. Reusing recycled aggregates in structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Shicong

    The utilization of recycled aggregates in concrete can minimize environmental impact and reduce the consumption of natural resources in concrete applications. The aim of this thesis is to provide a scientific basis for the possible use of recycled aggregates in structure concrete by conducting a comprehensive programme of laboratory study to gain a better understanding of the mechanical, microstructure and durability properties of concrete produced with recycled aggregates. The study also explored possible techniques to of improve the properties of recycled aggregate concrete that is produced with high percentages (≧ 50%) of recycled aggregates. These techniques included: (a) using lower water-to-cement ratios in the concrete mix design; (b) using fly ash as a cement replacement or as an additional mineral admixture in the concrete mixes, and (c) precasting recycled aggregate concrete with steam curing regimes. The characteristics of the recycled aggregates produced both from laboratory and a commercially operated pilot construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling plant were first studied. A mix proportioning procedure was then established to produce six series of concrete mixtures using different percentages of recycled coarse aggregates with and without the use of fly ash. The water-to-cement (binder) ratios of 0.55, 0.50, 0.45 and 0.40 were used. The fresh properties (including slump and bleeding) of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) were then quantified. The effects of fly ash on the fresh and hardened properties of RAC were then studied and compared with those RAC prepared with no fly ash addition. Furthermore, the effects of steam curing on the hardened properties of RAC were investigated. For micro-structural properties, the interfacial transition zones of the aggregates and the mortar/cement paste were analyzed by SEM and EDX-mapping. Moreover, a detailed set of results on the fracture properties for RAC were obtained. Based on the experimental

  8. Monitoring of Concrete Structures Using Ofdr Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henault, J. M.; Salin, J.; Moreau, G.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Bertand, J.; Taillade, F.; Quiertant, M.; Benzarti, K.

    2011-06-01

    Structural health monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors are able to provide relevant information on large structures, such as bridges, dikes, nuclear power plants or nuclear waste disposal facilities. The sensing chain includes an optoelectronic unit and a sensing cable made of one or more optical fibers. A new instrument based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), enables to perform temperature and strain measurements with a centimeter scale spatial resolution over hundred of meters and with a level of precision equal to 1 μstrain and 0.1 °C. Several sensing cables are designed with different materials targeting to last for decades in a concrete aggressive environment and to ensure an optimal transfer of temperature and strain from the concrete matrix to the optical fiber. Tests were carried out by embedding various sensing cables into plain concrete specimens and representative-scale reinforced concrete structural elements. Measurements were performed with an OFDR instrument; meanwhile, mechanical solicitations were imposed to the concrete element. Preliminary experiments are very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing system are comparable to values obtained with conventional sensors used in civil engineering and with the Strength of Materials Modelling. Moreover, the distributed sensing system makes it possible to detect and localize cracks appearing in concrete during the mechanical loading.

  9. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  10. Durability of thin-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Gallias, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present document is to draw up a survey of knowledge of the problems of ageing of reinforced concrete shell structure atmospheric coolers. The exposure conditions are particularly favourable to the induction and development of degradation which, because of the thinness of the reinforced concrete can compromise the stability and the durability of coolers. The study will be axed on the link between the specific characteristics of coolers from the point of view of operation, design and environment, also the durability of reinforced concrete. The set of factors exerting their influence on the reinforced concrete of the shell structure (condensates, rain water, temperature and humidity gradients, dynamic loads, weathering, etc.) is particularly complex. The principal degradation reactions involved are classified according to the chemical and physical action on concrete and on the reinforcement. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of degradation processes and the influence of the characteristics of the materials and of the medium. The aim is to determine the mechanisms which present the greatest risk for coolers. The interaction between the degradation to concrete and the change in mechanical characteristics is also studied [fr

  11. Reliability analysis of prestressed concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Zhao, Y.; Sun, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reliability analysis of prestressed concrete containment structures subjected to combinations of static and dynamic loads with consideration of uncertainties of structural and load parameters is presented. Limit state probabilities for given parameters are calculated using the procedure developed at BNL, while that with consideration of parameter uncertainties are calculated by a fast integration for time variant structural reliability. The limit state surface of the prestressed concrete containment is constructed directly incorporating the prestress. The sensitivities of the Choleskey decomposition matrix and the natural vibration character are calculated by simplified procedures. (author)

  12. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  13. CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO EXPOSURE CLASS XC1 DEPENDING ON CONCRETE COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Cherniakevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced steel corrosion which is the most important problem of reinforced concrete structures durability is generally stipulated for carbonization of concrete surrounding it. Concrete cover calculation at the design stage is predicated one because of the differences in manufacturing conditions and use of constructions. The applying of the probabilistic approaches to the carbonation process modeling allows to get predicated grade of the depth of carbonization of concrete and, thus, to settle minimum concrete cover thickness for a given projected service life of a construction. The procedures for concrete mix design for different strength classes of concrete are described in the article. Current recommendations on assignment of concrete strength class as well as concrete cover are presented. The European Standard EN 206:2013 defines the content requirements for the concrete structures operated in the exposure class XC1, including the minimum values of water-cement ratio, minimum cement content, and minimum strength class of concrete. Since the standard does not include any basis or explanations of the requirements, we made an effort to develop a scientific justification for the mentioned requirements. We developed the probabilistic models for the process of carbonation of concrete based on the concrete mix which was designed using the software VTK-Korroziya. The reinforced concrete structures with concrete cover 20–35 mm operated in the most unfavorable conditions within the exposure class XC1 were analyzed. The corresponding probabilistic calculations of the depth of carbonated concrete are described in the article. 

  14. Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  15. Nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures using software package abaqus

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Nemanja; Stojić Dragoslav; Cvetković Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (AB) is characterized by huge inhomogeneity resulting from the material characteristics of the concrete, then, quasi-brittle behavior during failure. These and other phenomena require the introduction of material nonlinearity in the modeling of reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents the modeling reinforced concrete in the software package ABAQUS. A brief theoretical overview is presented of methods such as: Concrete Damage Plasticity (CDP), Smeared Concrete Cr...

  16. High performance repairing of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskhakov, I.; Ribakov, Y.; Holschemacher, K.; Mueller, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Steel fibered high strength concrete is effective for repairing concrete elements. ► Changing fibers’ content, required ductility of the repaired element is achieved. ► Experiments prove previously developed design concepts for two layer beams. -- Abstract: Steel fibered high strength concrete (SFHSC) is an effective material that can be used for repairing concrete elements. Design of normal strength concrete (NSC) elements that should be repaired using SFHSC can be based on general concepts for design of two-layer beams, consisting of SFHSC in the compressed zone and NSC without fibers in the tensile zone. It was previously reported that such elements are effective when their section carries rather large bending moments. Steel fibers, added to high strength concrete, increase its ultimate deformations due to the additional energy dissipation potential contributed by fibers. When changing the fibers’ content, a required ductility level of the repaired element can be achieved. Providing proper ductility is important for design of structures to dynamic loadings. The current study discusses experimental results that form a basis for finding optimal fiber content, yielding the highest Poisson coefficient and ductility of the repaired elements’ sections. Some technological issues as well as distribution of fibers in the cross section of two-layer bending elements are investigated. The experimental results, obtained in the frame of this study, form a basis for general technological provisions, related to repairing of NSC beams and slabs, using SFHSC.

  17. Peculiarities of Thermal Treatment of Monolithic Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchin, V. N.; Shilonosova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    A mathematical program has been developed that allows one to determine the parameters of heat treatment of monolithic structures. One of the quality indicators of monolithic reinforced concrete structures is the level of temperature stresses arising in the process of heat treatment and further operation of structures. In winter at heat treatment the distribution of temperatures along the cross-section of the structure is uneven. A favorable thermo-stressed state in a concrete massif occurs when using the preheating method, providing the concrete temperature in the center of the structure is greater than at the periphery. In this case, after the strength is set and the temperature is later equalized along the cross-section, the central part of the structure tends to decrease its dimensions more but the extreme zones prevent it. Therefore, the center is in a state of tension, and the extreme zones on the periphery are compressed. In compressed concrete there is a lesser chance of cracks or defects. The temperature gradient over the section of the structure, the stress in the concrete and its strength are determined. When calculating the temperature and strength fields, the stress level was determined - a value equal to the ratio of the tensile stresses in the section under consideration to the tensile strength of the concrete in this section at the same time. The nature of the change in stress level is determined by the massive structure and power of the formwork heaters. It is shown that under unfavorable conditions the stress level is close to the critical value. The greatest temperature gradient occurs in the outer layers adjacent to the heating formwork. A technology for concrete conditioning is proposed which makes it possible to reduce the temperature stresses along the cross-section of the structure. The time for concrete conditioning in the formwork is reduced. In its turn, it further reduces labor costs and the cost of concrete work along with the cost of

  18. Lateral rigidity of cracked concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, A.; Chesi, C.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical results are discussed on the lateral rigidity of reinforced concrete structures with a given crack distribution. They have been favourably checked with experimental results for cylindrical shells under the effect of a thermal gradient producing vertical cracking or vertical plus horizontal cracking. The main effects characterizing the concrete behaviour are: (1) The shear transfer across a crack; (2) The shear transfer degradation after cyclic loading; (3) The tension stiffening provided by the concrete between crack and crack, in the normal stress transfer; (4) The temperature effect on the elastic moduli of concrete, when cracks are of thermal origin. Only the 1st effect is discussed on an experimental basis. Two broad cathegories of reinforced concrete structures have been investigated in this respect: shear walls of buildings and cylindrical containment structures. The main conclusions so far reached are: (1) Vertical cracks are unlikely to decrease the lateral rigidity to less than 80% of the original one, and to less than 90% when they do not involve the entire thickness of the wall; (2) The appearence of horizontal cracks can reduce the lateral rigidity by some 30% or more; (3) A noticeable but not yet evaluated influence is shown by cyclic loading. (orig.)

  19. Damping characteristics of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, M.; Nagashima, I.; Kawamura, S.

    1987-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures in a nuclear power plant are not permitted to go far into the inelasticity generally, even when subjected to strong ground motion. Therefore it is important to evaluate the damping appropriately in linear and after cracking stage before yielding in the dynamic response analysis. Next three dampings are considered of reinforced concrete structures. 1) Internal damping in linear range material damping of concrete without cracks;2) Hysteretic damping in inelastic range material hysteretic damping of concrete due to cracking and yielding;3) Damping due to the energy dissipation into the ground. Among these damping material damping affects dynamic response of a nuclear power plant on hard rock site where damping due to energy dissipation into the ground is scarcely expected. However material damping in linear and slightly nonlinear range have only been assumed without enough experimental data. In this paper such damping is investigated experimentally by the shaking table tests of reinforced concrete box-walls which modeled roughly the outer wall structure of a P.W.R. type nuclear power plant

  20. Nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    This report deals with nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures loaded in the short-term up until failure. A profound discussion of constitutive modelling on concrete is performed; a model, applicable for general stress states, is described and its predictions are compared with experimental data. This model is implemented in the AXIPLANE-program applicable for axisymmetrick and plane structures. The theoretical basis for this program is given. Using the AXIPLANE-program various concrete structures are analysed up until failure and compared with experimental evidence. These analyses include panels pressure vessel, beams failing in shear and finally a specific pull-out test, the Lok-Test, is considered. In these analyses, the influence of different failure criteria, aggregate interlock, dowel action, secondary cracking, magnitude of compressive strenght, magnitude of tensile strenght and of different post-failure behaviours of the concrete are evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that a suitable analysis of the theoretical data results in a clear insight into the physical behaviour of the considered structures. Finally, it is demonstrated that the AXISPLANE-program for widely different structures exhibiting very delicate structural aspects gives predictions that are in close agreement with experimental evidence. (author)

  1. Selected Aspects of Computer Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczecina M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some important aspects concerning material constants of concrete and stages of modeling of reinforced concrete structures. The problems taken into account are: a choice of proper material model for concrete, establishing of compressive and tensile behavior of concrete and establishing the values of dilation angle, fracture energy and relaxation time for concrete. Proper values of material constants are fixed in simple compression and tension tests. The effectiveness and correctness of applied model is checked on the example of reinforced concrete frame corners under opening bending moment. Calculations are performed in Abaqus software using Concrete Damaged Plasticity model of concrete.

  2. Pore Structure Characterization in Concrete Prepared with Carbonated Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sanjukta

    2018-03-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a technique to address the global concern of continuously rising CO2 level in the atmosphere. Fly ash is considered as a suitable medium for CCS due to presence of metal oxides. The fly ash which has already sequestered carbon dioxide is referred to as carbonated fly ash. Recent research reveals better durability of concretes using carbonated fly ash as part replacement of cement. In the present research pore structure characterization of the carbonated fly ash concrete has been carried out. Mercury Intrusion porosimetry test has been conducted on control concrete and concrete specimens using fly ash and carbonated fly ash at replacement levels of 25% and 40%. The specimens have been water cured for 28 days and 90 days. It is observed that porosity reduction rate is more pronounced in carbonated fly ash concrete compared to control concrete at higher water curing age. Correlation analysis is also carried out which indicates moderately linear relationship between porosity % and pore distribution with particle size and water curing.

  3. Innovating a classic course in concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2016-01-01

    A large number of changes, new activities and approaches have been tested at DTU in the teaching of concrete structures: Use of mandatory assignments, handing out solutions before or after exercises, detailed or summary solutions, brush-up teaching materials, strengthened consistency in solutions...

  4. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents methodologies for residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components using linear elastic and nonlinear fracture mechanics principles. The effect of cohesive forces due to aggregate bridging has been represented mathematically by employing tension softening models. Various tension ...

  5. Conceptual Design Tool for Concrete Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on conceptual tools for concrete shell structures when working within the span of performance-based design and computational morphogenesis. The designer, referred to as the Architect-Engineer, works through several iterations parallel with aesthetic, functional and technical re...

  6. New rheological model for concrete structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Long time deformation is of interest in estimating stresses of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, in predicting cracking due to shrinkage or thermal dilatation, and in the design of leak-tight structures. Many interacting influences exist among creep, shrinkage and cracking for concrete. An interaction which researchers have long observed, is that at simultaneous drying and loading, the deformation of a concrete structure under the combined effect is larger than the sum of the shrinkage deformation of the structure at no load and the deformation of the sealed structure. The excess deformation due to the difference between observed test data and conventional analysis is regarded as the Pickett Effect. A constitutive relation explaining the Pickett Effect and other similar superposition problems, which includes creep, shrinkage (or thermal dilation), cracking, aging was developed with an efficient time-step numerical algorithm. The total deformation in the analysis is the sum of strain due to elastic deformation and creep, cracking and shrinkage with thermal dilatation. Instead of a sudden stress reduction to zero after the attainment of the strength limit, the gradual strain-softening of concrete (a gradual decline of stress at increasing strain) is considered

  7. Duracrete: Service life design for concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Edvardsen, C.

    1999-01-01

    In the past decades much effort has been put into the improvement of the durability of concrete structures. This has resulted in a reasonable understanding of the main degradation processes or in experience with measures to prevent degradation. The results of this effort can be found in the present

  8. Three dimensional finite element linear analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inbasakaran, M.; Pandarinathan, V.G.; Krishnamoorthy, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    A twenty noded isoparametric reinforced concrete solid element for the three dimensional linear elastic stress analysis of reinforced concrete structures is presented. The reinforcement is directly included as an integral part of the element thus facilitating discretization of the structure independent of the orientation of reinforcement. Concrete stiffness is evaluated by taking 3 x 3 x 3 Gauss integration rule and steel stiffness is evaluated numerically by considering three Gaussian points along the length of reinforcement. The numerical integration for steel stiffness necessiates the conversion of global coordiantes of the Gaussian points to nondimensional local coordinates and this is done by Newton Raphson iterative method. Subroutines for the above formulation have been developed and added to SAP and STAP routines for solving the examples. The validity of the reinforced concrete element is verified by comparison of results from finite element analysis and analytical results. It is concluded that this finite element model provides a valuable analytical tool for the three dimensional elastic stress analysis of concrete structures like beams curved in plan and nuclear containment vessels. (orig.)

  9. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  10. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfergani, H A; Pullin, R; Holford, K M

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  11. Concrete finishes for highway structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The site conditions just about always dictate the basic layout of a structure. The choices of materials and appearance are usually made by the engineer. The materials going into the structure get a great deal of attention, but unfortunately the appea...

  12. Destructive vibration test of a concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.; Czarnecki, R.M.; Scholl, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two identical full-scale 4-story reinforced concrete structures were built in 1965-1966 at the Nevada Test Site to investigate their dynamic response behavior to underground nuclear explosions. For eight years following their construction, the structures were the subject of a continuing program of vibration testing, and substantial data has been collected on the elastic response of these structures. In 1974 it was decided to conduct a high-amplitude vibration test that would cause the south structure (free of partitions) to deform beyond its elastic limit and cause major structural damage. Results of the 1974 testing program are summarized

  13. Sustainability and durability analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, A.; Broukalová, I.; Kohoutková, A.; Vašková, J.

    2017-09-01

    The article describes an assessment of reinforced concrete structures in terms of durability and sustainable development. There is a short summary of findings from the literature on evaluation methods for environmental impacts and also about corrosive influences acting on the reinforced concrete structure, about factors influencing the durability of these structures and mathematical models describing the corrosion impacts. Variant design of reinforced concrete structure and assessment of these variants in terms of durability and sustainability was performed. The analysed structure was a concrete ceiling structure of a parking house for cars. The variants differ in strength class of concrete and thickness of concrete slab. It was found that in terms of durability and sustainable development it is significantly preferable to use higher class of concrete. There are significant differences in results of concrete structures durability for different mathematical models of corrosive influences.

  14. Numerical Limit Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Paaske

    For more than half a century, limit state analysis based on the extremum principles have been used to assess the load bearing capacity of reinforced concrete structures. Extensi- ve research within the field has lead to several techniques for performing such analysis manually. While these manual...... methods provide engineers with valuable tools for limit sta- te analysis, their application becomes difficult with increased structural complexity. The main challenge is to solve the optimization problem posed by the extremum principles. This thesis is a study of how numerical methods can be used to solve...... limit state analysis problems. The work focuses on determination of the load bearing capacity of reinforced concrete structures by employing the lower bound theorem and a finite element method using equilibrium elements is developed. The recent year’s development within the field of convex optimization...

  15. Research on working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete used in steel-concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongguang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-compacting concrete that has good working property is the prerequisite of steel-concrete structure. The early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete is the important parameter when design steel-concrete structure. Purpose: This paper attempts to research the working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete. Methods: Test is used to research the working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete. Results: Self-compacting concrete that could meet the requirement of steel-concrete structure has been mixed and parameters of early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete which is necessary for design of steel-concrete structure have been presented. Conclusions: Base on the results, this paper can guide the construction of self-compacting concrete in steel-concrete structure and the design and construction of steel-concrete structure. (author)

  16. Advances in the analysis and design of concrete structures, metal containments and liner plate for extreme loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.; Eibl, J.; Curbach, M.; Johnson, T.E.; Daye, M.A.; Riera, J.D.; Nemet, J.; Iyengar, K.T.S.

    1992-01-01

    The material presented in this paper summarizes the progress that has been made in the analysis, design, and testing of concrete structures. The material is summarized in the following documents: Part I: Containment Design Criteria and Loading Combinations; Part II: Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Behavior; Part III: Concrete Containment Analysis, Design and Related Testing; Part IV: Impact and Impulse Loading and Response Prediction; Part V: Metal Containments and Liner Plate Systems; Part VI: Prestressed Reactor Vessel Design, Testing and Analysis. (orig.)

  17. Utilization of recycled concrete aggregates in structural concrete by applying a fraction partitioning model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouw, van de P.M.F.; Doudart de la Grée, G.C.H.; Florea, M.V.A.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Bilek, V.; Kersner, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The recycling of concrete waste into new structural concrete reduces the utilization of raw materials, decreases transport and production energy cost, and saves the use of limited landfill space. Currently, recycling involves the use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) as road base material or in

  18. Mimicking Bone Healing Process to Self Repair Concrete Structure Novel Approach Using Porous Network Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    To repair concrete cracks in difficult or dangerous conditions such as underground structures or hazardous liquid containers, self healing mechanism is a promising alternative method. This research aims to imitate the bone self healing process by putting porous concrete internally in the concrete

  19. Contributions to reinforced concrete structures numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, P.B.

    2001-07-01

    In order to be able to carry out simulations of reinforced concrete structures, it is necessary to know two aspects: the behaviour laws have to reflect the complex behaviour of concrete and a numerical environment has to be developed in order to avoid to the user difficulties due to the softening nature of the behaviour. This work deals with these two subjects. After an accurate estimation of two behaviour models (micro-plan and mesoscopic models), two damage models (the first one using a scalar variable, the other one a tensorial damage of the 2 order) are proposed. These two models belong to the framework of generalized standard materials, which renders their numerical integration easy and efficient. A method of load control is developed in order to make easier the convergence of the calculations. At last, simulations of industrial structures illustrate the efficiency of the method. (O.M.)

  20. CONCRETE STRUCTURES' QUALITY CONTROL IN PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Dolaček-Alduk, Zlata; Blanda, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    The Croatian civil engineering is characterized by a lack of systematic approach to planning, control and quality assurance in all phases of project realization. The results obtained in establishing the quality management system in some segments of civil engineering production represent initial trends in solving this problem. Benefits are of two types: the achievement of quality for the contractor and obtaining that quaity is being achieved for clients. Execution of concrete structures is a c...

  1. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  2. Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities.Through tangible experiments the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect’s digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect th...

  3. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  4. Aircraft impact on nuclear power plants concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombs, R.F.; Barbosa, L.C.B.; Santos, S.H.C.

    1980-01-01

    A summary about the procedures for the analysis of aircraft on concrete structures, aiming to emphasize the aspects related to the nuclear power plants safety, is presented. The impact force is determined by the Riera model. The effect of this impact force on the concrete structures is presented, showing the advantages to use nonlinear behaviour in the concrete submitted to short loads. The simplifications used are shown through a verification example of the nuclear reactor concrete shielding. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Study of structural reliability of existing concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druķis, P.; Gaile, L.; Valtere, K.; Pakrastiņš, L.; Goremikins, V.

    2017-10-01

    Structural reliability of buildings has become an important issue after the collapse of a shopping center in Riga 21.11.2013, caused the death of 54 people. The reliability of a building is the practice of designing, constructing, operating, maintaining and removing buildings in ways that ensure maintained health, ward suffered injuries or death due to use of the building. Evaluation and improvement of existing buildings is becoming more and more important. For a large part of existing buildings, the design life has been reached or will be reached in the near future. The structures of these buildings need to be reassessed in order to find out whether the safety requirements are met. The safety requirements provided by the Eurocodes are a starting point for the assessment of safety. However, it would be uneconomical to require all existing buildings and structures to comply fully with these new codes and corresponding safety levels, therefore the assessment of existing buildings differs with each design situation. This case study describes the simple and practical procedure of determination of minimal reliability index β of existing concrete structures designed by different codes than Eurocodes and allows to reassess the actual reliability level of different structural elements of existing buildings under design load.

  6. Application of concrete filled steel bearing wall to inner concrete structure fro PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Inoue, Kunio; Fukihara, Masaaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    'Concrete filled steel bearing wall', applied to the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant, was developed for rationalization of construction procedure at site. It was concluded through preliminary studies that this new type of wall, where concrete is placed between steel plates, is best suited for the strength members of the above structure, due to the high strength and ductility of surface steel plates and the confinement effect of filled concrete. To verify the behavior from the elastic range to the inelastic range, the ultimate strength and the failure mechanism, and to clarify experimentally the structural integrity of the inner concrete structure, which was composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall, against seismic lateral loads, horizontal loading tests using a 1/10th scale model of the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant were conducted. As a result of the tests, the inner concrete structure composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall appeared to have a larger load carrying capacity and a higher ductility as compared with that composed of a reinforced concrete wall. (author)

  7. REINFORCING FIBRES AS PART OF TECHNOLOGY OF CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-07-01

    It was identified that the basalt fibre consumption rate influences both the strength and the density of products made of cellular concrete. The length of the basalt fibre impacts the strength of products. A nomogram was developed to identify the consumption rate of the basalt fibre driven by the strength of products and the Portland cement consumption rate. The authors also studied the influence of the consumption rate of Portland cement and basalt fibre onto the structural quality ratio of the foamed fibre concrete.

  8. Evaluation of calculational and material models for concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, R.S.; Rashid, Y.R.; Yuan, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code utilizing an appropriate finite element, material and constitutive model has been under development as a part of a comprehensive effort by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop and validate a realistic methodology for the ultimate load analysis of concrete containment structures. A preliminary evaluation of the reinforced and prestressed concrete modeling capabilities recently implemented in the ABAQUS-EPGEN code has been completed. This effort focuses on using a state-of-the-art calculational model to predict the behavior of large-scale reinforced concrete slabs tested under uniaxial and biaxial tension to simulate the wall of a typical concrete containment structure under internal pressure. This paper gives comparisons between calculations and experimental measurements for a uniaxially-loaded specimen. The calculated strains compare well with the measured strains in the reinforcing steel; however, the calculations gave diffused cracking patterns that do not agree with the discrete cracking observed in the experiments. Recommendations for improvement of the calculational models are given. (orig.)

  9. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  10. General requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This standard provides the general requirements used in the design, construction, testing, and commissioning of concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants designated as class containment and is directed to the owners, designers, manufacturers, fabricators, and constructors of the concrete components and parts

  11. Economic effects of full corrosion surveys for aging concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Raupach, M.; Reichling, K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the economic effects of full corrosion surveys of concrete structures. The background is that the existing concrete infrastructure is aging, while being exposed to aggressive influences, which increases the occurrence of corrosion and related concrete damage over time. The

  12. Proof testing of CANDU concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Prior to commissioning of a CANDU reactor, a proof pressure test is required to demonstrate the structural integrity of the containment envelope. The test pressure specified by AECB Regulatory Document R-7 (1991) was selected without a rigorous consideration of uncertainties associated with estimates of accident pressure and conatinment resistance. This study was undertaken to develop a reliability-based philosophy for defining proof testing requirements that are consistent with the current limit states design code for concrete containments (CSA N287.3).It was shown that the upodated probability of failure after a successful test is always less than the original estimate

  13. Ultrasonic measurements of undamaged concrete layer thickness in a deteriorated concrete structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demcenko, A.; Visser, Roy; Akkerman, Remko

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in deteriorated concrete structures was studied numerically and experimentally. Ultrasonic single-side access immersion pulse-echo and diffuse field measurements were performed in deteriorated concrete structures at 0.5 MHz center frequency. Numerically and experimentally

  14. Nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures using software package abaqus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Nemanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (AB is characterized by huge inhomogeneity resulting from the material characteristics of the concrete, then, quasi-brittle behavior during failure. These and other phenomena require the introduction of material nonlinearity in the modeling of reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents the modeling reinforced concrete in the software package ABAQUS. A brief theoretical overview is presented of methods such as: Concrete Damage Plasticity (CDP, Smeared Concrete Cracking (CSC, Cap Plasticity (CP and Drucker-Prager model (DPM. We performed a nonlinear analysis of two-storey reinforced concrete frame by applying CDP method for modeling material nonlinearity of concrete. We have analyzed damage zones, crack propagation and loading-deflection ratio.

  15. Nursing as concrete philosophy, Part II: Engaging with reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, Kyriakos

    2018-04-01

    This is the second paper of an essay in two parts. The first paper (Part I) is a critical discussion of Mark Risjord's conception of nursing knowledge where I argued against the conception of nursing knowledge as a kind of nursing science. The aim of the present paper (Part II) is to explicate and substantiate the thesis of nursing as a kind of concrete philosophy. My strategy is to elaborate upon certain themes from Wittgenstein's Tractatus in order to canvass a general scheme of philosophy based on a distinction between reality and the world. This distinction will be employed in the appropriation of certain significant features of nursing and nursing knowledge. By elaborating on the contrast between the abstract and the concrete, I will suggest that nursing may be seen as a kind of concrete philosophy, being primarily concerned with reality (and secondarily with the world). This thesis, I will argue, implies that philosophy is the kind of theory that is essential to nursing (which is not so much a theory than a certain kind of activity). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Design of reinforced concrete containment structures for thermal gradients effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.D.; Vecchio, F.

    1983-01-01

    The need for more accurate prediction of structural behaviour, particularly under extreme load conditions, has made the consideration of thermal gradient effects and increasingly important part of the design of reinforced concrete structures for nuclear applications. While the thermal effects phenomenon itself has been qualitatively well understood, the analytical complications involved in theoretical analysis have made it necessary to resort to major simplifications for practical design applications. A number of methods utilizing different variations in approach have been developed and are in use today, including one by Ontario Hydro which uses an empirical relationship for determining an effective moment of inertia for cracked members. (orig./WL)

  17. Finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures - Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This workshop is related to the finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures. It is composed of three sessions. The first session (which title is: the use of finite element analysis in safety assessments) comprises six papers which titles are: Historical Development of Concrete Finite Element Modeling for Safety Evaluation of Accident-Challenged and Aging Concrete Structures; Experience with Finite Element Methods for Safety Assessments in Switzerland; Stress State Analysis of the Ignalina NPP Confinement System; Prestressed Containment: Behaviour when Concrete Cracking is Modelled; Application of FEA for Design and Support of NPP Containment in Russia; Verification Problems of Nuclear Installations Safety Software of Strength Analysis (NISS SA). The second session (title: concrete containment structures under accident loads) comprises seven papers which titles are: Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis; What Kind of Prediction for Leak rates for Nuclear Power Plant Containments in Accidental Conditions; Influence of Different Hypotheses Used in Numerical Models for Concrete At Elevated Temperatures on the Predicted Behaviour of NPP Core Catchers Under Severe Accident Conditions; Observations on the Constitutive Modeling of Concrete Under Multi-Axial States at Elevated Temperatures; Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage; Program of Containment Concrete Control During Operation for the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant; Static Limit Load of a Deteriorated Hyperbolic Cooling Tower. The third session (concrete structures under extreme environmental load) comprised five papers which titles are: Shear Transfer Mechanism of RC Plates After Cracking; Seismic Back Calculation of an Auxiliary Building of the Nuclear Power Plant Muehleberg, Switzerland; Seismic Behaviour of Slightly Reinforced Shear Wall Structures; FE Analysis of Degraded Concrete

  18. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  19. Development of highly workable concrete, 'Neuro-crete'. Part 1. ; Basic properties of Neuro-crete and application to large-scale structures with heavy-reinforcement. Koryudo concrete (Neuro crete) no kaihatsu. 1. ; Neuro crete no kiso bussei to kamitsu haikin wo yusuru doboku kozobutsu eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, N; Chikamatsu, R; Sogo, S; Haga, T; Iriya, K; Taniguchi, M [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-08-10

    This paper introduces a highly workable concrete, 'Neuro-crete' developed for the purpose of simplifying construction of concrete structures and improving their guality. This concrete has a feature that it can reduce or eliminate a compacting process. Resistance to separation of coarse aggregate from mortar (separation resistance) is required. A difference of the material from conventional concrete is an increased unit particulate amount (binder + inert particulate). The binders may include cement, blast furnace slag particulate, flyash, silica fume, and expander. The inert particulate may be limestone powder. Kinds and mixing ratio of binders are important in improving fluidity. The separation resistivity is largely affected by a water-cement ratio and a water-binder ratio. A flow distance limit exists to maintain the fluidity without decreasing the compression strength after curing. The internal structure having become denser suppresses progress of neutralization or salt penetration. Drying contraction is equivalent to or less than the conventional concrete. 5 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  1. The Service Life Evaluation for Concrete Structure of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Min; Kim, Seong Soo; Bae, Sung Hwan; Sik, Yoon Eui

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to the marine environment degrades the durability of concrete and shortens the service life of concrete due to degradation factors such as chloride, carbonation, freezing and thawing, sulfate. Therefore, many country's organizations like the Korea Concrete Institute (KCI), the American Concrete Institute (ACI), the International Federation for Structural Concrete (FIB), the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) which recognized the seriousness of this deterioration proposed equation models to evaluate the service life for the concrete structures. As a result, this paper is to especially consider the service life evaluation using these equation models for concrete structure of NPP in Korea compared with 60 years as a design service life. The concrete durability evaluation for Shin-Hanul NPP units 1 and 2 is carried out by using typically proposed assessment models in domestic and foreign standard. It is confirmed that the service life of concrete durability for each of deterioration factors is significantly higher than 60 years as a design service life. As a result, the study of combined deterioration for the concrete structures of NPP in future is positively necessary and maintenance control through regular monitoring should be conducted to secure safety margin basis

  2. Topology Optimization for Conceptual Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Bogomolny, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Design of reinforced concrete structures is governed by the nonlinear behavior of concrete and by its dierent strengths in tension and compression. The purpose of this article is to present a computational procedure for optimal conceptual design of reinforced concrete structures, based on topology...... must be consid- ered. Optimized distribution of material is achieved by introducing interpolation rules for both elastic and plastic material properties. Several numerical examples illustrate the capability and potential of the proposed procedure....

  3. Porous Network Concrete : A bio-inspired building component to make concrete structures self-healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.

    2015-01-01

    The high energy consumption, its corresponding emission of CO2 and financial losses due to premature failure are the pressing sustainability issues which must be tackled by the concrete infrastructure industry. Enhancement of concrete materials and durability of structures (designing new

  4. Seismic fragility of a reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmann, Davide [Axpo Power AG, Baden (Switzerland); Proske, Dirk [Axpo Power AG, Doettingen (Switzerland); Cervenka, Jan [Cervenka Consulting, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-15

    Structures can be exposed to seismic loading. For structures of major importance, extreme seismic loadings have to be considered. The proof of safety for such loadings requires sophisticated analysis. This paper introduces an analysis method which of course still includes simplifications, but yields to a far more realistic estimation of the seismic load bearing capacity of reinforced concrete structures compared to common methods. It is based on the development of pushover curves and the application of time-histories for the dynamic model to a representative harmonic oscillator. Dynamic parameters of the oscillator, such as modal mass and damping are computed using a soil-structure-interaction analysis. Based on the pushover-curve nonlinear force-deformation-capacities are applied to the oscillator including hysteresis behaviour characteristics. The oscillator is then exposed to time-histories of several earthquakes. Based on this computation the ductility is computed. The ductility can be scaled based upon the scaling of the time-histories. Since both, the uncertainty of the earthquake by using different timehistories and the uncertainty of the structure by using characteristic and mean material values, are considered, the uncertainty of the structure under seismic loading can be explicitly represented by a fragility. (orig.)

  5. Study on the influence of Alkali-Silica reaction on structural behavior of reinforced concrete members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murazumi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Matsumoto, N.; Mitsugi, S.; Takiguchi, K.; Masuda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Expansion produced by alkali-silica reaction (ASR) has been observed in the turbine generator foundation of the unit 1, Ikata nuclear power station, Japan. The foundation is a reinforced concrete frame structure. This paper, as a part of the series of investigation and experiments, discusses tests on structural behavior of concrete members affected by ASR. The purpose of the study is to obtain experimental results on the effects of ASR on bending and shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams and shear walls, and compare with the calculated results by present evaluation methods for normal concrete structures For the experiments on bending/shear behavior of beam, bending test models with a small amount of rebar and shear test models with larger amount were made of concrete in which ASR was induced by adding alkali or concrete without ASR. It was found from the results that bending strength of the bending test models and shear strength of the shear test models did not fall, nor was it lower than the calculated strength for concrete members without ASR. In the shear wall test, the two test models were made of either concrete with ASR or one without it. Horizontal load was applied with actuators on the test model fixed on the test floor, while vertical load was applied with oil jacks. The results did not indicate that ASR lowered the stiffness or strength of the wall test models, showing the strength was able to be calculated with the same formula for reinforced concrete wall without ASR. (authors)

  6. Aging of nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, R.; Vydra, V.; Toman, J.; Vodak, F.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of aging processes in nuclear-safety-related concrete structures (NSRCS) is presented. The major environmental stressor and aging factors affecting the performance of NSRCS are summarized, as are drying and plastic shrinkage, expansion of water during the freeze-thaw cycle, water passing through cracks dissolving or leaching the soluble calcium hydroxide, attack of acid rain and ground water, chemical reactions between particular aggregates and the alkaline solution within cement paste, reaction of calcium hydroxide in cement paste hydration products with atmospheric carbon dioxide, and physical radiation effects of neutrons and gamma radiation. The current methods for aging management in NSRCS are analyzed and evaluated. A new treatment is presented for the monitoring, evaluation and prediction of aging processes, consisting in a combination of theoretical methods, laboratory experiments, in-situ measurements and numerical simulations. 24 refs

  7. Aging Evaluation of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Y.; Takesue, N.; Tsukagoshi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, method on the aging evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. Problems on the durability evaluation of reinforced concrete structures were pointed out and an evaluation framework was considered. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration factors of thermal effect, irradiation, neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. And the evaluation framework of the deteriorated material constitutive model which can be used for the numerical analysis of the integrity evaluation for the concrete structure was proposed. (author)

  8. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Masaaki; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Miyahara, Masanobu

    2006-01-01

    As for the accelerator facility, there is many a thing which is constructed as underground concrete structure from viewpoint such as cover of radiation and stability of the structure. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facility is the same as the general social infrastructure, but it has been possessed the feature where target performance differs largely. As for the body sentence, expressing the difference of the performance which is required from the concrete structure of the social infrastructure and the accelerator facility, construction management of the concrete structure which it plans from order of the accelerator engineering works facility, reaches to the design, supervision and operation it is something which expresses the method of thinking. In addition, in the future of material structural analysis of the concrete which uses the neutron accelerator concerning view it showed. (author)

  9. Photocatalysis applied to concrete products - Part 1: Principles and test procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunger, M.; Hüsken, G.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    This three-part article addresses the photocatalytic properties of concrete containing titanium dioxide (TiO2). In the first part, the evaluation of the air purifying abilities of the final concrete product is described. A setup for measuring the performance of photocatalytic active concrete

  10. Analysis of crack propagation in concrete structures with structural information entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of cracks in concrete structures causes energy dissipation and release, and also causes energy redistribution in the structures. Entropy can characterize the energy redistribution. To investigate the relation between the propagation of cracks and the entropy in concrete structures, cracked concrete structures are treated as dissipative structures. Structural information entropy is defined for concrete structures. A compact tension test is conducted. Meanwhile, numerical simulations are also carried out. Both the test and numerical simulation results show that the structural information entropy in the structures can characterize the propagation of cracks in concrete structures.

