WorldWideScience

Sample records for concrete reinforcing bars

  1. Behavior of reinforced concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Tavares

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars is one of the alternatives presented in recent studies to prevent the drawbacks related to the steel reinforcement in specific reinforced concrete members. In this work, six reinforced concrete beams were submitted to four point bending tests. One beam was reinforced with CA-50 steel bars and five with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars. The tests were carried out in the Department of Structural Engineering in São Carlos Engineering School, São Paulo University. The objective of the test program was to compare strength, reinforcement deformation, displacement, and some anchorage aspects between the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams and the steel-reinforced concrete beam. The results show that, even though four GFRP-reinforced concrete beams were designed with the same internal tension force as that with steel reinforcement, their capacity was lower than that of the steel-reinforced beam. The results also show that similar flexural capacity can be achieved for the steel- and for the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams by controlling the stiffness (reinforcement modulus of elasticity multiplied by the bar cross-sectional area - EA and the tension force of the GFRP bars.

  2. Corrosion of reinforcement bars in steel ibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe

    Steel fibres have been known as an alternative to traditional reinforcement bars for special applications of structural concrete for decades and the use of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) has gradually increased in recent years. Steel fibres lead to reduced crack widths in concrete formed......, among other reasons, due to shrinkage and/or mechanical loading. Steel fibres are nowadays also used in combination with traditional reinforcement for structural concrete, where the role of the fibres is to minimize the crack widths whereas the traditional reinforcement bars are used for structural....... The aim of the work presented in this Ph.D. thesis was to quantify the influence of steel fibres on corrosion of traditional reinforcement bars embedded in uncracked concrete as well as cracked concrete. Focus of the work was set on the impact of steel fibres on corrosion propagation in uncracked concrete...

  3. Concrete Cover Influence on Inelastic Buckling of Longitudinal Reinforcing Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korentz, Jacek; Kucharczyk, Anna

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical analyses of post yielding behaviour of compressed reinforcing bars, taking into account the impact of concrete cover on static equilibrium path. Concrete cover was modelled as a transverse ties with characteristics like for the tensioned concrete. The calculations were performed for various parameters of concrete cover and bar slenderness, with the use commercial system Abaqus/CAE. The results of analysis showed that the concrete cover has a significant impact on inelastic buckling of reinforcing bars.

  4. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement. Bars: Nigeria as Case Study. Arum, C. Abstract. An investigation was conducted into the level of conformance of ribbed steel bars used in Nigeria's structural concrete practice to relevant international and local provisions. In this research, all bars imported into Nigeria ...

  5. Analysis of FRP bars used as reinforcement in concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Brózda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the design and construction of building and engineering structures, it is of utmost importance to provide their reliability and safety. The use of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymers bars as reinforcement of structural concrete elements could help reducing the typical defects of reinforced concrete and increase its strength parameters. In the paper the selected FRP bar characteristic properties are presented and advantages derived therefrom are specified. Furthermore, the most commonly used in construction types of FRP bars, depending on the raw material used during the production process are listed. In addition, the possibility of recycling of elements reinforced with FRP bars is presented and compared with traditional reinforced concrete (reinforced with steel bars. The production method of FRP bars (pultrusion is shown. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of using this method are discussed.

  6. Durability of GFRP reinforcing bars and their bond in concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Arnaud; Chataigner, Sylvain; Quiertant, Marc; Benzarti, Karim; Argoul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite reinforcing bars (rebars) for the reinforcement of concrete appears as an attractive solution to prevent corrosion, which is the main pathology encountered on concrete structures. Although such rebars are being used for more than ten years, there is a clear lack of knowledge regarding their durability, especially under alkaline environment. This paper aims at investigating the evolutions of tensile properties and bond in concrete of GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer...

  7. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  8. 77 FR 64127 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus... concrete reinforcing bar from Latvia and Moldova. The Commission found that the respondent interested party...

  9. 77 FR 70140 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ...] Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, People's Republic of...'') initiated the second Sunset Reviews of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bars from.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bars from...

  10. 78 FR 60831 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty... (``CVD'') petition \\1\\ concerning imports of steel concrete reinforcing bar (``rebar'') from the Republic... Countervailing Duties on Imports of Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from the Republic of Turkey, dated September 4...

  11. 76 FR 48802 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... antidumping duty order on certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and...

  12. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  13. 78 FR 68090 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, provided for in... reinforcing bar that are allegedly subsidized by the government of Turkey.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec...

  14. Finite element modelling of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid fiber reinforced bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smring, Santa binti; Salleh, Norhafizah; Hamid, NoorAzlina Abdul; Majid, Masni A.

    2017-11-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous composite material made up of cement, sand, coarse aggregate and water mixed in a desired proportion to obtain the required strength. Plain concrete does not with stand tension as compared to compression. In order to compensate this drawback steel reinforcement are provided in concrete. Now a day, for improving the properties of concrete and also to take up tension combination of steel and glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars promises favourable strength, serviceability, and durability. To verify its promise and support design concrete structures with hybrid type of reinforcement, this study have investigated the load-deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid GFRP and steel bars by using ATENA software. Fourteen beams, including six control beams reinforced with only steel or only GFRP bars, were analysed. The ratio and the ordinate of GFRP to steel were the main parameters investigated. The behaviour of these beams was investigated via the load-deflection characteristics, cracking behaviour and mode of failure. Hybrid GFRP-Steel reinforced concrete beam showed the improvement in both ultimate capacity and deflection concomitant to the steel reinforced concrete beam. On the other hand, finite element (FE) modelling which is ATENA were validated with previous experiment and promising the good result to be used for further analyses and development in the field of present study.

  15. Bond of reinforcing bars in self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Braam, C.R.; Uijl, J.A. den; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Pull-out tests were performed on 10 mm diameter ribbed bars embedded along three times the bar diameter in 200 mm cubes made of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) of normal strength (B45). The fiber content was 60 and 120 kg/m3, respectively, the aspect ratio of the fibers was 45 and

  16. 78 FR 73838 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary... Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a countervailing duty investigation on steel concrete... December 16, 2013.\\3\\ \\1\\ See Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty...

  17. 77 FR 71631 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel Concrete...) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from...

  18. Research on deformation characteristics and design method of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M. X.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-04-01

    Two different glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars were produced to reinforce concrete beams, including plain GFRP bars and ribbed surface GFRP bars. The flexural property of GFRP reinforced concrete beams was studied by testing four specimen beams under two point vertical loads. The crack development and stain distribution of beam cross section during loading were recorded, and the deformation characteristics and failure mode were also analyzed in this experiment. According to the test results, the bond property of plain GFRP bars was too poor to serve as reinforcement bars, while the ribbed surface GFRP bars showed good bond performance and worked well with concrete before final failure. The test beam reinforced with ribbed surface GFRP bars exhibited a uniform crack distribution, and the strain agreed with the assumption of plane cross section. Moreover, calculation method for bending capacity of concrete beam strengthened with GFRP bars was deducted based on this experiment.

  19. 78 FR 55755 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and... from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, primarily provided for in subheadings 7213.10...

  20. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was conducted into the level of conformance of ribbed steel bars used in Nigeria's structural concrete practice to relevant international and local provisions. In this research, all bars imported into Nigeria from member countries of ISO as well as bars marked with the identity of the local producing mill are ...

  1. Bond characteristics of reinforced TMT bars in Self Compacting Concrete and Normal Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipun Verma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In its simplest form, it can be said that the resistance to separation of mortar and concrete from reinforcing steel (or other materials with which it is in contact is called bond strength. These days different kinds of concrete are manufactured, all with different properties. But bond strength is something which is essentially a well sort after quality for any RCC structure or element. Bond strength can be easily found out by standard pull-out test machine. But in this work, the bond strength was measured using Universal testing machine (UTM with some modified arrangements. The bond between the concrete and steel reinforcement was investigated for two different kinds of concretes. Using reinforcing bars bond strengths were measured using Self Compacting Concrete (SCC specimen and Normal Cement Concrete (NCC specimen. Castings of SCC specimens were carried out without compaction, while the normal concrete specimens were casted with substantial compaction and vibration. The study revealed that SCC specimens generated higher bond to reinforcing bars in comparison with NCC specimens. Secondly, the correlation between bond strength and compressive strength of NCC is more consistent. Thirdly, the results obtained with UTM were compared with the results obtained with standard pull-out test machine and they were found in permissible limits.

  2. Application of titanium alloy bars for strengthening reinforced concrete bridge girders (part a: shear) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-04

    Large numbers of conventionally reinforced concrete bridges (RC) were constructed during the interstate highway expansion of the 1950s and remain in the national inventory. Coincidently, deformed steel reinforcing bars were standardized. The stand...

  3. Numerical Study on Deflection Behaviour of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Osama A.; Khattab, Rania; Hawat, Waddah Al

    2017-10-01

    Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars are gaining popularity as sustainable alternatives to conventional reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete applications. The production of FRP bars has lower environmental impact compared to steel reinforcing bars. In addition, the non-corroding FRP materials can potentially decrease the cost or need for maintenance of reinforced concrete structural elements, especially in harsh environmental conditions that can impact both concrete and reinforcement. FRP bars offer additional favourable properties including high tensile strength and low unit weight. However, the mechanical properties of FRP bars can lead to large crack widths and deflections. The objective of this study is to investigate the deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with Glass FRP (GFRP) bars as a longitudinal main reinforcement. Six concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars were modelled using the finite element computer program ANSYS. The main variable considered in the study is the reinforcement ratio. The deflection equations in current North American codes including ACI 440.1R-06, ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12 are used to compute deflections, and these are compared to numerical results. It was concluded in this paper that deflections predicted by ACI 440.1R-06 equations are lower than the numerical analysis results while ACI 440.1R-15 is in agreement with numerical analysis with tendency to be conservative. The values of deflections estimated by CSA S806-12 formulas are consistent with results of numerical analysis.

  4. 75 FR 7562 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision... certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey covering the period of review (POR) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results...

  5. 75 FR 22552 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... Department) in the 2003-2004 administrative review of certain steel concrete of reinforcing bars (rebar) from...) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey...

  6. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers – polymers (epoxy bars (GFRP reinforced concrete for structural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkjk Saeed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  7. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  8. 78 FR 43858 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ...] Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's Republic... Department of Commerce (``Department'') that revocation of the antidumping duty orders \\1\\ on steel concrete... of the continuation of the antidumping duty orders. \\1\\ See Antidumping Duty Orders: Steel Concrete...

  9. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior between Plain Reinforcing Bars and Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the bond behavior between the reinforcing bar and surrounding concrete, a total of six-group pullout specimens with plain steel bars and two-group specimens with deformed steel bars, serving as a reference, are experimentally investigated and presented in this study. The main test parameters of this investigation include embedment length, surface type of reinforcing bars, and bar diameter. In particular, the bond mechanism of plain steel reinforcing bars against the surrounding concrete was analyzed by comparing with six-group pullout specimens with aluminium alloy bars. The results indicated that the bond stress experienced by plain bars is quite lower than that of the deformed bars given equal structural characteristics and details. Averagely, plain bars appeared to develop only 18.3% of the bond stress of deformed bars. Differing from the bond strength of plain steel bars, which is based primarily on chemical adhesion and friction force, the bond stress of aluminium alloy bars is mainly experienced by chemical adhesion and about 0.21~0.56 MPa, which is just one-tenth of that of plain steel bars. Based on the test results, a bond-slip model at the interface between concrete and plain bars is put forward.

  10. Study on crack development of concrete beams in bending reinforced with FRP bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M. X.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-04-01

    The comparatively high tensile strength and low elastic modulus of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars result in deflection and crack width requirements controlling the design of concrete beams reinforced with FRP bars. Consequently, when it comes to the design of such members, the deflection and crack width are first calculated at serviceability limit state, and then are checked at ultimate limit state. In this paper, five concrete beams reinforced with different FRP reinforcement ratios were tested and the crack development and pattern as well as the effect of reinforcement ratio on crack width and spacing were analyzed. The experimental results were compared with the calculation results using design guidelines recommended by Japan JSCE code, American ACI440.1R-03 code and China GB50608-2010 code. Several design suggestions were proposed for bending concrete beams reinforced with FRP bars.

  11. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    National Workshop on the theme: Preventing Incidences of Collapsed. Buildings and Structures in Nigeria, Lagos. Daodu O.F.(2005) “Determination of strength and ductility characteristics of steel reinforcement bars produced in Nigeria” Unpublished Post. Graduate Diploma Thesis, Federal University of Technology, Akure.

  12. Flexural strengthening of reinforced lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete beams with near-surface mounted GFRP bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.C.; Balendran, R.V.; Nadeem, A.; Leung, H.Y. [City University of Hong Kong (China). Department of Building and Construction

    2006-10-15

    Application of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is emerging as a promising technology for increasing flexural and shear strength of deficient reinforced concrete (RC) members. In order for this technique to perform effectively, the structural behaviour of RC elements strengthened with NSM FRP bars needs to be fully characterized. This paper focuses on the characterization of flexural behaviour of RC members strengthened with NSM glass-FRP bars. Totally, 10 beams were tested using symmetrical two-point loads test. The parameters examined under the beam tests were type of concretes (lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete and normal concrete), type of reinforcing bars (GFRP and steel), and type of adhesives. Flexural performance of the tested beams including modes of failure, moment-deflection response and ultimate moment capacity are presented and discussed in this paper. Results of this investigation showed that beams with NSM GFRP bars showed a reduction in ultimate deflection and an improvement in flexural stiffness and bending capacity, depending on the PA content of the beams. In general, beams strengthened with NSM GFRP bars overall showed a significant increase in ultimate moment ranging from 23% to 53% over the corresponding beams without NSM GFRP bars. The influence of epoxy type was found conspicuously dominated the moment-deflection response up to the peak moment. Besides, the ultimate moment of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars could be predicted satisfactorily using the equation provided in ACI 318-95 Building Code. (author)

  13. Replacement of minimum steel bar reinforcement with steel fibres in structural concrete members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, F.; Holschemacher, K.; Müller, T.; Kieslich, H.

    2017-09-01

    Using lightweight concrete enables a decrease in dead load and thermal conductivity in the case of the manufacturing of structural concrete members. With the addition of steel fibres in concrete, its properties are altered from brittle to ductile, so that the use of additional minimum reinforcement for securing ductility and crack control can be avoided. This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of replacing conventional minimum steel bar reinforcement with steel fibre reinforcement in lightweight aggregate concrete under flexural loading. Therefore, six full-scaled beams with two different lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC) (oven-dry densities of reinforcement were prepared. For each LWAC, a beam with traditional steel bars, a beam with steel fibres and a beam with a combination of steel fibre reinforcement and reduced steel bar reinforcement were produced. The cracking behaviour of the lightweight concrete beams was studied in a four-point bending test. The results of this study show that it is possible to replace a high amount of the conventional mesh or bar reinforcement with steel fibres.

  14. Prediction of punching shear capacities of two-way concrete slabs reinforced with FRP bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. Metwally

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Where corrosion of steel reinforcement is a concern, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP reinforcing bar or grid reinforcement provides an alternative reinforcement for concrete flat slabs. The existing provisions for punching of slabs in most international design standards for reinforced concrete are based on tests of steel reinforced slabs. The elastic stiffness and bonding characteristics of FRP reinforcement are sufficiently different from those of steel to affect punching strength [1]. This paper evaluates the punching shear strength of concrete flat slabs reinforced with different types of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. A total of 59 full-size slabs were constructed and tested collected from the literature of FRP bars reinforced concrete slabs. The test parameters were the amount of FRP reinforcing bars, Young’s modulus of FRP bars, slab thickness, loaded areas and concrete compressive strength. The experimental punching shear strengths were compared with the available theoretical predictions, including the ACI 318 Code, BS 8110 Code, ACI 440 design guidelines, and a number of models proposed by some researchers in the literature. Two approaches for predicting the punching strength of FRP-reinforced slabs are examined. The first is an empirical new model which is considered as a modification of El-Gamal et al. [2] model. The second is a Neural Networks Technique; which has been developed to predict the punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced concrete slabs. The accuracies of both methods were evaluated against the experimental test data. They attained excellent agreement with available test results compared to the existing design formulas.

  15. Effect of Different Bar Embedment Length on Bond-Slip in Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Chopra, M.B.; Kunnath, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This research aims to study the behaviour of the concrete-steel bond using numerical models, taking into account the effect of the different bar embedment length. Both plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are modeled. The interface bond stress as well as load-displacement response of the

  16. Experimental Study On The Flexural And Shear Analysis Of Concrete Beams Rein Forced With Glass Fiber -Reinforced (Gfrp Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Atutis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes experimental studies examining the flexuraland shear analysis of the beams reinforced with GFRP bars. Atesting program consisted of two beams reinforced with longitudinalprestressed GFRP tendons, two beams reinforced withlongitudinal GFRP bars and two beams reinforced with longitudinalsteel reinforcement and shear reinforcement of GFRP bars.The experimental flexural and shear strength of concrete beamswere compared with theoretical strength calculated according toa number of design recommendations, and the significance ofprestressing for deflection and cracking was analyzed.

  17. Experimental data of deformation and cracking behaviour of concrete ties reinforced with multiple bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimkus, Arvydas; Gribniak, Viktor

    2017-08-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Experimental Investigation of cracking and deformations of concrete ties reinforced with multiple bars" (Rimkus and Gribniak, 2017) [1]. The article provides data on deformation and cracking behaviour of 22 concrete ties reinforced with multiple bars. The number and diameter of the steel bars vary from 4 to 16 and from 5 mm to 14 mm, respectively. Two different covers (30 mm and 50 mm) are considered as well. The test recordings include average stains of the reinforcement and the concrete surface, the mean and maximum crack spacing, final crack patterns, and crack development schemes obtained using digital image correlation (DIC) system. The reported original data set is made publicity available for ensuring critical or extended analyses.

  18. Articularities of Analysis and Behaviour of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Fibrous Polymer Composite Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ţăranu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional steel based reinforcement systems for concrete elements are facing with serious problems mainly caused by corrosion due to chemically aggressive environments and salts used in deicing procedures, especially in case of bridge steel reinforced concrete girders. Also in some cases special applications require structural members with magnetic transparency. An alternative to this major problem has recently become the use of fiber reinforced polymer (FPR composite bars as internal reinforcement for concrete beams. The particularities of their mechanical properties are making the design process a difficult task for engineers, numerous research centers being involved in correcting this situation. The general aspects concerning the conceiving of FR.P reinforced concrete beams are firstly analyzed, compared to those reinforced with steel bars. Some results of a Finite Element Analysis, as part of a complex program which also implies full scale testing of FRP reinforced beams subjected to bending, are given and discussed in the paper. The low elasticity modulus presented by glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars does not justify its use from structural point of view when deflection is the limiting condition but for corrosive resistance reasons and special electromagnetic properties this system can be promoted.

  19. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  20. 75 FR 47260 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... International Trade Administration (A-489-807) Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of...) in the 2005-2006 administrative review of certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey...). In this redetermination, the Department recalculated the cost of production for rebar produced and...

  1. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete moment resisting frames reinforced with shape memory composite bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Adeel; Andrawes, Bassem

    2012-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars have been used in concrete structures as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, in order to overcome corrosion problems. However, due to the linear behavior of the commonly used reinforcing fibers, they are not considered in structures which require ductility and damping characteristics. The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers with their nonlinear elastic behavior as reinforcement in the composite could potentially provide a solution for this problem. Small diameter SMA wires are coupled with polymer matrix to produce SMA-FRP composite, which is sought in this research as reinforcing bars. SMA-FRP bars are sought in this study to enhance the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resisting frames (MRFs) in terms of reducing their residual inter-story drifts while still maintaining the elastic characteristics associated with conventional FRP. Three story one bay and six story two bay RC MRF prototype structures are designed with steel, SMA-FRP and glass-FRP reinforcement. The incremental dynamic analysis technique is used to investigate the behaviors of the two frames with the three different reinforcement types under a suite of ground motion records. It is found that the frames with SMA-FRP composite reinforcement exhibit higher performance levels including lower residual inter-story drifts, high energy dissipation and thus lower damage, which are important for structures in highly seismic zones.

  2. Static, Fire and Fatigue Tests of Ultra High-Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete and Ribbed Bars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilegaard; Heshe, Gert

    2001-01-01

    A new building system has been developed during the last 10 years. This new system consists of a column / slab system with 6 x 6 m distance between the columns. The slabs are precast concrete elements of size 2.9 x 5.9 m connected through joints of ultra high strength fibre reinforced concrete...... - Densit Joint Cast ®. Also the connections between the columns and the slabs are made of this very strong concrete material. The paper describes some of the static tests carried out as well as some fire tests. Further, 2 chapters deal with some fatigue tests of the reinforcing bars as well as some fatigue...... tests of tensile specimens consisting of reinforcing bars embedded in Densit Joint Cast ®. The objective of these fatigue tests is to show that the system / connection can presumably also be used in structures subjected to dominant time- varying loads and thus for example in earthquake regions....

  3. Digital fast neutron radiography of steel reinforcing bar in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, K.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron imaging has previously been used in order to test for cracks, degradation and water content in concrete. However, these techniques often fall short of alternative non-destructive testing methods, such as γ-ray and X-ray imaging, particularly in terms of resolution. Further, thermal neutron techniques can be compromised by the significant expense associated with thermal neutron sources of sufficient intensity to yield satisfactory results that can often precipitate the need for a reactor. Such embodiments are clearly not portable in the context of the needs of field applications. This paper summarises the results of a study to investigate the potential for transmission radiography based on fast neutrons. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of heterogeneities in concrete, such as reinforcement structures, could be identified on the basis of variation in transmitted fast-neutron flux. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed and the results from these are compared to those arising from practical tests using a 252Cf source. The experimental data have been acquired using a digital pulse-shape discrimination system that enables fast neutron transmission to be studied across an array of liquid scintillators placed in close proximity to samples under test, and read out in real time. Whilst this study does not yield sufficient spatial resolution, a comparison of overall flux ratios does provide a basis for the discrimination between samples with contrasting rebar content. This approach offers the potential for non-destructive testing that gives less dose, better transportability and better accessibility than competing approaches. It is also suitable for thick samples where γ-ray and X-ray methods can be limited.

  4. An Investigation of Bond Strength of Reinforcing Bars in Fly Ash and GGBS Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopalan C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous aluminosilicate materials. Geopolymers are binders formed by alkali activation of Geopolymer Source Materials (GSM using an alkaline activator solution. Concretes made using Geopolymer binders are excellent alternative to the Ordinary Portland Cement concretes from strength, durability, and ecological considerations. Especially, usage of industrial waste materials such as Fly Ash and Slags as GSMs considerably lower the carbon footprint of concrete and mitigate the damage due to the unscientific dumping/disposal of these materials. To use the Geopolymer concrete (GPC for reinforced structural members, the composite action of reinforcing bars with Geopolymer concrete i.e. the bond behaviour should be well understood. This paper describes the bond behaviour of 12mm and 16mm dia. bars embedded in Fly ash and GGBS based Geopolymer concrete and conventional Portland Pozzolana cement concrete specimens investigated using the pull-out tests as per Indian Standard Code IS:2770(Part-I; the bond stresses and corresponding slips were found out. The bond stress increased with increase in compressive strength. The peak bond stress was found to be 4.3 times more than the design bond stress as per IS:456-2000. The Geopolymer concretes possess higher bond strength compared to the conventional cement concretes.

  5. Parametric Study of Shear Strength of Concrete Beams Reinforced with FRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Job; Ramadass, S.

    2016-09-01

    Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars are being widely used as internal reinforcement in structural elements in the last decade. The corrosion resistance of FRP bars qualifies its use in severe and marine exposure conditions in structures. A total of eight concrete beams longitudinally reinforced with FRP bars were cast and tested over shear span to depth ratio of 0.5 and 1.75. The shear strength test data of 188 beams published in various literatures were also used. The model originally proposed by Indian Standard Code of practice for the prediction of shear strength of concrete beams reinforced with steel bars IS:456 (Plain and reinforced concrete, code of practice, fourth revision. Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi, 2000) is considered and a modification to account for the influence of the FRP bars is proposed based on regression analysis. Out of the 196 test data, 110 test data is used for the regression analysis and 86 test data is used for the validation of the model. In addition, the shear strength of 86 test data accounted for the validation is assessed using eleven models proposed by various researchers. The proposed model accounts for compressive strength of concrete ( f ck ), modulus of elasticity of FRP rebar ( E f ), longitudinal reinforcement ratio ( ρ f ), shear span to depth ratio ( a/ d) and size effect of beams. The predicted shear strength of beams using the proposed model and 11 models proposed by other researchers is compared with the corresponding experimental results. The mean of predicted shear strength to the experimental shear strength for the 86 beams accounted for the validation of the proposed model is found to be 0.93. The result of the statistical analysis indicates that the prediction based on the proposed model corroborates with the corresponding experimental data.

  6. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcing steel bars in concrete using A-C impedance spectroscopy; Koryu inpidansu ho ni yoru konkuritochu tekkin no fushoku monitaringu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, N. [Nakabothec Corrosion Protecting Corp., Saitama (Japan)

    1999-11-15

    The corrosion monitoring of reinforcing steel bars in concrete is presented as an attractive application of a-c impedance measurement methods. This paper reviews a-c impedance characteristics of reinforcing steel bars in concrete, its measuring methods and related problems on real concrete structures. (author)

  7. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-12-24

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works.

  8. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  9. High strength reinforcing steel bars : concrete shear friction interface : final report : Part A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcement, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) steel reinf...

  10. Bond of reinforcing bars in self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Braam, C.R.; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Plain concrete demonstrates a rather brittle behavior both under compression and tension. By adding steel fibers, the post-cracking behavior becomes more ductile and an increase of the strain capacity under tension and compression is found. The research project currently being carried out aims at

  11. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-17

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl(-)]/[OH(-)] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  12. Health monitoring of precast bridge deck panels reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The present research project investigates monitoring concrete precast panels for bridge decks that are reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars. Due to the lack of long term research on concrete members reinforced with GFRP bars, lo...

  13. Waste Metal For Improving Concrete Performance And Utilisation As An Alternative Of Reinforcement Bar

    OpenAIRE

    Tanvir Qureshi; Mustaq Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Waste material disposal is considered as a difficult issue to adopt in current world. Waste metal, which has been recognised as a major problem in the environment and resource deficiency, could have important implications in the concrete construction industries. Waste metal utilisation in construction of reinforced cement concrete (RCC) works is immerging in recent time. Construction industries are looking for cost effective structural materials and utilisation of renewable materi...

  14. 78 FR 41079 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Ukraine Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five-year reviews, the... reinforcing bar from Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine would be likely to lead... dissenting with respect to Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine. Background The Commission instituted these reviews...

  15. Behavior of Reworked Steel Reinforcement Bars in Reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steel reinforcement bars are a key component in reinforced concrete and are mainly employed to carry tensile stresses since concrete on its own is weak in tension. Sometimes these bars are wrongly bent, straightened and re bent, resulting in the altering of their original characteristics. Some of such steel has been used ...

  16. EXPERIENTIAL INVESTIGATION OF TWO-WAY CONCRETE SLABS WITH OPENINGS REINFORCED WITH GLASS FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHANAD T. ABDULJALEEL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research had focused on glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforced concrete flat plate slabs with symmetrical openings. The results of ten interior slab-column connections were presented and discussed. The test parameters are reinforcement ratio, reinforcement type, and openings location. The specimens had been tested under monotonic concentric loading up to failure. The result showed that increasing the reinforcement ratio resulted in higher punching shear-shear capacity, lower deflection, and lower reinforcement ratio. Existing of openings reduced the punching shear capacity, and increased of the deflection, for instance, when spaced of opening's location form column face up to three times of effective depth, it will be issued to increase 25% of punching strength in slab.

  17. Penetration of chloride ions into various concrete and corrosion of reinforcing bars in marine environments. Pt. 3. Proposal for estimating of chloride ion penetration and reinforcing bar corrosion for durability design of reinforced concrete structure; Kaiyo kankyoka ni okeru kakushu concrete no enbun shinto to tekkin no fushoku. 3. concrete kozobutsu no taikusei sekkei no tame no enbun shinto tekkin fushoku yosoku hoho no teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, N.; Sogo, S. [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-10

    Exposure tests of concrete in marine environments were conducted over a period of ten years to establish a rational design method that considers the durability of concrete structures. In these tests, penetration of chloride ions, corrosion of reinforcing bar and quality changes of the concrete were investigated. The following results were obtained: a) Chloride ion distribution can be predicted by using the chloride ion diffusion coefficient (Dc) and surface chloride ion density (Co) which change over time; and b) The progress of steel bar corrosion in the concrete can be estimated by using summation of the product of chloride ion content in concrete and existing term of chloride ion. (author)

  18. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Sadaf Moallemi; Alam, M. Shahria; Milani, Abbas S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models. PMID:28773859

  19. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Moallemi Pour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models.

  20. Investigation of the resistance of several new metallic reinforcing bars to chloride-induced corrosion in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation recently initiated a search for metallic reinforcing bars that are not only more durable and corrosion resistant than the epoxy-coated bars currently used, but also economical. In the last few years, several ...

  1. Feasibility of externally activated self-repairing concrete with epoxy injection network and Cu-Al-Mn superelastic alloy reinforcing bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Sanjay; Shrestha, Kshitij C.; Suzuki, Yusuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Araki, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the effectiveness of an externally activated self-repairing technique for concrete members with epoxy injection network and Cu-Al-Mn superelastic alloy (SEA) reinforcing bars (rebars). Compared to existing crack self-repairing and self-healing techniques, the epoxy injection network has the following strengths: (1) Different from the self-repairing methods using brittle containers or tubes for adhesives, the proposed self-repair process can be performed repeatedly and is feasible for onsite concrete casting. (2) Different from the autogenic self-healing techniques, full strength recovery can be achieved in a shorter time period without the necessity of water. This paper attempts to enhance the self-repairing capability of the epoxy injection network by reducing residual cracks by using cost-effective Cu-based SEA bars. The effectiveness of the present technique is examined using concrete beam specimens reinforced by 3 types of bars. The first specimen is reinforced by steel deformed bars, the second by steel threaded bars, and finally by SEA threaded rebars. The tests were performed with a 3 point cyclic loading with increasing amplitude. From the test results, effective self-repairing was confirmed for small deformation levels irrespective of the reinforcement types. Effective self-repairing was observed in the SEA reinforced specimen even under much larger deformations. Nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to confirm the experimental findings.

  2. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior.

  3. Modelling the Loss of Steel-Concrete Bonds in Corroded Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The existing stochastic models for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is extended by adding modelling of "loss of bond" due to corrosion between the reinforcement bars and the surrounding concrete.......The existing stochastic models for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is extended by adding modelling of "loss of bond" due to corrosion between the reinforcement bars and the surrounding concrete....

  4. effects of flexural rigidity of reinforcement bars on the fundamental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    2009-09-02

    Sep 2, 2009 ... numerical method, and the results show that the flexural rigidity of the bars has significant effect on the fundamental natural frequency of heavily reinforced concrete sections. KEYWORDS: Fundamental Natural Frequency, Reinforced Concrete Slab, Flexural Rigidity,. Reinforcement Bars. INTRODUCTION.

  5. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-02-16

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  6. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Szymanik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  7. Seismic performance of circular reinforced concrete bridge columns constructed with grade 80 reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This project assessed the use of ASTM A706 Grade 80 reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete columns. : Grade 80 is not currently allowed in reinforced concrete columns due to lack of information on the : material characteristics and column performanc...

  8. 78 FR 60827 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... (202) 482-3692 (Mexico); George McMahon at (202) 482-1167 (Turkey), AD/CVD Operations, Office 8, Import... like product.\\11\\ \\11\\ See Antidumping Duty Investigation Initiation Checklist: Steel Concrete...

  9. Prestressing of reinforcing bars in concrete slabs due to concrete expansion induced by Alkali-Silica Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Antonio Barbosa, Ricardo; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) in concrete bridges have been a major concern worldwide for many decades. In Denmark, several bridges are severely damaged due to ASR and over 600 bridges have the potential to develop ASR in the future. The majority of these bridges are slab-bridges. Despite the many...... cases, experimental research on structural safety and residual load carrying capacity of ASR-damaged bridges is limited. As ASR causes severe cracks in the concrete, which may affect the concrete compressive and tensile strength, concerns have been directed towards the residual shear capacity. Yet......-scale slabs, obtained by severe ASR-damaged bridges located in Denmark. The results show that in the early stage, the ASR-induced prestressing effect develops simultaneously with the ASR-induced cracks. Subsequently the cracks develop further, while the prestressing effect reaches a maximum. The results...

  10. Experimental study on penetration of chloride ions into concrete and corrosion of reinforcing bars in various marine environments; Shuju no kaiyo kankyo joken ni okeru concrete no enbun shinto to tekkin fushoku ni kansuru jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, N.; Sogo, S. [Obayashigumi Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)] Sakoda, S. [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] Idemitsu, T. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-08-20

    Moreover the various environmental conditions in the ocean, the conditions varies with a region, the construction position of the structures, a part and so on. Therefore, it makes difficult to grasp the effects of the difference of environmental conditions on the penetration rate of salinity and the advance of corrosion in reinforcing bars. In this study, exposure tests of concrete in marine environments were conducted over a period ten years to establish the rational design considered durability of concrete structures. In this tests, penetration of chloride ions, corrosion of reinforcing bar and quality change of concrete were investigated. As a result, chloride ion distribution can be predicted by using the chloride ion diffusion coefficient (Dc) and surface chloride ion density (Co) obtained from exposure tests. It was clarified that the rate of chloride ion penetration in marine environments is fastest in the splash zone, followed by submerged and atmospheric zones and so forth. 20 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of New Corrosion-Resistant Reinforcement Bars in Chloride-Containing Concrete Pore Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jin-yang; Liu, Yao; Chu, Hong-yan; Wang, Danqian; Ma, Han; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the pitting behaviour of a new corrosion-resistant alloy steel (CR) is compared to that of low-carbon steel (LC) in a simulated concrete pore solution with a chloride concentration of 5 mol/L. The electrochemical behaviour of the bars was characterised using linear polarisation resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting profiles were detected by reflective digital holographic microscopy (DHM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemi...

  12. Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of New Corrosion-Resistant Reinforcement Bars in Chloride-Containing Concrete Pore Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Liu, Yao; Chu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Danqian; Ma, Han; Sun, Wei

    2017-08-04

    In this study, the pitting behaviour of a new corrosion-resistant alloy steel (CR) is compared to that of low-carbon steel (LC) in a simulated concrete pore solution with a chloride concentration of 5 mol/L. The electrochemical behaviour of the bars was characterised using linear polarisation resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting profiles were detected by reflective digital holographic microscopy (DHM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical components produced in the pitting process were analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the CR bars have a higher resistance to pitting corrosion than the LC bars. This is primarily because of the periodic occurrence of metastable pitting during pitting development. Compared to the pitting process in the LC bars, the pitting depth grows slowly in the CR bars, which greatly reduces the risk of pitting. The possible reason for this result is that the capability of the CR bars to heal the passivation film helps to restore the metastable pits to the passivation state.

  13. Modeling reinforced concrete durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This project developed a next-generation modeling approach for projecting the extent of : reinforced concrete corrosion-related damage, customized for new and existing Florida Department of : Transportation bridges and suitable for adapting to broade...

  14. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  15. A study of steel bar reinforcement corrosion in concretes with SF and SRH using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Giannotti da Silva

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Several electrochemical techniques can be used to monitor corrosion, among them are open circuit potential (OCP and eletrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Monitoring OCP is the most typical procedure for routine inspection of reinforced concrete structures and can be easily carried out, however it only gives an approximate idea of the corrosion process. EIS is a more complete technique, which supplies information regarding the mechanism and kinetics of reaction electrochemistries, but only used in the laboratory. Based on these two techniques, this study is related to the steel corrosion in high-performance concrete with silica fume and silica from rice husk. The acceleration of the corrosion was carried out using immersion cycles in a 3.5% NaCl solution. As well as high compressive strength values, the addition of silica fume presented low corrosion risks and high impedance module values and significant increases of the concrete resistivity after 22 months of alternate immersion/drying cycles were obtained.

  16. Experimental Assessment on the Flexural Bonding Performance of Concrete Beam with GFRP Reinforcing Bar under Repeated Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkwan Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to investigate the flexural bond performance of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforcing bar under repeated loading. The flexural bond tests reinforced with GFRP reinforcing bars were carried out according to the BS EN 12269-1 (2000 specification. The bond test consisted of three loading schemes: static, monotonic, and variable-amplitude loading to simulate ambient loading conditions. The empirical bond length based on the static test was 225 mm, whereas it was 317 mm according to ACI 440 1R-03. Each bond stress on the rib is released and bonding force is enhanced as the bond length is increased. Appropriate level of bond length may be recommended with this energy-based analysis. For the monotonic loading test, the bond strengths at pullout failure after 2,000,000 cycles were 10.4 MPa and 6.5 MPa, respectively: 63–70% of the values from the static loading test. The variable loading test indicated that the linear cumulative damage theory on GFRP bonding may not be appropriate for estimating the fatigue limit when subjected to variable-amplitude loading.

  17. Strain Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Members Subjected to Uniaxial Tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagsten, Lars German; Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to set up a method to determine the strain capacity of tension bars of reinforced concrete (RC) subjected to pure tension. Due to the interaction between reinforcement and concrete and due to the presence of cracks, the stresses in both reinforcement and concrete are vary...

  18. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  19. Anchorage of Main Reinforcement in Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with the anchorage of reinforcement bars at end supports in beam component made of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure.......The paper deals with the anchorage of reinforcement bars at end supports in beam component made of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure....

  20. Performance of a bridge deck with glass fiber reinforced polymer bars as the top mat of reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars as reinforcement for concrete decks. Today's rapid bridge deck deterioration is calling for a replacement for steel reinforcement. The advan...

