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Sample records for concomitant boost technique

  1. Comparison of three concomitant boost techniques for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan S.; Chang, Sha X.; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast radiotherapy (RT) followed by a tumor bed boost typically spans 5-6 weeks of treatment. Interest is growing in RT regimens, such as concomitant boost, that decrease overall treatment time, lessening the time/cost burden to patients and facilities. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) scans from 20 cases were selected for this retrospective, dosimetric study to compare three different techniques of concomitant boost delivery: (1) standard tangents plus an electron boost (2) intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) tangents using custom compensators plus an electron boost, and (3) IMRT tangents plus a conformal photon boost. The equivalent uniform dose model was used to compare the plans. Results: The average breast equivalent uniform dose value for the three techniques (standard, IMRT plus electrons, and IMRT plus photons) was 48.6, 47.9, and 48.3, respectively. The plans using IMRT more closely approximated the prescribed dose of 46 Gy to the whole breast. The breast volume receiving >110% of the dose was less with the IMRT tangents than with standard RT (p 0.037), but no significant difference in the maximal dose or other evaluated parameters was noted. Conclusion: Although the IMRT techniques delivered the prescribed dose with better dose uniformity, the small improvement seen did not support a goal of improved resource use

  2. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, A H.M.; Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Pieters, B R; Koning, C C.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, F J [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Inst., Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, T.M. de [Dept. of Urology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was {>=} 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  3. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, A.H.M.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Pieters, B.R.; Koning, C.C.E.; Pos, F.J.; Reijke, T.M. de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was ≥ 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  4. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concomitant Boost Technique for Unresectable Non-Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    1991-01-01

    Twenty five patients with unresectable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung have been treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique since September, 1989. Those patients with history of previous surgery or chemotherapy, pleural effusion or significant weight loss (greater than 10% of body weight) were excluded from the study. Initially, 27 Gy were delivered in 15 fractions in 3 weeks to the large field. Thereafter, large field received 1.8 Gy and cone down boost field received 1.4Gy with twice a day fractinations up to 49.4Gy. After 49.4Gy, only boost field was treated twice a day with 1.8 and 1.4 Gy. Total tumor doses were 62.2Gy for 12 patients and 65.4Gy for remaining 13 patients. Follow up period was ranged from 6 to 24 month. Actuarial survival rates at 6, 12, and 18 month were 88%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. Corresponding disease free survival rates were 88%, 41%, and 21%, respectively. Actuarial cumulative local failure rates at 9,12 and 15 month were 36%, 42%, and 59%, respectively. No significant increase of acute or late complications including radiation pneumonitis was noted with maximum follow up of 24 month. Although the longer follow up is needed, it is worthwhile to try the prospective randomized study to evaluate the efficacy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique for unresectable non-small cell lung cancers in view of excellent tolerance of this treatment. In the future, further increase of total radiation dose might be necessary to improve local control for non-small cell lung cancer

  5. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Pos, Floris J; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant partial bladder boost schedule in radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, coupling a limited boost volume with shortening of the overall treatment time. Methods and materials: Between 1994 and 1999, 50 patients with a T2-T4 N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder received radiotherapy delivered in a short overall treatment time with a concomitant boost technique. With this technique a dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions was administered to the small pelvis with a concomitant boost limited to the bladder tumor area plus margin of 15 Gy in fractions of 0.75 Gy. The total tumor dose was 55 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks. Toxicity was scored according to EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria. Results: The feasibility of the treatment was good. Severe acute toxicity {>=}G3 was observed in seven patients (14%). Severe late toxicity {>=}G3 was observed in six patients (13%). Thirty-seven patients (74%) showed a complete and five (10 %) a partial remission after treatment. The actuarial 3-year freedom of local progression was 55%. Conclusion: In external radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer a concomitant boost technique coupling a partial bladder boost with shortening of the overall treatment time provides a high probability of local control with acceptable toxicity.

  6. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant partial bladder boost schedule in radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, coupling a limited boost volume with shortening of the overall treatment time. Methods and materials: Between 1994 and 1999, 50 patients with a T2-T4 N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder received radiotherapy delivered in a short overall treatment time with a concomitant boost technique. With this technique a dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions was administered to the small pelvis with a concomitant boost limited to the bladder tumor area plus margin of 15 Gy in fractions of 0.75 Gy. The total tumor dose was 55 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks. Toxicity was scored according to EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria. Results: The feasibility of the treatment was good. Severe acute toxicity ≥G3 was observed in seven patients (14%). Severe late toxicity ≥G3 was observed in six patients (13%). Thirty-seven patients (74%) showed a complete and five (10 %) a partial remission after treatment. The actuarial 3-year freedom of local progression was 55%. Conclusion: In external radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer a concomitant boost technique coupling a partial bladder boost with shortening of the overall treatment time provides a high probability of local control with acceptable toxicity

  7. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-04-19

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 "treatment plans" (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the "target coverage" was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5-2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature's preliminary data are confirming also a

  8. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 “treatment plans” (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the “target coverage” was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5–2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature’s preliminary data are confirming

  9. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  10. Concomitant GRID boost for Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Kwok, Young; Chin, Lawrence S.; Simard, J. Marc; Regine, William F.

    2005-01-01

    We developed an integrated GRID boost technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The technique generates an array of high dose spots within the target volume via a grid of 4-mm shots. These high dose areas were placed over a conventional Gamma Knife plan where a peripheral dose covers the full target volume. The beam weights of the 4-mm shots were optimized iteratively to maximize the integral dose inside the target volume. To investigate the target volume coverage and the dose to the adjacent normal brain tissue for the technique, we compared the GRID boosted treatment plans with conventional Gamma Knife treatment plans using physical and biological indices such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), DVH-derived indices, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probabilities (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). We found significant increase in the target volume indices such as mean dose (5%-34%; average 14%), TCP (4%-45%; average 21%), and EUD (2%-22%; average 11%) for the GRID boost technique. No significant change in the peripheral dose coverage for the target volume was found per RTOG protocol. In addition, the EUD and the NTCP for the normal brain adjacent to the target (i.e., the near region) were decreased for the GRID boost technique. In conclusion, we demonstrated a new technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery that can escalate the dose to the target while sparing the adjacent normal brain tissue

  11. The simultaneous boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Keus, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous boost technique in radiotherapy consists of delivering the boost treatment (additional doses to reduced volumes) simultaneously with the basic (large-field) treatment for all treatment sessions. Both the dose per fraction delivered by basic-treatment fields and by boost-treatment fields have to be reduced to end up with the same total dose in boost volume as in the original schedule, where basic treatment preceded boost treatment. These dose reductions and corresponding weighting factors have been calculated using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and the concept of Normalized Total Dose (NTD). Relative NTD distributions were computed to evaluate the dose distributions resulting for the simultaneous boost technique with respect to acute and late normal tissue damage and tumor control. For the example of treatment of prostate cancer the weighting factors were calculated on basis of NTD for late normal tissue damage. For treatment of oropharyngeal cancer NTD for acute and normal tissue damage was used to determine the weighting factors. In this last example a theoretical sparing of late normal tissue damage can be demonstrated. Another advantage of simultaneous boost technique is that megavoltage images of the large basic-treatment fields facilitates the determination of the position of the patient with respect to the small boost-treatment fields. (author). 42 refs., 8 figs

  12. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, John T.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Peters, Lester J.; Ang, K. Kian

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a concomitant boost fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for treating patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Patients and Methods: Between December 1983 and November 1992, 83 patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsil were treated with concomitant boost fractionation. The distribution of American Joint Committee on Cancer T stages was TX-4, T1-5, T2-29, T3-41, T4-4; N stages were NX-1, N0-26, N1-13, N2-31, N3-12. Patients were treated with standard large fields to 54 Gy in 6 weeks. The boost treatment consisted of a second daily 1.5 Gy fraction for 10-12 fractions, usually delivered during the final phase of treatment. The tumor dose was 69-72 Gy, given over 6 weeks. Twenty-one patients, who all had N2 or N3 regional disease, underwent neck dissections, either before (13 patients) or 6 weeks after radiotherapy (8 patients); the other patients were treated with radiotherapy alone. Results: The 5-year actuarial disease-specific survival and overall survival rates were 71 and 60%, respectively. Patients with T2 and T3 primary tumors had 5-year actuarial local control rates of 96 and 78%, respectively. Patients with T3 disease who received the final-phase boost had a 5-year actuarial local control rate of 82%. Actuarial 5-year regional disease control rates were N0, 92%; N1, 76%; N2, 89%; and N3, 89%. The 21 patients who had neck dissections all had their disease regionally controlled. Patients presenting with nodal disease or after a node excision who were treated with radiation alone had a 5-year actuarial regional disease control rate of 79%. All but five patients had confluent Grade 4 mucositis during treatment. Severe late complications attributable to radiation included mandibular necrosis, in-field osteosarcoma, and chronic dysphagia for solid foods. Conclusions: High rates of local and regional disease control were achieved with the concomitant boost fractionation schedule, with few cases of severe late

  13. Base-of-tongue carcinoma: treatment results using concomitant boost radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Albert C.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, Kian K.; Goepfert, Helmuth; Peters, Lester J.

    1995-01-01

    had subsequent regional failures. The 5-year actuarial risk of distant metastases in patients whose disease was controlled locoregionally was 21%. Grade 3 or 4 confluent acute mucositis occurred in 94% of patients. However, late complications were limited to two cases of transient mandibular exposure and three cases of self-limited mucosal ulcerations. Conclusion: The concomitant boost fractionation schedule is a very effective regimen for this disease when appropriately selected patients are treated with meticulous technique. The therapeutic ratio is favorable, with a high rate of disease control and no persistent severe late complications. Patients whose neck disease responds completely to treatment with this schedule do not appear to need a planned neck dissection

  14. The Role of Concomitant Radiation Boost in Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Ismail, Mahmoud; Boskos, Christos; Zhao, Kuaile; Kaul, David

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzed the impact of concomitant boost on long-term clinical outcomes in locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 141 patients (median age=61 years) were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Median total dose was 50.4 Gy. Forty-three patients received a concomitant boost. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), given as a 24-h continuous infusion. Mean follow-up was 83.7 months. The 3, 5-, and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.9%, 84.6%, and 52.9%, respectively. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates at 3, 5, and 10 years were 91.4%, 88.9%, and 79.3%, respectively. Metastasis-free survival (MFS) rates at 3, 5, and 10 years were 84.6%, 75.4%, and 49.9%, respectively. Overall, 9.9% of all patients achieved pathological complete response. Down-staging of T- or N-stage was achieved in 55.1% and 41.5% of patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that female sex (p=0.011), concomitant boost-radiotherapy (p=0.014), and the presence of fewer than five positive lymph nodes (prectal cancer in terms of local outcomes. Intensified radiotherapy using a concomitant boost has a positive effect on OS. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Prospective trial of preoperative concomitant boost radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher N.; Feig, Barry W.; Cleary, Karen; Dubrow, Ronelle; Curley, Steven A.; Ellis, Lee M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Lenzi, Renato; Lynch, Patrick; Wolff, Robert; Brown, Thomas; Pazdur, Richard; Abbruzzese, James; Hoff, Paulo M.; Allen, Pamela; Brown, Barry; Skibber, John

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: To evaluate the response to a concomitant boost given during standard chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Concomitant boost radiotherapy was administered preoperatively to 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in a prospective trial. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy to the pelvis with 18 mV photons at 1.8 Gy/fraction using a 3-field belly board technique with continuous infusion 5FU chemotherapy (300mg/m 2 ) 5 days per week. The boost was given during the last week of therapy with a 6-hour inter-fraction interval to the tumor plus a 2-3 cm margin. The boost dose equaled 7.5 Gy/5 fractions (1.5 Gy/fraction); a total dose of 52.5 Gy/5 weeks was given to the primary tumor. Pretreatment tumor stage, determined by endorectal ultrasound and CT scan, included 29 with T3N0 [64%], 11 T3N1, 1 T3Nx, 2 T4N0, 1 T4N3, and 1 with TxN1 disease. Mean distance from the anal verge was 5 cm (range 0-13 cm). Median age was 55 years (range 33-77 years). The population consisted of 34 males and 11 females. Median time of follow-up is 8 months (range 1-24 months). Results: Sphincter preservation (SP) has been accomplished in 33 of 42 (79%) patients resected to date. Three patients did not undergo resection because of the development of metastatic disease in the interim between the completion of chemoradiation (CTX/XRT) and preoperative evaluation. The surgical procedures included proctectomy and coloanal anastomosis (n = 16), low anterior resection (n = 13), transanal resection (n = 4). Tumor down-staging was pathologically confirmed in 36 of the 42 (86%) resected patients, and 13 (31%) achieved a pathologic CR. Among the 28 tumors (67%) located <6 cm from the anal verge, SP was accomplished in 21 cases (75%). Although perioperative morbidity was higher, toxicity rates during CTX/XRT were comparable to that seen with conventional fractionation. Compared to our contemporary experience with conventional CTX/XRT (45Gy; 1.8 Gy per

  16. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy versus concomitant boost radiation for advanced inoperable head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.; Schueller, P.; Micke, O.; Willich, N.

    2000-01-01

    In this prospective, non-randomized study we compare the results of simultaneous radiochemotherapy (RCT) with those of concomitant boost treatment (CBT) in advanced head and neck cancer. From January 1993 to March 1999, 77 patients were treated with cisplatin, 5-FU, and 70.2 Gy (accelerated split-course); from January 1995 to March 1999, a further 33 patients received CBT to a total dose of 72 Gy. Toxicities were prospectively recorded according to RTOG/EORTC criteria. Acute and subacute reactions did not differ significantly. Severe late effects (III/IV) remained anecdotal (one fistula). Therapy-associated mortalities were 3%(RCT) vs. 0% (CBT), most tumors responding well to therapy (CR + PR: RCT: 72%, CBT: 63%). The 2-year probabilities for freedom from locoregional progression amounted to 42% (RCT) and 31% (CBT); p > 0.05. Tumor-specific 2-year survival amounted to 40% (RCT) and 34% (CBT); p > 0.05. Both of the treatment concepts yield high remission rates with moderate toxicities. Nevertheless, median time to recurrence is still fairly short. We could not find any differences for local control and survival. For patients who are not able to complete the full three courses of radiochemotherapy, the concomitant boost schedule presents a good alternative

  17. Radiochemoimmunotherapy with intensity-modulated concomitant boost: interim analysis of the REACH trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Krauss, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Simon, Christian; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Lossner, Karen; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and toxicity clinical in the intensified treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with the combination of chemotherapy, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in a concomitant boost concept. REACH is a prospective, bi-centric phase II trial of carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab weekly combined with IMRT. Primary endpoint is locoregional control, secondary endpoints include acute radiation effects and adverse events. Evaluation of disease response is carried out according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST); toxicity is assessed using NCI CTC v 3.0. Treatment was tolerated moderately well, acneiforme erythema occurred in 74.1% (grade II/III), mucositis grade III in 28.6%, and radiation dermatitis grade III in 14.3%. Higher-grade side-effects resolved quickly until the first follow-up post treatment. Objective response rates were promising with 28.6% CR at first follow-up and 92.9% thereafter. The combination of standard carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab is feasible and results in promising objective response rates. The use of an IMRT concomitant boost is practicable in a routine clinical setting resulting in only moderate overall toxicity of the regimen.

  18. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica M.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; DiNardo, L.; Manning, Matthew A.; Silverman, L.; Clay, L.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Amir, Cyrus

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy of accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for advanced head-and-neck carcinomas. This study represents a single-institution experience, performed to identify the factors influencing tumor control, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1999, 133 patients with primary squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma underwent accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy using a concomitant boost. The concomitant boost in this regimen was delivered using reduced fields delivered 3 times weekly in a twice-daily schedule during the final phase. The total radiation dose ranged from 64.8 Gy to 76.5 Gy (mean 71.1). Patients were evaluated in follow-up for local control and late toxicity. Multivariate analysis of treatment and patient parameters was performed to evaluate their influence on toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results: With a mean follow-up of 37 months, the actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group at 5 years was 24% and the local control rate was 57%. The tumor volume was the most significant predictor of local control, such that each 1-cm 3 increase in volume was associated with a 1% decrease in local control. For patients with tumor volumes ≤30 cm 3 vs. >30 cm 3 , the 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 52% and 27% (p = 0.004) and locoregional control rate was 76% and 26% (p<0.001), respectively. Seventy-six patients with a minimum of 12 months and median of 39 months toxicity follow-up were studied for late effects. None of these patients experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The actuarial rate of significant toxicity (Grade III or greater) was 32% at 5 years. Of the toxicities observed, xerostomia (19%) was the most common. Multivariate analysis revealed N stage and dose as independent predictors of Grade 3 effects. Conclusion: The locoregional control and survival for patients in this institutional experience compare favorably to

  19. Concomitant boost radiation therapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: preliminary report of a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.-M.; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.; Yeh, S.-A.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Huang, David T.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The radiation therapy results for patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been disappointing. Tumor dose escalation using concomitant boost technique (CBT) has been shown to improve local control in a few prospective studies. This trial was carried out to prospectively assess the radiation response and acute toxicity of CBT in comparison to the conventional treatment technique (CTT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-seven consecutive eligible patients were entered in this prospective clinical trial between November 1994 and February 1998. Patients were randomized to receive either CBT (43 patients) or CTT (54 patients) radiation therapy. These patients either refused chemotherapy or were judged as unsuitable for chemotherapy. Patients in the CBT group received 46.8 Gy in 26 fractions using large fields that encompassed the gross and occult disease. A concomitant boost of 18.2 Gy (0.7 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the gross disease using small fields with 1.5-cm margins. The small fields were treated concurrently with the large fields and the total dose to the tumor area was 65 Gy in 26 fractions. Patients in the CTT group received 70.8 Gy in 38 fractions. The acute toxicity between each group was compared. The response rate was analyzed and compared by treatment group, gender, age, stage, histology, initial Karnofsky performance score (KPS), severity of acute toxicity, and maximum body weight loss (MBWL) during treatment course. Results: The demographic parameters such as sex, age, and stage were evenly distributed in each treatment group. The majority of these patients had Stage IIIA and IIIB disease. Overall median treatment times were 39 days for the CBT group of patients and 62 days for the CTT group. No treatment-related mortality was found. There were 2 patients in the CTT group with acute RTOG Grade 3 lung toxicity, and no Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity was observed in CBT group. The response rates, assessed by

  20. Phase I/II Trial of Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Radiotherapy for Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Takano, Shingo; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Hashii, Haruko; Kanemoto, Ayae; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Akira; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial GBM met the following criteria: (1) a Karnofsky performance status of ≥60; (2) the diameter of the enhanced area before radiotherapy was ≤40 cm; and (3) the enhanced area did not extend to the brain stem, hypothalamus, or thalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T 2 -weighted high area (clinical tumor volume 3 [CTV3]) was treated by x-ray radiotherapy in the morning (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). More than 6 hours later, 250 MeV proton beams were delivered to the enhanced area plus a 10-mm margin (CTV2) in the first half of the protocol (23.1 GyE in 14 fractions) and to the enhanced volume (CTV1) in the latter half (23.1 GyE in 14 fraction). The total dose to the CTV1 was 96.6 GyE. Nimustine hydrochloride (80 mg/m2) was administered during the first and fourth weeks. Results: Acute toxicity was mainly hematologic and was controllable. Late radiation necrosis and leukoencephalopathy were each seen in one patient. The overall survival rates after 1 and 2 years were 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. The median survival period was 21.6 months. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival rates were 45.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The median MRI change-free survival was 11.2 months. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy (96.6 GyE in 56 fractions) for GBM was tolerable and beneficial if the target size was well considered. Further studies are warranted to pursue the possibility of controlling border region recurrences.