  11. Quality control of fireproof coatings for reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravit, Marina; Dmitriev, Ivan; Ishkov, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The article analyzes methods of quality inspection of fireproof coatings (work flow, measuring, laboratory, etc.). In modern construction there is a problem of lack of distinct monitoring for the fire protection testing. There is a description of this testing for reinforced concrete structures. The article shows the results of calculation quality control of hatches as an example of fireproof coating for reinforced concrete structures.

  12. Design of fire resistant concrete structures, using validated Fem models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, S.J.F.; Overbeek, van A.B.M.; Heijden, van der G.H.A.; Pel, L.; Huinink, H.P.; Vervuurt, A.H.J.M.; Schlangen, E.; Schlutter, de G.

    2008-01-01

    Fire safety of buildings and structures is an important issue, and has a great impact on human life and economy. One of the processes negatively affecting the strength of a concrete building or structure during fire is spalling. Many examples exists in which spalling of concrete during fire has

  13. Factor Structure of the Piagetian Stage of Concrete Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausmeier, Herbert J.; Sipple, Thomas S.

    1982-01-01

    The Piagetian developmental stage of concrete operational thought and the theoretical groupement structures underlying children's performance of 12 concrete operations tasks are discussed. Tasks were shown to develop in five related sets. Three factor structures were found in this longitudinal study. (Author/CM)

  14. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment : reinforcement corrosion and mitigation - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Research conducted in Part 1 has verified that precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environment are deteriorating. The concrete is subjected to sulfate and : biological attack and the prestressed and nonprestressed reinforcement...

  15. Numerical analysis of pipe impact on reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and the results of numerical analyses carried out by using the computer code DYNA3D to analyse pipe impacts on a reinforced concrete slab, a floor beam and a column. Modelling techniques employed to represent various features of typical reinforced concrete (RC) structures and the details of a soil and crushable foam type of material model used to represent concrete material behaviour are described. The results show that a reasonable prediction of global behaviour of reinforced concrete structures under impact loading can be obtained by this numerical method. (author)

  16. On the Degradation of Concrete in Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Hofman Frisch, P.; Freisleben, P.

    1985-01-01

    Concrete is a cheap and extremely handy material and as such used extensively also in marine structures. Everybody dealing with this material knows examples of concrete apparently of almost infinite durability but also examples where serious degradation started shortly after completion of the str......Concrete is a cheap and extremely handy material and as such used extensively also in marine structures. Everybody dealing with this material knows examples of concrete apparently of almost infinite durability but also examples where serious degradation started shortly after completion...

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Structural Member from Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broukalová, I.; Šeps, K.

    2017-09-01

    The paper aims at the topic of sustainable building concerning recycling of waste rubble concrete from demolition. Considering demands of maximising recycled aggregate use and minimising of cement consumption, composite from recycled concrete aggregate was proposed. The objective of the presented investigations was to verify feasibility of the recycled aggregate cement based fibre reinforced composite in a structural member. Reliability of wall from recycled aggregate fibre reinforced composite was assessed in a probabilistic analysis of a load-bearing capacity of the wall. The applicability of recycled aggregate fibre reinforced concrete in structural applications was demonstrated. The outcomes refer to issue of high scatter of material parameters of recycled aggregate concretes.

  18. Concrete structures. Contribution to the safety assessment of existing structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. COUTO

    Full Text Available The safety evaluation of an existing concrete structure differs from the design of new structures. The partial safety factors for actions and resistances adopted in the design phase consider uncertainties and inaccuracies related to the building processes of structures, variability of materials strength and numerical approximations of the calculation and design processes. However, when analyzing a finished structure, a large number of unknown factors during the design stage are already defined and can be measured, which justifies a change in the increasing factors of the actions or reduction factors of resistances. Therefore, it is understood that safety assessment in existing structures is more complex than introducing security when designing a new structure, because it requires inspection, testing, analysis and careful diagnose. Strong knowledge and security concepts in structural engineering are needed, as well as knowledge about the materials of construction employed, in order to identify, control and properly consider the variability of actions and resistances in the structure. With the intention of discussing this topic considered complex and diffuse, this paper presents an introduction to the safety of concrete structures, a synthesis of the recommended procedures by Brazilian standards and another codes, associated with the topic, as well a realistic example of the safety assessment of an existing structure.

  19. Study on Detailing Design of Precast Concrete Frame Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lida, Tian; Liming, Li; Kang, Liu; Jiao, Geng; Ming, Li

    2018-03-01

    Taking a certain precast concrete frame structure as an example, this paper introduces the general procedures and key points in detailing design of emulative cast-in-place prefabricated structure from the aspects of structural scheme, precast element layout, shop drawing design and BIM 3D modelling. This paper gives a practical solution for the detailing design of precast concrete frame structure under structural design codes in China.

  20. Long-term properties of concrete in nuclear containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.N.; Bamforth, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last thirty years a large volume of testing has been carried out on concretes used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels and similar structures. The main aim of the work has been to provide the designers with a prediction method for elastic moduli and creep deformation which takes into account temperature and age at loading. This paper summarises and reviews the results from the six concretes tested by Taywood Engineering Ltd (T.E.L.), comparing mixes with and without PFA. (author)

  1. Prevention of shrinkage cracking in tight concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaredo, A.M.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that crack formation and propagation in concrete members subjected to restrained shrinkage can be realistically predicted by means of a comprehensive approach including a diffusion analysis and fracture mechanics considerations. The conditions for stable crack propagation regarding dimensions of the concrete member, degree of restraint to the imposed deformation and material properties are discussed. Guidelines on the prevention of shrinkage cracking of concrete structures are given. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs

  2. Modelling of the Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Stochastic modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is addressed in this paper on basis of a detailed modelling of corrosion initiation and corrosion cracking. It is proposed that modelling of the deterioration of concrete should be based on a sound understanding...... of the physical and chemical properties of the concrete. The relationship between rebar corrosion and crack width is investigated. A new service life definition based on evolution of the corrosion crack width is proposed....

  3. Standardization principles of radiographic investigation of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkiewicz, L.

    1979-01-01

    The PN-78/B-06264 Polish Standard concerning the radiographic methods of concrete structure control is discussed. It concerns the inner structure of the building elements, dimensions and position of honeycombs and reinforcement. (author)

  4. Behaviour of prestressed concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, J.G.; Murray, D.W.; Simmonds, S.H.

    1980-05-01

    The most significant finds from a study to assess the response of prestressed concrete secondary containment structures for nuclear reactors under the influence of high internal overpressures are presented. A method of analysis is described for determining the strains and deflections including effects of inelastic behaviour at various points in the structure resulting from increasing internal pressures. Experimentally derived relationships between the strains and crack spacing, crack width and leakage rate are given. These procedures were applied to the Gentilly-2 containment building to obtain the following results: (1) The first through-the-wall cracks would occur in the dome at 48 psi or 2.3 times the proof test pressure. (2) At this pressure leakage would begin and would increase exponentially as the pressure increases such that at 93% of the predicted failure load the calculated leakage rate would be approximately equal to the volume of the containment each second. (3) Assuming the pressurizing medium could be supplied sufficiently rapidly, failure would occur due to rupture of the horizontal tendons at approximately 77 psi. (author)

  5. Concrete structures under impact and impulsive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plauk, G.

    1982-05-01

    This book contains papers contributed to the RILEM/CEB/IABSE/IASS-Interassociation Symposium on 'Concrete Structures under Impact and Impulsive Loading'. The essential aim of this symposium is to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on existing and current research relating to impact problems as well as to identify areas to which further research activities should be directed. The subject of the symposium is far ranging. Fifty five papers were proposed and arranged in six technical sessions, a task which sometimes posed difficulties for the Organization Committee and the Advisory Group, because some of the papers touched several topics and were difficult to integrate. However, we are confident that these minor difficulties were solved to the satisfaction of everyone involved. Each session of the symposium is devoted to a major subject area and introduced by a distinguished Introductory Reporter. The large international attendance, some 21 countries are represented, and the large number of excellent papers will certainly produce a lively discussion after each session and thus help to further close the gaps in our knowledge about the behaviour of structures and materials under impact and impulsive loading. (orig./RW)

  6. Structural Response to Blast Loading: The Effects of Corrosion on Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yalciner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural blast design has become a necessary part of the design with increasing terrorist attacks. Terrorist attacks are not the one to make the structures important against blast loading where other explosions such as high gas explosions also take an important place in structural safety. The main objective of this study was to verify the structural performance levels under the impact of different blast loading scenarios. The blast loads were represented by using triangular pulse for single degree of freedom system. The effect of blast load on both corroded and uncorroded reinforced concrete buildings was examined for different explosion distances. Modified plastic hinge properties were used to ensure the effects of corrosion. The results indicated that explosion distance and concrete strength were key parameters to define the performance of the structures against blast loading.

  7. Characteristics of Structural Breakdown in Plastic Concrete and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characteristics of Structural Breakdown in Plastic Concrete and Their Potentials for Quality Control. ... A typical trace has four such significant features which characterise the mix. The significance of these features are analysed in relation to the functional requirements of plastic concrete in practice. Finally, the potentials of ...

  8. Early stage beneficial effects of cathodic protection in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Stoop, B.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete structures suffering from chloride induced reinforcement corrosion has shown to be successful and durable. CP current causes steel polarisation, electrochemical reactions and ion transport in the concrete. CP systems are

  9. Processing disaster debris liberating aggregates for structural concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wouw, P.M.F.; Florea, M.V.A.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Schmidt, W.; Msinjili, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the removal of debris and reconstruction is requested when natural disasters and conflicts cause damaged or collapsed buildings. The on-site recycling of concrete waste into new structural concrete decreases transport and production energy costs, reduces the utilization of raw materials,

  10. Evaluation of microbially-influenced degradation of massive concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Zolynski, M.; Veeh, R.

    1996-01-01

    Many low level waste disposal vaults, both above and below ground, are constructed of concrete. One potential contributing agent to the destruction of concrete structures is microbially-influenced degradation (MID). Three groups of bacteria are known to create conditions that are conducive to destroying concrete integrity. They are sulfur oxidizing bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria. Research is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assess the extent of naturally occurring microbially influenced degradation (MID) and its contribution to the deterioration of massive concrete structures. The preliminary steps to understanding the extent of MID, require assessing the microbial communities present on degrading concrete surfaces. Ultimately such information can be used to develop guidelines for preventive or corrective treatments for MID and aid in formulation of new materials to resist corrosion. An environmental study was conducted to determine the presence and activity of potential MID bacteria on degrading concrete surfaces of massive concrete structures. Scanning electron microscopy detected bacteria on the surfaces of concrete structures such as bridges and dams, where corrosion was evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing thiobacilli and nitrogen oxidizing Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from surface samples was conducted. Bacterial community composition varied between sampling locations, and generally the presence of either sulfur oxidizers or nitrifiers dominated, although instances of both types of bacteria occurring together were encountered. No clear correlation between bacterial numbers and degree of degradation was exhibited

  11. Ageing in reinforced concrete and pre-tensioned concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicky, P.; Rast, B.

    1990-01-01

    In establishing a nuclear power station's life expectancy, careful attention must be paid to structural components as well as the main systems and components. The construction industry has not as yet compiled any quantitative data on the life expectancy of structures: leading research on this subject is in the USA. As well as high-quality design and construction, the main requirements for a long life expectancy in structures are careful maintenance and complete life history documentation. As far as is known today, a station's structural components do not have to limit its life expectancy. 7 figs., 5 tabs., 16 refs

  12. Quality Control of Concrete Structure For APR1400 Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Inseop; Song, Changhak; Kim, Duill

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear structure shall be constructed to protect internal facilities in the normal operation against external accidents such as the radiation shielding, earthquakes and to be leak-proof of radioactive substances to the external environment in case of loss of coolants. containment and auxiliary building of nuclear power plants are built in reinforced concrete structures to maintain these protection functions. Nuclear structures shall be designed to ensure soundness in operation since they are located on the waterfront where is easy do drain the cooling water and so deterioration and damage of concrete structures caused by seawater can occur. Durability is ensured for concrete structures of APR1400, a Korea standard NPP, in compliance with all safety requirements. In particular, owners perform quality control directly on the production and pouring of cast in place concrete for the concrete structure construction to make sure concrete structures established with quality homogeneity and durability. This report is to look into the quality control standard and management status of cast in place concrete for APR1400 construction

  13. Sustainable monitoring of concrete structures : strength and durability performance of polymer-modified self-sensing concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Gonzalez, J.; Jalali, Said

    2012-01-01

    Concrete structures all over the world are reaching the end of their service life sooner than expected. This is due to the fact that ordinary Portland cement-based concrete deteriorates under environmental actions and also that structural inspections and conservation actions are expensive. Besides, as they consume energy and non-renewable resources, they have negative environmental impacts. Self-sensing concrete provides an alternative way of monitoring concrete-reinforced structures...

  14. Performance of Hydrophobisation Techniques in Case of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyński, Tomasz; Osesek, Mateusz; Gwozdowski, Błażej; Ilski, Mirosław

    2017-10-01

    Concrete is, unchangeably, one of the most frequently applied building materials, also in the case of bridges, overpasses or viaducts. Along with the aging of such structures, the degradation of concrete, which may accelerate the corrosion of reinforcing steel and drastically decrease the load-bearing capacity of the structure, becomes an important issue. The paper analyzes the possibilities of using deep hydrophobisation in repairing reinforced concrete engineering structures. The benefits of properly securing reinforced concrete structures from the damaging effects of UV radiation, the influence of harmful gases, or progression of chlorine induced corrosion have been presented, especially in regards to bridge structures. The need to calculate the costs of carrying out investments along with the expected costs of maintaining such structures, as well as the high share of costs connected with logistics, has also been indicated in the total costs of repair works.

  15. Modeling of crack in concrete structures subjected to severe loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is a construction materials are prevalent in the world. However, in many industries, it is becoming more common to study the safety margins of a structure with respect to solicitations. It becomes important to predict the failure mode of the structure. Much work has already been made in the world on this subject, leading to operational models in computer codes using finite elements. Nevertheless, difficulties remain, mainly related to concrete cracking. These difficulties lead to open problems concerning the location, initiation and crack propagation. The thesis explores two ways of improving methods of numerical simulation of crack propagation. The first possibility of improvement is the use of the extended finite element method, XFEM. A modeling of mechanical behavior of crack is introduced and leads to a description of crack propagation from one element to another. The second possibility is based on damage mechanics. As part of the modeling of damage generalized standard type, the localization phenomenon has been studied numerically for various behaviors: viscous or damage fragile. These behaviors are described in the same spirit that the laws of the visco-elastic or visco-plasticity or plasticity classics, from a general thermodynamic interpretation. In particular, the laws gradient of damage are also considered in conjunction with recent results from the literature. It is well known that a gradient model for interpreting the effects of scale structures under mechanical loading. It also plays an interesting role in the effects of strain localization. (author)

  16. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fundamental material parameters that can be determined for use in design or evaluation. ... of plain and reinforced concrete beams using fracture mechanics principles. Design equations ... components accounting for tension softening effect.

  17. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...... of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish...

  18. Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Degradation, reinforced concrete, Dar es Salaam port. Abstract—One of the ... especially corrosion of the reinforcement. ... Corrosion of steel reinforcement contributes .... cracks along the line of reinforcement bars and most of the ...

  19. Monitoring Ingress of Moisture in Structural Concrete Using a Novel Optical-Based Sensor Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, T L; Cox, M A C; Boswell, L F; Sun, T; Grattan, K T V

    2006-01-01

    The detection of moisture ingress in concrete is important for structural monitoring and in this work is realised by monitoring the shift in the characteristic wavelength of a fibre Bragg grating-based sensor. The sensor relies upon a moisture-sensitive polymer layer deposited on the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) and the strain induced on it as a result of polymer swelling is monitored. Moisture ingress experiments were carried out using two such optical fibre sensors, placed at varying distances from the edge of the face of standard concrete cubes to the inner part of the concrete sample and subjected to water at a constant temperature. Information on the properties of different types of concrete and thus potentially on the migration of dissolved salts and their effect on reinforcement bars within concrete can be obtained

  20. Effect of high temperature on integrity of concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of high temperature on concrete material properties and structural behavior are studied in order to relate these effects to the performance of concrete containment structures. Salient data obtained from a test program undertaken to study the behavior of a restrained concrete structure under thermal gradient loads up to its ultimate limit are described. The preliminary results indicate that concrete material properties can be considered to remain unaltered up to temperatures of 100 0 C. The presence of thermal gradients did not significantly affect the structures ultimate mechanical load capacity. Relaxation of restraint forces due to creep was found to be an important factor. The test findings are compared with the observations made in available literature. The effect of test findings on the integrity analysis of a containment structure are discussed. The problem is studied from the viewpoint of a CANDU heavy water reactor containment

  1. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in 2 mix and a 4.5 kip/in 2 mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in 2 . In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F

  2. PS buildings : reinforced concrete structure for shielding "bridge" pillar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1956-01-01

    The PS ring traverses the region between the experimental halls South and North (buildings Nos 150 and 151) under massive bridge-shaped concrete beams. This pillar stands at the S-W end of the structure.

  3. Characterization and mediation of microbial deterioration of concrete bridge structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Samples obtained from deteriorated bridge structures in Texas were cultured in growth medium containing thiosulfate as an energy source and investigated for acid production, type of acid produced by microbes and the bio-deterioration of concrete cyli...

  4. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This project determined that severe corrosion of steel can occur in the submerged : portions of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments. Field studies of decommissioned : pilings from Florida bridges revealed multiple instances of stron...

  5. Steel-concrete bond model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Chetra

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structure behavior can be extremely complex in the case of exceeding the cracking threshold. The composite characteristics of reinforced concrete structure should be finely presented especially in the distribution stress zone between steel-concrete at their interface. In order to compute the industrial structures, a perfect relation hypothesis between steel and concrete is supposed in which the complex phenomenon of the two-material relation is not taken into account. On the other hand, this perfect relation is unable to predict the significant disorders, the repartition, and the distribution of the cracks, which is directly linked to the steel. In literature, several numerical methods are proposed in order to finely study the concrete-steel bond behavior, but these methods give many difficulties in computing complex structures in 3D. With the results obtained in the thesis framework of Torre-Casanova (2012), the new concrete-steel bond model has been developed to improve performances (iteration numbers and computational time) and the representation (cyclic behavior) of the initial one. The new model has been verified with analytical solution of steel-concrete tie and validated with the experimental results. The new model is equally tested with the structural scale to compute the shear wall behavior in the French national project (CEOS.fr) under monotonic load. Because of the numerical difficulty in post-processing the crack opening in the complex crack formation, a new crack opening method is also developed. This method consists of using the discontinuity of relative displacement to detect the crack position or using the slip sign change between concrete-steel. The simulation-experiment comparison gives validation of not only the new concrete-steel bond model but also the new crack post-processing method. Finally, the cyclic behavior of the bond law with the non-reduced envelope is adopted and integrated in the new bond model in order to take

  6. Constitutive relation of concrete containing meso-structural characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guo

    Full Text Available A constitutive model of concrete is proposed based on the mixture theory of porous media within thermodynamic framework. By treating concrete as a multi-phase multi-component mixture, we constructed the constitutive functions for elastic, interfacial, and plastic strain energy respectively. A constitutive law of concrete accommodating internal micro-cracks and interfacial boundaries was established. The peak stress predicted with the developed model depends primarily on the volume ratio of aggregate, and the results explain very well reported experimental phenomena. The strain-stress curve under uniaxial loading was found in a good agreement with experimental data for concrete with three different mixing proportions. Keywords: Constitutive model of concrete, Mixture theory of porous media, Meso-structure, Interfacial energy

  7. Flexural strength of structural concrete repaired with HBPMM cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, G.H.; Khaskheli, G.B.; Kumar, A.

    2009-01-01

    To repair damaged concrete structures, Dadabhoy Cement Factory in Sindh has launched a product known as HBPMM (Hi-Bond Polymer Modified Mortar) cement. HBPMM is used to repair various concrete structures in Pakistan but the experimental back up regarding the real performance of the product, as far as flexural strength of concrete is concerned, is not well known yet. This study is thus aimed to investigate the flexural strength of structural concrete repaired with HBPMM compared to that repaired with OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement). In total 32 concrete beams (6x6x18) having compressive strength of 3000 and 5000 psi were manufactured. To obtain flexural strength of the beams, these were splitted by using a UTM (Universal Testing Machine). Beams were then repaired with different applications of HBPMM and OPC. After 28 days of curing, the repaired beams were re-splitted to determine the flexural strength of repaired beams. Results show that both HBPMM and OPC are not very effective. However, the performance of HBPMM remained slightly better than that of OPC. Both OPC and HBPMM remained more efficient in case of 5000 psi concrete than that of 3000 psi concrete. Flexural strength of repaired beams could be increased by increasing application of the repairing material. (author)

  8. Evaluation and rehabilitation of corrosion damaged reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, I.S.

    1999-01-01

    For the last two decades, rehabilitation of corrosion damaged concrete structures has been one of the most important challenges faced by the construction industry throughout the world. The extent of the damage is significant in cold climates and also in hot and humid climates. In both cases, the corrosion is invariably initiated by ingress of salts into the concrete either from de-icing salts used on roads, or from salt-laden air, soils or ground water. However, there is a contrast in sites of distress in the two climatic regions mentioned above. In cold climates, where de-icing salts are used, the damage is generally to superstructures and is therefore visible, but in hot, humid coastal regions damage is primarily in the substructures and may not be so clearly apparent. This paper presents the corrosion mechanism in concrete deterioration, the methods of evaluation of the damaged structures, and rehabilitation strategies. A case history of a concrete rehabilitation project is included together with some lessons learned in rehabilitation of corrosion damaged structures. Recommendations are made for maintenance of concrete structures and a warning is issued that salt run-off from roads in cold climates may cause distress in below ground concrete structures, similar to structures in hot and humid climates with saline groundwater and soils. (author)

  9. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  10. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  11. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  12. Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Flexure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a rotational capacity model for flexural reinforced concrete elements is presented. The model is based on the general assumption, that any other failure mode than bending is prevented by proper design. This includes failure due to shear, anchorage, concentrated loads etc. Likewise...... are not necessarily so. An example shows the applicability of the model and a parametric study shows the advantages of the model compared with code provisions. Finally, improvements of the compression zone modelling is performed in order to include a better performance when concrete crushing is the failure criterion...

  13. Analyses of Concrete Structures Exposed to Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    The text book contains the data and methods necessary for fire safety design of concrete constructions. The methods relate to standard fire as well as to any time of any other fire course.Material data are presented for concretes exposed to fire, and calculation methods are given for the ultimate...... bending capacity of beams and slabs, the ultimate shear capacity of beams, for the instability of columns and walls and for the deflection of prestressed and non-prestressed beams, slabs, walls and columns.All methods have been derived and compared to tests by Kristian Hertz....

  14. Study of the ruining behaviour of a structure with reinforced concrete carrying walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manas, B.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear facility buildings must be constructed with the respect of para-seismic rules. These rules are defined according to the most probable seismic risk estimated for the sites. This study concerns the ruining behaviour of a structure made of reinforced concrete walls. In a first part, a preliminary study on reinforced concrete is performed with the Castem 2000 finite elements code. This study emphasizes the non-linear phenomena that take place inside the material, such as the cracking of concrete and the plasticization of steels. In a second part, predictive calculations were performed on a U-shape structure. This structure was submitted to earthquakes of various magnitudes and the response of the structure was analyzed and interpreted. (J.S.)

  15. Structural Behaviors of Reinforced Concrete Piers Rehabilitated with FRP Wraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsuk Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP wraps to retrofit and strengthen existing structures such as reinforced concrete piers is becoming popular due to the higher tensile strength, durability, and flexibility gained and the method’s ease of handling and low installation and maintenance costs. As yet, however, few guidelines have been developed for determining the optimum thicknesses of the FRP wraps applied to external surfaces of concrete or masonry structures. In this study, nonlinear pushover finite element analyses were utilized to analyze the complex structural behaviors of FRP-wrapped reinforced rectangular piers. Design parameters such as pier section sizes, pier heights, pier cap lengths, compressive strengths of concrete, and the thicknesses of the FRP wraps used were thoroughly tested under incremental lateral and vertical loads. The results provide useful guidelines for analyzing and designing appropriate FRP wraps for existing concrete piers.

  16. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, P. A., E-mail: radchenko@live.ru; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  17. Sensor Systems for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a need of permanently embedded corrosion monitoring devices to monitor the progress of corrosion problems on a new or existing reinforced concrete structures before embarking on repair or rehabilitation of the structures. Numerous devices are available for investigating corrosion problems, because no single technique exists which tells an engineer what he needs to know, namely how much damage there is on a structure now and how rapidly the damage will grow with time. In this investigation the studies on the sensors systems based on the measurements of half cell potential of rebars inside the concrete, resistivity of concrete, corrosion rate of rebars by eddy current measurements and sensing of chloride ions are reported. An integrated system consists of above sensors are fabricated and embedded into concrete. The response from each sensor was acquired and analyzed by NI hardware through LabVIEW software.

  18. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  19. Reinforced concrete containment structures in high seismic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    A new structural concept for reinforced concrete containment structures at sites where earthquake ground motions in terms of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) exceeds 0.3 g is presented. The structural concept is based on: (1) an inner steel-lined concrete shell which houses the reactor and provides shielding and containment in the event of loss of coolant accident; (2) an outer annular concrete shell structure which houses auxiliary reactor equipment and safeguards systems. These shell structures are supported on a common foundation mat which is embedded in the subgrade. Under stipulated earthquake conditions the two shell structures interact to resist lateral inertia forces. Thus the annular structure which is not a pressure boundary acts as a lateral support for the inner containment shell. The concept is practical, economically feasible and new to practice. (Auth.)

  20. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  1. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  2. Constitutive Models for Design of Sustainable Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovsky, J.; Cajka, R.; Koktan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The paper deals with numerical models of reinforced concrete which are expected to be useful to enhance design of sustainable reinforced concrete structures. That is, the models which can deliver higher precision of results than the linear elastic models but which are still feasible for engineering practice. Such models can be based on an elastic-plastic material. The paper discusses properties of such models. A material model based of the Chen criteria and the Ohtani hardening model for concrete was selected for further development. There is also given a comparison of behaviour of such model with behaviour of a more complex smeared crack model which is based on principles of fracture mechanics.

  3. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs

  4. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  5. Leakage of pressurized gases through unlined concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizkalla, S.H.; Simmonds, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eight reinforced concrete specimens were fabricated and subjected to tensile membrane forces and air pressure to study the air leakage characteristics in cracked reinforced concrete members. A mathematical expression for the rate of pressurized air flowing through an idealized crack is presented. The mathematical expression is refined by using the experimental data to describe the air flow rate through any given crack pattern. Graphical charts are also presented for the calculation of the air leakage rate through concrete cracks. The concept of equivalent crack width for a given crack pattern is introduced. The mathematical expression and graphical charts are modified to include this equivalent crack width concept. The proposed technique is applicable for the prediction of the leakage from concrete containment structures or any similar structures due to high internal pressure sufficient to initiate cracking. (orig.)

  6. Review of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforced Material in Concrete Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuddin Ayuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP is a material that is lightweight, strong, anti-magnetic and corrosion resistant. This material can be used as an option to replace the steel material in concrete construction or as material to improve the strength of existing construction. CFRP is quite easy to be attached to the concrete structure and proved economically used as a material for repairing damaged structures and increase the resilience of structural beams, columns, bridges and other parts of the structure against earthquakes. CFRP materials can be shaped sheet to be attached to the concrete surface. Another reason is due to the use of CFRP has a higher ultimate strength and lower weight compared to steel reinforcement so that the handling is significantly easier. Through this paper suggests that CFRP materials can be applied to concrete structures, especially on concrete columns. Through the results of experiments conducted proved that the concrete columns externally wrapped with CFRP materials can increase the strength. This treatment is obtained after testing experiments on 130 mm diameter column with a height of 700 mm with concentric loading method to collapse. The experimental results indicate that a column is wrapped externally with CFRP materials can achieve a load capacity of 250 kN compared to the concrete columns externally without CFRP material which only reached 150 kN. If the column is given internally reinforcing steel and given externally CFRP materials can reach 270 kN. It shows that CFRP materials can be used for concrete structures can even replace reinforcing steel that has been widely used in building construction in Indonesia.

  7. Stainless steel reinforcement for durability in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Stainless steels and concrete are materials which the nuclear industry, more than any other, has given special attention to over the years. It is the intention of this paper to inform congress about developments outside the nuclear industry, in the use of stainless steel as reinforcement (rebar) in concrete structures. It is left to individual engineers within the industry to assess the implications of this information to applications with which they will be familiar. (author)

  8. The effect of alkali-aggregate reaction on concrete bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grković Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows contemporary issues related to unfavorable effects of concrete alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR on concrete bridge structures (CBS. Although AAR unfavorable effects on CBS were identified in 1930s, it was much later that AAR was acknowledged as one of the most pronounced deterioration processes in concrete that results in damages to concrete structures. There are two basic forms of AAR: alkali-silica reaction (ASR and alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR. Compared to ACR, ASR is more prominent, especially in certain geographic parts of the world. Damages to concrete caused by the ASR have negative effect primarily on usability and durability of CBS, what is followed by the decrease in load bearing capacity of structural components and reliability of the whole structure, shortening of service life (SL and costly repairs. For CBS, simultaneous occurrence of ASR and other degradation processes in concrete, such as those caused by the presence of moisture, water, temperature variations and use of deicing salt during winter, are especially damaging. Based on review of the most relevant literature, this paper is focused on mechanisms and mechanisms factors of the ASR, related contemporary research and reliability design guidelines for CBS that are based on prevention of the initiation and development of ASR.

  9. Corrosion initiation and service life of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Hwan Oh; Bong Seok Jang

    2005-01-01

    The Corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great concern in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. The reinforced concrete structures exposed to sea environments suffer from corrosion of steel bars due to chloride ingress. The chloride penetration into concrete is influenced by many parameters such as type of cement, mixture proportions and existence of rebars. The conventional diffusion analyses have neglected the existence of steel bar in concrete. The purpose of the present paper is, therefore, to explore the effects of reinforcement on the chloride diffusion in concrete structures by incorporating realistic diffusion models. To this end, the nonlinear binding isotherm which includes the effects of cement types and mixture proportion has been introduced in the chloride diffusion analysis. The effects of reinforcements on the chloride penetration have been analyzed through finite element analysis. The present study indicates that the chlorides are accumulated in front of a reinforcing bar and the accumulation of chlorides is much more pronounced for the case of larger-size bars. The higher accumulation of chlorides at bar location causes faster corrosion of reinforcing bars. The corrosion initiation time reduces by about 30-40 percent when the existence of rebar is considered in the chloride diffusion analysis. (authors)

  10. Mathematical Model to Predict the Permeability of Water Transport in Concrete Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon Ndubuisi Eluozo

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical model to predict the permeability of water transport in concrete has been established, the model is to monitor the rate of water transport in concrete structure. The process of this water transport is based on the constituent in the mixture of concrete. Permeability established a relation on the influence of the micropores on the constituent that made of concrete, the method of concrete placement determine the rate of permeability deposition in concrete structure, permeability es...

  11. Plant life management of the ACR-1000 Concrete containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrishami, H.H.; Ricciuti, R.; Elgohary, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Ageing of reinforced concrete structures due to service conditions, aggressive environments, or accidents may cause their strength, serviceability and durability to decrease over time. For a new plant, a Plant Life Management (PLiM) program should start in the design process and then continues through the plant operation and decommissioning. Hence, PLiM must provide not only Ageing Management program (AMP) but also provide requirements on material characteristic and design criteria as well. The purpose of this paper is to present the Plant Life Management (PLiM) strategy for the concrete containment structure of the ACR-10001 (Advanced CANDU Reactor) designed by AECL. The ACR-1000 is designed for a 100-year plant life including 60-year operating life and an additional 40-year decommissioning period. The approach adopted for the PLiM strategy of the concrete containment structure is a preventive one, key areas being: 1) design methodology, 2) material performance and 3) ageing management program. During the design phase, in addition to strength and serviceability, durability, throughout the service life and decommissioning phase of the ACR-1000 structure, is a major consideration. Factors affecting durability design include: a) concrete performance, b) structural application, and c) consideration of environmental conditions. In addition to addressing the design methodology and material performance requirements, a systematic approach for the ageing management program for the concrete containment structure is presented. (authors)

  12. Aging of concrete containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Arndt, E.G.

    1992-01-01

    Concrete structures play a vital role in the safe operation of all light-water reactor plants in the US Pertinent concrete structures are described in terms of their importance design, considerations, and materials of construction. Degradation factors which can potentially impact the ability of these structures to meet their functional and performance requirements are identified. Current inservice inspection requirements for concrete containments are summarized. A review of the performance history of the concrete components in nuclear power plants is provided. A summary is presented. A summary is presented of the Structural Aging (SAG) Program being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved bases for their continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technologies, and quantitiative methodology for continued service conditions. Objectives and a summary of accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented

  13. Assessing the performance of reinforced concrete structures under impact loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ozbolt, Josko; Hofmann, J.

    2011-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures housing nuclear facilities must qualify against much stringent requirements of operating and accidental loads than conventional structures. One such accidental load that must be considered while assessing the performance of safety related RC structures is impact load. It is known that the behavior of concrete/reinforced concrete structures is strongly influenced by the loading rate. The RC structural members subjected to impact loads behave quite differently as compared to the same subjected to quasi-static loading due to the strain-rate influence on strength, stiffness, and ductility as well as to the activation of inertia forces. Moreover, for concrete structures, which exhibit damage and fracture phenomena, the failure mode and cracking pattern depend significantly on loading rate. In general, there is a tendency that with the increase of loading rate the failure mode changes from mode-I to mixed mode. In order to assess the performance of existing structures against impact loads that may be generated mainly due to man-made accidental conditions, it is important to have models that can realistically predict the impact behavior of concrete structures. The present paper focuses on a relatively new approach for 3D finite element analysis of RC structures under impact loads. The approach uses rate sensitive micro-plane model as constitutive law for concrete, while the strain-rate influence is captured by the activation energy. Inertia forces are implicitly accounted for through dynamic finite element analysis. It is shown with the help of different examples that the approach can very well simulate the behavior of RC structural elements under high rate loading. (author)

  14. A method for the realization of complex concrete gridshell structures in pre-cast concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Martin; Egholm Pedersen, Ole; Pigram, Dave

    2012-01-01

    concrete casting techniques, complex funicular structures can be constructed using prefabricated elements in a practical, affordable and materially efficient manner. A recent case study is examined, in which the methodology has been used to construct a pavilion. Custom written dynamic relaxation software...