  1. A Comparison of Bond Performance of Concrete Reinforced with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transfer of stress from a deformed bar to the concrete is achieved by mechanical locking of the steel into the surrounding concrete. This interfacial bond strength between steel and the surrounding concrete is an important factor influencing the strength and durability of reinforced concrete structure. This paper presents ...

  2. of reinforced concrete columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szcześniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the modification of the dynamic relaxation method in order to increase its effectiveness in the range of the post-critical analysis. For this purpose, the arc-length parameter on the equilibrium path was introduced into the computational procedure. The additional constraints equation that combines increment of load parameter and the vector of displacement increments with the arc-length increment on the solution path was incorporated to analysis of the equations of motion. Solution of nonlinear equilibrium equations is obtained recursively in subsequent pseudo-time instants. The proposed method allows for tracking the global softening phenomenon of the structural element in the post-critical range, which leads to failure. We ran numerical experiments for the reinforced concrete eccentrically loaded column. Our comparative analysis with previously published numerical results demonstrated that the proposed computational method is effective.[b]Keywords[/b]: reinforced concrete columns, dynamic relaxation method, arc-length method, load-carrying capacity

  3. Transporting fibres as reinforcement in self-compacting concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of self-compacting concrete (SCC) was an important step towards efficiency at building sites, rationally producing prefabricated concrete elements, better working conditions and improved quality and appearance of concrete structures. By adding fibres to SCC bar reinforcement can be

  4. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold...... is reached causing the formation of anodic and cathodic regions along the reinforcement. Critical chloride thresholds, randomly distributed along the reinforcement sur-face, link the initiation and propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion. To demonstrate the potential use of the developed model......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  5. Bond characteristics of reinforcing steel embedded in geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvel, Parthiban; Thangavelu, Manju; Gopalan, Rashmi; Raja Mohan Kaliyaperumal, Saravana

    2017-07-01

    The force transferring between reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete in reinforced concrete is influenced by several factors. Whereas, the study on bond behaviour of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is lagging. In this paper, an experimental attempt has been made to evaluate the geopolymer concrete bond with reinforcing steel of different diameter and embedded length using standard pull out test. The geopolymer concrete is made of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) as geopolymer source material (GSM). The tests were conducted to evaluate the development of bond between steel and concrete of grade M40 and M50 with 12 and 16 mm diameter reinforcing steel for geopolymer and cement concrete mixes and to develop a relation between bond strength and compressive strength. From the experimental results, it has been observed that the bond strength of the geopolymer concrete mixes was more compared to the cement concrete mixes and increases with the reduction in the diameter of the bar.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  7. Numerical Simulation of GFRP Reinforced Concrete Beams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia Zhao; Xiong-Jun He; Yong-Chao Yang

    2017-01-01

    .... The finite element numerical simulation of GFRP fiber reinforced concrete beam was carried out, and the load deflection nephogram of fiber reinforced concrete beam, strain nephogram, crack nephogram...

  8. Fatigue of reinforcing bars during hydro-demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, C. W. K.; Ouwejan, A.

    2017-05-01

    Reinforcing steel fractured during hydro-demolition of a reinforced concrete pier head due to low cycle flexural fatigue from vibration caused by impact of the high pressure water jet on the exposed length of the bars. Research into the fatigue performance of steel reinforcing steel tends to focus on the high cycle axial performance in reinforced concrete members and re-bending behaviour. However with the increasing use of hydro-demolition of concrete structures as part of remediation works care is required to ensure the steel reinforcement exposed to the high pressure jet of water is not going to suffer relatively low cycle flexural damage that may compromise the designed performance of the completed reinforced concrete structure. This paper describes the failure assessment, fatigue analysis, and metallographic examination that was undertaken. It was found that the rib to flank transition radius on the reinforcement steel was small enough to cause a significant stress concentration effect and was the location of fatigue crack growth. A relatively simple analysis using the maximum unrestrained cantilevered bar length and force exerted by the water jet was used to calculate the maximum expected bending moment. This was compared to the bending capacity at initiation of yielding at the rib flank transition accounting for stress concentration effects. This showed that the observed cyclic reversing ductile crack growth and fracture of the H25 bars was consistent with the loading applied. A method is proposed based on these observations to assess suitable limits for unrestrained bar lengths or maximum working offset of the water jet from the point of bar restraint when undertaking hydro-demolition work. The fatigue critical performance requirements of AS/NZS4671 500E bars are also therefore compared with those of BS4449:2005 and PN EN/ISO 15630-1:2011 for comparable 500C bars

  9. Fibre Reinforced Concrete: Evaluation of test methods and material development

    OpenAIRE

    Sandbakk, Sindre

    2011-01-01

    Concrete is a structural material with excellent properties when subjected to compression, butthe abilities to resist tensile stresses are rather poor. The concrete’s tensile zone is normallyreinforced with large continuous steel bars, a combination which ensures an excellentconstruction material. Placing the re-bars generates many man-hours, which means that the reinforcement work accounts for a considerable part of the total concrete cost. An alternative to the conventional re-bars is fibre...

  10. Detection of corrosion in submerged reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, R.F.A.; Lawrence, P.F.; Wilkins, N.J.M. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Materials Development Div.

    1990-12-31

    Steel reinforcement in concrete is not usually subject to corrosion when it is under water and not exposed to air. However, research carried out within the Concrete in the Oceans Programme has produced evidence that localised corrosion can occur at cracks which intersect the reinforcing bars even though the concrete is fully immersed in seawater. The problem with underwater corrosion is that, although the corrosion products migrate out of the crack and slight rust staining appears, these are not easy to see. In contrast, when reinforced concrete is exposed to air, then corrosion is marked by expansive rust deposits and spalling concrete. The principal objective of this report was to define the conditions of crack geometry, electrochemical potential and rate of seawater flow, under which there would be no external visible signs of corrosion. A further objective was to define, on a concrete offshore platform, where this type of unseen corrosion is most likely to occur. At seawater flowrates of 0.25 metres per second or less, localised corrosion occurring at cracks in the concrete which intersected the reinforcing bars was only visible as rust staining or deposits near the crack. At higher flowrates there was no clear visual evidence of corrosion. Visual inspection is therefore not a reliable method of checking on the presence of corrosion in underwater concrete structures. It is also concluded than an overall underwater potential of -700 mV Ag/AgCl or more negative is required in order to dismiss the possibility of localized corrosion occurring at cracks. (author)

  11. Constructibility Problems in Blast Resistant, Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    34CONSTRUCTIBILITY PROBLEMS IN BLAST RESISTANT, REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES " Darrell D. Barker and Mark G. Whitney Wilfred Baker Engineering...Blast Resistant, Reinforced Concrete Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER... concrete structures , problems result from an attempt to minimize element thickness by increasing bar sizes and decreasing spacing. This is normally done

  12. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Dowel Bar Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) dowel bars were installed on one new construction project and two dowel bar : retrofit projects to evaluate the performance of this type of dowel bar in comparison to steel dowel bars installed on the same : cont...

  13. GFRP reinforced concrete bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    This report investigates the application of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars in concrete bridge decks as a potential replacement or supplement to conventional steel rebars. Tests were conducted to determine the material properties of the ...

  14. Experimental study of corrosion-induced degradation of reinforced concrete elements

    OpenAIRE

    LOUKIL, Olfa; Adelaide, Lucas; Bouteiller, Véronique; Quiertant, Marc; Chaussadent, Thierry; Ragueneau, Frédéric; Bourbon, Xavier; Trenty, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of damage for reinforced concrete structures. Iron oxides produced during the corrosion process can induce concrete cracking, loss of adhesion at the steel-concrete interface, loss of reinforcing bar cross-section and even spalling of the concrete cover. In the presented research, the durability problems related to the corrosion of the reinforcement are investigated by combining experimental and numerical studies. However, this paper particul...

  15. Modelling Tension Stiffening in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    Part I of the present thesis deals with crack formation in reinforced concrete and the phenomenon of tension stiffening in concrete tension rods reinforced with deformed bars.Two physical models are presented for uniaxial tension, and they are modified for application on beams subjected to pure...... predicted by the models are compared with experimental data from tests on tension rods as well as flexural beams.In the light of the simple assumptions made and the random nature of cracking, the accordance between the models and the test data is quite good.Part II of the present thesis deals...... of the simple assumptions, quite good accordance is found.Part III of the thesis deals with the deformations of a beam symmetrically loaded by two concentrated forces. In the shear-flexure beam model it is assumed that the load is carried by means of a stringer system and a diagonal stress field in the shear...

  16. Measurement of the Diameters of Deformed Bars in Concrete Using an Electromagnetic Wave Radar (in the Presence of Cross Bars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shogo; Begum, Halima

    The authors previously proposed a method to measure the diameter of the deformed reinforcing bars in concrete structures nondestructively using an electromagnetic wave radar. The method estimates the periodicity of the knots of the inspected bar and utilizes the standard relationship between the knot's pitch and the diameter of the bar to measure the diameter indirectly. The effectiveness of the method was verified using test specimens where the bars were placed parallel to each other. However, in practical case, where other reinforcing bars cross the inspected bar perpendicularly, the stronger reflections from the cross bars influence the reflection from the inspected bar. This paper thus proposes a general method which eliminates such unwanted influences from the cross bars and measures the diameter accurately even in practical environment.

  17. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded

    Recent advances regarding topology optimization procedures of reinforced concrete structures are presented. We discuss several approaches to the challenging problem of optimizing the distribution of concrete and steel reinforcement. In particular, the consideration of complex nonlinear constitutive...

  18. Behaviour of axially and eccentrically loaded short columns reinforced with GFRP bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, S.; Balaji, S.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is a predominant factor in limiting the life expectancy of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) structures. Corrosion resistant Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars can be an effective alternative to steel bars in this context. Recent investigations reported the flexural behaviour of RCC beams reinforced with Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars. This study is meant to investigate the suitability of Sand Coated GFRP reinforcement bars in short square columns which when loaded axially and loaded with a minimum eccentricity. Standard tests to assess mechanical properties of GFRP bars and pullout test to quantify the bond strength between the bars and concrete were conducted. GFRP reinforced column specimens with a cross-sectional dimension of 100mm X 100mm and of length 1000mm were cast and tested under axial and eccentric loading. The assessed load carrying capacity was compared with that of conventional steel reinforced columns of the same size. The yield load and ultimate load at failure withstood by the steel reinforced columns were considerably more than that of GFRP reinforced columns. The energy absorption capacity of GFRP reinforced columns was also poor compared to steel reinforced columns. Both the columns exhibited nearly the same ductile behaviour. Hence GFRP reinforcements are not recommendable for compression members.

  19. Iowa state highway 92 over drainage ditch #25 : performance evaluation - galvanized reinforcing bars, Louisa County, Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several strategies are available to the Iowa Department of Transportation (IaDOT) for limiting : deterioration due to chloride-induced corrosion of embedded reinforcing bars in concrete bridge decks. : While the method most commonly used throughout t...

  20. Design, installation, and condition assessment of a concrete bridge deck constructed with ASTM A1035 CS no. 4 bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Recently developed corrosion-resistant reinforcing structural design guidelines were used to design, construct, and : assess a reinforced concrete bridge deck with high-strength ASTM A1035 CS steel bars. The bridge replacement is located : along the ...

  1. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The planned research will indicate, whether fibre reinforced concrete has better or worse durability than normal concrete. Durability specimens will be measured on cracked as well as uncracked specimens. Also the pore structure in the concrete will be characterized.Keywords: Fibre reinforced...... concrete, durability, pore structure, mechanical load...

  2. Evaluation of a Tramway’s Track Slab in Conventionally Reinforced Concrete or Steel Fibre Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Zioris, Stavros; Vranjkovina, Alija

    2015-01-01

    The dominant reinforcement used widely for concrete structures is conventional steel bars (rebars). Nevertheless, the perpetual effort toward evolution and development could not exclude the engineering field, thus new innovative and sophisticated methods are introduced. It is true that, due to lack of extended regulations and standards, the fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) was limited to non-structural applications. However, the last years the situation is changing rapidly and already the appl...

  3. Rotation capacity of self-compacting steel fibre reinforced concrete beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Walraven, J.C.; Den Uijl, J.A.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.

    2009-01-01

    Steel fibres are known to enhance the toughness of concrete in compression and in tension. Steel fibres also improve the bond properties between concrete matrix and reinforcing steel bars. In order to investigate the effect of steel fibres on the rotation capacity of reinforced concrete members,

  4. Modeling the Time-to Corrosion Cracking of the Cover Concrete in Chloride Contaminated Reinforced Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Youping

    1996-01-01

    Significant factors on steel corrosion in chloride contaminated reinforced concrete and time-to-corrosion cracking were investigated in this study. Sixty specimens were designed with seven admixed chloride contents, three concrete cover depths, two reinforcing steel bar diameters, two exposure conditions, and a typical concrete with water to cement ratio of 0.45. Corrosion current density (corrosion rate), corrosion potential, ohmic resistance of concrete and temperature were measured monthly...

  5. Cracking and Strain Analysis of Beams Reinforced with Composite Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Timinskas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of experimental and numerical modelling using two beams reinforced with GFRP bars. One beam was made of plain concrete while the other contained short steel fibres. The influence of steel fibres on deflection and cracking behaviour was studied. A comparative analysis of experimental results has shown that steel fibres significantly reduce deflections and average crack width of the beam. Moreover, an addition of steel fibres to the concrete mix led to a more ductile failure mode of the beam. Numerical analysis employing nonlinear finite element software ATENA has revealed that a good agreement between calculated and experimental results regarding an ordinary concrete GFRP reinforced beam can be obtained.

  6. Review of Punching Shear Behaviour of Flat Slabs Reinforced with FRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Osama A.; Khattab, Rania

    2017-10-01

    Using Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars to reinforce two-way concrete slabs can extend the service life, reduce maintenance cost and improve-life cycle cost efficiency. FRP reinforcing bars are more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional reinforcing steel. Shear behaviour of reinforced concrete structural members is a complex phenomenon that relies on the development of internal load-carrying mechanisms, the magnitude and combination of which is still a subject of research. Many building codes and design standards provide design formulas for estimation of punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced flat slabs. Building code formulas take into account the effects of the axial stiffness of main reinforcement bars, the ratio of the perimeter of the critical section to the slab effective depth, and the slab thickness on the punching shear capacity of two-way slabs reinforced with FRP bars or grids. The goal of this paper is to compare experimental data published in the literature to the equations offered by building codes for the estimation of punching shear capacity of concrete flat slabs reinforced with FRP bars. Emphasis in this paper is on two North American codes, namely, ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12. The experimental data covered in this paper include flat slabs reinforced with GFRP, BFRP, and CFRP bars. Both ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12 are shown to be in good agreement with test results in terms of predicting the punching shear capacity.

  7. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  8. Mechanical characterization of fiber reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between epoxy Polymer Concrete plain, reinforced with carbon and glass fibers and commercial concrete mixes was made. The fibers are 6 mm long and the fiber content was 2% and 1%, respectively, in mass. Compressive tests were performed at room temperature and load vs. displacement curves were plotted up to failure. The carbon and glass fibers reinforcement were randomly dispersed into the matrix of polymer concrete. An increase in compressive properties was observed as function of reinforcement. The comparison also showed that Polymer Concrete, plain and reinforced, has a better performance than regular market concrete, suggesting that PC is a reliable alternative for construction industry.

  9. Effect Of Age And Concrete Cover Thickness On Steel Reinforcement Corrosion At Splash Zone In Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M. Al- Galawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete is considered as one of the biggest problems that face countries overlooking to the Arabian Gulf including Iraq. The research aims to study the effect of the corrosion of steel bars in concrete structures that are exposed to wetting and drying via waves. Reinforced concrete samples were exposed to marine simulated environment for 90 days using prepared system for this purpose. At the end of exposure period polarization test was implemented to measure the actual corrosion rate in each sample. After that the corrosion process was accelerated using impressed current technique by applying a constant electric current DC to the reinforcing bars. Depending on the corrosion current in natural conditions which was measured in polarization test periods of exposing samples to accelerated corrosion current so as to maintain virtual exposure ages of 5 and 25 years of exposure to natural corrosion were calculated. The results showed a remarkable increase in the corrosion current of steel bars in samples that had lower concrete cover thickness. The increase in the cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm had a significant effect on reducing the corrosion current at the age of 90 days to about 70 of its original value in both cases. At the virtual exposure age of 5 years the reduction percentage in the corrosion current resulted from increasing cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm were 43 and 79 respectively.

  10. Reinforced concrete bridges: effects due to corrosion and concrete young modulus variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. C. Mendes

    Full Text Available Most of the Brazilian bridges of federal road network are made of reinforced concrete and are more than 30 years old, with little information about the mechanical properties of their constitutive materials. Along the service life of these bridges much modification occurred on vehicles load and geometry and in design standard. Many of them show signs of concrete and steel deterioration and their stability conditions are unknown. With the aim of contributing to the structural evaluation of reinforced concrete bridges it was decided to analyze the stresses in reinforced concrete bridge sections to verify the effects due to reinforcement corrosion and variation of the concrete Young modulus on the stress distribution regarding several load patterns and cracking effects in a representative bridge of the Brazilian road network with different longitudinal reinforcement taxes and two concrete Young modulus, Ec and 0.5Ec, and with different percentage of reinforcement corrosion. The analysis considered two finite element models: frame and shell elements as well as solid elements. The results indicate that these variation effects are more significant in reinforcement bars than in concrete.

  11. Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    ADVANCEMENT RESEARCH (CPAR) PROGRAM Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures by Piyush K. Dutta, David M. Bailey, Stephen W. Tsai...AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures 3. REPORT...CPAR) Work Unit LX4, "Composite Grid/Frame Reinforcement for Concrete Structures ." The U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories

  12. CALCULATION ASSESSMENT OF ANCHORAGE IN CONCRETE FOR FIBERGLASS REINFORCEMENT MANUFACTURED IN THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ya. Sadin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes advantages and disadvantages of composite reinforcement while reinforcing concrete structures. Results of experimental investigations on adhesion strength of fiberglass reinforcement manufactured in the Republic of Belarus with concrete have been given in the paper. The paper contains an analysis pertaining to the influence of concrete contact diameter and length of fiberglass reinforcing bars on strength and deformability of adhesion with concrete. Failure behavior of prototypes and maximum loading that does cause breakage in adhesion of fiberglass reinforcement with the concrete have been controlled in order to study the influence of diameter and length of fiberglass reinforcing bar contact with the concrete on strength and deformability of concrete adhesion for composite reinforcement produced by various manufacturers. Displacement of non-loaded (free and loaded ends of the reinforcing bars with regard to concrete exposed face on both specimen ends has been also controlled. The experiments have shown that destruction of the prototypes occurred due to initiation of one of the following three reasons: reinforcement sliding in reference to concrete, cleaving of a protective concrete layer or breakage of composite reinforcement. Start-up moments for reinforcing bar slip in relation to the concrete have been determined with the help of two methods. The paper provides proposals for calculation assessment of anchorage in the concrete for fiberglass reinforcement manufactured by the following enterprises and companies “Stroykompozit” (Gomel, Republic of Belarus, Research and Production Company (RPC “Biznes-Kontinent” (Brest, Republic of Belarus and Private Eenterprise (PE “Minplast” (Minsk, Republic of Belarus.

  13. Technical note on using CNTs as reinforcements in reinforced concrete structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, C. Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    The disasters whether man made or natural dominates all types of structures and has ever been attention to researchers, academicians and scientists. Concrete had been reinforced with steel, macro fibers and microfibers which bridges the cracks. The advantages of microfibers are to delay the development of cracks. Numerous researches focused on arresting the initiation of micro cracks and delay in the macro cracks. However the initiation of the cracks could not be avoided. It is quite fruitful and needy for the present scenario in a country like India to carry out research by reinforcing concrete with fibers/nanomaterials at nano scale which would provide crack free materials and structures. This technical note explores the possibilities of impregnating concrete with CNTs (Carbon Nano Tubes) and also as reinforcement bars at macro level in reinforced concrete structural elements.

  14. Reinforcement layout design for concrete structures based on continuum damage and truss topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a new procedure for the layout design of reinforcement in concrete structures. Concrete is represented by a gradient-enhanced continuum damage model with strain-softening and reinforcement is modeled as elastic bars that are embedded into the concrete domain. Adjoint sensiti...... a fully digital work flow that can be highly effective, especially for the design of complex structures. Several test cases involving two- and three-dimensional concrete structures illustrate the capabilities of the proposed procedure....

  15. AWWA C303-17 concrete pressure pipe, bar-wrapped, steel-cylinder type

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This standard describes the manufacture of concrete pressure pipe, reinforced with a steel cylinder that is helically wrapped with mild steel bar reinforcement, in sizes ranging from 10 in. through 72 in. (250 mm through 1,830 mm), inclusive, and for working pressures up to 400 psi (2,760 kPa).

  16. Glassfibre Reinforced Concrete: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, P. J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Introduced to construction about 40 years ago, GRC has come of age. It is now widely used all over the world and in quantities very likely greater than most of the other types of fibre reinforced concrete, although it remains less known. A brief history of GRC is followed by review of the basic make-up of this complex composite. Methods of production are identified, properties reviewed and modes of fracture which are unique to GRC are explained. Benefits which are already available and exploited by its users are summarised and the wide spectrum of current applications of GRC is outlined.

  17. Behaviour of concrete beams reinforced withFRP prestressed concrete prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Dagmar

    The use of fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) to reinforce concrete is gaining acceptance. However, due to the relatively low modulus of FRP, in comparison to steel, such structures may, if sufficient amount of reinforcement is not used, suffer from large deformations and wide cracks. FRP is generally more suited for prestressing. Since it is not feasible to prestress all concrete structures to eliminate the large deflections of FRP reinforced concrete flexural members, researchers are focusing on other strategies. A simple method for avoiding excessive deflections is to provide sufficiently high amount of FRP reinforcement to limit its stress (strain) to acceptable levels under service loads. This approach will not be able to take advantage of the high strength of FRP and will be generally uneconomical. The current investigation focuses on the feasibility of an alternative strategy. This thesis deals with the flexural and shear behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms. FRP prestressed concrete prisms (PCP) are new reinforcing bars, made by pretensioning FRP and embedding it in high strength grout/concrete. The purpose of the research is to investigate the feasibility of using such pretensioned rebars, and their effect on the flexural and shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beams over the entire loading range. Due to the prestress in the prisms, deflection of concrete beams reinforced with this product is substantially reduced, and is comparable to similarly steel reinforced beams. The thesis comprises both theoretical and experimental investigations. In the experimental part, nine beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms, and two companion beams, one steel and one FRP reinforced were tested. All the beams were designed to carry the same ultimate moment. Excellent flexural and shear behaviour of beams reinforced with higher prestressed prisms is reported. When comparing deflections of three beams designed to have the

  18. Flexural Behavior of Textile-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the flexural behaviour of textile-reinforced concrete (TRC. Two samples of TRC made of high strength reinforcing fabrics made of glass and carbon rovings were produced. Three-point bending test was carried out to examine the flexural performance of the developed samples. The maximum flexural strength and reinforcement efficiency were calculated. Experimental results showed that that all types of applied fabric reinforcement contributed to increases strength as compared to nonreinforced concrete. Furthermore, the deformation behavior of reinforced concrete was analyzed. The advantage is in higher residual load-bearing capacity, which allows maintaining the integrity of the structure.

  19. Corrosion protection performance of corrosion inhibitors and epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in a simulated concrete pore water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We used a simulated concrete pore water solution to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of concrete corrosion-inhibiting admixtures and epoxy-coated reinforcing bars (ECR). We evaluated three commercial corrosion inhibitors, ECR from three ...

  20. Experimental investigation on bond of reinforcement in steel fibre-reinforced lightweight concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschemacher, K.; Ali, A.

    2017-10-01

    Bond behaviour of reinforcement is crucial parameter for load bearing reinforced concrete members. Many parameters like anchorage of reinforcement, lap splices, deflection or tension stiffening are influenced by the bond properties. It is well known that the ductility of bond can be improved by steel fibres. In this context almost innumerable experiments were performed for investigation of bond in normal weight concrete. However, the bond behaviour of reinforcement in steel fibre-reinforced lightweight concrete (SFRLWC) has received much less attention. For this reason, an experimental program dealing with bond in SFRLWC has been started at HTWK Leipzig/Germany. Main parts of the investigation were pull-out tests with various bar sizes and application of different steel fibre-reinforced lightweight and normal weight concretes. The paper reports the details of experimental investigations and evaluates the test results. As one of the most important outcomes that can be noted is that there is pronounced effect of bar size and steel fibre amount on bond properties in general. But those effects are more pronounced for SFRLWC in comparison to normal weight concrete with and without steel fibres.

  1. Punching Shear in Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Slabs Without Traditional Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. H.; Venkateshwaran, A.

    2017-09-01

    The punching shear capacity of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) slabs without traditional steel bar reinforcement was investigated by conducting central point-load tests on twelve square slabs. The test parameters covered fibres with different multi-hook ends, concrete compressive strength, reinforcing index and slab thickness. The statistical performance of two existing models for the prediction of punching shear capacity of SFRC slabs without traditional reinforcement was examined. The load carrying capacity of these slabs were also assessed using the yield line theory. It is noted that the slabs failed primarily in flexure and the yield line theory predicted the load carrying capacities of the slabs most accurately. The reason for a flexural failure in SFRC slabs without steel bars is attributed to the lesser energy required in the propagation of an existing flexural cracks than in the creation of a new circumferential cracks around the column face.

  2. Characterization of Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete | Elinwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental characterization of sisal fibre reinforced concrete showed that incorporating fibre into the concrete mixture is beneficial. Optimum performance for a matrix having sisal fibre as reinforcement is at 3% fibre volume fraction (Vff), with 70mm fibre length (Lf) and at a water-cement ratio of 0.6. There is a load increase ...

  3. Limit analysis of solid reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Paaske

    2009-01-01

    element for lower bound analysis of reinforced concrete structures is presented. The method defines the stress state at a point within the solid as a combination of concrete- and reinforcement stresses and yield criterions are applied to the stress components separately. This method allows for orthotropic...

  4. Optimizing Conventional Design Methods for Reinforced Concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained suggest that a suitable percentage of the concrete cross section area of raft slab foundations should be used as compression reinforcement in order to prevent differential settlements. The required nominal area of compression reinforcement is 0.9% of the cross section area of the concrete section.

  5. FAILURE MECHANISM OF THE SCABBING OF CONCRETE PLATES SUBJECTED TO HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT AND EFFECTS OF FIBER SHEET REINFORCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Masuhiro; Miwa, Koji; Takahashi, Jun

    This paper presents failure mechanism of the scabbing of concrete plates subjected to high velocity impact and effects of fiber sheet reinforcement. Prior to impact tests, strain measurement method using acrylic bar with strain gauges is validated by conducting impact test to concrete bar specimen. Then, impact tests are carried out to examine the failure mechanism of scabbing of concrete plates. In the tests, the strain measurement method is applied and strain behavior inside the concrete plate is discussed. After that, impact tests of fiber sheet reinforced concrete plates are conducted. Based on failure mode and strain behavior, effects of fiber sheet reinforcement on the failure of concrete plates are examined.

  6. Bamboo reinforced concrete slab with styrofoam lamina filler as solution of lightweight concrete application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Ari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy resilience is becoming more important nowadays especially in the field of building sustainability. Some implementations can be carried out including using recycled materials instead of nonrenewable materials such as steel. Hence, one of the investigation conducted in this paper is replacing steel reinforcement with bamboo bars and using recycled materials such as Styrofoam with the aim of producing a concrete element structure that is lighter and more economical. In this research stage, flexural strength test on bamboo reinforced concrete slab with Styrofoam lamination filler was conducted. The results showed that the flexural strength of specimens decreased by 15% but with the weight advantage of 20% less compared with those of normal reinforced concrete slab with the same dimension. It is considered good performance in practical design context, since the nominal flexural capacity of RC slab when designed with minimum reinforcement are usually much higher than the required moment.

  7. Rotational Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    The European Structural Integrity Society-Technical Committee 9, has initiated a Round Robin on 'Scale Effects and Transitional Failure Phenomena of Reinforced Concrete Beams in Flexure'. In Denmark, Aalborg University is participating. The programme for Aalborg University involves an experimental...... programme where 120 reinforced concrete beams, 54 plain concrete beams and 324 concrete cylinders are tested. For the reinforced concrete beams four different parar meters are varied. The slenderness is 6, 12 and 18, the beam depth is 100 mm, 200 mm and 400 mm giving nine different geometries, five...... reinforcement ratios between 0.14% and 1.57%, and the concrete has a compressive strength of approximately 60 MPa or 90 MPa. The beams are tested in threepoint bending in a servo controlled materials testing system specially designed for the wide range of geometries The casting of the beams is finished...

  8. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1998-01-01

    Durability studies are carried out at BKM as part of the research project "Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete" (FRC) involving BKM, The Concrete Research Center at DTI, Building Technology at Aalborg University, Rambøll, 4K-Beton and Rasmussen & Schiøtz. Concrete beams with or without...... fibre reinforcement are exposed to a combination of mechanical and environmental load to indicate whether fibre reinforcement will improve the durability of cracked concrete structures. Secondly, it is the aim to identify important mechanisms for the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the durability......) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used in the concrete beams as well as main reinforcement. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared with results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without fibres....

  9. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  10. Mechanical characterization of fiber reinforced Polymer Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Reis,João Marciano Laredo dos

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study between epoxy Polymer Concrete plain, reinforced with carbon and glass fibers and commercial concrete mixes was made. The fibers are 6 mm long and the fiber content was 2% and 1%, respectively, in mass. Compressive tests were performed at room temperature and load vs. displacement curves were plotted up to failure. The carbon and glass fibers reinforcement were randomly dispersed into the matrix of polymer concrete. An increase in compressive properties was observed as fun...

  11. New NDE technologies for evaluating reinforced concrete masonry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, A.M.; Haskins, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the Waterways' Experiment Station (WES) have demonstrated that two new nondestructive evaluation technologies show promise in making a more accurate diagnosis of the structural condition of concrete masonry walls than prior technologies. Traditionally, sounding with a hammer has been used to determine the presence and quality of the grout fill around the reinforcing bars in concrete masonry units (CMU's). First, WES has developed a new grout detection system, which senses the reverberating energy in the CMU's with a microphone. This energy is introduced into the CMU by using a pistol to fire a metal BB against the face of the block. A microphone and spectrum analyzer replaces the function of the human ear to distinguish different pitches of sound through sounding. Since a technician is more likely to get consistent results with the new system, it is not as subjective as sounding. Next, WES has evaluated the new digital steel detectors. A reinforced concrete masonry structure can contain many combinations of steel: vertical bars, horizontal bars, size of bar, number of bars, splices, etc. Digital steel detectors with microprocessors have the potential to provide much more information than traditional analog types.

  12. Computation of reinforcement for solid concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, P.C.J.; De Boer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Reinforcement in a concrete structure is often determined based on linear elastic stresses. This paper considers computation of the required reinforcement when these stresses have been determined by the finite element method with volume elements. Included are both tension reinforcement and

  13. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete columns strengthened with Self-Compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. M. Omar

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of reinforced concrete columns strengthened by addition of a self-compacting concrete overlay at the compressed and at the tensioned face of the member, with and without addition of longitudinal steel bars. Eight columns were submit- ted to loading with an initial eccentricity of 60 mm . These columns had 120 mm x 250 mm of rectangular cross section, 2000 mm in length and four longitudinal reinforcement steel bars with 10 mm in diameter. Reference columns P1 and P2 were tested to failure without any type of rehabilitation. Columns P3 to P8 were loaded to a predefined load (close to the initial yield point of tension reinforce- ment, then unloaded and strengthened for a subsequent test until failure. Results showed that the method of rehabilitation used was effective, increasing the loading capacity of the strengthened pieces by 2 to 5 times the ultimate load of the reference column.

  14. Influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation resistance of reinforced concrete slabs under hard missile impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, Nebojsa, E-mail: nebojsa.orbovic@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca; Sagals, Genadijs; Blahoianu, Andrei

    2015-12-15

    This paper describes the work conducted by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) related to the influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) slabs under “hard” missile impact (impact with negligible missile deformations). The paper presents the results of three tests on reinforced concrete slabs conducted at VTT Technical Research Centre (Finland), along with the numerical simulations as well as a discussion of the current code provisions related to impactive loading. Transverse reinforcement is widely used for improving the shear and punching strength of concrete structures. However, the effect of this reinforcement on the perforation resistance under localized missile impact is still unclear. The goal of this paper is to fill the gap in the current literature related to this topic. Based on similar tests designed by the authors with missile velocity below perforation velocity, it was expected that transverse reinforcement would improve the perforation resistance. Three slabs were tested under almost identical conditions with the only difference being the transverse reinforcement. One slab was designed without transverse reinforcement, the second one with the transverse reinforcement in form of conventional stirrups with hooks and the third one with the transverse reinforcement in form of T-headed bars. Although the transverse reinforcement reduced the overall damage of the slabs (the rear face scabbing), the conclusion from the tests is that the transverse reinforcement does not have important influence on perforation capacity of concrete slabs under rigid missile impact. The slab with T-headed bars presented a slight improvement compared to the baseline specimen without transverse reinforcement. The slab with conventional stirrups presented slightly lower perforation capacity (higher residual missile velocity) than the slab without transverse reinforcement. In conclusion, the performed tests show slightly

  15. Comparison of Failure Process of Bended Beams Reinforced with Steel Bars and GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszyńska, Maria; Błyszko, Jarosław; Olczyk, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    load were tested. Both types of beams were designed to have the same bearing capacity. Beams reinforced with GFRP rebar exhibited much bigger cracking than traditionally reinforced bars. The width of cracks appearing in beams reinforced with GFRP bars was equal or greater than limit values (0.4 mm) even though the ratio of moment of resistance and cracking moment was greater than 3. The composite rebar exhibits many significant advantages over steel rebar, but its rather low Young’s modulus comparing to steel causes exceeded deflection and cracking of bended concrete elements.

  16. Application of a Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete Jacket in Damaged Reinforced Concrete Beams under Monotonic and Repeated Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin E. Chalioris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental study on the application of a reinforced self-compacting concrete jacketing technique in damaged reinforced concrete beams. Test results of 12 specimens subjected to monotonic loading up to failure or under repeated loading steps prior to total failure are included. First, 6 beams were designed to be shear dominated, constructed by commonly used concrete, were initially tested, damaged, and failed in a brittle manner. Afterwards, the shear-damaged beams were retrofitted using a self-compacting concrete U-formed jacket that consisted of small diameter steel bars and U-formed stirrups in order to increase their shear resistance and potentially to alter their initially observed shear response to a more ductile one. The jacketed beams were retested under the same loading. Test results indicated that the application of reinforced self-compacting concrete jacketing in damaged reinforced concrete beams is a promising rehabilitation technique. All the jacketed beams showed enhanced overall structural response and 35% to 50% increased load bearing capacities. The ultimate shear load of the jacketed beams varied from 39.7 to 42.0 kN, whereas the capacity of the original beams was approximately 30% lower. Further, all the retrofitted specimens exhibited typical flexural response with high values of deflection ductility.

  17. Fatigue Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Zhang; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain basic data of fibre reinforced concrete under fatigue load and to set up a theoretical model based on micromechanics. In this study, the bridging stress in fiber reinforced concrete under cyclic tensile load was investigted in details. The damage...... mechanism of the interface between fiber and matrix was proposed and a rational model given. Finally, the response of a steel fiber reinforced concrete beam under fatigue loading was predicted based on this model and compared with experimental results....

  18. Connections in Precast Buildings using Ultra High-Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    Ultra high-strength concrete adds new dimensions to the design of concrete structures. It is a brittle material but introducing fibres into the matrix changes the material into a highly ductile material. Furthermore, the fibre reinforcement increases the anchorage of traditional reinforcement bars...... and the fire resistance. Such a fibre reinforced ultra high-strength material has been used to develop a simple joint solution between slab elements in a column - slab building system....

  19. Fibre reinforced concrete exposed to elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, J.; Kohoutková, A.

    2017-09-01

    Although concrete when subject to fire performs very well, its behaviour and properties change dramatically under high temperature due to damaged microstructure and mesostructure. As fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) represents a complex material composed of various components with different response to high temperature, to determine its behaviour and mechanical properties in fire is a demanding task. The presented paper provides a summary of findings on the fire response of fibre FRC. Namely, the information on steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC), synthetic fibre reinforced concrete and hybrid (steel + synthetic) fibre reinforced concrete have been gathered from various contributions published up to date. The mechanical properties including the melting point and ignition point of fibres affect significantly the properties of concrete composites with addition of fibres. The combination of steel and synthetic fibres represents a promising alternative how to ensure good toughness of a concrete composite before heating and improve its residual mechanical behaviour and spalling resistance as well as the ductility after heating. While synthetic fibres increase concrete spalling resistance, steel fibres in a concrete mix leads to an improvement in both mechanical properties and resistance to heating effects.

  20. Observations on the electrical resistivity of steel fibre reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Geiker, Mette Rica; Edvardsen, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is in many ways a well-known construction material, and its use has gradually increased over the last decades. The mechanical properties of SFRC are well described based on the theories of fracture mechanics. However, knowledge on other material properties......, including the electrical resistivity, is sparse. Among others, the electrical resistivity of concrete has an effect on the corrosion process of possible embedded bar reinforcement and transfer of stray current. The present paper provides experimental results concerning the influence of the fibre volume...... the observed correlation between the fibre volume fraction and the electrical resistivity of the composite (the SFRC) for conductive fibres and moisture saturated concrete. This indicates that the steel fibres were conducting when measuring the electrical resistivity by AC at 126 Hz. For partly saturated...

  1. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for four-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focus...