  1. Feasibility and efficacy of accelerated weekly concomitant boost postoperative radiation therapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Luthi, Francois; Matzinger, Oscar; Betz, Michael; Dragusanu, Daniela; Bulling, Shelley; Bron, Luc; Pasche, Philippe; Seelentag, Walter; Mirimanoff, René O; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess feasibility and efficacy of weekly concomitant boost accelerated postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) with concomitant chemotherapy (CT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Conformal or intensity-modulated 66-Gy RT was performed in 5.5 weeks in 40 patients. Cisplatin was given at days 1, 22, and 43. Median follow-up was 36 months. Grade 3 mucositis, dysphagia, and erythema was observed in ten (25%), nine (23%), and six (13%) patients, respectively. Grade 3 or more anemia was observed in two (6%) patients, and leukopenia in five (13%) patients. No grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia was observed. Grade 3 nephrotoxicity was observed in one patient (3%). No treatment-related mortality was observed. Grade 2 or more xerostomia and edema were observed in ten (25%) and one (3%) patient, respectively. Locoregional relapse occurred in eight patients, and seven patients developed distant metastases. Median time to locoregional relapse was 6 months. Three-year overall, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 63%, 62%, and 81%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only prognostic factor was nodal status. Reducing overall treatment time using accelerated PORT/CT by weekly concomitant boost (six fractions per week) combined with concomitant cisplatin CT is easily feasible with acceptable morbidity.

  2. A feasibility study of concomitant boost radiotheraphy for patients with cancer of the supraglottic larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujko, K.; Skoczylas, J.Z.; Bentzen, S.M.; Hliniak, A.; Wasilewski, M.; Szutkowski, Z.J.; Osmolski, A.

    1993-01-01

    Between February 1988 and December 1989, 65 patients with supraglottic cancer completed a course of concomitant boost radiotherapy. Cases with N3 disease, a Karnovsky performance score less than 70, age above 70 years, or a second primary cancer were not eligible for the study. Distribution of the patients was: Stage T1-T2 30%, T3-T4 70%, N0 68%, N+32%. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 76 Gy (median 66 Gy); overall treatment time ranged from 36 to 56 days with a median of 42 days. The daily dose during the first 4 weeks was 1.8 Gy, and during the last 2 weeks it was 1.6 Gy b.i.d. with a 4- or (after September 1988) 6-h interval. The clinical impression was that the early mucosal reactions were acceptable but more severe than after conventional treatment, with confluent membranous mucosal reaction being observed in 54% of the patients. Also, this reaction was significantly more frequent in patients treated with a 4-h interval (68%) than with a 6-h interval (41%) between the daily fractions. To relieve severe dysphagia, narcotics were required in 22% of the patients. The follow-up time ranged from 22 to 50 months, median 34 months. Treatment-requiring late complications were observed in 8 patients, and the 3-year actuarial risk was 17% with 95% confidence limits (6%, 27%). Two of these patients had severe complications: One of them required a temporary tracheostomy due to arytenoid edema and the other developed a laryngo-cutaneous fistula which healed after pharmacological treatment. Actuarial 3-year local-regional control was 59% (46%, 71%) and 3-year actuarial crude survival 55% (42%, 67%). There was no significant difference in the incidence of late complications or tumor control between the two groups of patients treated with a 4- or 6-h interval between the daily fractions. This study shows that the concomitant boost regimen tired here is feasible, but also stresses that the interval between dose fractions should be 6 h or more. (orig.)

  3. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Jose Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; Sacchetti de Pasos, Antonio; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asuncion; Alba, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. Material and methods: A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n=19) and IV (n=75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m 2 weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Results: Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Conclusions: Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data

  4. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy

  5. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yavuz, Melek Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey); Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  6. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Sylvie; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  7. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  8. Quality of Life After Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, Harvey; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated using hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I–II study enrolled patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8–10. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost to the prostate, for a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy per fraction) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Daily image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. Quality of life was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), a validated tool that assesses four primary domains (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal). Results: From 2004 to 2007, 97 patients were treated. Median follow-up was 39 months. Compared with baseline, at 24 months there was no statistically significant change in the mean urinary domain score (p = 0.99), whereas there were decreases in the bowel (p < 0.01), sexual (p < 0.01), and hormonal (p < 0.01) domains. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant difference in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores at 24 months was 27%, 31%, 55%, and 60%, respectively. However, moderate and severe distress related to these symptoms was minimal, with increases of only 3% and 5% in the urinary and bowel domains, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated. Although there were modest rates of clinically significant patient-reported urinary and bowel toxicity, most of this caused only mild distress, and moderate and severe effects on QOL were limited. Additional follow-up is ongoing to characterize long-term QOL.

  9. Feasibility of accelerated radiotherapy (AR) using a concomitant boost for the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Wan, Jim; Paig, Camilo U.; Kun, Larry E.; Niell, H. Barry

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The feasibility of AR using a concomitant boost in the treatment of unresectable NSCLC was prospectively tested in a phase II study. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients were enrolled to the protocol between 11/90 and 5/93. Stage distribution was as follows: Medically inoperable stage I = 5 (T 1 = 1, T 2 = 4), stage IIIA = 1, and stage IIIA(N 2 ) = 14. Planned AR delivered a total dose of 65 Gy in 45 fractions over five weeks using a 'field within a field technique'. The large field (day 1, a.m.) encompassed the primary lesion and adjacent lymph nodes to 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction (fx). A CT planned small field (day 8, >6 hours apart in p.m.) included only the primary lesion and overt nodal disease to 20 Gy at 1.0 Gy/fx. Doses were not corrected for lung inhomogeneity. Results: Median age of the 20 male enrolled patients was 68 years (range = 42-80 years). Eighteen (90%) of 20 patients completed the planned AR without any interruptions in therapy. One patient experienced a 4 day interruption due to tumor related obstructive pneumonia while the other patient missed 2 days secondary to non-treatment related small bowel obstruction. No incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis was observed. One patient experienced pneumonitis within the radiation portal 1 month post-RT which response d to corticosteroid therapy; otherwise, no late sequelae were observed. The median total delivered dose was 65 Gy (range 64.0-65.4). At a minimum follow-up interval of 30 months, the 2-year Kaplan-Meier and median survival are 15% and 13.4 months, respectively for all 20 patients. Conclusion: AR using a concomitant boost to 65 Gy in 5 weeks for unresectable NSCLC is feasible with minimal acute or long term toxicity. Median survival in our study was similar to the chemo radiation arms of CALGB 8433 and RTOG 8808 protocols. Protocols which combine AR with chemotherapy should be explored for unresectable NSCLC

  10. Influence of the timing of a concomitant boost during fractionated irradiation of rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubben, H.H.; Beck-Bornholdt, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat (WAG/Rij) were treated using fractionation schedules including a boost. The total dose was 60 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks. Four different boost schedules were applied: A single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the last day of treatment, a single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the first day of treatment, a schedule including the boost in 7 fractions during the first week, and a schedule including the boost in 10 fractions during the first week of treatment. A standard schedule with 30 fractions of 2 Gy without a boost was used for comparison. Initially accelerated schedules, i.e. those with a boost at start of treatment, revealed higher effect on tumour parenchyma as monitored by local control rate and net growth delay. This could be due to a decrease of radio-sensitivity, that is, an increase of the hypoxic fraction of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  11. Ten-year results of accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiation with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after conserving surgery for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cante, Domenico; Petrucci, Edoardo; Sciacero, Piera; Piva, Cristina; Ferrario, Silvia; Bagnera, Silvia; Patania, Sebastiano; Mondini, Guido; Pasquino, Massimo; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Vellani, Giorgio; La Porta, Maria Rosa; Franco, Pierfrancesco

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is considered a standard therapeutic option for early breast cancer (EBC) in the postoperative setting after breast conservation (BCS). A boost to the lumpectomy cavity may further increase local control. We herein report on the 10-year results of a series of EBC patients treated after BCS with hypofractionated WBRT with a concomitant photon boost to the surgical bed over 4 weeks. Between 2005 and 2007, 178 EBC patients were treated with a basic course of radiotherapy consisting of 45 Gy to the whole breast in 20 fractions (2.25 Gy daily) with an additional boost dose of 0.25 Gy delivered concomitantly to the lumpectomy cavity, for an additional dose of 5 Gy. Median follow-up period was 117 months. At 10-year, overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and local control were 92.2% (95% CI 88.7-93.4%), 99.2% (95% CI 96.7-99.7%), 95.5% (95% CI 91.2-97.2%) and 97.3% (95% CI 94.5-98.9%), respectively. Only eight patients recurred. Four in-breast recurrences, two axillary node relapses and two metastatic localizations were observed. Fourteen patients died during the observation period due to other causes while breast cancer-related deaths were eight. At last follow-up, ≥G2 fibrosis and telangiectasia were seen in 7% and 5% of patients. No major lung and heart toxicities were observed. Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 87.8% of patients and fair/poor in 12.2%. Hypofractionated WBRT with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after BCS in EBC led to consistent clinical results at 10 years. Hence, it can be considered a valid treatment option in this setting.

  12. The influence of quantitative tumor volume measurements on local control in advanced head and neck cancer using concomitant boost accelerated superfractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christopher R; Khandelwal, Shiv R; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K; Ravalese, Joseph; Wazer, David E

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: Current methods to clinically define head and neck tumor bulk are qualitative and imprecise. Although the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system is important for this purpose, limitations exist. This study will investigate the prognostic value of computed tomography (CT) derived tumor volume measurements in comparison to AJCC stage and other significant variables. Materials and Methods: Seventy-six patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated with concomitant boost accelerated superfractionated irradiation. Doses ranged from 68.4-73.8 Gy (median 70.2 Gy). Good quality pretherapy CT scans were available in 51 patients. Total tumor volume (TTV) estimates were derived from these scans using digital integration of primary tumor and metastatic lymphadenopathy. Actuarial and multivariate statistical techniques were applied to analyze local control. Results: Thirty-six-month local control was 63%. TTV ranged from 5-196 cm{sup 3} (median 35 cm{sup 3}) for all cases, 5-142 cm{sup 3} (median 17 cm{sup 3}) for those controlled, and 16-196 cm{sup 3} (median 47 cm{sup 3}) for local failures. There was a significant increase in failures above 35 cm{sup 3}. Univariate analysis found that TTV, T-stage, N-stage, and primary site were each significant prognostic variables. Local control for TTV {<=}35 cm{sup 3} was 92% at 36 months vs. 34% for TTV >35 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0001). Multivariate analysis, however, found that TTV, primary site, and sex were important as independent variables; T and N stage were not independently significant unless TTV was removed from the model. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the prognostic significance of TTV in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. This variable appears to be a more predictive than AJCC clinical stage. Quantitative tumor volume measurements may prove to be a useful parameter in future analyses of head and neck cancer.

  13. A Survey on Voltage Boosting Techniques for Step-Up DC-DC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forouzesh, Mojtaba; Siwakoti, Yam Prasad; Gorji, Saman Asghari

    2016-01-01

    boosting techniques and topologies are large, which at times may be confusing and difficult to follow/adapt for different applications. Considering these aspects and in order to make a clear sketch of the general law and framework of various voltage boosting techniques, this paper comprehensively reviews...

  14. Phase II study of cetuximab plus concomitant boost radiotherapy in Japanese patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Susumu; Yoshino, Takayuki; Fujii, Masato

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the tolerability of cetuximab plus radiotherapy in Japanese patients with untreated locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 initial dose then 250 mg/m 2 weekly) for 7 weeks plus concomitant boost radiotherapy (weeks 2-7: once daily [1.8 Gy] for 3.6 weeks, then twice daily [1.8 Gy morning and 1.5 Gy afternoon] for 2.4 weeks). The primary endpoint was treatment completion rate (the rate of treated patients completing ≥70% of the planned cetuximab dose and the full dose of radiotherapy within 2 weeks over the planned schedule). Twenty-two patients were evaluable. The treatment completion rate was 100% (95% confidence interval 85-100). The response rate 8 weeks post-radiotherapy was 82% (95% confidence interval 60-95). The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were mucosal inflammation (73%); dermatitis (27%); and infection, radiation skin injury and stomatitis (23% each). Cetuximab plus concomitant boost radiotherapy can be safely administered to Japanese patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Tolerability and efficacy were in line with those reported in the Phase III Bonner trial in a Western population of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. (author)

  15. Concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, Roy B.; Posner, Marshall R.; Norris, Charles M.; Mahadevan, Anand; Sullivan, Christopher; Goguen, Laura; Wirth, Lori J.; Costello, Rosemary; Case, MaryAnn; Stowell, Sara; Sammartino, Dan; Busse, Paul M.; Haddad, Robert I.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In a Phase I/II trial, we investigated concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) after induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients presented with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III/IV and were treated initially with induction chemotherapy using cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil (PF), carboplatinum-5-FU, or docetaxel-PF. Patients then received docetaxel four times weekly with concomitant boost (CB) radiation (1.8 Gy once-daily X20, 1.8/1.5 Gy twice a day). Fifteen patients each received 20 mg/M 2 and 25 mg/M 2 . Results: Thirty-one patients were enrolled and 30 were evaluable for response and toxicity. Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 27-63 months). Primary sites were: oropharynx 19, oral cavity 2, larynx/hypopharynx 5, and unknown primary 4. Eighty-seven percent of patients had N2/N3 disease; 60% had T3/T4 disease. Twenty percent of patients had a complete response (CR) to induction chemotherapy. After chemoradiotherapy, 21 of 30 patients had a CR, 2 had progressive disease, and 7 had partial response (PR). Nineteen of 26 patients presenting with neck disease had neck dissections, and 7 of 19 were positive. Ninety-three percent of all patients were rendered disease-free after all planned therapy. Treatment failed in 8 patients, and 7 have died of disease. An additional patient died with no evidence of disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) are currently alive with no evidence of disease. No acute dose-limiting toxicity was observed at either dose level. Conclusions: This intensive treatment regimen of concurrent docetaxel/concomitant boost radiation and surgery after induction chemotherapy in poor prognosis patients yields good local regional control and survival. Docetaxel/CB chemoradiotherapy represents an aggressive alternative regimen to platinum-based chemoradiotherapy or surgery in patients who have a poor response to induction

  16. A biologically competitive 21 days hypofractionation scheme with weekly concomitant boost in breast cancer radiotherapy feasibility acute sub-acute and short term late effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzi, Marina; Vagge, Stefano; Azinwi, Ngwa Che; D'Alonzo, Alessia; Belgioia, Liliana; Garelli, Stefania; Gusinu, Marco; Corvò, Renzo

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy after lumpectomy is a standard part of breast conserving therapy for invasive breast carcinoma. The most frequently used schedule worldwide is 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks, a time commitment that sporadically may dissuade some otherwise eligible women from undertaking treatment. The purpose and primary endpoint of this perspective study is to evaluate feasibility and short-term late toxicity in a hypofractionated whole breast irradiation schedule. Between February and October 2008 we treated 65 consecutive patients with operable invasive early-stage breast cancer with a hypofractionated schedule of external beam radiation therapy. All patients were assigned to 39 Gy in 13 fractions in 3 weeks to the whole breast plus a concomitant weekly boost dose to the lumpectomy cavity of 3 Gy in 3 fractions. All the patients had achieved a median follow up of 24 months (range 21-29 months). At the end of treatment 52% presented grade 0 acute toxicity 39% had grade 1 and 9% had grade 2. At 6 months with all the patients assessed there were 34% case of grade 1 subacute toxicity and 6% of grade 2. At 12 months 43% and 3% of patients presented with clinical grade 1 and grade 2 fibrosis respectively and 5% presented grade 1 hyperpigmentation. The remaining patients were free of side effects. At 24 months, with 56 assessed, just 2 patients (3%) showed grade 2 of late fibrosis. The clinical results observed showed a reasonably good feasibility of the accelerated hypofractionated schedule in terms of acute, subacute and short-term late toxicity. This useful 13 fractions with a concomitant boost schedule seems, in selected patients, a biologically acceptable alternative to the traditional 30 days regime