  15. Nondestructive test for estimating strength of concrete in structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Yoshitsugu; Soshiroda, Tomozo

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of concrete in structures, especially strength estimation is said to be one of the most important problem and needed to establish test method especial tv for non-destructive method in situ. The paper describes the nondestructive test to estimate strength of concrete. From experimental study using full scale model wall, strength estimating equations are proposed by ultra-sonic pulse velocity, rebound hardness of Schmidt hammer and combined with two methods. From statistical study of the results of experiments, errors of estimated strength by the proposed equations are suggested. The validity of the equations are verified by investigation for existing reinforced concrete buildings aged 20 - 50 years. And it was found from the statistical study that the strength estimating equations need to be corrected in applying to tons aged concrete, and correction factor to those squat ions were suggested. Furthermore the corrected proposed equations were verified by applying to buildings investigated the other case.

  16. Nursing as concrete philosophy, Part I: Risjord on nursing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, Kyriakos

    2018-04-01

    This essay addresses the problem of the essentiality of nursing knowledge and what kind of theory, if any, is essential to nursing practice. The overarching aim of the essay was to argue for the thesis that nursing may be described as a kind of philosophical activity, and, consequently, that philosophy is the kind of "theory" that is essential to nursing practice and to the nursing discipline at large. The essay consists of two papers. The present paper, Part I, is a critical examination of Mark Risjord's discussion of the problem of the theory-practice gap in his Nursing Knowledge: Practice, Science, Philosophy, from 2010. According to Risjord, the cause of the theory-practice gap originates in an erroneous conception of science (logical positivism) which had a decisive influence upon the way nursing scholars appropriated theoretical frameworks for the nursing discipline. This philosophical influence is considered in effect to have generated the theory-practice gap. In order to bridge the gap, Risjord suggests, the nursing discipline needs to adopt a standpoint epistemology conjoined with a postpositivist conception of scientific theory. In this way, a legitimate brand of nursing science may be developed and the theory-practice gap overcome. I will argue that neither Risjord's diagnosis of the problem, nor his recommended cure, may succeed in rescuing the nursing discipline from the theory-practice gap. Rather, the real cause of the theory-practice gap, I will claim, derives from an erroneous conception of nursing (not of science), namely the conception of nursing as a kind of science (roughly speaking). On my view, to overcome the gap, the nursing discipline needs to make salient the inherently philosophical character of nursing. In the second paper (Part II), I will continue the discussion of nursing knowledge and delineate the thesis of nursing as a kind of concrete philosophy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Study on polyurethane foamed concrete for use in structural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Kattoof Harith

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, foamed concrete is being widely used in civil construction and building, because of its high fluidity and settlement, low self-weight and low thermal conductivity. However, it has some major setbacks such as low strength and increased shrinkage at later ages. The strength gain of concrete depends upon several variables; one of these is the curing conditions. This work aims to study the potential production of foamed concrete as a sustainable structural material by varying the curing methods. For this purpose, sample cubes, cylinders and prisms were prepared to find the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage at different ages. Samples of the polyurethane foamed concrete cured under four different curing regimes (water, moisture, sealing by membrane-forming curing compound and air curing. At the end of the study, polyurethane foamed concrete used for this study has shown the potential for use in structural applications. Also, the results show that the samples cured by moisture have the highest compressive strength at all ages. Keywords: Polyurethane foamed concrete, Curing conditions, Fly ash, Compressive strength, Static modulus of elasticity drying shrinkage

  18. Ultimate load capacity assessment of reinforced concrete shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop capability for prediction of ultimate load capacity of reinforced concrete shell structures. The present finite element code ULCA (Ultimate Load Capacity Assessment) adopts a degenerate concept of formulating general isoparametric shell element with a layered approach in the thickness direction. Different failure modes such as crushing, tensile cracking and reinforcement yielding are recognised for various problems. The structure fails by crushing of concrete when the concrete strain/stress reaches the ultimate stress or strain of concrete. Material nonlinearities as a result of tension cracking, tension stiffening between reinforcement and concrete in cracked region and yielding of reinforcement are considered along with geometric nonlinearity. Thus with this code it is possible to predict the pressure at which the first cracking, first through thickness cracking, first yielding of reinforcement occurs. After validating the code with few bench mark problems for different failure modes a reinforced concrete nuclear containment is analysed for its ultimate capacity and the results are matched with the published results. Further the ultimate load capacity of outer containment wall of Narora Atomic Power Station is predicted. It is observed that containment fails in membrane region and has a sufficient margin against design pressure. (author). 9 refs., 56 figs., 3 tabs., 1 appendix with 4 tabs

  19. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment, part 2. Volume 1 : concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to determine methods which may be applied : economically to mitigate corrosion of reinforcement in precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environments. The research was divided into two par...

  20. Towards practical multiscale approach for analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyeda, Arturo; Fish, Jacob

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel multiscale approach for analysis of reinforced concrete structural elements that overcomes two major hurdles in utilization of multiscale technologies in practice: (1) coupling between material and structural scales due to consideration of large representative volume elements (RVE), and (2) computational complexity of solving complex nonlinear multiscale problems. The former is accomplished using a variant of computational continua framework that accounts for sizeable reinforced concrete RVEs by adjusting the location of quadrature points. The latter is accomplished by means of reduced order homogenization customized for structural elements. The proposed multiscale approach has been verified against direct numerical simulations and validated against experimental results.

  1. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without......Durability studies are carried out by subjecting FRC-beams to combined mechanical and environmental load. Mechanical load is obtained by exposing beams to il-point bending until a predefined crack width is reached, using a newly developed test setup. As environmental load, exposure to water...

  2. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  3. Examination and testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This Standard provides the examination and testing requirements that will apply to the work of any organization participating in the construction, installation, and fabrication of parts or components of concrete containment structures, or both, that are defined as class containment. 2 tabs.

  4. Examination and testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This Standard provides the examination and testing requirements that will apply to the work of any organization participating in the construction, installation, and fabrication of parts or components of concrete containment structures, or both, that are defined as class containment. 2 tabs

  5. Maintenance Planning for Chloride Initiated Corrosion in Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can be initiated when the chloride concentration around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In order to prevent the corrosion from reaching a stage where the load-bearing capacity of a given structure suffers a substantial decrease...

  6. SELF-HEALING CAPACITY OF CONCRETE - COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDY OF UNHYDRATED CEMENT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan He

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate occupies at least three-quarters of the volume of concrete, so its impact on concrete's properties is large. The aggregate's influence on the non-hydrated part of the matured paste is assessed by concurrent algorithm-based computer simulation system SPACE in this paper. A distinction is made between interfacial zones (ITZs and bulk paste. Containers with rigid boundaries were employed for the production of series of cement pastes. They were subjected to quantitative microstructure analysis. Relevant gradient structures in the ITZ and bulk are presented and discussed. The relevance of this structure information for possible selfhealing of cracks is briefly discussed.

  7. Determining the in situ concrete strength of existing structures for assessing their structural safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, R.D.J.M.; Vervuurt, A.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    EN 13791 applies when assessing the in situ compressive strength of structures and precast concrete components. According to the code itself, it may be adopted when doubt arises about the compressive strength of a concrete. For assessing the structural safety of existing structures, however, the

  8. Applications of fiber optic sensors in concrete structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jingyun; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2007-11-01

    The research of fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) sensors and their applications in concrete structural health monitoring are presented in this paper. Different types of fiber optic EFPI sensors are designed and fabricated. Experiments are carried out to test the performance of the sensors. The results show that the sensors have good linearity and stability. The applications of the fiber optic EFPI sensors in concrete structural health monitoring are also introduced. Ten fiber optic sensors are embedded into one section of the Liaohe Bridge in Qinghuangdao-Shenyang Railway. Field test demonstrates that the results of fiber optic sensors agree well with conventional strain gauges.

  9. Structural Applications of Fibre Reinforced Concrete in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutková, A.; Broukalová, I.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents improvement of function and performance of the precast structural members by using fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) instead of ordinary reinforced concrete and attempts to transfer innovative technologies from laboratory in academic sphere into real industrial production which is cost-effective and brings about savings of labour and material. Three examples of successful technology transfer are shown - application of FRC in an element without common rebar reinforcement, in the element with steel rebar reinforcement and SFRC pre-tensioned structural element. Benefits of FRC utilization are discussed.

  10. Structural optimization of reinforced concrete container for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.

    1984-01-01

    A structural optimization study of reinforced concrete container for transportation and disposal of the low level radioactive waste generated in Brazilian nuclear power plants. The code requires the structural integrity of these containers when subjected to fall from specified height, avoiding environmental contamination. The structural optimization allows material and transportation cost reduction by container wall thickness reduction. The structural analysis is performed by tridimensional mathematical model using finite element method. (Author) [pt

  11. Potential applications of steel fibre reinforced concrete to improve seismic response of frame structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Patnaik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Fibre reinforced concrete has gained acceptance in several civil engineering applications. The proclivity of new generation of engineers to use steel fibre reinforced concrete can be attributed to some distinct functional and structural benefits that it can provide compared to conventional reinforced concrete. Fibre reinforced concrete has been found to increase the post-cracking tensile strength of concrete thus facilitating pseudo-plastic response, improved energy absorption, and better energy dissipation capabilities that lead to better structural response under cyclic loading. These factors suggest benefits in considering the use of steel fibre reinforced concrete to enhance the structural response of reinforced concrete structures under earthquake loading. This paper summarizes useful background on steel fibre reinforced concrete, the benefits over conventional reinforced concrete, and its response to cyclic excitation. The authors believe that steel fibre reinforced concrete is a suitable ductile high performance material that is gaining acceptance for applications in frame structures and is particularly suitable for enhancing seismic response. (author)

  12. Offshore concrete structures; Estructuras Offshore (mar adentro) de Hormigon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-07-01

    In the offshore industry there are two possible materials for the construction of the hull of a structure; the steel and concrete, with the first one widely used until now, as in the rest of the shipbuilding industry of merchant ships, warships, etc. Materials such as aluminum, GRP or timber areused in small units with lengths lower than 100 m, and in less adverse conditions than in the offshore industry. Nevertheless, some ships/barges have been built of concrete in the past, but have been rather isolated cases which have not changed the practice in the industry. In the First and Second World War were built by the scarcity of materials, while the series of barges by Alfred A. Yee was a rare exception. Other units were also made in concrete, but almost anecdotal. Still, the behaviour of these concrete structures, especially in terms of maintenance, has been excellent. Therefore, the fact that the concrete has not had an adequate reception so far in shipbuilding, does not mean that in will not be the material best suited for the offshore industry in the future. The extra displacement and associated fuel costs in concrete ships have been found prohibitive in the past. But the loss of mobility of a concrete hull in relation to a steel hull can be perfectly offset by the advantages offered by the concrete, as the shipping and offshore industry have very different priorities. One of the main differences in these priorities is in terms of maintenance and resistance to fatigue, precisely where the concrete performs better. ships can easily be dry docked for maintenance and repair, while in the offshore platforms these works have to be done in situ so maintenance and fatigue are crucial to them. Besides these, the concrete has other advantages according to findings of several studies. And although they are interested in the conclusions that the makes as they came from people in the concrete industry, the fact that in recent years concrete offshore unit shave been built

  13. 77 FR 69508 - Inservice Inspection of Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures With Grouted Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... Containment Structures With Grouted Tendons AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide... (RG) 1.90, ``Inservice Inspection of Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures with Grouted Tendons... appropriate surveillance program for prestressed concrete containment structures with grouted tendons...

  14. A Simple Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nath, Paromita [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bao, Yanqing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bru Brea, Jose Maria [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adams, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kosson, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report describes a proof-of-concept example on a small concrete slab subjected to a freeze-thaw experiment that explores techniques in each of the four elements of the framework and their integration. An experimental set-up at Vanderbilt University’s Laboratory for Systems Integrity and Reliability is used to research effective combination of full-field techniques that include infrared thermography, digital image correlation, and ultrasonic measurement. The measured data are linked to the probabilistic framework: the thermography, digital image correlation data, and ultrasonic measurement data are used for Bayesian calibration of model parameters, for diagnosis of damage, and for prognosis of future damage. The proof-of-concept demonstration presented in this report highlights the significance of each element of the framework and their integration.

  15. Local response of concrete structures to explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, H.U.; Krutzik, N.J.; Muller, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the HDR safety program experiments performed concerning demolition of concrete structures and pipes by explosive charges. The precalculability of the local structure reaction as well as that of the global plant was checked. The effect on the bore hole wall by the detonating explosive and the local concrete behavior around the bore hole were investigated. The measured pressure-time history in and around the bore hole is compared with the calculated values. The calculated values seem to be near reality (as far as measurements are available), concerning pressure rise curve within the bore hole and the peak pressure. The analysis of the blow off contours performed with two variations of the material strength of the concrete plates is presented

  16. Hybrid Bridge Structures Made of Frp Composite and Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchel, Mateusz; Siwowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    Despite many advantages over the conventional construction materials, the contemporary development of FRP composites in bridge engineering is limited due to high initial cost, low stiffness (in case of glass fibers) and sudden composite failure mode. In order to reduce the given limitations, mixed (hybrid) solutions connecting the FRP composites and conventional construction materials, including concrete, have been tested in many countries for 20 years. Shaping the hybrid structures based on the attributes of particular materials, aims to increase stiffness and reduce cost without losing the carrying capacity, lightness and easiness of bridges that includes such hybrid girders, and to avoid the sudden dangerous failure mode. In the following article, the authors described examples of hybrid road bridges made of FRP composite and concrete within the time of 20 years and presented the first Polish hybrid FRP-concrete road bridge. Also, the directions of further research, necessary to spread these innovative, advanced and sustainable bridge structures were indicated.

  17. Analysis of FRP bars used as reinforcement in concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Brózda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the design and construction of building and engineering structures, it is of utmost importance to provide their reliability and safety. The use of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymers bars as reinforcement of structural concrete elements could help reducing the typical defects of reinforced concrete and increase its strength parameters. In the paper the selected FRP bar characteristic properties are presented and advantages derived therefrom are specified. Furthermore, the most commonly used in construction types of FRP bars, depending on the raw material used during the production process are listed. In addition, the possibility of recycling of elements reinforced with FRP bars is presented and compared with traditional reinforced concrete (reinforced with steel bars. The production method of FRP bars (pultrusion is shown. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of using this method are discussed.

  18. Dam safety review using non-destructive methods for reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philibert, Alain; Saint-Pierre, Francois; Turcotte, Bernard [Le Groupe S.M. International Inc., Sherbrooke, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Dams built at the beginning of the twentieth century include concrete structures that were put in under rehabilitation works. In some cases, the details of the structures are not well documented. In other cases, concrete damage can be hidden under new layers of undamaged material. This requires that the dam safety review in a real investigation gather the information necessary for carrying out the hydraulic and stability studies required by the Dam Safety Act. This paper presented the process of dam safety review using non-destructive methods for reinforced concrete structures. Two reinforced concrete dams built in the 1900's, the Eustic dam on the Coaticook River and the Frontenac dam on the Magog River near Sherbrooke, were evaluated by S.M. International using non-destructive methods such as sonic and ground penetrating radar methods. The studies allowed mapping of concrete damage and provided geometric information on some non visible structure elements that were part of previous reinforcement operations.

  19. Design optimization of embedded ultrasonic transducers for concrete structures assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Cédric; Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2017-08-01

    In the last decades, the field of structural health monitoring and damage detection has been intensively explored. Active vibration techniques allow to excite structures at high frequency vibrations which are sensitive to small damage. Piezoelectric PZT transducers are perfect candidates for such testing due to their small size, low cost and large bandwidth. Current ultrasonic systems are based on external piezoelectric transducers which need to be placed on two faces of the concrete specimen. The limited accessibility of in-service structures makes such an arrangement often impractical. An alternative is to embed permanently low-cost transducers inside the structure. Such types of transducers have been applied successfully for the in-situ estimation of the P-wave velocity in fresh concrete, and for crack monitoring. Up to now, the design of such transducers was essentially based on trial and error, or in a few cases, on the limitation of the acoustic impedance mismatch between the PZT and concrete. In the present study, we explore the working principles of embedded piezoelectric transducers which are found to be significantly different from external transducers. One of the major challenges concerning embedded transducers is to produce very low cost transducers. We show that a practical way to achieve this imperative is to consider the radial mode of actuation of bulk PZT elements. This is done by developing a simple finite element model of a piezoelectric transducer embedded in an infinite medium. The model is coupled with a multi-objective genetic algorithm which is used to design specific ultrasonic embedded transducers both for hard and fresh concrete monitoring. The results show the efficiency of the approach and a few designs are proposed which are optimal for hard concrete, fresh concrete, or both, in a given frequency band of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures in the Netherlands - Experience and developments: Cathodic protection of concrete - 10 years experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) of reinforcing steel in concrete structures has been used successfully for over 20 years. CP is able to stop corrosion in a reliable and economical way where chloride contamination has caused reinforcement corrosion and subsequent concrete damage. To new structures where

  1. Superelastic SMA–FRP composite reinforcement for concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierschem, Nicholas; Andrawes, Bassem

    2010-01-01

    For many years there has been interest in using fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) as reinforcement in concrete structures. Unfortunately, due to their linear elastic behavior, FRP reinforcing bars are never considered for structural damping or dynamic applications. With the aim of improving the ductility and damping capability of concrete structures reinforced with FRP reinforcement, this paper studies the application of SMA–FRP, a relatively novel type of composite reinforced with superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. The cyclic tensile behavior of SMA–FRP composites are studied experimentally and analytically. Tests of SMA–FRP composite coupons are conducted to determine their constitutive behavior. The experimental results are used to develop and calibrate a uniaxial SMA–FRP analytical model. Parametric and case studies are performed to determine the efficacy of the SMA–FRP reinforcement in concrete structures and the key factors governing its behavior. The results show significant potential for SMA–FRP reinforcement to improve the ductility and damping of concrete structures while still maintaining its elastic characteristic, typical of FRP reinforcement

  2. Applicability Problem in Optimum Reinforced Concrete Structures Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashara Assedeq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum reinforced concrete structures design is very complex problem, not only considering exactness of calculus but also because of questionable applicability of existing methods in practice. This paper presents the main theoretical mathematical and physical features of the problem formulation as well as the review and analysis of existing methods and solutions considering their exactness and applicability.

  3. Condition Indicators for Inspection Planning of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous work by the authors a Bayesian formulation of condition indicators is developed further whereby in conjunction with a systems modelling of concrete structures the experience and expertise of the inspection personnel may be fully utilized. It is shown how the predicted evolution ...

  4. Design, Analysis And Realization Of Topology Optimized Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Asbjørn; Dombernowsky, Per

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of topology optimisation as a constitutive design tool for design and form-finding of architectural concrete structures, and realisation of these designs using large scale CNCmilling of polystyrene form-work for in situ casting....

  5. Indicators for Inspection and Maintenance Planning of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    utilized and consistently updated as frequentistic information is collected. The approach is illustrated on an example considering a concrete structure subject to corrosion. It is shown how half-cell potential measurements may be utilized to update the probability of excessive repair after 50 years...

  6. Failure/leakage predictions of concrete structures containing cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.C.; Marchertas, A.H.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    An approach is presented for studying the cracking and radioactive release of a reactor containment during severe accidents and extreme environments. The cracking of concrete is modeled as the blunt crack. The initiation and propagation of a crack are determined by using the maximum strength and the J-integral criteria. Furthermore, the extent of cracking is related to the leakage calculation by using a model developed by Rizkalla, Lau and Simmonds. Numerical examples are given for a three-point bending problem and a hypothetical case of a concrete containment structure subjected to high internal pressure during an accident

  7. Seismic fragility of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, P.

    1985-01-01

    The failure and fragility analyses of reinforced concrete structures and elements in nuclear reactor facilities within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are evaluated. Uncertainties in material modeling, behavior of low shear walls, and seismic risk assessment for nonlinear response receive special attention. Problems with ductility-based spectral deamplification and prediction of the stiffness of reinforced concrete walls at low stress levels are examined. It is recommended to use relatively low damping values in connection with ductility-based response reductions. The study of static nonlinear force-deflection curves is advocated for better nonlinear dynamic response predictions

  8. Research requirements for improved design of reinforced concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, A.K.; Holley, M.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reinforced concrete is a competitive material for the construction of nuclear power plant containment structures. However, the designer is constrained by limited data on the behavior of certain construction details which require him to use what may be excessive rebar quantities and lead to difficult and costly construction. This paper discusses several design situations where research is recommended to increase the designer's options, to facilitate construction, and to extend the applicability of reinforced concrete to such changing containment requirements as may be imposed by an evolving nuclear technology. (Auth.)

  9. Scale modeling of reinforced concrete structures subjected to seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Reinforced concrete, Category I structures are so large that the possibility of seismicly testing the prototype structures under controlled conditions is essentially nonexistent. However, experimental data, from which important structural properties can be determined and existing and new methods of seismic analysis benchmarked, are badly needed. As a result, seismic experiments on scaled models are of considerable interest. In this paper, the scaling laws are developed in some detail so that assumptions and choices based on judgement can be clearly recognized and their effects discussed. The scaling laws developed are then used to design a reinforced concrete model of a Category I structure. Finally, how scaling is effected by various types of damping (viscous, structural, and Coulomb) is discussed

  10. Studies on various characteristics of concrete structures using crushed sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimatsu, Makoto; Sugita, Hideaki; Yonemura, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    With the recent advances of construction industry, the demands for concrete, hence for aggregate, are rising. The sand as such is in extreme shortage due to the exhaustion of river sand. Under the situation, the recent trends are for the use of crushed sand, i.e. the artificial sand obtained by crushing rocks, which have advantages of stabilized quality and adequate supplies. In building of nuclear power plants requiring large amounts of concrete, the usage of crushed sand is now unavoidable. The following are described : the situation of aggregate in Kyushu. production method of crushed sand and the quality standards, rocks used for crushed stone and sand and the properties, quality survey on crushed sand and the basic tests, characteristic tests of crushed-stone and -sand mixed concrete, the application of crushed sand in structures of the Sendai Nuclear Power Station. (Mori, K.)

  11. Elasto-viscoplastic finite element model for prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates Junior, N.P.; Silva, C.S.B.; Campos Filho, A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model, based on the finite element method, for the study of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures under plane stress states. It comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete and steel relaxation are considered. Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive models are used to describe the behavior of the materials. The model includes prestressing and no prestressing reinforcement, on situation with pre- and post-tension with and without bond. A set of prestressed concrete slab elements were tested under instantaneous and long-term loading. The experimental data for deflections, deformations and ultimate strength are used to compare and validate the results obtained through the proposed model. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  12. Ultrasonic assessment of service life of concrete structures subject to reinforcing steel corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udegbunam, Ogechukwu Christian

    Over half of the bridges in the United States were built before 1970. Such bridges and the network of roads that they carry include the Inter State system, which was built as part of the great public works program, following the end of the Second World War. During that era, the emphasis was on strength design and economical construction of new structures, and not much premium was placed on durability and maintainability concerns. Since the end of this construction boom in the early 1970s, the concern for the durability of transportation infrastructure has steadily gained prominence among those agencies that must secure, program and administer funds for maintaining highway networks. The objective of this research was to develop a nondestructive method of assessing the durability of concrete bridge decks susceptible to damage from corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel. This was accomplished by formulating a holistic approach that accounts for the major factors that influence corrosion based deterioration of reinforced concrete. In this approach, the assessment of the durability of concrete bridge decks is based on a model that estimates the time it takes for the cover concrete to fail a result of stresses caused by expansion of reinforcing steel bars, due to corrosion activities. This time to failure is comprised of two distinct periods that must be evaluated before the problem can be solved. The research consisted of an experimental program and an analytical study. In the experimental program concrete specimens were cast and tested to determine their diffusivity and mechanical properties. The diffusivity was used to evaluate the period it takes for corrosion of the reinforcing bars to commence. In the analytical study, the resistance of the concrete structure against the internal forces caused by corrosion was evaluated with the finite element techniques. This resistance was used to evaluate the period defining the failure of the cover concrete. These two periods

  13. Aging of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Pland, C.B.; Arndt, E.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), had the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant structures for continued service. The program consists of three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued service determinations. Major accomplishments under the SAG Program during the first two years of its planned five-year duration have included: development of a Structural Materials Information Center and formulation of a Structural Aging Assessment Methodology for Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants. 9 refs

  14. Anisotropic 3D delay-damage model to simulate concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gatuingt , Fabrice; Desmorat , Rodrigue; Chambart , Marion; Combescure , Didier; Guilbaud , Daniel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; High dynamic loadings lead to material degradation and structural failure. This is even more the case for concrete structures where the parts initially in compression break in ten- sion due to waves propagation and reflection. The dissymmetry of the material behavior plays a major role in such cases, dissymmetry mainly due to damage induced anisotropy. Loading induced damage is most often anisotropic and one proposes here to take advantage of such a feature to build a ...

  15. Rational and Safe Design of Concrete Transportation Structures for Size Effect and Multi-Decade Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve the safety and sustainability in the design of large : prestressed concrete bridges and other transportation structures. The safety of large concrete : structures, including bridges, has been insufficie...

  16. Plant Life Management of the EC6 Concrete Containment Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrishami, Homayoun; Ricciuti, Rick; Khan, Azhar [CANDU Energy Inc., Mississauga (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Aging of reinforced concrete structures due to service conditions, aggressive environments, or accidents may cause their strength, serviceability and durability to decrease over time. Due to the complex nature of safety-related structures in nuclear power plants in comparison to other structures, they possess a number of characteristics that make them comparison to other structures, they possess a number of characteristics that make them unique. These characteristics are: thick concrete cross-sections, heavy reinforcement, often one-side access only, subjected to such ageing stresses as irradiation and elevated temperature, in addition to other typical ageing mechanisms (i. e., exposure to freeze/thaw cycles, aggressive chemicals, etc.) that typically affects other types of non-nuclear structures. For a new plant, the Plant Life Management Program (PLiM) should start in the design process and then continues through construction, plant operation and decommissioning. Hence PLiM must provide not only Ageing Management program (AMP) but also provide requirements on material characteristic and the design criteria as well. The purpose of this paper is to present the Plant Life Management (PLiM) strategy for the concrete containment structure of EC6 (Enhanced CANDU 6) Nuclear Power Plant designed by CANDU Energy Inc. The EC6 is designed for 100-year plant life including a 60-year operating life and an additional 40-year decommissioning period of time. The approach adopted for the PLiM strategy of the concrete containment structure is a preventive one, key areas being: 1) design methodology, 2) material performance and 3) life cycle management and ageing management program. In addition to strength and serviceability, durability is a major consideration during the design phase, service life and up to the completion of decommissioning. Factors affecting durability design include: a) concrete performance, b) structural application, and c) consideration of environmental

  17. Plant Life Management of the EC6 Concrete Containment Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrishami, Homayoun; Ricciuti, Rick; Khan, Azhar

    2012-01-01

    Aging of reinforced concrete structures due to service conditions, aggressive environments, or accidents may cause their strength, serviceability and durability to decrease over time. Due to the complex nature of safety-related structures in nuclear power plants in comparison to other structures, they possess a number of characteristics that make them comparison to other structures, they possess a number of characteristics that make them unique. These characteristics are: thick concrete cross-sections, heavy reinforcement, often one-side access only, subjected to such ageing stresses as irradiation and elevated temperature, in addition to other typical ageing mechanisms (i. e., exposure to freeze/thaw cycles, aggressive chemicals, etc.) that typically affects other types of non-nuclear structures. For a new plant, the Plant Life Management Program (PLiM) should start in the design process and then continues through construction, plant operation and decommissioning. Hence PLiM must provide not only Ageing Management program (AMP) but also provide requirements on material characteristic and the design criteria as well. The purpose of this paper is to present the Plant Life Management (PLiM) strategy for the concrete containment structure of EC6 (Enhanced CANDU 6) Nuclear Power Plant designed by CANDU Energy Inc. The EC6 is designed for 100-year plant life including a 60-year operating life and an additional 40-year decommissioning period of time. The approach adopted for the PLiM strategy of the concrete containment structure is a preventive one, key areas being: 1) design methodology, 2) material performance and 3) life cycle management and ageing management program. In addition to strength and serviceability, durability is a major consideration during the design phase, service life and up to the completion of decommissioning. Factors affecting durability design include: a) concrete performance, b) structural application, and c) consideration of environmental

  18. Condition monitoring and maintenance of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, R.; Prasad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures are potentially subject to deterioration due to several environmental conditions, including weather exposure, ground water exposure, and sustained high temperature and radiation levels. The nuclear power plant are generally licensed for a term of 40 years. In order to maximize the return from the existing plants, feasibility studies are in progress for continued operation of many of these plants beyond the original licensed life span. This paper describes a study that was performed with an objective to define appropriate condition monitoring and maintenance procedures. A timely implementation of a condition monitoring and maintenance program would provide a valuable database and would provide justification for extension of the plant's design life. The study included concrete structures such as the containment buildings, interior structures, basemats, intake structures and cooling towers. Age-related deterioration at several operating power plants was surveyed and the potential degradation mechanisms have been identified

  19. Analysis of seismic effects on reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, A.A.

    1981-12-01

    An important bibliographical research was undertaken in order to make the best possible analysis of the dynamic behaviour of materials and of structural components. This research work was completed by the study of the structures tested on a seismic table. The results obtained from this preliminary study, particularly those concerning the modification in the rigidity of reinforced concrete structures under alternate and seismic loading, enabled a calculation method (called ''equivalent static'') to be drawn up for analyzing the behaviour of reinforced concrete structures in earthquakes. This method takes into account the non-linearity of the behaviour of materials, in particular. The earthquake responses that were obtained by this method on gantries tested on a vibrating table, tally very satisfactorily with the test figures [fr

  20. Application of global elements to a reinforced concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morand, O.

    1994-01-01

    The dimensioning of nuclear facilities requires to take into account the possible risk of earthquakes. However such installations are generally complex structures with reinforced concrete poles, walls, beams and porches. In this study, a seismic analysis of such a structure is proposed. The use of the Castem 2000 global element code was attempted to dynamically simulate the behaviour of the reinforced concrete elements. However, no suitable modeling has been found for the storeys, the functioning of which being dominated by carrying walls. Concerning the porch-type storeys, monotonous static loads were simulated and provided information on the local and global behaviour of these structures. Thus, representative global elements could be realized for these structures. Results obtained are satisfactory for these storeys which essentially undergo a bending deformation. (J.S.)

  1. Lattice Modeling of Early-Age Behavior of Structural Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yaming; Prado, Armando; Porras, Roc?o; Hafez, Omar M.; Bolander, John E.

    2017-01-01

    The susceptibility of structural concrete to early-age cracking depends on material composition, methods of processing, structural boundary conditions, and a variety of environmental factors. Computational modeling offers a means for identifying primary factors and strategies for reducing cracking potential. Herein, lattice models are shown to be adept at simulating the thermal-hygral-mechanical phenomena that influence early-age cracking. In particular, this paper presents a lattice-based ap...

  2. Simulation of reinforced concrete NPP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, A.B.; Yaskevich, E.E.; Tarannikov, V.N.; Loginov, A.Ya.; Lagutov, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of stress-strained state of NPP frame structures at different stages of their operation using the method of physical simulation, is conducted. Comparison of model investigations to the data of full-scale deformation measurement allows one to define the strength resource of the structures under operation. Bench test layout and results of investigations into strength, deformation, thermal-physical and acoustic emission parameters of the investigated processes during model loading, are presented

  3. Finite element model updating of concrete structures based on imprecise probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, S.; Ramaswamy, A.

    2017-09-01

    Imprecise probability based methods are developed in this study for the parameter estimation, in finite element model updating for concrete structures, when the measurements are imprecisely defined. Bayesian analysis using Metropolis Hastings algorithm for parameter estimation is generalized to incorporate the imprecision present in the prior distribution, in the likelihood function, and in the measured responses. Three different cases are considered (i) imprecision is present in the prior distribution and in the measurements only, (ii) imprecision is present in the parameters of the finite element model and in the measurement only, and (iii) imprecision is present in the prior distribution, in the parameters of the finite element model, and in the measurements. Procedures are also developed for integrating the imprecision in the parameters of the finite element model, in the finite element software Abaqus. The proposed methods are then verified against reinforced concrete beams and prestressed concrete beams tested in our laboratory as part of this study.

  4. Concrete structures under impact loading: general aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Baeră

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic loading conditions distress the structural integrity of a structure differently than the static ones. Such actions transfer high rate strains and instant energy waves to the structure, inducing the possibility of imminent collapse and casualties as a direct consequence. In the latest years, considering the dramatic increase of terrorist threats and global warming, the structural safety criteria imply more than ever the need to withstand this kind of loading (e.g., missiles and blast, projectiles, strong winds, tornados and earthquakes in addition to the static ones. The aim of this paper is to provide a general overview with regard to impact loading in terms of defining the phenomenon from physical and mechanical perspective, its complex local or global effect on the targeted structure, relevant material characteristics, main research approaches, namely theoretical studies and experimental procedures developed for improving the predictability of the dynamic loads and their effects. New directions in developing superior cementitious composites, with better characteristics in terms of dynamic loading performance are also emphasized.

  5. Contributions to the nonlinear modeling of the mechanical behaviour of concrete and of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Krayani

    2007-12-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of the material and its loading history (at any point of the structure) is necessary to evaluate the tightness of a containment structure and therefore its durability. An elastic plastic non local damage model is developed for modelling the mechanical behaviour of concrete. A regularization technique is introduced on the part responsible of the strain-softening behaviour in order to avoid the numerical problems due to the phenomenon of localisation of damage. The constitutive law and its numerical implementation are detailed. The consistent tangent matrix is derived, where the numerical differentiation technique is applied to integrate plastic constitutive laws and to obtain a quadratic convergence with the Newton-Raphson method at Gauss-point level and in the solution of the boundary value problem. Simulations have shown the capacity of the model to reproduce the classical and complex structural behaviour of concrete. The comparisons with the isotropic damage models illustrate the improvements achieved by introducing the plasticity to the damage formulation: the mode of failure is reproduced correctly (mode I and mixed mode) and the ultimate load is in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, we present modifications of the classical non local damage model in order to take into account the boundary effects. Our justification is based on micro-mechanical arguments in which the interactions between microcracks are reduced nearby the free boundary. (author)

  6. Design of concrete structures important to safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    Civil engineering structures in nuclear installations form an important feature having implications to safety performance of these installations. The objective and minimum requirements for the design of civil engineering buildings/structures to be fulfilled to provide adequate assurance for safety of nuclear installations in India (such as pressurised heavy water reactor and related systems) are specified in the Safety standard for civil engineering structures important to safety of nuclear facilities. This standard is written by AERB to specify guidelines for implementation of the above civil engineering safety standard in the design of concrete structures important to safety

  7. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. In this part, some of the important properties of heavy density concrete are discussed. They include density, water retentivity, air content, permeability with special reference to concrete mixes used in India's nuclear power reactors. All these properties are affected to various extents by heating. Indian shield concrete is rarely subjected to temperatures above 60degC during its life, because of thermal shield protection. During placement, the maximum anticipated rise in temperature due to heat of hydration is restricted to around 45degC by chilling, if necessary to reduce shrinkage stresses and cracks. (M.G.B.)

  8. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Sammiuddin; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  9. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Sammiuddin [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 426 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Gupta, Abhinav, E-mail: agupta1@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 413 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  10. Analysis of aircraft impact to concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arros, Jorma; Doumbalski, Nikolay

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of aircraft impact to nuclear power plant structures is discussed utilizing a simplified model of a 'fictitious nuclear building' to perform analyses using LS-DYNA software, representing the loading: (i) by the Riera force history method and (ii) by modeling the crash by impacting a model of a plane similar to Boeing 747-400 to the structure (i.e., 'missile-target interaction method'). Points discussed include: (1) comparison of shock loading within the building as obtained from the Riera force history analysis versus from the missile-target interaction analysis, (2) sensitivity of the results on the assumed Riera force loading area, (3) linear versus nonlinear modeling and (4) on failure criteria

  11. Limit analysis of solid reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Paaske

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Semidefinite Programming (SDP) can be used effectively for limit analysis of isotropic cohesive-frictional continuums using the classical Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion. In this paper we expand on this previous research by adding reinforcement to the model and a solid...... reinforcement and it is therefore possible to analyze structures with complex reinforcement layouts. Tests are conducted to validate the method against well-known analytical solutions....