  2. REINFORCED CONCRETE SILO DEMOLITION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Krsnik

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the demolition of reinforced concrete silo by blasting. The loadbearing structure was blasted so that the weight of the silo itself done most of the felling (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  4. Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The present paper describes the outline of a research project on Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) currently being carried out in Denmark under the supervision of Danish Council of Technology, Danish Technical Research Council and Danish Natural Science Research Counsil.......The present paper describes the outline of a research project on Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) currently being carried out in Denmark under the supervision of Danish Council of Technology, Danish Technical Research Council and Danish Natural Science Research Counsil....

  5. The Recent Research on Bamboo Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sri Murni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last research on bamboo reinforced concrete in Brawijaya University Indonesia. Three kinds of structures studied in recent year, the mounting of pegs on reinforcement, the use of lightweight brick to reduce the weight of the beams, and the use the light weight aggregate for bamboo concrete composite frame. All that experiments overcome some problems exist in using bamboo as environmental acceptance structures.

  6. Weldability, mechanical and corrosion properties of microalloyed reinforcing bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico]|[UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Hernandez, G.; Carpio, J.J. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico; Arganis, C. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The first Mexican specification of low alloy reinforcing bars of weldable grade and optimal mechanical response during plastic deformation caused by earthquakes was issued in 1987. The modifications of the Construction Code of Mexico City after the 1985 earthquakes included the recommendation of using low alloy rebars as a first option for the reinforced concrete building main structural components. The low alloy rebars are fabricated employing low carbon steels microalloyed with niobium or vanadium in order to combine the weldability and high ductility of the low carbon steels with the high strength provided by the, microalloying elements. The present paper reports the results of a comparative study of standard (medium carbon) and microalloyed rebars considering features of microstructure, mechanical behavior, weldability and the electrochemical properties of these two materials embedded in plain and chloride contaminated concrete. The main differences were observed in microstructural features, mechanical behavior and weldability. The corrosion rate measurements of standard and microalloyed rebars are similar. The weldability of the rebars is discussed in terms of the better electrical connectivity of the reinforcement and cathodic protection.

  7. Optimizing the Flexural Strength of Beams Reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bars Using Back-Propagation Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman O. Taha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced concrete with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars (carbon, aramid, basalt and glass is used in places where a high ratio of strength to weight is required and corrosion is not acceptable. Behavior of structural members using (FRP bars is hard to be modeled using traditional methods because of the high non-linearity relationship among factors influencing the strength of structural members. Back-propagation neural network is a very effective method for modeling such complicated relationships. In this paper, back-propagation neural network is used for modeling the flexural behavior of beams reinforced with (FRP bars. 101 samples of beams reinforced with fiber bars were collected from literatures. Five important factors are taken in consideration for predicting the strength of beams. Two models of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP are created, first with single-hidden layer and the second with two-hidden layers. The two-hidden layer model showed better accuracy ratio than the single-hidden layer model. Parametric study has been done for two-hidden layer model only. Equations are derived to be used instead of the model and the importance of input factors is determined. Results showed that the neural network is successful in modeling the behavior of concrete beams reinforced with different types of (FRP bars.

  8. Self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The project 'self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete (SCFRC)' is part of the Dutch STW/PPM program - 'cement-bonded materials' - DCT.4010. Subproject III to which the project ,SCFRC' belongs deals with the development of new high performance concretes. The project 'SCFRC' aims at investigating the

  9. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...

  10. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-02-25

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures.

  11. DESIGN OF COMPOSITION OF CONCRETE USING POLYPROPYLENE FIBRE REINFORCEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Dang Van Thanh1,*, Vu Hoang Hiep2, Nguyen Van Bac1, Hoang Gia Duong1

    2016-01-01

    Fibre-reinforced concrete is an emerging trend that delivers new materials with high quality for construction. Polyporpylene fibre, an organic textile, has high potential to be used for reinforcing concrete, but there has been little research conducted into using this fibre for concrete reinforcement worldwide and no research work on this fibre reinforced concrete has been published in Vietnam. Thereofore, researchinginto Polyporylene fibre reinforced concrete to establish fundamental underst...

  12. Optimum detailed design of reinforced concrete frames using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, V.; Ramasamy, J. V.

    2007-06-01

    This article presents the application of the genetic algorithm to the optimum detailed design of reinforced concrete frames based on Indian Standard specifications. The objective function is the total cost of the frame which includes the cost of concrete, formwork and reinforcing steel for individual members of the frame. In order for the optimum design to be directly constructible without any further modifications, aspects such as available standard reinforcement bar diameters, spacing requirements of reinforcing bars, modular sizes of members, architectural requirements on member sizes and other practical requirements in addition to relevant codal provisions are incorporated into the optimum design model. The produced optimum design satisfies the strength, serviceability, ductility, durability and other constraints related to good design and detailing practice. The detailing of reinforcements in the beam members is carried out as a sub-level optimization problem. This strategy helps to reduce the size of the optimization problem and saves computational time. The proposed method is demonstrated through several example problems and the optimum results obtained are compared with those in the available literature. It is concluded that the proposed optimum design model can be adopted in design offices as it yields rational, reliable, economical, time-saving and practical designs.

  13. Experimental Study of Beam-Column Joints Reinforced Concrete with Fiber Concrete and Fly-Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwanto Edy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete elements in the beam - column joint (HBK plays a very important role for maintaining the structure when subjected to the lateral load, despite the presence of many bars in the area often results in imperfections implementation. The use of fly-ash and fiber in the area of HBK can be one of available solutions; both can increase the strength of concrete and reduce the reinforcement. This study discusses the usage of fly-ash in concrete with proportion of 25% by weight of cement and dramix steel fibers and 10 kg for one m3 of concrete. This study uses the specimens of HBK with a variation of the concrete at age of 28 and 90 days. The analysis of 28 days HBK results: specimen with normal and with fly ash have average load of 10.53 kN and 6.97 kN where specimen with Fly-ash + additive has 12.65 kN (20.13% higher than normal specimen. At the age of 90 days, HBK with normal concrete, fly ash and fiber concrete can withstand load at 12.73 kN, 10.87 kN, and 13.15 kN respectively, where HBK with fiber + fly-ash reaches at 13.38 kN or has 5.00% more than HBK with normal concrete.

  14. Ultimate Load Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Beam with Corroded Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchana Devi, A.; Ramajaneyulu, K.; Sundarkumar, S.; Ramesh, G.; Bharat Kumar, B. H.; Krishna Moorthy, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion of reinforcement reduces the load carrying capacity, energy dissipation and ductility of Reinforced Concrete (RC) members. In the present study, reinforcements of RC beam are subjected to 10, 25, and 30% corrosion and the respective RC beams are tested to evaluate their ultimate load behaviour. A huge drop in energy dissipation capacity of the RC beam is observed beyond the corrosion level of 10%. Further, nonlinear finite element analysis is employed to assess the load-displacement behaviour and ultimate load of RC beam. The corrosion induced damage to the reinforcement is represented in the finite element model by modifying its mechanical properties based on the results reported in the literature. The resultant load versus displacement curves of reinforced concrete beams are obtained. Good correlation is observed between the finite element analysis results and that obtained from experimental investigation on the control beam. The experimental results are also compared with the finite element analysis results for RC beams with corroded reinforcement. In order to understand the effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of reinforcement, the corroded reinforcements are modelled in nonlinear finite element analysis by (i) reducing the area of reinforcement alone (ii) by reducing both area and mechanical properties and (iii) reducing the mechanical properties without reducing the area of steel as reported in literature. The results obtained for the beam with corroded reinforcement confirms reduction in yield stress and ultimate stress of the reinforcement steel.

  15. Influence of reinforcement mesh configuration for improvement of concrete durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chong-gen; Jin, Wei-liang; Mao, Jiang-hong; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Li-hao; Wei, Dong

    2017-08-01

    Steel bar in concrete structures under harsh environmental conditions, such as chlorine corrosion, seriously affects its service life. Bidirectional electromigration rehabilitation (BIEM) is a new method of repair technology for reinforced concrete structures in such chloride corrosion environments. By applying the BIEM, chloride ions can be removed from the concrete and the migrating corrosion inhibit can be moved to the steel surface. In conventional engineering, the concrete structure is often configured with a multi-layer steel mesh. However, the effect of the BIEM in such structures has not yet been investigated. In this paper, the relevant simulation test is carried out to study the migration law of chloride ions and the migrating corrosion inhibitor in a concrete specimen with complex steel mesh under different energizing modes. The results show that the efficiency of the BIEM increases 50% in both the monolayer steel mesh and the double-layer steel mesh. By using the single-sided BIEM, 87% of the chloride ions are removed from the steel surface. The different step modes can affect the chloride ion removal. The chloride ions within the range of the reinforcement protective cover are easier to be removed than those in the concrete between the two layers of steel mesh. However, the amount of migrating corrosion inhibitor is larger in the latter circumstances.

  16. The influence of plain bar on bond strength of geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Evrianti Syntia; Ekaputri, Januarti Jaya

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents some results of experimental study of bond strength of plain bar embedded in geopolymer concrete. Fly ash class F was used as a raw material activated with alkali solutions. The combination of 8 Molar of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) as alkali activators was examined in the mixture with ratio of 2.5 by weight. Nine cubical specimens with a size of 150 × 150 × 150 mm were prepared to measure bond strength and slip between reinforcement and concrete. The influential factors studied for the experimental investigation were the diameter of reinforcement bar, bond area, and concrete cover to diameter (c/d) of reinforcement. The result showed that the average bond strength decreased as the diameter of plain bar and bonded length were increased from 16 mm to 19 mm. However, the 12 mm showed the different result allegedly caused by the effect of bond area and the passive confined provided by the concrete. Based on several equations used to compare the bond strength, it is clear that deformed bar of 12 mm in diameter is potential to increase the bond strength.

  17. Prediction of the Service Life of a Reinforced Concrete Column under Chloride Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K. Alkam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, service life of a reinforced concrete column exposed to chloride environment has been predicted. This study has been based on numerical simulation of chloride ion diffusion in a concrete column during its anticipated life span. The simulation process has included the concrete cover replacement whenever chloride ion concentration has reached the critical threshold value at the reinforcement surface. Repair scheduling of the concrete column under consideration has been discussed. Effects of the concrete cover thickness and the water cement ratio on the service life of the concrete column at hand have been presented. A new approach for arranging locations of reinforcement steel bars has been introduced. This approach is intended to prolong the service life of the concrete column under consideration against chloride induced corrosion.

  18. Application of Fiber Reinforcement Concrete Technique in Civil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reinforcing the concrete structures with fibers such as polyester is one of the possible ways to provide all the criteria of the durable repair material. This type of reinforcement is called Fiber Reinforcement of Concrete Structures. There is an increasing worldwide interest in utilizing fiber. reinforced concrete structures for civil ...

  19. FOAM CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT BY BASALT FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate that the foam concrete performance can be improved by dispersed reinforcement, including methods that involve basalt fibres. They address the results of the foam concrete modeling technology and assess the importance of technology-related parameters. Reinforcement efficiency criteria are also provided in the article. Dispersed reinforcement improves the plasticity of the concrete mix and reduces the settlement crack formation rate. Conventional reinforcement that involves metal laths and rods demonstrates its limited application in the production of concrete used for thermal insulation and structural purposes. Dispersed reinforcement is preferable. This technology contemplates the infusion of fibres into porous mixes. Metal, polymeric, basalt and glass fibres are used as reinforcing components. It has been identified that products reinforced by polypropylene fibres demonstrate substantial abradability and deformability rates even under the influence of minor tensile stresses due to the low adhesion strength of polypropylene in the cement matrix. The objective of the research was to develop the type of polypropylene of D500 grade that would demonstrate the operating properties similar to those of Hebel and Ytong polypropylenes. Dispersed reinforcement was performed by the basalt fibre. This project contemplates an autoclave-free technology to optimize the consumption of electricity. Dispersed reinforcement is aimed at the reduction of the block settlement in the course of hardening at early stages of their operation, the improvement of their strength and other operating properties. Reduction in the humidity rate of the mix is based on the plasticizing properties of fibres, as well as the application of the dry mineralization method. Selection of optimal parameters of the process-related technology was performed with the help of G-BAT-2011 Software, developed at Moscow State University of Civil Engineering. The authors also

  20. Fiber reinforcement of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Deterioration of concrete structures due to steel corrosion is a matter of considerable concern since the repairing of these structures proved to be a costly process. Repair and rehabilitation of the civil structures needs an enduring repair material...

  1. Tensile properties of structural fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipka, M.; Vašková, J.

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the comparison of several loading tests, which are using for determination of tensile strength of cementitious composites. The paper describes several test methods, their advantages, disadvantages and possible outputs. In the experimental program several recipes of concrete and fibre reinforced concrete were tested in splitting test, 3-point and 4-point bending tests and in 2 variants of axial tension test. Tension strength ratios and conversion factors between loading tests were determined for each recipe, based on test results.

  2. EMBEDDED CAPACITOR SENSOR FOR MONITORING CORROSION OF REINFORCEMENT IN CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI FATIMAH ABDUL RAHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcement can affect durability and integrity of reinforced concrete structures. Repair cost for a badly corroded structure can be very costly and time consuming. In this paper, several capacitor sensors were developed to monitor corrosion potential of reinforcement in concrete. The impedance capacitive of sensors was tested in various acid and alkali solutions using Agilent 4284A Precision LCR meter. The other sensors were tied to reinforcements and embedded in concrete specimen contaminated with 5% chloride to measure corrosion potential. The specimens were exposed to the corrosion chamber and indoor environments. From the research, it was found that the sensor can measure the impedance capacitive at different frequencies in the aggressive solutions. Besides, it was observed that the patterns of corrosion potential shown by the embedded sensors were similar to the SRI sensor. The output values from embedded sensor are in a range of recommendation by the ASTM-C876. Eventually, the bars were found corroded from the broken specimens that confirmed the detection of corrosion activities as recorded by the sensors.

  3. Influence of Additives on Reinforced Concrete Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neverkovica Darja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the research on carbonation and chloride induced corrosion mechanisms in reinforced concrete structures, based on three commercially available concrete admixtures: Xypex Admix C-1000, Penetron Admix and Elkem Microsilica. Carbonation takes place due to carbon dioxide diffusion, which in the required amount is present in the air. Chlorides penetrate concrete in case of the use of deicing salt or structure exploitation in marine atmosphere. Based on the implemented research, Elkem Microsilica is the recommended additive for the use in aggressive environmental conditions. Use of Xypex Admix C-1000 and Penetron Admix have only average resistance to the aggressive environmental impact.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ABOUT THE APPLICATIONS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BRIDGE PIERS WITH HIGH-STRENGTH-STEEL LONGITUDINAL AND HOOP REINFORCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogabe, Naoki; Kitsugi, Katsuhiko; Ibuki, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Yoichi; Ishiyama, Kazuyuki; Yamanobe, Shinichi; Suda, Kumiko; Watanabe, Yoshimitsu

    The cross-sectional area of reinforced concrete bridge piers and the number of longitudinal reinforcing bars required for bridge piers can be reduced by usin g high-strength reinforcing steel with a yield strength of 685 N/mm2. Reduction in the quantity of materials for bridge pier structures is effective in enhancing constructibility and reducing construction cost because pier foundations can be made smaller. As an example of use of high-strength reinforcing steel in reinforced concrete bridge piers, high-strength blast furnace steel has been used to reinforce tall (about 60 to 120 m) bridge piers made with concrete with a design strength of 50 N/mm2. In this study, verification was made, through a series of structural experiments, with respect to the structural characteristics of concrete piers reinforced with high-strength electric furnace steel. This paper re ports the findings that may help promote the use of high-strength reinforcing steel in reinforced concrete piers.

  5. Ultra thin continuously reinforced concrete pavement research in south Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Perrie, BD

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra thin continuously reinforced concrete pavements (UTCRCP), in literature also referred to as Ultra Thin Reinforced High Performance Concrete (UTHRHPC), have been used in Europe successfully as a rehabilitation measure on steel bridge decks...

  6. What Happens with Reinforced Concrete Structures when the Reinforcement Corrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper, corrosion of reinforced concrete structures is discussed from the point of view of corrosion products. The different types of corrosion products are presented and a detailed study of the important diffusion coefficient is performed. Stochastic modelling of corrosion initiated...

  7. Tension stiffening of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Álvaro Oliveira Júnior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanical behavior of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete was investigated to analyze the influence of steel fibers on tension stiffening. Using tension tests, the tension stiffening coefficient was evaluated through the load versus strain responses obtained from strain gages fixed to reinforcement steels. Moreover, an empirical model is proposed to estimate the tension stiffening coefficient of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete from reinforcement strains. From the test results, it was verified that the addition of steel fibers to concrete reduced the reinforcement steel strains and the crack width and increased the stiffness of cracked concrete, mainly in concretes reinforced with highvolumesof fibers.

  8. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  9. Shear assessment of reinforced concrete slab bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; Walraven, J.C.; De Boer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of reinforced concrete solid slab bridges in shear is assessed by comparing the design beam shear resistance to the design value of the applied shear force due to the permanent actions and live loads. Results from experiments on half-scale continuous slab bridges are used to develop a

  10. Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEGRADATION OF WATERFRONT REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES AT DAR ES SALAAM PORT 73. Quay consists of eleven berths, which serve international vessels. Eight of the berths handle break bulk cargo and three berths handle container traffic. Lighter quay, also known as Malindi wharf, is located to the ...

  11. Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    especially those at Malindi dhow quay, which are found to need a major rehabilitation. However, carbonation test reVealed that all concrete structures have not been affected by carbonation. The observed deterioration of the structures at the port is due to other environmental factors, especially corrosion of the reinforcement.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Research on Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Flexural Elements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deividas Rumšys; Darius Bačinskas; Edmundas Spudulis; Eugenijus Gudonis; Aleksandr Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with analysis of structural lightweight concrete. New lightweight concrete mixture made with expanded clay aggregate has been proposed and applied for experimental rein-forced concrete beams...

  13. Impact of biofouling on corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, B.T.; Gajendragad, M.R.; Ranganna, G.; Wagh, A.B.; Sudhakaran, T.

    The settlement of marine organisms on reinforced concrete surfaces can affect the durability of concrete structures due to the initiation of corrosion processes. A uniform settlement of biofoulers covering an entire concrete surface can protect...

  14. Acoustic emission techniques applied to conventionally reinforced concrete bridge girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) bridges generally operate at service-level loads except during discrete overload events that can reduce the integrity of the structure by initiating concrete cracks, widening or extending of existing concrete cracks, as well ...

  15. Comparison of Flexural Performance of Lightweight Fibre-reinforced Concrete and Normalweight Fibre-reinforced Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahsan Ali; Shahid Iqbal; Klaus Holschemacher; Thomas A Bier

    2017-01-01

    ...) and Lightweight Fibre-reinforced Concrete (LWFC) beam specimens. Fibres are known for their positive effect on crack control, better post-cracking behaviour under flexure and for enhancing toughness...

  16. Simulating distributed reinforcement effects in concrete analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the bond slip is brought into the TEMP-STRESS finite element code by relaxing the equal strain condition between concrete and reinforcement. This is done for the elements adjacent to the element which is cracked. A parabolic differential strain variation is assumed along the reinforcement from the crack, which is taken to be at the centroid of the cracked element, to the point where perfect bonding exists. This strain relationship is used to increase the strain of the reinforcement in the as yet uncracked elements located adjacent to a crack. By the same token the corresponding concrete strain is decreased. This estimate is made assuming preservation of strain energy in the element. The effectiveness of the model is shown by examples. Comparison of analytical results is made with structural test data. The influence of the bonding model on cracking is portrayed pictorially. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  18. Nondestructive inspection of corrosion and delamination at the concrete-steel reinforcement interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tri Huu

    The proposed study explores the feasibility of detecting and quantifying corrosion and delamination (physical separation) at the interface between reinforcing steel bars and concrete using ultrasonic guided waves. The problem of corrosion of the reinforcing steel in structures has increased significantly in recent years. The emergence of this type of concrete deterioration, which was first observed in marine structures and chemical manufacturing plants, coincided with the increased applications of deicing salts (sodium and calcium chlorides) to roads and bridges during winter months in those states where ice and snow are of major concern. Concrete is strengthened by the inclusion of the reinforcement steel such as deformed or corrugated steel bars. Bonding between the two materials plays a vital role in maximizing performance capacity of the structural members. Durability of the structure is of concern when it is exposed to aggressive environments. Corrosion of reinforcing steel has led to premature deterioration of many concrete members before their design life is attained. It is therefore, important to be able to detect and measure the level of corrosion in reinforcing steel or delamination at the interface. The development and implementation of damage detection strategies, and the continuous health assessment of concrete structures then become a matter of utmost importance. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a nondestructive testing technique to quantify the amount of corrosion in the reinforcing steel. The guided mechanical wave approach has been explored towards the development of such methodology. The use of an embedded ultrasonic network for monitoring corrosion in real structures is feasible due to its simplicity. The ultrasonic waves, specifically cylindrical guided waves can p ropagate a long distance along the reinforcing steel bars and are found to be sensitive to the interface conditions between steel bars and concrete. Ultrasonic

  19. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish......Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...

  20. Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Shear Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heecheul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the shear capacities of concrete beams reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP plates as shear reinforcement. To examine the shear performance, we manufactured and tested a total of eight specimens. Test variables included the GFRP strip-width-to-spacing ratio and type of opening array. The specimen with a GFRP plate with a 3×2 opening array showed the highest shear strength. From the test results, the shear strength increased as the strip-width-to-strip-spacing ratio increased. Also, we used the experimental results to evaluate whether the shear strength equations of ACI 318-14 and ACI 440.1R can be applied to the design of GFRP shear reinforcement. In the results, the ACI 440 equation underestimated the experimental results more than that of ACI 318.

  1. FLEXURAL TOUGHNESS OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi ÇİVİCİ

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber concrete is a composite material which has mechanical and physical characteristics unlike plain concrete. One of the important mechanical characteristics of fiber concrete is its energy absorbing capability. This characteristics which is also called toughness, is defined as the total area under the load-deflection curve. A number of composite characteristics such as crack resistance, ductility and impact resistance are related to the energy absorbtion capacity. According to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 the calculation of toughness is determined by uniaxial flexural testing. Fiber concrete is often used in plates such as bridge decks, airport pavements, parking areas, subjected to cavitation and erosion. In this paper, toughness has been determined according to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 methods by testing beam specimens. Energy absorbing capacities of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete has been compared by evaluating the results of two methods. Also plain and steel fiber reinforced plate specimens behaviors subjected to biaxial flexure are compared by the loaddeflection curves of each specimen.

  2. Non-Destructive Testing of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, D.; Tronca, G.

    2017-09-01

    For standard reinforced concrete, there are several non-destructive test (NDT) methods available for measuring the concrete cover and for locating subsurface objects and defects. Whether or not these methods may also be applied to fibre reinforced concrete has been the subject of a recent study. The results and a recommendation for the most suitable technology for use with fibre reinforced concrete is the topic of this paper.

  3. Stochastic Analysis of the Multi-dimensional Effect of Chloride Ingress into Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of the reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. One mode of corrosion initiation occurs when the chloride content around the reinforcement bars exceeds a critical threshold value, which...... is the subject of the present paper. Typically, the chloride concentration is obtained by solving Fick's diffusion partial differential equation assuming chloride flow into an infinite half space. However, when the concrete structure is relatively thin or when a rebar is situated at a corner of the structure...... Optimum Linear Estimation) approach. A bridge pier in a marine environment is considered to exemplify the results....

  4. Numerical Limit Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Paaske

    limit state analysis problems. The work focuses on determination of the load bearing capacity of reinforced concrete structures by employing the lower bound theorem and a finite element method using equilibrium elements is developed. The recent year’s development within the field of convex optimization...... is applied to solve the limit state problems. Three different element types have been developed and tested. The first is a solid tetra- hedral element with a linear stress distribution. The tri-axial stress state in the element is decomposed into concrete and reinforcement stresses, to which separate yield...... section forces such as plate bending and transverse shear. Examples are given which illustrates how the element can model plate and disk structures and the importance of taking transverse shear into account for structural problems with combined bending and transverse shear is illustrated....

  5. Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Flexure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a rotational capacity model for flexural reinforced concrete elements is presented. The model is based on the general assumption, that any other failure mode than bending is prevented by proper design. This includes failure due to shear, anchorage, concentrated loads etc. Likewise......, beams governed by failure described by Kani’s Valley are not covered by the presented model. Hence, the model is delimited to shear reinforced elements failing in flexure. The rotational capacity model is divided into the following calculation procedures. 1. A cross sectional analysis of the critical...... are not necessarily so. An example shows the applicability of the model and a parametric study shows the advantages of the model compared with code provisions. Finally, improvements of the compression zone modelling is performed in order to include a better performance when concrete crushing is the failure criterion...

  6. fatigue strength of reinforced concrete flexural members

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1980-03-01

    Mar 1, 1980 ... to cyclic creep of concrete after 2xl06 cycles of loading or before the collapse (in the cases when failure occurs) was within the range of 15-47 per cent deformation in tensile reinforcement increase with number of load cycles and before the beam collapses (or after 2xl06 cycles) they were 18-49 per cent ...

  7. Time-Dependent Behavior of Reinforced Polymer Concrete Columns under Eccentric Axial Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Paolo Berardi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymer concretes (PCs represent a promising alternative to traditional cementitious materials in the field of new construction. In fact, PCs exhibit high compressive strength and ultimate compressive strain values, as well as good chemical resistance. Within the context of these benefits, this paper presents a study on the time-dependent behavior of polymer concrete columns reinforced with different bar types using a mechanical model recently developed by the authors. Balanced internal reinforcements are considered (i.e., two bars at both the top and bottom of the cross-section. The investigation highlights relevant stress and strain variations over time and, consequently, the emergence of a significant decrease in concrete’s stiffness and strength over time. Therefore, the results indicate that deferred effects due to viscous flow may significantly affect the reliability of reinforced polymer concrete elements over time.

  8. Resistance of reinforced concrete beams in explosive charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Krzewiński

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the dynamic interaction on reinforced concrete beams, caused by the outbreak of not-direct contact with the design. Depending on the distance of the source of the outbreak, the structure may be loaded with gas stream postexplosion or air shock wave. The impact of such influence on the reinforced concrete beam of a constant cross-section and small transverse dimensions compared with their length was assessed. For the beams located in the closer zone, there were evaluated the parameters of the destructive action of explosions limit case, in which the concrete chipping occurs at a length of at least the length of the buckling of steel rods. In case of loading of beams with air shock wave, using literature data, they determined the way of evaluating equivalent static load at which the boundary elastic deflection of beams occurs. The above analysis is shown by the example calculation, which sets the minimum length of the buckling of steel bars in the beam bending.[b]Keywords:[/b] civil engineering, the dynamics of the explosion, the noncontact loads, dynamic loads, reflectance

  9. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2013-01-01

    is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from......Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...... and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...

  10. Simplified equation for Young's modulus of CNT reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, RameshBabu; Gifty Honeyta A, Maria

    2017-12-01

    This research investigation focuses on finite element modeling of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced concrete matrix for three grades of concrete namely M40, M60 and M120. Representative volume element (RVE) was adopted and one-eighth model depicting the CNT reinforced concrete matrix was simulated using FEA software ANSYS17.2. Adopting random orientation of CNTs, with nine fibre volume fractions from 0.1% to 0.9%, finite element modeling simulations replicated exactly the CNT reinforced concrete matrix. Upon evaluations of the model, the longitudinal and transverse Young's modulus of elasticity of the CNT reinforced concrete was arrived. The graphical plots between various fibre volume fractions and the concrete grade revealed simplified equation for estimating the young's modulus. It also exploited the fact that the concrete grade does not have significant impact in CNT reinforced concrete matrix.

  11. Self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete applied in thin plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Shionaga, R.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Floor panels produced with traditionally vibrated concrete are relatively thick due to the need to reinforce concrete and consequently, heavy. Without the need to place rebars in panels and by applying self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete (SCFRC) the production process becomes more efficient.

  12. Disperse reinforced concrete used in obtaining prefabricated elements for roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan MEZEI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most used material in construction. By improving the performance of materials and of technologies, concretes with outstanding performances were also developed, in the past two decades. Concrete with dispersed reinforcement represents a new generation of reinforced concrete that combines a good behavior of concrete compressive strength with an increased tensile strength of steel fibers. Using this material, monolithic and prefabricated concrete elements with high mechanical strengths and high durability can be obtained. Technological processes for preparation of concrete with dispersed reinforcement are similar to the conventional methods and do not involve using additional equipment for dosing the dispersed reinforcement. The study aimed the development of road plates made with optimized disperse- reinforced concrete. The first tests were done on plates from the gutter roadway, having a classic reinforcement, using different percentages of fibre reinforcement in the concrete composition, leading to the development of a new optimized economical solution. The results prove the enhanced characteristics of the disperse-reinforced concrete versus conventional concrete, and hence of the developed concrete plates.

  13. Fatigue Strength of Reinforced Concrete Flexural Members | Kuryllo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that reinforced concrete flexural members subjected to cyclic loads behave differently compared with static bending and can collapse due to the fatigue of concrete, reinforcement or both when maximum fatigue stresses of concrete and steel are well below the corresponding static strengths. But up till now ...

  14. An Experimental Study of a Midbroken 2-Bay 6-Storey Reinforced Concrete Frame subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Taskin, B.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1997-01-01

    A 2-bay, 6-storey model test reinforced concrete frame (scale 1:5) subjected to sequential earthquakes of increasing magnitude is considered in this paper. The frame was designed with a weak storey, in which the columns are weakened by using thinner and weaker reinforcement bars. The aim of the w......A 2-bay, 6-storey model test reinforced concrete frame (scale 1:5) subjected to sequential earthquakes of increasing magnitude is considered in this paper. The frame was designed with a weak storey, in which the columns are weakened by using thinner and weaker reinforcement bars. The aim...... of the work is to study global response to a damaging strong motion earthquake event of such buildings. Special emphasis is put on examining to what extent damage in the weak storey can be identified from global response measurements during an earthquake where the structure survives, and what level...

  15. REVIEW OF STRENGTHENING REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS USING CFRP LAMINATE

    OpenAIRE

    SAGATOV BAHODIR UKTAMOVICH; SHODMONOV ANARQUL YULDASHEVICH; ALIYEV MASHRAB RAHMONQULOVICH; DJURAYEV UKTAM URALBAYEVICH

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Literature Review of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) strips to reinforced concrete (RC) as a strengthening solution for T-beams. Although a great deal of research has been carried out on Rectangular beams strengthened with Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (FRP), Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly studied for their application in the flexural or shear strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) members. A detailed discussion of the ...

  16. Tensile Capacity of U-bar Loop Connections with Precast Fiber Reinforced Dowels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the tensile capacity of in-situ cast U-bar loop connections between precast concrete elements. The basic idea is to introduce a small precast cylindrical dowel of fiber reinforced mortar that fits into the bend diameter of the overlapping U...... to ideal ductile behavior than that of the specimens grouted with regular mortar. The experimental results of the tensile tests are compared with calculations based on an upper bound plasticity model and satisfactory agreement has been obtained....... that use of a precast fiber reinforced dowel performs at a slightly lower load level, as compared to a connection grouted solely with regular mortar and reinforced with the same amount of transverse reinforcement. However, the load-displacement response of specimens with a fiber reinforced dowel is closer...

  17. Nonlinear Analysis of External Prestressed Reinforced Concrete Beams with BFRP and CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleem K. Hussain

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional strengthening methods for concrete structure (girders, beams, columns…. consuming time and could be an economical, a new modern repair methods using the Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP and Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP as a laminate strips or bars,and considered a competitive solution that will increase the life-cycle of repaired structures. This study investigated the strengthen reinforced concrete girder. Nonlinear analysis have been adopted to the models using FEM analysis (ANSYS to simulate the theoretical results compared with experimental results.Using finite element packages, more efficient and better analyses can be made to fully understand the response of individual structural components and their contribution to a structure as a whole.Three type of material are used in this study as an external prestressed wire (steel, CFRP and BFRP. The prestressed beam is modeled as simply supported beam with two concentrated point load. The results showed that all tested strengthening beam increased the load carryingcapacity of the beams depend on prestressing force. Obtained Result was compared for different type of beam.This study also was enlarged to include using CFRP and BFRPbarwhich are light weight and moredurable, lead to ease of handling and maintenance. The research conducted analytical work to evaluate the effectiveness of concrete beams reinforced normally by the use of CFRP and BFRP bars. The results showed a significant gain in the beam’s ultimate capacities using CFRP bars comparing with beam reinforced with BFRP bar and reference beam

  18. Development of an embeddable reference electrode for reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    There is a concern that none of the existing concrete-embeddable reference electrodes that are being used as a convenient means for monitoring the condition of the reinforcing steel in concrete bridges or the operation of cathodic protection systems ...

  19. Fracture in high performance fibre reinforced concrete pavement materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available high performance fibre reinforced concrete pavement slab with a nominal thickness of approximately 50 mm. The material has a significant post crack stress capacity compared to plain concrete. Current design methods for UTCRCP are based on conventional...

  20. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  1. Laboratory fatigue evaluation of continuously fiber-reinforced concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the worlds most versatile construction material. PCC has : been in use in the United States for over 100 years. PCC pavement is generally constructed as : either continually reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) or ...

  2. Mortar and Concrete Reinforced with Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Agullo, J.; Chozas-Ligero, V.; Portillo-Rico, D.; García-Casas, M. J.; Gutiérrez-Martínez, A.; Mieres-Royo, J. M.; Grávalos-Moreno, J.

    In this work, several nanomaterials have been used in cementitious matrices: carbon nanofilaments (either multiwall nanotubes or nanofibers), nanosilica and nanoclays. The physico-chemical behavior of these nanomaterials at three different levels has been analyzed: cement paste, mortar and concrete. It has been determined the setting times, the workability, the mineralogical structure and the dispersion of the nanomaterials in the cement matrix by ESEM/EDX , the percentage of hydration by TGA and the mechanical properties of mortar and concrete at 3, 7, 28 and 56 days. It has been found that almost all the nanomaterials used in this study accelerate the hydration process (with a proper dispersion), obtaining reinforcements in compression and flexural strength at 3 and 7 days (between 20 and 40 %). At 28 days, it has been observed that carbon nanotubes and nanofibers exhibit a reinforcement in the flexural strength (more than 25%), due to their fibrilar structure. Reinforcements, either in compression or flexural strength, have been reached with nanosilica (between 20 and 40 %); indeed, pozzolanic activity has been confirmed with nanosilica.

  3. Buckling model of longitudinal reinforcing bars under reverse cyclic load; Koban kurikaeshi kajuka ni okeru chukin no zakutsu model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Y.; Suda, K.; Ichinomiya, T.; Shinbo, H. [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-10-31

    For RC (reinforced concrete) columns such as towers of long-span cable-stayed bridges or high-rise piers, there is desired development of an analytical method including a method of arranging reinforcing bars for increasing their ductility against strong earthquake motion. For this, it is necessary to investigate their characteristics after their being rendered to maximum load and their final states, and hence there must be newly investigated the properties of a plastic hinge formed on the bottom of the column, particularly determination of the buckling point of reinforcing bars and a hysteresis model after the buckling. In this study, there is developed a direct method of measuring the stress of reinforcing bars embedded in a model specimen which is conventionally difficult to be measured, and there is investigated the stress-strain hysteresis of the bars before and after the buckling thereof. The principle of the method of measuring the stress is such that only a local minimum portion of objective reinforcing bars is rendered to rf quenching, and a distortion gauge is sticked to the center of the quenching. This is based upon a fact that that portion keeps a linear relationship between the stress and the strain even if a host material is yielded. On the basis of an experimental result, a mechanism of buckling of these bars is clarified and a buckling model of the reinforcing bars at the plastic hinge. 6 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Performance of steel-making slag concrete reinforced with fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-López Vanesa; Fuente-Alonso José Antonio; Skaf Marta; Santamaría Amaia; Aragón Ángel; Manso Juan Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In this research, the possibility of making concrete reinforced with fibers and manufactured with recycled aggregates from carbon steel production was explored. Electric arc furnace slag (EAFS) was used as coarse and medium aggregate, and part of the sand sizes. Metallic and synthetic fibers were added in different amounts. Initially, the properties of EAFS and their suitability to be used in the manufacture fiber reinforced concrete were analysed. Then, a series of fiber reinforced concrete ...

  5. Ductility of reinforced lightweight concrete beams and columns

    OpenAIRE

    Charif, Abdelhamid; Shannag, M. Jamal; Dghaither,Saleh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents analytical and experimental results on ductility of reinforced lightweight concrete beams and columns in the form of moment curvature relationships, and compares the response with that of normal reinforced concrete members. The experimental part is limited to flexural tests on beams made of lightweight concrete. The latter is obtained with natural lightweight aggregates. Concrete and steel stress-strain models in compression and tension are integrated analytically through ...

  6. Structural behavior of lightweight bamboo reinforced concrete slab with EPS infill panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Ari; Wijatmiko, Indradi; Nainggolan, Christin Remayanti

    2017-09-01

    Eco-friendly, green, and natural materials have become increasingly important issues in supporting sustainable development, for the substitution of nonrenewable materials such as steel. Bamboo has been considered in many studies to replace steel in reinforced concrete elements. Further investigation has been carried out to obtain lightweight and eco-friendly reinforced concrete slabs by using bamboo bars as reinforcement and recycled materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene) as infill panel. The flexural loading test on full scale one-way slabs test has been conducted. The results showed that the flexural strength of specimens decreased marginally of about 6% but with the weight advantage of 27% less compared with those of steel rebar reinforced concrete slab with the same dimension. Two type shear-connectors comprising of concrete and bamboo studs were also investigated which showed that the bamboo stud provided better ductility compared to that of slab with concrete as shear connector. Overall, the reinforced concrete slab with bamboo reinforcement and EPS infill panel showed reasonably good performance compared to slabs with steel rebar.