  17. Three-Dimensional Conformal Simultaneously Integrated Boost Technique for Breast-Conserving Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Maduro, John H.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Hollander, Miranda; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the target coverage and normal tissue dose with the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and the sequential boost technique in breast cancer, and to evaluate the incidence of acute skin toxicity in patients treated with the SIB technique. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer underwent breast-conserving radiotherapy using the SIB technique. The breast and boost planning target volumes (PTVs) were treated simultaneously (i.e., for each fraction, the breast and boost PTVs received 1.81 Gy and 2.3 Gy, respectively). Three-dimensional conformal beams with wedges were shaped and weighted using forward planning. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk with the SIB technique, 28 x (1.81 + 0.49 Gy), were compared with those for the sequential boost technique, 25 x 2 Gy + 8 x 2 Gy. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated for 90 patients treated with the SIB technique according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: PTV coverage was adequate with both techniques. With SIB, more efficiently shaped boost beams resulted in smaller irradiated volumes. The mean volume receiving ≥107% of the breast dose was reduced by 20%, the mean volume outside the boost PTV receiving ≥95% of the boost dose was reduced by 54%, and the mean heart and lung dose were reduced by 10%. Of the evaluated patients, 32.2% had Grade 2 or worse toxicity. Conclusion: The SIB technique is proposed for standard use in breast-conserving radiotherapy because of its dose-limiting capabilities, easy implementation, reduced number of treatment fractions, and relatively low incidence of acute skin toxicity

  18. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Paolo, E-mail: passoni.paolo@hsr.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Reni, Michele [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni M. [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Slim, Najla [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cereda, Stefano [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Longobardi, Barbara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Gusmini, Simone [Department of Radiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Staudacher, Carlo [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  19. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicity of Two Regimens of 3- and 5-Week Concomitant Boost Prone IMRT to Standard 6-Week Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Shahzad; Lymberis, Stella C.; Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Magnolfi, Chiara; Rosenstein, Barry; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-08

    Purpose: Limited information is available comparing toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy (RT) to that of standard fractionation RT for early stage breast cancer. We report early and late toxicities of two prone regimens of accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed delivered over 3 or 5 weeks as compared to standard 6 week RT with a sequential electron boost. Methods: From 2/2003 to 12/2007, 169 consecutive patients with Stage I–II breast cancer were offered the choice to undergo prone RT with either: a 6-week standard RT regimen of 46 Gy/23 fractions (fx) to the whole breast (WB), followed by a14 Gy sequential boost (SB) to the tumor bed (6wSB), a 5-week regimen of 50 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 6.25 Gy in 25 fx (5wCB); or a 3-week protocol of 40.5 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 7.5 Gy in 15 fx (3wCB). These regimens were estimated as biologically equivalent, based on alpha/beta = 4 for tumor control. Toxicities were reported using RTOG and LENT/SOMA scoring. Results: 51/169 patients chose standard 6wSB, 28 selected 5wCB, and 90 enrolled in 3wCB protocol. Maximum acute toxicity was Grade 3 dermatitis in 4% of the patients in the 6wSB compared 1% in 3wCB. In general, acute complications (breast pain, fatigue, and dermatitis) were significantly less in the 3wCB than in the other schedules (P < 0.05). With a median follow-up of 61 months, the only Grade 3 late toxicity was telangiectasia in two patients: one in 3wCB and one in 5wCB group. Notably, fibrosis was comparable among the three groups (P = NS). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that accelerated regimens of breast RT over 3 or 5 weeks in the prone position, with an IMRT tumor bed CB, result in comparable late toxicity to standard fractionation with a sequential tumor boost delivered over 6 weeks. As predicted by radiobiological modeling the shorter regimen was associated with less acute effects.

  20. Performance of Jet Substructure Techniques and Boosted Object Identification in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS has implemented and commissioned many new jet substructure techniques to aid in the identification and interpretation of hadronic final states originating from Lorentz-boosted heavy particles produced at the LHC. These techniques include quantum jets, jet charge, jet shapes, quark/gluon, boosted boson and top quark tagging, along with grooming methods such as pruning, trimming, and filtering. These techniques have been validated using the large 2012 ATLAS dataset. Presented here is a summary of the state of the art jet substructure and tagging techniques developed in ATLAS, their performance and recent results.

  1. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriella.ferrandina@libero.it [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Antonietta [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gallotta, Valerio [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Fagotti, Anna [Gynecologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Autorino, Rosa [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  2. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei-Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doo Seok [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Daehang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok, E-mail: hsjang11@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  3. Climate change adaptation: Boosting quinoa production using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2015-01-01

    In the battle to help developing countries overcome threats from declining food production caused by climate change, one species of edible grain-like crop has caught international attention because of its unique nutritional value. New and improved varieties of quinoa, historically grown in the highlands of South America, will be made available to farmers in mutations adapted to challenging environments in Bolivia and Peru. Increased genetic diversity is the result of the use of nuclear techniques in collaboration with the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), said L. Gomez-Pando, Principal Professor and Head of the Cereals and Native Grains Research programme at the National Agrarian University of La Molina in Peru. “There are 64 mutant lines of quinoa selected by yield potential and quality for the market,” he said. “These mutant lines will be further evaluated and the best lines will be released as new varieties in 2015–2016.”

  4. Laparoendoscopic management of concomitant gallbladder stones and common bile duct stones: what is the best technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Geidie, Ahmed Abdel-Raouf

    2011-08-01

    The intraoperative use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is a safe, single-stage option for the management of concomitant gallstones (GS) and common bile duct stones (CBDS). This study aims to compare between 2 techniques of combined laparoendoscopic management, which are laparoendoscopic Rendez-vous (LC/LERV) technique and standard ERCP after the completion of LC intraoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy (IOES). Patients with GS and suspected CBDS were included. They were divided into 2 groups; LC/LERV and LC/IOES. Both groups were compared for failure of endoscopic sphincterotomy/stone extraction, operative time, conversion rate, mortality/morbidity, and length of hospital stay. Between October 2007 and February 2010, 98 patients with GS and CBDS were eligible for inclusion in the study. They were prospectively randomized into 2 groups; LC/LERV (N=45) and LC/IOES (N=53). There were no differences in preoperative parameters between both groups. There was a significant difference in operative time (shorter for LC/IOES). No difference was noted in success/failure rate, post-ERCP pancreatitis. Both Standard ERCP after the completion of LC and LC/LERV are valid single-session management for CBD stones, but LC-ERCP may be preferred.

  5. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  6. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging

  7. Identification techniques for highly boosted W bosons that decay into hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Guichardant, C.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. 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A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Triossi, A.; Ventura, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xin, Y.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2014-12-01

    In searches for new physics in the energy regime of the LHC, it is becoming increasingly important to distinguish single-jet objects that originate from the merging of the decay products of W bosons produced with high transverse momenta from jets initiated by single partons. Algorithms are defined to identify such W jets for different signals of interest, using techniques that are also applicable to other decays of bosons to hadrons that result in a single jet, such as those from highly boosted Z and Higgs bosons. The efficiency for tagging W jets is measured in data collected with the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The performance of W tagging in data is compared with predictions from several Monte Carlo simulators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Face Detection for Augmented Reality Application Using Boosting-based Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Hbali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality has gained an increasing research interest over the few last years. Customers requirements have become more intense and more demanding, the need of the different industries to re-adapt their products and enhance them by recent advances in the computer vision and more intelligence has become a necessary. In this work we present a marker-less augmented reality application that can be used and expanded in the e-commerce industry. We take benefit of the well known boosting techniques to train and evaluate different face detectors using the multi-block local binary features. The work purpose is to select the more relevant training parameters in order to maximize the classification accuracy. Using the resulted face detector, the position of the face will serve as a marker in the proposed augmented reality.

  9. Maximum power point tracking techniques for wind energy systems using three levels boost converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cuong Hung; Nollet, Frédéric; Essounbouli, Najib; Hamzaoui, Abdelaziz

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of three level Boost DC-DC converter in Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS). Three-level Boost converter has significant advantage compared to conventional Boost. A maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method for a variable speed wind turbine using permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) is also presented. Simulation of three-level Boost converter topology with Perturb and Observe algorithm and Fuzzy Logic Control is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK. Results of this simulation show that the system with MPPT using fuzzy logic controller has better performance to the Perturb and Observe algorithm: fast response under changing conditions and small oscillation.

  10. To boost or not boost in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Suwinski, R.; Withers, H.R.; Fowler, J.; Fijuth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper it to analyse and discuss standard definition of the 'boost' procedure in relation to clinical results and new forms of the boost designed on physical and radiobiological bases. Seventeen sets of clinical data including over 5000 cases cancer with different tumour stages and locations and treated with various forms of 'boost' method have been subtracted from literature. Effectiveness of boost is analyzed regarding its place in combined treatment, timing and subvolume involved. Radiobiological parameter of D10 and normalization method for biologically equivalent doses and dose intensity are used to simulated cold and not subvolumes (hills and dales) and its influence of effectiveness on the boost delivery. Sequential and concomitant boost using external irradiation, although commonly used, offers LTC benefit lower than expected. Brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy boost methods appear more effective. Conformal radiotherapy, with or without dose-intensity modulation, allows heterogeneous increase in dose intensity within the target volume and can be used to integrate the 'boost dose' into baseline treatment (Simultaneous Integrated Boost and SIB). Analysis of interrelationships between boost-dose; boost volume and its timing shows that a TCP benefit from boosting can be expected when a relatively large part of the target volume is involved. Increase in boost dose above 1.2-1.3 of baseline dose using 'standard' methods does not substantially further increase the achieved TCP benefit unless hypoxic cells are a problem. Any small uncertainties in treatment planning can ruin all potential beneficial effect of the boost. For example, a 50% dose deficit in a very small (e.g. 1%) volume of target can decrease TCP to zero. Therefore boost benefits should be carefully weighed against any risk of cold spots in the target volume. Pros and cons in discussion of the role of boost in radiotherapy lead to the important

  11. Repeat Whole Brain Radiation Therapy with a Simultaneous Infield Boost: A Novel Technique for Reirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Prabhu, R.S.; Crocker, I.R.; Dhabban, A.; Ogunleye, T.; Kandula, Sh.; Jiang, X.; Curran, W.J.; Shu, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of patients who experience intracranial progression after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is a clinical challenge. Novel radiation therapy delivery technologies are being applied with the objective of improving tumor and symptom control in these patients. The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical outcomes of the application of a novel technology to deliver repeat WBRT with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and a simultaneous infield boost (WB-SIB) to gross disease. A total of 16 patients were initially treated with WBRT between 2000 and 2008 and then experienced intracranial progression, were treated using repeat WB-SIB, and were analyzed. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range: 30–50.4 Gy). Median time between the initial course of WBRT and repeat WB-SIB was 11.3 months. The median dose at reirradiation was 20 Gy to the whole brain with a median boost dose of 30 Gy to gross disease. A total of 2 patients demonstrated radiographic disease progression after treatment. The median overall survival (OS) time from initial diagnosis of brain metastases was 18.9 months (range: 7.1–66.6 (95% CI: 0.8–36.9)). The median OS time after initiation of reirradiation for all patients was 2.7 months (range: 0.46–14.46 (95% CI: 1.3–8.7)). Only 3 patients experienced CTCAE grade 3 fatigue. No other patients experienced any ≥ CTCAE grade 3 toxicity. This analysis reports the result of a novel RT delivery technique for the treatment of patients with recurrent brain metastases. Side effects were manageable and comparable to other conventional repeat WBRT series. Repeat WB-SIB using the VMAT RT delivery technology is feasible and appears to have acceptable short-term acute toxicity. These results may provide a foundation for further exploration of the WB-SIB technique for repeat WBRT in future prospective clinical trials.

  12. Boosting the FM-Index on the GPU: Effective Techniques to Mitigate Random Memory Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Alejandro; Marco-Sola, Santiago; Espinosa, Antonio; Ribeca, Paolo; Moure, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The recent advent of high-throughput sequencing machines producing big amounts of short reads has boosted the interest in efficient string searching techniques. As of today, many mainstream sequence alignment software tools rely on a special data structure, called the FM-index, which allows for fast exact searches in large genomic references. However, such searches translate into a pseudo-random memory access pattern, thus making memory access the limiting factor of all computation-efficient implementations, both on CPUs and GPUs. Here, we show that several strategies can be put in place to remove the memory bottleneck on the GPU: more compact indexes can be implemented by having more threads work cooperatively on larger memory blocks, and a k-step FM-index can be used to further reduce the number of memory accesses. The combination of those and other optimisations yields an implementation that is able to process about two Gbases of queries per second on our test platform, being about 8 × faster than a comparable multi-core CPU version, and about 3 × to 5 × faster than the FM-index implementation on the GPU provided by the recently announced Nvidia NVBIO bioinformatics library.

  13. Variances in the projections, resulting from CLIMEX, Boosted Regression Trees and Random Forests techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit; Solhjouy-fard, Samaneh

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to have a comparative investigation and evaluation of the capabilities of correlative and mechanistic modeling processes, applied to the projection of future distributions of date palm in novel environments and to establish a method of minimizing uncertainty in the projections of differing techniques. The location of this study on a global scale is in Middle Eastern Countries. We compared the mechanistic model CLIMEX (CL) with the correlative models MaxEnt (MX), Boosted Regression Trees (BRT), and Random Forests (RF) to project current and future distributions of date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.). The Global Climate Model (GCM), the CSIRO-Mk3.0 (CS) using the A2 emissions scenario, was selected for making projections. Both indigenous and alien distribution data of the species were utilized in the modeling process. The common areas predicted by MX, BRT, RF, and CL from the CS GCM were extracted and compared to ascertain projection uncertainty levels of each individual technique. The common areas identified by all four modeling techniques were used to produce a map indicating suitable and unsuitable areas for date palm cultivation for Middle Eastern countries, for the present and the year 2100. The four different modeling approaches predict fairly different distributions. Projections from CL were more conservative than from MX. The BRT and RF were the most conservative methods in terms of projections for the current time. The combination of the final CL and MX projections for the present and 2100 provide higher certainty concerning those areas that will become highly suitable for future date palm cultivation. According to the four models, cold, hot, and wet stress, with differences on a regional basis, appears to be the major restrictions on future date palm distribution. The results demonstrate variances in the projections, resulting from different techniques. The assessment and interpretation of model projections requires reservations

  14. Extended Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Boost for Lymph Node–Positive Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Regional Control and Recurrence Patterns in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Kim, Hayeon; Choi, Serah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is commonly used for nodal staging in locally advanced cervical cancer; however the false negative rate for para-aortic disease are 20% to 25% in PET-positive pelvic nodal disease. Unless surgically staged, pelvis-only treatment may undertreat para-aortic disease. We have treated patients with PET-positive nodes with extended field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to address the para-aortic region prophylactically with concomitant boost to involved nodes. The purpose of this study was to assess regional control rates and recurrence patterns. Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with cervical cancer (stage IBI-IVA) diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 with PET-avid pelvic nodes treated with extended field IMRT (45 Gy in 25 fractions with concomitant boost to involved nodes to a median of 55 Gy in 25 fractions) with concurrent cisplatin and brachytherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The nodal location was pelvis-only in 41 patients (67%) and pelvis + para-aortic in 20 patients (33%). There were a total of 179 nodes, with a median number of positive nodes of 2 (range, 1-16 nodes) per patient and a median nodal size of 1.8 cm (range, 0.7-4.5 cm). Response was assessed by PET/CT at 12 to 16 weeks. Results: Complete clinical and imaging response at the first follow-up visit was seen in 77% of patients. At a mean follow-up time of 29 months (range, 3-116 months), 8 patients experienced recurrence. The sites of persistent/recurrent disease were as follows: cervix 10 (16.3%), regional nodes 3 (4.9%), and distant 14 (23%). The rate of para-aortic failure in patients with pelvic-only nodes was 2.5%. There were no significant differences in recurrence patterns by the number/location of nodes, largest node size, or maximum node standardized uptake value. The rate of late grade 3+ adverse events was 4%. Conclusions: Extended field IMRT was well tolerated and resulted in low regional recurrence

  15. New Technique for Voltage Tracking Control of a Boost Converter Based on the PSO Algorithm and LTspice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhang, Peyman; Drimus, Alin; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new technique is proposed to design a Modified PID (MPID) controller for a Boost converter. An interface between LTspice and MATLAB is carried out to implement the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. The PSO algorithm which has the appropriate capability to find out...... the optimal solutions is run in MATLAB while it is interfaced with LTspice for simulation of the circuit using actual component models obtained from manufacturers. The PSO is utilized to solve the optimization problem in order to find the optimal parameters of MPID and PID controllers. The performances...

  16. Learning Boost C++ libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    If you are a C++ programmer who has never used Boost libraries before, this book will get you up-to-speed with using them. Whether you are developing new C++ software or maintaining existing code written using Boost libraries, this hands-on introduction will help you decide on the right library and techniques to solve your practical programming problems.