  12. Full surface inspection methods regarding reinforcement corrosion of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichling, K.; Raupach, M.; Broomfield, J.; Gulikers, J.; L'Hostis, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    For reinforced concrete structures a localisation of all significant critical areas can only be done by a full surface inspection. The economic advantages are obvious: uncritical areas have not to be repaired expensively.The first step of the assessment should always be a visual inspection. The range of deterioration causes can be limited and the degree of deterioration may be estimated roughly. The inspection program can be adjusted to the requirements. By means of a full surface potential mapping areas with a high risk for chloride induced reinforcement corrosion can be localised, although no deteriorations are visually detectable at the concrete surface. In combination with concrete cover depth and resistivity measurements areas with corrosion promoting exposure conditions can be localised even if the reinforcement is not yet de-passivated. The following publication gives an overview about the essential full surface investigation methods to localise critical areas regarding corrosion of steel in concrete. The selection of methods is based on the inspection procedure given in reference 2. (authors)

  13. Limit load analysis of thick-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Faust, G.; Willam, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper illustrates the interaction of constitutive modeling and finite element solution techniques for limit load prediction of concrete structures. On the constitutive side, an engineering model of concrete fracture is developed in which the Mohr-Coulomb criterion is augmented by tension cut-off to describe incipient failure. Upon intersection with the stress path the failure surface collapses for brittle behaviour according to one of three softening rules, no-tension, no-cohesion, and no-friction. The stress transfer accompanying the energy dissipation during local failure is modelled by several fracture rules which are examined with regard to ultimate load prediction. On the numerical side the effect of finite element idealization is studied first as far as ultimate load convergence is concerned. Subsequently, incremental tangential and initial load techniques are compared together with the effect of step size. Limit load analyses of a thick-walled concrete ring and a lined concrete reactor closure conclude the paper with examples from practical engineering. (orig.) [de

  14. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  15. Reliability algorithms applied to reinforced concrete structures durability assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Nogueira

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the analysis of probabilistic corrosion time initiation in reinforced concrete structures exposed to ions chloride penetration. Structural durability is an important criterion which must be evaluated in every type of structure, especially when these structures are constructed in aggressive atmospheres. Considering reinforced concrete members, chloride diffusion process is widely used to evaluate the durability. Therefore, at modelling this phenomenon, corrosion of reinforcements can be better estimated and prevented. These processes begin when a threshold level of chlorides concentration is reached at the steel bars of reinforcements. Despite the robustness of several models proposed in the literature, deterministic approaches fail to predict accurately the corrosion time initiation due to the inherently randomness observed in this process. In this regard, the durability can be more realistically represented using probabilistic approaches. A probabilistic analysis of ions chloride penetration is presented in this paper. The ions chloride penetration is simulated using the Fick's second law of diffusion. This law represents the chloride diffusion process, considering time dependent effects. The probability of failure is calculated using Monte Carlo simulation and the First Order Reliability Method (FORM with a direct coupling approach. Some examples are considered in order to study these phenomena and a simplified method is proposed to determine optimal values for concrete cover.

  16. The surrounding concrete structure of the containment as a safety component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, H.; Kuntze, W.M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper will briefly discuss the containments of the various types of reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany and will try to show the importance of the surrounding concrete structures with respect to safety. It will be seen that the surrounding concrete structures serve in any case - as protection against external events - as secondary shielding and must therefore be considered as a passive safety feature. The design requirements for the surrounding concrete structures with respect to protection against external events and to physical protection generally supplement each other. Reference will be made to possible alternatives, which might result from studies of underground siting of nuclear power plants. Whether or not this type of construction can lead to additional safety can only be judged when the results of all these studies - some of which are still under way - are evaluated. The concluding part of this paper will deal with the responsibilities of the civil engineering supervisory authorities and the nuclear licensing authorities with respect to the surrounding concrete structures. (orig.) [de

  17. New potentional of high-speed water jet technology for renovating concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnárová, L.; Sitek, L.; Hela, R.; Foldyna, J.

    2011-06-01

    The paper discusses the background and results of research focused on the action of a high-speed water jet on concrete with different qualities. The sufficient and careful removal of degraded concrete layers is very important for the renovation of concrete structures. High-speed water jet technology is one of the most common methods used for removing degraded concrete layers. Different types of high-speed water jets were tested in the experimental part. The classical technology of a single continuous water jet generated with one nozzle was tested as well as the technology of revolving water jets generated by multiple nozzles (used mainly for the renovation of larger areas). A continuous flat water jet and pulsating flat water jet were tested the first time, because the connection of a water jet with the acoustic generator of a pulsating jet offers new possibilities for the use of a water jet (see [1] and [2]). A water jet with such a modification is capable of efficient action and can even be used for cutting solid concrete with a relatively low consumption of energy. A flat pulsating water jet which can be newly used for renovation seems to be a promising technology.

  18. Reinforced concrete containment structures in high seismic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    A new structural concept for reinforced concrete containment structures at sites where earthquake ground motions in terms of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) exceeds 0.3 g is presented. The structural concept is based on: (1) an inner steel-lined concrete shell which houses the reactor and provides shielding and containment in the event of loss of coolant accident; (2) an outer annular concrete shell structure which houses auxilary reactor equipment and safeguards systems. These shell structures are supported on a common foundation mat which is embeded in the subgrade. Under stipulated earthquake conditions the two shell structures interact to resist lateral inertia forces. Thus the annular structure which is not a pressure boundary acts as a lateral support for the inner containment shell. The concept is practical, economically feasible and new to practice. An integrated configuration which includes the interior shell, the annular structure and the subgrade is analyzed for several static and dynamic loading conditions. The analysis is done using a finite difference solution scheme for the static loading conditions. A semi-analytical three-dimensional finite element scheme combined with a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm is used for the dynamic loading conditions. The effects of cracking of the containment structure due to pressurization in conjunction with earthquake loading are discussed. Analytical results for both the finite difference and the finite element schemes are presented and the sensitivity of the results to changes in the input parameters is studied. General recommendations are given for plant configurations where high seismic loading is a major design consideration

  19. Data on optimum recycle aggregate content in production of new structural concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suvash Chandra

    2017-12-01

    This data presented herein are the research summary of "mechanical behavior and durability performance of concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate" (Paul, 2011) [1]. The results reported in this article relate to an important parameter of optimum content of recycle concrete aggregate (RCA) in production of new concrete for both structural and non-structural applications. For the purpose of the research various types of physical, mechanical and durability tests are performed for concrete made with different percentages of RCA. Therefore, this data set can be a great help of the readers to understand the mechanism of RCA in relates to the concrete properties.

  20. Structure simulation of a pre-stressed concrete containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Sievers, J.

    2004-01-01

    An axisymmetric Finite-Element-Model of the 1:4 pre-stressed containment model tested at SANDIA was developed. The model is loaded by the pre-stressing of the tendons and by increasing internal pressure (up to 1.3 MPa). The analyses results in terms of displacements and strains in the liner, the rebars, the tendons and the concrete of the cylindrical part agree well with measured data up to about 0.6 MPa internal pressure (i.e. 1.5 times design pressure). First circumferential micro-cracks in the concrete are found at about 0.75 MPa. With increasing pressure micro-cracks are present through the whole wall. Above about 0.9 MPa the formation of micro-cracks in radial and meridional direction is calculated. At the maximum load (1.3 MPa) almost all concrete parts of the model have micro-cracks which may cause leaks. Nevertheless the failure of the containment model is not expected for loads up to 1.3 MPa without consideration of geometric inhomogeneities due to penetrations in the wall. Although the calculated strains in liner, rebars and tendons show some plastification, the maximum values are below the critical ones. The safety margin against failure is smallest in some hoop tendons. At present parametric studies are performed to investigate the differences between calculations and measured data. Furthermore three-dimensional models are developed for a better simulation of the meridional tendons in the dome region. (orig.)

  1. Prediction of Chloride Diffusion in Concrete Structure Using Meshless Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of RC structures due to chloride penetration followed by reinforcement corrosion is a serious problem in civil engineering. The numerical simulation methods at present mainly involve finite element methods (FEM, which are based on mesh generation. In this study, element-free Galerkin (EFG and meshless weighted least squares (MWLS methods are used to solve the problem of simulation of chloride diffusion in concrete. The range of a scaling parameter is presented using numerical examples based on meshless methods. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples validated the effectiveness and accuracy of the two meshless methods by comparing results obtained by MWLS with results computed by EFG and FEM and results calculated by an analytical method. A good agreement is obtained among MWLS and EFG numerical simulations and the experimental data obtained from an existing marine concrete structure. These results indicate that MWLS and EFG are reliable meshless methods that can be used for the prediction of chloride ingress in concrete structures.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of dissipative behavior of reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, M.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, LMS, CNRS, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2001-07-01

    Current technological developments tend toward increased exploitation of materials strengths and toward tackling extreme loads and environmental actions such as offshore structures subject to wind and wave loading, or buildings in seismic area. Concrete is widely used as a construction material because of its high strength-cost ratio in many applications. Experience of earthquakes and laboratory tests has shown that well designed and detailed reinforced concrete is suitable for earthquake resistant structures. The most severe likely earthquake can be survived if the members are sufficiently ductile to absorb and dissipate seismic energy by inelastic deformation. This requires a designer to assess realistically the acceptable levels of strength and to ensure adequate dissipation. This paper proposes the use of infrared thermography as a nondestructive, noncontact and real-time technique to examine diverse mechanisms of dissipation and to illustrate the onset of damage process, stress concentration and heat dissipation localization in loaded zone. In addition, this technique can be used as a nondestructive method for evaluating the fatigue limit of concrete structure subject to repeated loading.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of dissipative behavior of reinforced concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Current technological developments tend toward increased exploitation of materials strengths and toward tackling extreme loads and environmental actions such as offshore structures subject to wind and wave loading, or buildings in seismic area. Concrete is widely used as a construction material because of its high strength-cost ratio in many applications. Experience of earthquakes and laboratory tests has shown that well designed and detailed reinforced concrete is suitable for earthquake resistant structures. The most severe likely earthquake can be survived if the members are sufficiently ductile to absorb and dissipate seismic energy by inelastic deformation. This requires a designer to assess realistically the acceptable levels of strength and to ensure adequate dissipation. This paper proposes the use of infrared thermography as a nondestructive, noncontact and real-time technique to examine diverse mechanisms of dissipation and to illustrate the onset of damage process, stress concentration and heat dissipation localization in loaded zone. In addition, this technique can be used as a nondestructive method for evaluating the fatigue limit of concrete structure subject to repeated loading

  4. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  5. Seismic reliability assessment methodology for CANDU concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.J.; Nessim, M.A.; Hong, H.P.

    1995-05-01

    A study was undertaken to develop a reliability-based methodology for the assessment of existing CANDU concrete containment structures with respect to seismic loading. The focus of the study was on defining appropriate specified values and partial safety factors for earthquake loading and resistance parameters. Key issues addressed in the work were the identification of an approach to select design earthquake spectra that satisfy consistent safety levels, and the use of structure-specific data in the evaluation of structural resistance. (author). 23 refs., 9 tabs., 15 figs

  6. Seismic damage assessment of reinforced concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, HoHyun; Koh, Hyun-Moo; Hyun, Chang-Hun; Kim, Moon-Soo; Shin, Hyun Mock

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for assessing seismic damage of concrete containment structures using the nonlinear time-history numerical analysis. For this purpose, two kinds of damage index are introduced at finite element and structural levels. Nonlinear finite element analysis for the containment structure applies PSC shell elements using a layered approach leading to damage indices at finite element and structural levels, which are then used to assess the seismic damage of the containment structure. As an example of such seismic damage assessment, seismic damages of the containment structure of Wolsong I nuclear power plant in Korea are evaluated against 30 artificial earthquakes generated with a wide range of PGA according to US NRC regulatory guide 1.60. Structural responses and corresponding damage index according to the level of PGA and nonlinearity are investigated. It is also shown that the containment structure behaves elastically for earthquakes corresponding to or lower than DBE. (author)

  7. Stiffness analysis of glued connection of the timber-concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daňková, Jana; Mec, Pavel; Majstríková, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental and mathematical analysis of stiffness characteristics of a composite timber-concrete structure. The composite timberconcrete structure presented herein is non-typical compared to similar types of building structures. The interaction between the timber and concrete part of the composite cross-section is not based on metal connecting elements, but it is ensured by a glued-in perforated mesh made of plywood. The paper presents results of experimental and mathematical analysis for material alternatives of the solution of the glued joint. The slip modulus values were determined experimentally. Data obtained from the experiment evaluated by means of regression analysis. Test results were also used as input data for the compilation of a 3D model of a composite structure by means of the 3D finite element model. On the basis of result evaluation, it can be stated that the stress-deformation behaviour at shear loading of this specific timber-concrete composite structure can be affected by the type of glue used. Parameters of the 3D model of both alternative of the structure represent well the behaviour of the composite structure and the model can be used for predicting design parameters of a building structure.

  8. Performance and working life of cathodic protection systems for concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Worm, D.; Courage, W.; Leegwater, G.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures causes concrete cracking and steel diameter reduction, eventually resulting in loss of safety. Conventional repair means heavy, labour intensive and costly work and the required quality level is under economic pressure. Consequently, conventional

  9. Concrete structures vulnerability under impact: characterization, modeling, and validation - Concrete slabs vulnerability under impact: characterization, modeling, and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuan Dung Vu

    2013-01-01

    Concrete is a material whose behavior is complex, especially in cases of extreme loads. The objective of this thesis is to carry out an experimental characterization of the behavior of concrete under impact-generated stresses (confined compression and dynamic traction) and to develop a robust numerical tool to reliably model this behavior. In the experimental part, we have studied concrete samples from the VTT center (Technical Research Center of Finland). At first, quasi-static triaxial compressions with the confinement varies from 0 MPa (unconfined compression test) to 600 MPa were realized. The stiffness of the concrete increases with confinement pressure because of the reduction of porosity. Therefore, the maximum shear strength of the concrete is increased. The presence of water plays an important role when the degree of saturation is high and the concrete is subjected to high confinement pressure. Beyond a certain level of confinement pressure, the maximum shear strength of concrete decreases with increasing water content. The effect of water also influences the volumetric behavior of concrete. When all free pores are closed as a result of compaction, the low compressibility of the water prevents the deformation of the concrete, whereby the wet concrete is less deformed than the dry concrete for the same mean stress. The second part of the experimental program concerns dynamic tensile tests at different loading velocities, and different moisture conditions of concrete. The results show that the tensile strength of concrete C50 may increase up to 5 times compared to its static strength for a strain rate of about 100 s -1 . In the numerical part, we are interested in improving an existing constitutive coupled model of concrete behavior called PRM (Pontiroli-Rouquand-Mazars) to predict the concrete behavior under impact. This model is based on a coupling between a damage model which is able to describe the degradation mechanisms and cracking of the concrete at

  10. Development of a Skewed Pipe Shear Connector for Precast Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hyo; Choi, Jae-Gu; Park, Sejun; Lee, Hyunmin; Heo, And Won-Ho

    2017-05-13

    Joint connection methods, such as shear key and loop bar, improve the structural performance of precast concrete structures; consequently, there is usually decreased workability or constructional efficiency. This paper proposes a high-efficiency skewed pipe shear connector. To resist shear and pull-out forces, the proposed connectors are placed diagonally between precast concrete segments and a cast-in-place concrete joint part on a girder. Design variables (such as the pipe diameter, length, and insertion angle) have been examined to investigate the connection performance of the proposed connector. The results of our testing indicate that the skewed pipe shear connectors have 50% higher ductility and a 15% higher ratio of maximum load to yield strength as compared to the corresponding parameters of the loop bar. Finite element analysis was used for validation. The resulting validation indicates that, compared to the loop bar, the skewed pipe shear connector has a higher ultimate shear and pull-out resistance. These results indicate that the skewed pipe shear connector demonstrates more idealized behavior than the loop bar in precast concrete structures.

  11. Mathematical modeling of vibration processes in reinforced concrete structures for setting up crack initiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. A.; Matveenko, B. P.; Serovaev, G. S.; Shardakov, I. N.; Shestakov, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    The contemporary construction industry is based on the use of reinforced concrete structures, but emergency situations resulting in fracture can arise in their exploitation. In a majority of cases, reinforced concrete fracture is realized as the process of crack formation and development. As a rule, the appearance of the first cracks does not lead to the complete loss of the carrying capacity but is a fracture precursor. One method for ensuring the safe operation of building structures is based on crack initiation monitoring. A vibration method for the monitoring of reinforced concrete structures is justified in this paper. An example of a reinforced concrete beam is used to consider all stages related to the analysis of the behavior of natural frequencies in the development of a crack-shaped defect and the use of the obtained numerical results for the vibration test method. The efficiency of the method is illustrated by the results of modeling of the physical part of the method related to the analysis of the natural frequency evolution as a response to the impact action in the crack development process.

  12. Activities at ORNL in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure's performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if its effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. (author)

  13. Photocatalysis applied to concrete products - part 2 : influencing factors and product performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunger, M.; Hüsken, G.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The second part of this three-part article series addresses the influence of physicochemical parameters on the degradation performance of concrete products containing photocatalytic active TiO2. The influence of process conditions like irradiance, relative humidity, pollutant concentration and flow

  14. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to combined mechanical and environmental load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1999-01-01

    The main conclusions from a research project on durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides, water or freeze-thaw are presented. The effect of fibres and cracks on the durability of concrete is studied.......The main conclusions from a research project on durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides, water or freeze-thaw are presented. The effect of fibres and cracks on the durability of concrete is studied....

  15. Considerations on the repassivation of corroded reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobo, A.; Gonzalez, M. N.; Otero, E.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is made of the responses of clean and precorroded steel electrodes in Ca(OH) 2 saturated solutions and in cement mortar, using gravimetric, metallographic and electrochemical techniques, essentially polarisation resistance measurements. The paper aims to answer some important questions about the corrosion of reinforced concrete structures (RCS) which, though seemingly elementary, continue to arouse controversy in scientific, technical and economical circles, such as the following: What corrosion rates are dangerous in RCS? What concrete resistivities guarantee sufficient durability of RCS?. Is it possible to detain corrosion once it has begun?. Can corroded RCS be repassivated? Are electrochemical RCS rehabilitation methods efficient, and if so, when? The results obtained indicate that electrochemical chloride removal and realkalisation cannot repassive heavily corroded steel surfaces, however they can be effective methods to prevent corrosion provided they are used before the transition from the passive state to the active one occurs. If applied to late, are useless for this purpose. (Author) 25 refs

  16. Impact of soil-structure interaction on the probabilistic frequency variation of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.; Hamilton, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Earthquake response of equipment in nuclear power plants is characterized by floor response spectra. Since these spectra peak at the natural frequencies of the structure, it is important, both from safety and cost standpoints, to determine the degree of the expected variability of the calculated structural frequencies. A previous work is extended on the variability of the natural frequencies of structures due to the variations of concrete properties and a rigorous approach is presented to evaluate frequency variations based on the probability distributions of both the structural and soil parameters and jointly determine the distributions of the natural frequencies. It is assumed that the soil-structure interaction coefficients are normally distributed. With the proper choice of coordinates, the simultaneous random variations of both the structural properties and the interaction coefficients can be incorporated in the eigenvalue problem. The key methodology problem is to obtain the probability distribution of eigenvalues of matrices with random variable elements. Since no analytic relation exists between the eigenvalues and the elements, a numerical procedure had to be designed. It was found that the desired accuracy can be best achieved by splitting the joint variation into two parts: the marginal distribution of soil variations and the conditional distribution of structural variations at specific soil fractiles. Then after calculating the actual eigenvalues at judiciously selected paired values of soil and structure parameters, this information is recombined to obtain the desired cumulative distribution of natural frequencies

  17. THE STUDY ON THE DURABILITY OF SUBMERGED STRUCTURE DISPLACEMENT DUE TO CONCRETE FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures that exposed to marine environments are subjected to multiple deterioration mechanisms. An overview of the existing technology for submerged concrete, pressure resistant, concrete structures which related such as cracks, debonds, and delamination are discussed. Basic knowledge related to drowning durability such as submerged concrete structures in the maritime environment are the durability of a concrete and the ability to resist to weathering, chemical attack, abrasion or other deterioration processes. The measuring techniques and instrumentation for geometrical monitoring of submerged structural displacements have traditionally been categorized into two groups according to the two main groups, namely as geodetic surveying and geotechnical structural measurements of local displacements. This paper aims to study the durability of submerged concrete displacement and harmful effects of submerged concrete structures.

  18. Ultimate internal pressure capacity of concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, C.N.; Namperumal, R.; Al-Dabbagh, A.

    1983-01-01

    Lesson learned from the accident at Three-Mile Island nuclear plant has necessitated the computation of the ultimate internal pressure capacity of containment structures as a licensing requirement in the U.S. In general, a containment structure is designed to be essentially elastic under design accident pressure. However, as the containment pressure builds up beyond the design value due to a more severe postulated accident, the containment response turns nonlinear as it sequentially passes through cracking of concrete, yielding of linear plate, yielding of rebar, and yielding of post-tensioning tendon (if the containment concrete is prestressed). This paper reports on the determination of the ultimate internal pressure capacity and nonlinear behavior of typical reinforced and prestressed concrete BWR containments. The probable modes of failure, the criteria for ultimate pressure capacity, and the most critical sections are described. Simple equations to hand-calculate the ultimate pressure capacity and the nonlinear behavior at membrane sections of the containment shell are presented. A nonlinear finite element analysis performed to determine the nonlinear behavior of the entire shell including nonmembrane sections is briefly discribed. The analysis model consisted of laminated axisymmetric shell finite elements with nonlinear stress-strain properties for each material. Results presented for typical BWR concrete containments include nonlinear response plots of internal pressure versus containment deflection and strains in the liner, rebar, and post-tensioning tendons at the most stressed section in the shell. Leak-tightness of the containment liner and the effect of thermal loads on the ultimate capacity are discussed. (orig.)

  19. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  20. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  1. Concretes with ternary composite cements. Part III: multicriteria optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irassar, E. F.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimization methods are tools of vital importance in composite material design, where large numbers of components and design criteria must be taken into account. The formulation of today’s separately milled custommade cements is a clear example of just such a case, for the components must be proportioned to yield mortars and concretes with the proper balance of durability, strength, financial and environmental features. Multicriteria optimization has been used to develop many materials, although its application in cement formulation has yet to be explored. The present paper discusses the use of an objective function to jointly optimize sorptivity and compressive strength in limestone- (up to 20% and/or granulated blast furnace slag- (up to 20% additioned Portland cement concrete.Los métodos de optimización constituyen una herramienta de vital importancia en el diseño de materiales compuestos, donde la cantidad de componentes de la mezcla y los criterios de diseño que deben tenerse en cuenta en el proceso de fabricación son numerosos. En la actualidad, la formulación de un cemento a medida (tailor made a partir del proceso de molienda separada es un claro ejemplo de ello, pues las proporciones relativas de las componentes de la mezcla deben permitir luego obtener morteros y hormigones con el equilibrio justo entre los requerimientos durables, mecánicos, económicos y ecológicos que se soliciten. La optimización por multicriterios ha sido empleada en el desarrollo de diversos materiales, sin embargo, su aplicación en la formulación del cemento no ha sido aún explorada. En este trabajo se presenta la optimización conjunta de la capacidad de absorción y la resistencia a compresión de hormigones elaborados con cemento Portland con caliza (hasta un 20% y/o escoria granulada de alto horno (hasta un 20% utilizando la función objetivo.

  2. Vibration tests of a 4-story concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.; Czarnecki, R.M.; Scholl, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A series of forced vibration tests on a full-scale 4-story reinforced concrete test structure was performed to investigate its dynamic response before, after, and during the time it underwent structural damage. Nondestructive tests were conducted first, exciting four translational modes at force levels within the elastic limit, during which the structure suffered no structural damage. Next, a destructive test excited only the lowest translational mode at high-amplitude destructive levels, during which the structure exhibited inelastic response and suffered major structural damage. Post-destructive tests used force levels similar to the nondestructive tests. The work was in support of the program to develop methods for predicting building response to and damage from underground nuclear explosions

  3. Novel approach to make concrete structures self-healing using porous network concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.; Schlangen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers proposed self healing mechanism using hollow fibres and or microcapsule containing a modifying agent dispersed in the concrete to prolong its service life and make it more durable. A novel self healing concrete concept is proposed in this paper by using porous network concrete

  4. Assessment of degradation and aging of nuclear power plants concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, J.; Naus, D.; Graves, H.; Sheikh, A.; Le Pape, Y.; Rashid, J.; Saouma, V.; Wall, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an expert-panel assessment of ageing degradation modes and mechanisms of concrete structures in NPPs, where, based on specific operating environments, degradation is likely to occur, or may have occurred; to define relevant aging and degradation modes and mechanisms; and to perform systematic assessment of the effects of these age-related degradation mechanisms on the future life of those materials and structures. The following 7 degradation modes and mechanisms have been identified as having the greatest potential impact on the ability of concrete structures to fulfill their safety related functions during long-term NPP operation. 1) Corrosion of conventional reinforcement is difficult to assess because of inaccessibility to inspection; 2) Creep of pre-stressed concrete containments continuously affects the internal stress state and adds to tendon relaxation and gradual loss of prestress; 3) Irradiation of concrete lacks sufficient data to for a clear evaluation of its effects on long-term operations; 4) Alkali-silica reaction potential consequences on the structural integrity of the containment; 5) Fracture/cracking, which is a well understood behavior characteristic of concrete structures and is accounted for in structural design, plays a unique role in post-tensioned containments during de-tensioning and re-tensioning operations which may be undertaken as part of life extension retrofit work, resulting in delamination, and may evolve with time as a creep-cracking interaction mechanism; 6) Boric acid attack of concrete in the spent fuel pool involves knowledge gaps related to the kinetics and the extent of the attack (role of the concrete mix design); 7) Corrosion of the inaccessible side of the spent fuel pool and containment liners and the stress corrosion cracking of the tendons are important degradation modes due to the absence of in-service inspection. The potential impact of these mechanisms may be mitigated by

  5. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, P A; Batuev, S P; Radchenko, A V; Plevkov, V S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells. (paper)

  6. Reliability-based inspection of prestressed concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, M.D.

    1996-03-01

    A study was undertaken to develop a reliability-based approach to the planning of inspection programs for prestressed concrete containment structures. The main function of the prestressing system is to ensure the leak integrity of the containment by maintaining a compressive state of stress under the tensile forces which arise in a hypothesized loss of coolant accident. Prestressing force losses (due to creep and shrinkage, stress relaxation or tendon corrosion) can lead to tensile stresses under accident pressure, resulting in loss of containment leak integrity due to concrete cracking and tensile yielding of the non-prestressed reinforcement. Therefore, the evaluation of prestressing inspection programs was based on their effectiveness in maintaining an acceptable reliability level with respect to a limit state representing yeilding of non-prestressed reinforcement. An annual target reliability of 10 -4 was used for this limit state. As specified in CSA-N287.7, the evaluation of prestressing systems for containment structures is based on the results of lift-off tests to determine the prestressing force. For unbonded systems the tests are carried out on a randomly selected sample from each tendon group in the structure. For bonded systems, the test is carried out on an unbonded test beam that matches the section geometry and material properties of the containment structure. It was found that flexural testing is useful in updating the probability of concrete cracking under accident pressure. For unbonded systems, the analysis indicated that the sample size recommended by the CSA Standard (4% of the tendon population) is adequate. The CSA recommendation for a five year inspection interval is conservative unless severe degradation of the prestressing system, characterized by a high prestressing loss rate (>3%) and a large coefficient of variation of the measured prestressing force (>15%), is observed

  7. Innovative Ultrasonic Techniques for Inspection and Monitoring of Large Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niederleithinger E.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic echo and transmission techniques are used in civil engineering on a regular basis. New sensors and data processing techniques have lead to many new applications in the structural investigation as well as quality control. But concrete structures in the nuclear sector have special features and parameters, which pose problems for the methods and instrumentation currently available, e.g. extreme thickness, dense reinforcement, steel liners or special materials. Several innovative ultrasonic techniques have been developed to deal with these issues at least partly in lab experiments and pilot studies. Modern imaging techniques as multi-offset SAFT have been used e. g. to map delaminations. Thick concrete walls have successfully been inspected, partly through a steel liner. Embedded ultrasonic sensors have been designed which will be used in monitoring networks of large concrete structures above and below ground. In addition, sensitive mathematical methods as coda wave interferometry have been successfully evaluated to detect subtle changes in material properties. Examples of measurements and data evaluation are presented.

  8. Fully probabilistic design: the way for optimizing of concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Laníková

    Full Text Available Some standards for the design of concrete structures (e.g. EC2 and the original ČSN 73 1201-86 allow a structure to be designed by several methods. This contribution documents the fact that even if a structure does not comply with the partial reliability factor method, according to EC2, it can satisfy the conditions during the application of the fully probabilistic approach when using the same standard. From an example of the reliability of a prestressed spun concrete pole designed by the partial factor method and fully probabilistic approach according to the Eurocode it is evident that an expert should apply a more precise (though unfortunately more complicated method in the limiting cases. The Monte Carlo method, modified by the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS method, has been used for the calculation of reliability. Ultimate and serviceability limit states were checked for the partial factor method and fully probabilistic design. As a result of fully probabilistic design it is possible to obtain a more efficient design for a structure.

  9. Unintended out-of-plane actions in size effect tests of structural concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramallo, J.C.; Danesi, R.F.; Kotsovos, M.D.; Pavlovic, M.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is part of a larger research program on the causes of size-effect in structural concrete. The obtained results through the application of a nonlinear finite element analysis using material models extensive tested reliability, pointed out a possible connection between unintended out-of-plane actions and the ultimate strength of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, The computational analysis brought up unacceptable discrepancies only in those cases where possible unintended out-of-plane actions could not be negligible nor neutralized. Herein, it arises the need of experimental on such situations to inquire into the role played for those actions and. if they really were detected, to try to link them to some suitable parameters that would allow to take into account their presence in numerical analysis. (author). 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Prestressed concrete nuclear reactor containment structures. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, H.R.; Chang-Lo, P.L.C.; Pfeifer, B.W.; Shah, G.H.; Whitcraft, J.S.

    1975-02-01

    A discussion of the techniques and procedures used for the design of prestressed concrete nuclear reactor containment structures is presented. A physical description of Bechtel designed containment structures is presented. The design bases and load combinations are given for anticipated conditions of service. Reference design documents which include industry codes, specifications, AEC Regulatory Guides, Bechtel Topical Reports and additional criteria as appropriate to containment design are listed. Stepwise procedures typically followed by Bechtel for design of containments is discussed and design examples are presented. A description of currently used analytical methods and the practical application of these methods for containment design is also presented. The principal containment construction materials are identified and codes of practice pertaining to construction procedures are listed. Preoperational structural testing procedures and post-operational surveillance programs are furnished along with results of tests on completed containment structures. (U.S.)

  11. Modelling reinforced concrete structures in DYNA3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhouse, B.J.; Neilson, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    A material model for reinforced concrete has been implemented in the transient structural dynamics code DYNA3D. This paper outlines the constitutive material model, and presents comparisons of DYNA3D calculations and experiments on impulsively loaded panels, covering the full range of panel damage states from light cracking through to panel collapse or perforation. The results are presented using the post-processor code TAURUS, which has also been modified to provide mesh diagrams with superimposed crack patterns from the DYNA3D predictions. (author)

  12. Extracting and identifying concrete structural defects in GPR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiling; Jiao, Liangbao; Liu, Chuanxin; Cao, Xuehong; Huston, Dryver; Xia, Tian

    2018-03-01

    Traditionally most GPR data interpretations are performed manually. With the advancement of computing technologies, how to automate GPR data interpretation to achieve high efficiency and accuracy has become an active research subject. In this paper, analytical characterizations of major defects in concrete structures, including delamination, air void and moisture in GPR images, are performed. In the study, the image features of different defects are compared. Algorithms are developed for defect feature extraction and identification. For validations, both simulation results and field test data are utilized.

  13. 3D-finite element impact simulation on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, N.

    1989-12-15

    The analysis of impact processes is an interesting application of full 3D Finite Element calculations. This work presents a simulation of the penetration process of a Kinetic Energy projectile into a concrete target. Such a calculation requires an adequate FE model, especially a proper description of the crack opening process in front of the projectile. The aim is the prediction of the structural survival of the penetrator case with the help of an appropriate failure criterion. Also, the computer simulation allows a detailed analysis of the physical phenomena during impact. (orig.) With 4 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Numerical modelling of crack initiation and propagation in concrete structure under hydro-mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian, H.B.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    propagation. The XFEM provides an efficient tool for modelling crack propagation without re-meshing by introducing enriched shape functions to account for displacement discontinuities across cracks. It has been widely used for fracture and failure analysis in various applications. Of cause, there are other methods exist, possible to deal with the crack propagation, for example the mesh free methods. However, in this study, we focus on the XFEM framework. Generally, the failure of concrete structure begins with the microscopic defects initially present and/or initiated under either mechanical loading and/or hydraulic loading, until the coalescence of some of these defects results in the creation of a macroscopic crack in the material. Thus, there is a transition from microscopic, diffuse micro-cracks toward macroscopic, localized fractures or macro-cracks. Comi, Mariani and Cazes, as well as their co-worker suggest that there is a critical damage, when the damage attaints its critical value, the macro-cracks appears. The presentation is organized as follows: the basic principles of XFEM technique are firstly summarized; followed by the numerical model for the desiccation process in partially saturated concrete. Then the formulation of an isotropic elastic damage model for concrete is then presented. In the fifth section, the criteria for initiation and propagation of crack will be discussed in the framework of XFEM. In the last part, a typical modelling example is presented in the context of geological storage of radioactive wastes, considering a typical concrete liner of underground gallery subjected to ventilation process. (authors)

  15. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobol Khrystyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  16. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Khrystyna; Markiv, Taras; Hunyak, Oleksii

    2017-12-01

    Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  17. Assessment of structural reliability of precast concrete buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyankin Alexandr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Precast housing construction is currently being under rapid development, however, reliability of building structures made from precast reinforced concrete cannot be assessed rationally due to insufficient research data on that subject. In this regard, experimental and numerical studies were conducted to assess structural reliability of precast buildings as described in the given paper. Experimental studies of full-scale and model samples were conducted; numerical studies were held based on finite element models using “Lira” software. The objects under study included fragment of flooring of a building under construction, full-size fragment of flooring, full-scale models of precast cross-beams-to-columns joints and joints between hollow-core floor slabs and precast and cast-in-place cross-beams. Conducted research enabled to perform an objective assessment of structural reliability of precast buildings.

  18. Rigid-plastic seismic design of reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Joao Domingues; Bento, R.; Levtchitch, V.

    2007-01-01

    structural strength with respect to a pre-defined performance parameter using a rigid-plastic response spectrum, which is characteristic of the ground motion alone. The maximum strength demand at any point is solely dependent on the intensity of the ground motion, which facilitates the task of distributing......In this paper a new seismic design procedure for Reinforced Concrete (R/C) structures is proposed-the Rigid-Plastic Seismic Design (RPSD) method. This is a design procedure based on Non-Linear Time-History Analysis (NLTHA) for systems expected to perform in the non-linear range during a lifetime...... earthquake event. The theoretical background is the Theory of Plasticity (Rigid-Plastic Structures). Firstly, a collapse mechanism is chosen and the corresponding stress field is made safe outside the regions where plastic behaviour takes place. It is shown that this allows the determination of the required...

  19. Supplementary quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel during the construction phase of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    This standard sets forth the supplementary quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel for nuclear power plant construction. The requirements may also be extended to other appropriate parts of nuclear power plants when specified in contract documents. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with ANSI N45.2

  20. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, K.G.; Remec, I.; Pape, Y. Le

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 10 19 n/cm 2 fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation

  1. Self-flowing underwater concrete mixtures for high rise structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Placement of conventional concrete mixtures in underwater construction results in a high percentage of material loss due to washout of cement paste. This paper presents the influence of anti washout admixture (AWA) on various properties of concrete. Eleven self-flowing concrete (SFC) mixtures using type II cement were proportioned. A combination of low water cement (w/c), high cement contents, anti washout admixtures, fly ash, and silica fume were used to enhance the resistance of fresh concrete to washout. The concrete mixtures proportioned to be highly flow able, self-leveling and cohesive. The water-cementitious materials ratios ranged between 0.356 and 0.392 which correspond a typical underwater concrete mixture. The concrete mixtures were tested for slump, slump flow, washout resistance and compressive strength. The compressive strength of each concrete mixture cast underwater was determined at 3, 7, 28 days and compared with the compressive strength of the same concrete mixture cast in normal condition (in air). Test results indicated that the use of an AWA facilitates the production of flow able concrete mixtures with the added benefit of lower washout loss. Concrete mixture proportioned using Type II cement and fly ash at level of replacement of 15% was found to develop self flowing concrete with better fresh and hardened properties and more resistant to washout. The self-flowing underwater concretes developed a 28-day compressive strengths ranging from 20 to 28 MPa

  2. Structural behavior of concrete box bridge using embedded FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wonseok; Kang, Donghoon

    2012-04-01

    For the structural monitoring of railway bridges, electromagnetic interference (EMI) is a significant problem as modern railway lines are powered by high-voltage electric power feeding systems. Fiber optic sensing systems are free from EMI and have been successfully applied in civil engineering fields. This study presents the application of fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensing systems to precast concrete box railway bridges. A 20 m long full-scale precast concrete box railway girder was fabricated and tested in order to identify its static performance. The experimental program involved the measurement of the nonlinear static behavior until failure. Multiplexed FBG strain sensors were embedded along the length of steel rebar and a strain-induced wavelength shift was measured in order to monitor internal strains. The measured values from the FBG-based sensors are compared with the results using electric signal-based sensors. The results show that the FBG sensing system is promising and can improve the efficiency of structural monitoring for modern railway bridges.