  7. Design Optimization of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutani, Sonia; Singh, Jagbir

    2017-12-01

    This work presents a typical optimization technique i.e. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to achieve optimal design of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. Optimal cross-sectional sizing of an RC beam results in cost saving, but it (optimal sizing) cannot be standardized for the various factors that influence a given design. An algorithm has been developed to search for a minimum cost solution that satisfies Indian codal requirements for RC beams. The objective function consists of the cost of concrete and rebars as prevalent at the place of construction. Successful implementation of the algorithm clearly establishes PSO's ability of performance in the case of RC beams. A number of examples have been presented to show the effectiveness of this formulation for achieving optimal design.

  8. Reinforced concrete design to Eurocode 2

    CERN Document Server

    Toniolo, Giandomenico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook describes the basic mechanical features of concrete and explains the main resistant mechanisms activated in the reinforced concrete structures and foundations when subjected to centred and eccentric axial force, bending moment, shear, torsion and prestressing,. It presents a complete set of limit-state design criteria of the modern theory of RC incorporating principles and rules of the final version of the official Eurocode 2. This textbook examines methodological more than notional aspects of the presented topics, focusing on the verifications of assumptions, the rigorousness of the analysis and the consequent degree of reliability of results. Each chapter develops an organic topic, which is eventually illustrated by examples in each final paragraph containing the relative numerical applications. These practical end-of-chapter appendices and intuitive flow-charts ensure a smooth learning experience. The book stands as an ideal learning resource for students of structural design and analysis cou...

  9. Design of Reinforced Concrete Elements Under Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mihai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire safety regulations can have a major impact on many aspects of the overall design of a building, including layout, aesthetics, function, and cost. Rapid developments in modern building technology in the last decades often have resulted in unconventional structures and design solutions. Because the world is developed continuously, the physical size of buildings increases continually; there is a tendency to build large underground car parks, warehouses, and shopping complexes. As a result, we have a worldwide movement to replace prescriptive building codes with ones based on performance. The paper presents the basic principles for the designing process of reinforced concrete elements under fire.

  10. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  11. Calculation methodology of reinforced concrete elements based on calculated resistance of reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochkarev Dmitriy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation methodology of reinforced concrete elements based on the calculated resistance of reinforced concrete is presented. The basic dependence which allows setting the strength of bending sections and non-central compressed elements is obtained. The proposed method for calculating reinforced concrete elements is based on the use of nonlinear diagrams of material deformation, the hypothesis of flat sections and deformation criteria for the destruction of materials. The basic equations of strength are reduced to dimensionless quantities and are tabulated. When compiling the tables, the formula proposed in Euroсode 2 was adopted as the diagram of concrete deformation, and for the reinforcement two linear Prandtl diagram was used. The calculated formulas of the proposed method fully correspond to the formulas of the classical resistance of materials, and make it possible to solve the most frequently encountered problems in the practice of modern construction. The reliability of the dependencies is experimentally confirmed. There are calculation examples of bending and non-central compressed elements by the developed methodology.

  12. A Load-Deflection Study of Fiber-Reinforced Plastics as Reinforcement in Concrete Bridge Decks

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Curtis Barton

    1997-01-01

    Approximately fifty percent of the bridges in the United States are considered deficient. The deterioration of the concrete components is a leading cause of the problem. The deterioration of concrete bridge decks is due primarily to corrosion of the reinforcing steel in the concrete. A promising solution to the problem is the use of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) as a replacement for reinforcing steel. The use of FRP as reinforcement has the following advantages of lightweight, high tensile ...

  13. Bond slip and crack development in FRC and regular concrete specimens longitudinally reinforced with FRP or steel under tension loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    tensile loading using high definition image analysis in two unique test setups. Two different types of cementitious materials, conventional concrete and highly ductile Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), and two types of reinforcement bars, regular steel and Glass Fiber Reinforcement Polymer (GFRP......The governing mechanism in the structural response of reinforced concrete members in tension is the interaction between structural reinforcement and the surrounding concrete matrix. The composite response and the mechanical integrations of reinforced cementitious members were investigated during......), were tested. It was found that the ductile ECC in contrast to regular brittle concrete decreases crack widths significantly which effectively results in decreased bond slip between the reinforcement and surrounding matrix. Furthermore the use of elastic GFRP in comparison to elastic/plastic steel...

  14. Finite Element Simulation of GFRP Reinforced Concrete Beam Externally Strengthened With CFRP Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh Norhafizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction technology now has become more and more advanced allowing the development of new technologies or material to replace the previous one and also solved some of the troubles confronted by construction experts. The Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP composite is an alternative to replace the current usage of steel as it is rust proof and stronger in terms of stiffness compared to steel. Furthermore, GFRP bars have a high strength-to-weight ratio, making them attractive as reinforcement for concrete structures. However, the tensile behavior of GFRP bars is characterized by a linear elastic stress–strain relationship up to failure and, therefore, concrete elements reinforced with GFRP reinforcement exhibit brittle failure without warning. Design codes encourage over-reinforced GFRP design since it is more progressive and leads to a less catastrophic failure with a higher degree of deformability. Moreover, because of GFRP low modulus of elasticity, GFRP reinforced concrete members exhibit larger deflections and wider cracks width than steel reinforced concrete. This aims of this paper is to developed 2D Finite Element (FE models that can accurately simulate the respond on an improvement in the deflection of GFRP reinforced concrete beam externally strengthened with CFRP plates on the tension part of beam. The prediction of flexural response according to RCCSA software was also discussed. It was observed that the predicted FE results are given similar result with the experimental measured test data. Base on this good agreement, a parametric study was the performed using the validation FE model to investigate the effect of flexural reinforcement ratio and arrangement of the beams strengthened with different regions of CFRP plates.

  15. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete columns strengthened with self-compacting concrete and connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Nascimento

    Full Text Available There are many problems involving cases of destruction of buildings and other structures. The columns can deteriorate for several reasons such as the evolution and changing habits of the loads. The experimental phase of this work was based on a test involving nine reinforced concrete columns under combined bending and axial compression, at an initial eccentricity of 60 mm. Two columns were used as reference, one having the original dimensions of the column and the other, monolithic, had been cast along the thickness of the strengthened piece. The remaining columns received a 35 mm thick layer of self-compacting concrete on their compressed face. For the preparation of the interface between the two materials, this surface was scarified and furrowed and connectors were inserted onto the columns' shear reinforcement in various positions and amounts.As connectors, 5 mm diameter steel bars were used (the same as for stirrups, bent in the shape of a "C" with 25 mm coatings. >As a conclusion, not only the quantity, but mainly, the location of the connectors used in the link between substrate and reinforcement is crucial to increase strength and to change failure mode.

  16. Temperature effects on bond between concrete and reinforcing steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lublóy Éva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bond behaviour between concrete and reinforcing bars was observed under elevated temperatures. Five different concrete compositions were used. Hundred five pull-out specimens (Ø120 mm, 100 mm were prepared. After removing the specimens from the formwork, they were stored in water for seven days then kept at laboratory conditions until testing. The specimens were 28 days old by testing. After heating up the specimens, they were kept for two hours at these maximum temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C, 800 °C. Specimens were then cooled down in laboratory conditions. Finally the specimens were tested at room temperature. In order to check the compressive strength standard cubes were cast, cured, and heat treated, then tested to compressive strength. The results showed reduction in residual compressive strength and considerable changes in steel-concrete bond under high temperatures. Based on test results, a proposal is presented for the modification of MC2010 bond-ship formula in order to consider temperature effect.

  17. Evaluation of Different Methods for Considering Bar-Concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    real nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete frames has been compared to the precision of two other suggested methods for considering ... Keywords: Bond-slip effect, Pull-out effect, Dynamic analysis, Seismic analysis, RC frames. One of the most ..... results, but as shown in Figure 4, there is still no good agreement ...

  18. Evaluation of Different Methods for Considering Bar-Concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theory, but the perfect bond assumption has been removed. The precision of the proposed method in considering the real nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete frames has been compared to the precision of two other suggested methods for considering bond-slip effect in layer model. Among the capabilities of this ...

  19. Corrosion detection and evolution monitoring in reinforced concrete structures by the use of fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Alvarez, S.; Ferdinand, P.; Magne, S.; Nogueira, R. P.

    2013-04-01

    Corrosion of reinforced bar (rebar) in concrete structures represents a major issue in civil engineering works, being its detection and evolution a challenge for the applied research. In this work, we present a new methodology to corrosion detection in reinforced concrete structures, by combining Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors with the electrochemical and physical properties of rebar in a simplified assembly. Tests in electrolytic solutions and concrete were performed for pitting and general corrosion. The proposed Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methodology constitutes a direct corrosion measurement potentially useful to implement or improve Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) program for civil engineering concrete structures.

  20. Determination of concrete cover thickness in a reinforced concrete pillar by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Pietro Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Mangini, Fabio; Pajewski, Lara

    2017-04-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field by a reinforced concrete structure is calculated by means of frequency-domain numerical simulations and by making use of the scattered-field formulation. The concrete pillar, used as supporting architectural element, is modelled as a parallelepiped shell made of concrete material inside which are present steel bars. In order to make the model simpler, the steel bars are supposed running parallel to the air-pillar interface. To excite the model, a linearly-polarized plane wave impinging normally with respect to the pillars surface, is adopted. We consider two different polarizations in order to determine the most useful in terms of scattered-field sensitivity. Moreover, a preliminary frequency sweep allows us to choose the most suitable operating frequency depending on the dimensions of the pillar cross-section, the steel bars cross-section and the concrete cover. All the three components of the scattered field are monitored along a line just above the interface air-pillar. The electromagnetic properties of the materials employed in this study are present in the literature and, since a frequency-domain technique is adopted, no further approximation is needed. The results obtained for different values of the concrete cover are compared, with the goal of determining the scattered field dependence on the concrete cover thickness. Considering different concrete cover thicknesses, we want to provide an electromagnetic method to obtain this useful parameter by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field. One of the practical applications of this study in the field of Civil Engineering may be the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) techniques to monitor the thickness of the concrete that separates the metal bars embedded in the pillar from the outer surface. A correct distance is useful because the concrete cover serves as a protection against external agents avoiding corrosion of the bars that might prejudice the reinforced

  1. Sustainability and durability analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, A.; Broukalová, I.; Kohoutková, A.; Vašková, J.

    2017-09-01

    The article describes an assessment of reinforced concrete structures in terms of durability and sustainable development. There is a short summary of findings from the literature on evaluation methods for environmental impacts and also about corrosive influences acting on the reinforced concrete structure, about factors influencing the durability of these structures and mathematical models describing the corrosion impacts. Variant design of reinforced concrete structure and assessment of these variants in terms of durability and sustainability was performed. The analysed structure was a concrete ceiling structure of a parking house for cars. The variants differ in strength class of concrete and thickness of concrete slab. It was found that in terms of durability and sustainable development it is significantly preferable to use higher class of concrete. There are significant differences in results of concrete structures durability for different mathematical models of corrosive influences.

  2. Axial Compression Tests on Corroded Reinforced Concrete Columns Consolidated with Fibre Reinforced Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ding

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structure featured by strong bearing capacity, high rigidity, good integrity, good fire resistance, and extensive applicability occupies a mainstream position in contemporary architecture. However, with the development of social economy, people need higher requirements on architectural structure; durability, especially, has been extensively researched. Because of the higher requirement on building material, ordinary reinforced concrete structure has not been able to satisfy the demand. As a result, some new materials and structures have emerged, for example, fibre reinforced polymers. Compared to steel reinforcement, fibre reinforced polymers have many advantages, such as high tensile strength, good durability, good shock absorption, low weight, and simple construction. The application of fibre reinforced polymers in architectural structure can effectively improve the durability of the concrete structure and lower the maintenance, reinforcement, and construction costs in severe environments. Based on the concepts of steel tube concrete, fibre reinforced composite material confined concrete, and fibre reinforced composite material tubed concrete, this study proposes a novel composite structure, i.e., fibre reinforced composite material and steel tube concrete composite structure. The structure was developed by pasting fibre around steel tube concrete and restraining core concrete using fibre reinforced composite material and steel tubes. The bearing capacity and ultimate deformation capacity of the structure was tested using column axial compression test.

  3. Crack Formation During Hardening in Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project is to establish models for the development of cracks in the early age of fibre reinforced concrete due to restrained shrinkage and temperature variations. These models will be based on measurements of age dependant material properties including the post crack response...... of the fibre reinforced concrete....

  4. column frame for design of reinforced concrete sway frames

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adminstrator

    Journal, proceedings, 2009, pp.24-48. 11. Ewnetie A., Investigation on Applicability of Substitute Beam-Column Frame for. Design of Reinforced Concrete Sway. Frames, MSc Thesis, 2012. Notations. ACI: American Concrete Institute. As,tot: Theoretical area of reinforcement required by the design. D: Dead (permanent) load.

  5. effect of uncertainty on the fatigue reliability of reinforced concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... The deterioration of reinforced concrete bridge deck that has been damaged as a result of load action can affect the durability, safety and function of the structure. In this paper, a reliability time-variant fatigue analysis and uncertainty effect on the serviceability of reinforced concrete bridge deck was carried ...

  6. Quality control of fireproof coatings for reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravit, Marina; Dmitriev, Ivan; Ishkov, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The article analyzes methods of quality inspection of fireproof coatings (work flow, measuring, laboratory, etc.). In modern construction there is a problem of lack of distinct monitoring for the fire protection testing. There is a description of this testing for reinforced concrete structures. The article shows the results of calculation quality control of hatches as an example of fireproof coating for reinforced concrete structures.

  7. Midbroken Reinforced Concrete Shear Frames Due to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Cakmak, A. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    A non-linear hysteretic model for the response and local damage analyses of reinforced concrete shear frames subject to earthquake excitation is proposed, and, the model is applied to analyse midbroken reinforced concrete (RC) structures due to earthquake loads. Each storey of the shear frame...

  8. Axisymmetric analysis of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment building using a distributed cracking model for the concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherby, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Results of axisymmetric structural analyses of a 1:6 scale model of a reinforced concrete nuclear containment building are presented. Both a finite element shell analysis and a simplified membrane analysis were made to predict the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of the model. Analytical results indicate that the model will fail at an internal pressure of 187 psig when the stress level in the hoop reinforcement at the midsection of the cylinder exceeds the ultimate strength of the bar splices. 5 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Size Effects on the Bending Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Henriksen, M. S.; Christensen, F. A.

    1999-01-01

    Load-deformation curves for reinforced concrete beams subjected to bending show size effects due to tensile failure of the concrete at early stages in the failure process and due to compression failure of the concrete when the final failure takes place. In this paper these effects are modelled...

  10. Flow modelling of steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich

    Concrete is one of the most widely used materials in the world. Ordinary concrete composition makes the material strong in compression yet weak and brittle in tension. Steel reinforced concrete successfully eliminates the weak tensile properties of the ordinary concrete. Steel fibres dispersed...... and fills the formwork with a little or no effort. Steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete is a logical combination of the two types of concrete. The combination nevertheless creates several challenges. It has been observed by many authors that steel fibres orient and distribute according...... to the flow of the fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete. The orientation and distribution of the fibres results in non-homogeneous and non-isotropic mechanical properties of the structural elements. The primary aim of this research project was to develop a numerical framework capable of predicting...

  11. Properties of self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Vandewalle, Lucie; Heirman, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The postcracking behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete is particularly influenced by the fibre distribution and the fibre orientation. One could suppose that in self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete (SCFRC) fibres orient along the flow due to the wall-effect, the flow direction and the velocity profile in the concrete. To investigate the fresh and hardened characteristics (mechanical properties, orientation and distribution of the fibres) of SCFRC and to relate them to those of tradition...

  12. Assessment of Asphalt Concrete Reinforcement Grid in Flexible Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 7 New Hampshire DOT SPR2 Program Assessment of Asphalt Concrete Reinforcement Grid in Flexible Pavements Co ld...the asphalt concrete layer of a flexible pavement as an effective rehabilitation method to reduce or arrest cracking. The New Hampshire Department...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of Asphalt Concrete Reinforcement Grid in Flexible Pavements 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER CRADA 13-CRL-01 5b

  13. Experimental investigation of the relation between damage at the concrete-steel interface and initiation of reinforcement corrosion in plain and fibre reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Pease, Bradley Justin

    2013-01-01

    Cracks in covering concrete are known to hasten initiation of steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. To minimise the impact of cracks on the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, current approaches in (inter)national design codes often limit the concrete surface crack width...... embedded in plain and fibre reinforced concrete. Comparisons of experimental and numerical results indicate a strong correlation between corrosion initiation and interfacial condition.......Cracks in covering concrete are known to hasten initiation of steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. To minimise the impact of cracks on the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, current approaches in (inter)national design codes often limit the concrete surface crack width....... Recent investigations however, indicate that the concrete-reinforcement interfacial condition is a more fundamental criterion related to reinforcement corrosion. This work investigates the relation between macroscopic damage at the concrete-steel interface and corrosion initiation of reinforcement...

  14. Shaking Table Tests of Reinforced Concrete Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    The purpose of the paper is to present a series of shaking table experiments performed at the Structural Laboratory at Aalborg University, Denmark during the autumn of 1996 and to show some selected results from these experiments. The aim of the tests was to test methods for identification of time...... in the shaking table test are 2-bay, 6-storey RC-frames in scale 1:5 with outer measures of 2.4 m in with and 3.3 m in height. The structures are subjected to a series of sequential earthquakes and after each earthquake the structure is visually inspected. The results of the work have revealed that the recursive...... vector ARMA model is suitable for modal identification of degrading reinforced concrete structures and the maximum softening damage index calculated from the obtained identification provides a valuable tool for assessment of the damage state of the structure....

  15. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  16. Effect of chloride-based deicers on reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We conducted an extensive literature review and performed laboratory tests to assess the effect of chloride-based deicers on the rebars and dowel bars in concrete and to determine whether or not deicer corrosion inhibitors help preserve the transport...

  17. Retrofit of existing reinforced concrete bridges with fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A two-part research was focused on examining various issues related to the use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites for strengthening of existing reinforced concrete bridges. A summary of each phase is presented separately.

  18. CREATION OF MUSIC WITH FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hayato; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ogura, Naoyuki; Kitahara, Yukiko; Okamoto, Takahisa

    This research focuses on the Fiber Reinforcement Concrete(FRC) and its performance on musical tones. Thepossibility of future musical instruments made of this concrete is discussed. Recently, the technical properties of FRC had been improved and the different production styles, such as unit weight of binding material and volume of fiber in the structure, hardly affects the results of the acoustics. However, the board thickness in the FRC instruments is directly related with the variety of musical tone. The FRC musical effects were compared with those produced with wood on wind instruments. The sounds were compared with those produced with woodwind instruments. The sound pressure level was affected by the material and it becomes remarkably notorious in the high frequency levels. These differences had great influence on the spectrum analysis of the tone in the wind instruments and the sensory test. The results from the sensory test show dominant performances of brightness, beauty and power in the FRC instruments compared with those made of wood.

  19. Development of structural health monitoring and early warning system for reinforced concrete system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iranata, Data, E-mail: iranata-data@yahoo.com, E-mail: data@ce.its.ac.id; Wahyuni, Endah [Civil Engineering Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia); Murtiadi, Suryawan [Civil Engineering Department, Universitas Mataram, Mataram 83125 (Indonesia); Widodo, Amien [Geophysical Engineering Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia); Riksakomara, Edwin; Sani, Nisfu Asrul [Information Systems Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Many buildings have been damaged due to earthquakes that occurred recently in Indonesia. The main cause of the damage is the large deformation of the building structural component cannot accommodate properly. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the Structural Health Monitoring System (SHMS) to measure precisely the deformation of the building structural component in the real time conditions. This paper presents the development of SHMS for reinforced concrete structural system. This monitoring system is based on deformation component such as strain of reinforcement bar, concrete strain, and displacement of reinforced concrete component. Since the deformation component has exceeded the limit value, the warning message can be sent to the building occupies. This warning message has also can be performed as early warning system of the reinforced concrete structural system. The warning message can also be sent via Short Message Service (SMS) through the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) network. Hence, the SHMS should be integrated with internet modem to connect with GSM network. Additionally, the SHMS program is verified with experimental study of simply supported reinforced concrete beam. Verification results show that the SHMS has good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Numerical Study on Section Constitutive Relations of Members Reinforced by Steel-BFRP Composite Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tongliang; Qiu, Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    Steel-Basalt FRP Composite Bar (S-BFCB) is a new kind of substitute material for longitudinal reinforcement, with high elastic modulus, stable post-yield stiffness and excellent corrosive resistance. Based on mechanical properties of S-BFCB and the plane cross-section assumption, the moment-curvature curves of beam and column members are simulated. Some parameters such as equivalent rebar ratio, postyeild stiffness, concrete strength and axial compression ratio of column were discussed. Results show that the constitutive relation of the cross section is similar with RC member in elastic and cracking stages, while different in post-yield stage. With the increase of postyeild stiffness ratio of composite bar, the ultimate bearing capacity of component improved observably, member may turn out over-reinforced phenomenon, concrete crushing may appear before the fibersarefractured. The effect of concrete strength increase in lower postyeild stiffness ratio is not obvious than in higher. The increase of axial compression ratio has actively influence on bearing capacity of column, but decreases on the ductility.

  1. Effect of Steel Fiber and Different Environments on Flexural Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Barkhordari Bafghi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main kind of deterioration in marine Reinforced Concrete (RC structures and other infrastructures is steel bar corrosion due to cracks in concrete surfaces, which leads to the reduction of the load carrying capacity, ductility, and structural safety. It seems that steel fibers can reduce and delay the cracking, and increase the flexural strength and ductility of marine RC structures. To do so, in marine atmosphere and the tidal zone of the Oman Sea and fresh water, the flexural behavior of beams containing Plain Concrete (PC, Concrete with Steel fiber Reinforcement (SFRC, RC, Concrete with Steel fiber, and bar Reinforcement ((R+SC at 28, 90 and 180 days were determined. Beams were 99 un-cracked and pre-cracked beams, with dimensions of 200 × 200 × 750 mm. Based on results and at 180 days, the flexural strength and toughness of pre-cracked (R+SC beams were 22%–43% higher than the pre-cracked RC beams. The effect of steel fiber on the increment of load capacity and the toughness of pre-cracked RC beams were approximately the same. By addition of steel fiber to un-cracked RC beams, load capacity and toughness were increased up to 20%. The load capacity and toughness in marine atmosphere and tidal zone were approximately 15% lower than the fresh water condition.

  2. Detection of active corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete: overview of NIST TIP project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Ziehl, P.

    2011-04-01

    The US transportation infrastructure has been receiving intensive public and private attention in recent years. The Federal Highway Administration estimates that 42 percent of the nearly 600,000 bridges in the Unites States are in need of structural or functional rehabilitation1. Corrosion of reinforcement steel is the main durability issue for reinforced and prestressed concrete structures, especially in coastal areas and in regions where de-icing salts are regularly used. Acoustic Emission (AE) has proved to be a promising method for detecting corrosion in steel reinforced and prestressed concrete members. This type of non-destructive test method primarily measures the magnitude of energy released within a material when physically strained. The expansive ferrous byproducts resulting from corrosion induce pressure at the steel-concrete interface, producing longitudinal and radial microcracks that can be detected by AE sensors. In the experimental study presented herein, concrete block specimens with embedded steel reinforcing bars and strands were tested under accelerated corrosion to relate the AE activity with the onset and propagation stages of corrosion. AE data along with half cell potential measurements and galvanic current were recorded to examine the deterioration process. Finally, the steel strands and bars were removed from the specimens, cleaned and weighed. The results were compared vis-à-vis Faraday's law to correlate AE measurements with degree of corrosion in each block.

  3. Shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Lima Araújo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the mechanical behavior of shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams. Six beams subjected to shear loading were tested until failure. Additionally, prisms were tested to evaluate fiber contribution to the concrete shear strength. Steel fibers were straight, hook-ended,35 mmlong and aspect ratio equal to 65. Volumetric fractions used were 1.0 and 2.0%. The results demonstrated a great contribution from steel fibers to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams and to reduce crack width, which can reduce the amount of stirrups in reinforced concrete structures. Beam capacity was also evaluated by empirical equations, and it was found that these equations provided a high variability, while some of them have not properly predicted the ultimate shear strength of the steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams.

  4. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  5. Long-Term Flexural Behaviors of GFRP Reinforced Concrete Beams Exposed to Accelerated Aging Exposure Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonho Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of accelerated aging conditions on the long-term flexural behavior and ductility of reinforced concrete (RC members with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP bars (RC-GFRP specimen and steel bars (RC-steel specimen. A total of thirty six specimens were designed with different amounts of reinforcement with three types of reinforcing bars (i.e., helically wrapped GFRP, sand-coated surface GFRP and steel. Eighteen specimens were subjected to sustained loads and accelerated aging conditions (i.e., 47 °C and 80% relative humidity in a chamber. The flexural behavior of specimens under 300-day exposure was compared to that of the companion specimens without experiencing accelerated aging conditions. Results indicate that the accelerated aging conditions reduced flexural capacity in not only RC-steel, but also RC-GFRP specimens, with different rates of reduction. Different types of GFRP reinforcement exhibited different rates of degradation of the flexural capacity when embedded in concrete under the same exposure conditions. Several existing models were compared with experimental results for predicting the deflection and deformability index for specimens. Bischoff and Gross’s model exhibited an excellent prediction of the time-dependent deflections. Except for the deformability index proposed by Jaeger, there was no general trend related to the aging duration. This study recommends the need for further investigation on the prediction of the deformability index.

  6. Propagation characteristics of acoustic emission wave in reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiong Feng

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of components and damage mechanism of reinforced concrete, the wave propagation characteristics in reinforced concrete are always complicated and difficult to determine. The objective of this article is to study the failure process of reinforced concrete structure under the damage caused by pencil-broken. A new method on the basis of the acoustic emission technique and the Hilbert-Huang transform theory is proposed in this work. By using acoustic emission technique, the acoustic emission wave signal is generating while the real-time damage information and the strain field of the reinforced concrete structure is receiving simultaneously. Based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT theory, the peak frequency characteristics of the acoustic emission signals were extracted to identify the damage modes of the reinforced concrete structure. The results demonstrate that this method can quantitatively investigate the acoustic emission wave propagation characteristic in reinforced concrete structures and might also be promising in other civil constructions. Keywords: Acoustic emission, Reinforced concrete structure, Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, Propagation characteristics

  7. Transport and Corrosion Behavior of Cracked Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin

    to enter the concrete. This is, among others, important in the corrosion of reinforcing steel. When cracks protrude to the depth of reinforcing steel, liquids containing aggressive ions (i.e. chlorides associated with salts and sea water) may rapidly access and initiate corrosion of the reinforcing...... structures. These models currently lack some of the scientific validity to fully represent actual field structures, i.e. structures containing cracks. Further understanding, therefore is needed on the effect cracks have on transport and corrosion in reinforced concrete. The fundamental mechanisms...... of transport and corrosion in cracked, reinforced concrete are not yet fully understood. The scope of this study therefore is to develop a link between concrete cracks and the relevant transport mechanism(s) under particular environmental conditions. It is envisioned that a finite element model...

  8. Elastodynamics model updating for the monitoring of reinforced concrete beam: methodology and numerical implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Waeytens, Julien; LE CORVEC, Véronique; Leveque, Philippe; Siegert, Dominique; Bourquin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete beams are widely employed in civil engineering structures. To reduce the maintenance financial cost, structure damages have to be detected early. To this end, one needs robust monitoring techniques. The paper deals with the identification of mechanical parameters, useful for Structural Health Monitoring, in a 2D beam using inverse modeling technique. The optimal control theory is employed. As an example, we aim to identify a reduction of the steel bar cross-section and a d...

  9. Compressive behaviour at High Temperatures of Fibre Reinforced Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the research that is being carried out at the Universities of Coimbra and Rio de Janeiro, on fibre reinforced concretes at high temperatures. Several high strength concrete compositions reinforced with fibres (polypropylene, steel and glass fibres were developed. The results of compressive tests at high temperatures (300 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C and after heating and cooling down of the concrete are presented in the paper. In both research studies, the results indicated that polypropylene fibers prevent concrete spalling. 

  10. Topology Optimization for Conceptual Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Bogomolny, Michael

    2011-01-01

    optimization with elasto-plastic material modeling. Concrete and steel are both considered as elasto-plastic materials, including the appropriate yield criteria and post-yielding response. The same approach can be applied also for topology optimization of other material compositions where nonlinear response......Design of reinforced concrete structures is governed by the nonlinear behavior of concrete and by its dierent strengths in tension and compression. The purpose of this article is to present a computational procedure for optimal conceptual design of reinforced concrete structures, based on topology...

  11. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  12. Thermal analysis of GFRP-reinforced continuous concrete decks subjected to top fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawileh, Rami A.; Rasheed, Hayder A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study that investigates the behavior of continuous concrete decks doubly reinforced with top and bottom glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars subjected to top surface fire. A finite element (FE) model is developed and a detailed transient thermal analysis is performed on a continuous concrete bridge deck under the effect of various fire curves. A parametric study is performed to examine the top cover thickness and the critical fire exposure curve needed to fully degrade the top GFRP bars while achieving certain fire ratings for the deck considered. Accordingly, design tables are prepared for each fire curve to guide the engineer to properly size the top concrete cover and maintain the temperature in the GFRP bars below critical design values in order to control the full top GFRP degradation. It is notable to indicate that degradation of top GFRP bars do not pose a collapse hazard but rather a serviceability concern since cracks in the negative moment region widen resulting in simply supported spans.

  13. Thermal analysis of GFRP-reinforced continuous concrete decks subjected to top fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawileh, Rami A.; Rasheed, Hayder A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical study that investigates the behavior of continuous concrete decks doubly reinforced with top and bottom glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars subjected to top surface fire. A finite element (FE) model is developed and a detailed transient thermal analysis is performed on a continuous concrete bridge deck under the effect of various fire curves. A parametric study is performed to examine the top cover thickness and the critical fire exposure curve needed to fully degrade the top GFRP bars while achieving certain fire ratings for the deck considered. Accordingly, design tables are prepared for each fire curve to guide the engineer to properly size the top concrete cover and maintain the temperature in the GFRP bars below critical design values in order to control the full top GFRP degradation. It is notable to indicate that degradation of top GFRP bars do not pose a collapse hazard but rather a serviceability concern since cracks in the negative moment region widen resulting in simply supported spans.

  14. Physical vulnerability of reinforced concrete buildings impacted by snow avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bertrand

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the assessment of physical vulnerability of civil engineering structures to snow avalanche loadings. In this case, the vulnerability of the element at risk is defined by its damage level expressed on a scale from 0 (no damage to 1 (total destruction. The vulnerability of a building depends on its structure and flow features (geometry, mechanical properties, type of avalanche, topography, etc.. This makes it difficult to obtain vulnerability relations. Most existing vulnerability relations have been built from field observations. This approach suffers from the scarcity of well documented events. Moreover, the back analysis is based on both rough descriptions of the avalanche and the structure. To overcome this problem, numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures loaded by snow avalanches are carried out. Numerical simulations allow to study, in controlled conditions, the structure behavior under snow avalanche loading. The structure is modeled in 3-D by the finite element method (FEM. The elasto-plasticity framework is used to represent the mechanical behavior of both materials (concrete and steel bars and the transient feature of the avalanche loading is taken into account in the simulation. Considering a reference structure, several simulation campaigns are conducted in order to assess its snow avalanches vulnerability. Thus, a damage index is defined and is based on global and local parameters of the structure. The influence of the geometrical features of the structure, the compressive strength of the concrete, the density of steel inside the composite material and the maximum impact pressure on the damage index are studied and analyzed. These simulations allow establishing the vulnerability as a function of the impact pressure and the structure features. The derived vulnerability functions could be used for risk analysis in a snow avalanche context.

  15. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat...

  16. Multiple corrosion protection systems for reinforced concrete bridge components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Eleven systems combining epoxy-coated reinforcement with another corrosion protection system are evaluated using : the rapid macrocell, Southern Exposure, cracked beam, and linear polarization resistance tests. The systems include : bars that are pre...

  17. Ambient Vibration Test on Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Nurul Shazwin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to determine dynamic characteristic of reinforced concrete (RC bridges by using ambient vibration test (AVT. The ambient vibration sources on bridges may come from traffic, wind, wave motion and seismic events. AVT describes the dynamic characteristics of the bridge and ground by measuring the natural frequencies using highly sensitive seismometer sensor. This test is beneficial due to light weight equipment and smaller number of operator required, cheap and easy to be handled. It is able to give a true picture of the bridge dynamic behavior without any artificial force excitation when vibration data is recorded. A three-span reinforced concrete bridge located in Sri Medan, Batu Pahat, Johor was measured by using microtremor equipment consist of three units of 1 Hz eigenfrequency passive sensors used in this test was performed in normal operating condition without excitation required from any active sources or short period noise perturbations. Ten measurements were conducted on the bridge deck and ten measurements on the ground surface in order to identify the natural frequencies of the bridge. Several peak frequencies were identified from three components of Fourier Amplitude Spectra (FAS in transverse (North-South, longitudinal (East-West and vertical (Up-Down direction as well as squared average Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR of ground response, computed by using Geopsy software. From the result, it was expected the bridge have five vibration modes frequencies in the range of 1.0 Hz and 7.0 Hz with the first two modes in the transverse and longitudinal direction having a frequency 1.0 Hz, the third mode is 2.2 Hz in transverse direction, fourth and fifth mode is 5.8 Hz and 7.0 Hz. For ground natural frequencies are in range 1.0 Hz to 1.3 Hz for North-South direction and 1.0 Hz to 1.6 Hz for East-West direction. Finally the results are compared with several empirical formulas for simple

  18. Structural Applications of Fibre Reinforced Concrete in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutková, A.; Broukalová, I.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents improvement of function and performance of the precast structural members by using fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) instead of ordinary reinforced concrete and attempts to transfer innovative technologies from laboratory in academic sphere into real industrial production which is cost-effective and brings about savings of labour and material. Three examples of successful technology transfer are shown - application of FRC in an element without common rebar reinforcement, in the element with steel rebar reinforcement and SFRC pre-tensioned structural element. Benefits of FRC utilization are discussed.

  19. TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTALLATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR SLABS LIGHTENED BY CORE DRIVERS WITH PRELIMINARY REINFORCEMENT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents technology for installation of floor slabs lightened by plastic core drivers which are preliminary stressed under construction conditions.  Efficiency of such constructive solution is justified by the action of preliminary concrete compression in the tensile zone while reducing structure dead weight due to void arrangement.  The paper provides classification of systems for preliminary stress and contains recommendations on selection of the system depending on peculiariar features of the designed construction.  Main products and materials required for execution of works , requirements to stressed wire rope reinforcement, its main characteristics have been considered in the paper.Principal diagram of the lightened preliminary stressed slab stipulates arrangement of so called  dummy caisson. Strands of reinforcement ropes are located within the framework of bars passing over supporting structures (over vertical bearing structures of  the framework and voids are formed in the cells between bars by laying hollow plastic items joined together by a cage. The paper presents technological sequence of operations required for arrangement of the lightened preliminary stressed slab, schemes for equipment arrangement and characteristics of the applied devices and units (pushing device for reinforcement ropes, hydraulic jack with delivery hydraulic pump, mixing station, injection pump and others.  Recommendations have been given for execution of works in cold weather. The paper considers problems pertaining to control quality of the materials and items which are supplied to a construction site and directly execution of works on preliminary stress of a cellular slab.The executed analysis of technology permits to conclude that it is characterized by high level of applicability for import substitution. It is necessary to consider the possibility to apply the technology at objects of various application while comparing it with other

  20. Optimal Material Layout - Applied on Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dollerup, Niels; Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a general, finite-element-based optimisation tool for improving the material layout of concrete structures. The application presented is general and exemplified by material optimisation of reinforced concrete slabs. By utilising the optimisation tool, it is possible to deter......This paper introduces a general, finite-element-based optimisation tool for improving the material layout of concrete structures. The application presented is general and exemplified by material optimisation of reinforced concrete slabs. By utilising the optimisation tool, it is possible...... to determine the optimal material layout of a slab in the ultimate load state, based on simple inputs such as outer geometry, boundary conditions, multiple load cases and design domains. The material layout of the optimal design can either be fully orthotropic or isotropic, or a combination with a predefined......, a number of reinforced concrete slab examples validate the method described and show the potential of saving large amounts of material in constructions....

  1. Behavior of reinforced concrete short columns exposed to fire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamed Bikhiet, M; El-Shafey, Nasser F; El-Hashimy, Hany M

    2014-01-01

    Fire could dramatically reduce strength of reinforced concrete columns. The objective of this work is to study columns exposed to fire under axial load and to evaluate reduction in column compressive capacity after fire...

  2. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  3. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of various concrete reinforcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Vermont Agency of Transportation undertook a simple experiment to determine the corrosion : resistance ability of various reinforcing steels (rebar) that may be used in bridges and other concrete : structures. Eight types of rebar were used in th...

  4. Behavior of concrete specimens reinforced with composite materials : laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the interaction between FRP composite and concrete by addressing the most important : variables in terms of FRP (fiber reinforced polymer) properties. Type of fibers, thickness of the laminates, fib...

  5. Evaluation of continuously reinforced concrete pavement : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    This report provides a review of the performance and structural characteristic exhibited on five continuously reinforced concrete pavement projects in the State of Louisiana. The performance characteristics were evaluated by means of the Mays Ride Me...

  6. Experimental Study on Voided Reinforced Concrete Beams with Polythene Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaneshan, P.; Harishankar, S.