  17. Boosting Higgs pair production in the [Formula: see text] final state with multivariate techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, J Katharina; Bortoletto, Daniela; Frost, James A; Hartland, Nathan P; Issever, Cigdem; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of Higgs pair production will be a cornerstone of the LHC program in the coming years. Double Higgs production provides a crucial window upon the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and has a unique sensitivity to the Higgs trilinear coupling. We study the feasibility of a measurement of Higgs pair production in the [Formula: see text] final state at the LHC. Our analysis is based on a combination of traditional cut-based methods with state-of-the-art multivariate techniques. We account for all relevant backgrounds, including the contributions from light and charm jet mis-identification, which are ultimately comparable in size to the irreducible 4 b QCD background. We demonstrate the robustness of our analysis strategy in a high pileup environment. For an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text] ab[Formula: see text], a signal significance of [Formula: see text] is obtained, indicating that the [Formula: see text] final state alone could allow for the observation of double Higgs production at the High Luminosity LHC.

  18. Treatment of breast cancer with simultaneous integrated boost in hybrid plan technique. Influence of flattening filter-free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrainy, Marzieh; Kretschmer, Matthias; Joest, Vincent; Kasch, Astrid; Wuerschmidt, Florian; Dahle, Joerg; Lorenzen, Joern [Radiologische Allianz, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The present study compares in silico treatment plans using hybrid plan technique during hypofractionated radiation of mammary carcinoma with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). The influence of 6 MV photon radiation in flattening filter free (FFF) mode against the clinical standard flattening filter (FF) mode is to be examined. RT planning took place with FF and FFF radiation plans for 10 left-sided breast cancer patients. Hybrid plans were realised with two tangential IMRT fields and one VMAT field. The dose prescription was in line with the guidelines in the ARO-2010-01 study. The dosimetric verification took place with a manufacturer-independent measurement system. Required dose prescriptions for the planning target volumes (PTV) were achieved for both groups. The average dose values of the ipsi- and contralateral lung and the heart did not differ significantly. The overall average incidental dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) of 8.24 ± 3.9 Gy in the FFF group and 9.05 ± 3.7 Gy in the FF group (p < 0.05) were found. The dosimetric verifications corresponded to the clinical requirements. FFF-based RT plans reduced the average treatment time by 17 s/fraction. In comparison to the FF-based hybrid plan technique the FFF mode allows further reduction of the average LAD dose for comparable target volume coverage without adverse low-dose exposure of contralateral structures. The combination of hybrid plan technique and 6 MV photon radiation in the FFF mode is suitable for use with hypofractionated dose schemes. The increased dose rate allows a substantial reduction of treatment time and thus beneficial application of the deep inspiration breath hold technique. (orig.) [German] Vergleich der ''In-silico''-Bestrahlungsplaene der klinisch etablierten Hybridplan-Technik bei hypofraktionierter Bestrahlung des Mammakarzinoms mit simultan integriertem Boost (SIB). Untersucht wird der Einfluss von 6MV-Photonenstrahlung im Flattening

  19. Deep Incremental Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosca, Alan; Magoulas, George D

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces Deep Incremental Boosting, a new technique derived from AdaBoost, specifically adapted to work with Deep Learning methods, that reduces the required training time and improves generalisation. We draw inspiration from Transfer of Learning approaches to reduce the start-up time to training each incremental Ensemble member. We show a set of experiments that outlines some preliminary results on some common Deep Learning datasets and discuss the potential improvements Deep In...

  20. A modified technique reduced operative time of laparoendoscopic rendezvous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy for concomitant gallstone and common bile ductal stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Qunwei; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Liying; Huang, Jiangsheng; Tan, Zhaohui; Li, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    Laparoendoscopic rendezvous (LERV) endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC+ERCP/LERV) are considered an optimal approach for concomitant gallstones and common bile duct stones. The rendezvous technique is essential for the success of procedure. We applied two different LERV techniques, traditional technique and modified technique, in 60 consecutive cases from January 2011 to November 2012. 32 cases who underwent modified technique (group 1) from February 2012 to November 2012 were retrospectively compared to 28 cases (group 2) who underwent traditional technique from January 2011 to January 2012. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to preoperative demographic features. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the procedure was successfully performed in 31 cases (96.9%) in group 1 and 24 cases (86.2%) in group 2. The mean operative time and time of endoscopic part were 82.6 ± 19.6 min and 26.5 ± 5.99 min in group 1 which were significantly shorter than those in group 2 (118.0 ± 23.1 min and 58.7 ± 13.3 min, resp.). There was no postoperative pancreatitis and mortality in both groups. The mean hospital stay, blood loss, incidence of complications, and residual stone were of no difference in both groups. This study proved that this modified technique can effectively reduce the operative time and time of endoscopic part of LC+ERCP/LERV compared with traditional technique.

  1. A Modified Technique Reduced Operative Time of Laparoendoscopic Rendezvous Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Combined with Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Concomitant Gallstone and Common Bile Ductal Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoendoscopic rendezvous (LERV endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC+ERCP/LERV are considered an optimal approach for concomitant gallstones and common bile duct stones. The rendezvous technique is essential for the success of procedure. We applied two different LERV techniques, traditional technique and modified technique, in 60 consecutive cases from January 2011 to November 2012. 32 cases who underwent modified technique (group 1 from February 2012 to November 2012 were retrospectively compared to 28 cases (group 2 who underwent traditional technique from January 2011 to January 2012. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to preoperative demographic features. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the procedure was successfully performed in 31 cases (96.9% in group 1 and 24 cases (86.2% in group 2. The mean operative time and time of endoscopic part were 82.6 ± 19.6 min and 26.5 ± 5.99 min in group 1 which were significantly shorter than those in group 2 (118.0 ± 23.1 min and 58.7 ± 13.3 min, resp.. There was no postoperative pancreatitis and mortality in both groups. The mean hospital stay, blood loss, incidence of complications, and residual stone were of no difference in both groups. This study proved that this modified technique can effectively reduce the operative time and time of endoscopic part of LC+ERCP/LERV compared with traditional technique.

  2. Preliminary analysis of the sequential simultaneous integrated boost technique for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Shingo; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Isono, Masaru; Masaoka, Akira; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three strategies for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for 20 head-and-neck cancer patients. For simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), doses were 66 and 54 Gy in 30 fractions for PTVboost and PTVelective, respectively. Two-phase IMRT delivered 50 Gy in 25 fractions to PTVelective in the First Plan, and 20 Gy in 10 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Sequential SIB (SEQ-SIB) delivered 55 Gy and 50 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively, to PTVboost and PTVelective using SIB in the First Plan and 11 Gy in 5 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Conformity indexes (CIs) (mean ± SD) for PTVboost and PTVelective were 1.09 ± 0.05 and 1.34 ± 0.12 for SIB, 1.39 ± 0.14 and 1.80 ± 0.28 for two-phase IMRT, and 1.14 ± 0.07 and 1.60 ± 0.18 for SEQ-SIB, respectively. CI was significantly highest for two-phase IMRT. Maximum doses (Dmax) to the spinal cord were 42.1 ± 1.5 Gy for SIB, 43.9 ± 1.0 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 40.3 ± 1.8 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Brainstem Dmax were 50.1 ± 2.2 Gy for SIB, 50.5 ± 4.6 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 47.4 ± 3.6 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Spinal cord Dmax for the three techniques was significantly different, and brainstem Dmax was significantly lower for SEQ-SIB. The compromised conformity of two-phase IMRT can result in higher doses to organs at risk (OARs). Lower OAR doses in SEQ-SIB made SEQ-SIB an alternative to SIB, which applies unconventional doses per fraction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous modulated accelerated boost technique and chemotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareed, Muhammad M; AlAmro, Abdullah S; Bayoumi, Yasser; Tunio, Mutahir A; Ismail, Abdul S; Akasha, Rashad; Mubasher, Mohamed; Al Asiri, Mushabbab

    2013-01-01

    To present our experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty eight patients of NPC were treated between April 2006 and December 2011 including 45 males and 23 females with mean age of 46 (range 15–78). Stage distribution was; stage I 3, stage II 7, stage III 26 and stage IV 32. Among 45 (66.2%) evaluated patients for presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 40 (88.8%) were positive for EBV. Median radiation doses delivered to gross tumor volume (GTV) and positive neck nodes were 66–70 Gy, 63 Gy to clinical target volume (CTV) and 50.4 Gy to clinically negative neck. In addition 56 (82.4%) patients with bulky tumors (T4/N2+) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy 2–3 cycles (Cisplatin/Docetaxel or Cisplatin/Epirubicin or Cisplatin/5 Flourouracil). Concurrent chemotherapy with radiation was weekly Cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 (40 patients) or Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (28 patients). With a median follow up of 20 months (range 3–43), one patient developed local recurrence, two experienced regional recurrences and distant failure was seen in 3 patients. Estimated 3 year disease free survival (DFS) was 94%. Three year DFS for patients with EBV was 100% as compared to 60% without EBV (p = 0.0009). Three year DFS for patients with undifferentiated histology was 98% as compared to 82% with other histologies (p = 0.02). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen as 21 (30.9%) having G-III mucositis and 6 (8.8%) with G-III skin reactions. Late toxicity was minimal and loss of taste was seen in 3 patients (7.5%) at time of analysis. IMRT with SMART in combination with chemotherapy is feasible and effective in terms of both the clinical response and safety profile. EBV, histopathology and nodal involvement were found important prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence

  4. Normal tissue complication probability: Does simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy score over other techniques in treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothy Basu K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of this study was to analyze the radiobiological effect of different treatment strategies on high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: Ten cases of high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma were selected for this dosimetric study. Four different treatment strategies used for treating prostate cancer were compared. Conventional four-field box technique covering prostate and nodal volumes followed by three-field conformal boost (3D + 3DCRT, four-field box technique followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT boost (3D + IMRT, IMRT followed by IMRT boost (IMRT + IMRT, and simultaneous integrated boost IMRT (SIBIMRT were compared in terms of tumor control probability (TCP and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP. The dose prescription except for SIBIMRT was 45 Gy in 25 fractions for the prostate and nodal volumes in the initial phase and 27 Gy in 15 fractions for the prostate in the boost phase. For SIBIMRT, equivalent doses were calculated using biologically equivalent dose assuming the α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy with a dose prescription of 60.75 Gy for the gross tumor volume (GTV and 45 Gy for the clinical target volume in 25 fractions. IMRT plans were made with 15-MV equispaced seven coplanar fields. NTCP was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB model. Results: An NTCP of 10.7 ± 0.99%, 8.36 ± 0.66%, 6.72 ± 0.85%, and 1.45 ± 0.11% for the bladder and 14.9 ± 0.99%, 14.04 ± 0.66%, 11.38 ± 0.85%, 5.12 ± 0.11% for the rectum was seen with 3D + 3DCRT, 3D + IMRT, IMRT + IMRT, and SIBIMRT respectively. Conclusions: SIBIMRT had the least NTCP over all other strategies with a reduced treatment time (3 weeks less. It should be the technique of choice for dose escalation in prostate carcinoma.

  5. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  6. Boosted jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juknevich, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the substructure of jets high transverse momentum at hadron colliders. A template method is introduced to distinguish heavy jets by comparing their energy distributions to the distributions of a set of templates which describe the kinematical information from signal or background. As an application, a search for a boosted Higgs boson decaying into bottom quarks in association with a leptonically decaying W boson is presented as well. (author)

  7. Robust boosting via convex optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätsch, Gunnar

    2001-12-01

    In this work we consider statistical learning problems. A learning machine aims to extract information from a set of training examples such that it is able to predict the associated label on unseen examples. We consider the case where the resulting classification or regression rule is a combination of simple rules - also called base hypotheses. The so-called boosting algorithms iteratively find a weighted linear combination of base hypotheses that predict well on unseen data. We address the following issues: o The statistical learning theory framework for analyzing boosting methods. We study learning theoretic guarantees on the prediction performance on unseen examples. Recently, large margin classification techniques emerged as a practical result of the theory of generalization, in particular Boosting and Support Vector Machines. A large margin implies a good generalization performance. Hence, we analyze how large the margins in boosting are and find an improved algorithm that is able to generate the maximum margin solution. o How can boosting methods be related to mathematical optimization techniques? To analyze the properties of the resulting classification or regression rule, it is of high importance to understand whether and under which conditions boosting converges. We show that boosting can be used to solve large scale constrained optimization problems, whose solutions are well characterizable. To show this, we relate boosting methods to methods known from mathematical optimization, and derive convergence guarantees for a quite general family of boosting algorithms. o How to make Boosting noise robust? One of the problems of current boosting techniques is that they are sensitive to noise in the training sample. In order to make boosting robust, we transfer the soft margin idea from support vector learning to boosting. We develop theoretically motivated regularized algorithms that exhibit a high noise robustness. o How to adapt boosting to regression problems

  8. Detection of Illegitimate Emails using Boosting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    and spam email detection. For our desired task, we have applied a boosting technique. With the use of boosting we can achieve high accuracy of traditional classification algorithms. When using boosting one has to choose a suitable weak learner as well as the number of boosting iterations. In this paper, we......In this paper, we report on experiments to detect illegitimate emails using boosting algorithm. We call an email illegitimate if it is not useful for the receiver or for the society. We have divided the problem into two major areas of illegitimate email detection: suspicious email detection...

  9. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skladowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland); Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  10. Boosted top: experimental tools overview

    CERN Document Server

    Usai, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    An overview of tools and methods for the reconstruction of high-boost top quark decays at the LHC is given in this report. The focus is on hadronic decays, in particular an overview of the current status of top quark taggers in physics analyses is presented. The most widely used jet substructure techniques, normally used in combination with top quark taggers, are reviewed. Special techniques to treat pileup in large cone jets are described, along with a comparison of the performance of several boosted top quark reconstruction techniques.

  11. Heart dose reduction in breast cancer treatment with simultaneous integrated boost. Comparison of treatment planning and dosimetry for a novel hybrid technique and 3D-CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joest, Vincent; Kretschmer, Matthias; Sabatino, Marcello; Wuerschmidt, Florian; Dahle, Joerg; Lorenzen, Joern; Ueberle, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The present study compares in silico treatment plans of clinically established three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with a hybrid technique consisting of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) during normally fractionated radiation of mammary carcinomas with simultaneous integrated boost on the basis of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Radiation treatment planning was performed with a hybrid and a 3D-CRT treatment plan for 20 patients. Hybrid plans were implemented with two tangential IMRT fields and a VMAT field in the angular range of the tangents. Verification of the plan was performed with a manufacturer-independent measurement system consisting of a detector array and rotation unit. The mean values of the heart dose for the entire patient collective were 3.6 ± 2.5 Gy for 3D-CRT and 2.9 ± 2.1 Gy for the hybrid technique (p < 0.01). For the left side (n = 10), the mean values for the left anterior descending artery were 21.8 ± 7.4 Gy for 3D-CRT and 17.6 ± 7.4 Gy for the hybrid technique (p < 0.01). The mean values of the ipsilateral lung were 11.9 ± 1.6 Gy for 3D-CRT and 10.5 ± 1.3 Gy for the hybrid technique (p < 0.01). Calculated dose distributions in the hybrid arm were in good accordance with measured dose (on average 95.6 ± 0.5 % for γ < 1 and 3 %/3 mm). The difference of the mean treatment time per fraction was 7 s in favor of 3D-CRT. Compared with the established 3D-CRT technique, the hybrid technique allows for a decrease in dose, particularly of the mean heart and lung dose with comparable target volume acquisition and without disadvantageous low-dose load of contralateral structures. Uncomplicated implementation of the hybrid technique was demonstrated in this context. The hybrid technique combines the advantages of tangential IMRT with the superior sparing of organs at risk by VMAT. (orig.) [de

  12. External beam techniques to boost cervical cancer when brachytherapy is not an option—theories and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Sarah; Khan, Atif J.; Beriwal, Sushil; Small, William

    2017-01-01

    The management of locally advanced cervical cancer relies on brachytherapy (BT) as an integral part of the radiotherapy delivery armamentarium. Occasionally, intracavitary BT is neither possible nor available. In these circumstances, post-external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) interstitial brachytherapy and/or hysterectomy may represent viable options that must be adequately executed in a timely manner. However, if these options are not applicable due to patient related or facility related reasons, a formal contingency plan should be in place. Innovative EBRT techniques such as intensity modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy may be considered for patients unable to undergo brachytherapy. Relying on provocative arguments and recent data, this review explores the rationale for and limitations of non-brachytherapy substitutes in that setting aiming to establish a formal process for the optimal execution of this alternative plan. PMID:28603722

  13. Esophageal gel-shifting technique facilitating eradicative boost or reirradiation to upper mediastinal targets of recurrent nerve lymph node without damaging esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Iida, Takeshi; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new technique using hyaluronic gel injection as a spacer to safely move the esophagus away from the high-dose area during interstitial brachytherapy of a mediastinal target close to the esophagus. We percutaneously injected a high-molecular-weight hyaluronic gel mixed with contrast medium to create a space between the esophagus and the target during interstitial brachytherapy. We applied this technique to two cases of relapsed recurrent nerve lymph node metastasis from esophageal cancer: one refractory tumor after 50 Gy of radiotherapy, and one recurrence after mediastinal radiotherapy of total 64 Gy. We prescribed 20 Gy and 18 Gy in one fraction to each target, with calculated esophageal D 2cc (the minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 2 cc) of 4.0 Gy and 6.8 Gy, respectively. Calculated enhancement factor by gel shifting in equivalent dose was 2.69 and 2.34, respectively. In each patient, accumulated esophageal D 1cc (minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of p cc. minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 1 cc) was 74.4 Gy and 85.6 Gy without shifting, and 59.1 Gy and 37.6 Gy with shifting, respectively. There were no procedure-related complications. Four months after the brachytherapy, each tumor was remarkably diminished. No evidence of recurrences or late complications were observed 8 months and 9 months after the procedure, respectively. The esophageal gel-shifting technique may facilitate eradicative brachytherapy to upper mediastinal targets without damaging the esophagus, and can be used in conjunction with boost irradiation or reirradiation to overcome the problem of salvage failure. (author)

  14. Top reconstruction and boosted top experimental overview

    CERN Document Server

    Skinnari, Louise

    2015-01-01

    An overview of techniques used to reconstruct resolved and boosted top quarks is presented. Techniques for resolved top quark reconstruction include kinematic likelihood fitters and pseudo- top reconstruction. Many tools and methods are available for the reconstruction of boosted top quarks, such as jet grooming techniques, jet substructure variables, and dedicated top taggers. Different techniques as used by ATLAS and CMS analyses are described and the performance of different variables and top taggers are shown.