  3. Analysis of reinforced concrete structures subjected to aircraft impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Scharpf, F.; Schwarz, R.

    1983-01-01

    Concerning the evaluation of the effects of aircraft impact loading on the reactor building and the contained equipment special interest belongs to both the characteristic of loading conditions and the consideration of the nonlinear behaviour of the local impacted area as well as the overall behaviour of the structure. To cover this extensive scope of problems the fully 3-dimensional code DYSMAS/L was prepared for the analysis of highly dynamic continuum mechanics problems. For this totally Lagrangian description, derived and tested in the field of the simulation of impact phenomena and penetration of armoured structures, an extension was made for the reasonable modelling of the material behaviour of reinforced concrete. Conforming the available experimental data a nonlinear stress-strain curve is given and a continuous triaxial failure-surface is composed which allows cracking of concrete in the tensile region and its crushing in the compressive mode. For the separately modeled reinforcement an elastic-plastic stress-strain relationship with kinematic hardening is used. (orig./RW)

  4. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the third part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. Specific considerations relevant to natural but manufactured heavy aggregates like haematite used in India are briefly discussed. They include water-cement ratio, strength versus water-cement ratio, mix design strength and aggregate grading. Some typical mix proportions in haematite concretes used in India are given. Equipment for heavy density concrete is mentioned. Quality control methods and tests for heavy density concrete are described under the heading: type and chemical composition of the rock, specific gravity and surface absorption of the aggregates, grading of aggregates, cement, batching, mixing, compressive strength, and density. Construction aspects such as form work, placement, vibration, finishing, and temperature control are discussed. Finally it is pointed out that for optimising the design and economy of heavy density concrete, it is necessary to carry out country-wide survey of suitable materials, to study their properties, suitability and effectiveness in shielding radiation. (M.G.B.)

  5. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2 : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Thousands of Florida bridges have steel-reinforced concrete piling foundations standing : in salt water. Over time, chloride ions in the water can migrate through the concrete to : attack the steel inside. The Florida Department of Transportation (FD...

  6. Structural design of nuclear power plant using stiffened steel plate concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Ilhwan; Kim, Sungmin; Mun, Taeyoup; Kim, Keunkyeong; Sun, Wonsang

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power is an alternative energy source that is conducive to mitigate the environmental strains. The countries having nuclear power plants are encouraging research and development sector to find ways to construct safer and more economically feasible nuclear power plants. Modularization using Steel Plate Concrete(SC) structure has been proposed as a solution to these efforts. A study of structural modules using SC structure has been performed for shortening of construction period and enhancement of structural safety of NPP structures in Korea. As a result of the research, the design code and design techniques based on limit state design method has been developed. The design code has been developed through various structural tests and theoretical studies, and it has been modified by application design of SC structure for NPP buildings. The code consists of unstiffened SC wall design, stiffened SC wall design, Half-SC slab design, stud design, connection design and so on. The stiffened steel plate concrete(SSC) wall is SC structure whose steel plates with ribs are composed on both sides of the concrete wall, and this structure was developed for improved constructability and safety of SC structure. This paper explains a design application of SC structure for a sample building specially devised to reflect all of major structural properties of main buildings of APR1400. In addition, Stiffening effect of SSC structure is evaluated and structural efficiency of SSC structure is verified in comparison with that of unstiffened SC structure. (author)

  7. Pore structure modification of cement concretes by impregnation with sulfur-containing compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANAKHMETOV Marat Rafisovich

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors study how the impregnation with sulfur-containing compounds changes the concrete pore structure and how it influences on the water absorption and watertightness. The results of this research indicate that impregnation of cement concrete with water-based solution of polysulphide modifies pore structure of cement concrete in such a way that it decreases total and effective porosity, reduces water absorption and increases watertightness. The proposed impregnation based on mineral helps to protect for a long time the most vulnerable parts of buildings – basements, foundations, as well as places on the facades of buildings exposed to rain, snow and groundwater. Application of the new product in the construction industry can increase the durability of materials, preventing the destruction processes caused by weathering, remove excess moisture in damp basements. The surfaces treated by protective compounds acquire antisoiling properties for a long time, and due to reduced thermal conductivity the cost of heating buildings is decreased. The effectiveness of the actions and the relatively low cost of proposed hydrophobizator makes it possible to spread widely the proposed protection method for building structures.

  8. Void structure of concrete with superabsorbent polymers and its relation to frost resistance of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    the difference between poor and satisfactory frost-resistance. Furthermore, the results indicate that voids created directly by SAP protect concrete against frost deterioration just like other air voids; if the concrete contains enough SAP voids, these alone can provide sufficient frost resistance. © 2013 RILEM....

  9. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Ekman, Tom; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1999-01-01

    is used as environmental load. The chloride penetration is characterized both qualitatively (UV-test) and quantitatively (chloride profile) and by microscopy. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities. Both steel fibres and polypropylene fibres are used in the concrete beams as well...... as main reinforcement. The effect of the cracks, the fibres and the concrete quality on the chloride penetration is studied....

  10. Evaluation of structural systems in precast concrete buildings by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In general, the precast concrete is the type of concrete that constructing, casting and curing in the standard factory conditions with high quality and then it will be transported with proper equipments and then it will be installed in the final position. In fact, the precast concrete buildings are the combined of several types of ...

  11. Enhancing corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures with hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt, J.; Jen, G.; Ostertag, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Reinforced concrete beams were subjected to cyclic flexural loading. • Hybrid fiber reinforced composites were effective in reducing corrosion rates. • Crack resistance due to fibers increased corrosion resistance of steel rebar. • Galvanic corrosion measurements underestimated corrosion rates. • Polarization resistance measurements predicted mass loss more accurately. - Abstract: Service loads well below the yield strength of steel reinforcing bars lead to cracking of reinforced concrete. This paper investigates whether the crack resistance of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HyFRC) reduces the corrosion rate of steel reinforcing bars in concrete after cyclic flexural loading. The reinforcing bars were extracted to examine their surface for corrosion and compare microcell and macrocell corrosion mass loss estimates against direct gravimetric measurements. A delay in corrosion initiation and lower active corrosion rates were observed in the HyFRC beam specimens when compared to reinforced specimens containing plain concrete matrices cycled at the same flexural load

  12. Ductility in high performance concrete structures:an experimental investigation and a theoretical study of prestressed hollow core slabs and prestressed cylindrical poles

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielsson, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The thesis presents results from a project dealing with ductility in high performance concrete structures. The main objectives were to investigate the material and structural ductility/brittleness of prestressed structural elements of High Performance Concrete (HPC). The aim was to get a better understanding of the fracture process and to study sudden and brittle failures formed by shear stresses. The project was split into three parts: (I) Torsion of cylindrical pole elements, (II) Shear, to...

  13. High-strength concrete and the design of power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttonen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the literature, the design of high-strength concrete structures and the suitability of high-strength concrete for the power plant structures have been studied. Concerning the behavior of structures, a basic difference between the high-strength concrete and the traditional one is that the ductility of the high-strength concrete is smaller. In the design, the non-linear stress-strain relationship of the high-strength concrete has to be taken into account. The use of the high-strength concrete is economical if the strength of the material can be utilized. In the long term, the good durability and wear resistance of the high-strength concrete increases the economy of the material. Because of the low permeability of the high-strength concrete, it is a potential material in the safety-related structures of nuclear power plants. The study discovered no particular power plant structure which would always be economical to design of high-strength concrete. However, the high-strength concrete was found to be a competitive material in general

  14. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Ohnuma, H.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural damage induced by an aircraft crashing into a reinforced concrete structure includes local damage caused by the deformable engines, and global damage caused by the entire aircraft. Local damage to the target may consist of spalling of concrete from its front face together with missile penetration into it, scabbing of concrete from its rear face, and perforation of missile through it. Until now, local damage to concrete structures has been mainly evaluated by rigid missile impact tests. Past research work regarding local damage caused by impact of deformable missiles has been limited. This paper presents the results of a series of impact tests of small-, intermediate-, and full-scale engine models into reinforced concrete panels. The purpose of the tests was to determine the local damage to a reinforced concrete structure caused by the impact of a deformable aircraft engine. (orig.)

  15. Use of recycled tires in non-structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rawahi Zamzam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research addresses the issue of tire waste management and natural aggregate resource depletion. It investigates use of commercially produced recycled tire rubber as replacement for fine and coarse aggregate in non-structural concrete. Two replacement levels of 10% and 20% were considered for fine aggregate with 0% or 10% of coarse aggregate. The study employed a mix proportion of 1:5:4 (cement: fine aggregate: coarse aggregate with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.25, which is normally utilized in concrete block manufacturing in Oman. The mixes were tested for their thermal conductivity, water absorption and compressive strength. The behavior of mixes exposed to 100 and 200°C was also studied and the samples were later tested for compressive strength. The results showed improvements in compressive strength after exposure to heat. Thermal conductivity was reduced as the percentage replacement increased for both fine and coarse aggregate. During heat exposure, the temperature rise was faster in rubberized mixes, and the compressive strength of all mixes improved after the exposure to heat. Water absorption and void content increased with increase in replacement percentage. The compressive strength did not show a clear trend with the replacement and this is due to the sensitivity of the stiff mix used in the study and its inherent lean nature. The results indicate that the lean nature of the mix makes it insensitive to small replacement investigated in this research.

  16. Structural response of reinforced concrete slabs to impulsive loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    The structure treated here is a clamped circular slab of reinforced concrete. The loading is a rectangular pulse uniformly distributed over a central area. The practical value of this problem is that it probably represents a most severe loading case for bending response among more realistic cases, because it replaces the local loaded area with a circular area at the slab center, and because it replaces the pulse with a rectangular pulse of the same peak pressure and impulse. In the theoretical treatment the pulse is assumed to produce plastic deformations large enough to neglect elastic deformation but small enough to neglect membrane action. Yielding of the reinforced concrete slab is assumed to be governed by the Johansen criterion and the associated flow rule. For simplicity, the analysis is restricted to isotropic slabs with top and bottom steel reinforcement arranged to provide the same yield moment magnitude for positive and negative curvature changes. A consequence of the assumed rigid-perfectly plastic behavior is that the deformation modes may be considered as simple mechanism governed by a yield circle. Moreover, the yield circle is stationary while the constant pressure is being applied and expands to the support once the pressure is removed. After the yield circle has arrived at the support, the remaining deformation occurs in the static collapse mode. The principal results are explicit simple formulas for permanent central deflection in terms of pressure, duration, loaded area radius, and plate properties (radius, density, yield moment)

  17. Detecting alkali-silica reaction in thick concrete structures using linear array ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull Ezell, N. Dianne; Albright, Austin; Clayton, Dwight; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2018-03-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) depend heavily on concrete structures, making the long-term performance of these structures crucial for safe operation, especially with license period extensions to 60 years and possibly beyond. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a reaction that occurs over time in concrete between alkaline cement paste and reactive, noncrystalline silica (aggregates). In the presence of water, an expansive gel is formed within the aggregates, which results in microcracks in aggregates and adjacent cement paste. ASR can potentially affect concrete properties and performance characteristics such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, flexural stiffness, shear strength, and tensile strength. Currently, no nondestructive evaluation methods have proven effective in identifying ASR before surface cracks form. ASR is identified visibly or by petrographic analysis. Although ASR definitely impacts concrete material properties, the performance of concrete structures exhibiting ASR depends on whether or not the concrete is unconfined or confined with reinforcing bars. Confinement by reinforcing bars restrainsthe expansion of ASR-affected concrete, similar to prestressing, thus improving the performance of a structure. Additionally, there is no direct correlation between the mechanical properties of concrete sample cores and the in-situ properties of the concrete. The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and a consortium of universities have developed an accelerated ASR experiment. Three large concrete specimens, representative of NPP infrastructure, were constructed containing both embedded and surface instruments. This paper presents preliminary analysis of these specimens using a frequency-banded synthetic aperture focusing technique.

  18. Static reliability of concrete structures under extreme temperature, radiation, moisture and force loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, P.; Stastnik, S.; Salajka, V.; Hradil, P.; Skolar, J.; Chlanda, V.

    2003-01-01

    The contribution presents some aspects of the static reliability of concrete structures under temperature effects and under mechanical loading. The mathematical model of a load-bearing concrete structure was performed using the FEM method. The temperature field and static stress that generated states of stress were taken into account. A brief description of some aspects of evaluation of the reliability within the primary circuit concrete structures is stated. The knowledge of actual physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical composition of concrete were necessary for obtaining correct results of numerical analysis. (author)

  19. The structural aging assessment program: ranking methodology for CANDU nuclear generating station concrete components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Muhkerjee, P.K.; McColm, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the major structural components in CANDU nuclear generating stations are constructed of reinforced concrete. Although passive in nature, these structures perform many critical safety functions in the operation of each facility. Aging can affect the structural capacity and integrity of structures. The reduction in capacity due to aging is not addressed in design codes. Thus a program is warranted to monitor the aging of safety-related CANDU plant structures and to prioritize those that require maintenance and repairs. Prioritization of monitoring efforts is best accomplished by focusing on those structures judged to be the most critical to plant performance and safety. The safety significance of each sub-element and its degradation with time can be evaluated using a numerical rating system. This will simplify the utility's efforts, thereby saving maintenance costs while providing a higher degree of assurance that performance is maintained. This paper describes the development of a rating system (ranking procedure) as part of the Plant Life Management of CANDU generating station concrete structures and illustrates its application to an operating plant. (author)

  20. Towards assuring the continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Mori, Y.; Arndt, E.G.

    1993-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. Pertinent concrete structures are described in terms of their importance, design considerations, and materials of construction. Degradation factors which can potentially impact the ability of these structures to meet their functional and performance requirements are identified. A review of the performance history of the concrete components in nuclear power plants is provided. Accomplishments of the SLAG Program are summarized, i.e., development of the structural materials information center, development of a structural aging assessment methodology, evaluation of models for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete, review of in-service inspection methods, and development of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessment and life prediction of concrete structures. On-going activities are also described

  1. Internal inspection of reinforced concrete for nuclear structures using shear wave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Aging of reinforced concrete used for worldwide nuclear structures is increasing and necessitating evaluation. • Nondestructive evaluation is a tool for assessing the condition of reinforced concrete of nuclear structures. • Ultrasonic shear wave tomography as a stress wave technique has begun to be utilized for investigation of concrete material. • A study using ultrasonic shear wave tomography indicates anomalies vital to the long-term operation of the structure. • The use of this technique has shown to successfully evaluate the internal state of reinforced concrete members. - Abstract: Reinforced concrete is important for nuclear related structures. Therefore, the integrity of structural members consisting of reinforced concrete is germane to the safe operation and longevity of these facilities. Many issues that reduce the likelihood of safe operation and longevity are not visible on the surface of reinforced concrete material. Therefore, an investigation of reinforced concrete material should include techniques which will allow peering into the concrete member and determining its internal state. The performance of nondestructive evaluations is pursuant to this goal. Some of the categories of nondestructive evaluations are electrochemical, magnetism, ground penetrating radar, and ultrasonic testing. A specific ultrasonic testing technique, namely ultrasonic shear wave tomography, is used to determine presence and extent of voids, honeycombs, cracks perpendicular to the surface, and/or delamination. This technique, and others similar to it, has been utilized in the nuclear industry to determine structural conditions

  2. Design Of A Laboratory Set-up For Evaluating Structural Strength Of Deteriorated Concrete Sewer Pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Salet, T.; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of structural behaviour of buried concrete pipes is fairly understood, except for how material deterioration affects structural behaviour and performance. Consequently, information on the structural behaviour of deteriorated sewer pipes will contribute to better understanding of the

  3. Anisotropic damage and dynamic behavior of reinforced concrete structures until failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambart, M.

    2009-09-01

    Dynamic loadings such as impact on reinforced concrete structures lead to degradations and structural failures significantly different to the ones observed for quasi-static loadings. Local effects (spalling, compaction...) and global mechanisms (bending, shear, perforation...) are experimentally observed. Wave propagation due to dynamics loadings can lead to failure in tension in a part of a structure or a component previously in compression. Induced damage anisotropy in concrete is partly responsible for the dissymmetry of behavior between tension and compression. Concrete anisotropy can be modelled by means of a second order damage tensor. In the damage model considered, damage growth is governed by the positive extensions. The model, written in the thermodynamics framework, is robust and is able to compute efficiently Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures. The initial anisotropic model is here extended to dynamics by introducing a viscosity law to govern dynamic damage evolution. The strain rate effect observed experimentally in tension (strength increases with strain rate) is reproduced. In compression no strain rate is introduced since inertial forces seem sufficient to reproduce the strength enhancement in dynamics. One also focuses on regularization issues. For high strain rates the solution is regularized since the characteristic time introduced indirectly defines an internal length and since the damage rate is bounded by a maximum damage rate parameter (visco/delay damage law). This visco/delay regularization is efficient at large strain rates, otherwise, the delay in damage evolution is too small to let damage grow in a wide enough zone. For quasi-static or low speed dynamic cases, the regularization is gained by means of classical non-local damage. For intermediary loading rates where both the strain rate effect and the non-local regularization are needed, a non-local delay-damage model is written (and used in 3D computations). The example of a dynamic

  4. Structural and mechanical study of concrete made from cementitious materials of low environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A. K.; Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Santos, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work shows the results obtained by replacing Type I Portland®, by cementitious geopolymers materials, derived from minerals, in concrete mixtures. Synthesis of both geopolymers through alkaline activation of two alluminosilicates: Bentonite and Pumice with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3). XRD, SEM and XRDE are used to structural study of new geopolymers. Concrete mixtures with replacement of Portland have 10% and 30% of geopolymer. Finally, concrete mortars formed were mechanically analysed according to ICONTEC 220 at 7, 14, 28, 41, 90 and 120 days of cure. Results shows that compressive strength of concrete from Bentonite and Pumice are almost the same for the standard concrete at 28 days of cure. At 90 days of cure, compression resistance of concrete from Pumice at 10% is even higher than those that standard concrete shows.

  5. Soft impact testing of a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vepsä, Ari, E-mail: ari.vepsa@vtt.fi; Calonius, Kim; Saarenheimo, Arja; Aatola, Seppo; Halonen, Matti

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure was built. • The structure was subjected to three almost identical soft impact tests. • Response was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. • Modal tests was also carried out with the same structure in different conditions. • The results are meant to be used for validation of computational methods and models. - Abstract: Assessing the safety of the reactor building of a nuclear power plant against the crash of an airplane calls for valid computational tools such as finite element models and material constitutive models. Validation of such tools and models in turn calls for reliable and relevant experimental data. The problem is that such data is scarcely available. One of the aspects of such a crash is vibrations that are generated by the impact. These vibrations tend to propagate from the impact point to the internal parts of the building. If strong enough, these vibrations may cause malfunction of the safety-critical equipment inside the building. To enable validation of computational models for this type of behaviour, we have conducted a series of three tests with a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure under soft impact loading. The response of the structure was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. In addition to impact tests, the structure was subjected to modal tests under different conditions. The tests yielded a wealth of useful data for validation of computational models and better understanding about shock induced vibration physics especially in reinforced concrete structures.

  6. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge. (paper)

  7. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-04-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge.

  8. Tensile Characterization of FRP Rods for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelli, F.; Nanni, A.

    2003-07-01

    The application of FRP rods as an internal or external reinforcement in new or damaged concrete structures is based on the development of design equations that take into account the mechanical properties of FRP material systems.The measurement of mechanical characteristics of FRP requires a special anchoring and protocol, since it is well known that these characteristics depend on the direction and content of fibers. In this study, an effective tensile test method is described for the mechanical characterization of FRP rods. Twelve types of glass and carbon FRP specimens with different sizes and surface characteristics were tested to validate the procedure proposed. In all, 79 tensile tests were performed, and the results obtained are discussed in this paper. Recommendations are given for specimen preparation and test setup in order to facilitate the further investigation and standardization of the FRP rods used in civil engineering.

  9. Stochastic modeling of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2004-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modeled by stochastic fields. The paper contains a description of the parameters to be included in a stochastic model and a proposal for the information needed to obtain values for the parameters in order to be able to perform reliability investigations....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  10. Stochastic Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Structures Exposed to Chloride Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modeled by stochastic fields. The paper contains a description of the parameters to be included in a stochastic model and a proposal for the information needed to obtain values for the parameters in order to be ab le to perform reliability investigations....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  11. Durability reliability analysis for corroding concrete structures under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a durability reliability analysis of reinforced concrete structures subject to the action of marine chloride. The focus is to provide insight into the role of epistemic uncertainties on durability reliability. The corrosion model involves a number of variables whose probabilistic characteristics cannot be fully determined due to the limited availability of supporting data. All sources of uncertainty, both aleatory and epistemic, should be included in the reliability analysis. Two methods are available to formulate the epistemic uncertainty: the imprecise probability-based method and the purely probabilistic method in which the epistemic uncertainties are modeled as random variables. The paper illustrates how the epistemic uncertainties are modeled and propagated in the two methods, and shows how epistemic uncertainties govern the durability reliability.

  12. Studies on connecting structure between steel shell and steel reinforced concrete; Kokaku to tekkotsu tekkin concrete tono ketsugo kozo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Morikawa, H.; Ito, N. [Metropolitan Expressway Public Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-15

    On the insert reinforcing bar structure for the connecting part of the main tower of cable stayed bridges, this paper reports verification results on a load resistant safety with a full-scale model, structure analysis and construction work. The basic structure was composed of a drilled steel shell, inserted reinforcing bars, fixing structure of bars in lining concrete of the shell and a pressure bearing plate. As an experimental result, the connecting part had a sufficient load carrying capacity against both tensile and compressive loads. The shear stress of the insert reinforcing bar structure was estimated successfully under von Mises`s condition. The shear spring constant in deformation characteristics was linearly proportional to an inserted reinforcing bar ratio. In earthquake, nearly 60% of an allowable compressive load was transferred to concrete through the pressure bearing plate. The analytical results of load resistant deformation characteristics of the connecting part well agreed with experimental ones, and the proposed analytical model was applicable to estimation of a dynamic behavior. 5 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Static and dynamic pile testing of reinforced concrete piles with structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kohlhoff, Harald; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Baeßler, Matthias; Niederleithinger, Ernst; Georgi, Steven; Herten, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Static and dynamic pile tests are carried out to determine the load bearing capacity and the quality of reinforced concrete piles. As part of a round robin test to evaluate dynamic load tests, structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors were used to receive more detailed information about the strains along the pile length compared to conventional measurements at the pile head. This paper shows the instrumentation of the pile with extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers sensors and fibre Bragg gratings sensors together with the results of the conducted static load test as well as the dynamic load tests and pile integrity tests.

  14. Design and Modeling of Structural Joints in Precast Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild

    and in the onsite construction speed. The challenges appear in the on-site assembly phase, where structural integrity has to be ensured by in-situ cast connections in narrow zones. These connections are essential for the overall structural behavior and for this reason, strong and ductile connections...... is the orientation of the U-bar loops and the use of a double T-headed rebar in the overlapping area of the Ubars. The investigation covers several independent research topics, which in combination provides a broad knowledge of the behavior of keyed shear connections. As the first topic, the structural behavior...... the loop connection in such a way, that the tensile capacity is governed by yielding of the U-bars and not by a brittle failure of the grout. This is important in order to obtain a ductile response when the connection is loaded in shear. The main focus of the thesis is test and modeling of keyed shear...

  15. Tensile strength of structural concrete repaired with hi-bond polymer modified mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Repair of cracks in concrete is often required to save the concrete structures. Appearance of crack in concrete is bound with the tensile strength of concrete. Recently a cement factory in Sindh has launched a HBPMM (Hi-Bond Polymer Modified Mortar) that can be used as a concrete repairing material instead of normal OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement). It is needed to investigate its performance compared to that of OPC. In total 144 concrete cylinders (150x300mm) having strength of 3000 and 5000 psi were manufactured. These cylinders were then splitted by using a UTM (Universal Testing Machine) and their actual tensile strength was obtained. The concrete cylinders were then repaired with different applications of HBPMM and arc. The repaired samples were again splitted at different curing ages (3, 7 and 28 days) and their tensile strength after repair was obtained. The results show that the concrete cylinders repaired with HBPMM could give better tensile strength than that repaired with arc, the tensile strength of concrete cylinders after repair could increase with increase in the application of repairing material i.e. HBPMM or OPC and with curing time, and HBPMM could remain more effective in case of rich mix concrete than that of normal mix concrete. (author)

  16. Structural recycled concrete: utilization of recycled aggregate from construction and demolition wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaejos Gutierrez, P.; Sanchez de Juan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to present the main results of CEDEX research works concerning the use of recycled aggregates for structural concretes. By way of conclusion, recommendations on the requirements of the recycled aggregates have been established, providing information about the influence of these aggregates on the properties of structural concrete. (Author)

  17. Special protective concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete is the most convenient material when large-scale radiation protection is needed. Thus, special concretes for nuclear purposes are used in various facilities like reactors, reprocessing centers, storage sites, accelerators, hospitals with nuclear medicine equipment, food ionization centers etc.. The recent advances made in civil engineering for the improvement of concrete durability and compactness are for a large part transposable to protection concretes. This article presents the basic knowledge about protection concretes with the associated typological and technological aspects. A large part is devoted to the intrinsic properties of concretes and to their behaviour in irradiation and temperature conditions: 1 - definition and field of application of special protective concretes; 2 - evolution of concepts and technologies (durability of structures, techniques of formulation, new additives, market evolution); 3 - design of protective structures (preliminary study, radiation characteristics, thermal constraints, damping and dimensioning, mechanical criteria); 4 - formulation of special concretes (general principles, granulates, hydraulic binders, pulverulent additives, water/cement ratio, reference composition of some special concretes); 5 - properties of special concretes (damping and thermo-mechanical properties); 6 - induced-irradiation and temperature phenomena (activation, radiolysis, mineralogical transformations, drying, shrinking, creep, corrosion of reinforcement). (J.S.)

  18. Analysis of time-dependent reliability of degenerated reinforced concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Durability deterioration of structure is a highly random process. The maintenance of degenerated structure involves the calculation of the reliability of time-dependent structure. This study introduced reinforced concrete structure resistance decrease model and related statistical parameters of uncertainty, analyzed resistance decrease rules of corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, and finally calculated timedependent reliability of the corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, aiming to provide a specific theoretical basis for the application of time-dependent reliability theory.

  19. POROSIMETRY BY RANDOM NODE STRUCTURING IN VIRTUAL CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Stroeven

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different porosimetry methods are presented in two successive papers. Inspiration for the development came from the rapidly-exploring random tree (RRT approach used in robotics. The novel methods are applied to virtual cementitious materials produced by a modern concurrent algorithm-based discrete element modeling system, HADES. This would render possible realistically simulating all aspects of particulate matter that influence structure-sensitive features of the pore network structure in maturing concrete, namely size, shape and dispersion of the aggregate and cement particles. Pore space is a complex tortuous entity. Practical methods conventionally applied for assessment of pore size distribution may fail or present biased information. Among them, mercury intrusion porosimetry and 2D quantitative image analysis are popular. The mathematical morphology operator “opening” can be applied to sections and even provide 3D information on pore size distribution, provided isotropy is guaranteed. However, aggregate grain surfaces lead to anisotropy in porosity. The presented methods allow exploration of pore space in the virtual material, after which pore size distribution is derived from star volume measurements. In addition to size of pores their continuity is of crucial importance for durability estimation. Double-random multiple tree structuring (DRaMuTS, introduced earlier in IA&S (Stroeven et al., 2011b and random node structuring (RaNoS provide such information.

  20. Design of reinforced concrete members based on structural mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, B.E.; Schulz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Up to now the design of reinforced concrete linear members is performed with the help of an inconsistent design theory, which nevertherless is sufficiently safe and simple to be used in the practice. The purpose of this paper is to present a rational reinforced concrete design method which is not too dissimilar to the present design rules, but is capable of defining consistently internal stresses along a reinforced concrete section. The present status of the completed computer procedures allows the analysis of linear reinforced concrete members formed by laminar reinforced concrete plates presenting variable thickness. A practical approach is presented for which the concrete and steel section is constant along the member axis. In this case, the concept of the equivalent section is introduced, which allows a simple analysis of the stress pattern along the member section. (Author) [pt

  1. Strain measurements of temperatures up to 3000C in a concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittenhelm, Ch.

    1975-10-01

    Strain measurements in a concrete structure representing a cylindrical section of a Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel with hot liner, were made. In order to interpret these values in terms of strain and stress in a three dimensional structure, the gauge characteristics as well as the material date of the concrete have to be known in great detail. The paper deals with the performance of different gauges embedded in small concrete blocks and others of the same type embedded in the test ring. Temperature resistance, long-time performance, electrical drift and hysteresis of the gauges were investigated. (author)

  2. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures considering control of shrinkage and strength failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhou, Mingdong

    2015-01-01

    To take into account the shrinkage effect in the early stage of Reinforced Concrete (RC) design, an effective continuum topology optimization method is presented in this paper. Based on the power-law interpolation, shrinkage of concrete is numerically simulated by introducing an additional design......-dependent force. Under multi-axial stress conditions, the concrete failure surface is well fitted by two Drucker-Prager yield functions. The optimization problem aims at minimizing the cost function under yield strength constraints on concrete elements and a structural shrinkage volume constraint. In conjunction...... to ensure the structural safety under the combined action of external loads and shrinkage....

  3. Concrete containment tests: Phase 2, Structural elements with liner plates: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, N.W.; Roller, J.J.; Schultz, D.M.; Julien, J.T.; Weinmann, T.L.

    1987-08-01

    The tests described in this report are part of Phase 2 of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program. The overall objective of the EPRI program is to provide a test-verified analytical method of estimating capacities of concrete reactor containment buildings under internal overpressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. The Phase 2 testing included seven large-scale specimens representing structural elements from reinforced and prestressed concrete reactor containment buildings. Six of the seven test specimens were square wall elements. Of these six specimens, four were used for biaxial tension tests to determine strength, deformation, and leak-rate characteristics of full-scale wall elements representing prestressed concrete containment design. The remaining two square wall elements were used for thermal buckling tests to determine whether buckling of the steel liner plate would occur between anchorages when subjected to a sudden extreme temperature differential. The last of the seven test specimens for Phase 2 represented the region where the wall and the basemat intersect in a prestressed concrete containment building. A multi-directional loading scheme was used to produce high bending moments and shear in the wall/basemat junction region. The objective of this test was to determine if there is potential for liner plate tearing in the junction region. Results presented include observed behavior and extensive measurements of deformations and strains as a function of applied load. The data are being used to confirm analytical models for predicting strength and deformation of containment structures in a separate parallel analytical investigation sponsored by EPRI

  4. Cracking in reinforced concrete structures due to imposed deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, A.

    1997-04-01

    This thesis is concerned with modeling of the cracking process in reinforced concrete due to imposed deformations. Cracking is investigated both at early ages, during hydration, and at mature age when the final properties of the concrete are reached. One of the most important material characteristics of the concrete at early ages, the Young`s modulus is determined by means of a dynamic method called the resonance frequency method. 40 refs

  5. A study on the effects of seawater on the durable life of concrete structures(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Jang, Bong Suk; Jang, Seung Yeop; Jeon, Se Jin; Yu, Yeong; Park, Dae Gyun; Hyeong, Sang Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    Recently, large scale concrete structures such as nuclear power plants and offshore structures are actively being built in this country. These structures are subject to heavy attack due to seawater environment. A reasonable consideration for corrosion has not been paid to the structures in the past decades due to insufficient research data and guidelines. The durability is emerging as one of the most important factors. In the design and construction of concrete structures. The purpose of the present study is, therefore, to explore the corrosion mechanism and penetration mechanism of chloride ion, and to establish the evaluation procedure of durability life of concrete structures. In this study, the chloride ion concentration of seawater around our country have been analyzed and the deterioration mechanism of concrete structures have been also analyzed. The penetration mechanism of seawater into the concrete has been also studied. To this end, a comprehensive experimental program has been setup. The major test variables include the type of cement and the type of mineral admixture. The strength test as well as corrosion test have been conducted to explore the effects of chloride ion penetration on the properties of concrete. The corrosion mechanism and the penetration of chloride ion into concrete structures have been studied. These results will allow the estimation of durable life of concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The experimental results and the developed theory in the present study can be efficiently used to analyze the chloride ion penetration and to estimate the durability of concrete structures In nuclear power plants. The present study may also provide strong basis to evaluate the remaining service life of concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  6. Contrastive Numerical Investigations on Thermo-Structural Behaviors in Mass Concrete with Various Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Feng, Chuqiao; Liu, Xinghong; Liu, Shuhua; Zhang, Chao; Yuan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contrastive investigation of numerical simulations to improve the comprehension of thermo-structural coupled phenomena of mass concrete structures during construction. The finite element (FE) analysis of thermo-structural behaviors is used to investigate the applicability of supersulfated cement (SSC) in mass concrete structures. A multi-scale framework based on a homogenization scheme is adopted in the parameter studies to describe the nonlinear concrete behaviors. Based on the experimental data of hydration heat evolution rate and quantity of SSC and fly ash Portland cement, the hydration properties of various cements are studied. Simulations are run on a concrete dam section with a conventional method and a chemo-thermo-mechanical coupled method. The results show that SSC is more suitable for mass concrete structures from the standpoint of temperature control and crack prevention. PMID:28773517

  7. Quality control of concrete structures in nuclear power plant, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hisao; Kawaguchi, Tohru; Oike, Takeshi; Morimoto, Shoichi; Takeshita, Shigetoshi.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the result of an investigation to clarify the effect of concrete temperature as mixed in the summer season on the strength gain characteristics of mass concrete such as used in construction of nuclear power plants. It is pointed out that the low strength gain of control cylinders in summer is caused by two main factors, viz., the absence of water modification in the mix design according to concrete temperature as mixed and high curing temperature after placing up to mold removal rather than concrete temperature itself as mixed. On the other hand, it has been clarified that high strength gain in mass concrete can be realized by lowering concrete temperature as mixed so as to lower the subsequent curing temperature at early age. Furthermore, it is explained that the larger the size of the member is, the more effect can be expected from lowering concrete temperature. The effect of concrete temperature as mixed on high strength concrete to be used in PCCV is discussed in the Appendix. (author)

  8. Efficiency of fiber reinforced concrete application in structures subjected to dynamic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Valeriy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced concretes possess high strength under dynamic loadings, which include impact loads, thanks to their high structural viscosity. This is the reason for using them in difficult operating conditions, where increasing the performance characteristics and the structure durability is of prime importance, and the issues of the cost become less significant. Applying methods of disperse reinforcement is most challenging in case of subtle high-porous materials on mineral binders, for example foamed concrete. At the same time, the experiments conducted in Russia and abroad show, that also in other cases the concrete strength resistance several times increases as a result of disperse reinforcement. This doesn't depend on average density of the concrete and type of fiber used. In the article the fibre reinforced concrete impact resistance is analysed. Recommendations are given in regard to fibre concrete application in manufacture of monolithic floor units for industrial buildings and precast piles.

  9. 2.4. Kinetics of voids structure change according to the specific properties of the concrete mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    This work is devoted to kinetics of voids structure changes according to the specific properties of concrete mix. The influence of concrete mix mobility on durability and watertightness of concrete was studied. The influence of cement expenditure on concrete durability was examined.

  10. Partial Prestress Concrete Beams Reinforced Concrete Column Joint Earthquake Resistant On Frame Structure Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astawa, M. D.; Kartini, W.; Lie, F. X. E.