    2017-07-01

    The primary component in any structure is concrete, that exist in buildings and bridges. In present situation, a serious problems faced by construction industry is exhaustive use of raw materials. Recent times, various methods are being adopted to limit the use of concrete. In structural elements like beams, polythene balls can be induced to reduce the usage of concrete. A simply supported reinforced concrete beam has two zones, one above neutral axis and other below neutral axis. The region below neutral axis is in tension and above neutral axis is in compression. As concrete is weak in tension, steel reinforcements are provided in tension zone. The concrete below the neutral axis acts as a stress transfer medium between the compression zone and tension zone. The concrete above the neutral axis takes minimum stress so that we could partially replace the concrete above neutral axis by creating air voids using recycled polythene balls. Polythene balls of varying diameters of 75 mm, 65 mm and 35 mm were partially replaced in compression zone. Hence the usage of concrete in beams and self-weight of the beams got reduced considerably. The Load carrying capacity, Deflection of beams and crack patterns were studied and compared with conventional reinforced concrete beams.

  7. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  8. Numerical simulation of the throwing power of cathodic prevention applied to marine reinforced concrete piles by means of sacrificial anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Luca; Redaelli, Elena [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' G. Natta' , Via Mancinelli, 7, 20131 Milan (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    The paper deals with the determination of current and potential distribution in reinforced concrete elements partially submerged in seawater aimed at predicting the throwing power of cathodic prevention applied by means of sacrificial anodes. Previous laboratory studies carried out on reinforced concrete columns 15 cm x 15 cm x 120 cm showed that the use of sacrificial anodes placed in the solution at the bottom of the column could provide protection of corroding steel bars in the emerged part of the pile up to about 60 cm from the water level. However, if sacrificial anodes were applied when the concrete was chloride free and steel bars were still passive, even the highest bar, placed at 1 m from the level of water, was protected. This is due to the higher polarizability of passive steel, that makes the throwing power of cathodic prevention higher compared to that of cathodic protection. In order to extend the results obtained on small-scale specimens to elements of higher dimensions, numerical simulations of current and potential distribution were carried out. Two-dimensional models were set up of reinforced concrete piles containing steel bars at different heights protected with sacrificial anodes placed in the water in which they were partially submerged. Boundary conditions describing the electrochemical behaviour of bars were obtained from polarisation curves measured on the previously mentioned columns. Values of concrete conductivity at different heights from the water level were also obtained from those tests. Several cases were considered, representative of conditions differing in electrochemical behaviour of steel bars, dimensions of element, position of sacrificial anodes. The paper discusses the results obtained from the models and compares them in terms of the throwing power that can be reached by using sacrificial anodes immersed in the seawater to protect reinforcing steel bars in the emerged part of a pile. (authors)

  9. Experimental analysis of reinforcing columns of reinforced concrete, with anchor steel bolts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. MESQUITA

    Full Text Available Abstract This article presents a columns reinforcement experimental study, with the use of anchor steel bolts and fill with self-compacting concrete. Were tested five columns of reinforced concrete subjected to flexion-compression: two columns were used as reference, and a cross-section equal to 120 x 250 mm; with a monolithic section equal to 155 x 250 mm cross section of the same reinforced columns and three which were initially molded with a 120 x 250 mm section and subsequently received a layer of 35 mm thick self-compacting concrete in the compressed side. Despite the studs do not present break, there was peeling of the reinforcement layer. The results indicate the possibility of using this method in reinforcing structural rehabilitation of reinforced concrete columns, with increase in load capacity on average equal to 403% in relation to the column reference.

  10. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  11. Calculation of load-bearing capacity of prestressed reinforced concrete trusses by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Vladimir; Golovanov, Roman; Aidemirov, Kurban

    2017-10-01

    The technique of calculation of prestressed reinforced concrete trusses with taking into account geometrical and physical nonlinearity is considered. As a tool for solving the problem, the finite element method has been chosen. Basic design equations and methods for their solution are given. It is assumed that there are both a prestressed and nonprestressed reinforcement in the bars of the trusses. The prestress is modeled by setting the temperature effect on the reinforcement. The ways of taking into account the physical and geometrical nonlinearity for bars of reinforced concrete trusses are considered. An example of the analysis of a flat truss is given and the behavior of the truss on various stages of its loading up to destruction is analyzed. A program for the analysis of flat and spatial concrete trusses taking into account the nonlinear deformation is developed. The program is adapted to the computational complex PRINS. As a part of this complex it is available to a wide range of engineering, scientific and technical workers

  12. Buckling Load of Reinforced Concrete Frames in Fire Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bajc, Urška

    2015-01-01

    In the dissertation a failure scenarios of reinforced concrete columns in fire and for the scenarios suitable calculating procedure for determination of fire load capacity are introduced. The calculating procedures are numerical and, where is possible, semi-analytical as well. In the end all partial calculating procedures are combined in a global algorithm for determining the fire load capacity of reinforced concrete column. The main novelties of the global algorithm are, that we ...

  13. Reinforcement of the concrete base slab of the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 05: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 07: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 09: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 10: UX15 cavern, view into PX14 shaft above. Photo 12: UX15 cavern, temporary access platform of RB16 tunnel. Photo 15: UJ17 chamber, invert excavation.

  14. The Use of the Fiberglass at the Reinforced Concrete Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Corobceanu, Vladimir; Giuşcă, Răzvan

    2005-01-01

    The main constituent of the reinforced fiberglass concrete are: the glass fibers, the binder, the sand and the water. In order to change certain characteristics there can be used different types of additives of fillers. The fiberglass is used in the shape of beams and cords having the lengths comprised between 12 and 15 mm; the cutting is realized with different devices, which are designed, built and used by variant firms. The reinforced fiberglass concretes use the following binders: hydraul...

  15. Numerical approach of the bond stress behavior of steel bars embedded in self-compacting concrete and in ordinary concrete using beam models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Almeida Filho

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the bond behavior between steel bars and concrete by means of a numerical analysis based on Finite Element Method. Results of a previously conducted experimental program on reinforced concrete beams subjected to monotonic loading are also presented. Two concrete types, self-compacting concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered in the study. Non-linear constitutive relations were used to represent concrete and steel in the proposed numerical model, aiming to reproduce the bond behavior observed in the tests. Experimental analysis showed similar results for the bond resistances of self-compacting and ordinary concrete, with self-compacting concrete presenting a better performance in some cases. The results given by the numerical modeling showed a good agreement with the tests for both types of concrete, especially in the pre-peak branch of the load vs. slip and load vs. displacement curves. As a consequence, the proposed numerical model could be used to estimate a reliable development length, allowing a possible reduction of the structure costs.

  16. A numerical model for self-compacting concrete flow through reinforced sections. A porous medium analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilic, Ksenija

    2016-05-01

    This thesis addresses numerical simulations of self-compacting concrete (SCC) castings and suggests a novel modelling approach that treats reinforcement zones in a formwork as porous media. As a relatively new field in concrete technology, numerical simulations of fresh concrete flow can be a promising aid to optimise casting processes and to avoid on-site casting incidents by predicting the flow behaviour of concrete during the casting process. The simulations of fresh concrete flow generally involve complex mathematical modelling and time-consuming computations. In case of a casting prediction, the simulation time is additionally significantly increased because each reinforcement bar occurring in succession has to be considered one by one. This is particularly problematic when simulating SCC casting, since this type of concrete is typically used for heavily reinforced structural members. However, the wide use of numerical tools for casting prediction in practice is possible only if the tools are user-friendly and simulations are time-saving. In order to shorten simulation time and to come closer to a practical tool for casting prediction, instead to model steel bars one by one, this thesis suggests to model zones with arrays of steel bars as porous media. Consequently, one models the flow of SCC through a reinforcement zone as a free-surface flow of a non-Newtonian fluid, propagating through the medium. By defining characteristic parameters of the porous medium, the influence on the flow and the changed (apparent) behaviour of concrete in the porous matrix can be predicted. This enables modelling of any reinforcement network as a porous zone and thus significantly simplifies and fastens simulations of reinforced components' castings. Within the thesis, a computational model for SCC flow through reinforced sections was developed. This model couples a fluid dynamics model for fresh concrete and the macroscopic approach for the influence of the porous medium

  17. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research...... on the shear strength of such connections can be found in the literature, this type of connection is increasingly being used because wire ropes are much more construction-friendly than traditional U-bars. A rigid plastic upper bound model for the shear strength of wall connections reinforced with looped wire...

  18. Modelling of the Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Stochastic modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is addressed in this paper on basis of a detailed modelling of corrosion initiation and corrosion cracking. It is proposed that modelling of the deterioration of concrete should be based on a sound understanding...

  19. Rotation capacity of self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.

    2006-01-01

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) has been used in segmental tunnel linings in the past years. In order to investigate the effect of steel fibers on the rotation capacity of plastic hinges in self-compacting concrete (SCC) the effect of the addition of fibers to SCC in compression, tension and

  20. Corrosion protection of reinforcement by hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Vries, H. de

    1999-01-01

    Penetration of de-icing salts into concrete bridge decks may cause corrosion of reinforcement. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete was studied as additional protection. It was shown that hydrophobic treatment strongly reduces chloride ingress, during semi-permanent contact and in wetting/drying

  1. Recent development in blast performance of fiber-reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, R.; Foglar, M.; Kohoutkova, A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents an overview of the recent development in blast performance of fiber reinforced concrete. The paper builds on more than ten years’ history of the research in this field by the team of the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague.

  2. Optimising of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Mix Design | Beddar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the incorporation of fibres into plain concrete disrupts the granular skeleton and very quickly causes problems of mixing as a result of the loss of mixture workability that will be translated into a difficult concrete casting in site. This study was concerned on the one hand with optimising the fibres in reinforced ...

  3. Diagonal Cracking and Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping

    1997-01-01

    The shear failure of non-shear-reinforced concrete beams with normal shear span ratios is observed to be governed in general by the formation of a critical diagonal crack. Under the hypothesis that the cracking of concrete introduces potential yield lines which may be more dangerous than the ones...

  4. Reinforcement of concrete structures by fiberglass rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdeeva Arina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduced conducted experiments to determine the basic characteristics of composite reinforcement fiberglass reinforcement on the example of the same diameter, but with a different number of rovings. We have established strength along the reinforcing fiber and the corresponding class of the steel reinforcement.

  5. DEFLECTION CALCULATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLEXURAL ELEMENTS WITH THE TOP LAYER MADE OF HIGH QUALITY CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potapov Yuriy Borisovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main requirements to the operational integrity of reinforced concrete flexural elements is nonexeedance of the deflection limits at the assumed load. It is possible to provide the given requirement using different methods, one of which is the production of a sandwich construction of the concretes with different strength. The article presents the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the deflection of reinforced concrete beams with the top layer made of high-quality concrete, with different percentage and strength of longitudinal tensile reinforcement without prestressing. The study of different methods of calculating the curvature of reinforced concrete beams is carried out and the recommendations on calculating the deflections of such elements are made. The use of high quality concrete in the compression area of flexural elements allows reducing the deflections. The theoretical deflections of beams produced of the B60 class concrete are 15…20 % more than the deflections of the proposed composite sections in case of equal bearing capacity. The authors proposed a formula to calculate the bending of reinforced concrete flexural members with the top layer made of high-quality concrete in the compressed area.

  6. Combined Effects of Curing Temperatures and Alkaline Concrete on Tensile Properties of GFRP Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-rui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of studies have been conducted on the tensile properties of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under different environments. However, most of these studies have been experimentally based on the environmental immersion test after standard-curing and the lack of influence on the tensile properties of GFRP bars embedded in concrete during the curing process of concrete. This paper presents the results of the microscopic structures through scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and tensile properties of GFRP bars, which were employed to investigate the combined effects of curing temperatures and alkaline concrete on tensile properties of GFRP bars. The results showed that the higher curing temperature aggravated the influence of the alkaline concrete environment on GFRP bars but did not change the mechanisms of mechanical degradation of the GFRP bars. The influence of different curing temperatures on the tensile strength of GFRP bars was different between the bare bar and bars in concrete. Finally, the exponential correlation equation of two different test methods was established, and the attenuation ratio of the tensile strength of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under different curing temperatures was predicted by the bare test.

  7. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened in bending with carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. VIEIRA

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP has been widely used for the reinforcement of concrete structures due to its practicality and versatility in application, low weight, high tensile strength and corrosion resistance. Some construction companies use CFRP in flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams, but without anchor systems. Therefore, the aim of this study is analyze, through an experimental program, the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams flexural strengthened by CFRP without anchor fibers, varying steel reinforcement and the amount of carbon fibers reinforcement layers. Thus, two groups of reinforced concrete beams were produced with the same geometric feature but with different steel reinforcement. Each group had five beams: one that is not reinforced with CFRP (reference and other reinforced with two, three, four and five layers of carbon fibers. Beams were designed using a computational routine developed in MAPLE software and subsequently tested in 4-point points flexural test up to collapse. Experimental tests have confirmed the effectiveness of the reinforcement, ratifying that beams collapse at higher loads and lower deformation as the amount of fibers in the reinforcing layers increased. However, the increase in the number of layers did not provide a significant increase in the performance of strengthened beams, indicating that it was not possible to take full advantage of strengthening applied due to the occurrence of premature failure mode in the strengthened beams for pullout of the cover that could have been avoided through the use of a suitable anchoring system for CFRP.

  8. Seismic Behaviour of Composite Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boita, Ioana-Emanuela; Dan, Daniel; Stoian, Valeriu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper is presented an experimental study conducted at the “Politehnica” University of Timisoara, Romania. This study provides results from a comprehensive experimental investigation on the behaviour of composite steel fibre reinforced concrete shear walls (CSFRCW) with partially or totally encased profiles. Two experimental composite steel fibre reinforced concrete walls (CSFRCW) and, as a reference specimen, a typical reinforced concrete shear wall (RCW), (without structural reinforcement), were fabricated and tested under constant vertical load and quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loads, in displacement control. The tests were performed until failure. The tested specimens were designed as 1:3 scale steel-concrete composite elements, representing a three storeys and one bay element from the base of a lateral resisting system made by shear walls. Configuration/arrangement of steel profiles in cross section were varied within the specimens. The main objective of this research consisted in identifying innovative solutions for composite steel-concrete shear walls with enhanced performance, as steel fibre reinforced concrete which was used in order to replace traditional reinforced concrete. A first conclusion was that replacing traditional reinforcement with steel fibre changes the failure mode of the elements, as from a flexural mode, in case of element RCW, to a shear failure mode for CSFRCW. The maximum lateral force had almost similar values but test results indicated an improvement in cracking response, and a decrease in ductility. The addition of steel fibres in the concrete mixture can lead to an increase of the initial cracking force, and can change the sudden opening of a crack in a more stable process.

  9. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  10. Engineered cementitious composites for strengthening masonry infilled reinforced concrete frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Ayoub; Nateghi-Alahi, Fariborz; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The results of the second part of a comprehensive experimental program, aimed at investigating the behavior of masonry infilled reinforced concrete (RC) frames strengthened with fiber reinforced engineered cementitious composites (ECC) used as an overlay on the masonry wall, are presented...... and energy absorption capacity of the infilled frame, prevent brittle failure modes in the infill wall, and provide a reasonable system overstrength....

  11. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The report deals with the shear strength of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete beams without shear reinforcement. Solutions for a number of beams with different load and support conditions have been derived by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin- Ping Zhang.This model...

  12. Experiment and calculation of reinforced concrete at elevated temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhenhai

    2011-01-01

    Concrete as a construction material goes through both physical and chemical changes under extreme elevated temperatures. As one of the most widely used building materials, it is important that both engineers and architects are able to understand and predict its behavior in under extreme heat conditions. Brief and readable, this book provides the tools and techniques to properly analysis the effects of high temperature of reinforced concrete which will lead to more stable, safer structures. Based on years of the author's research, Reinforced Concrete at Elevated Temperatures four par

  13. Optimization Design and Application of Underground Reinforced Concrete Bifurcation Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground reinforced concrete bifurcation pipe is an important part of conveyance structure. During construction, the workload of excavation and concrete pouring can be significantly decreased according to optimized pipe structure, and the engineering quality can be improved. This paper presents an optimization mathematical model of underground reinforced concrete bifurcation pipe structure according to real working status of several common pipe structures from real cases. Then, an optimization design system was developed based on Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm. Furthermore, take the bifurcation pipe of one hydropower station as an example: optimization analysis was conducted, and accuracy and stability of the optimization design system were verified successfully.

  14. Study of the internal confinement of concrete reinforced (in civil engineering) with woven reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, M.; Goumairi, O.; El Malik, A.

    2017-10-01

    Concrete is generally the most used material in the field of construction. Despite its extensive use in structures, it represents some drawbacks related to its properties including its low tensile strength and low ductility. To solve this problem, the use of steel reinforcement in concrete structures is possible. Another possibility is the introduction of different types of continuous fibre / staple in the concrete, such as steel fibres or synthetic fibres, to obtain ″Concretes bundles″. Many types of fibre concrete, which have been developed and for many of them, the gain provided by the fibre was rather low and no significant improvement in tensile strength was really reaching. By cons, the ductility was higher than that of ordinary concrete. The objective of this study is to examine concrete reinforcement by inserting reinforcements woven polyester. These are either woven bidirectional (2D) or three-dimensional woven (3D). So we will report the properties of each type of reinforcement and the influence of the method of weaving on the strength reinforcements and on the strength of concrete in which they are incorporated. Such influence should contribute to improving the sustainability and enhancement of reinforcement

  15. Studies on connecting structure between steel shell and steel reinforced concrete; Kokaku to tekkotsu tekkin concrete tono ketsugo kozo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Morikawa, H.; Ito, N. [Metropolitan Expressway Public Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-15

    On the insert reinforcing bar structure for the connecting part of the main tower of cable stayed bridges, this paper reports verification results on a load resistant safety with a full-scale model, structure analysis and construction work. The basic structure was composed of a drilled steel shell, inserted reinforcing bars, fixing structure of bars in lining concrete of the shell and a pressure bearing plate. As an experimental result, the connecting part had a sufficient load carrying capacity against both tensile and compressive loads. The shear stress of the insert reinforcing bar structure was estimated successfully under von Mises`s condition. The shear spring constant in deformation characteristics was linearly proportional to an inserted reinforcing bar ratio. In earthquake, nearly 60% of an allowable compressive load was transferred to concrete through the pressure bearing plate. The analytical results of load resistant deformation characteristics of the connecting part well agreed with experimental ones, and the proposed analytical model was applicable to estimation of a dynamic behavior. 5 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Study on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongqing; Wu, Min; Jie, Pengyu

    2017-12-01

    Several common high elastic modulus fibers (steel fibers, basalt fibers, polyvinyl alcohol fibers) and low elastic modulus fibers (polypropylene fiber) are incorporated into the concrete, and its cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength are studied. The test result and analysis demonstrate that single fiber and hybrid fiber will improve the integrity of the concrete at failure. The mechanical properties of hybrid steel fiber-polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete are excellent, and the cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength respectively increase than plain concrete by 6.4%, 3.7%, 11.4%. Doped single basalt fiber or polypropylene fiber and basalt fibers hybrid has little effect on the mechanical properties of concrete. Polyvinyl alcohol fiber and polypropylene fiber hybrid exhibit ‘negative confounding effect’ on concrete, its splitting tensile and flexural strength respectively are reduced by 17.8% and 12.9% than the single-doped polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete.

  17. Service-life prediction of reinforced concrete structures in subsurface environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jung; Jung, Hae Ryong; Park, Joo Wan [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This paper focuses on the estimation of durability and service-life of reinforced concrete structures in Wolsong Low- and intermediate-level wastes Disposal Center (WLDC) in Korea. There are six disposal silos located in the saturated environment. The silo concrete is degraded due to reactions with groundwater and chemical attacks, and finally it will lose its properties as a transport barrier. The infiltration of sulfate and magnesium, leaching of potassium hydroxide, and chlorine induced corrosion are the most significant factors for degradation of reinforced concrete structure in underground environment. From the result of evaluation of the degradation time for each factor, the degradation rate of the reinforced concrete due to sulfate and magnesium is 1.308×10{sup -3} cm/yr, and it is estimated to take 48,000 years for full degradation while potassium hydroxide is leached in depth of less than 1.5 cm at 1,000 years after the initiation of degradation. In case of chlorine induced corrosion, it takes 1,648 years to initiate corrosion in the main reinforced bar and 2,288 years to reach the lifetime limit of the structural integrity, and thus it is evaluated as the most significant factor.

  18. Modelling of the fracture toughness anisotropy in fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tarasovs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced concrete is potentially very promising material with unique properties, which currently is widely used in some applications, such as floors and concrete pavements. However, lack of robust and reliable models of fiber reinforced concrete fracture limits its application as structural material. In this work a numerical model is proposed for predicting the crack growth in fiber reinforced concrete. The mixing of the steel fibers with the concrete usually creates nonuniform fibers distribution with more fibers oriented in horizontal direction, than in vertical. Simple numerical models of fiber reinforced concrete require a priori knowledge of the crack growth direction in order to take into account bridging action of the fibers, which depends on the fibers orientation. In proposed model user defined elements are used to calculate the bridging force during the course of the analysis when the crack starts to grow. Cohesive elements were used to model the crack propagation in the concrete matrix. In cohesive zone model the cohesive elements are embedded between all solid elements to simulate the arbitrary crack path. The bridging effect of the fibers are modeled as nonlinear springs, where the stiffness of the springs is defined from experimentally measured pull-out force and the angle between the fiber and crack opening direction.

  19. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORM/SORM-analysis....

  20. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Svend; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a 1reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORMISORM-analysis....

  1. Performance of Hydrophobisation Techniques in Case of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyński, Tomasz; Osesek, Mateusz; Gwozdowski, Błażej; Ilski, Mirosław

    2017-10-01

    Concrete is, unchangeably, one of the most frequently applied building materials, also in the case of bridges, overpasses or viaducts. Along with the aging of such structures, the degradation of concrete, which may accelerate the corrosion of reinforcing steel and drastically decrease the load-bearing capacity of the structure, becomes an important issue. The paper analyzes the possibilities of using deep hydrophobisation in repairing reinforced concrete engineering structures. The benefits of properly securing reinforced concrete structures from the damaging effects of UV radiation, the influence of harmful gases, or progression of chlorine induced corrosion have been presented, especially in regards to bridge structures. The need to calculate the costs of carrying out investments along with the expected costs of maintaining such structures, as well as the high share of costs connected with logistics, has also been indicated in the total costs of repair works.

  2. Study of reinforcement corrosion in expanded clay concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Uglyanitsa

    2015-12-01

    The results of the studies conducted are the recommended design and technological measures for the reinforcement protection against corrosion in various fine aggregate-based (natural sand, ash and dry hydroremoval light-weight expanded clay concrete. Thus, the minimum concrete protective cover for main and distribution reinforcement of external walls must be at least 25 mm. It is necessary to inject additives – reinforcement corrosion inhibitors (sodium nitrite, sodium tetraborate to the concrete composition. The consumption of cement, and hence, the cement paste content of concrete mixture must be not lower than 220 kg/m3, and under the application of the active dry fly ash removal −200 kg/m3.

  3. Structural Behaviors of Reinforced Concrete Piers Rehabilitated with FRP Wraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsuk Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP wraps to retrofit and strengthen existing structures such as reinforced concrete piers is becoming popular due to the higher tensile strength, durability, and flexibility gained and the method’s ease of handling and low installation and maintenance costs. As yet, however, few guidelines have been developed for determining the optimum thicknesses of the FRP wraps applied to external surfaces of concrete or masonry structures. In this study, nonlinear pushover finite element analyses were utilized to analyze the complex structural behaviors of FRP-wrapped reinforced rectangular piers. Design parameters such as pier section sizes, pier heights, pier cap lengths, compressive strengths of concrete, and the thicknesses of the FRP wraps used were thoroughly tested under incremental lateral and vertical loads. The results provide useful guidelines for analyzing and designing appropriate FRP wraps for existing concrete piers.

  4. Effect of the loading rate on fibre reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, K. P.; Schaul, P.; Nagy, L.

    2017-09-01

    Fibre reinforced concrete has become a widely used material since the end of the 20th century. The uniformly distributed steel or macro synthetic fibres in the concrete structures can give the concrete a residual flexural strength after the first cracks. The different behaviour of materials subjected to different loading rates is a well-known phenomenon, both with steel, synthetic and concrete materials. Standards usually present a recommendation for the loading speed in for different tests. Concrete elements show higher performance due to the high speed of loading or impact loads, their fracture energy and therefore their overall capacity appears greater than the specimens loaded at standard speeds. Fibre reinforced concrete structures are widely used in tramlines and railways, where the speed of the loading is high and therefore of impact by nature. It is important to know what the effect of this high speed loading is for fibre reinforced concrete structures: do these structures have additional capacity, or has the designer overestimated their performance? This article will present an investigation into the effect of the loading rate on case of using fibres with different materials in concrete beams.

  5. Finite Element Reliability Analysis of Chloride Ingress into Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of the reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in maintenance and repair actions. Further, a reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. In the present paper the Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is employed...... for obtaining the probability of exceeding a critical chloride concentration level at the reinforcement bars, both using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) and the First Order Reliability Method (FORM). The chloride ingress is modelled by the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the diffusion coefficient, surface chloride...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modelled by stochastic fields, which are discretized using the Expansion Optimum Linear Estimation (EOLE) approach. The response gradients needed for FORM analysis are derived analytically using the Direct Differentiation Method (DDM). As an example, a bridge pier...

  6. Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Bărbuţă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer concrete is a composite material realized with resin and aggregates. In the present study the epoxy resin was used for binding the aggregates. In the composition were introduced near the fly ash, used as filler, the cellulose fibers. The mechanical characteristics such as compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength of polymer concrete with fibers were investigated. The fiber percentage was constant, the epoxy resin and the filler dosages were varied. The cellulose fiber had not improved the mechanical characteristics of the polymer concrete in comparison to that of polymer concrete without cellulose fibers.

  7. The Experimental Study on Concrete Permeability of Wireless Communication Module Embedded in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Park, Jung-Hoon; Yoon, Kwang-Won

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study is to investigate the capability of wireless communication of sensor node embedded in reinforced concrete structure with a basic experiment on electric wave permeability...

  8. Crack width analysis of steel fibers reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šahinagić-Isović Merima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced concrete in recent years has grown from experimental material to a practical usable material, due to its positive properties such as increased tensile strength, bending strength, toughness etc. However, still there are many unanswered questions that are the subject of many research. In this paper results and analysis of crack width of concrete beams with steel fibres are presented. This analysis considers influence of steel fibre addition on the crack width of reinforced concrete beams (dimensions 15/28/300 cm loaded up to fracture during short-term ultimate static load with one unloading cycle. Concrete beams were made of two types of concrete: ordinary strength concrete (OSC - C30/37 and high strength concrete (HSC - C60/70, with and without 0.45% of steel fibres. The results indicate that there is a significant influence of fibre addition on crack width, especially for ordinary concrete. At the end, empirical calculations of the concrete elements' crack width with steel fibres according to the recommendations of RILEM and ACI building code are given.

  9. Verification of the spar model of a reinforced concrete beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkrtychev Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the outcomes of the research aimed at the verification of the computational model simulating a reinforced concrete beam employing spar and 3D finite elements, with account taken of physical nonlinearity. Structural calculations involved in R&D and design effort must factor in non-linear structural behavior both of the material and of structural elements. In particular, this is valid for the analysis of special types of impact (seismic, accidental etc.. However, design models under development may incorporate significantly varying models of nonlinear materials as well as different kinds of finite elements, and both have to be verified. This article considers two models of a hinged (pinned beam. In the first case, the modeling was based on 3D elements for concrete and on spar elements for reinforcement using Euler-Lagrange coupling of finite elements belonging to concrete and reinforcement (three-dimensional model. The second case the simulation based on spar finite elements (spar model. Both the spar model and 3D model allow for non-linear nature of concrete and reinforcement. In case of concrete the material was set using the Continuous Surface Cap Model, while the reinforcement was modeled involving a bilinear diagram of material behavior.

  10. In-plane shear test of fibre reinforced concrete panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Stang, Henrik; Goltermann, Per

    2008-01-01

    The present paper concerns the investigation of polymer Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) panels subjected to in-plane shear. The use of fibers as primary reinforcement in panels is a new application of fiber reinforcement, hence test methods, design bases and models are lacking. This paper...... contributes to the investigation of fibers as reinforcement in panels with experimental results and a consistent approach to material characterization and modeling. The proposed model draws on elements from the classical yield line theory of rigid, perfectly plastic materials and the theory of fracture...

  11. Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-26

    low - . AFOSR-T... 84-0.165 DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF CONCRETE AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES FIRST ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT LAWRENCE E. 14ALVERN C. ALLEN ROSS...and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT I PERIOD COVERED DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF CONCRETE 1 DEC 1982 - 30 NOV 1983 AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES I_____198__-__0_NOV_198...Bar Dynamic Loads Fracture Materials Testing Dynamic Properties Impact Rate Effects Dynamic Testing Hopkinson Bar Reinforced Concrete Structures 20

  12. Near Surface Mounted Composites for Flexural Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing structural components require strengthening after a certain period of time due to increases in service loads, errors in design, mechanical damage, and the need to extend the service period. Externally-bonded reinforcement (EBR and near-surface mounted (NSM reinforcement are two preferred strengthening approach. This paper presents a NSM technique incorporating NSM composites, namely steel and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP bars, as reinforcement. Experimental and analytical studies carried out to explore the performance of reinforced concrete (RC members strengthened with the NSM composites. Analytical models were developed in predicting the maximum crack spacing and width, concrete cover separation failure loads, and deflection. A four-point bending test was applied on beams strengthened with different types and ratios of NSM reinforcement. The failure characteristics, yield, and ultimate capacities, deflection, strain, and cracking behavior of the beams were evaluated based on the experimental output. The test results indicate an increase in the cracking load of 69% and an increase in the ultimate load of 92% compared with the control beam. The predicted result from the analytical model shows good agreement with the experimental result, which ensures the competent implementation of the present NSM-steel and CFRP technique.

  13. Flexural Behaviour of Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Beams Made with Oil Palm Shell (OPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teo, Delsye C. L; Mannan, Md. Abdul; Kurian, John V

    2006-01-01

    .... The investigation revealed that the flexural behaviour of reinforced OPS concrete beams was comparable to that of other lightweight concretes and the experimental results compare reasonably well...

  14. Creep behaviour of macro glass fibre reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, P.; Heiden, B.; Holschemacher, K.

    2017-09-01

    This paper aims to present a creep study on structural concrete reinforced with macro glass fibres and wants to contribute to the understanding of creep behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete (FRC). Fibre reinforced concrete beams have been subjected to bending and tested in cracked state under defined stress levels. Therefore, a four-point-bending test setup was chosen and the creep period was 372d. The aim was to determine creep coefficients and to test residual strength values afterwards. Results show a dependence of residual strength and applied stress level. It turned out, that the beams failed due to tertiary creep at stress levels between 65 and 70% of residual crack load at 0.5 mm pre-crack deflection. Nevertheless, all remaining specimens showed increased loads after creep period. Finally, the evaluation is conducted in comparison to other fibre types.

  15. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    The main object of the research work presented in this paper is to establish design tools for concrete structures where main reinforcement is combined with addition of short discrete steel fibers. The work is concerned with calculating and measuring crack widths in structural elements subjected...... to bending load. Thus, the aim of the work is to enable engineers to calculate crack widths for flexural concrete members and analyze how different combinations of amounts of fibers and amounts of main reinforcement can meet a given maximum crack width requirement. A mathematical model including...... the ductility of the fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is set up and experimental work is conducted in order to verify the crack width model. The ductility of the FRC is taken into account by using the stress crack width relation. The constitutive model for the FRC is based on the idea that the initial part...

  16. Cost Effectiveness of Precast Reinforced Concrete Roof Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parskiy, N. D.; Molodtsov, M. V.; Molodtsova, V. E.

    2017-11-01

    Engineers always seek to free interior space from intermediate supporting elements. Nowadays plants, being at the forefront of technology, produce a new generation of exclusive patented prefabricated reinforced concrete elements with a high load-bearing capacity, excellent heat resistance characteristics combined with the aesthetics and beauty. It is a system of Seagull Gabbiano prestressed roof slabs for the spans of 12m - 40m. The article shows the advantages of the Seagull slabs over conventional precast reinforced concrete and metal roof trusses. It also gives the analysis of the technical and economic indices of design and construction of a building with the Seagull slabs depending on the size of spans to cover. The use of structural systems with increased spans allows for the modern buildings and structures of prefabricated reinforced concrete with enhanced functionality and aesthetics alongside with a wide range of planning solutions.

  17. Study on bonded slip of reinforced concrete based on extended finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hailin; Cui, Fubing; Zhu, Liangcai; Zheng, Zhiqiang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, for the tensile test of reinforced concrete specimens, the numerical simulation model is established to simulate the whole process of concrete specimen from crack generation and extension to final fracture based on the extended finite element method. Based on the numerical simulation results and the tensile test results of concrete specimens, the differences of the numerical simulation results with the bond slip relationship and those without the bond slip relationship are analysed. The results show that the numerical analysis results of bearing ratio of steel bar with bond slip relationship are close to those of the test, and its numerical analysis results of crack width are also closer to the measured values of the test. And there is great deviation between the numerical analysis results without bond slip relationship and the test results, at the same time, the feasibility of solving the continuous - discontinuous problem based on extended finite element method is verified.

  18. Shear Capacity of Steel and Polymer Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh-Poulsen, Jens C.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Goltermann, Per

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of a plasticity model for shear strength estimation of fibre reinforced concrete beams without stirrups. When using plastic theory to shear problems in structural concrete, the so-called effective strengths are introduced, usually determined by calibrating...... the plastic solutions with tests. This approach is, however, problematic when dealing with fibre reinforced concrete (FRC), as the effective strengths depend also on the type and the amount of fibres. In this paper, it is suggested that the effective tensile strength of FRC can be determined on the basis...... of the tensile stress-crack opening relationship found from wedge splitting tests. To determine the effective compressive strength of FRC, it is proposed to adopt the formula used for conventional concrete and modify it by introducing a fibre enhancement factor to describe the effect of fibres on the compressive...

  19. Blast impact behaviour of concrete with different fibre reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdlová, Martina; Čechmánek, René; Řídký, Radek

    2015-09-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the development of special concrete intended for the explosion resistance applications, with the emphasis on minimal secondary fragments formation at the explosion. The fine-grained concrete matrix has been reinforced by various types of short dispersed fibers (metallic, mineral and polymer) of different sizes and by their combination and the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the physico-mechanical properties and blast resistance was observed. The concrete prism specimens have been subjected to the determination of mechanical parameters (compressive and flexural strength at quasi-static load). The blast tests were conducted on the slab specimens prepared from selected mixtures. The material characteristics and explosion test data have been used for numerical investigation, which defined the optimal wall composition and dimensions of the concrete element which should resist the explosion defined by type, size, weight and placement of the blast. In the next step the test elements resistance was verified by real explosion test.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  1. Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marinela Bărbuţă; Maria Harja

    2008-01-01

    .... In the composition were introduced near the fly ash, used as filler, the cellulose fibers. The mechanical characteristics such as compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength of polymer concrete with fibers were investigated...

  2. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  3. Recycling an ultra high performance fiber-reinforced concrete

    OpenAIRE

    SEDRAN, T; Durand, C.

    2006-01-01

    A new generation of concrete has appeared few years ago : Ultra Hight Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC). They are characterized by a compressive strength higher than 150 MPa and a high volume of steel fibers providing them a noteworthy ductility. Their use is still marginal but the applications start to multiply. One thus attends the emergence of a new material whose recycling raises, at the first approach, two difficulties : its high resistance versus its demolition on one hand,...

  4. A general analytical approach for prestressed and non-prestressed concrete beam-columns reinforced with bonded and unbonded composites: (i) theory

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. RODRIGUEZ-GUTIÉRREZ; ARISTIZÁBAL-OCHOA, J. DARÍO

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method that determines the short and long-term response of prestressed and non-prestressed concrete beam-columns reinforced with any combination of FRP bars or/and plates, steel rebars, bonded and/or unbonded prestressed tendons is proposed. Beams and columns encased with FRP fabrics and FRP tubes filled with concrete are covered with the proposed model. The effects of tension stiffening, creep and shrinkage of the concrete, and the relaxation of the prestressed steel reinforcem...

  5. Cracked reinforced concrete walls of chimneys, silos and cooling towers as result of using formworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Marek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There are presented in this paper some problems connected with reinforced concrete shell objects operation in the aggressive environment and built in method of formworks. Reinforced concrete chimneys, cooling towers, silos and other shells were built for decades. Durability of cracked shells are one of the most important parameters during process of designing, construction and exploitation of shells. Some reasons of appearance of horizontal and vertical cracks as temperature, pressure of stored material, live loads e.g. dynamic character of wind, moisture, influence of construction joints, thermal insulation, chemistry active environmental etc. reduce the carrying capacity of the walls. Formworks, as is occurred recently, are the reason for technological joints with leaking connection, imperfections of flexible formworks slabs and as result can initiate cracks. Cracked surface of this constructions causes decreasing capacity and lower the state of reliability. Horizontal, vertical cracks can caused corrosion of concrete and steel bars, decreasing stiffness of contraction, increasing of deflection and carbonation of concrete cover. Local and global imperfactions of concrete shells are increasing according to greater number of cracks...

  6. Towards practical multiscale approach for analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyeda, Arturo; Fish, Jacob

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel multiscale approach for analysis of reinforced concrete structural elements that overcomes two major hurdles in utilization of multiscale technologies in practice: (1) coupling between material and structural scales due to consideration of large representative volume elements (RVE), and (2) computational complexity of solving complex nonlinear multiscale problems. The former is accomplished using a variant of computational continua framework that accounts for sizeable reinforced concrete RVEs by adjusting the location of quadrature points. The latter is accomplished by means of reduced order homogenization customized for structural elements. The proposed multiscale approach has been verified against direct numerical simulations and validated against experimental results.