  15. Comparing pseudo-absences generation techniques in Boosted Regression Trees models for conservation purposes: A case study on amphibians in a protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cerasoli

    Full Text Available Boosted Regression Trees (BRT is one of the modelling techniques most recently applied to biodiversity conservation and it can be implemented with presence-only data through the generation of artificial absences (pseudo-absences. In this paper, three pseudo-absences generation techniques are compared, namely the generation of pseudo-absences within target-group background (TGB, testing both the weighted (WTGB and unweighted (UTGB scheme, and the generation at random (RDM, evaluating their performance and applicability in distribution modelling and species conservation. The choice of the target group fell on amphibians, because of their rapid decline worldwide and the frequent lack of guidelines for conservation strategies and regional-scale planning, which instead could be provided through an appropriate implementation of SDMs. Bufo bufo, Salamandrina perspicillata and Triturus carnifex were considered as target species, in order to perform our analysis with species having different ecological and distributional characteristics. The study area is the "Gran Sasso-Monti della Laga" National Park, which hosts 15 Natura 2000 sites and represents one of the most important biodiversity hotspots in Europe. Our results show that the model calibration ameliorates when using the target-group based pseudo-absences compared to the random ones, especially when applying the WTGB. Contrarily, model discrimination did not significantly vary in a consistent way among the three approaches with respect to the tree target species. Both WTGB and RDM clearly isolate the highly contributing variables, supplying many relevant indications for species conservation actions. Moreover, the assessment of pairwise variable interactions and their three-dimensional visualization further increase the amount of useful information for protected areas' managers. Finally, we suggest the use of RDM as an admissible alternative when it is not possible to individuate a suitable set of

  16. Helical Tomotherapy for Whole-Brain Irradiation With Integrated Boost to Multiple Brain Metastases: Evaluation of Dose Distribution Characteristics and Comparison With Alternative Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegrün, Sabine; Pöttgen, Christoph; Wittig, Andrea; Lübcke, Wolfgang; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Stuschke, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dose distribution characteristics achieved with helical tomotherapy (HT) for whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) with integrated boost (IB) to multiple brain metastases in comparison with alternative techniques. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions for 23 patients with 81 metastases treated with WBRT (30 Gy/10 fractions) and IB (50 Gy) were analyzed. The median number of metastases per patient (N mets ) was 3 (range, 2-8). Mean values of the composite planning target volume of all metastases per patient (PTV mets ) and of the individual metastasis planning target volume (PTV ind met ) were 8.7 ± 8.9 cm 3 (range, 1.3-35.5 cm 3 ) and 2.5 ± 4.5 cm 3 (range, 0.19-24.7 cm 3 ), respectively. Dose distributions in PTV mets and PTV ind met were evaluated with respect to dose conformity (conformation number [CN], RTOG conformity index [PITV]), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity (homogeneity index [HI], ratio of maximum dose to prescription dose [MDPD]). The dependence of dose conformity on target size and N mets was investigated. The dose distribution characteristics were benchmarked against alternative irradiation techniques identified in a systematic literature review. Results: Mean ± standard deviation of dose distribution characteristics derived for PTV mets amounted to CN = 0.790 ± 0.101, PITV = 1.161 ± 0.154, TC = 0.95 ± 0.01, HI = 0.142 ± 0.022, and MDPD = 1.147 ± 0.029, respectively, demonstrating high dose conformity with acceptable homogeneity. Corresponding numbers for PTV ind met were CN = 0.708 ± 0.128, PITV = 1.174 ± 0.237, TC = 0.90 ± 0.10, HI = 0.140 ± 0.027, and MDPD = 1.129 ± 0.030, respectively. The target size had a statistically significant influence on dose conformity to PTV mets (CN = 0.737 for PTV mets ≤4.32 cm 3 vs CN = 0.848 for PTV mets >4.32 cm 3 , P=.006), in contrast to N mets . The achieved dose conformity to PTV mets , assessed by both CN and PITV, was in all investigated volume strata

  17. Diet-boosting foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity - diet-boosting foods; Overweight - diet-boosting foods ... Low-fat and nonfat milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese are healthy sources of calcium, vitamin D , and potassium. Unlike sweetened drinks with extra calories, milk ...

  18. Boosting foundations and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Schapire, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Boosting is an approach to machine learning based on the idea of creating a highly accurate predictor by combining many weak and inaccurate "rules of thumb." A remarkably rich theory has evolved around boosting, with connections to a range of topics, including statistics, game theory, convex optimization, and information geometry. Boosting algorithms have also enjoyed practical success in such fields as biology, vision, and speech processing. At various times in its history, boosting has been perceived as mysterious, controversial, even paradoxical.

  19. Saying Good-by: An Example of Using a Good-by Technique and Concomitant Psychodrama in the Resolving of Family Grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Robert C.

    A structured technique for saying "good-bye," or terminating a relationship, an important aspect of the therapeutic relationship, is presented. It consists of three distinct phases that are all dynamically interrelated, and can also be structured into separation caused by death. The technique is described in terms of three specific areas…

  20. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  1. Nirschl surgical technique for concomitant lateral and medial elbow tendinosis: a retrospective review of 53 elbows with a mean follow-up of 11.7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Oliver N; Dunn, Jonathan H; Ochiai, Derek H; Donovan, J Skye; Nirschl, Robert P

    2011-05-01

    Combined lateral elbow tendinosis (tennis elbow) and medial elbow tendinosis (golfer's elbow) can be a disabling condition that, if unresponsive to nonoperative treatments, may be effectively treated surgically. The authors are not aware of any study that reports the outcome of a combined operation for lateral and medial elbow tendinosis (country club elbow) performed in the same operative setting. Combined surgical treatment of country club elbow in the same operative setting has similar outcomes to those seen in the literature for single operative procedures. Case series; Level of evidence 4. Outcome measurements included the Numeric Pain Intensity Scale, the Nirschl tennis elbow scoring system, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons elbow form. Forty-eight patients (53 clinical elbows) were available by telephone, with a minimum time to follow-up of 5 years (range, 5-19 years; mean, 11.7 years). The average Nirschl tennis elbow score improved from 16.7 preoperatively to 70.8 postoperatively (P Elbow Surgeons elbow score improved from 45.2 to 90.4 (P tennis elbow score, results were rated excellent in 38 elbows, good in 7 elbows, fair in 5 elbows, and poor in 3 elbows, with 85% (45 of 53) good to excellent results. Patient satisfaction with the surgery averaged 8.7 out of 10. Of the 46 patients who played sports, 44 (96%) reported returning to their sports. When nonoperative treatment of lateral and medial elbow tendinosis fails, combined surgical intervention via the Nirschl operative techniques for country club elbow is highly effective, with results similar to those of single-sided intervention.

  2. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  3. Boost.Unicode

    OpenAIRE

    Wien, Erik; Gigstad, Lars Erik

    2005-01-01

    The project has resulted in a Unicode string library for C++ that abstracts away the complexity of working with Unicode text. The idea behind the project originated from the Boost community's developer mailings lists, and is developed with inclusion into the Boost library collection in mind.

  4. LDA boost classification: boosting by topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, La; Qiao, Guo; Qimin, Cao; Qitao, Li

    2012-12-01

    AdaBoost is an efficacious classification algorithm especially in text categorization (TC) tasks. The methodology of setting up a classifier committee and voting on the documents for classification can achieve high categorization precision. However, traditional Vector Space Model can easily lead to the curse of dimensionality and feature sparsity problems; so it affects classification performance seriously. This article proposed a novel classification algorithm called LDABoost based on boosting ideology which uses Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to modeling the feature space. Instead of using words or phrase, LDABoost use latent topics as the features. In this way, the feature dimension is significantly reduced. Improved Naïve Bayes (NB) is designed as the weaker classifier which keeps the efficiency advantage of classic NB algorithm and has higher precision. Moreover, a two-stage iterative weighted method called Cute Integration in this article is proposed for improving the accuracy by integrating weak classifiers into strong classifier in a more rational way. Mutual Information is used as metrics of weights allocation. The voting information and the categorization decision made by basis classifiers are fully utilized for generating the strong classifier. Experimental results reveals LDABoost making categorization in a low-dimensional space, it has higher accuracy than traditional AdaBoost algorithms and many other classic classification algorithms. Moreover, its runtime consumption is lower than different versions of AdaBoost, TC algorithms based on support vector machine and Neural Networks.

  5. A double-tracer technique to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of [14C]-basimglurant and absolute bioavailability after oral administration and concomitant intravenous microdose administration of [13C6]-labeled basimglurant in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerini, Elena; Schadt, Simone; Greig, Gerard; Haas, Ruth; Husser, Christophe; Zell, Manfred; Funk, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas; Gloge, Andreas; Mallalieu, Navita L

    2017-02-01

    1. The emerging technique of employing intravenous microdose administration of an isotope tracer concomitantly with an [ 14 C]-labeled oral dose was used to characterize the disposition and absolute bioavailability of a novel metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist under clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD). 2. Six healthy volunteers received a single 1 mg [ 12 C/ 14 C]-basimglurant (2.22 MBq) oral dose and a concomitant i.v. tracer dose of 100 μg of [ 13 C 6 ]-basimglurant. Concentrations of [ 12 C]-basimglurant and the stable isotope [ 13 C 6 ]-basimglurant were determined in plasma by a specific LC/MS-MS method. Total [ 14 C] radioactivity was determined in whole blood, plasma, urine and feces by liquid scintillation counting. Metabolic profiling was conducted in plasma, urine, blood cell pellet and feces samples. 3. The mean absolute bioavailability after oral administration (F) of basimglurant was ∼67% (range 45.7-77.7%). The major route of [ 14 C]-radioactivity excretion, primarily in form of metabolites, was in urine (mean recovery 73.4%), with the remainder excreted in feces (mean recovery 26.5%). The median t max for [ 12 C]-basimglurant after the oral administration was 0.71 h (range 0.58-1.00) and the mean terminal half-life was 77.2 ± 38.5 h. Terminal half-life for the [ 14 C]-basimglurant was 178 h indicating presence of metabolites with a longer terminal half-life. Five metabolites were identified with M1-Glucuronide as major and the others in trace amounts. There was minimal binding of drug to RBCs. IV pharmacokinetics was characterized with a mean ± SD CL of 11.8 ± 7.4 mL/h and a Vss of 677 ± 229 L. 4. The double-tracer technique used in this study allowed to simultaneously characterize the absolute bioavailability and disposition characteristics of the new oral molecular entity in a single study.

  6. A novel double-tracer technique to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of [14C]tofogliflozin after oral administration and concomitant intravenous microdose administration of [13C]tofogliflozin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Dietmar; Portron, Agnes; Backholer, Zoe; Lausecker, Berthold; Kawashima, Kosuke

    2013-06-01

    Human mass balance studies and the assessment of absolute oral bioavailability (F) are usually assessed in separate studies. Intravenous microdose administration of an isotope tracer concomitant to an unlabeled oral dose is an emerging technique to assess F. We report a novel double-tracer approach implemented for tofogliflozin combining oral administration of a radiolabel tracer with concomitant intravenous administration of a stable isotope tracer. Tofogliflozin is a potent and selective sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus currently in clinical development. The objectives of the present study were to assess the systemic exposure of major circulating metabolites, excretion balance, F and contribution of renal clearance (CLR) to total clearance (CL) of tofogliflozin in healthy subjects within one study applying a novel double-tracer technique. Six healthy male subjects received 20 mg [(12)C/(14)C]tofogliflozin (3.73 MBq) orally and a concomitant microdose of 0.1 mg [(13)C]tofogliflozin intravenously. Pharmacokinetics of tofogliflozin were determined for the oral and intravenous route; the pharmacokinetics of the metabolites M1 and M5 were determined for the oral route. Quantification of [(12)C]tofogliflozin in plasma and urine and [(13)C]tofogliflozin in plasma was performed by selective LC-MS/MS methods. For the pre-selected metabolites of tofogliflozin, M1 and M5, a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was applied to plasma and urine samples. Total radioactivity was assessed in plasma, urine and feces. Pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted by non-compartmental methods. The pharmacokinetics of tofogliflozin in healthy subjects were characterized by an F of 97.5 ± 12.3 %, CL of 10.0 ± 1.3 l/h and volume of distribution at steady-state (V(ss)) of 50.6 ± 6.7 l. The main route of elimination of total drug-related material was by excretion into urine (77.0 ± 4.1 % of the dose). The

  7. Boosted tops at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    A sample of candidate events for highly boosted top quarks is selected following the standard ATLAS selection for semi-leptonic ttbar events plus a requirement that the invariant mass of the reconstructed ttbar pair is greater than 700 GeV. Event displays are presented for the most promising candidates, as well as quantitative results for observables designed to isolate a boosted top quark signal.

  8. ATLAS boosted object tagging 2

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Julien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study into the optimal techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. Various algorithms for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets are compared for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 8 TeV data and 8 TeV and 13 TeV MC simulations. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons. The modeling of the tagging variables used in this technique is studied using 8 TeV pp collision data and systematic uncertainties for the tagger efficiency and fake rates are evaluated.

  9. Influence of boost technique (external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy) on the outcome of patients with carcinoma of the base of the tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regueiro, C.A.; Millan, I.; Torre, A. de la; Valcarcel, F.J.; Magallon, R.; Fernandez, E.; Aragon, G.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed 90 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue. Fifty-three patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy alone (3 T1, 11 T2, 21 T3, and 18 T4 tumors) and thirty-seven patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy boost (4 T1, 15 T2, 11 T3, and 7 T4 tumors). For patients with T1, T2 and T3 primaries, the actuarial 3-year local relapse-free survival was 42% following external beam radiotherapy alone and 67% following external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (p<0.05). The actuarial 3-year cause specific survival for these T-stages was 37% for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone and 53% for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (p=0.1). In the Cox multivariate analyses restricted patients with T1, T2 and T3 staged tumors, treatment modality was the only predictor for local control but no influence on specific survival was found. The trend towards significant differences in specific survival found in the univariate comparison of both treatment modalities was probably due to the significantly higher number of N-positive patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone. When all stages were included in the Cox analysis, low hemoglobin level, invasion of deep muscle, number of palpable nodes, and history of weight loss significantly influenced the outcome. Soft tissue necrosis occurred more frequently in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (33% vs. 10%, p=0.52). (orig.)

  10. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    but confirmed benefit in terms of toxicities. If a concurrent boost to the tumor bed is not required, a conformal 3D-CRT approach can adequately deliver prone whole-breast hypofractionation radiotherapy.

  11. Can you boost your metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000893.htm Can you boost your metabolism? To use the sharing ... boosting metabolism than tactics that work. Some myths can backfire. If you think you are burning more ...

  12. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation therapy with concomitant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for non resectable esophageal carcinoma. For patients with operable tumors, surgery is the traditional treatment. However several data could improve therapeutic results. At the present time, no randomized trial has demonstrated, except for adenocarcinoma of the cardia, the benefit of preoperative treatment. Other randomized trials are needed to determine the role and the optimal modalities of these treatments. This is a review of the literature data in concomitant chemotherapy and radiation in the management of esophagus. (author)

  13. Boosted top production in ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237277; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the boosted top production analyses using data collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at $\\sqrt{s}=$' 8 TeV and 13 TeV of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. These analyses use techniques for the reconstruction of boosted objects to measure the production of top quarks at high transverse momenta. The measurements are optimized for the different final states and for different ranges of the transverse momenta of the particles involved, improving on measurements with traditional objects reconstruction based on the combination of resolved objects.

  14. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  15. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  16. Imaging and concomitant dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Image guidance in radiotherapy now involves multiple imaging procedures for planning, simulation, set-up inter and intrafraction monitoring. Presently ALARA (i.e. as low as reasonable achievable) is the principle of management of dose to radiation workers and patients in any diagnostic imaging procedures including image guided surgery. The situation is different in repeated radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging performed for simulation, dose planning, patient positioning and set-up corrections during preparation/execution of Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) as well as for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). Reported imaging and concomitant doses will be highlighted and discussed for the management and optimization of imaging techniques in IMRT and IGRT

  17. CLINICAL STUDY OF CONCOMITANT SQUINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chopra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Malalignment in the visual axes of the two eyes is called strabismus. Fusion of both images is replaced either by diplopia or suppression of one image. Squint leads to loss of binocular single vision. Concomitant squint is a type of manifest squint in which the amount of deviation in the squinting eye is same in all gazes. Binocular single vision and ocular movement coordination are not present since birth, but are acquired in the early childhood. This process starts by the age of 3-6 months and is completed up to 5-6 years. Any hindrance in the development of these processes may result in concomitant squint. MATERIALS AND METHODS In 100 cases of concomitant squint, patients were included in our study. Detailed history was taken regarding the onset of squint and duration. Past history and family history was also elicited. General examination was done to detect any abnormalities of central nervous system. Routine ophthalmic examination including best corrected visual acuity, cover test performed to detect the type of deviation whether uniocular or alternating and the type of fixation. Angle of deviation was measured by Hirschberg’s test and on the synoptophore. Binocular single vision was assessed using Worth’s 4-dot test and synoptophore. Cycloplegic refraction and fundus evaluation done in all patients. Inclusion Criteria- All primary non-paralytic deviations, sensory deprivation strabismus. Exclusion Criteria- Paralytic strabismus, strabismus associated with neurological disorders, consecutive strabismus and palpebral fissure abnormalities patients. RESULTS Majority of cases of concomitant squint were of esotropic type. Most common form of esotropia seen was infantile esotropia. Most common form of exotropia was intermittent exotropia. 19% of cases were secondary to other ocular diseases namely cataract, macular lesion, high myopia, etc. Amblyopia was present in 54% patients and of very dense type, which could not be treated

  18. Searches with Boosted Objects at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of searches for new physics in boosted final states conducted by the ATLAS and CMS experiments during Run-I of the LHC. An emphasis is put on techniques for the reconstruction and identification of both hadronic and leptonic decays of objects with large transverse momenta: Various substructure and grooming techniques as well as modified lepton isolation criteria are reviewed and their use in the most common algorithms for boosted top and boson tagging is discussed.