    2018-01-01

    Floor Building that requires a large space such as for the meeting room, so it must remove the column in the middle of the room, then the span beam above the room will be long. If the beam of structural element with a span length reaches 15.00 m, then it is less effective and efficient using a regular Reinforced Concrete Beam because it requires a large section dimension, and will reduce the beauty of the view in terms of aesthetics of Architecture. In order to meet these criteria, in this design will use partial prestressing method with 400/600 mm section dimension, assuming the partial Prestressed Beam structure is still able to resist the lateral force of the earthquake. The design of the reinforcement has taken into account to resist the moment due to the gravitational load and lateral forces. The earthquake occurring on the frame structure of the building. In accordance with the provisions, the flexural moment capacity of the tendon is permitted only by 25% of the total bending moment on support of the beam, while the 75% will be charged to the reinforcing steel. Based on the analysis result, bring ini 1 (one) tendon contains 6 strand with diameter 15,2 mm. On the beam pedestal, requires 5D25 tensile reinforcement and 3D25 for the compression reinforcement, for shear reinforcement on the pedestal using Ø10-100 mm. Dimensional column section are 600/600 mm with longitudinal main reinforcement of 12D25, and transverse reinforcement Ø10-150. At the core of the beam-column joint, use the transversal reinforcement Ø10-100 mm. The moment of Column versus Beam Moment ∑Me > 1.2 Mg, with a value of 906.99 kNm > 832.25 kNm, qualify for ductility and Strong Columns-weak beam. Capacity of contribution bending moment of Strand Tendon’s is 23.95% from the total bending moment capacity of the beam, meaning in accordance with the provisions. Thus, the stability and ductility structure of Beam-Column joint is satisfy the requirements of SNI 2847: 2013 and ACI 318-11.

  11. Procedure for getting safety classed concrete structures approved by Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halme, Ville-Juhani

    2015-01-01

    Posiva is preparing geological final disposal in the Finnish bedrock in Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. The final disposal facility includes encapsulation plant and underground repository. Most of the main civil structures are concrete structures. STUK is the supervising authority in civil structures. The National Building Code of Finland and STUK's Regulatory Guide on nuclear safety (YVL) are the most important instructions when constructing concrete structures into nuclear installation. Posiva has classified concrete structures in two classes according STUK's YVL-guidance: EYT (non-nuclear) and Safety Class 3 (SC 3, nuclear safety significance). When building SC 3 concrete structures, specific protocol must be followed. Protocol includes planned routines for design, construction, supervision, quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) activities. Documents relating concrete structures must be approved by Posiva and STUK before construction work. After structures have been designed and actual building is ongoing, there are two main steps. Before concreting, readiness inspection for concreting must be arranged. Readiness inspection will be arranged according to a specific plan and the date must be informed to STUK. After establishing readiness for concreting, casting work can begin. Once concrete structures are done, inspected and approved, final documentation according to a quality control plan will be reviewed by Posiva. After Posiva's approval, final documentation will be sent for STUK's approval. In the end STUK will give the permission for commissioning of the concrete structures after approved commissioning inspection. The document is made up of an abstract and a poster

  12. Electrochemical techniques to detect corrosion in concrete structures in nuclear installations - Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    optimum time for repair. 3. Control of efficiency of repair technologies. All nuclear plants have concrete structures which need a correct performance and aging for assuring the necessary protection to the public. Metallic corrosion is recognized as the most important degradation mechanism that may affect concrete structures. Its early detection will help the nuclear installations to be maintained in the necessary margin of safe operation. The monitoring of feasibility of occurrence of this process has, therefore, to be one of the priorities in the overall plan of maintenance of nuclear plants and installations and an adequate periodicity should be established, linked to the particular environments and type of structure. Regarding the necessary strategy of inspection and maintenance, particular non-accessible parts of concrete structures in new plants could be instrumented by sensors in order to help their assessment. Attached sensors can be also installed in existing plants, in operation or in decommissioning, when their aging is in a risky or critical situation. However, while simple periodical inspection using non-permanent NDET will be the correct operation in those cases of good aging performance of the metal embedded in concrete

  13. PARCS - A pre-stressed and reinforced concrete shell element for analysis of containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buragohain, D.N.; Mukherjee, A.

    1993-01-01

    within the element and they need not pass through any nodal line. Therefore, the element frees the user from the rigor of providing a nodal line along every reinforcement and therefore a much smaller model can be generated. The element takes into account the exact location of the reinforcements and no limiting assumption like uniform smearing is necessary. Moreover, the element is based on isoparametric quadratic shape functions. Therefore, it can easily accommodate irregular boundaries. A two step analysis for the pre-stressed concrete structures has been proposed. In the first step only the pre-stressing forces are applied. In this part the cable is excluded from the model. The effect of superimposed load on the pre-stressed structures is found out in the second step. The stiffness of the cable is included in this step. The final solution is obtained by superimposing the two responses. The solved examples show that this method generates a better value of final cable tension than the single step method

  14. Rigid missiles impact on reinforced concrete structures: analysis by discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, W.J.

    2008-10-01

    The constructions likely to be subjected to some extreme loadings like reactor containment buildings have to be dimensioned accordingly. As a part of study of concrete structures, this thesis focuses on numerical modelling of rigid missile impacts against a rigid reinforced concrete slab. Based on some experiment tests data, an elasto-plastic-damaged constitutive law has been implanted into a discrete element numerical code. To calibrate certain parameters of the numerical model, some quasi static tests have been first simulated. Once the model calibration was done, some missile impact simulation tests have then been carried out. The numerical results are well agree with these provided by French Atomic Energy Agency (Cea) and the French Electrical power Company (EDF) in terms of the trajectory of the missile. We were able to show the need of a constitutive law taking into account the compaction behaviour of the concrete when the predictions of penetration and perforation of a thick slab was demanded. Finally, a parametric study confirmed that the numerical model can be used the way predictive as well as the empirical prediction law, while the first can provide additional significant mechanical description. (author)

  15. Damage detection in concrete structures with smart piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Akshay S. K.; Bhalla, Suresh

    2003-10-01

    Detection of damages and progressive deterioration in structures is a critical issue. Visual inspections are tedious and unreliable. Incipient damages are often not discernible by low frequency dynamic response and other NDE techniques. Smart piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) transducers are emerging as an effective alternative in health monitoring of structures. The electro-mechanical impedance method employs the self-actuating and sensing characteristics of the PZT, without having to use actuators and sensors separately. When excited by an ac source, the PZT transducers bonded to the host structure activates the higher modes of vibration locally. Changes in the admittance response of the transducer serves as an indicator of damage around the transducer. In this paper, the effectiveness of PZT transducers for characterizing damages in concrete, in terms of the damage extent and location, is experimentally examined. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index, adopted to quantify the changes in the admittance signatures, correlates with the damage extent. The damages on the surface that is not mounted by the PZT are also discernible. An array of transducers proves effective in detecting the damaged zone. The progressive incipient crack can be detected much before it actually becomes visible to the naked eye.

  16. Tests and calculation of the seismic behaviour of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvain, J.; Hoffman, A.; Jeandidier, C.; Livolant, M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with the frame type buildings, which are generally the most sensible to earthquakes. Its objectives are to describe the main phenomena governing the behaviour of such structures, when the earthquake level increases up to the structure collapse, to point out what type of calculation model shall be used to obtain good results and to give an estimation of the safety factors corresponding to the usual design practice. Extended experimental research on the behaviour of reinforced concrete beams and frames submitted to monotonic or cyclic loading has been done. These tests are very useful to build constitutive laws models, but as they do not reproduce the earthquake loads, they do not simulate directly what happens to the structure during an earthquake. For that reason, since 1966, dynamics tests were performed using vibration generators or shaking-tables. As an example of that type of test and of the corresponding results, we describe here with more details the tests made at the Saclay Center, on a shaking-table called VESUVE, on simple beams and frames

  17. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure

  18. Strategy for 100-year life of the ACR-1000 concrete containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrishami, H.; Elgohary, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Plant Life Management (PLiM) strategy for the concrete containment structure of the ACR-1000 (Advanced CANDU Reactor) designed by AECL. The ACR-1000 is designed for 100-year plant life including 60-year operating life and additional 40-year decommissioning period of time. The approach adopted for the PLiM strategy of the concrete containment structure is a preventive one, key areas being: 1) design methodology, 2) material performance and 3) life cycle management and ageing management program. In the design phase, in addition to strength and serviceability, durability is a major requirement during the service life and decommissioning phase of the ACR structure. Parameters affecting durability design include: a) concrete performance, b) structural application, and c) environmental conditions. Due to the complex nature of the environmental effects acting on structures during the service life of project, it is considered that true improved performance during the service life can be achieved by improving the material characteristics. Many recent innovations in advanced concrete materials technology have made it possible to produce modern concrete such as high-performance concrete with exceptional performance characteristics. In this paper, the PLiM strategy for the ACR-1000 concrete containment is presented. In addition to addressing the design methodology and material performance areas, a systematic approach for ageing management program for the concrete containment structure is presented. (author)

  19. Structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures under monotonous and cyclic loadings: numerical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepretre, C.; Millard, A.; Nahas, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures is usually performed either by means of simplified methods of strength of materials type i.e. global methods, or by means of detailed methods of continuum mechanics type, i.e. local methods. For this second type, some constitutive models are available for concrete and rebars in a certain number of finite element systems. These models are often validated on simple homogeneous tests. Therefore, it is important to appraise the validity of the results when applying them to the analysis of a reinforced concrete structure, in order to be able to make correct predictions of the actual behaviour, under normal and faulty conditions. For this purpose, some tests have been performed at I.N.S.A. de Lyon on reinforced concrete beams, subjected to monotonous and cyclic loadings, in order to generate reference solutions to be compared with the numerical predictions given by two finite element systems: - CASTEM, developed by C.E.A./.D.E.M.T. - ELEFINI, developed by I.N.S.A. de Lyon

  20. Proceedings of the NEA workshop on development priorities for NDE of concrete structures in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The first session's objectives of this conference were to identify the perspectives of national regulators and plant operators on what is required of NDE. The second session objectives were to provide opportunity for NDE practitioners to share experience and views on the status of development of key NDE techniques: tomographic imaging for investigation of concrete structures, four examples of modern NDE techniques applied to the investigation of nuclear and non-nuclear concrete structures and a vision of future improvements, investigating concrete structures by 3D Radar imaging and imaging using mechanical impact, synopsis NDT of concrete using ultrasonics and radar. The third session objectives were to prioritise development of NDE techniques for safety related concrete structures in nuclear installations: key conclusions from earlier sessions, proposed priorities and next steps

  1. The study on the mechanical characteristics of concrete of nuclear reactor containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, W. S.; Kwon, K. J.; Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    Reactor containment structure of nuclear power plant designed by prestressed concrete causes time-dependent prestress loss due to the mechanical characteristics of concrete. Prestress loss strongly affects to the safety factor of structure under the circumstances of designing, construction and inspection. Thus, this study is to investigate the mechanical characteristics of reactor containment concrete structure of Yonggwang No. 5 and 6. In this study, the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, poisson's ratio and creep test followed by ASTM code are performed to investigate the mechanical characteristics of concrete made by V type cement. Additionally, since creep causes more time-dependent prestress loss than the other, the measurement value from the creep test is compared with the results from the creep prediction equations by KSCE, JSCE, Hansen, ACI and CEB-FIP model for the effective application. Hereafter, the results of this study may enable to assist the calculation effective stress considering time-dependent prestress loss of the prestressed concrete structures

  2. Survey of Experience Using Reinforced Concrete in Floating Marine Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    analyzed in several steps. The load history can be simulated by .. using load increments and independent load vectors . 4.31 NTH is not only active in...NILSEN, N., " FEILD TEST OF REINFORCEMENT CORROSION IN CONCRETE", PERFORMANCE OF CONCRETE IN MARINE ENVIRONMENT, ACI SPECIAL PUBLICATION SP-65, 1980. 136

  3. History of service life design of concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    After the introduction of reinforced concrete it was believed that the material was extremely durable. Soon it was found that reinforced concrete could have serious durability problems and that special care should be taken to avoid them. Durability became a design issue. Based on experience from

  4. Long-term analysis of slender concrete structures with cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, J.C.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A special form of the finite element program, which is based on the equilibrium of forces in various cross sections of the beam together with the principle of virtual work, is presented for solving concrete beam problems. This analytical method uses the newly developed rheological element and exponential algorithm for computing time-dependent deformation and stress distribution in cracked concrete members subjected to sustained loads, temperature, or drying. Temperature and moisture effects on hydration (aging) and creep rate are included. The rate effects of temperature and moisture on the deformation of concrete are also taken into account in the formulation. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the validity of the analysis on concrete beams. Plain and reinforced concrete beams subjected to bending, heating or drying are analyzed and checked against experimental data

  5. Bond slip model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, A.; Jason, L.; Davenne, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new finite element approach to model the steel-concrete bond effects. This model proposes to relate steel, represented by truss elements, with the surrounding concrete in the case where the two meshes are not necessary coincident. The theoretical formulation is described and the model is applied on a reinforced concrete tie. A characteristic stress distribution is observed, related to the transfer of bond forces from steel to concrete. The results of this simulation are compared with a computation in which a perfect relation between steel and concrete is supposed. It clearly shows how the introduction of the bond model can improve the description of the cracking process (finite number of cracks). (authors)

  6. Explosive Spalling of Fire Exposed Resource Saving Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes briefly a new test facility, which has been developed within the project “Resource Saving Concrete Structures”, also called “Green Concrete” and some test results from the project. A full report is available from the home page of the Department of Civil Engineering Kristiansen......, Hertz, Sørensen [1]. The main idea was to establish a test method by means of which it should be possible to assess whether a particular concrete has an increased risk of spalling compared to traditional concretes as defined in Hertz [2] and only using ordinary standard cylinders as test specimens....... The method has been applied on the green concretes of the project and later also as a first indicator in other projects. The method appears to be a valuable tool for the first investigation of new concretes...

  7. Composite action of steel frames and precast concrete infill panels with corner connections – Part 2 : finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.; Hofmeyer, H.; Snijder, H.H.; Liew, J.Y.R.; Lee, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    When precast concrete infill panels are connected to steel frames at discrete locations, interaction at the structural interface is neither complete nor absent. The contribution of precast concrete infill panels to the lateral stiffness and strength of steel frames can be significant depending on

  8. Composite action of steel frames and precast concrete infill panels with corner connections – Part 1 : experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.; Snijder, H.H.; Hofmeyer, H.; Liew, J.Y.R.; Lee, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    When precast concrete infill panels are connected to steel frames at discrete locations, interaction at the structural interface is neither complete nor absent. The contribution of precast concrete infill panels to the lateral stiffness and strength of steel frames can be significant depending on

  9. Study of risk of developing a delayed ettringite formation and its consequences in concrete of nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Shamaa, M.

    2012-01-01

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in concrete structures is a pathology that can develop when special conditions on the concrete composition, the thermal conditions at the young age and the environment are met. This phenomenon provokes swelling of the material and cracking in the structure. It affects two types of concrete: the concrete heat-treated and the concrete cast in place in massive parts. Although many studies were done before in order to better understand this pathology, the DEF is still not well known. This is due to its complex mechanism, the influential parameters and its consequences on microscopic and structural scales. For that purpose, the thesis work was designed in order to better understand this pathology. Experimental studies were done to evaluate the impact of certain factors during the reaction, by focusing on nuclear application. An important part of this study was dedicated to assess the risk of DEF development in a nuclear power plant, and to understand how this pathology affects the mechanical characteristics and transfer properties of the concrete. Then, we have studied the impact of the hygrometry on the development of DEF. This has lead to identify a relation between environmental humidity and swelling. We have also examined the role of alkali leaching. A follow up study of the transfer properties was also done and was confronted to the observed swelling. Finally, we were interested in the characterization of the aggregates effect on the kinetics and the amplitude of DEF swelling. So, we have examined the parameters related to the size and the volume fraction of granular inclusions. Furthermore, an application of a mesoscopic numerical modeling of swelling is proposed. (author)

  10. Rapid chloride permeability test as durability index of the concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Sánchez, B.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available From the RCPT publication, this test has been frequently used in the concrete structures durability assessment. This test it could be determined in a relatively short time the material permeability, within a rank or quality level that allows comparing concretes as far as their characteristics. In this document, is present an intense investigation to evaluate mix designs with the principal objective to measure the participation and contribution of the components that take part in the concrete manufacture. A detailed review of the components contribution is applied to know specifically the properties in the product during any state: fresh or hard path. In this paper, are identified and included the most influence variables in the concrete properties modification.

    Desde su lanzamiento, la prueba de permeabilidad rápida a la penetración de cloruros ha sido usada frecuentemente en la evaluación de la durabilidad en las estructuras de hormigón, ya que se puede establecer, en un tiempo relativamente corto, la determinación de la permeabilidad del material, dentro de un nivel de calidad que permite comparar hormigones en cuanto a esta característica. En este articulo se presenta una investigación en donde se evalúan diseños de mezcla con la finalidad de medir la participación y contribución de cada uno de los componentes que intervienen en la fabricación del hormigón, revisando con detalle su contribución en las propiedades finales del producto, sin olvidar sus efectos en su comportamiento en estado fresco o cuando se encuentra en fase de endurecimiento. En el trabajo se incluyen e identifican las variables de mayor influencia y su relación con la propiedad que modificaron en el hormigón.

  11. Model - including thermal creep effects - for the analysis of three-dimensional concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Rebora, B.; Favrod, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents the most recent developments and results of research carried out by IPEN to establish a mathematical model for the non-linear rheological three-dimensional analysis of massive prestressed concrete structures. The main point of these latest developments is the simulation of the creep of concrete submitted to high temperatures over a long period of time. This research, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation, has taken an increased importance with the advent of nuclear reactor vessels of the HHT type and new conceptions concerning the cooling of their concrete (replacement of the thermal insulation by a zone of hot concrete). (orig.)

  12. A 3D analysis of reinforced concrete structures by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claure, J.D.; Campos Filho, A.

    1995-01-01

    Fundamental features of a computational model, based on the finite element methods, for the analysis of concrete structure are presented. The study comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete are considered. The reinforcement is inserted in the finite element model using an embedded model. A smeared crack model is used for the concrete cracking, which considers the contribution of concrete between cracks and allows the closing the cracks closing. The computational code MPGS (Multi-Purpose Graphic System) is used, to make easy the analysis and interpretation of the numeric results. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  13. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  14. Development of laboratory acceleration test method for service life prediction of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C.; Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, D. K.

    1999-01-01

    Service life prediction of nuclear power plants depends on the application of history of structures, field inspection and test, the development of laboratory acceleration tests, their analysis method and predictive model. In this study, laboratory acceleration test method for service life prediction of concrete structures and application of experimental test results are introduced. This study is concerned with environmental condition of concrete structures and is to develop the acceleration test method for durability factors of concrete structures e.g. carbonation, sulfate attack, freeze-thaw cycles and shrinkage-expansion etc

  15. Method on the aging evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Yoshinori; Tsukagoshi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, method on the durability evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration factors of thermal effect, irradiation, neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers

  16. Nonlocal Peridynamic Modeling and Simulation on Crack Propagation in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended peridynamic approach for crack propagation analysis in concrete structures was proposed. In the peridynamic constitutive model, concrete material was described as a series of interacting particles, and the short-range repulsive force and anisotropic behavior of concrete were taken into account in the expression of the interactive bonding force, which was given in terms of classical elastic constants and peridynamic horizon. The damage of material was defined locally at the level of pairwise bond, and the critical stretch of material bond was described as a function of fracture strength in the classical concrete failure theory. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed model and algorithms were validated by simulating the propagation of mode I and I-II mixed mode cracks in concrete slabs. Furthermore, crack propagation in a double-edge notched concrete beam subjected to four-point load was simulated, in which the experimental observations are captured naturally as a consequence of the solution.

  17. Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for concrete of containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Woo, S. K.; Song, Y. C.; Kweon, Y. K.; Cho, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for plain concrete of containment structure on nuclear power plants are studied under uniaxial and biaxial stress(compression-compression, compression-tension, and tension-tension combined stress). The concrete specimens of a square plate type are used for uniaxial and biaxial loading. The experimental data indicate that the strength of concrete under biaxial compression, f 2 /f 1 =-1/-1, is 17 percent larger than under uniaxial compression and the poisson's ratio of concrete is 0.1745. On the base of the results, a biaxial failure envelope for plain concrete that the uniaxial strength is 5660 psi are provided, and the biaxial failure behaviors for three biaxial loading areas are plotted respectively. And, various analytical equations having the reliability are proposed for representations of the biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response curves of concrete

  18. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Barbudo, Auxiliadora; De Brito, Jorge

    2016-02-02

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results) from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  19. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Uceda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%, using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  20. Concrete structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Winkel, B.V.; Weiner, E.O.

    1995-09-01

    As Hanford Site Contractors address maintenance and future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice has building codes for reinforced concrete design guidelines, the tanks were not constructed to today's building codes and future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current practice. The Hanford Site engineering staff has embraced nonlinear finite-element modeling of concrete in an effort to obtain a more accurate understanding of the actual tank margins. This document brings together and integrates past Hanford Site nonlinear reinforced concrete analysis methods, past Hanford Site concrete testing, public domain research testing, and current concrete research directions. This document, including future revisions, provides the structural engineering overview (or survey) for a consistent, accurate approach to nonlinear finite-element modeling of reinforced concrete for Hanford Site waste storage tanks. This report addresses concrete strength and modulus degradation with temperature, creep, shrinkage, long-term sustained loads, and temperature degradation of rebar and concrete bonds. Recommendations are given for parameter studies and evaluation techniques for review of nonlinear finite-element analysis of concrete

  1. Stress-based topology optimization of concrete structures with prestressing reinforcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Deng, Zichen

    2013-11-01

    Following the extended two-material density penalization scheme, a stress-based topology optimization method for the layout design of prestressed concrete structures is proposed. The Drucker-Prager yield criterion is used to predict the asymmetrical strength failure of concrete. The prestress is considered by making a reasonable assumption on the prestressing orientation in each element and adding an additional load vector to the structural equilibrium function. The proposed optimization model is thus formulated as to minimize the reinforcement material volume under Drucker-Prager yield constraints on elemental concrete local stresses. In order to give a reasonable definition of concrete local stress and prevent the stress singularity phenomenon, the local stress interpolation function and the ɛ -relaxation technique are adopted. The topology optimization problem is solved using the method of moving asymptotes combined with an active set strategy. Numerical examples are given to show the efficiency of the proposed optimization method in the layout design of prestressed concrete structures.

  2. Connecting to concrete: wireless monitoring of chloride ions in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; ten Have, Bas; Hoekstra, Gerrit I.; Douma, Arjan; de Bruijn, Douwe; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, chloride ions are measured wirelessly in concrete. The half-cell potential of a silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode, which corresponds to the concentration of chloride ions, is measured wirelessly. The sensor system (the Ag/AgCl and a reference electrode) is embedded in

  3. Material model for non-linear finite element analyses of large concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engen, Morten; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Øverli, Jan Arve; Åldstedt, Erik; Beushausen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A fully triaxial material model for concrete was implemented in a commercial finite element code. The only required input parameter was the cylinder compressive strength. The material model was suitable for non-linear finite element analyses of large concrete structures. The importance of including

  4. A degradation model for stray current induced corrosion in underground reinforced concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of stray currents on durability and reinforcement corrosion of underground concrete structures. Cathodic protection of underground pipelines are stationary sources of stray current interference with concrete, and rail traction systems are non-stationary sources. The

  5. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES OF REPAIR TECHNOLOGY PERTAINING TO REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a brief review of new methods for repair of concrete and reinforced concrete products, structures etc. The review demonstrates that the usage of diffusion processes proceeding in the porous materials makes it possible to obtain positive effects while performing  repair works. 

  6. Realisation of complex precast concrete structures through the integration of algorithmic design and novel fabrication techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Martin; Egholm Pedersen, Ole; Pigram, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for constructing complex concrete structures from small-scale individualized elements. The method was developed through the investigation of laser cutting, folding and concrete casting in PETG plastic sheets and funicular grid shell simulations as a generator o...

  7. Working life of cathodic protection systems for concrete structures - Analysis of field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leegwater, G.; Worm, D.; Courage, W.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures causes concrete cracking, steel diameter reduction and eventually loss of safety. In infrastructure this is mainly due to penetration of chloride ions from de-icing or marine salts. Conventional repair means heavy, labour intensive and costly

  8. Service life and life cycle cost modelling of cathodic protection systems for concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leegwater, G.; Worm, D.; Courage, W.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures causes concrete cracking, steel diameter reduction and eventually loss of safety. In infrastructure this is mainly due to penetration of chloride ions from de-icing or marine salts. Conventional repair means heavy, labour intensive and costly

  9. Design of concrete structures for durability. Example: Chloride penetration in the lining of a bored tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present design method for durability of concrete is based on a set of rules that give no objective in-sight in the service life to expect from the concrete structure. An objective comparison between different durability measures is therefor not possible. Especially if the lack of durability can

  10. Effect Of Age And Concrete Cover Thickness On Steel Reinforcement Corrosion At Splash Zone In Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M. Al- Galawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete is considered as one of the biggest problems that face countries overlooking to the Arabian Gulf including Iraq. The research aims to study the effect of the corrosion of steel bars in concrete structures that are exposed to wetting and drying via waves. Reinforced concrete samples were exposed to marine simulated environment for 90 days using prepared system for this purpose. At the end of exposure period polarization test was implemented to measure the actual corrosion rate in each sample. After that the corrosion process was accelerated using impressed current technique by applying a constant electric current DC to the reinforcing bars. Depending on the corrosion current in natural conditions which was measured in polarization test periods of exposing samples to accelerated corrosion current so as to maintain virtual exposure ages of 5 and 25 years of exposure to natural corrosion were calculated. The results showed a remarkable increase in the corrosion current of steel bars in samples that had lower concrete cover thickness. The increase in the cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm had a significant effect on reducing the corrosion current at the age of 90 days to about 70 of its original value in both cases. At the virtual exposure age of 5 years the reduction percentage in the corrosion current resulted from increasing cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm were 43 and 79 respectively.

  11. Dam safety investigations of the concrete structures of Hugh Keenleyside dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, A.W.; Nunn, J.O.H.; Cornish, L.; Northcott, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Hugh Keenleyside dam is located on the Columbia River in southeastern British Columbia, and impounds Arrow Lakes Reservoir which has a live storage of 8.8 km 3 and drains an area of 36,000 km 2 . It consists of a number of concrete structures, with a total length of 360 m and a maximum height of 58 m, and an earthfill embankment which spans across the original river channel. The 450 m long zoned earthfill dam is founded on pervious alluvium over 150 m deep. It has a sloping impervious core constructed from glacial till which extends 670 m upstream of the dam. This impervious blanket extends over the full width of the reservoir and is connected to the upstream face of the concrete structures. The results of a dam safety study, which was carried out due to the presence of high uplift pressures at some parts of the foundation, and stability concerns, are presented. The investigation concluded that the high uplift pressures were due to a localized defect in the upstream blanket and did not indicate any general deterioration of the blanket. Techniques that were found to be of particular use in the study for defining the source and nature of the foundation defects were: temperature surveys of flows from piezometers, cells and drains; air injection tests; and pressure response testing of cells, piezometers and drains to establish foundation interconnections. The concrete structures met the stability criteria for all load cases considered except for the navigation lock and the low level outlets. 3 refs., 6 figs

  12. Analysis of prestressed concrete slab-and-beam structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Katsikadelis, J. T.

    In this paper a solution to the problem of prestressed concrete slab-and-beam structures including creep and shrinkage effect is presented. The adopted model takes into account the resulting inplane forces and deformations of the plate as well as the axial forces and deformations of the beam, due to combined response of the system. The analysis consists in isolating the beams from the plate by sections parallel to the lower outer surface of the plate. The forces at the interface, which produce lateral deflection and inplane deformation to the plate and lateral deflection and axial deformation to the beam, are established using continuity conditions at the interface. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative with the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the plate and the beams is taken into account. The estimation of the prestressing axial force of the beams is accomplished iteratively. Both instant (e.g. friction, slip of anchorage) and time dependent losses are encountered. The solution of the arising plate and beam problems, which are nonlinearly coupled, is achieved using the analog equation method (AEM). The adopted model, compared with those ignoring the inplane forces and deformations, describes better the actual response of the plate-beams system and permits the evaluation of the shear forces at the interfaces, the knowledge of which is very important in the design of prefabricated ribbed plates.

  13. Reliability-based design code calibration for concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.K.; Cho, H.N.; Chang, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, a load combination criteria for design and a probability-based reliability analysis were proposed on the basis of a FEM-based random vibration analysis. The limit state model defined for the study is a serviceability limit state of the crack failure that causes the emission of radioactive materials, and the results are compared with the case of strength limit state. More accurate reliability analyses under various dynamic loads such as earthquake loads were made possible by incorporating the FEM and random vibration theory, which is different from the conventional reliability analysis method. The uncertainties in loads and resistance available in Korea and the references were adapted to the situation of Korea, and especially in case of earthquake, the design earthquake was assessed based on the available data for the probabilistic description of earthquake ground acceleration in the Korea peninsula. The SAP V-2 is used for a three-dimensional finite element analysis of concrete containment structure, and the reliability analysis is carried out by modifying HRAS reliability analysis program for this study. (orig./GL)

  14. Study on Seismic Behavior of Recycled Concrete Energy-efficient Homes Structure Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point is to study the seismic behavior of the lattice type recycled concrete energy saving wall under low-cyclic loading,to provide the basis for the seismic performance of application of recycled concrete lattice wall in energy-saving residential structure. Design two walls with the same structure measures, include Lattice type recycled concrete wall and natural concrete wall, they are tested under low-cycle repetitive loading, compared failure mode and seismic performance in different reinforcement conditions of side column. The bearing capacity and ductility of recycled aggregate concrete are better than natural aggregate concrete, The stiffness degradation curves and the skeleton curves of the walls are basically the same, both of them have better seismic energy dissipation capacity. Lattice type concrete wall is good at seismic performance, recycled aggregate concrete is good at plastic deformation ability, it is advantageous to seismic energy dissipation of wall, it can be applied in energy efficient residential structure wall.

  15. Overview of ORNL/NRC programs addressing durability of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    The role of reinforced concrete relative to its applications as either safety-related structures in nuclear power or engineered barriers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities is described. Factors that can affect the long-term durability of reinforced concrete are identified. Overviews are presented of the Structural Aging Program, which is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, and the Permeability Test Methods and Data Program, which is identifying pertinent data and information for use in performance assessments of engineered barriers for low-level radioactive waste disposal

  16. Behaviour of concrete nuclear containment structures upto ultimate failure with special reference to MAPP-1 containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appa Rao, T.V.S.R.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental methods for investigating the behaviour of concrete secondary containment structures subjected to loads upto their ultimate failure have been discussed in the paper. Need for inelastic nonlinear analysis of containments has been emphasized. Different contitutive models of concrete that can be employed in the nonlinear analysis of concrete structures were briefly reviewed. Based on the experimental results obtained in a 1:12 scale model test conducted at the Structural Engineering Research (Regional) Centre, Madras, behaviour of the MAPP-1 containment to internal pressure loading upto its ultimate failure has been discussed. (author)

  17. Effect of chloride-based deicers on reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We conducted an extensive literature review and performed laboratory tests to assess the effect of chloride-based deicers on the rebars and dowel bars in concrete and to determine whether or not deicer corrosion inhibitors help preserve the transport...

  18. Quality control of concrete structures in nuclear power plant, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hisao; Kawaguchi, Tohru; Oike, Takeshi; Morimoto, Shoichi; Takeshita, Shigetoshi.

    1979-01-01

    In general, concrete placed in the winter season has a tendency to have lower strength at the age of 4 weeks due to low curing temperature after placement. Therefore, under the Japanese code, the target mix Proportions in the winter season are modified adding an extra correction factor based on air temperature. Meanwhile, the quality control system for mass concrete to be placed in the winter system is indistinct at this stage. It is the aim of this report to present the results of investigations to clarify the following two subjects: (1) whether the correction factor due to temperature is needed or not for mass concrete in the winter season; (2) what kind of curing should be applied to control cylinders for estimating strength of mass concrete. (author)

  19. Corrosion of reinforcement bars in steel ibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe

    and the influence of steel fibres on initiation and propagation of cracks in concrete. Moreover, the impact of fibres on corrosion-induced cover cracking was covered. The impact of steel fibres on propagation of reinforcement corrosion was investigated through studies of their impact on the electrical resistivity...... of concrete, which is known to affect the corrosion process of embedded reinforcement. The work concerning the impact of steel fibres on initiation and propagation of cracks was linked to corrosion initiation and propagation of embedded reinforcement bars via additional studies. Cracks in the concrete cover...... are known to alter the ingress rate of depassivating substances and thereby influence the corrosion process. The Ph.D. study covered numerical as well as experimental studies. Electrochemically passive steel fibres are electrically isolating thus not changing the electrical resistivity of concrete, whereas...

  20. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  1. Long-term behaviour of concrete under saline conditions for long-term stable sealing structures; Langzeitverhalten von Beton unter salinaren Bedingungen fuer langzeitstabile Verschlussbauwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlhaus, Frank; Haucke, Joerg [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bergbau und Spezialtiefbau

    2012-03-15

    The authors of the contribution under consideration examine the long-term behaviour of concrete under saline conditions and in particular the suitability of the dam construction materials salt concrete and brine concrete for the use as a part of a sealing system of long-term stable geotechnical sealing structures. The long-term stability of the building material mainly is determined by the corrosion of the cement paste phases. The specific shrinkage behaviour of the construction material is analyzed experimentally in order to verify the expected cracks. The mechanisms of cracking in the salt concrete and brine concrete are analyzed by means of a mesomechanical approach in numerical finite-element calculations.

  2. Analytical capability for predicting structural response of NPP concrete containments to severe loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planas, J.; Guinea, G.; Trbojevic, V.M.; Marti, J.; Martinez, F.; Cortes, P.

    1989-12-01

    A survey has been conducted on the state-of-the-art of analytical techniques for predicting the structural response of concrete containment buildings under severe accident conditions. The validity of inelastic analysis is often limited by the inadequacy of the material models adopted. This is specially true in the case of materials which undergo localization phenomena in the course of the deformation process. Because of this, the Joint Research Centre at Ispra has given a high priority to the review of existing constitutive models for concrete. Such models must be able to describe concrete behaviour with and without steel reinforcement across the complete stress range, from initial elastic behaviour to and beyond the point of failure. For reinforced and prestressed concrete, segregated models (where concrete and steel are independently simulated) are preferred. A review of existing constitutive models for mass concrete has been conducted. The review focused on necessary features for describing the near-peak and post-peak stages of deformation. Special attention was dedicated to the localization of strains in tension and the post-peak softening behaviour. Existing models for representing the concrete steel bond were also reviewed. These models are still relatively simplistic and incorporate seldom a number of effects of considerable importance: sustained, dynamic and cyclic loading, environmental effects, etc. Finally, the computational procedures currently available for modelling problems involving the ultimate capacity of concrete containments have also been reviewed. This includes methodologies for modelling amongst other mass concrete, cracking procedures, bond behaviour, in existing computer codes

  3. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL PERFORMANCE OF COMPOSITE STEEL AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamaliev Farit Sakhapovich

    2012-12-01

    steel-concrete slabs limits their use in the construction of residential housing. This article describes the composition, geometry, reinforcement, and anchors to enable the use of concrete slabs and steel beams. The article contains photographs that illustrate the load distribution model. Methods of testing of fiber strains of concrete slabs and steel profiles, deflections of beams, shear stresses in the layers of the "steel-to-concrete" contact area that may involve slab cracking are analyzed. Dynamics of fiber deformations of concrete slabs, steel beams, and layers of the "steel-to-concrete" contact areas, deflection development patterns, initial cracking and crack development to destruction are analyzed. The author also describes the fracture behavior of the floor model. Results of experimental studies of the three-dimensional overlapping of structural elements are compared to the test data of individual composite beams. Peculiarities of the stress-strain state of composite steel and concrete slabs, graphs of strains and stresses developing in sections of middle and external steel-and-concrete beams, deflection graphs depending on the loading intensity are provided. The findings of the experimental studies of the three-dimensional performance of composite steel-and-concrete slabs are provided, as well.

  4. A realistic structural analysis of the integrity of the liner of reinforced and prestressed concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchhardt, F.; Brandl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR Gundremmingen II is the first German nuclear power plant with a concrete containment having a thin steel plate liner directly attached to the interior concrete surface to provide an air-tight seal. Due to this monolithic way of anchorage a bonded system of concrete and metal liner membrane is obtained so that the same deformations of the loading or strain conditions are induced to the very stiff concrete hull as well as to the liner. Because of the complex structural behaviour of the bonded system the evaluation is carried out by the finite element method. The overall system is decoupled in several steps. Due to its considerable stiffness the concrete structure can be regarded as the liner supporting basis. The liner system itself might be subdivided into perfect and imperfect sections discretized by plain or curved elements which are supported by point-wise spring elements representing the stud anchors. (orig.)