  7. Anti-vibration characteristics of rubberised reinforced concrete beams

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, M; Al-Ghalib, A; Mohammad, FA

    2014-01-01

    The flexural and vibration properties were examined in order to evaluate the anti-vibration characteristics of rubber modified reinforced concrete beam. The rubberised mixtures were produced by replacing 5, 7.5, and 10 % by mass of the fine aggregate with 1–4 mm scrap truck tyre crumb rubber particles. A series of reinforced concrete beam (1,200 × 135 × 90 mm3) was tested in a free vibration mode and then subsequently in a four point flexural tests. The input and output signals from vibration...

  8. Monitoring of transverse displacement of reinforced concrete beams under flexural loading with embedded arrays of optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Tinoco, Juan E.; Gomez-Rosas, Enrique R.; Guzmán-Olguín, Héctor; Khotiaintsev, Sergei; Zuñiga-Bravo, Miguel A.

    2015-04-01

    We present results of an ongoing study of structural health monitoring of concrete elements by means of arrays of telecommunications-grade optical fibers embedded in such elements. In this work, we show a possibility of using this technique for monitoring the transverse displacement of the reinforced concrete beams under flexural loading. We embedded a number of multimode silica-core/polymer-clad/polymer-coated optical fibers in a mold with preinstalled reinforcing steel bars and fresh concrete mix. Then the concrete was compacted and cured. Some optical fibers were broken during the fabrication process. The fiber survival rate varied with concrete grade, compacting technique and optical fiber type. The fibers that survived the fabrication process were employed for the monitoring. They were connected to the optical transmitter and receiver that formed a part of a larger measurement system. The system continuously measured the optical transmission of all optical fibers while the reinforced concrete beams were subjected to incremental transverse loading. We observed a quasi-linear decrease in optical transmission in all optical fibers of the array vs. the applied load and respective flexural displacement. Although the underlying phenomena that lead to such a variation in optical transmission are not clear yet, the observed behavior might be of interest for assessing the transverse displacement of the reinforced concrete beams under flexural loading.

  9. Flexural Cracking Behavior Of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abdalkader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibers are added to concrete due to its ability to improve the tensile strength and control propagation of cracks in reinforced concrete members. Steel fiber reinforced concrete is made of cement fine water and coarse aggregate in addition to steel fibers. In this experimental work flexural cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams contains different percentage of hooked-end steel fibers with length of 50 mm and equivalent diameter of 0.5 mm was studied. The beams were tested under third-point loading test at 28 days. First cracking load maximum crack width cracks number and load-deflection relations were investigated to evaluate the flexural cracking behavior of concrete beams with 34 MPa target mean strength. Workability wet density compressive and splitting tensile strength were also investigated. The results showed that the flexural crack width is significantly reduced with the addition of steel fibers. Fiber contents of 1.0 resulted in 81 reduction in maximum crack width compared to control concrete without fiber. The results also showed that the first cracking load and maximum load are increased with the addition of steel fibers.

  10. Design of reinforced areas of concrete column using quadratic polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Gunadi, Tjiang; Parung, Herman; Rachman Djamaluddin, Abd; Arwin Amiruddin, A.

    2017-11-01

    Designing of reinforced concrete columns mostly carried out by a simple planning method which uses column interaction diagram. However, the application of this method is limited because it valids only for certain compressive strenght of the concrete and yield strength of the reinforcement. Thus, a more applicable method is still in need. Another method is the use of quadratic polynomials as a basis for the approach in designing reinforced concrete columns, where the ratio of neutral lines to the effective height of a cross section (ξ) if associated with ξ in the same cross-section with different reinforcement ratios is assumed to form a quadratic polynomial. This is identical to the basic principle used in the Simpson rule for numerical integral using quadratic polynomials and had a sufficiently accurate level of accuracy. The basis of this approach to be used both the normal force equilibrium and the moment equilibrium. The abscissa of the intersection of the two curves is the ratio that had been mentioned, since it fulfill both of the equilibrium. The application of this method is relatively more complicated than the existing method but provided with tables and graphs (N vs ξN ) and (M vs ξM ) so that its used could be simplified. The uniqueness of these tables are only distinguished based on the compresssive strength of the concrete, so in application it could be combined with various yield strenght of the reinforcement available in the market. This method could be solved by using programming languages such as Fortran.

  11. Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass-ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    surrounding concrete Steel Reinforcement BUILDING STRONG® Properties of Coating  Covers the reinforcement with an insulator  Does not delaminate...The enameled rebar can be manufactured using the conventional enamel application methods and modification of standard alkali-resistant porcelain

  12. Stochastic modeling of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2004-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... the reinforcement exceeds a critical threshold value. In the present paper a stochastic model is described by which the chloride content in a reinforced concrete structure can be estimated. The chloride ingress is modeled by a 2-dimensional diffusion process and the diffusion coefficient, surface chloride....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  13. Stochastic Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Structures Exposed to Chloride Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... the reinforcement exceeds a critical threshold value. In the present paper a stochastic model is described by which the chloride content in a reinforced concrete structure can be estimated. The chloride ingress is modeled by a 2-dimensional diffusion process and the diffusion coefficient, surface chloride....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  14. Evaluation of concrete inlay for continuously reinforced concrete pavement rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    In 1996, WisDOT constructed a concrete inlay test section on I43 in Manitowoc County. The existing pavement was CRCP constructed in 1978 and was badly deteriorated with punchouts. In the area of the 2777foot test section, the existing paveme...

  15. Crack Width Analysis of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Ulbinas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the effectiveness of steel fiber reinforcement in RC concrete members in regard to ordinary reinforcement. The advantages and disadvantages of different shapes of steel fibers are discussed. The algorithm for calculating crack width based on EC2 and Rilem methodologies is presented. A comparison of theoretical and experimental crack widths has been performed. The relative errors of crack width predictions at different load levels were defined.Article in Lithuanian

  16. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Ekman, Tom; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1999-01-01

    Durability studies are carried out by subjecting FRC-beams to combined mechanical and environmental load. Mechanical load is obtained by exposing beams to 4-point bending until a predefined crack width is reached, using a newly developed test setup. Exposure to a concentrated chloride solution is...... as main reinforcement. The effect of the cracks, the fibres and the concrete quality on the chloride penetration is studied....... is used as environmental load. The chloride penetration is characterized both qualitatively (UV-test) and quantitatively (chloride profile) and by microscopy. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities. Both steel fibres and polypropylene fibres are used in the concrete beams as well...

  17. An Incursion on Punching of Reinforced Concrete Flat Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Vasile Bompa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the early 60s continuous studies have been made regarding punching of concrete flat slabs. The evolution of technology and calculus systems influenced this engineering branch. Nowadays is possible to account in structural analysis all the non-linear behaviour of reinforced and prestressed concrete and to get the most close structural response in comparison with the real behaviour. As a controversy matter, several tests and theories have been developed. Nowadays researchers try to find the most accurate and economic formula for punching. This paper purpose is to make a survey on punching classical model and related nonlinear concrete behaviour regarded to this issue.

  18. Factors that influence the efficiency of electrochemical chloride extraction during corrosion mitigation in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE) is an electrochemical bridge restoration method for mitigating corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. ECE does this by moving chlorides away from the reinforcement and out of the concrete while simultan...

  19. Assessing the service life of corrosion-deteriorated reinforced concrete member highway bridges in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Corrosion of steel-reinforced concrete bridges is a serious problem facing the WVDOT. This : paper provides an overview of techniques for evaluating the condition of reinforced concrete : bridge elements; methods for modeling the remaining service li...

  20. Evaluation of long carbon fiber reinforced concrete to mitigate earthquake damage of infrastructure components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The proposed study involves investigating long carbon fiber reinforced concrete as a method of mitigating earthquake damage to : bridges and other infrastructure components. Long carbon fiber reinforced concrete has demonstrated significant resistanc...

  1. Relief of reinforcing congestion in beams and bent caps of concrete bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In order to determine how to resolve the issues involving steel congestion in reinforced concrete (RC) structures, three potential solutions to this problem were researched. In the first method, reinforced concrete (RC) was mixed with steel fibers. T...

  2. Lightweight Building Floors Using Precast Reinforced Concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The panels are designed based on loads of self-weight, partition wall, service and ceiling, screed and live load. The investigations have been focused on concrete usage, structural weight, and structural functions of both ultimate and service conditions. It has been observed that 'C-channels' are more economical and ...

  3. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  4. Ultimate deformation capacity of reinforced concrete slabs underblast load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Weerheijm, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a test method to determine the deformation capacity and the resistance-deformation curve of blast-loaded slabs is described. This method was developed at TNO-PML. The method has been used to determine the ultimate deformation capacity of some simply supported reinforced concrete slabs

  5. Comparison of two novel approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, F.K.F.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present two approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete. In both approaches, discrete fibre distributions and the behaviour of the fibre-matrix interface are explicitly considered. One approach employs the reaction forces from fibre to matrix while the other is based on the partition of unity

  6. Stereology of concrete reinforced with short steel fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical tests on steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) can only be interpreted on the basis of a structural analysis. Stereological tools are available for that purpose. Results of recent investigations will be presented, revealing quite complex characteristics of the fibre dispersion in the

  7. The Response of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Impulsive Loading,

    Science.gov (United States)

    A finite element method is presented to analyze the effects of airblast-induced ground shock on shallow-buried, flat-roofed, reinforced concrete ... structures . A finite element based on Timoshenko beam theory is adopted. Material properties are defined in terms of nonlinear stress-strain relations in

  8. Lateral Behavior of Partially Infilled Reinforced Concrete Frames ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many reinforced concrete constructions with such partial masonry infill face serious earthquake damages due to captive-column effect. In this study, an attempt was made to improve the performance of such structures by providing masonry inserts without completely closing the gap. Experimental investigations were ...

  9. Applicability Problem in Optimum Reinforced Concrete Structures Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashara Assedeq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum reinforced concrete structures design is very complex problem, not only considering exactness of calculus but also because of questionable applicability of existing methods in practice. This paper presents the main theoretical mathematical and physical features of the problem formulation as well as the review and analysis of existing methods and solutions considering their exactness and applicability.

  10. Fatigue life prediction of fiber reinforced concrete under flexural load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jun; Stang, Henrik; Li, Victor

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method to predict fatigue behavior in flexure of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) based on the equilibrium of force in the critical cracked section. The model relies on the cyclic bridging law, the so-called stress-crack width relationship under cyclic tensile...... load as the fundamental consitutive relationship in tension....

  11. Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structure at the Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structure at the Port of Dar es Salaam. I P Sanga, A M Dubi. Abstract. No Abstract. West Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science Vol. 5 (1) 2006: pp. 71-78. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  12. a review of the effects of wastewater on reinforced concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This paper reviews the degradation mechanism of wastewater on reinforced concrete structures with a view to finding what needs to be done to salvage these structures. Potential disintegrating agents in wastewater generated in Nigeria were identified and common degradation effects were examined. Regeneration ...

  13. Design of Ultra High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Michael S.; Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Damkilde, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Fiber Reinforced Concrete shell. The major challenge in the design phase has been securing sufficient stiffness of the structure while keeping the weight at a minimum. The weight/stiffness issue has been investigated by means of the finite element method, to optimize the structure regarding overall...

  14. Service Life and Maintenance Modelling of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Decks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Recent research in the area of assessment and maintenance of reinforced concrete bridge decks is presented in this paper. Three definitions of service lifetime are introduced and the difficult problem of assessing the service life is discussed. A stochastic modelling of corrosion and corrosion...

  15. Performance of steel-making slag concrete reinforced with fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega-López Vanesa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the possibility of making concrete reinforced with fibers and manufactured with recycled aggregates from carbon steel production was explored. Electric arc furnace slag (EAFS was used as coarse and medium aggregate, and part of the sand sizes. Metallic and synthetic fibers were added in different amounts. Initially, the properties of EAFS and their suitability to be used in the manufacture fiber reinforced concrete were analysed. Then, a series of fiber reinforced concrete mixtures were developed incorporating EAFS, and they were compared with the reference mixtures, made with conventional components plus fibers and made with EAFS without fibers. A series of tests were performed, including concepts such as consistency, compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength, resistance to water penetration or toughness. The results show that it is possible to make a suitable steel-slag concrete reinforced with fibers, complying with the standard requirements for it use in pavements and slab, and improving their proprieties respect to the control mixtures.

  16. Design Basis for Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) Pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Søren; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    -crack opening relationship can beused to descibe the properties of fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) intension and how the stress-crack opening relationship can beapplied in a simple design scheme for pavements. The projectincludes development of design tools, experiments to determine thestress-crack opening...

  17. Methodology of modeling fiber reinforcement in concrete elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper’s focus is on the modeling methodology of (steel) fiber reinforcement in concrete. The orthogonal values of fiber efficiency are presented. Bulk as well as boundary situations are covered. Fiber structure is assumed due to external compaction by vibration to display a partially linear

  18. Reliability - Based Design of Reinforced Concrete Two-Way Solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, a FORTRAN-based computer program was developed to aid the design of reinforced concrete slabs to Eurocode 2 (EC 2)[1]design requirements at constant reliability levels using First Order Reliability Method (FORM).The design variables for the design of the slab were considered random with safety indices ...

  19. Uniform load coefficients for beams in reinforced concrete two - way ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While designing reinforced concrete two - way slab systems, triangular or trapezoidal loadings are encountered during transferring the slab loading to the supporting beams. When analysing continuous beams, uniform loading conditions are, as much as possible, preferred because of their simplicity. In this paper, respective ...

  20. Optimization of design formulations for reinforced concrete slabs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predictions for flexural requirement in singly reinforced concrete slabs and sections have been assessed using the minimum weight approach and mathematical programming. Results indicate that although the predictions in the codes are safe; they are quite conservative, expensive and encourage although the ...

  1. Safety of Premature Loading on Reinforced Concrete Slabs | Shema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The provision of safe structural systems has always been the object of any structural design formulation and practice. This paper investigates the safety of premature loading on reinforced concrete slabs in a more rational manner. The slab was designed to BS8110 (1985; 1997) provisions. The moment of resistance of a ...

  2. Mechanical Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the investigations towards developing a better understanding on the contribution of steel fibers on the compressive, flexural, and splitting tensile strengths of steel fiber reinforced silica fume concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out with w/cm ratio ranging from 0.25 to 0.40, and fiber ...

  3. Corrosion resistance of steel fibre reinforced concrete - A literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos Meson, Victor; Michel, Alexander; Solgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is increasingly being used in the construction of civil infrastructure. However, there are inconsistencies among international standards and guidelines regarding the consideration of carbon-steel fibres for the structural verification of SFRC exposed to corr...

  4. Probabilistic Fatigue Model for Reinforced Concrete Onshore Wind Turbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquez-Dominguez, Sergio; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    Reinforced Concrete Slab Foundation (RCSF) is the most common onshore wind turbine foundation type installed by the wind industry around the world. Fatigue cracks in a RCSF are an important issue to be considered by the designers. Causes and consequences of the cracks due to fatigue damage in RCSFs...

  5. an evaluated model for fibre reinforced concrete in tension controll

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN TUNJI OGUNDELE

    of its properties, primarily cracking resistance, impact and wear resistance and ductility. For this reason fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) is currently being used in increasing amounts in structures such as airport and highway pavements, bridge decks, machine foundations and storage tanks. Early studies by Romualdi and ...

  6. Rigid-plastic seismic design of reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Joao Domingues; Bento, R.; Levtchitch, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a new seismic design procedure for Reinforced Concrete (R/C) structures is proposed-the Rigid-Plastic Seismic Design (RPSD) method. This is a design procedure based on Non-Linear Time-History Analysis (NLTHA) for systems expected to perform in the non-linear range during a lifetime ...

  7. Study of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete overhead road.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.I. Kovalchyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection and testing of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete road trestle built in Kyiv are considered. The analysis of the gained results has shown that parametres correspond to the requirements of current standards on design of bridges.

  8. Optimisation of the Crack Pattern in Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent field investigations on several new Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements (CRCP) in Belgium indicate that its crack pattern is characterized by low mean crack spacing along with a high percentage of clusters of closely spaced cracks. Field surveys also indicate that it is difficult to

  9. Micro-Mechanical Modeling of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) on the micro- the meso- as well as the macro-level, i.e. modeling aspects of fiber-matrix interaction, overall constitutive modeling and structural modeling. Emphasis is placed on the micro- and meso-aspects, however, some basic results on the macro-level are also...

  10. Numerical simulation of CFRP-repaired reinforced concrete columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to investigate the influence of repair to individual reinforced concrete bridge columns on the : post-repair seismic performance of the bridge system. A method was developed to rapidly repair an earthquake-damag...

  11. mode of collapse of square single panel reinforced concrete space

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    MODE OF COLLAPSE OF SQUARE SINGLE PANEL REINFORCED CONCRETE SPACE- FRAMED STRUCTURES.... L. M. Olantori, et al. Nigerian Journal of Technology. Vol. 35, No. 1, January 2016. 17 particularly in exterior joints where additional sources of shear transfer within the joint region cannot develop after first ...

  12. Acoustic emission techniques applied to conventionally reinforced concrete bridge girders : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) bridges generally operate at service-level loads except during discrete overload events that can reduce the integrity of the structure by initiating concrete cracks, widening or extending of existing concrete cracks, as well ...

  13. Quantification of cracking localization in fibre-reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werzbrger, S.; Karinski, Y. S.; Dancygier, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents an analysis of cracking localization in beams made of fibre-reinforced concrete with conventional reinforcement. This phenomenon has been quantified by the ratio m/n between the number of the significantly wide cracks and the total number of flexural cracks that developed within the constant moment zone of the beams. It is shown that beams with larger reinforcement ratio had larger values of m/n, that is, lower cracking localization. For the given concrete mix, when the reinforcement ratios ρ were larger than ∼2% cracking localization was diminished. Furthermore, for low values of ρ, m/n ratios of the specimens with lower fibre contents are somewhat larger than those of the specimens with larger content. It is also shown that as the reinforcement ratio decreases below ∼0.5% the normalized mid-span ultimate deflections decreases as well, which corresponds with the observation of the cracking localization phenomenon for low reinforcement ratios. For larger reinforcement ratio, when m/n increases above ∼0.6, there is no effect of cracking localization on the ultimate deflection. Moreover, in this range of r the values of d are ≳ 1.0, as commonly expected for RFC structural elements. It is noted that the ultimate deflection of the beams corresponds to their flexural ductility.

  14. Steel Fibers Reinforced Concrete Pipes - Experimental Tests and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doru, Zdrenghea

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents in the first part a state of the art review of reinforced concrete pipes used in micro tunnelling realised through pipes jacking method and design methods for steel fibres reinforced concrete. In part two experimental tests are presented on inner pipes with diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with metal fibres (35 kg / m3). In part two experimental tests are presented on pipes with inner diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with steel fibres (35 kg / m3). The results obtained are analysed and are calculated residual flexural tensile strengths which characterise the post-cracking behaviour of steel fibres reinforced concrete. In the third part are presented numerical simulations of the tests of pipes and specimens. The model adopted for the pipes test was a three-dimensional model and loads considered were those obtained in experimental tests at reaching breaking forces. Tensile stresses determined were compared with mean flexural tensile strength. To validate tensile parameters of steel fibres reinforced concrete, experimental tests of the specimens were modelled with MIDAS program to reproduce the flexural breaking behaviour. To simulate post - cracking behaviour was used the method σ — ε based on the relationship stress - strain, according to RILEM TC 162-TDF. For the specimens tested were plotted F — δ diagrams, which have been superimposed for comparison with the similar diagrams of experimental tests. The comparison of experimental results with those obtained from numerical simulation leads to the following conclusions: - the maximum forces obtained by numerical calculation have higher values than the experimental values for the same tensile stresses; - forces corresponding of residual strengths have very similar values between the experimental and numerical calculations; - generally the numerical model estimates a breaking force greater

  15. Direct Shear Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Al-Quraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the accuracy of load-deformation behavior, failure mode, and ultimate load capacity for reinforced concrete members subjected to in-plane loadings such as corbels, wall to foundation connections and panels need shear strength behavior to be included. Shear design in reinforced concrete structures depends on crack width, crack slippage and roughness of the surface of cracks. This paper illustrates results of an experimental investigation conducted to investigate the direct shear strength of fiber normal strength concrete (NSC and reactive powder concrete (RPC. The tests were performed along a pre-selected shear plane in concrete members named push-off specimens. The effectiveness of concrete compressive strength, volume fraction of steel fiber, and shear reinforcement ratio on shear transfer capacity were considered in this study. Furthermore, failure modes, shear stress-slip behavior, and shear stress-crack width behavior were also presented in this study. Tests’ results showed that volume fraction of steel fiber and compressive strength of concrete in NSC and RPC play a major role in improving the shear strength of concrete. As expectedly, due to dowel action, the shear reinforcement is the predominant factor in resisting the shear stress. The shear failure of NSC and RPC has the sudden mode of failure (brittle failure with the approximately linear behavior of shear stress-slip relationship till failure. Using RPC instead of NSC with the same amount of steel fibers in constructing the push-off specimen result in high shear strength. In NSC, shear strength influenced by the three major factors; crack surface friction, aggregate interlock and steel fiber content if present. Whereas, RPC has only steel fiber and cracks surface friction influencing the shear strength. Due to cementitious nature of RPC in comparisons with NSC, the RPC specimen shows greater cracks width. It is observed that the Mattock model gives very satisfactory

  16. Polarization Induced Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete with CFRP Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Sun, Hongfang; Tang, Luping; Xing, Feng

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the deterioration of reinforced concrete with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) anode after polarization. The steel in the concrete was first subjected to accelerated corrosion to various extents. Then, a polarization test was performed with the external attached CFRP as the anode and the steel reinforcement as the cathode. Carbon fiber reinforced mortar and conductive carbon paste as contact materials were used to adhere the CFRP anode to the concrete. Two current densities of 1244 and 2488 mA/m², corresponding to the steel reinforcements were applied for 25 days. Electrochemical parameters were monitored during the test period. The deterioration mechanism that occurred at the CFRP/contact material interface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The increase of feeding voltage and the failure of bonding was observed during polarization process, which might have resulted from the deterioration of the interface between the contact material and CFRP. The formation and accumulation of NaCl crystals at the contact material/CFRP interface were inferred to be the main causes of the failure at the interface.

  17. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without...... fibres and the influence of fibres and cracks on the water uptake is discussed....

  18. PERSPECTIVE REINFORCING MATERIAL FOR FIBRE CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vedeneev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of wire fiber are considered, advantages of fiber of high-modular wire with heightened bending stiffness are shown. analysis by volumes of fiber production in the world is carried out. Peculiarities of fiber production at RUP «BMZ» are shown. recommendations on correlation «wire diameter-fiber length» are given for different types of fiber for prevention of fiber caking at production of fibrous concrete are given.

  19. Exploitation of Ultrahigh-Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete for the Strengthening of Concrete Structural Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Osta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair and strengthening of reinforced concrete members are very important due to several factors, including unexpected increases in load levels and/or the damaging impact of aggressive environmental conditions on structural concrete members. Many researchers have turned to using materials for the repair and strengthening of damaged structures or the construction of new concrete structural members. Ultrahigh-performance fibre-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC, characterized by superior structural and durability performance in aggressive environmental conditions, is one of the materials that have been considered for the repair and strengthening of concrete structural members. The repair or strengthening of concrete structures using UHPFRC needs a thorough knowledge of the behaviour of both the strengthening material and the strengthened concrete structure at service load conditions, in addition to an understanding of the design guidelines governing the use of such materials for effective repair and strengthening. In this study, the recent issues and findings regarding the use of UHPFRC as a repair or strengthening material for concrete structural members are reviewed, analysed, and discussed. In addition, recommendations were made concerning areas where future attention and research on the use of UHPFRC as a strengthening material needs to be focused if the material is to be applied in practice.

  20. Assessment of the Uretek process on continuously reinforced concrete pavement, jointed concrete pavement, and bridge approach slabs : technical assistance report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluates the rehabilitation method utilizing the injection of Uretek (polyurethane) into the pavement structures on continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP), jointed concrete pavement (JCP), and bridge approach slabs. The polyuret...

  1. ASSIMILATION OF PRODUCTION OF THERMO-MECHANICALLY HARDENED REINFORCING BAR WITH EFFECTIVE AND ECONOMICAL CUT, EQUIVALENT DIAMETER 5,5—8,0 mm and 500 H/mm2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Matochkin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The carried out team-work of NIIZHB and RUP “BMZ” enabled to receive new technological decisions at production of bale reinforcing bar, realization of which will increase reliability of reinforced-concrete constructions of buildings and installations.

  2. REPAIR AND STRENGTHENING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS USING FIBRE REINFORCED POLIMER (FRP MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat ÇETİNKAYA

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of Fibre Reinforced Polimer (FRP materials for the repair and strengthening of Reinforced Concrete structures has become widespread recently. FRP materials are being prefered because they have very high tensile strength, resistance to corrosion and they do not affect the use of the building during the repair and strengthening process. Four reinfoced concrete beams repaired and strengthened with FRP materials have been used in this study which were performed at Pamukkale University-Faculty of Engineering- Civil Engineering Department- Structural Engineering Laboratuary. The behaviour of the beams before and after repair and strengthening was compared by obtaining the load- displacement curves under static loading. In this study, it was observed that the repair and strengthening of reinforced concrete beams by using FRP materials had increased the load carrying capacity significantly.

  3. Application of the wave finite element method to reinforced concrete structures with damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Masri, Evelyne; Ferguson, Neil; Waters, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Vibration based methods are commonly deployed to detect structural damage using sensors placed remotely from potential damage sites. Whilst many such techniques are modal based there are advantages to adopting a wave approach, in which case it is essential to characterise wave propagation in the structure. The Wave Finite Element method (WFE) is an efficient approach to predicting the response of a composite waveguide using a conventional FE model of a just a short segment. The method has previously been applied to different structures such as laminated plates, thinwalled structures and fluid-filled pipes. In this paper, the WFE method is applied to a steel reinforced concrete beam. Dispersion curves and wave mode shapes are first presented from free wave solutions, and these are found to be insensitive to loss of thickness in a single reinforcing bar. A reinforced beam with localised damage is then considered by coupling an FE model of a short damaged segment into the WFE model of the undamaged beam. The fundamental bending, torsion and axial waves are unaffected by the damage but some higher order waves of the cross section are significantly reflected close to their cut-on frequencies. The potential of this approach for detecting corrosion and delamination in reinforced concrete beams will be investigated in future work.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Research on Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Flexural Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deividas Rumšys

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysis of structural lightweight concrete. New lightweight concrete mixture made with expanded clay aggregate has been proposed and applied for experimental rein-forced concrete beams. Totally 8 beams with different rein-forcement ratios (0.309%, 0.557%, 0.895% and 1.255% were tested under short-term four point bending loading. Stress-strain behavior of the beams under considerations has been investigated. Average strains at 4 different levels of pure bend-ing zone and vertical displacements at 12 different points of the beam were measured. During the test, deformations and crack-ing of the pure bending zone were additionally observed using high-speed digital video cameras. The data obtained by cameras were analyzed using digital image correlation technique. Applying the test data bending moments and curvature diagrams were derived for each beam. The obtained relationships were compared with theoretical results calculated using design code methods LST EN and STR. Using the inverse algorithm developed by VGTU, tension reinforced lightweight concrete stress and strain diagrams were obtained, which were adapted to numerical modeling by software ATENA. Moment and curvature diagrams obtained by finite elements program were compared with experimental moment and curvature diagrams. Good agreement between both diagrams has been obtained.

  5. Integrity assessment of grouted posttensioning cables and reinforced concrete of a nuclear containment building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenton B.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Containment Buildings of CANDU Nuclear Generating Stations were designed to house nuclear reactors and process equipment and also to provide confinement of releases from a potential nuclear accident such as a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA. To meet this design requirement, a post-tensioning system was designed to induce compressive stresses in the structure to counteract the internal design pressure. The CANDU reactor building at Gentilly-1 (G-1, Quebec, Canada (250 MWe was built in the early 1970s and is currently in a decommissioned state. The structure at present is under surveillance and monitoring. In the year 2000, a field investigation was conducted as part of a condition assessment and corrosion was detected in some of the grouted post-tension cable strands. However, no further work was done at that time to determine the cause, nature, impact and extent of the corrosion. An investigation of the Gentilly-1 containment building is currently underway to assess the condition of grouted post-tensioning cables and reinforced concrete. At two selected locations, concrete and steel reinforcements were removed from the containment building wall to expose horizontal cables. Individual cable strands and reinforcement bars were instrumented and measurements were taken in-situ before removing them for forensic examination and destructive testing to determine the impact of ageing and corrosion. Concrete samples were also removed and tested in a laboratory. The purpose of the field investigation and laboratory testing, using this structure as a test bed, was also to collect material ageing data and to develop potential Nondestructive Examination (NDE methods to monitor Containment Building Integrity. The paper describes the field work conducted and the test results obtained for concrete, reinforcement and post-tensioning cables.

  6. Finite element analysis of bond behavior in a steel reinforced concrete structure strengthened carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) strips

    OpenAIRE

    Pastorek, P.; Novák, P.; P. Kopas; Močilan, M.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the analysis of influence of carbon-fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) on stress distribution in a steel reinforced concrete beam loaded by four-point bending flexural test. Simulation of the delamination is modelled by FEM with a cohesion zone material model. Distribution of cracks with CFRP strengthening is analysed, too. Finally, the fatigue life tests analysis was executed for the steel specimen (W.Nr. 1.0429 – concrete steel), which was used in the reinforced concrete...

  7. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP Bars for Enhancing the Flexural Performance of RC Beams Using Side-NSM Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC structures require strengthening for numerous factors, such as increased load, modification of the structural systems, structural upgrade or errors in the design and construction stages. The side near-surface mounted (SNSM strengthening technique with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP bars is a relatively new emerging technique for enhancing the flexural capacities of existing RC elements. Nine RC rectangular beams were flexurally strengthened with this technique and tested under four-point bending loads until failure. The main goal of this study is to optimize the structural capacity of the RC beams by varying the amount of strengthening reinforcement and bond length. The experimental test results showed that strengthening with SNSM GFRP bars significantly enhanced the flexural responses of the specimens compared with the control specimen. The first cracking and ultimate loads, energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness were remarkably enhanced by the SNSM technique. It was also confirmed that the bond length of the strengthened reinforcement greatly influences the energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness. The effect of the bond length on these properties is more significant compared to the amount of strengthening reinforcement.

  8. Review of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforced Material in Concrete Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuddin Ayuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP is a material that is lightweight, strong, anti-magnetic and corrosion resistant. This material can be used as an option to replace the steel material in concrete construction or as material to improve the strength of existing construction. CFRP is quite easy to be attached to the concrete structure and proved economically used as a material for repairing damaged structures and increase the resilience of structural beams, columns, bridges and other parts of the structure against earthquakes. CFRP materials can be shaped sheet to be attached to the concrete surface. Another reason is due to the use of CFRP has a higher ultimate strength and lower weight compared to steel reinforcement so that the handling is significantly easier. Through this paper suggests that CFRP materials can be applied to concrete structures, especially on concrete columns. Through the results of experiments conducted proved that the concrete columns externally wrapped with CFRP materials can increase the strength. This treatment is obtained after testing experiments on 130 mm diameter column with a height of 700 mm with concentric loading method to collapse. The experimental results indicate that a column is wrapped externally with CFRP materials can achieve a load capacity of 250 kN compared to the concrete columns externally without CFRP material which only reached 150 kN. If the column is given internally reinforcing steel and given externally CFRP materials can reach 270 kN. It shows that CFRP materials can be used for concrete structures can even replace reinforcing steel that has been widely used in building construction in Indonesia.

  9. Reinforced concrete beams with Fabric-Reinforced Cementitious Matrix type materials. Experimental and analytical stud

    OpenAIRE

    Escrig, C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the good performance offered by concrete subjected to compression and steel to tension, reinforced concrete has a limited durability. This is influenced by the passage of time and the appearance of various pathologies related to the environment. The consequence is a progressive decrease of the initial benefits of the structural elements built with this material. In addition, the continuous updating of design codes (in some cases significantly limiting the behavior of the material) as ...

  10. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa K. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to develop a numerical model suitable for nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete shells. A nine-node Lagrangian element Figure (1 with enhanced shear interpolation will be used in this study. Table (1 describes shape functions and their derivatives of this element.An assumed transverse shear strain is used in the formulation of this element to overcome shear locking. Degenerated quadratic thick plate elements employing a layered discrelization through the thickness will be adopted. Different numbers of layers for different thickness can be used per element. A number of layers between (6 and 10 have proved to be appropriate to represent the nonlinear material behavior in structures. In this research 8 layers will be adequate. Material nonlinearities due to cracking of concrete, plastic flow or crushing of concrete in compression and yield condition of reinforcing steel are considered. The maximum tensile strength is used as a criterion for crack initiation. Attention is given to the tension stiffening phenomenon and the degrading effect of cracking on the compressive and shear strength of concrete. Perfect bond between concrete and steel is assumed. Attention is given also to geometric nonlinearities. An example have been chosen in order to demonstrate the suitability of the models by comparing the predicted behaviour with the experimental results for shell exhibiting various modes of failure.

  11. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Fiber Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Containing Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Jae Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced aerated lightweight concrete (FALC was developed to reduce concrete's density and to improve its fire resistance, thermal conductivity, and energy absorption. Compression tests were performed to determine basic properties of FALC. The primary independent variables were the types and volume fraction of fibers, and the amount of air in the concrete. Polypropylene and carbon fibers were investigated at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4% volume ratios. The lightweight aggregate used was made of expanded clay. A self-compaction agent was used to reduce the water-cement ratio and keep good workability. A surfactant was also added to introduce air into the concrete. This study provides basic information regarding the mechanical properties of FALC and compares FALC with fiber reinforced lightweight concrete. The properties investigated include the unit weight, uniaxial compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and toughness index. Based on the properties, a stress-strain prediction model was proposed. It was demonstrated that the proposed model accurately predicts the stress-strain behavior of FALC.

  13. Performance of steel wool fiber reinforced geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Ariffin, Nurliayana

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, performance of geopolymer concrete was studied by mixing of Class F fly ash from Manjung power station, Lumut, Perak, Malaysia with alkaline activator which are combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. Steel wool fiber were added into the geopolymer concrete as reinforcement with different weight percentage vary from 0 % - 5 %. Chemical compositions of Malaysian fly ash was first analyzed by using X-ray fluorescence. All geopolymer concrete reinforced with steel wool fiber with different weight percentage were tested in terms of density, workability, and compression. Result shows Malaysian fly ash identified by using XRF was class F. Density of geopolymer concrete close to density of OPC which is approximately 2400 kg/m3 and the density was increase gradually with the additions of steel fiber. However, the inclusions of steel fibers also shows some reduction to the workability of geopolymer concrete. Besides, the compressive strength was increased with the increasing of fibers addition until maximum of 18.6 % improvement at 3 % of steel fibers.

  14. Limit Analysis of 3D Reinforced Concrete Beam Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper P.; Nielsen, Leif Otto; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2012-01-01

    A new finite-element framework for lower-bound limit analysis of reinforced concrete beams, subjected to loading in three dimensions, is presented. The method circumvents the need for a direct formulation of a complex section-force-based yield criterion by creating a discrete representation...... Coulomb criterion is applied to the concrete stresses. The modified Coulomb criterion is approximated using second-order cone programming for improved performance over implementations using semidefinite programming. The element is verified by comparing the numerical results with analytical solutions....

  15. Flexural strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete beams using polypropylene fiber: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisantono, Ade; Praja, Baskoro Abdi; Hermawan, Billy Nouwen

    2017-11-01

    One of the methods to increase the tensile strength of concrete is adding a fiber material into the concrete. While to reduce a noise in a construction project, a self compacting concrete was a good choices in the project. This paper presents an experimental study of flexural behavior and strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete (RC) beams using polypropylene fiber. The micro monofilament polypropylene fibers with the proportion 0.9 kg/m3 of concrete weight were used in this study. Four beam specimens were cast and tested in this study. Two beams were cast of self compacting reinforced concrete without fiber, and two beams were cast of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete using polypropylene. The beams specimen had the section of (180×260) mm and the length was 2000 mm. The beams had simple supported with the span of 1800 mm. The longitudinal reinforcements were using diameter of 10 mm. Two reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for compressive reinforcement and three reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for tensile reinforcement. The shear reinforcement was using diameter of 8 mm. The shear reinforcements with spacing of 100 mm were put in the one fourth near to the support and the spacing of 150 mm were put in the middle span. Two points loading were used in the testing. The result shows that the load-carrying capacity of the self compacting reinforced concrete beam using polypropylene was a little bit higher than the self compacting reinforced concrete beam without polypropylene. The increment of load-carrying capacity of self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete was not so significant because the increment was only 2.80 % compare to self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete. And from the load-carrying capacity-deflection relationship curves show that both the self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete beam and the self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete beam were ductile beams.

  16. Effect of Reinforcement on Early-Age Concrete Temperature Stress: Preliminary Experimental Investigation and Analytical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianda Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For concrete under short-term loading, effect of reinforcement on concrete crack resistance capability is usually negligible; however, recent research results show that extension of this viewpoint to concrete under long-term loading (temperature variation may be unsuitable. In order to investigate this phenomenon, this paper presents the experimental and analytical results of early-age reinforced concrete temperature stress development under uniaxial restraint. The experiments were carried out on a temperature stress testing machine (TSTM. Experimental results show that the coupling of reinforcement and concrete creep behavior influenced the concrete temperature stress development, and nearly 16% of concrete stress was reduced in the current research. Moreover, the cracking time of reinforced concrete was also delayed. Finally, based on the principle of superposition, analytical simulations of effect of reinforcement on concrete temperature stress have been performed.

  17. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  18. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced : concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effor...