  19. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  20. Distribution-Specific Agnostic Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Vitaly

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of boosting the accuracy of weak learning algorithms in the agnostic learning framework of Haussler (1992) and Kearns et al. (1992). Known algorithms for this problem (Ben-David et al., 2001; Gavinsky, 2002; Kalai et al., 2008) follow the same strategy as boosting algorithms in the PAC model: the weak learner is executed on the same target function but over different distributions on the domain. We demonstrate boosting algorithms for the agnostic learning framework tha...

  1. Robust loss functions for boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Takafumi; Takenouchi, Takashi; Eguchi, Shinto; Murata, Noboru

    2007-08-01

    Boosting is known as a gradient descent algorithm over loss functions. It is often pointed out that the typical boosting algorithm, Adaboost, is highly affected by outliers. In this letter, loss functions for robust boosting are studied. Based on the concept of robust statistics, we propose a transformation of loss functions that makes boosting algorithms robust against extreme outliers. Next, the truncation of loss functions is applied to contamination models that describe the occurrence of mislabels near decision boundaries. Numerical experiments illustrate that the proposed loss functions derived from the contamination models are useful for handling highly noisy data in comparison with other loss functions.

  2. Cash boost to Great British science unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary, Patricia Hewitt today unveiled new plans for the DTI's record science budget over the next three years, to keep Britain at the forefront of world science. The plans include funding to develop life saving new health techniques, to seek alternative energy sources, to help our rural economy, to develop the computers of tomorrow and boost business with the next generation of leading edge technologies" (1 page).

  3. Search for New Physics in Boosted Topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Cochran, James; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The presentation is expected to focus on the opportunities of discovery of new physics profiting of the latest reconstruction tools for boosted top-quark or boson (W,Z,H) reconstruction and their large effect on increasing the analysis efficiency. A summary of Run 1 results showing latest techniques for background suppression and data-driven background estimate should be included pointing out the possibilities and improvements for Run 2.

  4. Boosted Higgs shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaffer, Matthias; Spannowsky, Michael; Wymant, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of H→2l+p T via H→ττ and H→WW * could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the t anti tH channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  5. Combining Boosted Global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szidónia Lefkovits

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The domain of object detection presents a wide range of interest due to its numerous application possibilities especially real time applications. All of them require high detection rate correlated with short processing time. One of the most efficient systems, working with visual information, were presented in the publication of Viola et al. [1], [2].This detection system uses classifiers based on Haar-like separating features combined with the AdaBoost learning algorithm. The most important bottleneck of the system is the big number of false detections at high hit rate. In this paper we propose to overcome this disadvantage by using specialized parts classifiers. This aim comes from the observation that the target object does not resemble the false detections at all.The reason of this fact is the coding manner of Haar-like features which attend to handle image patches and neglect the edges and contours. In order to obtain a more robust classifier, a global aspect method is combined with a part-based method, having the goal to improve the performance of the detector without significant increase of the detection time.

  6. Modeling of asymmetrical boost converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Isabel Arango Zuluaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrical interleaved dual boost (AIDB is a fifth-order DC/DC converter designed to interface photovoltaic (PV panels. The AIDB produces small current harmonics to the PV panels, reducing the power losses caused by the converter operation. Moreover, the AIDB provides a large voltage conversion ratio, which is required to step-up the PV voltage to the large dc-link voltage used in grid-connected inverters. To reject irradiance and load disturbances, the AIDB must be operated in a closed-loop and a dynamic model is required. Given that the AIDB converter operates in Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM, classical modeling approaches based on Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM are not valid. Moreover, classical DCM modeling techniques are not suitable for the AIDB converter. Therefore, this paper develops a novel mathematical model for the AIDB converter, which is suitable for control-pur-poses. The proposed model is based on the calculation of a diode current that is typically disregarded. Moreover, because the traditional correction to the second duty cycle reported in literature is not effective, a new equation is designed. The model accuracy is contrasted with circuital simulations in time and frequency domains, obtaining satisfactory results. Finally, the usefulness of the model in control applications is illustrated with an application example.

  7. A PIPO Boost Converter with Low Ripple and Medium Current Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandri, S.; Sofian, A.; Ismail, F.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a Parallel Input Parallel Output (PIPO) boost converter is proposed to gain power ability of converter, and reduce current inductors. The proposed technique will distribute current for n-parallel inductor and switching component. Four parallel boost converters implement on input voltage 20.5Vdc to generate output voltage 28.8Vdc. The PIPO boost converter applied phase shift pulse width modulation which will compare with conventional PIPO boost converters by using a similar pulse for every switching component. The current ripple reduction shows an advantage PIPO boost converter then conventional boost converter. Varies loads and duty cycle will be simulated and analyzed to verify the performance of PIPO boost converter. Finally, the unbalance of current inductor is able to be verified on four area of duty cycle in less than 0.6.

  8. TOPOLOGICAL REVIEW AND ANALYSIS OF DC-DC BOOST CONVERTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. INDRA GANDHI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available DC voltage boost up is essential in numerous applications; especially considering Photovoltaic (PV based renewable power generation system. The conventional DC-DC boost converter is the most admired configuration for this scheme, even if the converter efficiency is restricted at duty cycle near to maximum value. In order to find solution to the problem and improve its conversion capability, many converter configurations have been implemented so far. With this circumstance, this research work proposes to give overview of a few most imperative research works related to DC-DC boost converters. Some configurations are covered and classified basically based on the application. The major benefits and disadvantages related to the available techniques are also briefly conveyed. At last, a proper evaluation is recognized among the important types of DC-DC boost converters in terms of efficiency, number of components, and stability.

  9. Sequentially delivered boost plans are superior to simultaneously delivered plans in head and neck cancer when the boost volume is located further away from the parotid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamers-Kuijper, Emmy; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Mourik, Anke van; Rasch, Coen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To find parameters that predict which head and neck patients benefit from a sequentially delivered boost treatment plan compared to a simultaneously delivered plan, with the aim to spare the salivary glands. Methods and materials: We evaluated 50 recently treated head and neck cancer patients. Apart from the clinical plan with a sequentially (SEQ) given boost using an Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT), a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique plan was constructed with the same beam set-up. The mean dose to the parotid glands was calculated and compared. The elective nodal areas were bilateral in all cases, with a boost on either one side or both sides of the neck. Results: When the parotid gland volume and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) for the boost overlap there is on average a lower dose to the parotid gland with a SIB technique (-1.2 Gy), which is, however, not significant (p = 0.08). For all parotid glands with no boost PTV overlap, there is a benefit from a SEQ technique compared to a SIB technique for the gland evaluated (on average a 2.5 Gy lower dose to the parotid gland, p < 0.001). When the distance between gland and PTV is 0-1 cm, this difference is on average 0.8 Gy, for 1-2 cm distance 2.9 Gy and for glands with a distance greater than 2 cm, 3.3 Gy. When the lymph nodes on the evaluated side are also included in the boost PTV, however, this relationship between the distance and the gain of a SEQ seems less clear. Conclusions: A sequentially delivered boost technique results in a better treatment plan for most cases, compared to a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique, if the boost PTV is more than 1 cm away from at least one parotid gland.

  10. Application of multivariate techniques in the optimization of a procedure for the determination of bioavailable concentrations of Se and As in estuarine sediments by ICP OES using a concomitant metals analyzer as a hydride generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Watson da Luz; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal; Oliveira, Eliane Padua; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Bezerra, Marcos Almeida

    2009-10-15

    A procedure has been developed for the determination of bioavailable concentrations of selenium and arsenic in estuarine sediments employing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using a concomitant metals analyzer device to perform hydride generation. The optimization of hydride generation was done in two steps: using a two-level factorial design for preliminary evaluation of studied factors and a Doehlert design to assess the optimal experimental conditions for analysis. Interferences of transition metallic ions (Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Ni(2+)) to selenium and arsenic signals were minimized by using higher hydrochloric acid concentrations. In this way, the procedure allowed the determination of selenium and arsenic in sediments with a detection limit of 25 and 30 microg kg(-1), respectively, assuming a 50-fold sample dilution (0.5 g sample extraction to 25 mL sample final volume). The precision, expressed as a relative standard deviation (% RSD, n=10), was 0.2% for both selenium and arsenic in 200 microg L(-1) solutions, which corresponds to 10 microg g(-1) in sediment samples after acid extraction. Applying the proposed procedure, a linear range of 0.08-10 and 0.10-10 microg g(-1) was obtained for selenium and arsenic, respectively. The developed procedure was validated by the analysis of two certified reference materials: industrial sludge (NIST 2782) and river sediment (NIST 8704). The results were in agreement with the certified values. The developed procedure was applied to evaluate the bioavailability of both elements in four sediment certified reference materials, in which there are not certified values for bioavailable fractions, and also in estuarine sediment samples collected in several sites of Guanabara Bay, an impacted environment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  11. Mixed Lorentz boosted $Z^{0}'s$

    CERN Document Server

    Kjaer, N J

    2001-01-01

    A novel technique is proposed to study systematic errors on jet reconstruction in W physics measurements at LEP2 with high statistical precision. The method is based on the emulation of W pair events using Mixed Lorentz Boosted Z0 events. The scope and merits of the method and its statistical accuracy are discussed in the context of the DELPHI W mass measurement in the fully hadronic channel. The numbers presented are preliminary in the sense that they do not constitute the final DELPHI systematic errors.

  12. Performance of Boosted W Boson Identification with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This note presents the performance of a variety of techniques used to identify highly- boosted hadronically-decaying $W$ bosons. The studies presented here are divided into two parts: the first is based on Monte Carlo simulation, and the second compares the simulations to 20.3$\\pm$0.6 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-–proton collisions data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. Various tagging approaches and different grooming algorithms are compared in simulation, using a signal of large-$R$ jets containing a highly boosted $W$ boson and a background of large-$R$ jets originating from high-momentum light quarks or gluons. These techniques could also be utilised to identify hadronic decays of boosted $Z$ and Higgs bosons. A sample enriched in $t\\bar{t}\\to (W^+b)(W^-\\bar{b}) \\to (q\\bar{q}b)(\\mu \\bar{\

  13. Boosted W/Z Tagging at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Aparajita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study of the techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. The best performing algorithm for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets as seen in studies using 8 TeV data and simulation is validated for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 13 TeV data and MC simulations. The same is studied for Z bosons in 13 TeV MC simulation. Improvement in tagger performance using detector tracking information is also studied. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons using 8 TeV data. The alternative of using variable-R jets for capturing the hadronic decay products compared to standard techniques is also discussed.

  14. BoostEMM : Transparent boosting using exceptional model mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zon, S.B.; Zeev Ben Mordehay, O.; Vrijdag, T.S.; van Ipenburg, W.; Veldsink, J.; Duivesteijn, W.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Bordino, I.; Caldarelli, G.; Fumarola, F.; Gullo, F.; Squartini, T.

    2017-01-01

    Boosting is an iterative ensemble-learning paradigm. Every iteration, a weak predictor learns a classification task, taking into account performance achieved in previous iterations. This is done by assigning weights to individual records of the dataset, which are increased if the record is

  15. SemiBoost: boosting for semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapragada, Pavan Kumar; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K; Liu, Yi

    2009-11-01

    Semi-supervised learning has attracted a significant amount of attention in pattern recognition and machine learning. Most previous studies have focused on designing special algorithms to effectively exploit the unlabeled data in conjunction with labeled data. Our goal is to improve the classification accuracy of any given supervised learning algorithm by using the available unlabeled examples. We call this as the Semi-supervised improvement problem, to distinguish the proposed approach from the existing approaches. We design a metasemi-supervised learning algorithm that wraps around the underlying supervised algorithm and improves its performance using unlabeled data. This problem is particularly important when we need to train a supervised learning algorithm with a limited number of labeled examples and a multitude of unlabeled examples. We present a boosting framework for semi-supervised learning, termed as SemiBoost. The key advantages of the proposed semi-supervised learning approach are: 1) performance improvement of any supervised learning algorithm with a multitude of unlabeled data, 2) efficient computation by the iterative boosting algorithm, and 3) exploiting both manifold and cluster assumption in training classification models. An empirical study on 16 different data sets and text categorization demonstrates that the proposed framework improves the performance of several commonly used supervised learning algorithms, given a large number of unlabeled examples. We also show that the performance of the proposed algorithm, SemiBoost, is comparable to the state-of-the-art semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  16. Boost.Asio C++ network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Torjo, John

    2013-01-01

    What you want is an easy level of abstraction, which is just what this book provides in conjunction with Boost.Asio. Switching to Boost.Asio is just a few extra #include directives away, with the help of this practical and engaging guide.This book is great for developers that need to do network programming, who don't want to delve into the complicated issues of a raw networking API. You should be familiar with core Boost concepts, such as smart pointers and shared_from_this, resource classes (noncopyable), functors and boost::bind, boost mutexes, and the boost date/time library. Readers should

  17. Measuring performance in health care: case-mix adjustment by boosted decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Holstein, Josiane; Le Gall, Jean-Roger; Lepage, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the suitability of boosted decision trees for the case-mix adjustment involved in comparing the performance of various health care entities. First, we present logistic regression, decision trees, and boosted decision trees in a unified framework. Second, we study in detail their application for two common performance indicators, the mortality rate in intensive care and the rate of potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. For both examples the technique of boosting decision trees outperformed standard prognostic models, in particular linear logistic regression models, with regard to predictive power. On the other hand, boosting decision trees was computationally demanding and the resulting models were rather complex and needed additional tools for interpretation. Boosting decision trees represents a powerful tool for case-mix adjustment in health care performance measurement. Depending on the specific priorities set in each context, the gain in predictive power might compensate for the inconvenience in the use of boosted decision trees.

  18. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  19. Breast Conserving Treatment for Breast Cancer: Dosimetric Comparison of Sequential versus Simultaneous Integrated Photon Boost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Van Parijs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. Methods. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. Results. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001. There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04. The dose to the organs at risk (OAR was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. Conclusions. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine.

  20. Breast conserving treatment for breast cancer: dosimetric comparison of sequential versus simultaneous integrated photon boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Parijs, Hilde; Reynders, Truus; Heuninckx, Karina; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001). There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04). The dose to the organs at risk (OAR) was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine.

  1. High-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and inverse optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Meijer, Gert J.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sangen, Maurice J. van der; Cassee, Jorien

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recently a Phase III randomized trial has started comparing a boost of 16 Gy as part of whole-breast irradiation to a high boost of 26 Gy in young women. Our main aim was to develop an efficient simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) technique for the high-dose arm of the trial. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning was performed for 5 left-sided and 5 right-sided tumors. A tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique added to a sequentially planned 3-field boost (SEQ) was compared with a simultaneously planned technique (SIB) using inverse optimization. Normalized total dose (NTD)-corrected dose volume histogram parameters were calculated and compared. Results: The intended NTD was produced by 31 fractions of 1.66 Gy to the whole breast and 2.38 Gy to the boost volume. The average volume of the PTV-breast and PTV-boost receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose was 97% or more for both techniques. Also, the mean lung dose and mean heart dose did not differ much between the techniques, with on average 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SEQ and 3.8 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SIB, respectively. However, the SIB resulted in a significantly more conformal irradiation of the PTV-boost. The volume of the PTV-breast, excluding the PTV-boost, receiving a dose higher than 95% of the boost dose could be reduced considerably using the SIB as compared with the SEQ from 129 cc (range, 48-262 cc) to 58 cc (range, 30-102 cc). Conclusions: A high-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost technique has been developed. The unwanted excessive dose to the breast was significantly reduced

  2. Boosted Objects: A Probe of Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A.; /Oxford U.; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; /DESY; Bitenc, U.; /Freiburg U.; Brooijmans, G.; /Columbia U.; Butterworth, J.; /University Coll. London; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.; /Cracow, INP; Buarque Franzosi, D.; /Turin U.; Buckingham, R.; /Oxford U.; Chapleau, B.; /McGill U.; Dasgupta, M.; /Manchester U.; Davison, A.; /University Coll. London; Dolen, J.; /UC, Davis; Ellis, S.; /Washington U., Seattle; Fassi, F.; /Lyon, IPN; Ferrando, J.; /Oxford U.; Frandsen, M.T.; /Oxford U.; Frost, J.; /Cambridge U.; Gadfort, T.; /Brookhaven; Glover, N.; /Durham U.; Haas, A.; /SLAC; Halkiadakis, E.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Oxford U. /Ohio State U. /Rutherford /Oxford U. /Oxford U. /Maryland U. /Bristol U. /Princeton U. /Oxford U. /Oxford U. /Arizona U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Rutherford /Bristol U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Weizmann Inst. /Washington U., Seattle /Johns Hopkins U. /Oslo U. /Durham U. /Princeton U. /Paris, LPTHE /CERN /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Granada U. /SLAC /Rutherford /Toronto U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U. /Yale U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-12

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.