  5. Structural-functional integrated concrete with macro-encapsulated inorganic PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ehsan; Tang, Waiching; Wang, Zhiyu

    2017-09-01

    Over the last few years the application of thermal energy storage system incorporating phase change materials (PCMs) to foster productivity and efficiency of buildings energy has grown rapidly. In this study, a structural-functional integrated concrete was developed using macro-encapsulated PCM-lightweight aggregate (LWA) as partial replacement (25 and 50% by volume) of coarse aggregate in control concrete. The PCM-LWA was prepared by incorporation of an inorganic PCM into porous LWAs through vacuum impregnation. The mechanical and thermal performance of PCM-LWA concrete were studied. The test results revealed that though the compressive strength of concrete with PCM-LWA was lower than the control concrete, but ranged from 22.02 MPa to 42.88 MPa which above the minimum strength requirement for structural application. The thermal performance test indicated that macro-encapsulated PCM-LWA has underwent the phase change transition reducing the indoor temperature.

  6. Viscoelastic and thermal behavior of structural concrete with reference to containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A method of numerical viscoelastic stress analysis is described suitable for concrete structures operating at elevated temperatures. The paper describes how approximate numerical methods of elastic analysis of the finite element type can be extended to incorporate the viscoelastic behavior of structural concrete of the quasi-static type. A new eight parameter viscoelastic model is proposed to represent concrete behavior in the loaded and unloaded stage. The deformational expressions for the proposed viscoelastic analogue are also developed. Finally, as a result of courve-fitting procedures, the evaluation of the creep law coefficients are obtained for creep laws appropriate to a test regime. The proposed method is of general application providing that the properties of concrete are assessed reasonably well. The analytical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained on concrete model specimens loaded for 3 1/2 months, at a temperature of 80 0 C. (author)

  7. Steel fiber reinforced concrete pipes: part 1: technological analysis of the mechanical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. de Figueiredo

    Full Text Available This paper is the first part of an extensive work focusing the technological development of steel fiber reinforced concrete pipes (FRCP. Here is presented and discussed the experimental campaign focusing the test procedure and the mechanical behavior obtained for each of the dosages of fiber used. In the second part ("Steel fiber reinforced concrete pipes. Part 2: Numerical model to simulate the crushing test", the aspects of FRCP numerical modeling are presented and analyzed using the same experimental results in order to be validated. This study was carried out trying to reduce some uncertainties related to FRCP performance and provide a better condition to the use of these components. In this respect, an experimental study was carried out using sewage concrete pipes in full scale as specimens. The diameter of the specimens was 600 mm, and they had a length of 2500 mm. The pipes were reinforced with traditional bars and different contents of steel fibers in order to compare their performance through the crushing test. Two test procedures were used in that sense. In the 1st Series, the diameter displacement was monitored by the use of two LVDTs positioned at both extremities of the pipes. In the 2nd Series, just one LVDT is positioned at the spigot. The results shown a more rigidity response of the pipe during tests when the displacements were measured at the enlarged section of the socket. The fiber reinforcement was very effective, especially when low level of displacement was imposed to the FRCP. At this condition, the steel fibers showed an equivalent performance to superior class pipes made with traditional reinforced. The fiber content of 40 kg/m3 provided a hardening behavior for the FRCP, and could be considered as equivalent to the critical volume in this condition.

  8. Activities in Support of Continuing the Service of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status provided. Operating experience related to performance of the concrete structures is presented. Basic components of a program to manage aging of the concrete structures are identified and described: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, non-destructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Finally, areas are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  9. An improved basis for evaluating continued service of Category I concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Mori, Y.; Arndt, E.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program has the overall objective of preparing technical bases for regulatory criteria which will provide the NRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in nuclear power plant evaluations for continued service. In meeting this objective three primary activities are underway: (1) development of a structural materials information center containing data and information on the variation of concrete and concrete-related material properties over time; (2) establishment of procedures to make quantitative evaluations of the presence, magnitude, and significance of environmental stressors or aging factors that can impact critical component performance, as well as techniques which can be used for repair of degraded concrete structures; and (3) formulation of a quantitative methodology for performing current condition assessments and making reliability-based life predictions of critical concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Accomplishments to date under each of these tasks are presented

  10. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use. PMID:22399929

  11. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowen Yang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  12. A reusable PZT transducer for monitoring initial hydration and structural health of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  13. Modification of Concrete Damaged Plasticity model. Part II: Formulation and numerical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamińska Inez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A refined model for elastoplastic damaged material is formulated based on the plastic potential introduced in Part I [1]. Considered model is an extension of Concrete Damaged Plasticity material implemented in Abaqus [2]. In the paper the stiffness tensor for elastoplastic damaged behaviour is derived. In order to validate the model, computations for the uniaxial tests are performed. Response of the model for various cases of parameter’s choice is shown and compared to the response of the CDP model.

  14. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  15. A Review of the Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Graves, H.L. III

    2006-01-01

    Concrete's properties are more complex than those of most materials because not only is concrete a composite material whose constituents have different properties, but its properties depend upon moisture and porosity. Exposure of concrete to elevated temperature affects its mechanical and physical properties. Elements could distort and displace, and, under certain conditions, the concrete surfaces could spall due to the buildup of steam pressure. Because thermally-induced dimensional changes, loss of structural integrity, and release of moisture and gases resulting from the migration of free water could adversely affect plant operations and safety, a complete understanding of the behavior of concrete under long-term elevated-temperature exposure as well as both during and after a thermal excursion resulting from a postulated design-basis accident condition is essential for reliable design evaluations and assessments of nuclear power plant structures. As the properties of concrete change with respect to time and the environment to which it is exposed, an assessment of the effects of concrete aging is also important in performing safety evaluations. The effects of elevated temperature on Portland cement concretes and constituent materials are summarized, design codes and standards identified, and considerations for elevated temperature service noted. (authors)

  16. Studies on limestone concrete as a low-activation structural material for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Mikio; Nagano, Hiroshi; Naito, Yasuhiro

    2000-01-01

    Because of low content of Li, Co and Eu, the target nuclides of activation reaction, limestone concrete is considered to be effective in reducing the decommissioning cost of nuclear plants. Induced activity calculation and structural strength test were performed for limestone concrete and the results were compared with the data obtained for sandstone concrete, which is generally used in nuclear plants. Minor elements, which are important from the viewpoint of activation, were measured with elementary analysis for limestone samples from three different quarries in Japan. Induced activity in biological shield walls (BSW) of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants was calculated with the isotope generation code ORIGEN-79 using neutron flux data obtained with the one-dimensional Sn transport code ANISN and MGCL 137-group activation cross section library based on JENDL-3. Estimated total radioactivity accumulated in limestone concrete BSW was 5 times lower than that in the sandstone concrete BSW. Structural strength were compared between limestone concrete and sandstone concrete, and limestone concrete was found to have enough compressive strength and tensile strength. (author)

  17. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program

  18. Global models for studying the non linear behavior of structures. Application to reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Gauvain, J.; Nahas, G.

    1982-06-01

    The application of global methods to design reinforced concrete structures was investigated. The dynamic calculation of beam structures can be carried out very economically and with suitable accuracy by these methods. Moreover, one ideal application of global methods is design to failure, in order to estimate the safety margins of a given structure subject to accidental stresses, such as explosions, earthquakes, aircraft crash etc. In all cases, the global method combined with finite element programs serves to determine the failure automatically, and offers a good estimate of the failure load [fr

  19. The effect of crack width on the service life of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Nguyen; Viet Hung, Vu; Viet, Tran Bao

    2018-04-01

    Reinforced concrete has become a widely used construction material around the world. Nowadays, the assessment of deterioration and life expectancy of reinforced concrete structure is very important and necessary as concrete is a complex material with brittle failure. Under the effect of load and over time, cracks occur in the structure, significantly reducing its performance and durability. Therefore, a number of models for predicting the penetration of chloride ions into the concrete were proposed to assess the durability of the structure. In the study performed by T B Viet (2016) [1], the author proposed a new theoretical model, especially considering the effects of macro and micro cracking on the diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in the cracked concrete. The following experimental results, in term of electrical indication of concrete’s ability to resist chloride ion penetration, are used to calculate the lifespan of a reinforced concrete structure according to Dura Crete approach [8] with different crack widths to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the above model in the range of concrete compressive strength of 30-70MPa.

  20. Recovery and residual stress of SMA wires and applications for concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Cho, Sung-Chul; Park, Taehyo; Hu, Jong Wan; Chung, Young-Soo

    2010-01-01

    In general, NiTi shape memory alloys are used for applications in civil structures. NiTi SMAs show good superelasticity and shape memory effect properties. However, for application of the shape memory effect, it is desirable for SMAs to show a wide temperature hysteresis, especially for civil structures which are exposed to severe environmental conditions. NiTiNb SMAs, in general, show a wider temperature hysteresis than NiTi SMAs and are more applicable for civil structures. This study examines the temperature hysteresis of NiTiNb and NiTi SMAs, and their recovery and residual stress are investigated. In addition, the tensile behaviors of SMA wires under residual stress are evaluated. This study explains the possible applications for concrete structures with the shape memory effect and illustrates two experimental results of concrete cylinders and reinforced concrete columns. For both tests, SMA wires of NiTiNb and NiTi are used to confine concrete using residual stress. The SMA wire jackets on the concrete cylinders increase the peak strength and the ductility compared to the plain concrete cylinders. In addition, the SMA wire jackets on reinforced concrete columns increase the ductility greatly without flexural strength degradation

  1. Structural design guidelines for concrete bridge decks reinforced with corrosion-resistant reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This research program develops and validates structural design guidelines and details for concrete bridge decks with : corrosion-resistant reinforcing (CRR) bars. A two-phase experimental program was conducted where a control test set consistent : wi...

  2. Screening life cycle assessment study of a sisal fibre reinforced micro-concrete structural insulated panel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available First international conference on composites, biocomposites and nanocomposites, DUT, Durban, South Africa, 2-4 December 2013 SCREENING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT STUDY OFA SISAL FIBRE REINFORCED MICRO-CONCRETE STRUCTURAL INSULATED PANEL Naa Lamkai Ampofo...

  3. Load-carrying capacity of lightly reinforced, prefabricated walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and evaluates the results of a coordinated testing of prefabricated, lightly reinforced walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure. The coordinated testing covers all wall productions in Denmark and will therefore provide a representative assessment...

  4. ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca Asensio, Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Cuenca Asensio, E. (2012). ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE [Tesis doctoral no publicada]. Universitat Politècnica de València. doi:10.4995/Thesis/10251/18326. Palancia

  5. Conceptual design of reinforced concrete structures using topology optimization with elastoplastic material modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogomolny, Michael; Amir, Oded

    2012-01-01

    Design of reinforced concrete structures is governed by the nonlinear behavior of concrete and by its different strengths in tension and compression. The purpose of this article is to present a computational procedure for optimal conceptual design of reinforced concrete structures on the basis...... response must be considered. Optimized distribution of materials is achieved by introducing interpolation rules for both elastic and plastic material properties. Several numerical examples illustrate the capability and potential of the proposed procedure. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  6. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  7. Modeling and analysis of aging behavior of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, J.Y.R.; James, R.J.; Dunham, R.S. [ANATECH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    As nuclear power plants approach the end of their original design life and begin to transition to the life extension phase, consideration has to be given to the effects of structural aging when evaluating the extended operation of reinforced or pre-stressed concrete structures. The behavior of concrete is highly nonlinear, having low tensile strength, shear stiffness and strength that depend on crack widths, and a confinement-dependent compressive elasto-plasticity. A concrete material model is described having the appropriate capabilities required for evaluating structural aging. The model treats reinforced concrete as a three-phase composite: plain concrete material as a three-dimensional continuum phase, steel reinforcement (rebar) as a uni-directional phase, and a rebar-concrete interaction phase. Structural aging is defined as the combined effects of time dependent material properties degradation and service induced changes in loading and operational conditions. Three broad categories of structural aging, and the interaction between them, are considered: 1) Aging effects due to expected time dependent changes in material properties, 2) Aging effects due to unexpected time dependent material degradation, and 3) Aging effects due to operational environment and loading. Example analyses are presented which illustrate the value of using advanced modeling and simulation in evaluating expected and unusual structural behavior. This is particularly important for safety structures that are approaching the end of their design life and are facing the prospect of re-licensing for extended operation

  8. Serviceability design load factors and reliability assessments for reinforced concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bong Koo

    1998-01-01

    A reinforced concrete nuclear power plant containment structure is subjected to various random static and stochastic loads during its lifetime. Since these loads involve inherent randomness and other uncertainties, an appropriate probabilistic model for each load must be established in order to perform reliability analysis. The current ASME code for reinforced concrete containment structures are not based on probability concepts. The stochastic nature of natural hazard or accidental loads and the variations of material properties require a probabilistic approach for a rational assessment of structural safety and performance. The paper develops probability-based load factors for the limit state design of reinforced concrete containment structures. The purpose of constructing reinforced concrete containment structure is to protect against radioactive release, and so the use of a serviceability limit state against crack failure that can cause the emission of radioactive materials is suggested as a critical limit state for reinforced concrete containment structures. Load factors for the design of reinforced concrete containment structures are proposed and carried out the reliability assessments. (orig.)

  9. Review of Repair Materials for Fire-Damaged Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, MZA Mohd; Abu Bakar, BH; Nazri, FM; Ahmad, MM; Muhamad, K.

    2018-03-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures perform well during fire and may be repaired after the fire incident because their low heat conductivity prevents the loss or degradation of mechanical strength of the concrete core and internal reinforcing steel. When an RC structure is heated to more than 500 °C, mechanical properties such as compressive strength, stiffness, and tensile strength start to degrade and deformations occur. Although the fire-exposed RC structure shows no visible damage, its residual strength decreases compared with that in the pre-fire state. Upon thorough assessment, the fire-damaged RC structure can be repaired or strengthened, instead of subjecting to partial or total demolition followed by reconstruction. The structure can be repaired using several materials, such as carbon fiber-reinforced polymer, glass fiber-reinforced polymer, normal strength concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, ferrocement, epoxy resin mortar, and high-performance concrete. Selecting an appropriate repair material that must be compatible with the substrate or base material is a vital step to ensure successful repair. This paper reviews existing repair materials and factors affecting their performance. Of the materials considered, ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) exhibits huge potential for repairing fire-damaged RC structures but lack of information available. Hence, further studies must be performed to assess the potential of UHPFRC in rehabilitating fire-damaged RC structures.

  10. Estimation of Concrete Carbonation Depth Considering Multiple Influencing Factors on the Deterioration of Durability for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Chang Cho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the durability of concrete structures is greatly influenced by many factors, previous studies typically considered only a single durability deterioration factor. In addition, these studies mostly conducted their experiments inside the laboratory, and it is extremely hard to find any case in which data were obtained from field inspection. Accordingly, this study proposed an Adaptive Neurofuzzy Inference System (ANFIS algorithm that can estimate the carbonation depth of a reinforced concrete member, in which combined deterioration has been reflected based on the data obtained from field inspections of 9 buildings. The proposed ANFIS algorithm closely estimated the carbonation depths, and it is considered that, with further inspection data, a higher accuracy would be achieved. Thus, it is expected to be used very effectively for durability estimation of a building of which the inspection is performed periodically.

  11. STRENGTHENING CONCRETE HOLLOW SECTION GIRDER BRIDGE USING POLYURETHANE-CEMENT MATERIAL (PART B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleem K. Hussain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental study to retrofitted reinforced concrete Hollow Section Bridge. The study was carried out on the White River Bridge structure (Bai xi da Qiao / China. The effect of retrofitting on stress and strain of beams at the critical section was studied. Evaluating the bridges girder after strengthening using new material called PolyurethaneCement material (PUC as an external material .This study present the strain and deflection before and after strengthening the bridge girders. The results has shown that the overall state of the bridge structural strengthening is in good condition. The enhancement was significant in stiffness of the bridge structure. Regarding to the results of static load test, the experimental values strain and deflection are less than theoretical values, indicating that the stiffness of the structure, overall deformation and integrity satisfy the designed and standard requirements and the working performance are in good condition, and flexure capacity has a certain surplus.

  12. Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1980-12-01

    Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

  13. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures. Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  14. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures; Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  15. The evolution and structural design of prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannah, I.W.

    1978-01-01

    The introduction of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel to contain the main gas coolant circuit of nuclear reactors has marked a major step forward. This chapter traces the evolution and development of the PCPV, and lists the principal parameters adopted. Current design and loading standards are discussed in relation to the two main limit states of serviceability and safety. Prestressed concrete pressure vessel analysis has called for very extensive adaptation and expansion of conventional finite element and finite difference methods in order to deal with the elevated temperature of operation, together with extensive concrete testing at temperature and under multi-directional stressing. These new methods and extra data are being adopted in prestressed applications in other fields and may well prove to be of much wider significance than is presently appreciated. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the suitability for concrete using fly ash in N.P.P. structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C.; Kim, S. W.; Ko, K. T.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear power plant structures constructed in Korea has been generally used type V cement(sulfate-resisting Portland cement), but according to the study results reported recently, it shows that type V cement is superior the resistance of sulfate attack, but the resistance of salt damage is weaker than type I cement. It is increased the demands on the use of mineral admixtures such as fly ash, ground granulated blast-furnace slag instead of type V cement in order to improve the durability of concrete structures. But the study on concrete mixed with fly ash in Korea has been mainly performed on rheology and strength properties of the concrete. Therefore, this study is to improve the durability of concrete structures of N.P.P. as using fly ash cement instead of type V cement. As a results, the concrete containing fly ash is improved the resistance to salt attack, sulfate attack and freezing-thawing and is deteriorated the carbonation. But if it is used the concrete with high strength or low water-powder ratio, the concrete have not problem on the durability

  17. Fundamental and assessment of concrete structure monitoring by using acoustic emission technique testing: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desa, M. S. M.; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Shahidan, S.; Ghadzali, N. S.; Misri, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the non-destructive (NDT) testing, where it can be used to determine the damage of concrete structures such as crack, corrosion, stability, sensitivity, as structure monitoring and energy formed within cracking opening growth in the concrete structure. This article gives a comprehensive review of the acoustic emission (AE) technique testing due to its application in concrete structure for structural health monitoring (SHM). Assessment of AE technique used for structural are reviewed to give the perception of its structural engineering such as dam, bridge and building, where the previous research has been reviewed based on AE application. The assessment of AE technique focusing on basic fundamental of parametric and signal waveform analysis during analysis process and its capability in structural monitoring. Moreover, the assessment and application of AE due to its function have been summarized and highlighted for future references

  18. Impact design of reinforced concrete fuel storage structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickell, R.E.; Rashid, Y.R.; Williams, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    We characterize the loading experienced by reinforced concrete slabs, as the result of a drop or a tip-over of a dry storage cask, and we provide simple design charts and formulas by which the margin of safety of such slabs can be readily demonstrated. These charts are based on the calculation of crack patterns in the concrete and yielding in the reinforcement as the pad is loaded by the dropping or tip-over of a dry storage cask to a point of collapse. This ultimate-strength design approach is appropriate for unlikely loading events provided that adequate margin against slab collapse is maintained. (orig./HP)

  19. Flexural fatigue behavior of steel fiber reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.I.; Chai, W.K.; Park, C.W.; Min, I.K.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis, the fatigue tests are performed on a series of SFRC (steel fiber reinforced concrete) to investigate the fatigue behavior of SFRC varing with the steel fiber contents and the steel fiber aspect ratios. Thirty SFRC beams are used in this test. The relationships between repeated loading cycle and mid-span deflection of the beams are observed under the three-point loading system. From the test results, the effects of the fiber content and the fiber aspect ratio on the concrete fatigue behavior were studied. According to the regression technique, some empirical formulae for predicting the fatigue strength of SFRC beams are also suggested. (author)

  20. The use of acoustic monitoring to manage concrete structures in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, P.O.; Tozser, O.; Wit, M. de

    2003-01-01

    Concrete and steel are widely used in containment vessels within the nuclear industry. Both are excellent acoustic transmitters. In many structures tensioned wire elements are used within containment structures. However, tensioned wire can be vulnerable to corrosion. To reduce the probability of corrosion sophisticated protection systems are used. To confirm that the design strength is available through time, extensive inspection and maintenance regimes are implemented. These regimes include tests to confirm the condition of the post-tensioning, and pressure tests (leak tests) to verify the performance of vessel. This paper presents an acoustic monitoring technology which uses widely distributed sensors to detect and locate wire failures using the energy released at failure. The technology has been used on a range of structures including post-tensioned concrete bridges, suspension bridges, buildings, pre-cast concrete cylinder pipelines (PCCP) and prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCV), where it has increased confidence in structures and reduced maintenance costs. Where the level of ambient noise is low then SoundPrint acoustic monitoring can detect concrete cracking. This has been shown in PCCP pipelines, on laboratory test structures and also in nuclear structures. The programme has shown that distributed sensors can locate internal cracking well before there is any external evidence. Several projects have been completed on nuclear vessels. The first has been completed on an Electricite de France (EDF) concrete test pressure vessel at Civaux in France. The second at the Sandia PCCV Test Vessel in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, which involved the testing of a steel lined concrete vessel. The third was on a PCCV in Maryland, USA. Acoustic monitoring is also able to monitor the deterioration of post-tensioned concrete structures as a result of seismic activity. Summary details of a case history are presented. (author)

  1. Long-term prediction of reinforced concrete structures - Use of thermodynamic data to assess steel corrosion in carbonated concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, Bruno [Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et Argiles, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, Bat. 158, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France)]|[Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Industrielle, LPCI, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Leonard de Vinci, 20 av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); L' Hostis, Valerie; Le Bescop, Patrick [Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et Argiles, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, Bat. 158, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Idrissi, Hassane [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Industrielle, LPCI, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Leonard de Vinci, 20 av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In the context of the prediction of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear waste storage, the corrosion mechanisms of the steels have to be assessed and modelled. When nuclear wastes are embedded in reinforced concrete containers, the chemical environment of the reinforcement is progressively modified, due to the diffusion of the carbonation front inside the concrete matrix. This modification leads to the variation of the properties of the iron oxides formed at the steel/concrete interface, and the active corrosion can be initiated. In order to understand and modelled the mechanisms of steel corrosion in concrete, the equilibrium of two main systems must be separately described with the help of thermodynamic data issued from the literature: - The mineral phases, lime and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), in equilibrium with the pore solution during the propagation of the carbonation front; - The iron oxides in equilibrium with the aqueous solution. For this purpose, the nature of aqueous species present in the pore solution was calculated in the whole range of pH encountered during the cement paste degradation by carbonation. As a matter of fact, as the pH decreases, calcium concentration decreases and silicates concentration increases due to the calcium carbonate formation and C-S-H dissolution. The pH of a carbonated concrete ranges between 8.3 and 10, depending on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the porosity and the conversion degree of carbonation. In this pH range, the iron oxides equilibria were analysed as a function of the redox potential and aqueous species (carbonates and sulphates present in the solution) present inside the solution. In a reductive solution and in presence of carbonates, the high solubility of iron oxides may prevent passivation or generate the dissolution of the passive film. Moreover, the relevance of thermodynamics calculations has been confirmed by corrosion tests of mild steel

  2. Long-term prediction of reinforced concrete structures - Use of thermodynamic data to assess steel corrosion in carbonated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Bruno; L'Hostis, Valerie; Le Bescop, Patrick; Idrissi, Hassane

    2004-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear waste storage, the corrosion mechanisms of the steels have to be assessed and modelled. When nuclear wastes are embedded in reinforced concrete containers, the chemical environment of the reinforcement is progressively modified, due to the diffusion of the carbonation front inside the concrete matrix. This modification leads to the variation of the properties of the iron oxides formed at the steel/concrete interface, and the active corrosion can be initiated. In order to understand and modelled the mechanisms of steel corrosion in concrete, the equilibrium of two main systems must be separately described with the help of thermodynamic data issued from the literature: - The mineral phases, lime and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), in equilibrium with the pore solution during the propagation of the carbonation front; - The iron oxides in equilibrium with the aqueous solution. For this purpose, the nature of aqueous species present in the pore solution was calculated in the whole range of pH encountered during the cement paste degradation by carbonation. As a matter of fact, as the pH decreases, calcium concentration decreases and silicates concentration increases due to the calcium carbonate formation and C-S-H dissolution. The pH of a carbonated concrete ranges between 8.3 and 10, depending on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the porosity and the conversion degree of carbonation. In this pH range, the iron oxides equilibria were analysed as a function of the redox potential and aqueous species (carbonates and sulphates present in the solution) present inside the solution. In a reductive solution and in presence of carbonates, the high solubility of iron oxides may prevent passivation or generate the dissolution of the passive film. Moreover, the relevance of thermodynamics calculations has been confirmed by corrosion tests of mild steel

  3. Evaluation of the environmental, material, and structural performance of recycled aggregate concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Katherine Sarah

    Concrete is the most commonly used building material in the construction industry, and contributes to 52% of construction and demolition waste in Canada. Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) is one way to reduce this impact. To evaluate the performance of coarse and granular (fine and coarse) RCA in structural concrete applications, four studies were performed: an environmental assessment, a material testing program, a shear performance study, and a flexural performance study. To determine the environmental benefits of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC), three case studies were investigated using different populations and proximities to city centres. Environmental modelling suggested that RCA replacement could result in energy savings and greenhouse gas emission reductions, especially in remote areas. Tests were performed to determine if the volumetric replacement of up to 30% coarse RCA and 20% granular RCA is suitable for structural concrete applications in Canada. Fresh, hardened, and durability properties were evaluated. All five (5) of the RCA mixes showed equivalent material performance to the control mixes and met the requirements for a structural concrete mix. The five (5) RAC mixes were also used in structural testing. One-way reinforced concrete slab specimens were tested to failure to evaluate the shear and flexural performance of the RAC members. Peak capacities of and crack formation within each member were analyzed to evaluate the performance of RAC compared to conventional concrete. The shear capacity of specimens made from four (4) of the five (5) RAC mixtures was higher or equivalent to the control specimens. Specimens of the concrete mixture containing the highest content of recycled aggregate, 20% volumetric replacement of granular RCA, had shear capacities 14.1% lower, and exhibited cracking at lower loads than the control. The average flexural capacities of all RAC specimens were within 3.7% of the control specimens. Results from this research

  4. Research on Deterioration Mechanism of Concrete Materials in an Actual Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause for deterioration of the concrete structure located in severe environment has been explored both in field and in laboratory. Serious cracking and spalling appeared upon surface of the concrete structure soon after the structure was put into service. Both alkali-aggregate reaction and freeze-thaw cycles may result in similar macro visible cracking and spalling. The possibility of alkali-aggregate reaction was excluded by both field survey and lab examination such as chemical analysis, petrographic analysis, and determination of alkali reactivity of aggregates. According to results of freeze-thaw cycles, impermeability testing, and microstructure analysis, it is deduced that the severe environmental conditions plus the relatively inferior frost resistance cause the deterioration of concrete. Usage of air entraining admixture can improve frost resistance and impermeability. Furthermore, new approaches to mitigate the deterioration of concrete used in severe environmental condition are discussed.

  5. The effects of pressure dependent constitutive model to simulate concrete structures failure under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhatar, S. N.; Sonoda, Y.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Noh, M. S. Md; Tokumaru, S.

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore the effect of confining pressure in the compression and tension zone by simulating the behaviour of reinforced concrete/mortar structures subjected to the impact load. The analysis comprises the numerical simulation of the influences of high mass low speed impact weight dropping on concrete structures, where the analyses are incorporated with meshless method namely as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The derivation of the plastic stiffness matrix of Drucker-Prager (DP) that extended from Von-Mises (VM) yield criteria to simulate the concrete behaviour were presented in this paper. In which, the displacements for concrete/mortar structures are assumed to be infinitesimal. Furthermore, the influence of the different material model of DP and VM that used numerically for concrete and mortar structures are also discussed. Validation upon existing experimental test results is carried out to investigate the effect of confining pressure, it is found that VM criterion causes unreal impact failure (flexural cracking) of concrete structures.

  6. The Effect of Different Shape and Perforated rHDPE in Concrete Structures on Flexural Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhazri, MY; Hafiz, KM; Myia, YZA; Jia, CP; Sihombing, H.; Sapuan, SM; Badarulzaman, NA

    2017-10-01

    This research was carried out to develop a reinforcing structure from recycled HDPE plastic lubricant containers to be embedded in concrete structure. Different forms and shapes of recycled HDPE plastic are designed as reinforcement incorporate with cement. In this study, the reinforcing structure was prepared by washing, cutting, dimensioning and joining of the waste HDPE containers (direct technique without treatment on plastic surface). Then, the rHDPE reinforced concrete was produced by casting based on standard of procedure in civil engineering technique. Eight different shapes of rHDPE in concrete structure were used to determine the concrete’s ability in terms of flexural strength. Embedded round shape in solid and perforated of rHDPE in concrete system drastically improved flexural strength at 17.78 % and 13.79 %. The result would seem that the concrete with reinforcing rHDPE structure exhibits a more gradual or flexible properties than concrete beams without reinforcement that has the properties of fragile.

  7. characteristics of structural breakdown in plastic concrete and their

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    observed as shearing proceeded. ANALYSIS OF THIXOTROPIC BREAKDOWN OF. CONCRETE. As the cup rotates on application of rotational shear stress, the stator also tends to rotate due to the viscous drag transmitted by the mix. The stator continues to rotate until the resistance registered by the torque arm becomes ...

  8. Mix design proposal for structural concrete using messobo ordinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hessebo Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Realizing the various factors contributing to the quality of concrete, 43 trial batches of different mix designs were investigated. Based on the test results, equations were derived to relate compressive strength to w/c and to predict the 28 days compressive strength from the 7 days ...

  9. characteristics of structural breakdown in plastic concrete and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    CONCRETE AND THEIR POTENTIALS FOR QUALITY ... is the angular velocity. ϕ ..... Figure 6,. By virtue of the linearity of the curves, variations in water/cement ratio do not appear to affect the .... It is shown in the article that apart from the.

  10. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The fracture mechanics size effect, as opposed to the Weibull statistical size effect, is a .... Solutions for TPB beam and a typical wedge-splitting geometry have been ..... Bazant Z P 1984 Size effect in blunt fracture: Concrete, rock, metal. J. Eng.

  11. 3D concrete printing – a structural engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salet, T.A.M.; Bos, F.P.; Wolfs, R.J.M.; Ahmed, Z.Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; Luković, M.

    2017-01-01

    3D Concrete Printing (3DCP) is being developed in an increasing number of places around the globe. The focus is mainly on a trial-and-error based exploration of the possibilities. However, to obtain a viable manufacturing technology and realize the 3DCP potential, a higher level of process control

  12. Experimental investigation on the threshold chloride concentration for corrosion initiation in reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Hwan Oh; Seung Yup Jang

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great importance in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. This study is focused on the corrosion behavior of steel bars induced by internal chlorides in concrete. The main objective of this study is to determine the threshold chloride concentration causing depassivation and active corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete. To examine the threshold concentration of chloride ion, the half-cell potential, the chemical composition of extracted pore solutions of concrete and the extent of corroded area of the specimens were measured. Major test variables include the added amount of chlorides in concrete, type of binder, and water-to-binder ratios. From the present comprehensive test results, the factors influencing threshold chloride concentration are investigated, and the rational ranges of threshold chloride concentration causing active corrosion of steels are proposed. The present study provides the realistic chloride limit for corrosion initiation of reinforced concrete structures, which can be used efficiently in the future technical specification. (authors)

  13. Influence of cellulose fibers on structure and properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov Valeriy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the promising means of foamed concrete quality improvement is micro-reinforcement by adding synthetic and mineral fibers to the base mix. This research is the first to investigate peculiarities of using recycled cellulose fiber extracted from waste paper for obtaining fiber reinforced foam concrete. The paper presents results of experimental research on the influence of cellulose fibers on structure and properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete by using methods of chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The research determines peculiarities of new formations appearance and densification of binder hydration products in the contact zone between fiber and cement matrix, which boost mechanical strength of fiber reinforced foam concrete. Physico-mechanical properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete were defined depending on the amount of recycled cellulose fiber added to the base mix. It was found that the use of recycled cellulose fibers allows obtaining structural thermal insulating fiber reinforced foam concretes of non-autoclaved hardening of brand D600 with regard to mean density with the following improved properties: compressive strength increased by 35% compared to basic samples, higher stability of foamed concrete mix and decreased shrinkage deformation.

  14. Experimental Study on Temperature Behavior of SSC (Stiffened Steel Plate Concrete) Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. J.; Ham, K. W.; Park, D. S.; Kwon, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    SSC(Stiffened Steel plate Concrete) module method uses steel plate instead of reinforcing bar and mold in existing RC structure. Steel plate modules are fabricated in advance, installed and poured with concrete in construction field, so construction period is remarkably shortened by SC module technique. In case of existence of temperature gap between internal and external structure surface such as containment building, thermal stress is taken place and as a result of it, structural strength is deteriorated. In this study, we designed two test specimens and several tests with temperature heating were conducted to evaluate temperature behavior of SSC structures and RC structure

  15. Evaluation of ternary blended cements for use in transportation concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Amanda Louise

    This thesis investigates the use of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures for transportation structures. The study documents technical properties of three concrete mixtures used in federally funded transportation projects in Utah, Kansas, and Michigan that used ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. Data were also collected from laboratory trial batches of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures with mixture designs similar to those of the field projects. The study presents the technical, economic, and environmental advantages of ternary blended cement mixtures. Different barriers of implementation for using ternary blended cement concrete mixtures in transportation projects are addressed. It was concluded that there are no technical, economic, or environmental barriers that exist when using most ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. The technical performance of the ternary blended concrete mixtures that were studied was always better than ordinary portland cement concrete mixtures. The ternary blended cements showed increased durability against chloride ion penetration, alkali silica reaction, and reaction to sulfates. These blends also had less linear shrinkage than ordinary portland cement concrete and met all strength requirements. The increased durability would likely reduce life cycle costs associated with concrete pavement and concrete bridge decks. The initial cost of ternary mixtures can be higher or lower than ordinary portland cement, depending on the supplementary cementitious materials used. Ternary blended cement concrete mixtures produce less carbon dioxide emissions than ordinary portland cement mixtures. This reduces the carbon footprint of construction projects. The barriers associated with implementing ternary blended cement concrete for transportation projects are not significant. Supplying fly ash returns any investment costs for the ready mix plant, including silos and other associated equipment. State specifications can make

  16. Mix design and properties of fly ash waste lightweight aggregates in structural lightweight concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu S. Nadesan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and has the ability to consume industrial wastes in high volume. As the demand for concrete is increasing, one of the effective ways to reduce the undesirable environmental impact of the concrete is by the use of waste and by-product materials as cement and aggregate substitutes in concrete. One such waste material is fly ash, which is produced in large quantities from thermal power plants as a by-product. A substantial amount of fly ash is left unused posing environmental and storage problems. The production of sintered lightweight aggregate with fly ash is an effective method to dispose of fly ash in large quantities. Due to lack of a proper mix design procedure, the production and application of lightweight aggregate in structural concrete are not much entertained. The absorption characteristic of lightweight aggregate is a major concern, while developing the mix proportioning of lightweight concretes. The present study is an attempt to establish a new mix design procedure for the development of sintered fly ash lightweight aggregate concretes, which is simple and more reliable than the existing procedures. Also, the proposed methodology has been validated by developing a spectrum of concretes having water cement ratios varying from 0.25 to 0.75. From the study, it is obvious that the development of 70 MPa concrete is possible by using cement alone without any additives. Also, it is ensured that all the concretes have densities less than 2000 kg/m3.

  17. Research on Anchorage Performance of Grouting Anchor Connection of Precast Concrete Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Sheng; Cao, Xixi

    2018-03-01

    The bonding of grouted anchor bars is one of the vertical connection forms of steel bars in fabricated concrete structures. The performance of grouted connection is mainly affected by the anchorage length and lap length of steel bars. The mechanisms of bond and anchorage between steel bar and concrete are analyzed, and the factors that influence the anchorage performance of steel bar are systematically summarized. Results show that the bond and anchorage performance of steel and concrete have been studied widely, but there are still shortcomings, and the connection forms need to be further improved.