  19. MEASURED AND CALCULATED DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF THE BRIDGE DECK MODEL REINFORCED WITH FRP BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz PIĄTKOWSKI

    Full Text Available Composite materials mainly used in the aeronautics industry are gaining more and more application in various areas such as the construction of bridges. The article presents a set of dynamic researches carried out on a plate made of lightweight concrete reinforced with composite bars. The tested plate with dimensions 514 x 190 x 18 cm was a model of the real bridge deck. A multi-channel signal recorder with specialized software was used for performing the measurements and to estimate modal parameters of the plate. Dynamic response of the plate on a modal hammer impact was measured with numerous of piezoelectric acceleration sensors. The vibration tests were carried out simultaneously with statics tests only for non-cracked concrete of the plate. A range of FEM models was created, started with analytical 1-D beam model. Next, more complex 2-D plate and 3-D volume models were developed. The aim was to show how the results change in terms of complexity of the model. Only in the 3-D model the composite rebar was modelled. Additionally, in case of 2-D and 3-D models there were considered various lengths of the selected support. The basic frequencies and mode shapes obtained for physical model were compared with those for numerical models. There were significant differences. The conducted analysis indicated more complicated than theoretical boundary conditions of the tested plate.

  20. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironova, M., E-mail: mirona@imbm.bas.bg; Ivanova, M., E-mail: magdalena.ivanova@imbm.bas.bg; Naidenov, V., E-mail: valna53@mail.bg [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 4, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Georgiev, I., E-mail: ivan.georgiev@parallel.bas.bg [Institute of Information and Communication Technologies & Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stary, J., E-mail: stary@ugn.cas.cz [Institute of Geonics Czech Academy of Sciences, Studentska str., Ostrava 1768 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-28

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  1. Effects of Reinforcement Configuration on Reserve Capacity of Concrete Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Reinforced concreted Tensile membrane,, Buried shelters/ Shelters/ ..i, Civil defense, Slab capacity, 120. A34TlRACT rCcnhma in~ r aidit noe..era aad...CHAPTER 1 I XTPODLCT, CI At the- iiti it io., of this Study civil d~efense plwlgcalled for the .;evacuation of nonessenrt*I51 pezrsonnel to safe (lower...lqbal and Derecho (Reference 10). The reinforcement ratio, p , was 0.0062 in "Christianscn’s te,;tts and varied from 0.0023 to 0.0093 in Roberts’ tests

  2. Optimization of the Infrastructure of Reinforced Concrete Reservoirs by a Particle Swarm Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Saeed; Sebt, Mohammad Hassan; Shahhosseini, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Optimization techniques may be effective in finding the best modeling and shapes for reinforced concrete reservoirs (RCR) to improve their durability and mechanical behavior, particularly for avoiding or reducing the bending moments in these structures. RCRs are one of the major structures applied for reserving fluids to be used in drinking water networks. Usually, these structures have fixed shapes which are designed and calculated based on input discharges, the conditions of the structure's topology, and geotechnical locations with various combinations of static and dynamic loads. In this research, the elements of reservoir walls are first typed according to the performance analyzed; then the range of the membrane based on the thickness and the minimum and maximum cross sections of the bar used are determined in each element. This is done by considering the variable constraints, which are estimated by the maximum stress capacity. In the next phase, based on the reservoir analysis and using the algorithm of the PARIS connector, the related information is combined with the code for the PSO algorithm, i.e., an algorithm for a swarming search, to determine the optimum thickness of the cross sections for the reservoir membrane's elements and the optimum cross section of the bar used. Based on very complex mathematical linear models for the correct embedding and angles related to achain of peripheral strengthening membranes, which optimize the vibration of the structure, a mutual relation is selected between the modeling software and the code for a particle swarm optimization algorithm. Finally, the comparative weight of the concrete reservoir optimized by the peripheral strengthening membrane is analyzed using common methods. This analysis shows a 19% decrease in the bar's weight, a 20% decrease in the concrete's weight, and a minimum 13% saving in construction costs according to the items of a checklist for a concrete reservoir at 10,000 m3.

  3. Repair of earthquake-damaged bridge columns with interlocking spirals and fractured bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    During earthquakes, reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns may experience different levels of damage such as cracking, spalling, or crushing of concrete and yielding, buckling, or fracture of reinforcing bars. Although several repair options exist f...

  4. A comparison of tensile, fracture and fatigue mechanical behaviour of structural reinforcing bars made with different steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez, C.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of austenitic stainless steels as rebar is an option increasingly used in reinforced concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments and especially those that have to work in marine environments. The same is true for duplex stainless steel rebars, although nowadays they have a lower use, mainly due to the fact that their inclusion in the reinforced concrete standards was delayed 10 years compared to austenitic stainless steel ones, and consequently their in-service behavior is not as well known. A study of the mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, fatigue behaviour and corrosion resistance in saline alkaline environments of austenitic (AISI 304LN and 316LN and duplex (D2205 stainless steel reinforcing bars was performed in this work. Bars made on a high ductility carbon steel (B500SD that are normally used to reinforce concrete were also characterized and used as a comparison. Stainless steel reinforcing bars show mechanical properties at least similar but usually higher than one of the best carbon steel re-bars (B500SD, along with a significantly higher ductility and, of course, much better corrosion behaviour in saline alkaline environments.El uso de aceros inoxidables austeníticos como armaduras de refuerzo es una opción cada vez más utilizada en estructuras de hormigón armado expuestas a ambientes agresivos y especialmente en las que han de trabajar en ambientes marinos. Lo mismo cabe decir de las armaduras de acero inoxidable dúplex, si bien su uso es menor, debido sobre todo a que su inclusión en la normativa aplicable al armado de hormigón se retrasó 10 años con respecto a los inoxidables austeníticos y, consecuentemente, su comportamiento en servicio es menos conocido. En este trabajo se analiza el comportamiento mecánico, incluyendo fractura y fatiga, así como la resistencia a la corrosión en medios que simulan un hormigón contaminado de cloruros, de armaduras fabricadas tanto con

  5. Structural health and dynamic behavior of residential buildings: field challenges in the rehab of damaged reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalhoub M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete buildings require special consideration under dynamic excitations due to their anisotropic material properties. Strain compatibility equations are used in concrete analysis and design with assumptions about the stress and strain field across member section and member length. However, these assumptions fall short of describing real life behavior when concrete elements deteriorate, age or undergo cyclic loading. This paper addresses the structural health of reinforced concrete buildings and proposes an analytical model to account for concrete damage through loss of bond. The proposed model relates steel loading that causes bond distress to design parameters such as development length and bar properties, and therefore could be complemented by field measurement. The paper proposes a diagnosis method and discusses the sustainability of the structure by assisting in a simplistic decision rule as to whether to perform minor fixes, major rehabilitation, or disposal. Emphasis is placed on the difference between reversible and irreversible effects of cyclic loading on structural behaviour, and draws a distinction between damage to the girder and damage to the column in the overall structural system. The model is compared to empirical results to address field challenges faced when the structure is subjected to severe conditions in its ambient environment, or to unusual loading. Deterioration in concrete causes alteration in its composite behavior with the reinforcing steel. This affects the fundamental period of the structure, and its response to seismic loading.

  6. Behavior of reinforced concrete columns strenghtened by partial jacketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. FERREIRA

    Full Text Available This article presents the study of reinforced concrete columns strengthened using a partial jacket consisting of a 35mm self-compacting concrete layer added to its most compressed face and tested in combined compression and uniaxial bending until rupture. Wedge bolt connectors were used to increase bond at the interface between the two concrete layers of different ages. Seven 2000 mm long columns were tested. Two columns were cast monolithically and named PO (original column e PR (reference column. The other five columns were strengthened using a new 35 mm thick self-compacting concrete layer attached to the column face subjected to highest compressive stresses. Column PO had a 120mm by 250 mm rectangular cross section and other columns had a 155 mm by 250mm cross section after the strengthening procedure. Results show that the ultimate resistance of the strengthened columns was more than three times the ultimate resistance of the original column PO, indicating the effectiveness of the strengthening procedure. Detachment of the new concrete layer with concrete crushing and steel yielding occurred in the strengthened columns.

  7. Shear strength of reinforced concrete circular cross-section beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. G. N. Teixeira

    Full Text Available A proposed adequation of NBR 6118, Item 7.4, related to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams is presented with aims to application on circular cross-section. The actual expressions are most suitable to rectangular cross-section and some misleading occurs when applied to circular sections at determination of VRd2, Vc and Vsw, as consequence of bw (beam width and d (effective depth definitions as well as the real effectiveness of circular stirrups. The proposed adequation is based on extensive bibliographic review and practical experience with a great number of infrastructure elements, such as anchored retaining pile walls, where the use of circular reinforced concrete members is frequent.

  8. Steel fiber reinforced concrete behavior, modelling and design

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harvinder

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses design aspects of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) members, including the behavior of the SFRC and its modeling. It also examines the effect of various parameters governing the response of SFRC members in detail. Unlike other publications available in the form of guidelines, which mainly describe design methods based on experimental results, it describes the basic concepts and principles of designing structural members using SFRC as a structural material, predominantly subjected to flexure and shear. Although applications to special structures, such as bridges, retaining walls, tanks and silos are not specifically covered, the fundamental design concepts remain the same and can easily be extended to these elements. It introduces the principles and related theories for predicting the role of steel fibers in reinforcing concrete members concisely and logically, and presents various material models to predict the response of SFRC members in detail. These are then gradually extended to d...

  9. Glass fiber reinforced concrete for terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete (GRC) as a low-cost structural substrate for terrestrial solar cell arrays is discussed. The properties and fabrication of glass-reinforced concrete structures are considered, and a preliminary design for a laminated solar cell assembly built on a GRC substrate is presented. A total cost for such a photovoltaic module, composed of a Korad acrylic plastic film front cover, an aluminum foil back cover, an ethylene/vinyl acetate pottant/adhesive and a cotton fabric electrical isolator in addition to the GRC substrate, of $9.42/sq m is projected, which is less than the $11.00/sq m cost goal set by the Department of Energy. Preliminary evaluations are concluded to have shown the design capabilities and cost effectiveness of GRC; however, its potential for automated mass production has yet to be evaluated.

  10. The Use of the Fiberglass at the Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Giuşcă

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main constituent of the reinforced fiberglass concrete are: the glass fibers, the binder, the sand and the water. In order to change certain characteristics there can be used different types of additives of fillers. The fiberglass is used in the shape of beams and cords having the lengths comprised between 12 and 15 mm; the cutting is realized with different devices, which are designed, built and used by variant firms. The reinforced fiberglass concretes use the following binders: hydraulic binders - based on Portland cement, like the normal Portland cement, the Portland cement with additions, the fast - hardening cement (in Romania the RIM, the white and coloured cements; the alumina cements, non-hydraulic binders - the burnt plaster, the magnesite cement, clay.

  11. Study of the stress-strain state of compressed concrete elements with composite reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko Yurii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency analysis of the application of glass composite reinforcement in compressed concrete elements as a load-carrying component has been performed. The results of experimental studies of the deformation-strength characteristics of this reinforcement on compression and compressed concrete cylinders reinforced by this reinforcement are presented. The results of tests and mechanisms of sample destruction have been analyzed. The numerical analysis of the stress-strain state has been performed for axial compression of concrete elements with glasscomposite reinforcement. The influence of the reinforcement percentage on the stressed state of a concrete compressed element with the noted reinforcement is estimated. On the basis of the obtained results, it is established that the glass-composite reinforcement has positive effect on the strength of the compressed concrete elements. That is, when calculating the load-bearing capacity of such structures, the function of composite reinforcement on compression should not be neglected.

  12. Thermal analysis of reinforced concrete beams and frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam H. El-Tayeb

    2017-04-01

    The obtained results of the studied cases reveal that material modeling of reinforced concrete beams and frames plays a major role in how these structures react to temperature variation. Cracking contributes to the release of significant portion of temperature restrain and in some cases this restrain is almost eliminated. The response of beams and frames deviates significantly based on the temperature gradient, linear or nonlinear; hence, the nonlinear temperature gradient which is the realistic profile is important to implement in the analysis.

  13. Interfacial chemistry of zinc anodes for reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R. [Dept. of Energy, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center; McGill, G.E.; Cryer, C.B. [Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR (United States); Stoneman, A. [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Carter, R.R. [California Dept. of Transportation, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Thermally-sprayed zinc anodes are used in both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems for reinforced concrete structures. The Albany Research Center, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation, has been studying the effect of electrochemical aging on the bond strength of zinc anodes for bridge cathodic protection systems. Changes in anode bond strength and other anode properties can be explained by the chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface. The chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface in laboratory electrochemical aging studies is compared with that of several bridges with thermal-sprayed zinc anodes and which have been in service for 5 to 10 years using both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems. The bridges are the Cape Creek Bridge on the Oregon coast and the East Camino Undercrossing near Placerville, CA. Also reported are interfacial chemistry results for galvanized steel rebar from the 48 year old Longbird Bridge in Bermuda.

  14. Fatigue Strain and Damage Analysis of Concrete in Reinforced Concrete Beams under Constant Amplitude Fatigue Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangping Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete fatigue strain evolution plays a very important role in the evaluation of the material properties of concrete. To study fatigue strain and fatigue damage of concrete in reinforced concrete beams under constant amplitude bending fatigue loading, constant amplitude bending fatigue experiments with reinforced concrete beams with rectangular sections were first carried out in the laboratory. Then, by analyzing the shortcomings and limitations of existing fatigue strain evolution equations, the level-S nonlinear evolution model of fatigue strain was constructed, and the physical meaning of the parameters was discussed. Finally, the evolution of fatigue strain and fatigue damage of concrete in the compression zone of the experimental beam was analyzed based on the level-S nonlinear evolution model. The results show that, initially, fatigue strain grows rapidly. In the middle stages, fatigue strain is nearly a linear change. Because the experimental data for the third stage are relatively scarce, the evolution of the strain therefore degenerated into two phases. The model has strong adaptability and high accuracy and can reflect the evolution of fatigue strain. The fatigue damage evolution expression based on fatigue strain shows that fatigue strain and fatigue damage have similar variations, and, with the same load cycles, the greater the load level, the larger the damage, in line with the general rules of damage.

  15. Blast impact behaviour of concrete with different fibre reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drdlová Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the results of the development of special concrete intended for the explosion resistance applications, with the emphasis on minimal secondary fragments formation at the explosion. The fine-grained concrete matrix has been reinforced by various types of short dispersed fibers (metallic, mineral and polymer of different sizes and by their combination and the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the physico-mechanical properties and blast resistance was observed. The concrete prism specimens have been subjected to the determination of mechanical parameters (compressive and flexural strength at quasi-static load. The blast tests were conducted on the slab specimens prepared from selected mixtures. The material characteristics and explosion test data have been used for numerical investigation, which defined the optimal wall composition and dimensions of the concrete element which should resist the explosion defined by type, size, weight and placement of the blast. In the next step the test elements resistance was verified by real explosion test.

  16. Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) for High Rise Construction: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehbaghi, Koorosh; Chenery, Rhea

    2017-12-01

    Due to its material element, Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) could be stronger than traditional Concrete. This is due to FRC internal material compounds and elements. Furthermore, FRC can also significantly improve flexural strength when compared to traditional Concrete. This improvement in flexural strength can be varied depending on the actual fibers used. Although not new, FRC is gradually gaining popularity in the construction industry, in particular for high rise structures. This is due to its flexural strength, especially for high seismic zones, as it will provide a better solution then reinforced Concrete. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the structural importance of FRC for the high rise construction. Although there has been numerous studies and literature in justifying the FRC for general construction; this paper will consider its use specifically for high rise construction. Moreover, this paper will closely investigate eight case studies from Australian and United States as a part of the FRC validation for high rise construction. In doing so, this paper will examine their Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) to determine their overall structural performance.

  17. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  18. Nonlinear Finite Elements Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Columns Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Dewan Abdulla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study to have better understanding of structural behavior of the reinforced concrete (RC column wrapped by carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP sheets. In this study, 3D F.E model has been presented using ANSYS computer program (Release 16.0 to analyze reinforced concrete columns strengthened with CFRP composites , to evaluate the gain in performance (strength and ductility due to strengthening, and to study the effect of the most important parameters such as: compressive strength of concrete, modulus of elasticity of CFRP and corner radius of square columns. Three dimensional eight-node brick element (SOLID65 was used to represent the concrete, three dimensional spar element (LINK180 represented the steel and using a three dimensional shell element (SHELL41 to represent the CFRP composites. The present study has a comparison between the analytical results from the ANSYS finite element analysis with experimental data. The results of the study show that, external bonded CFRP sheets are very effective in enhancing the axial strength and ductility of the concrete columns. Inspection of

  19. Theoretical and numerical analysis of reinforced concrete beams with confinement reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Delalibera

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the use of confinement in over-reinforced concrete beams. This reinforcement consists of square stirrups, placed in the compression zone of the beam cross-section, in order to improve its ductility. A parametric numerical study is initially performed, using a finite element computational program that considers the material nonlinearities and the confinement effect. To investigate the influence of the transverse reinforcing ratio on the beam ductility, an experimental program was also conducted. Four over-reinforced beams were tested; three beam specimens with additional transverse reinforcement to confine the beams, and one without it. All specimens were fabricated with a concrete designed for a compressive strength of 25 MPa. The experimental results show that the post-peak ductility factor is proportional to the confining reinforcement ratio, however the same is not observed for the pre-peak ductility factor, which varied randomly with changes in the confining reinforcement ratio. It was also observed from the experiments that the confinement effect tends to be smaller close to the beam neutral axis.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Monitoring Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Based on Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhupeng; Lei, Ying; Xue, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on finite element method is conducted to predict the location of pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete. Simulation results show that it is feasible to predict corrosion monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave in reinforced concrete, and wavelet analysis can be used for the extremely weak signal of guided waves due to energy leaking into concrete. The characteristic of time-frequency localization of wavelet transform is adopted in the corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete. Guided waves can be successfully used to identify corrosion defects in reinforced concrete with the analysis of suitable wavelet-based function and its scale. PMID:25013865

  1. Cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures in the Netherlands - Experience and developments: Cathodic protection of concrete - 10 years experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) of reinforcing steel in concrete structures has been used successfully for over 20 years. CP is able to stop corrosion in a reliable and economical way where chloride contamination has caused reinforcement corrosion and subsequent concrete damage. To new structures where

  2. A Wireless Passive Sensing System for Displacement/Strain Measurement in Reinforced Concrete Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ozbey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show a wireless passive sensing system embedded in a reinforced concrete member successfully being employed for the measurement of relative displacement and strain in a simply supported beam experiment. The system utilizes electromagnetic coupling between the transceiver antenna located outside the beam, and the sensing probes placed on the reinforcing bar (rebar surface inside the beam. The probes were designed in the form of a nested split-ring resonator, a metamaterial-based structure chosen for its compact size and high sensitivity/resolution, which is at µm/microstrains level. Experiments were performed in both the elastic and plastic deformation cases of steel rebars, and the sensing system was demonstrated to acquire telemetric data in both cases. The wireless measurement results from multiple probes are compared with the data obtained from the strain gages, and an excellent agreement is observed. A discrete time measurement where the system records data at different force levels is also shown. Practical issues regarding the placement of the sensors and accurate recording of data are discussed. The proposed sensing technology is demonstrated to be a good candidate for wireless structural health monitoring (SHM of reinforced concrete members by its high sensitivity and wide dynamic range.

  3. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  4. Post-cracking behavior of blocks, prisms, and small concrete walls reinforced with plant fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Soto

    Full Text Available Structural masonry using concrete blocks promotes the rationalization of construction projects, lowering the final cost of a building through the elimination of forms and the reduction of the consumption of reinforcement bars. Moreover, production of a block containing a combination of concrete and vegetable fiber sisal results in a unit with properties such as mechanical strength, stiffness, flexibility, ability to absorb energy, and post-cracking behavior that are comparable to those of a block produced with plain concrete. Herein are reported the results of a study on the post-cracking behavior of blocks, prisms, and small walls reinforced with sisal fibers (lengths of 20 mm and 40 mm added at volume fractions of 0.5% and 1%. Tests were performed to characterize the fibers and blocks and to determine the compressive strength of the units, prisms, and small walls. The deformation modulus of the elements was calculated and the stress-strain curves were plotted to gain a better understanding of the values obtained. The compression test results for the small walls reinforced with fibers were similar to those of the reference walls and better than the blocks and prisms with added fibers, which had resistances lower than those of the corresponding conventional materials. All elements prepared with the addition of sisal exhibited an increase in the deformation capacity (conferred by the fibers, which was observed in the stress-strain curves. The failure mode of the reference elements was characterized by an abrupt fracture, whereas the reinforced elements underwent ductile breakage. This result was because of the presence of the fibers, which remained attached to the faces of the cracks via adhesion to the cement matrix, thus preventing loss of continuity in the material. Therefore, the cement/plant fiber composites are advantageous in terms of their ductility and ability to resist further damage after cracking.

  5. Numerical Study of FRP Reinforced Concrete Slabs at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Adelzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One-way glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforced concrete slabs at elevated temperatures are investigated through numerical modeling. Serviceability and strength requirements of ACI-440.1R are considered for the design of the slabs. Diagrams to determine fire endurance of slabs by employing “strength domain” failure criterion are presented. Comparisons between the existing “temperature domain” method with the more representative “strength domain” method show that the “temperature domain” method is conservative. Additionally, a method to increase the fire endurance of slabs by placing FRP reinforcement in two layers is investigated numerically. The amount of fire endurance gained by placing FRP in two layers increases as the thickness of slab increases.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF FIBRE-REINFORCED POLYMER STRENGTHENING SOLUTIONS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian George MAXINEASA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The construction sector is considered by many as one of the key factors in fulfilling the three dimensions of sustainability. Notwithstanding its indisputable influence over economy and society at large, the statement above is most importantly justified by the massive impact the construction industry exerts over the environment. Strengthening existing reinforced concrete structures with composites and reusing them instead of building new ones is one of the ways by which the impact of the built environment over the natural one can be successfully decreased. This paper aims at determining if the extension of the life span of the reinforced concrete columns by applying different carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP strengthening systems can be considered a viable solution in terms of the ecological dimension of sustainability. The results obtained after conducting Life Cycle Assessment (LCA studies encourage the usage of the composite systems hereby analysed in the context of achieving the environmental aspect of sustainability in the construction sector.

  7. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  8. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  9. Dynamic tensile resistance of concrete-split Hopkinson bar test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Sharma, A.; Ozbolt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of concrete structures is strongly influenced by the loading rate. Compared to quasi-static loading, on meso and macro-scale concrete loaded by impact loading acts in a different way. First, there is a strain-rate influence on strength, stiffness, ductility, and, second, there are

  10. Dynamic tensile resistance of concrete - Split hopkinson bar test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ožbolt, J.; Weerheijm, J.; Sharma, A.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of concrete structures is strongly influenced by the loading rate. Compared to quasi-static loading, on meso and macro-scale concrete loaded by impact loading acts in a different way. First, there is a strain-rate influence on strength, stiffness, ductility, and, second, there are

  11. Development of Practical Finite Element Models for Collapse of Reinforced Concrete Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bermejo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two practical methodologies for modeling the collapse of reinforced concrete structures. They are validated with a real scale test of a two-floor structure which loses a bearing column. The objective is to achieve accurate simulations of collapse phenomena with moderate computational cost. Explicit finite element models are used with Lagrangian meshes, modeling concrete, and steel in a segregated manner. The first model uses 3D continuum finite elements for concrete and beams for steel bars, connected for displacement compatibility using a penalty method. The second model uses structural finite elements, shells for concrete, and beams for steel, connected in common nodes with an eccentricity formulation. Both are capable of simulating correctly the global behavior of the structural collapse. The continuum finite element model is more accurate for interpreting local failure but has an excessive computational cost for a complete building. The structural finite element model proposed has a moderate computational cost, yields sufficiently accurate results, and as a result is the recommended methodology.

  12. Improvement in reinforcing bond strength in reinforced concrete with self-repairing chemical adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    1997-05-01

    Self-healing concretes have embedded adhesives which are released from hollow fibers inside the concrete when and where cracking of the matrix and the fibers occurs. It was found that the adhesive improves the strength of the cracked portions of the concrete and increases its ability to deflect under load. Structural materials subjected to dynamic events such as earthquakes and impacts can have improved response by the noise of adhesive type which can impart improved damping, lateral stiffness, or deflection. Testing also assessed the improvement of the bond strength in structures. In laboratory tests the internal adhesive repair system improved the bond between the reinforcing steel and the concrete to prevent pullout failure or debonding at the interface.

  13. Interface study of fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacios, A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In a composite material that uses fibers as reinforcement, the breakage of the matrix is produced jointly with the separation of the fiber from the matrix. The mechanical behavior of the interface describes how fibers can work stabilizing the cracking process. The interface is the medium that puts the fiber on load, being the mechanical behavior of the interface and the strength of the fiber two important parameters to consider to characterize the general behavior of the composite. The present work studies the effect of several parameters on the behavior of the interface. Those parameters are the type of fiber, its geometry and dimension and the modified matrix and loading rate. An experimental technique was designed to allow testing the same set-up for pull-out tests in a quasistatic machine and Charpy pendulum. Modifications of the matrix by adding a mineral admixture improve the behavior of the interface as much as a 100%. It has been observed that combining the two actions, an improved matrix with crimped fibers, the type of failure can be modified. In this new type of failure, the fiber breaks consequently toughness decreases. Other parameters, as the loading rate and inclination of the fiber also affect the behavior of the interface.

    En un material compuesto que utiliza fibras como refuerzo, la rotura de la matriz se produce conjuntamente con la separación de la fibra de la matriz, por lo que el comportamiento mecánico de la interfase describe hasta que punto las fibras pueden trabajar como estabilizadores en el proceso defisuración. La interfase es el medio que pone en carga a la fibra y, por ello, la resistencia mecánica de la interfase y de la fibra son dos parámetros importantes a considerar para caracterizar el comportamiento general del composite. Este trabajo investiga el efecto de la variación del tipo de fibra, geometría y dimensión de las mismas y las modificaciones de la matriz y la velocidad de desplazamiento

  14. Seismic retrofitting of reinforced concrete frame structures using GFRP-tube-confined-concrete composite braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi B., Nasim S.; Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new type of structural bracing intended for seismic retrofitting use in framed structures. This special composite brace, termed glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP)-tube-confined-concrete composite brace, is comprised of concrete confined by a GFRP tube and an inner steel core for energy dissipation. Together with a contribution from the GFRP-tube confined concrete, the composite brace shows a substantially increased stiffness to control story drift, which is often a preferred feature in seismic retrofitting. An analysis model is established and implemented in a general finite element analysis program — OpenSees, for simulating the load-displacement behavior of the composite brace. Using this model, a parametric study of the hysteretic behavior (energy dissipation, stiffness, ductility and strength) of the composite brace was conducted under static cyclic loading and it was found that the area ratio of steel core to concrete has the greatest influence among all the parameters considered. To demonstrate the application of the composite brace in seismic retrofitting, a three-story nonductile reinforced concrete (RC) frame structure was retrofitted with the composite braces. Pushover analysis and nonlinear time-history analyses of the retrofitted RC frame structure was performed by employing a suite of 20 strong ground motion earthquake records. The analysis results show that the composite braces can effectively reduce the peak seismic responses of the RC frame structure without significantly increasing the base shear demand.

  15. The application of penetrating compounds for repairing concrete, reinforced concrete and stone structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliia Medeia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repair and protection of structural elements remain a relevant issue throughout the whole period of building operation and maintenance. Housing and public facilities regularly require rehabilitation and major repair. One of the main reasons behind a shorter lifespan of structural elements and units in a building is the impact on them of aggressive liquid and gaseous environments. The application of newly-developed cementitious products with penetrating properties is suggested in order to maintain and restore the protective properties of the concrete and reinforced concrete structures.

  16. Investigation on Reinforced Mechanism of Fiber Reinforced Asphalt Concrete Based on Micromechanical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Short fibers have been widely used to prepare the fiber reinforced asphalt concrete (FRAC. However, internal interactions between fiber and other phases of asphalt concrete are unclear although experimental methods have been used to design the FRAC successfully. In this paper, numerical method was used to investigate the reinforced mechanism of FRAC from microperspective. 2D micromechanical model of FRAC was established based on Monte Carlo theory. Effects of fiber length and content on stress state of asphalt mortar, effective modulus, and viscoelastic deformation of asphalt concrete were investigated. Indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM test and uniaxial creep test were carried out to verify the numerical results. Results show that maximum stress of asphalt mortar is lower compared to the control concrete when the fiber length is longer than 12 mm. Fiber reduces the stress level of asphalt mortar significantly. Fiber length has no significant influence on the effective modulus of asphalt concrete. Fiber length and content both have notable impacts on the viscoelastic performance of FRAC. Fiber length should be given more attention in the future design of FRAC except the content.

  17. Durability of precast prestressed concrete piles in marine environment : reinforcement corrosion and mitigation - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Research conducted in Part 1 has verified that precast prestressed concrete piles in : Georgias marine environment are deteriorating. The concrete is subjected to sulfate and : biological attack and the prestressed and nonprestressed reinforcement...

  18. Correlations Between Mechanical Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrillo Julián

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tension strength and post-cracking deformation capacities that exhibits steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC stimulate its use in elements governed by shear deformations. Aimed at developing design aids that promote the use of SFRC as web shear reinforcement of concrete walls for low-rise economic housing (LEH, an experimental study for describing the mechanical properties of SFRC was carried out. The experimental program included testing of 128 cylinder- and beam-type specimens. According to requirements specified by ACI-318, to thickness of walls used in LEH, and to results of previous studies, three Dramix fibers with length-diameter ratios of 55, 64 and 80 were selected. Fiber dosage was expressed in terms of the minimum fiber dosage specified by ACI-318 for replacing the minimum area of conventional shear reinforcement in beams (60 kg/m3. Therefore, five dosages were used: 0, 40, 45, 60 and 75 kg/m3. Mechanical properties of SFRC under compressive, tensile and flexural stresses were evaluated in this study. Based on trends of experimental results, numerical correlations for estimating both basic mechanical properties and properties that describe flexural performance of SFRC are proposed.

  19. Strengthening Reinforced Concrete Beams with CFRP and GFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Mustafa Önal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete beams were strengthened by wrapping the shear edges of the beams twice at 45° in opposite directions by either carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP or glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP. The study included 3 CFRP wrapped beams, 3 GFRP wrapped beams, and 3 control beams, all of which were 150 × 250 × 2200 mm and manufactured with C20 concrete and S420a structural steel at the Gazi University Technical Education Faculty labs, Turkey. Samples in molds were cured by watering in the open air for 21 days. Four-point bending tests were made on the beam test specimens and the data were collected. Data were evaluated in terms of load displacement, bearing strength, ductility, and energy consumption. In the CFRP and GFRP reinforced beams, compared to controls, 38% and 42%, respectively, strength increase was observed. In all beams, failure-flexural stress occurred in the center as expected. Most cracking was observed in the flexural region 4. A comparison of CFRP and GFRP materials reveals that GFRP enforced parts absorb more energy. Both materials yielded successful results. Thicker epoxy application in both CFRP and GFRP beams was considered to be effective in preventing break-ups.

  20. Experimental Study on Tensile Properties of GFRP Bars Embedded in Concrete Beams with Working Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the test results of an experimental study carried out to investigate the tensile properties of GFRP bars embedded in concrete beams with working cracks. The specimens were conditioned with sustained loading in 50°C alkaline solution and tap water for 6, 12, 18 months. The tensile test results show that the degradation rate of GFRP bars embedded in the concrete specimens with work cracks is larger than that of non-work cracks, while the effect of working cracks on the elastic modulus is not significant. The microstructure of GFRP bar surface before and after the test was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and differential-scanning calorimetry (DSC, the degree of hydrolysis reaction and glass transition temperature is also analyzed. Compared with the hydrolysis of resin matrix, it can be found that the deterioration of glass fiber and the delamination at the interfacial is more pronounced for the GFRP bars embedded in concrete beams. As a result, the mainly reason that caused the degradation of GFRP bars embedded in concrete environments are the deterioration of glass fiber and the delamination at the interfacial.

  1. Peculiarities of Thermal Treatment of Monolithic Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchin, V. N.; Shilonosova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    A mathematical program has been developed that allows one to determine the parameters of heat treatment of monolithic structures. One of the quality indicators of monolithic reinforced concrete structures is the level of temperature stresses arising in the process of heat treatment and further operation of structures. In winter at heat treatment the distribution of temperatures along the cross-section of the structure is uneven. A favorable thermo-stressed state in a concrete massif occurs when using the preheating method, providing the concrete temperature in the center of the structure is greater than at the periphery. In this case, after the strength is set and the temperature is later equalized along the cross-section, the central part of the structure tends to decrease its dimensions more but the extreme zones prevent it. Therefore, the center is in a state of tension, and the extreme zones on the periphery are compressed. In compressed concrete there is a lesser chance of cracks or defects. The temperature gradient over the section of the structure, the stress in the concrete and its strength are determined. When calculating the temperature and strength fields, the stress level was determined - a value equal to the ratio of the tensile stresses in the section under consideration to the tensile strength of the concrete in this section at the same time. The nature of the change in stress level is determined by the massive structure and power of the formwork heaters. It is shown that under unfavorable conditions the stress level is close to the critical value. The greatest temperature gradient occurs in the outer layers adjacent to the heating formwork. A technology for concrete conditioning is proposed which makes it possible to reduce the temperature stresses along the cross-section of the structure. The time for concrete conditioning in the formwork is reduced. In its turn, it further reduces labor costs and the cost of concrete work along with the cost of

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN ON THE PLASTIC PROPERTIES OF THE REINFORCING BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Baradyntseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research carried out in laboratory of metal science on detection of hydrogen presence in reinforcement depending on period of aging and reinforcement profile and also its influence on plastic properties of reinforcing bar is described in this article. The method of glycerine tests was applied for identification of hydrogen presence in finished reinforcing bar, the essence of which is in the fact that at gas emission from metal the bubbles stay too long on the surface of cross samples under glycerin layer. The revealed regularities enable to recommend actions for providing stable mechanical properties of the heat-strengthened reinforcement by creation of conditions for lowering of steel saturation with hydrogen, preventing thereby occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement of reinforcement on JSC «BMZ» – management company of holding «BMK».

  3. Performance Assessment of Discontinuous Fibers in Fiber Reinforced Concrete: Current State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -1 9 Performance Assessment of Discontinuous Fibers in Fiber-Reinforced Concrete: Current State-of-the- Art G eo te...Discontinuous Fibers in Ultra-High Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete: Current State-of-the- Art Charles A. Burchfield Geotechnical and...Finally, a summary of the current state-of-the- art and future research recommendations will be discussed in Chapter 4. 1.1 Fiber-reinforced concrete

  4. Applicability of Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced-Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building N00244-09-G-OO 14 Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM...Professional 7.0 Applicability of Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures By Timothy...Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures By Timothy P. James Submitted to the Department of Civil and

  5. A New Method for Calculating Deflection of FRP Reinforced Concrete Beams Using the Tension Stiffening Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Sheitt, Feras; Razaqpur, A. Ghani (Co-Supervisor)

    2015-01-01

    Accurate calculation of the deflection of reinforced concrete members has been a challenge since the inception of modern reinforced concrete. Many formulas and methods have been developed, over the years. However, most of them are empirical in nature and do not predict accurately the flexural deflection of reinforced concrete members over the entire loading range. Deflection calculation has important impact on the satisfactory performance of structures, especially in performance based design ...

  6. Effect of steel surface conditions on reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete exposed to marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzola, E.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory methods and experimental tests were deployed in the present study to evaluate corrosion in reinforced concrete exposed to marine environments. Reinforcing steel exhibiting two different surface conditions prior to embedment in concrete were studied, one the one hand to assess the electrochemical behaviour of the bars during exposure of the concrete specimens to a simulated marine environment, and on the other to determine the strength of the steel/concrete bond. The reinforced concrete specimens prepared were adapted as required for electrochemical potential and corrosion rate testing. A total of 56 7x15-cm cylindrical specimens containing 3/8" steel rods anchored at a depth of 11.5 cm were made to evaluate the steel / concrete bond and exposed to a natural marine environment for 28 or 190 days prior to testing. All the specimens were made with ready-mixed concrete. It may be concluded from the results of the corrosion tests on reinforcing steel with different surface conditions that the oxide initially covering the bars was dissolved and the steel passivated by the alkalinity in the concrete. The chief finding of the bonding study was that the layer of oxide formed in pre-embedment steel deterioration contributed to establishing a better bond.

    En el contexto de esta investigación, se tomaron en consideración métodos y ensayos experimentales de laboratorio, que permiten hacer una evaluación de la corrosión del hormigón armado expuesto en ambientes marinos. Por una parte se evaluó el comportamiento electroquímico de dos condiciones de estados superficiales del acero embebido en el hormigón, exponiéndolo en un ambiente marino simulado y, por otra parte, se estudió la adherencia entre el acero y el hormigón, con los mismos estados superficiales usados para la evaluación electroquímica. Las probetas se fabricaron de hormigón con acero de refuerzo en su interior, adecuándolas para realizar los ensayos de potenciales

  7. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to combined mechanical and environmental load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1999-01-01

    The main conclusions from a research project on durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides, water or freeze-thaw are presented. The effect of fibres and cracks on the durability of concrete is studied.......The main conclusions from a research project on durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides, water or freeze-thaw are presented. The effect of fibres and cracks on the durability of concrete is studied....

  8. Serviceability behavior of Reinforcement Concrete beams with polypropylene and steel fibers

    OpenAIRE

    NaserKabashi; Cenë Krasniqi

    2015-01-01

    Serviceability Limit States (SLS) may lead to the design of concrete elements internally reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP).In many types of concrete structure loss the serviceability due to wide cracks, number of cracks or large deflection is not uncommon behaviour in concrete structures or concrete beams.The flexural ductility affects the serviceability deflection of RC beams once flexural cracking take place.Imprvement will be focused on the use of polypropilene fib...