  3. Boosted objects: a probe of beyond the Standard Model physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Bitenc, U; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P; Buarque Franzosi, D; Buckingham, R; Chapleau, B; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S; Fassi, F; Ferrando, J; Frandsen, M T; Frost, J; Gadfort, T; Glover, N; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, K; Hays, C; Hill, C; Jackson, J; Issever, C; Karagoz, M; Katz, A; Kreczko, L; Krohn, D; Lewis, A; Livermore, S; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; March-Russell, J; Martin, A; McCubbin, N; Newbold, D; Ott, J; Perez, G; Policchio, A; Rappoccio, S; Raklev, A R; Richardson, P; Salam, G P; Sannino, F; Santiago, J; Schwartzman, A; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C; Sinervo, P; Sjoelin, J; Son, M; Spannowsky, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Tseng, J; Tweedie, B; Vermillion, C; Voigt, J; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wilson, M G

    2011-01-01

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.

  4. Boosted black holes on Kaluza-Klein bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    We construct an exact stationary solution of black-hole-bubble sequence in the five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory by using solitonic solution-generating techniques. The solution describes two stationary black holes with topology S 3 on a Kaluza-Klein bubble and has a linear momentum component in the compactified direction. We call the solution boosted black holes on Kaluza-Klein bubble because it has the linear momentum. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass and the linear momentum depend on the two boosted velocity parameters of black holes. In the effective four-dimensional theory, the solution has an electric charge which is proportional to the linear momentum. The solution includes the static solution found by Elvang and Horowitz. The small and the big black holes limits are investigated. The relation between the solution and the single boosted black string are considered

  5. Boosted Higgs boson tagging using jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shvydkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Searching BSM particles via the Higgs boson final state has now become common. The mass of desired BSM particle is more than 1 TeV, thereby its decay products are highly Lorentz-boosted. Hence the jets from b quark-antiquark pair - which the Higgs boson mostly decays into - are very closed to each other, and merged into one jet, that is typically reconstructed using large jet sizes (∆R = 0.8). In this work regression technique is applied to AK8 jets (which defined by anti-kT algorithm, using ΔR = 0.8). The regression makes use of boosted jets with substructure information, coupled with the pecularities of a b quark decay, like the presence of a soft lepton (SL) inside the jet. It has allowed to improve the resolution of the mass reconstruction and transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. This application results in improvement of the mass reconstruction by 3-4 percent. These result may be improved firstly by making more careful pileup rejection. Then it is possible to combine base regression train for dif...

  6. Oral lichen planus preceding concomitant lichen planopilaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoopler, Eric T; Alfaris, Sausan; Alomar, Dalal; Alawi, Faizan

    2016-09-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is an immune-mediated mucocutaneous disorder with a wide array of clinical presentations. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is characterized clinically by striae, desquamation, and/or ulceration. Lichen planopilaris (LPP), a variant of LP, affects the scalp, resulting in perifollicular erythema and scarring of cutaneous surfaces accompanied by hair loss. The association between OLP and LPP has been reported previously with scant information on concomitant or sequential disease presentation. We describe a patient with concomitant OLP and LPP, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on OLP preceding the onset of LPP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brachytherapy boost for breast cancer: what do we know? where do we go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Marsiglia, H.

    2004-01-01

    Since many years, Brachytherapy (BT) appears to play an important role in the treatment of many solid tumors. For breast cancer, BT is usually used as boost after postoperative external beam radiation therapy. In certain circumstances. BT can be used as sole radiation technique focalized on the tumor bed or more rarely, as second conservative treatment in case of local recurrence for woman refusing salvage mastectomy. Boost BT is most often applied via an interstitial technique while the dose rate can vary from low to high close rate through pulse dose rate. All of those boost techniques were published and some of them compared the results obtained with BT and external beam electron therapy. The analysis of the published phase II and III trials was not able to show significant differences between the two boost techniques in term of local control as well as late skin side effects. However, we noted that the patients who received BT boost presented a higher risk of local recurrence compare to those treated with electron therapy, due to age, margin status or presence of extensive intraductal component. Only a phase III trial randomizing BT boost vs electron therapy boost could show a possible improvement of local control rate in the BT arm; however, this trial should enroll patients with a real high risk of local recurrence in order to take benefit from the dosimetric advantages of BT. (author)

  8. Boosted PWM open loop control of hydraulic proportional valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirante, R.; Innone, A.; Catalano, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative open loop control technique for direct single stage hydraulic proportional valves whose response rate is significantly higher than that obtained by standard open loop control techniques, even comparable to more costly commercial closed loop systems. Different from standard open loop techniques, which provide the coil with a constant current proportional to the target position, the control strategy proposed in this paper employs the peak and hold (P and H) technique, widely used in Diesel engine modern supply systems, to boost the duty cycle value of the pulse width modulation (PWM) signal for a short time, namely during the spool displacement, while maintaining a lower duty cycle for holding the spool in the required opening position. The developed 'boosted PWM' technique only requires a low cost microcontroller, such as a peripheral interface controller (PIC) equipped with a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) power driver. The PWM parameters are calibrated as a function of the spool displacement so as to maximize the response rate without introducing overshoots: the collected data are stored in the PIC. Different valve opening procedures with step response have been compared to demonstrate the merits of the proposed boosted PWM technique. No overshoots have been registered. Moreover, the proposed method is characterized by a significantly higher response rate with respect to a standard open loop control, which approximately has the same cost. Similar experimental tests show that the proposed boosted PWM technique has a response rate even higher than that provided by the more costly commercial closed loop system mounted on the valve, and it produces no overshoots

  9. Boosted PWM open loop control of hydraulic proportional valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirante, R.; Catalano, L.A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Via Re David 200, 70125 Bari (Italy); Innone, A. [Universita degli Studi di Foggia, via Napoli, 25 Foggia (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents an innovative open loop control technique for direct single stage hydraulic proportional valves whose response rate is significantly higher than that obtained by standard open loop control techniques, even comparable to more costly commercial closed loop systems. Different from standard open loop techniques, which provide the coil with a constant current proportional to the target position, the control strategy proposed in this paper employs the peak and hold (P and H) technique, widely used in Diesel engine modern supply systems, to boost the duty cycle value of the pulse width modulation (PWM) signal for a short time, namely during the spool displacement, while maintaining a lower duty cycle for holding the spool in the required opening position. The developed 'boosted PWM' technique only requires a low cost microcontroller, such as a peripheral interface controller (PIC) equipped with a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) power driver. The PWM parameters are calibrated as a function of the spool displacement so as to maximize the response rate without introducing overshoots: the collected data are stored in the PIC. Different valve opening procedures with step response have been compared to demonstrate the merits of the proposed boosted PWM technique. No overshoots have been registered. Moreover, the proposed method is characterized by a significantly higher response rate with respect to a standard open loop control, which approximately has the same cost. Similar experimental tests show that the proposed boosted PWM technique has a response rate even higher than that provided by the more costly commercial closed loop system mounted on the valve, and it produces no overshoots. (author)

  10. Concomitant hypo-hyperdontia with dens invaginatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, B S; Nagarajappa, D; Singh, Santosh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Although developmental anomalies of tooth number are quite common in permanent dentition, concomitant occurrence of hypohyperdontia is a very rare mixed numeric anomalous condition of teeth. Very few cases of this condition have been reported in the English literature. Here we report such a rare case noted in a 26 year-old male dental graduate with no other associated systemic condition or syndrome.

  11. Effect of pole zero location on system dynamics of boost converter for micro grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavanya, A.; Vijayakumar, K.; Navamani, J. D.; Jayaseelan, N.

    2018-04-01

    Green clean energy like photo voltaic, wind energy, fuel cell can be brought together by microgrid.For low voltage sources like photovoltaic cell boost converter is very much essential. This paper explores the dynamic analysis of boost converter in a continuous conduction mode (CCM). The transient performance and stability analysis is carried out in this paper using time domain analysis and frequency domain analysis techniques. Boost converter is simulated using both PSIM and MATLAB software. Furthermore, state space model obtained and the transfer function is derived. The converter behaviour when a step input is applied is analyzed and stability of the converter is analyzed from bode plot frequency for open loop. Effect of the locations of poles and zeros in the transfer function of boost converter and how the performance parameters are affected is discussed in this paper. Closed loop performance with PI controller is also analyzed for boost converter.

  12. Boosted dibosons from mixed heavy top squarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy

    2013-12-01

    The lighter mass eigenstate (t˜1) of the two top squarks, the scalar superpartners of the top quark, is extremely difficult to discover if it is almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino (χ˜10), the lightest stable supersymmetric particle in the R-parity conserving supersymmetry. The current experimental bound on t˜1 mass in this scenario stands only around 200 GeV. For such a light t˜1, the heavier top squark (t˜2) can also be around the TeV scale. Moreover, the high value of the Higgs (h) mass prefers the left- and right-handed top squarks to be highly mixed, allowing the possibility of a considerable branching ratio for t˜2→t˜1h and t˜2→t˜1Z. In this paper, we explore the above possibility together with the pair production of t˜2 t˜2*, giving rise to the spectacular diboson+missing transverse energy final state. For an approximately 1 TeV t˜2 and a few hundred GeV t˜1 the final state particles can be moderately boosted, which encourages us to propose a novel search strategy employing the jet substructure technique to tag the boosted h and Z. The reconstruction of the h and Z momenta also allows us to construct the stransverse mass MT2, providing an additional efficient handle to fight the backgrounds. We show that a 4-5σ signal can be observed at the 14 TeV LHC for ˜1TeV t˜2 with 100fb-1 integrated luminosity.

  13. Concomitant hypo-hyperdontia with dens invaginatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Manjunatha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although developmental anomalies of tooth number are quite common in permanent dentition, concomitant occurrence of hypohyperdontia is a very rare mixed numeric anomalous condition of teeth. Very few cases of this condition have been reported in the English literature. Here we report such a rare case noted in a 26 year-old male dental graduate with no other associated systemic condition or syndrome.

  14. Extracorporeal Detoxification in Victims with Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ye. Khoroshilov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the results of victims with massive crushes of soft tissues in severe concomitant injury (SCI, by applying extracorporeal detoxification techniques as soon as possible. Subjects and methods. The results of examination and treatment were studied in 41 victims with SCI treated at the N. N. Burdenko Main Military Clinical Hospital in 2006 to 2008. In the early posttraumatic period (on days 1—3, all the victims (n=41 were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 victims (n=19 underwent hemodiafiltration (HDF with replacement at 35 ml/kg/hr; Group 2 (n=22 had plasmapheresis. Results. Early HDF applied to Group 1 victims could achieve 32, 44, and 37% reductions in the elevated levels creatine phosphokinase, myoglobin, and middle-sized molecules, respectively. In Group 2, plasmapheresis showed a lower effect (19, 25, and 26% reductions. Furthermore, there was a decrease in total protein in Group 1, which was absent in Group 2. Conclusion. The timely use of extracorporeal detoxification techniques in victims with massive crushes of soft tissues in the early posttraumatic period prevents the development of fatal complications of SCI, at the same time HDF is more effective and safe than plasmapheresis. Key words: severe concomitant injury, rhabdomyolysis, myoglobin, plasmapheresis, hemodiafiltration.

  15. Radiographer-led breast boost localisation – A service evaluation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Comins, C.

    2015-01-01

    A radiation boost to the tumour bed as part of breast conserving therapy reduces the rate of local recurrence. Radiographer-led planning for tangential field radiotherapy has been the practice at our centre since 2007. The transition from conventional simulation to computed tomography (CT) and virtual simulation enhanced the radiographer's role in the breast planning process. Electron boost mark ups continued to be marked up freehand by doctors using available imaging to determine tumour bed. The paper reports on a service evaluation undertaken to establish a change in practice for electron breast boosts to be simulated using the virtual simulator by suitably trained radiographers. The retrospective simulation of ten patients confirmed the consistency of radiographer tumour bed localisation, followed by the prospective simulation of ten patients' boost fields. The introduction of a radiographer-led planning breast boost service has given greater autonomy and job satisfaction to individuals as well as resulting in a cost effective use of available resources. - Highlights: • A service evaluation study was undertaken to train a radiographer to perform breast boost planning. • Retrospective breast boost planning established proposed technique was workable. • Prospective planning by radiographer proved their competence. • Introduction of new technique provided job satisfaction and service improvement

  16. The gradient boosting algorithm and random boosting for genome-assisted evaluation in large data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Recio, O; Jiménez-Montero, J A; Alenda, R

    2013-01-01

    In the next few years, with the advent of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and genome sequencing, genomic evaluation methods will need to deal with a large number of genetic variants and an increasing sample size. The boosting algorithm is a machine-learning technique that may alleviate the drawbacks of dealing with such large data sets. This algorithm combines different predictors in a sequential manner with some shrinkage on them; each predictor is applied consecutively to the residuals from the committee formed by the previous ones to form a final prediction based on a subset of covariates. Here, a detailed description is provided and examples using a toy data set are included. A modification of the algorithm called "random boosting" was proposed to increase predictive ability and decrease computation time of genome-assisted evaluation in large data sets. Random boosting uses a random selection of markers to add a subsequent weak learner to the predictive model. These modifications were applied to a real data set composed of 1,797 bulls genotyped for 39,714 SNP. Deregressed proofs of 4 yield traits and 1 type trait from January 2009 routine evaluations were used as dependent variables. A 2-fold cross-validation scenario was implemented. Sires born before 2005 were used as a training sample (1,576 and 1,562 for production and type traits, respectively), whereas younger sires were used as a testing sample to evaluate predictive ability of the algorithm on yet-to-be-observed phenotypes. Comparison with the original algorithm was provided. The predictive ability of the algorithm was measured as Pearson correlations between observed and predicted responses. Further, estimated bias was computed as the average difference between observed and predicted phenotypes. The results showed that the modification of the original boosting algorithm could be run in 1% of the time used with the original algorithm and with negligible differences in accuracy

  17. Powerful boost for Indian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The Neyveli Lignite Corporation (NLC) of India has begun the first phase of an expansion program that will open a second mine and boost lignite production in Tamil Nadu to nearly five times its present level within the next 15 years. Mining conditions at Neyveli are particularly difficult. The harsh abrasive overburden strata present severe and strenuous conditions; sticky and marshy surface clays, the presence of groundwater aquifers, the cyclonic and monsoonal climate and high stripping ratios are other problems. The overburden is drilled and blasted; in areas of sticky topsoil, non-stick liners for the buckets etc. are used. Adequate safeguards and infrastructure are being developed to deal with differing strata conditions. The conveyor transport system features slow, wider belt conveyors, changeover from fixed type roller to freely hanging garland type, interlinking of benches and specially designed drive heads. The groundwater aquifers are continuously depressurized by grid pumping from a series of pumps; boreholes have been sunk to 120 m.

  18. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  19. Face Alignment Using Boosting and Evolutionary Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Duanduan; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus; Zha, H.; Taniguchi, R.-I.; Maybank, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a face alignment approach using granular features, boosting, and an evolutionary search algorithm. Active Appearance Models (AAM) integrate a shape-texture-combined morphable face model into an efficient fitting strategy, then Boosting Appearance Models (BAM) consider the

  20. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  1. The impact of gap duration on local control in anal canal carcinoma treated by split-course radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Kurtz, John M.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefit of reducing the intersequence gap in patients with anal cancer treated with split-course chemoradiotherapy. Methods: The study group consisted of 90 patients with anal squamous carcinoma treated between 1981 and 1998, using concomitant chemotherapy (CT) and radiation (RT). Median age was 65 years (range 41-87). RT was delivered in a split course, with a median gap of 37.5 days (range 4-97) between sequences. First (pelvic) sequence delivered a median dose of 40 Gy (range 36-50.4), using AP/PA megavoltage photon beams. Boost treatment (median dose 20 Gy, range 13-26) consisted of either Iridium-192 implantation (49 patients) or external beam RT (41 patients). CT consisted of 1-2 cycles of a 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil and bolus mitomycin C, usually administered during the first week of each RT course. Median follow-up was 76.2 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with locoregional control (LRC). Results: Five-year actuarial LRC was 72.5%. Factors associated with poorer LRC (univariate) were: age ≤65, male gender, and gap >37.5 days. Number of CT cycles (1 vs. 2 or more), boost technique (brachytherapy vs. external), and T-stage were not significantly associated with LRC. In multivariate analysis, only age (p=0.01), and gap (p=0.02) retained their significance. In patients older than 65 years, LRC was 92.3% and 75% for shorter and longer gaps, respectively. In younger patients, the corresponding values for LRC were 73.7% and 50%. Conclusion: In anal cancers, split-course RT with >50 Gy dose delivery is difficult to avoid because of acute toxicity. The present analysis suggests that shortening the gap contributes to optimizing LRC. Gaps longer than 5 weeks correlated with poorer LRC, with especially unsatisfactory results observed in younger patients

  2. Diode-Assisted Buck-Boost Voltage-Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    , a number of diode-assisted inverter variants can be designed with each having its own operational principle and voltage gain expression. For controlling them, a generic modulation scheme that can be used for controlling all diode-assisted variants with minimized harmonic distortion and component stress......This paper proposes a number of diode-assisted buck-boost voltage-source inverters with a unique X-shaped diode-capacitor network inserted between the inverter circuitry and dc source for producing a voltage gain that is comparatively higher than those of other buck-boost conversion techniques....... Using the diode-assisted network, the proposed inverters can naturally configure themselves to perform capacitive charging in parallel and discharging in series to give a higher voltage multiplication factor without compromising waveform quality. In addition, by adopting different front-end circuitries...