  18. Use of pulsating water jet technology for removal of concrete in repair of concrete structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sitek, Libor; Foldyna, Josef; Martinec, Petr; Ščučka, Jiří; Bodnárová, L.; Hela, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2011), s. 235-242 ISSN 1822-427X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/07/1662; GA ČR GP101/07/P512; GA AV ČR 1QS300860501; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Grant - others:GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI2/390 Program:FR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : high-speed water jet technology * pulsating jet * rotating jets * removal of concrete layer Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2011 http://www.bjrbe.vgtu.lt/volumes/en/volume6/number4/03.php

  19. A survey of the mechanical properties of concrete for structural purposes prepared on construction sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. J. RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper aims to study the concrete dosage conditions for structural purposes in construction sitesl, and the impacts of non-compliance of structural concrete for structural safety, having as study case the city of Angicos / RN. Were analyzed the dynamic elasticity modulus, static elasticity modulus and the compressive strength of concrete samples. Was conducted to collect the survey data, a field research aiming to gather information about dosage of concrete used in the works, as well as the collection of cylindrical specimens of 150 mm diameter by 300 mm of height, prepared according to practice of those professionals. The study indicated a clear necessity to reflection on the subject, since there is no concern, or even, a lack of knowledge by the interviewed professionals regarding the care and procedures necessary for the production of concrete with satisfactory quality, once at least 50% of evaluated construction sites presented compressive strength lower than 20 MPa, minimal strength to structural concrete, as recommended by ABNT-NBR 6118:2014.

  20. Application of smart BFRP bars with distributed fiber optic sensors into concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Zhao, Lihua; Song, Shiwei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the self-sensing and mechanical properties of concrete structures strengthened with a novel type of smart basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars were experimentally studied, wherein the sensing element is Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber sensing technique. First, one of the smart bars was applied to strengthen a 2m concrete beam under a 4-points static loading manner in the laboratory. During the experiment, the bar can measure the inner strain changes and monitor the randomly distributed cracks well. With the distributed strain information along the bar, the distributed deformation of the beam can be calculated, and the structural health can be monitored and evaluated as well. Then, two smart bars with a length of about 70m were embedded into a concrete airfield pavement reinforced by long BFRP bars. In the field test, all the optical fiber sensors in the smart bars survived the whole concrete casting process and worked well. From the measured data, the concrete cracks along the pavement length can be easily monitored. The experimental results also confirmed that the bars can strengthen the structures especially after the yielding of steel bars. All the results confirm that this new type of smart BFRP bars show not only good sensing performance but also mechanical performance in the concrete structures.

  1. The maximum percentage of fly ash to replace part of original Portland cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallisa, Harun; Turuallo, Gidion

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the maximum percent of fly ash to replace part of Orginal Portland Cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete. Many researchers have found that the incorporation of industrial by-products such as fly ash as in producing concrete can improve properties in both fresh and hardened state of concrete. The water-binder ratio was used 0.30. The used sand was medium sand with the maximum size of coarse aggregate was 20 mm. The cement was Type I, which was Bosowa Cement produced by PT Bosowa. The percentages of fly ash to the total of a binder, which were used in this research, were 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%; while the super platicizer used was typed Naptha 511P. The results showed that the replacement cement up to 25 % of the total weight of binder resulted compressive strength higher than the minimum strength at one day of high-strength concrete.

  2. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part II: Identification of Concrete Fracture Energy in Dynamic Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Bratislav B.; Saletti, Dominique; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a second part of the study aimed at investigating the fracture behavior of concrete under high strain rate tensile loading. The experimental method together with the identified stress-strain response of three tests conducted on ordinary concrete have been presented in the paper entitled Part I (Forquin and Lukić in Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40870-017-0135-1). In the present paper, Part II, the investigation is extended towards directly determining the specific fracture energy of each observed fracture zone by visualizing the dynamic cracking process with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. Having access to temporal displacement fields of the sample surface, it is possible to identify the fracture opening displacement (FOD) and the fracture opening velocity of any principle (open) and secondary (closed) fracture at each measurement instance, that may or may not lead to complete physical failure of the sample. Finally, the local Stress-FOD curves were obtained for each observed fracture zone, opposed to previous works where indirect measurements were used. The obtained results indicated a much lower specific fracture energy compared to the results often found in the literature. Furthermore, numerical simulations were performed with a damage law to evaluate the validity of the proposed experimental data processing and compare it to the most often used one in the previous works. The results showed that the present method can reliably predict the specific fracture energy needed to open one macro-fracture and suggested that indirect measurement techniques can lead to an overestimate of specific fracture energy due to the stringent assumption of linear elasticity up-to the peak and the inability of having access to the real post-peak change of axial stress.

  3. Effect of Water-Cement Ratio on Pore Structure and Strength of Foam Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foam concrete with different dry densities (400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 kg/m3 was prepared from ordinary Portland cement (P.O.42.5R and vegetable protein foaming agent by adjusting the water-cement ratio through the physical foaming method. The performance of the cement paste adopted, as well as the structure and distribution of air pores, was characterized by a rheometer, scanning electron microscope, vacuum water saturation instrument, and image analysis software. Effects of the water-cement ratio on the relative viscosity of the cement paste, as well as pore structure and strength of the hardened foam concrete, were discussed. Results showed that water-cement ratio can influence the size, distribution, and connectivity of pores in foam concrete. The compressive strength of the foam concrete showed an inverted V-shaped variation law with the increase in water-cement ratio.

  4. Characterization and modeling of fiber reinforced concrete for structural applications in beams and plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva

    (i.e., stirrups) is investigated in detail using digital image correlation (DIC) measurement technique. The use of steel fibers to replace traditional shear reinforcement is not without precedent in current reinforced concrete design codes. However, more detailed information is provided......Fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) with discrete, short and randomly distributed fibers can be specified and designed for structural applications in flexural members. In certain cases, fibers are used as the only reinforcement, while in other cases fibers are used in combination with a reduced amount...... are considered in structural design, the work presented in this thesis analyzes in detail many commonly used test methods on three types of FRC, including Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Concrete (PP-FRC), Polyvinyl Alcohol Fiber Reinforced Concrete called Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) and Steel Fiber...

  5. Analysis and modelling composite timber-concrete systems: Design of bridge structure according to EN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Timber-concrete composite structures are already applied more than 80 years in engineering practice, went trought the intuitive problem solution to the fully prefabricated hybride assemblies for dry building. The development path of timber-concrete composites was always followed by extensive theoretical and experimental research, whose results were successfully implemented in practice, i.e. on the market, but till presence didn't result in modern designer's code. In expectation of new European codes for timber-concrete composites, the objective of the paper is to provide a comprehensive review of available standards provisions and recent conclusions from literature. The key issues for practical design are highlighted and ilustrated on the example of glulam composite arch bridge structure with concrete deck, according the Eurocodes.

  6. Model abstraction addressing long-term simulations of chemical degradation of large-scale concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, D.; Perko, J.; Seetharam, S.; Mallants, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to assess the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in real-size concrete structures typical of a near-surface radioactive waste disposal facility. The methodology consists of the abstraction of a so-called full (complicated) model accounting for the multicomponent - multi-scale nature of concrete to an abstracted (simplified) model which simulates chemical concrete degradation based on a single component in the aqueous and solid phase. The abstracted model is verified against chemical degradation fronts simulated with the full model under both diffusive and advective transport conditions. Implementation in the multi-physics simulation tool COMSOL allows simulation of the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in large-scale concrete structures. (authors)

  7. An approach regarding aging management program for concrete containment structure at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenier, J-O.; Komljenovic, D., E-mail: Chenier.jean-olivier@hydro.qc.ca [Nuclear Power Plant Gentilly-2, Becancour, Quebec (Canada); Gocevski, V. [Hydro-Quebec Equipment, Structural Dept., Quebec (Canada); Picard, S.; Chretien, G. [Nuclear Power Plant Gentilly-2, Becancour, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The current paper presents the approach used by the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant, Hydro-Quebec, in elaborating a specific Aging Management Program (AMP) for its concrete containment structure. It is developed as a part of preparation activities for the plant refurbishment project. The specificity of the AMP consists in addressing Alkali-Aggregate Reaction (AAR) degradation mechanism which is not well known in the nuclear power industry. HQ developed a numerical model based on finite elements for assessing the concrete containment structure behaviour under the impact of AAR and other relevant degradation mechanisms. Such predictions enable a better targeting of corrective and mitigating actions during the second cycle of the G-2 operation while required. (author)

  8. Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP): Using the CBP Software Toolbox to Simulate Sulfate Attack and Carbonation of Concrete Structures - 13481

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.C.; Sarkar, S. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, CRESP, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Smith, F.G.III; Burns, H. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Van der Sloot, H. [Hans Van der Sloot Consultancy, Dorpsstraat 216, 1721BV Langedijk (Netherlands); Meeussen, J.C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Petten (Netherlands); Seignette, P.F.A.B. [Energy Research Center of The Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada); Mallick, P.; Suttora, L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Esh, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Philip, J. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP project has developed a set of integrated modeling tools and leaching test methods to help improve understanding and prediction of the long-term hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious materials used in nuclear applications. State-of-the-art modeling tools, including LeachXS{sup TM}/ORCHESTRA and STADIUM{sup R}, were selected for their demonstrated abilities to simulate reactive transport and degradation in cementitious materials. The new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaching test methods based on the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF), now adopted as part of the SW-846 RCRA methods, have been used to help make the link between modeling and experiment. Although each of the CBP tools has demonstrated utility as a standalone product, coupling the models over relevant spatial and temporal solution domains can provide more accurate predictions of cementitious materials behavior over relevant periods of performance. The LeachXS{sup TM}/ORCHESTRA and STADIUM{sup R} models were first linked to the GoldSim Monte Carlo simulator to better and more easily characterize model uncertainties and as a means to coupling the models allowing linking to broader performance assessment evaluations that use CBP results for a source term. Two important degradation scenarios were selected for initial demonstration: sulfate ingress / attack and carbonation of cementitious materials. When sufficient sulfate is present in the pore solution external to a concrete barrier, sulfate can diffuse into the concrete, react with the concrete solid phases, and cause cracking that significantly changes the transport and structural properties of the concrete. The penetration of gaseous carbon dioxide within partially saturated concrete usually initiates a series of carbonation

  9. Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP): Using the CBP Software Toolbox to Simulate Sulfate Attack and Carbonation of Concrete Structures - 13481

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.G.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.C.; Sarkar, S.; Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Smith, F.G.III; Burns, H.; Van der Sloot, H.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Seignette, P.F.A.B.; Samson, E.; Mallick, P.; Suttora, L.; Esh, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Philip, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP project has developed a set of integrated modeling tools and leaching test methods to help improve understanding and prediction of the long-term hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious materials used in nuclear applications. State-of-the-art modeling tools, including LeachXS TM /ORCHESTRA and STADIUM R , were selected for their demonstrated abilities to simulate reactive transport and degradation in cementitious materials. The new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaching test methods based on the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF), now adopted as part of the SW-846 RCRA methods, have been used to help make the link between modeling and experiment. Although each of the CBP tools has demonstrated utility as a standalone product, coupling the models over relevant spatial and temporal solution domains can provide more accurate predictions of cementitious materials behavior over relevant periods of performance. The LeachXS TM /ORCHESTRA and STADIUM R models were first linked to the GoldSim Monte Carlo simulator to better and more easily characterize model uncertainties and as a means to coupling the models allowing linking to broader performance assessment evaluations that use CBP results for a source term. Two important degradation scenarios were selected for initial demonstration: sulfate ingress / attack and carbonation of cementitious materials. When sufficient sulfate is present in the pore solution external to a concrete barrier, sulfate can diffuse into the concrete, react with the concrete solid phases, and cause cracking that significantly changes the transport and structural properties of the concrete. The penetration of gaseous carbon dioxide within partially saturated concrete usually initiates a series of carbonation reactions with

  10. Effect of soil–structure interaction on the reliability of reinforced concrete bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel Bezih; Alaa Chateauneuf; Mahdi Kalla; Claude Bacconnet

    2015-01-01

    In the design of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges, the random and nonlinear behavior of soil may lead to insufficient reliability levels. For this reason, it is necessary to take into account the variability of soil properties which can significantly affect the bridge behavior regarding ultimate and serviceability limit states. This study investigates the failure probability for existing reinforced concrete bridges due to the effects of interaction between the soil and the structure. In this ...

  11. A study on the behavior of beam-column connections in precast concrete structures: experimental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka,M. N.; Ferreira,M. A.; El Debs,A. L. H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large increase in the use of precast concrete structures in multistory buildings, this work covers a study on the behavior of beam-column connection with emphasis on the continuity provided by the slab reinforcement. Two prototypes were tested, each one with a different detail of the continuity reinforcement distribution. In both connections, the steel area used on the concrete cover of the hollow core slab was the same, varying the amount of bars that passed through the column and...

  12. A study on the effect of crack in concrete structure in the point of radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kun-Jai; Cho, Cheon-Hyung; Choi, Byung-Il; Lee, Heung-Young

    2005-01-01

    The saturation of South Korea's at-reactor (AR) spent fuel storage pools has created a necessity for additional spent fuel storage capacity. Because the South Korean government has a plan to increase the number of nuclear power plants to 27 units by 2016, the increase of spent nuclear fuel generation will be accelerated. Because there is no concrete plan for spent unclear fuel permanent disposal, the Korea hydraulic nuclear power company is planning to construct dry storage facility. Spent nuclear fuel from CANDU type nuclear power plant will be stored in MACSTOR-400 composed by reinforced concrete. Because it is new model, it has to be licensed. Life time estimation is needed for licensing. Deterioration of reinforced concrete structure is currently of great concern for life time estimation. The most significant form of deterioration is reinforcement corrosion that gives rise to crack the concrete structure. In this study, in order to estimate the life time of MACSTOR, the tendency of crack creation, propagation and the effect of crack in concrete structure against radiation shielding are investigated. Crack creation and propagation depends on concrete cover thickness and c/d ratio. The surface dose rate at the concrete shield in MACSTOR is simulated by MCNP code about several cases. Generally in the case of point source, surface dose rate depends on shape, width and length of crack. In the case of MACSTOR-400, It is estimated that crack is not dominant factor in the point of radiation shielding in less than 0.4mm of crack width. Above results will be helpful to estimate the life time of concrete structure as radiation shield

  13. Assessment of empirical formulae for local response of concrete structures to hard projectile impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzaud, E.; Cazaubon, Ch.; Chauvel, D.

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of the impact of a hard projectile on a reinforced concrete structure is affected by different parameters such as the configuration of the interaction, the projectile geometry, mass and velocity and the target geometry, reinforcement, and concrete mechanical properties. Those parameters have been investigated experimentally during the last 30 years, hence providing a basis of simplified mathematical models like empirical formulae. The aim of the authors is to assess the relative performances of classical and more recent empirical formulae. (authors)

  14. A study on the effects of seawater on the durable life of concrete structures(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Chang, Bong Seok; Chang, Seung Yeob; Cheon, Se Jin; Cheong, Sang Hwa; Yu, Yeong; Shin, Yong Seok; Shin, Myeong Su; Hyeong, Sang Su [Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-15

    Recently, large scale concrete structures such as Nuclear Power Plants and offshore structures are actively being built in this country. These structures are subject to heavy attack due to seawater environment. A reasonable consideration for corrosion has not been paid to the structures in the past decades due to insufficient research data and guidelines. The durability os emerging as one of the most important factors in the design and construction of concrete structures. The purpose of the present study is, therefore, to explore the corrosion mechanism and penetration mechanism of chloride ion, and to establish the evaluation procedure of durability life of concrete structures. A comprehensive experimental program has been set up and severe the types and amount of cement and mineral admixtures. The test results on the corrosion and strength characteristics of various concrete with be reported in the second-year report since the corrosion tests need long time. The results can be used in the design and construction of concrete structures in the future.

  15. Structural pounding of concrete frame structure with masonry infill wall under seismic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rozaina; Hasnan, Mohd Hafizudin; Shamsudin, Nurhanis

    2017-10-01

    Structural pounding is additional problem than the other harmful damage that may occurs due to the earthquake vibrations. A lot of study has been made by past researcher but most of them did not include the walls. The infill masonry walls are rarely involved analysis of structural systems but it does contribute to earthquake response of the structures. In this research, a comparison between adjacent building of 10-storey and 7-storey concrete frame structure without of masonry infill walls and the same dynamic properties of buildings. The diagonal strut approach is adopted for modeling masonry infill walls. This research also focused on finding critical building separation in order to prevent the adjacent structures from pounding. LUSAS FEA v14.03 software has been used for modeling analyzing the behavior of structures due to seismic loading and the displacement each floor of the building has been taken in order to determine the critical separation distance between the buildings. From the analysis that has been done, it is found that masonry infill walls do affect the structures behavior under seismic load. Structures without masonry infill walls needs more distance between the structures to prevent structural pounding due to higher displacement of the buildings when it sways under seismic load compared to structures with masonry infill walls. This shows that contribution of masonry infill walls to the analysis of structures cannot be neglected.

  16. CRITICAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF STRUCTURAL LIGHT-WEIGHT CONCRETE AND THE EFFECTS OF THESE PROPERTIES ON THE DESIGN OF THE PAVEMENT STRUCTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    In this study, critical mechanical properties of structural lightweight concrete were determined and utilized in the evaluation of a design of concrete pavements. Also presented are the critical mechanical properties resulting from unrestrained and r...

  17. Aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Arndt, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plants for continued service. In meeting this objective, a materials property data base is being developed as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, studies are well under way to review and assess inservice inspection techniques for concrete structures and to develop a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future conditions assessments of these structures. 16 refs., 2 tabs

  18. Monitoring of concrete structures by using the 14 MeV tagged neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudac, D.; Nad, K.; Obhodas, J.; Valkovic, V.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance and repair of reinforced concrete structures, especially those submerged in the sea-water require effective inspection and monitoring techniques for assessing the state of corrosion in the reinforcement material. An underwater inspection system was developed which is able to monitor the corrosion of the reinforcement. The system is composed of a remotely operating vehicle (ROV) equipped with the sealed tube neutron generator (NG). By rotating the NG and by using the associated alpha particle technique it is possible to measure the concrete cover thickness together with the reinforcing bar diameter. The possibility of estimating the carbon and chloride contents in the concrete was investigated. Iron plates of different thickness, covered by 6 cm thick concrete block, were successfully detected and the thickness of the concrete cover was estimated. In addition, reinforcing bar of one and 3 cm in diameter were identified and measured. All measurements could be performed without cleaning the concrete surface from fouling material. -- Highlights: • An underwater inspection system was developed which is able to monitor the state of reinforcement corrosion. • The system is composed of a remotely operating vehicle (ROV) equipped with the sealed tube neutron generator (NG). • All measurements could be performed without cleaning the concrete surface from fouling material

  19. Guidebook on non-destructive testing of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has been active in the promotion of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology for many years. NDT is an important component of a number of IAEA regional projects. This guidebook deals with NDT of concrete. This book covers a wide range of NDT methods including industrial radiography, ultrasonic testing, electromagnetic testing, infrared thermography, etc. Codes, standards, specifications and procedures are also covered

  20. Embedded micro-sensor for monitoring pH in concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Rengaswamy; Phillips, Terry E.; Bargeron, C. Brent; Carlson, Micah A.; Schemm, Elizabeth R.; Saffarian, Hassan M.

    2000-04-01

    Three major causes of corrosion of steel in concrete are chloride ions (Cl-), temperature (T) and acidity (pH). Under normal operating temperatures and with pH above 13, steel does not undergo pitting corrosion. In presence of Cl-, if the pH decreases below 12, the probability of pitting increases. Acid rain and atmospheric carbon dioxide cause the pH to drop in concrete, often leading to corrosion of the structure with the concomitant cost of repair or replacement. Currently, the pH level in concrete is estimated through destructive testing of the structures. Glass ISFET, and other pH sensors that need maintenance and calibration cannot be embedded in concrete. In this paper, we describe an inexpensive solid state pH sensor that can be embedded in concrete, to detect pH changes at the early stages. It employs a chemical reagent, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) that exhibits changes in optical properties in the 12 - 14 pH range, and is held in a film of a sol-gel/TNBS composite on an optically transparent surface. A simple LED/filter/photodiode transducer monitors pH-induced changes in TNBS. Such a device needs no periodic calibration or maintenance. The optical window, the light-source and sensor can be easily housed and encapsulated in a chemically inert structure, and embedded in concrete.

  1. Probabilistic methods for condition assessment and life prediction of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.R.; Mori, Yasuhiro

    1993-01-01

    A probability-based methodology is being developed in support of the NRC Structural Aging Program to assist in evaluating the reliability of existing concrete structures in nuclear power plants under potential future operating loads and extreme evironmental and accidental events. The methodology includes models to predict structural deterioration due to environmental stressors, a database to support the use of these models, and methods for analyzing time-dependent reliability of concrete structural components subjected to stochastic loads. The methodology can be used to support a plant license extension application by providing evidence that safety-related concrete structures in their current (service) condition are able to withstand future extreme events with a level of reliability sufficient for public health and safety. (orig.)

  2. Photogrammetric analysis of concrete specimens and structures for condition assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Nicolas; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Deterioration of civil infrastructure in America demands routine inspection and maintenance to avoid catastrophic failures from occurring. Among many other non-destructive evaluations (NDE), photogrammetry is an accessible and realistic approach used for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of a civil infrastructure systems. The objective of this paper is to explore the capabilities of photogrammetry for locating, sizing, and analyzing the remaining capacity of a specimen or system using point cloud data. Geometric interpretations, composed from up to 70 photographs are analyzed as a mesh or point cloud models. In this case study, concrete, which exhibits a large amount of surface texture features, was thoroughly examined. These evaluative techniques discussed were applied to concrete cylinder models as well as portions of civil infrastructure including buildings, retaining walls, and bridge abutments. In this paper, the aim is to demonstrate the basic analytical functionality of photogrammetry, as well as its applicability to in-situ civil infrastructure systems. In concrete specimens defect length and location can be evaluated in a fully defined model (one with the maximum amount of correctly acquired photographs) with less than 2% error. Error was found to be inversely proportional to the number of acceptable photographs acquired, remaining significantly under 10% error for any model with enough data to render. Furthermore, volumetric stress evaluations were applied using a cross sectional evaluation technique to locate the critical area, and determine the severity of damages. Finally, findings and the accuracy of the results are discussed.

  3. Endochronic theory for inelasticity and failure analysis of concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Bhat, P.D.; Shieh, C.L.

    1976-12-01

    A gradual accumulation of inelastic strain can be most conveniently described in terms of the so-called intrinsic time, whose increment depends on the time increment as well as the strain increments. This approach, which gives a particularly simple description of irreversibility of strain at unloading and cyclic loading, was previously developed for metals and is extended herein to concrete by introducing the hydrostatic pressure sensitivity of inelastic strain, the inelastic dilatancy produced by deviator strains, and the strain-softening tendency at high stress. Failure envelopes are obtained as a collection of the peaks of stress-strain diagrams. By comparison with experimental data from the literature, it is demonstrated that the proposed model predicts quite closely: stress-strain diagrams for concretes of different strength; uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial stress-strain diagrams and failure envelopes; failure envelopes for combined torsion and compression, lateral strains and volume expansion in uniaxial and biaxial tests; the behavior of spirally confined concrete; hysteresis loops or repeated high compression; cyclic creep up to 10/sup 6/ cycles; the strain rate effect; the decrease of long time strength; and the increase of short-time strength due to low stress creep.

  4. Endochronic theory for inelasticity and failure analysis of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Bhat, P.D.; Shieh, C.L.

    1976-12-01

    A gradual accumulation of inelastic strain can be most conveniently described in terms of the so-called intrinsic time, whose increment depends on the time increment as well as the strain increments. This approach, which gives a particularly simple description of irreversibility of strain at unloading and cyclic loading, was previously developed for metals and is extended herein to concrete by introducing the hydrostatic pressure sensitivity of inelastic strain, the inelastic dilatancy produced by deviator strains, and the strain-softening tendency at high stress. Failure envelopes are obtained as a collection of the peaks of stress-strain diagrams. By comparison with experimental data from the literature, it is demonstrated that the proposed model predicts quite closely: stress-strain diagrams for concretes of different strength; uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial stress-strain diagrams and failure envelopes; failure envelopes for combined torsion and compression, lateral strains and volume expansion in uniaxial and biaxial tests; the behavior of spirally confined concrete; hysteresis loops or repeated high compression; cyclic creep up to 10 6 cycles; the strain rate effect; the decrease of long time strength; and the increase of short-time strength due to low stress creep

  5. Lightweight concrete with Algerian limestone dust. Part II: study on 50% and 100% replacement to normal aggregate at timely age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kitouni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A control lightweight concrete (LWC mixture made with 50% and 100% of limestone as a replacement of coarse aggregates in weight was prepared. Limestone is used for economical and environmental concern. The concrete samples were cured at 65% relative humidity at 20 ºC. The compressive and flexural tensile strengths, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of hardened concrete were measured. Laboratory compressive and tensile strength tests results showed that LWC can be produced by the use of limestone. The aim of this study is twofold: one is to design a lightweight concrete with the use of limestone that will provide an advantage of reduction in dead weight of a structure; and second is to obtain a more economical LWC mixture with the use of limestone.

  6. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  7. New Trends for Reinforced Concrete Structures: Some Results of Exploratory Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo N. F. Carmo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, the concrete sector is being pushed to innovate in order to better address current challenges with higher competitiveness and more sustainable solutions. Different research studies have been conducted all over the world in which novel approaches and paths were proposed. It is important to spread information to define new strategies for the future of this industry. The enhancement of concrete properties and the impact of these changes in structural design are some of the topics analysed in those studies. This paper presents four experimental studies conducted by the authors where different types of concrete and structural members were tested. The common goal of these studies was to develop innovative solutions with high performance and low environmental impact. The scope of the first study was the structural behaviour of members produced with lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC. Results of several beams, ties, and slabs are herein presented and analysed. The advantage of using glass fibre–reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars was addressed in a second study, and main results obtained with this type of rebar are also herein presented. Recent advances in nanotechnology led to the development of concretes incorporating nanoparticles into the binder matrix. Typically, these nanoparticles have a diameter of 10–300 nanometers and are added to the mixture to reduce the porosity and increase the density of the binder matrix, improving the mechanical properties and durability. To analyse their influence on steel-to-concrete bonding and on the shear and flexural behaviour of the beams was the main goal of the third study herein described. Finally, a new concept to produce reinforced concrete members with high durability using a special concrete cover, which was the goal of the fourth study, is also herein presented.

  8. Structural Behavior of Fibrous Reinforced Concrete Hollow Core One-Way Slabs Strengthening by C.F.R.P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    وصيف مجيد

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A reinforced concrete hollow core one-way slab is one of the types of slabs used widely around the world in residential and industrial buildings to take advantage of them Economic and thermal insulation as well as to reduce the self-weight of the construction. The aim of the present study is to examine the structural behavior of the reinforced concrete hollow core one-way slabs reduce failure using the normal concrete and fibrous concrete and then strengthened using carbon fiber(CFRPThis study include molding of ( 6 specimens differ in terms of the voids volume (Vv , volumetric percentage of steel fibers (ا, and then strengthened by using fibers of carbon , with the aim of rehabilitation by fibers, carbon polymer (CFRP is to find out how efficient element structural when treated after the occurrence of the failure and the validity of its use in the event of a failure has occurred entirely or partly in the roof, and re- examined using the same method and conditions that were examined ceilings is affected through it, knowing that these ceilings have been addressed and strengthened in the same way , the results of the tests of the models that have been rehabilitated using carbon fiber (CFRP, compared with the same models before strengthening and examined reduce failure, increased very high susceptibility endurance extreme , with the increase ranging from (51.6% to (96.2%, as has been observed decrease in deflection value of models after strengthening by (CFRP.It is concluded through this study the possibility of using its concrete hollow core one-way slab as a roofing system for buildings also proved the highly efficient for this slab after rehabilitation using carbon fiber (CFRP.

  9. structural behavior of fibrous reinforced concrete hollowcore one-way slabs strengthening by C.F.R.P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    wassif khudair majeed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A reinforced concrete hollow core one-way slab is one of the types of slabs used widely around the world in residential and industrial buildings to take advantage of them Economic and thermal insulation as well as to reduce the self weight of the construction . The aim of the present study is to examine the structural behavior of the reinforced concrete hollow core one-way slabs  reduce failure using the normal concrete and fibrous concrete and then strengthened using carbon fiber(CFRP This study include molding of ( 6 specimens differ in terms of the voids volume (Vv , volumetric percentage of steel fibers ( , and then strengthened by using fibers of carbon , with the aim of rehabilitation by fibers, carbon polymer (CFRP is to find out how efficient element structural when treated after the occurrence of the failure and the validity of its use in the event of a failure has occurred entirely or partly in the roof, and re- examined using the same method and conditions that were examined ceilings is affected through it, knowing that these ceilings have been addressed and strengthened in the same way , the results of the tests of the models that have been rehabilitated using carbon fiber (CFRP, compared with the same models before strengthening and examined reduce failure, increased very high susceptibility endurance extreme , with the increase ranging from (51.6% to ( 96.2% , as has been observed decrease in deflection value of models after strengthening by (CFRP. It is concluded through this study the possibility of using its concrete hollow core one-way slab as a roofing system for buildings also proved the highly efficient for this slab after rehabilitation using carbon fiber (CFRP .

  10. Methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete structures on the basis of half-cell potential and concrete resistivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential E corr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures.

  11. Methodology for Assessing the Probability of Corrosion in Concrete Structures on the Basis of Half-Cell Potential and Concrete Resistivity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Sadowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential Ecorr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures.

  12. Compressive behavior of pervious concretes and a quantification of the influence of random pore structure features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Omkar; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Identified the relevant pore structure features of pervious concretes, provided methodologies to extract those, and quantified the influence of these features on compressive response. → A model for stress-strain relationship of pervious concretes, and relationship between model parameters and parameters of the stress-strain relationship developed. → Statistical model for compressive strength as a function of pore structure features; and a stochastic model for the sensitivity of pore structure features in strength prediction. - Abstract: Properties of a random porous material such as pervious concrete are strongly dependent on its pore structure features, porosity being an important one among them. This study deals with developing an understanding of the material structure-compressive response relationships in pervious concretes. Several pervious concrete mixtures with different pore structure features are proportioned and subjected to static compression tests. The pore structure features such as pore area fractions, pore sizes, mean free spacing of the pores, specific surface area, and the three-dimensional pore distribution density are extracted using image analysis methods. The compressive stress-strain response of pervious concretes, a model to predict the stress-strain response, and its relationship to several of the pore structure features are outlined. Larger aggregate sizes and increase in paste volume fractions are observed to result in increased compressive strengths. The compressive response is found to be influenced by the pore sizes, their distributions and spacing. A statistical model is used to relate the compressive strength to the relevant pore structure features, which is then used as a base model in a Monte-Carlo simulation to evaluate the sensitivity of the predicted compressive strength to the model terms.

  13. DYNAPCON: a computer code for dynamic analysis of prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A finite element computer code for the transient analysis of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs) for LMFBR containment is described. The method assumes rotational symmetry of the structure. Time integration is by an explicit method. The quasistatic prestressing operation of the PCRV model is performed by a dynamic relaxation technique. The material model accounts for the crushing and tensile cracking in arbitrary direction in concrete and the elastic-plastic behavior of reinforcing steel. The variation of the concrete tensile cracking and compressive crushing limits with strain rate is taken into account. Relative slip is permitted between the concrete and tendons. Several example solutions are presented and compared with experimental results. These sample problems range from simply supported beams to small scale models of PCRV's. It is shown that the analytical methods correlate quite well with experimental results, although in the vicinity of the failure load the response of the models tend to be quite sensitive to input parameters

  14. Modelling Dowel Action of Discrete Reinforcing Bars in Cracked Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, A. K. H.; Ng, P. L.; Lam, J. Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Dowel action is one of the component actions for shear force transfer in cracked reinforced concrete. In finite element analysis of concrete structures, the use of discrete representation of reinforcing bars is considered advantageous over the smeared representation due to the relative ease of modelling the bond-slip behaviour. However, there is very limited research on how to simulate the dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars. Herein, a numerical model for dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars crossing cracks in concrete is developed. The model features the derivation of dowel stiffness matrix based on beam-on-elastic-foundation theory and the direct assemblage of dowel stiffness into the concrete element stiffness matrices. The dowel action model is incorporated in a nonlinear finite element programme with secant stiffness formulation. Deep beams tested in the literature are analysed and it is found that the incorporation of dowel action model improves the accuracy of analysis.

  15. Development of structural health monitoring and early warning system for reinforced concrete system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iranata, Data; Wahyuni, Endah; Murtiadi, Suryawan; Widodo, Amien; Riksakomara, Edwin; Sani, Nisfu Asrul

    2015-01-01

    Many buildings have been damaged due to earthquakes that occurred recently in Indonesia. The main cause of the damage is the large deformation of the building structural component cannot accommodate properly. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the Structural Health Monitoring System (SHMS) to measure precisely the deformation of the building structural component in the real time conditions. This paper presents the development of SHMS for reinforced concrete structural system. This monitoring system is based on deformation component such as strain of reinforcement bar, concrete strain, and displacement of reinforced concrete component. Since the deformation component has exceeded the limit value, the warning message can be sent to the building occupies. This warning message has also can be performed as early warning system of the reinforced concrete structural system. The warning message can also be sent via Short Message Service (SMS) through the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) network. Hence, the SHMS should be integrated with internet modem to connect with GSM network. Additionally, the SHMS program is verified with experimental study of simply supported reinforced concrete beam. Verification results show that the SHMS has good agreement with experimental results

  16. Experimental collaboration for thick concrete structures with alkali-silica reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, N. Dianne Bull; Hayes, Nolan; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Clayton, Dwight; Ma, Z. John; Le Pape, Sihem; Le Pape, Yann

    2018-04-01

    Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) is a reaction that occurs over time in concrete between alkaline cement paste and reactive, non-crystalline silica in aggregates. An expansive gel is formed within the aggregates which results in micro-cracks in aggregates and adjacent cement paste. The reaction requires the presence of water and has been predominantly detected in groundwater-impacted portions of below grade structures, with limited impact to exterior surfaces in above grade structures. ASR can potentially affect concrete properties and performance characteristics such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shear strength, and tensile strength. Since ASR degradation often takes significant amounts of time, developing ASR detection techniques is important to the sustainability and extended operation lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) designed and built an experiment representative of typical NPP structures to study ASR in thick concrete structures.

  17. Reinforced concrete structures under impact and impulsive loading: recent development, problems and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plauk, G.; Herter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear plant facilities and other reinforced concrete structures have to be regarded as to their safety in design and construction with respect to impact and impulsive loading in order to avoid serious damage to mankind and environment. The paper gives a survey on theoretical and experimental developments currently in progress, in particular regarding airplane crash. Some new results arising out of several research programs relevant to particular problems of impact loading have been reviewed and are presented. Experimental investigation for determination of material properties of plain concrete, reinforcing steel as well as steel-concrete bond under high strain-rates are treated in this paper including theoretical approaches for the respective material laws. An outline of soft missile impact tests performed on structural members, e.g. beams and plates, to determine the load deformation or fracture behaviour is given. Furthermore, numerical models and calculations to analyse structural components and structures under impact loading were discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. LEO 1.0. An assistant software for maintenance of corroded reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, B.; Petre-Lazar, I.

    1998-04-01

    The reinforced concrete structures capacity to fulfill the users requirements decreases in time and a constant preoccupation for the maintenance is required at EDF. In order to ease up the site investigations, a computer program - LEO - is developed. Its general layout is proposed in this document. LEO 1.0 is developed to be applied to corroded reinforced concrete structures. A simplified model based on the main mechanisms of the steel corrosion in concrete has been developed. It can quantify the influence of the reinforcement corrosion on the structure performances. A probabilistic calculus which takes into account the variability of the input data (material properties, environment, etc.) was also performed using PROBAN computer code. This type of analysis quantifies the time evolution of the structure (incubation, initiation, propagation, collapse). (author)

  19. Structural and seismic analyses of waste facility reinforced concrete storage vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Facility 317 of Argonne National Laboratory consists of several reinforced concrete waste storage vaults designed and constructed in the late 1940's through the early 1960's. In this paper, structural analyses of these concrete vaults subjected to various natural hazards are described, emphasizing the northwest shallow vault. The natural phenomenon hazards considered include both earthquakes and tornados. Because these vaults are deeply embedded in the soil, the SASSI (System Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) code was utilized for the seismic calculations. The ultimate strength method was used to analyze the reinforced concrete structures. In all studies, moment and shear strengths at critical locations of the storage vaults were evaluated. Results of the structural analyses show that almost all the waste storage vaults meet the code requirements according to ACI 349--85. These vaults also satisfy the performance goal such that confinement of hazardous materials is maintained and functioning of the facility is not interrupted

  20. Adaptive Crack Modeling with Interface Solid Elements for Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yijian; Meschke, Günther

    2017-07-08

    The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh processing technique is proposed for computational simulations of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures to progressively disintegrate the initial finite element mesh and to add degenerated solid elements into the interfacial gaps. In comparison with the implementation where the entire mesh is processed prior to the computation, the proposed adaptive cracking model allows simulating the failure behavior of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures with remarkably reduced computational expense.