  9. Effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior of reinforcing B500C steel bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C. Vasco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a series of applications, steel reinforced concrete structures are subjected to fatigue loads during their service life, what in most cases happens in corrosive environments. Surface treatments have been proved to represent proper processes in order to improve both fatigue and corrosion resistances. In this work, the effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior reinforcing steel bars is investigated. The investigated material is the reinforcing steel bar of technical class B500C, of nominal diameter of 12 mm. Steel bars specimens were first exposed to corrosion in alternate salt spray environment for 30 and 60 days and subjected to both tensile and fatigue tests. Then, a series of specimens were subjected to common sandblasting, corroded and mechanically tested. Metallographic investigation and corrosion damage evaluation regarding mass loss and martensitic area reduction were performed. Tensile tests were conducted after each corrosion exposure period prior to the fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were performed at a stress ratio, R, of 0.1 and loading frequency of 20 Hz. All fatigue tests series as well as tensile test were also performed for as received steel bars to obtain the reference behavior. The results have shown that sandblasting hardly affects the tensile behavior of the uncorroded material. The effect of sandblasting on the tensile behavior of pre-corroded specimens seems to be also limited. On the other hand, fatigue results indicate an improved fatigue behavior for the sandblasted material after 60 days of corrosion exposure. Martensitic area reductions, mass loss and depth of the pits were significantly smaller for the case of sandblasted materials, which confirms an increased corrosion resistance

  10. The effects of steel fibre reinforced concrete on system ductility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz, U. S.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibre-reinforced concrete is being used extensively today in both field applications and experimental studies on concrete strength and ductility. The state of passive confinement generated by the fibre delays cracking and enhances ductility. The present paper reports on both experimental and analytical studies. In the former, a series of 16 steel-fibre reinforced concrete prismatic specimens were subjected to axial loads and the respective axial load-unit strain diagrams were subsequently plotted to determine the effect of steel fibres on reinforced concrete column ductility. Secondly, an analytical study was run to determine the additional ductility accruing to a frame system when steel fibres are included in the concrete. Analytical models were generated for 16 two-storey, single-span reinforced concrete frames. The columns in these frames were designed to the same characteristics as the specimens used in the experimental tests. Non-linear static (pushover analyses were performed for each frame to obtain load-displacement curves and determine the effect of steel fibres on reinforced concrete column ductility.El hormigón reforzado con fibra de acero se emplea actualmente tanto en obra como en los trabajos experimentales para estudiar la resistencia mecánica y ductilidad del hormigón. El estado de confinamiento pasivo producido por la fibra retrasa la fisuración y aumenta la ductilidad. El presente trabajo es de índole tanto experimental como analítica. En primer lugar, en la parte experimental se aplica una fuerza axial a 16 probetas prismáticas (160 x 160 x 840 mm de hormigón reforzado con fibra de acero para determinar su comportamiento, obteniéndose las curvas de fuerza axial-deformación unitaria correspondientes a partir de los resultados observados. A partir de una evaluación de dichos resultados experimentales, se determina el efecto que ejercen las fibras de acero sobre la ductilidad de las probetas de hormigón armado

  11. STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES’ RESEARCH OF A500C-CLASS REINFORCEMENT BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Yaznevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and mechanical properties of A500C-class reinforcement bars are investigated in the paper. The paper demonstrates that rolled products of thermally strengthened reinforcement have a layered structure with coaxially located layers having different mechanical characteristics. Micro-hardness measurements have shown that the maximum hardness has a pre-surface part of a reinforcement bar, and the minimum hardness is in the central part. Thickness of the strengthened surface layers grows while increasing a diameter and at preservation of structural composition. 

  12. High strength reinforcing steel bars : low-cycle fatigue behavior : final report - part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing steel, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) reinfor...

  13. High strength reinforcing steel bars : low cycle fatigue behavior : final report - part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing steel, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) reinfor...

  14. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Macro Polyamide Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joong Kyu; Kim, WooSeok; Jeon, Chan Ki; Kim, Jin Cheol

    2014-11-26

    This study developed a macro-sized polyamide (PA) fiber for concrete reinforcement and investigated the influence of the PA fiber on flexural responses in accordance with ASTM standards. PA fibers are advantageous compared to steel fibers that are corrosive and gravitated. The macro-sized PA fiber significantly improved concrete ductility and toughness. Unlike steel fibers, the PA fibers produced two peak bending strengths. The first-peaks occurred near 0.005 mm of deflection and decreased up to 0.5 mm of deflection. Then the bending strength increased up to second-peaks until the deflections reached between 1.0 and 1.5 mm. The averaged flexural responses revealed that PA fiber content did not significantly influence flexural responses before L/600, but had significant influence thereafter. Toughness performance levels were also determined, and the results indicated more than Level II at L/600 and Level IV at others.

  15. Durability Studies on Confined Concrete using Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponmalar, V.; Gettu, R.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 24 concrete cylinders with a notch at the centre were prepared. Among them six cylinders were wrapped using single and double layers of fiber reinforced polymer; six cylinders were coated with epoxy resin; the remaining cylinders were used as a control. The cylinders were exposed to wet and dry cycling and acid (3 % H2SO4) solution for the period of 120 days. Two different concrete strengths M30 and M50 were considered for the study. It is found that the strength, ductility and failure mode of wrapped cylinders depend on number of layers and the nature of exposure conditions. It was noticed that the damage due to wet and dry cycling and acid attack was severe in control specimen than the epoxy coated and wrapped cylinders.

  16. Evaluation of Concrete Consolidation: DSS-35 Antenna Reinforced Concrete Pedestal, Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldua, B. P.; Dodge, E. C.; Kolf, P. R.; Olson, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Antenna structures for the Deep Space Network track spacecraft that are millions of miles away. Therefore, these structures have tight specifications for translation, rotation, and differential settlement. This article presents several nondestructive test methods that were used to evaluate, locate, and repair imperfections in the reinforced concrete pedestal that supports the DSS-35 antenna structure. These methods include: (1) impulse response (IR), (2) ultrasonic shear-wave tomography (MIRA), and (3) ground-penetrating radar (GPR).

  17. Corrosion of steel reinforced concrete in the tropical coastal atmosphere of Havana City, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Castañeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of chloride deposition rate on concrete using an atmospheric corrosion approach is rarely studied in the literature. Seven exposure sites were selected in Havana City, Cuba, for exposure of reinforced concrete samples. Two significantly different atmospheric corrosivity levels with respect to corrosion of steel reinforced concrete were observed after two years of exposure depending on atmospheric chloride deposition and w/c ratio of the concrete. Changes in corrosion current are related to changes in chloride penetration and chloride atmospheric deposition. The influence of sulphur compound deposition could also be a parameter to consider in atmospheric corrosion of steel reinforced concrete.

  18. Bamboo as a substitute for steel in reinforced concrete wall panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himasree, P. R.; Ganesan, N.; Indira, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents a review of the works done by various researchers on different types of reinforced concrete wall panels. Full scale bamboo reinforced concrete wall panels of three different aspect ratios of 1, 1.204 and 1.515 subjected to one way in-plane loading are considered in this study. Also an attempt is made to compare the ultimate loads estimated using the available equations with the experimental values of bamboo reinforced concrete wall panels. The investigation indicates that steel reinforcement could be replaced by bamboo in concrete wall panels.

  19. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeongsoo Nam; Gyuyong Kim; Jaechul Yoo; Gyeongcheol Choe; Hongseop Kim; Hyeonggil Choi; Youngduck Kim

    2016-01-01

      This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC...

  20. THE PROBLEM OF ESTIMATING THE DURABILITY OF THE REINFORCED CONCRETE BRIDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Lantukh-Liashchenko

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment and prediction of service life for reinforced concrete bridges. The deterministic and probabilistic approach prediction models of durability are proposed.

  1. Tests on reinforced concrete slabs with cut-out openings strengthened with fibre-reinforced polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Floruţ, Sorin-Codruţ; Sas, Gabriel; Popescu, Cosmin; Stoian, Valeriu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations on reinforced concrete slabs strengthened using fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP). Eight tests were carried out on four two-way slabs, with and without cut-out openings. Investigations on slabs with cut-outs revealed that the FRP can be placed only around the edges of the cut-out when retrofitting the slabs whereas, in the situation of inserting cut-outs combined with increased demands of capacity, it is necessary to apply FRP compo...

  2. Nonlinear material influence on reinforced concrete beams’ immediate deflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gómez Cassab

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical and experimental research programme’s results regarding material nonlinearity’s influence on reinforced concrete beams’ immediate deflections. Six full-size laboratory beams were tested under different type of loads in the experimental programme. The ANSYS finite element software nonlinear material model was used for simulating the beams’ analytical behaviour. Comparing ANSYS nonlinear material model results, ACI 318 equations and the results of the tests made revealed that a beam’s structural behaviour is strongly influenced by material nonlinearity.

  3. Seismic Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shaft Support Water Storage Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti Tekwani; Dr. Archana Bohra Gupta

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares the results of Seismic Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shaft Support Water Storage Tank carried out in accordance with IS: 1893- 1984 and IS: 1893-2002 (Part-2) draft code. The analysis is carried out for shaft supported water tank of 500,750 and 1000 Cu.m capacity, located in four seismic zones (Zone-II, Zone -III, Zone-IV, Zone-V) and on three different soil types (Hard rock, Medium soil, Soft soil). Further, 1000 kl tank for conditions - tank full, tank empt...

  4. Collapse mechanisms and strength prediction of reinforced concrete pile caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe G.; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an upper bound plasticity approach for strength prediction of reinforced concrete pile caps. A number of collapse mechanisms are identified and analysed. The procedure leads to an estimate of the load-carrying capacity and an identification of the critical collapse mechanism....... Calculations have been compared with nearly 200 test results found in the literature. Satisfactory agreement has been found. The analyses are conducted on concentrically loaded caps supported by four piles. The paper briefly outlines how the approach may be extended to more complicated loadings and geometries...

  5. Finite element modeling of reinforced concrete structures strengthened with FRP laminates : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Linear and non-linear finite element method models were developed for a reinforced concrete bridge that had been strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer composites. ANSYS and SAP2000 modeling software were used; however, most of the development ef...

  6. Research notes : non-destructive evaluation of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Many reinforced concrete structures across the country are being strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites to increase the load capacity. In many cases, composites provide the most cost effective strengthening option, and they do no...

  7. Deterioration of J-bar reinforcement in abutments and piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Deterioration and necking of J-bars has been reportedly observed at the interface of the footing and stem wall during the demolition : of older retaining walls and bridge abutments. Similar deterioration has been reportedly observed between the pier ...

  8. An experimental investigation on flexural behaviour of fibre-reinforced pond ash-modified concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sofi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The flexural behaviour of plain and fibre-reinforced pond ash concrete (FRC beams under monotonic loading condition was analysed. Sixteen beams reinforced with top and bottom longitudinal deformed steel bars and transverse steel stirrups were tested. The beams were cast using three different percentages of pond ash, namely, 10%, 20% and 30% by weight of cement. Grooved type steel fibres were incorporated at different percentages of 0.5%, 1% and 2% by volume of concrete. Beams of cross section 150 mm × 150 mm and length 700 mm were tested in flexure under three-point bending system (one loading point plus two simple supports. Addition of fibres increased the failure load of the beams and ensured ductile behaviour. Ductility index and flexural rigidity of the beams were also studied. The predicted crack width (ACI 224 R-01 was compared with the measured crack width, and a good correlation was obtained.

  9. Chemical Interactions in Reinforced Concrete Exposed at a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Mendoza-Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of concrete structure behavior is complicated by diverse factors, including interaction between elements and concrete compounds, chlorides diffusion through concrete, and compounds formed by corrosion of steel reinforcement. These factors were evaluated in concrete test cylinders exposed to a tropical marine environment since 1993 (during 126 months. Electrochemical, chlorides profile, scanning electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry analyses were done and results compared. This suite of analytical methods accurately characterized reinforced concrete condition and generated data useful in developing prediction models of corrosion in concrete structures.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of IPS –Empress II Ceramic Bridge Reinforced by Zirconia Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of trenched zirconia bar on the von Mises stress distribution of IPS –Empress II core ceramics.Material and Methods: The three-dimensional model including a three-unit bridge from the second premolar to the second molar was designed. The model was reinforced with zirconia bar (ZB, zirconia bar with vertical trench (VZB, and zirconia bar with horizontal trench (HZB (cross sections of these bars were circular. The model without zirconia bar was designed as the control. The bridges were loaded by 200 N and 500 N on the occlusal surface at the middle of the pontic component, and Von-Mises stresses were evaluated along a defined path.Result: In the connector area, VonMises stress in MPa were approximately identical in the specimens with ZB (at molar connector (MC: 4.75, and at premolar connector (PC: 6.40 and without ZB (MC: 5.50, PC: 6.68, and considerable differences were not recognized. Whereas, Von-Mises stress (MPa in the specimens with horizontal trenched Zirconia bar (HZB (MC: 3.91, PC: 2.44 and Vertical trenched Zirconia bar (VZB (MC: 2.53, PC: 2.56 was decreased considerably.Conclusion: Embeded trenched zirconia bar could reinforce IPS-Empress II at the connector area which is a main failure region in all ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  11. Reinforced Concrete Finite Element Modeling based on the Discrete Crack Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Tudjono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of reinforced concrete elements is complex due to the nature of the concrete that is weak in tension. Among these complex issues are the initial cracking and crack propagation of concrete, and the bond-slip phenomenon between the concrete and reinforcing steel. Laboratory tested specimens are not only costly, but are limited in number. Therefore a finite element analysis is favored in combination to experimental data. The finite element technique involving the cracks inserting is one of the approaches to study the behavior of reinforced concrete structures through numerical simulation. In finite element modeling, the cracks can be represented by either smeared or discrete crack. The discrete crack method has its potential to include strain discontinuity within the structure. A finite element model (FEM including the concrete cracking and the bond-slip was developed to simulate the nonlinear response of reinforced concrete structures.

  12. Size effect of concrete column retrofitted by fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-04-01

    At present, the research on the size effect of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforced concrete members is not enough, besides the conclusions about size effect are different. It is of great theoretical significance and engineering application value to study the size effect of FRP reinforced concrete members in this field. In this paper, the study status from two aspects containing plain concrete columns and reinforced concrete columns for the retrofitted effect were analyzed and some new problems were put forward in this field. Also the paper mainly discussed the size effect of FRP constraint ratio and column slenderness ratio on FRP retrofitted concrete columns, and the effects of different load forms of FRP reinforced concrete columns under eccentric loading, repeated loading and unloading, and horizontal cyclic loading on the size effect of FRP reinforced concrete columns, and the influence of the single factor change of FRP paste way, type, package type and the concrete strength on the FRP reinforced concrete column. Besides, the changing tendency and regularity of the size effect of FRP strengthened concrete columns under the condition of muti-factors were given.

  13. Predicting Nonlinear Behavior and Stress-Strain Relationship of Rectangular Confined Reinforced Concrete Columns with ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a nonlinear finite element modeling and analysis of rectangular normal-strength reinforced concrete columns confined with transverse steel under axial compressive loading. In this study, the columns were modeled as discrete elements using ANSYS nonlinear finite element software. Concrete was modeled with 8-noded SOLID65 elements that can translate either in the x-, y-, or z-axis directions from ANSYS element library. Longitudinal and transverse steels were modeled as discrete elements using 3D-LINK8 bar elements available in the ANSYS element library. The nonlinear constitutive law of each material was also implemented in the model. The results indicate that the stress-strain relationships obtained from the analytical model using ANSYS are in good agreement with the experimental data. This has been confirmed with the insignificant difference between the analytical and experimental, i.e. 5.65 and 2.80 percent for the peak stress and the strain at the peak stress, respectively. The comparison shows that the ANSYS nonlinear finite element program is capable of modeling and predicting the actual nonlinear behavior of confined concrete column under axial loading. The actual stress-strain relationship, the strength gain and ductility improvement have also been confirmed to be satisfactorily.

  14. DRIVEN POLYSTRONG REINFORCED CONCRETE PILES AND NEW DESIGN OF PILE CAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Bekbasarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents constructional and technological features for manufacturing driven piles with variable strength of pile shaft. Economical efficiency of their production has been shown in the paper. The paper provides a pile cap design that ensures perception of hammer impacts with the help of lateral edges of the pile cap. Driven reinforced concrete piles which are manufactured from three shaft sections having various strength have been proposed in the paper. Material strength (concrete grade and diameter of bars and length of shaft sections are given on a case by case basis in accordance with nature and rate of stresses in piles during their driving process. Manufacturing of polystrong piles provides an opportunity to select them for a particular construction site with due account of their preservation during driving process.A pile cap has been developed that as opposed to existing analogous designs makes it possible to transmit impact efforts from a hammer to the pile through lateral surface of its head part. The pile cap provides the possibility to increase an area for perception of hammer impact efforts by the pile and in doing so it is possible significantly to reduce a damage risk and destruction of pile concrete during its driving. Application of polystrong piles and their driving with the help of new pile cap are considered as a basis for defect-free and resource-saving technology for pile foundations in the construction.

  15. Finite element analysis of bond behavior in a steel reinforced concrete structure strengthened carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pastorek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of influence of carbon-fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP on stress distribution in a steel reinforced concrete beam loaded by four-point bending flexural test. Simulation of the delamination is modelled by FEM with a cohesion zone material model. Distribution of cracks with CFRP strengthening is analysed, too. Finally, the fatigue life tests analysis was executed for the steel specimen (W.Nr. 1.0429 – concrete steel, which was used in the reinforced concrete beam. The fatigue test results are used to plot the fatigue life curve.

  16. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...

  17. Probabilistic Flexural Fatigue in Plain and Fiber-Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, José D; Cifuentes, Héctor; Yu, Rena C; Ruiz, Gonzalo

    2017-07-07

    The objective of this work is two-fold. First, we attempt to fit the experimental data on the flexural fatigue of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete with a probabilistic model (Saucedo, Yu, Medeiros, Zhang and Ruiz, Int. J. Fatigue, 2013, 48, 308-318). This model was validated for compressive fatigue at various loading frequencies, but not for flexural fatigue. Since the model is probabilistic, it is not necessarily related to the specific mechanism of fatigue damage, but rather generically explains the fatigue distribution in concrete (plain or reinforced with fibers) for damage under compression, tension or flexion. In this work, more than 100 series of flexural fatigue tests in the literature are fit with excellent results. Since the distribution of monotonic tests was not available in the majority of cases, a two-step procedure is established to estimate the model parameters based solely on fatigue tests. The coefficient of regression was more than 0.90 except for particular cases where not all tests were strictly performed under the same loading conditions, which confirms the applicability of the model to flexural fatigue data analysis. Moreover, the model parameters are closely related to fatigue performance, which demonstrates the predictive capacity of the model. For instance, the scale parameter is related to flexural strength, which improves with the addition of fibers. Similarly, fiber increases the scattering of fatigue life, which is reflected by the decreasing shape parameter.

  18. Durability of reinforced concrete exposed to aggressive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world. The combination of high compressive strength, afforded by concrete and, and the excellent mechanical properties that characterise steel make it an ideal composite for all manner of structures. One of the main weaknesses of this material, however, is that when the concrete is exposed to aggressive environments, in particular high concentrations of chloride ions or carbon dioxide, reinforcing steel corrodes, shortening service life. This article reviews the state of the art on concrete durability, along with the conditions that affect its useful life by inducing reinforcing steel corrosion. It also discusses the prevention and control methods, in particular electrochemical prevention and rehabilitation techniques, that have been developed to mitigate the problem.

    El hormigón armado se ha convertido en el material más utilizado a nivel mundial en el sector de la construcción. La combinación de las altas prestaciones a resistencia a la compresión que ofrece el hormigón y las excelentes propiedades mecánicas del acero lo hacen el material compuesto ideal para aplicaciones estructurales. Sin embargo, uno de los mayores problemas que afecta la vida útil del hormigón es la corrosión del acero de refuerzo, la cual se presenta cuando el hormigón se encuentra expuesto a ambientes agresivos, en especial frente a la exposición a iones cloruros y/o dióxido de carbono. Este trabajo revisa el estado del conocimiento con respecto a la durabilidad del hormigón enfatizando en los fenómenos que afectan su durabilidad y generan la corrosión del acero de refuerzo, adicionalmente se incluyen los métodos de prevención y control que se han desarrollado para mitigar el problema, en particular los relacionados con las técnicas electroquímicas de prevención y rehabilitación.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Fediuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows crystallization centers to be created by ash particles as a result of the binding of Ca(OH2 during hardening alite, which intensifies the clinker minerals hydration process; the presence of fine grains limestone also leads to the hydrocarboaluminates calcium formation. The relation between cement stone neoplasms composition as well as fibrous concrete porosity and permeability of composite at nanoscale level for use of composite binders with polydispersed mineral supplements was revealed. The results are of potential importance in developing the wide range of fine-grained fiber-reinforced concrete with a compressive strength more than 100 MPa, with low permeability under actual operating conditions.

  20. Non-traditional shape GFRP rebars for concrete reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claure, Guillermo G.

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) composites as internal reinforcement (rebars) for concrete structures has proven to be an alternative to traditional steel reinforcement due to significant advantages such as magnetic transparency and, most importantly, corrosion resistance equating to durability and structural life extension. In recent years, the number of projects specifying GFRP reinforcement has increased dramatically leading the construction industry towards more sustainable practices. Typically, GFRP rebars are similar to their steel counterparts having external deformations or surface enhancements designed to develop bond to concrete, as well as having solid circular cross-sections; but lately, the worldwide composites industry has taken advantage of the pultrusion process developing GFRP rebars with non-traditional cross-sectional shapes destined to optimize their mechanical, physical, and environmental attributes. Recently, circular GFRP rebars with a hollow-core have also become available. They offer advantages such as a larger surface area for improved bond, and the use of the effective cross-sectional area that is engaged to carry load since fibers at the center of a solid cross-section are generally not fully engaged. For a complete understanding of GFRP rebar physical properties, a study on material characterization regarding a quantitative cross-sectional area analysis of different GFRP rebars was undertaken with a sample population of 190 GFRP specimens with rebar denomination ranging from #2 to #6 and with different cross-sectional shapes and surface deformations manufactured by five pultruders from around the world. The water displacement method was applied as a feasible and reliable way to conduct the investigation. In addition to developing a repeatable protocol for measuring cross-sectional area, the objectives of establishing critical statistical information related to the test methodology and recommending improvements to

  1. Optimization of the Infrastructure of Reinforced Concrete Reservoirs by a Particle Swarm Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kia Saeed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimization techniques may be effective in finding the best modeling and shapes for reinforced concrete reservoirs (RCR to improve their durability and mechanical behavior, particularly for avoiding or reducing the bending moments in these structures. RCRs are one of the major structures applied for reserving fluids to be used in drinking water networks. Usually, these structures have fixed shapes which are designed and calculated based on input discharges, the conditions of the structure's topology, and geotechnical locations with various combinations of static and dynamic loads. In this research, the elements of reservoir walls are first typed according to the performance analyzed; then the range of the membrane based on the thickness and the minimum and maximum cross sections of the bar used are determined in each element. This is done by considering the variable constraints, which are estimated by the maximum stress capacity. In the next phase, based on the reservoir analysis and using the algorithm of the PARIS connector, the related information is combined with the code for the PSO algorithm, i.e., an algorithm for a swarming search, to determine the optimum thickness of the cross sections for the reservoir membrane’s elements and the optimum cross section of the bar used. Based on very complex mathematical linear models for the correct embedding and angles related to achain of peripheral strengthening membranes, which optimize the vibration of the structure, a mutual relation is selected between the modeling software and the code for a particle swarm optimization algorithm. Finally, the comparative weight of the concrete reservoir optimized by the peripheral strengthening membrane is analyzed using common methods. This analysis shows a 19% decrease in the bar’s weight, a 20% decrease in the concrete’s weight, and a minimum 13% saving in construction costs according to the items of a checklist for a concrete reservoir at 10,000 m3.

  2. Reinforcement contribution to the behavior of low-rise concrete walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Carrillo

    Full Text Available Based on steel strains recorded during shake table tests of six wall specimens, the effect and contribution of steel reinforcement to peak shear strength and displacement capacity of low-rise concrete walls is assessed and discussed. The experimental program included four variables such as wall geometry, concrete type, web steel ratio and type of web reinforcement. Wall response was assessed through effective steel strains in vertical reinforcement, efficiency factors of wall reinforcement, contribution of web horizontal reinforcement to wall shear strength, and the effect of type of web reinforcement to wall displacement.

  3. Earthquake Response of Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with Geopolymer Concrete and X-shaped Metallic Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Prakash vel, J.; Sathishkumar, K.; Rao, G. V. Rama

    2017-06-01

    A three-storey half scale reinforced concrete (RC) building is fixed with X-shaped metallic damper at the ground floor level, is designed and fabricated to study its seismic response characteristics. Experimental studies are carried out using the (4 m × 4 m) tri-axial shake-table facility to evaluate the seismic response of a retrofitted RC building with open ground storey (OGS) structure using yielding type X-shaped metallic dampers (also called as Added Damping and Stiffness-ADAS elements) and repairing the damaged ground storey columns using geopolymer concrete composites. This elasto-plastic device is normally incorporated within the frame structure between adjacent floors through chevron bracing, so that they efficiently enhance the overall energy dissipation ability of the seismically deficient frame structure under earthquake loading. Free vibration tests on RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper is carried out. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper are determined. The retrofitted reinforced concrete building is subjected to earthquake excitations and the response from the structure is recorded. This work discusses the preparation of test specimen, experimental set-up, instrumentation, method of testing of RC building and the response of the structure. The metallic damper reduces the time period of the structure and displacement demands on the OGS columns of the structure. Nonlinear time history analysis is performed using structural analysis package, SAP2000.

  4. Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete : Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete. Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative. The aim of the research project was to study the possibilities for establishing a new or improved electrochemical method for corrosion prevention/protection for reinforced concrete.

  5. The Shrinkage Cracking Behavior in Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A. Al-Mashhadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the reduced scale wall models were used (they are believed to resemble as much as possible the field conditions to study the shrinkage behavior of reactive powder concrete (RPC base restrained walls. Six base restrained RPC walls were casted in different length/height ratios of two ratios of steel fiber by volume in Summer. These walls were restrained by reinforced concrete bases to provide the continuous base restraint to the walls. The mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete investigated were; compressive strength between (75.3 – 140.1 MPa, splitting tensile strength between (5.7 – 13.9 MPa, flexural tensile strength (7.7 – 24.5 MPa, and static modulus of elasticity (32.7 – 47.1GPa. Based on the observations of this work, it was found that the cracks did not develop in the reduced scale of the reactive powder concrete (RPC walls restrained from movement at their bases for different L/H ratios (2, 5, and 10 and for two ratio of steel fiber (1% & 2% during 90 days period of drying conditions. Moreover, the shrinkage values increase toward the edges. Based on the results of this work, the increase in the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 1% steel fiber were (29%, 28%, 28% of the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 2% steel fiber of length/height ratios of (2, 5, and 10 respectively. The experimental observation in beam specimens showed that the free shrinkage, tensile strain capacity and elastic tensile strain capacity (at date of cracking of beams with 1% steel fiber were higher than the beams with 2% steel fiber by about (24%, (45% and (42% respectively

  6. Seismic response of reinforced concrete frames at different damage levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-González, Merangeli; Vidot-Vega, Aidcer L.

    2017-03-01

    Performance-based seismic engineering is focused on the definition of limit states to represent different levels of damage, which can be described by material strains, drifts, displacements or even changes in dissipating properties and stiffness of the structure. This study presents a research plan to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resistant frames at different performance levels established by the ASCE 41-06 seismic rehabilitation code. Sixteen RC plane moment frames with different span-to-depth ratios and three 3D RC frames were analyzed to evaluate their seismic behavior at different damage levels established by the ASCE 41-06. For each span-to-depth ratio, four different beam longitudinal reinforcement steel ratios were used that varied from 0.85 to 2.5% for the 2D frames. Nonlinear time history analyses of the frames were performed using scaled ground motions. The impact of different span-to-depth and reinforcement ratios on the damage levels was evaluated. Material strains, rotations and seismic hysteretic energy changes at different damage levels were studied.

  7. Application of artificial neural networks to predict the deflections of reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Mateusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear structural mechanics should be taken into account in the practical design of reinforced concrete structures. Cracking is one of the major sources of nonlinearity. Description of deflection of reinforced concrete elements is a computational problem, mainly because of the difficulties in modelling the nonlinear stress-strain relationship of concrete and steel. In design practise, in accordance with technical rules (e.g., Eurocode 2, a simplified approach for reinforced concrete is used, but the results of simplified calculations differ from the results of experimental studies.

  8. Numerical modelling of the fracture process in reinforced concrete by means of a continuum strong discontinuity approach. Part II: application to shear panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Luís Linero Segrera

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation results of the fracture process in reinforced concrete shear panels are presented in this work. The simulation used a model based on the continuum strong discontinuity approach (CSDA and mixing theory. CSDA describes strain localization and formation of discontinuity associated with the appearance of a crack. On the other hand, mixing theory represents composite material behaviour which is formed by a simple concrete matrix and one or two bundles of long reinforcement bars. The behaviour of simple concrete and steel is represented by a two-dimensional damage model and one-dimensional plasticity model, respectively. The model has been implemented in the finite element method which considers plane stress, infinitesimal strain and static loads. Three panels are simulated, reinforced in one or two ways;they are mainly subjected to shear forces. The numerical simulation results as well as structural response and cracking patterns were satisfactory.

  9. Efficiency of fiber reinforced concrete application in structures subjected to dynamic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Valeriy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced concretes possess high strength under dynamic loadings, which include impact loads, thanks to their high structural viscosity. This is the reason for using them in difficult operating conditions, where increasing the performance characteristics and the structure durability is of prime importance, and the issues of the cost become less significant. Applying methods of disperse reinforcement is most challenging in case of subtle high-porous materials on mineral binders, for example foamed concrete. At the same time, the experiments conducted in Russia and abroad show, that also in other cases the concrete strength resistance several times increases as a result of disperse reinforcement. This doesn't depend on average density of the concrete and type of fiber used. In the article the fibre reinforced concrete impact resistance is analysed. Recommendations are given in regard to fibre concrete application in manufacture of monolithic floor units for industrial buildings and precast piles.

  10. Photogrammetric Assessment of Flexure Induced Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams under Service Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are known to crack due to restrained shrinkage, temperature gradients, application of load, and expansive reactions. Cracks provide paths for rapid ingress of moisture, chlorides, and other aggressive substances, which may affect the long-term durability...... of the structure. For example, concrete cracks located at the reinforcing steel may contribute to a rapid corrosion initiation and propagation. Previous research has shown that cracked reinforced concrete under static flexural loading may have an increased ingress of chloride ions along the reinforcement....../concrete interface. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the development of cracks in reinforced concrete under flexural load. Cracking at both realistic service load levels (1.0-1.8 times estimated cracking load) and unrealistically high service load levels (> 0.5 times beam capacity) has...

  11. Review of Japanese recommendations on design and construction of different classes of fiber reinforced concrete and application examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchida, Yuichi; Fischer, Gregor; Hishiki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The development of concrete and cementitious composites with fiber reinforcement to improve the tensile load-deformation behavior has resulted in three distinct classes of materials. These include conventional Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) with tension softening response, High Performance Fiber...

  12. Experimental Study on Fibre-reinforced Cementitious Matrix Confined Concrete Columns under Axial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zeng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Poor fire resistance of fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP restricts its further application in construction structures. In this paper, a novel fibre-reinforced cementitious matrix confined concrete column (FRCMCC using fireproof grout as the fibre matrix was developed, and experiments were conducted to establish its performance and analyse the mechanical properties under axial compression. The test results show that its failure mode was more moderate compared to the traditional fibre-reinforced resinous matrix confined concrete column (FRRMCC, and the concrete columns confined with multi-layer fibres and end reinforcement could provide both good strength and ductility.

  13. Study of the shear behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barragán, B.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a series of tests for characterizing the structural behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete beams subjected to shear loading. The experimental program involves three types of fibres; two steel fibres and a polypropylene fibre. As a reference, plain concrete and conventionally reinforced concrete specimens have also been tested. The ultimate shear capacity of the beams is calculated and these values compared with those predicted by existing formulations. The study confirms that the toughness and shear crack resistance of the material is greatly enhanced by the fibres. However, the incorporation of 1% of fibres yielded lower shear strength than conventionally reinforced beams with the same amount of steel in the form of transversal stirrups. Existing design methods seem sufficiently robust to estimate the maximum shear load, even when using material properties (toughness, tensile strength extrapolated from code formulae.Este trabajo presenta una serie de ensayos para caracterizar el comportamiento estructural de vigas realizadas con hormigón reforzado con fibras sometidas a cortante. El programa de ensayos incluía tres tipos de fibras, dos de acero y una de polipropileno. Asimismo, se realizó una serie de ensayos con una viga confeccionada con hormigón armado convencional. La resistencia a cortante de las vigas es comparada con los valores que la formulación existente predice. El estudio confirma que la tenacidad y la resistencia a cortante son incrementadas tras la adición de fibras al hormigón. Sin embargo, la incorporación de un 1% en volumen de fibras conduce a valores de resistencia última a cortante inferiores a los obtenidos con vigas de hormigón convencional con la misma cantidad de acero dispuesta en forma de cercos de cortante. Los actuales métodos de cálculo parecen lo suficientemente precisos para evaluar la carga de cortante último, incluso cuando los parámetros mecánicos utilizados en las f

  14. Confinement of Reinforced-Concrete Columns with Non-Code Compliant Confining Reinforcement plus Supplemental Pen-Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anang Kristianto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the important requirements for earthquake resistant building related to confinement is the use of seismic hooks in the hoop or confining reinforcement of reinforced-concrete column elements. However, installation of a confining reinforcement with a 135-degree hook is not easy. Therefore, in practice, many construction workers apply a confining reinforcement with a 90-degreehook (non-code compliant. Based on research and records of recent earthquakes in Indonesia, the use of a non-code compliant confining reinforcement for concrete columns produces structures with poor seismic performance. This paper presents a study that introduces an additional element that is expected to improve the effectiveness of concrete columns confined with a non-code compliant confining reinforcement. The additional element, named a pen-binder, is used to keep the non-code compliant confining reinforcement in place. The effectiveness of this element under pure axial concentric loading was investigatedcomprehensively.The specimens tested in this study were 18 concrete columns,with a cross-section of 170 mm x 170 mm and a height of 480 mm. The main test variables were the material type of the pen-binder, the angle of the hook, and the confining reinforcement configuration.The test results indicate that adding pen-binders can effectively improve the strength and ductility of the column specimens confined with a non-code compliant confining reinforcement

  15. Probabilistic design and management of environmentally sustainable repair and rehabilitation of reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepech, Michael D.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a probabilistic sustainability design framework for the design of concrete repairs and rehabilitations intended to achieve targeted improvements in quantitative sustainability indicators. The framework consists of service life prediction models combining deterioration mechanisms...... the probability that reinforced concrete repair strategies using thicker concrete cover will meet future greenhouse gas emission reduction targets proposed by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change....

  16. Experimental Study of Concrete-filled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Tube with Internal Reinforcement under Axially Loading

    OpenAIRE

    SUN Wenbin; Qiangqiang ZHU; Weizhong HE

    2014-01-01

    Comparing with the circular concrete columns confined with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) wrap or tube, the rectilinear confined columns were reported much less. Due to the non-uniform distribution of confining pressure in the rectilinear confined columns, the FRP confinement effectiveness was significant reduced. This paper presents findings of an experimental program where nine prefabricated rectangular cross-section CFRP tubes with CFRP integrated crossties filled concrete to form concrete...

  17. Reinforced concrete containment safety under hydrogen explosion loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardis, M.N.; Nacar, A.; Delichatsios, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    In the present study the behavior and safety of a typical steel-lined reinforced concrete containment under postulated hydrogen explosions is investigated. The containment structure is that of the Indian Point, Unit 3, nuclear power plant, and consists of a cylinder capped with a hemispherical dome. The postulated explosions include both deflagrations and detonations. A deflagration produces a slow increase in pressure and temperature inside the containment. The pressure at the end of deflagration is, in first approximation, proportional to the predeflagration pressure and to the hydrogen volumetric concentration, and inversely proportional to the initial absolute temperature of the containment. The response to the quasistatic deflagration loading is computed by axisymmetric nonlinear Finite Element analysis.

  18. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ma, Jianxun; Ismail, Zubaidah; Iseley, David Thomas

    2016-12-16

    In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs) have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam). The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in civil engineering.

  19. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam. The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM system in civil engineering.

  20. Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Simulation with the SPH Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hušek, Martin; Kala, Jiří; Král, Petr; Hokeš, Filip

    2017-10-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is very popular in many branches of civil engineering. Thanks to its increased ductility, it is able to resist various types of loading. When designing a structure, the mechanical behaviour of SFRC can be described by currently available material models (with equivalent material for example) and therefore no problems arise with numerical simulations. But in many scenarios, e.g. high speed loading, it would be a mistake to use such an equivalent material. Physical modelling of the steel fibres used in concrete is usually problematic, though. It is necessary to consider the fact that mesh-based methods are very unsuitable for high-speed simulations with regard to the issues that occur due to the effect of excessive mesh deformation. So-called meshfree methods are much more suitable for this purpose. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is currently the best choice, thanks to its advantages. However, a numerical defect known as tensile instability may appear when the SPH method is used. It causes the development of numerical (false) cracks, making simulations of ductile types of failure significantly more difficult to perform. The contribution therefore deals with the description of a procedure for avoiding this defect and successfully simulating the behaviour of SFRC with the SPH method. The essence of the problem lies in the choice of coordinates and the description of the integration domain derived from them – spatial (Eulerian kernel) or material coordinates (Lagrangian kernel). The contribution describes the behaviour of both formulations. Conclusions are drawn from the fundamental tasks, and the contribution additionally demonstrates the functionality of SFRC simulations. The random generation of steel fibres and their inclusion in simulations are also discussed. The functionality of the method is supported by the results of pressure test simulations which compare various levels of fibre reinforcement of SFRC