  3. Concomitant Hip Arthroscopy and Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, Benjamin G; LaReau, Justin M; Hammarstedt, Jon E; Gupta, Asheesh; Stake, Christine E; Redmond, John M

    2015-11-01

    To detail our early experience using concomitant hip arthroscopy and periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia. We prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed the surgical and outcome data of 17 patients who underwent concomitant hip arthroscopy and PAO between October 2010 and July 2013. Preoperative and postoperative range of motion, outcome and pain scores, and radiographic data were collected. Intraoperative arthroscopic findings and postoperative complications were recorded. The group consisted of 3 male and 14 female patients with a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. Three patients had undergone previous surgery on the affected hip. Chondrolabral pathology was identified in all 17 patients. Twelve patients underwent labral repair, and five patients underwent partial labral debridement. No patient was converted to total hip arthroplasty or required revision surgery at short-term follow-up. All 4 patient-reported outcome scores showed statistically significant changes from baseline to latest follow-up (P arthroscopy and PAO has been favorable. We noted that all our patients have evidence of chondrolabral damage at the time of PAO when the joint is distracted and evaluated. All patients in this series had intra-articular pathology treated arthroscopically and showed satisfactory mean clinical improvement. Hip arthroscopy with PAO did not appear to introduce complications beyond the PAO alone. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  5. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3–4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade ≥3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade ≥3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  6. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  7. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  8. Boosting Learning Algorithm for Stock Price Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengzhang; Bai, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    To tackle complexity and uncertainty of stock market behavior, more studies have introduced machine learning algorithms to forecast stock price. ANN (artificial neural network) is one of the most successful and promising applications. We propose a boosting-ANN model in this paper to predict the stock close price. On the basis of boosting theory, multiple weak predicting machines, i.e. ANNs, are assembled to build a stronger predictor, i.e. boosting-ANN model. New error criteria of the weak studying machine and rules of weights updating are adopted in this study. We select technical factors from financial markets as forecasting input variables. Final results demonstrate the boosting-ANN model works better than other ones for stock price forecasting.

  9. Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    India, particularly among vulnerable women and children. The research ... This approach will improve the quality of life for farmers, and is part of a long-term solution to rural poverty in India. ... Traditional grains boost nutrition in rural India.

  10. Two-inductor boost and buck converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. L.; Muldoon, W. J.

    The derivation, analysis and design of a coupled inductor boost converter is presented. Aspects of the qualitative ac behavior of coupled inductor converters are discussed. Considerations for the design of the magnetics for such converters are addressed.

  11. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  12. Internationalization of Boost Juice to Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jane L. Menzies; Stuart C. Orr

    2014-01-01

    This case describes the process that the Australian juice retail chain, Boost Juice, has used to internationalize to Malaysia. The main objective of this case is to demonstrate good practice in regard to internationalization. The case provides the background of the juice bar industry in Malaysia and determines that it is an attractive market for new start-up juice bars. An analysis of Boost Juice's capability determined that the company utilized the skills of its staff, product innovations, b...

  13. Search for pair production of vector-like T and B quarks in single-lepton final states using boosted jet substructure techniques at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, A.M.; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Bagaturia, Iuri; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Seitz, Claudia; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Boran, Fatma; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Benaglia, Andrea; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Zaleski, Shawn; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-11-15

    A search for pair production of massive vector-like T and B quarks in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV is presented. The data set was collected in 2015 by the CMS experiment at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of up to 2.6 fb$^{-1}$. The T and B quarks are assumed to decay through three possible channels into a heavy boson (either a W, Z or Higgs boson) and a third generation quark. This search is performed in final states with one charged lepton and several jets, exploiting techniques to identify W or Higgs bosons decaying hadronically with large transverse momenta. No excess over the predicted standard model background is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the T quark pair production cross section are set that exclude T quark masses below 860 GeV in the singlet, and below 830 GeV in the doublet branching fraction scenario. For other branching fraction combinations with $\\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{ t }\\mathrm{ H }) + \\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{ b }\\mathrm{ W }) \\geq $ 0.4,...

  14. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost vs. conventional radiotherapy with sequential boost for breast cancer - A preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsuei, Le-Ping; Chen, Fang-Ming; Ou-Yang, Fu; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2015-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess the acute dermatological adverse effect from two distinct RT techniques for breast cancer patients. We compared intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and conventional radiotherapy followed by sequential boost (CRT-SB). The study population was composed of 126 consecutive female breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Sixty-six patients received IMRT-SIB to 2 dose levels simultaneously. They received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction to the whole breast and 60.2 Gy at 2.15 Gy per fraction to the tumor bed by integral boost. Sixty patients in the CRT-SB group received 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a boost irradiation to tumor bed in 5-7 fractions to a total dose of 60-64 Gy. Acute skin toxicities were documented in agreement with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v.3.0). Ninety-eight patients had grade 1 radiation dermatitis while 14 patients had grade 2. Among those with grade 2, there were 3 patients in IMRT-SIB group (4.5%) while 11 in CRT-SB group (18.3%). (P = 0.048) There was no patient with higher than grade 2 toxicity. Three year local control was 99.2%, 3-year disease free survival was 97.5% and 3-year overall survival was 99.2%. A significant reduction in the severity of acute radiation dermatitis from IMRT-SIB comparing with CRT-SB is demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Concomitant overdosing of other drugs in patients with paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Paracetamol is frequently involved in intended self-poisoning, and concomitant overdosing of other drugs is commonly reported. The purpose of the study was to investigate further concomitant drug overdose in patients with paracetamol poisoning and to evaluate its effects on the outcome...... of the paracetamol intoxication. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-one consecutive patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning were studied and concomitant drug intake was recorded. The relative risk of hepatic encephalopathy, death or liver transplantation, hepatic dysfunction, liver cell damage, and renal...... favourable outcome was observed in patients with concomitant NSAID overdose. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant overdosing of benzodiazepines or analgesics is frequent in patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning. Concomitant benzodiazepine or acetylsalicylic acid overdose was associated with more severe toxicity...

  17. CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Peter M.; Kirikuta, Ion C.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study was performed to compare the accuracy of clinical treatment set-up and CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods: Between September 1993 and October 1994, 45 women who underwent breast conserving surgery and irradiation containing a boost to the tumour bed were investigated. Prospective evaluation of CT planning of the boost was carried out. The target volume/boost field, electron energy and treatment set-up had been defined on the basis of clinical examination, initial and postsurgical mammograms by one radiotherapist. Next, a planning CT was performed in treatment position and a CT-based treatment plan was calculated according to a target volume defined by another radiotherapist. The clinical treatment set-up was imported into our computer planning system and the resulting isodose plots were compared with those from CT planning and reviewed critically. Results: The clinically defined treatment set-up had to be modified in 80% of the patients. Most discrepancies observed were related to the size of the boost field itself and the chosen electron energy. Minor changes had to be made with respect to angle of table and gantry. Conclusions: Critical review of the isodose plots from both methods showed clear advantages for CT planning. Guidelines for target definition in CT planning of boost irradiation and subgroups of patients benefiting from this technique are described

  18. Concomitant Suppurative Parotitis and Condylar Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrasi, John; Zinberg, Geoffrey

    2017-03-01

    Parotitis is a common occurrence in the immunocompromised, dehydrated, and malnourished patient as a result of dysfunctional ductal and parotid cells. Inflammation can be acute or chronic based on clinical history, and it can be suppurative based on the presence of micro or macro abscess formation within the substance of the gland. This report presents a case of concomitant condylar osteomyelitis and chronic suppurative parotitis in the setting of previous methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus foot infection. Ultimately, resection of osteomyelitis, drainage of parotid infection, and intravenous antibiotic therapy led to full resolution of the infection and symptoms. The final pathology of osteomyelitis of the temporomandibular joint and methicillin-resistant S aureus infection is an unusual consequence of chronic parotitis. The patient was restored with a total joint replacement approximately 3 months after resection with no recurrence of infection after 24 months. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Concomitant urethral triplication, bladder, and colon duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourchi, Ali; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Khakpour, Mahshid; Mohammadi Nejad, Payam; Mousavian, Amir-Abbas; Kalantary, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    The concomitant presence of urethral triplication and caudal duplication is extremely rare with no previous reported cases. We report a case of urethral triplication associated with bladder, sigmoid, and rectum duplication. The patient was initially referred with a history of fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infection. Physical examination revealed 2 meatal opening on the glans penis. Further investigation revealed three distinct urinary streams, two terminating on the glans penis, and one in the rectum in voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography. Computed tomography demonstrated the bladder divided into two compartments by a complete sagittal septum. The patient was managed by the excision of the rectal ending urethra and removal of the bladder sagittal septum during which, two sigmoidal and rectal segments (the right one filled with fecal) were revealed. The right sigmoid and rectum was resected. The two ventral urethras were kept intact. The postoperative course was uneventful. At his 4 month readmission for colostomy closure, the patient reported good urethral voiding with no complication and recurrence of urinary tract infection and the colostomy was closed with no major complication.

  20. ATLAS searches for New Physics with Boosted Objects

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    With the increase of energy and luminosity at the LHC, searches for new physics are focusing on the multi-TeV mass range. Decays of heavy resonances associated with new physics in this mass range often result in highly boosted very massive objects such as W/Z bosons or Top quarks. New reconstruction techniques, based on jet sub-structure algorithms, are needed to efficiently reconstruct such decay signatures. We will review recent ATLAS developments of jet sub-structure reconstruction tools, and their application to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  1. Boosted decision trees and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coadou, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Decision trees are a machine learning technique more and more commonly used in high energy physics, while it has been widely used in the social sciences. After introducing the concepts of decision trees, this article focuses on its application in particle physics. (authors)

  2. Concomitant hypo-hyperdontia: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: Concomitant hypo-hyperdontia (CHH is a rare numeric dental anomaly characterized by congenital missing teeth and supernumerary teeth occurring in the same individual. Due to its rarity and sporadicity, the causes of CHH have been completely unknown. Detailed characterization and presentation of more CHH cases not only strengthen clinical diagnosis and treatment for the patients but facilitate the search for etiological factors of the disorder. Materials and methods: From a pedodontic patient population, 21 CHH subjects, with a mean age of 6 years 10 months, were identified and characterized. Dental records and radiographs were scrutinized and analyzed for the distribution and frequencies of involved teeth and concurrent dental anomalies. Through further literature review, 59 CHH cases with supernumeraries in the premaxillary region were retrieved for comparative analyses. Results: The boys were affected twice as often as the girls. While most cases were unrelated and sporadic, two sisters and a pair of identical twins from two unrelated families were presented. Of all cases, only one was of syndromic CHH carrying Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Bimaxillay CHH, with anomalies involving two jaws, occurred more than 4 times as often as maxillary CHH. While all supernumeraries were found in premaxillary region, hypodontia frequently involved lateral incisors and premolars of both jaws. Conclusion: As genetic contribution to CHH is strongly suggested by its familial occurrence and syndromic cases, environmental factors seem to play certain roles in modifying disease phenotypes. Judicious use of radiographs during early mixed dentition stage enhances clinical diagnosis and treatment of CHH. Keywords: Tooth agenesis, Supernumerary, Numeric anomaly, Premaxillary

  3. Boost breaking in the EFT of inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Noumi, Toshifumi, E-mail: lvd@stanford.edu, E-mail: tnoumi@phys.sci.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu [Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-01

    If time-translations are spontaneously broken, so are boosts. This symmetry breaking pattern can be non-linearly realized by either just the Goldstone boson of time translations, or by four Goldstone bosons associated with time translations and boosts. In this paper we extend the Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation to consider the case in which the additional Goldstone bosons associated with boosts are light and coupled to the Goldstone boson of time translations. The symmetry breaking pattern forces a coupling to curvature so that the mass of the additional Goldstone bosons is predicted to be equal to √2 H in the vast majority of the parameter space where they are light. This pattern therefore offers a natural way of generating self-interacting particles with Hubble mass during inflation. After constructing the general effective Lagrangian, we study how these particles mix and interact with the curvature fluctuations, generating potentially detectable non-Gaussian signals.

  4. Improved Stereo Matching With Boosting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiny B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an approach based on classification for improving the accuracy of stereo matching methods. We propose this method for occlusion handling. This work employs classification of pixels for finding the erroneous disparity values. Due to the wide applications of disparity map in 3D television medical imaging etc the accuracy of disparity map has high significance. An initial disparity map is obtained using local or global stereo matching methods from the input stereo image pair. The various features for classification are computed from the input stereo image pair and the obtained disparity map. Then the computed feature vector is used for classification of pixels by using GentleBoost as the classification method. The erroneous disparity values in the disparity map found by classification are corrected through a completion stage or filling stage. A performance evaluation of stereo matching using AdaBoostM1 RUSBoost Neural networks and GentleBoost is performed.

  5. An Update on Statistical Boosting in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Mayr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical boosting algorithms have triggered a lot of research during the last decade. They combine a powerful machine learning approach with classical statistical modelling, offering various practical advantages like automated variable selection and implicit regularization of effect estimates. They are extremely flexible, as the underlying base-learners (regression functions defining the type of effect for the explanatory variables can be combined with any kind of loss function (target function to be optimized, defining the type of regression setting. In this review article, we highlight the most recent methodological developments on statistical boosting regarding variable selection, functional regression, and advanced time-to-event modelling. Additionally, we provide a short overview on relevant applications of statistical boosting in biomedicine.

  6. An Update on Statistical Boosting in Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Andreas; Hofner, Benjamin; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Hepp, Tobias; Meyer, Sebastian; Gefeller, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Statistical boosting algorithms have triggered a lot of research during the last decade. They combine a powerful machine learning approach with classical statistical modelling, offering various practical advantages like automated variable selection and implicit regularization of effect estimates. They are extremely flexible, as the underlying base-learners (regression functions defining the type of effect for the explanatory variables) can be combined with any kind of loss function (target function to be optimized, defining the type of regression setting). In this review article, we highlight the most recent methodological developments on statistical boosting regarding variable selection, functional regression, and advanced time-to-event modelling. Additionally, we provide a short overview on relevant applications of statistical boosting in biomedicine.

  7. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M Y; Martinez-Botas, R F; Zhuge, W L; Qureshi, U; Richards, B

    2013-01-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically

  8. The boosts in the noncommutative special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagraa, M.

    2001-01-01

    From the quantum analogue of the Iwasawa decomposition of SL(2, C) group and the correspondence between quantum SL(2, C) and Lorentz groups we deduce the different properties of the Hopf algebra representing the boost of particles in noncommutative special relativity. The representation of the boost in the Hilbert space states is investigated and the addition rules of the velocities are established from the coaction. The q-deformed Clebsch-Gordon coefficients describing the transformed states of the evolution of particles in noncommutative special relativity are introduced and their explicit calculation are given. (author)

  9. Concomitant overdosing of other drugs in patients with paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    of the paracetamol intoxication. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-one consecutive patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning were studied and concomitant drug intake was recorded. The relative risk of hepatic encephalopathy, death or liver transplantation, hepatic dysfunction, liver cell damage, and renal...... was a protective factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (OR 0.26; CI 0.07, 0.96). Concomitant acetylsalicylic acid overdose was a risk factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (OR 4.87; CI 1.52, 15.7) and death or liver transplantation (OR 6.04; CI 1.69, 21.6). A tendency towards a more...... favourable outcome was observed in patients with concomitant NSAID overdose. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant overdosing of benzodiazepines or analgesics is frequent in patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning. Concomitant benzodiazepine or acetylsalicylic acid overdose was associated with more severe toxicity...

  10. Laparoendoscopic Rendezvous for Concomitant Cholecystocholedocholithiasis: A Successful Modality Even in the Most Difficult Presentations Including Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirah, Bader Hamza; Mikwar, Zaher Abdulaziz; Ahmad, Akram Neyaz; Dahlan, Yaser Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background . Laparoendoscopic rendezvous (LERV) technique is emerging as an attractive treatment option for concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis. In this paper, we report our experience in performing the LERV technique in patients with unusual presentations in terms of anatomical difficulty, pregnancy, multiple comorbid diseases, and postlaparotomy. We aim to highlight the effectiveness of the LERV technique in some clinical situations where conventional methods would fail or carry high risks in adequately managing concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis. Methods . Four patients diagnosed to have concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis with associated difficult presentation or comorbid diseases were treated using the LERV technique. One patient presented with difficult anatomy where ERCP failed at initial attempts. Another patient was pregnant (first trimester). A third patient had complex comorbid diseases (bronchial asthma, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis). A fourth patient had previous laparotomy and sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease and had severe hospital phobia. Results . All patients tolerated the LERV technique very well; no intraoperative occurrence was reported. The mean operative time was 86.3 ± 17.2 minutes; mean time of the endoscopic part was 29.4 ± 3.57 minutes. The mean blood loss was 44.3 ± 18.2 mL (range 20-85). Residual stone, postoperative complications, postoperative morbidity, and postoperative mortality were 0 (0%). Postoperative short hospital stay was reported in all patients, average 3 days (range 2-4). Conclusion . LERV procedure is a safe and effective treatment option for the management of concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis, even in difficult situations where other methods would fail or carry high risks, or in patients presenting with severe comorbid diseases or pregnancy. This procedure may emerge as an attractive alternative option for high

  11. Laparoendoscopic Rendezvous for Concomitant Cholecystocholedocholithiasis: A Successful Modality Even in the Most Difficult Presentations Including Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Hamza Shirah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laparoendoscopic rendezvous (LERV technique is emerging as an attractive treatment option for concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis. In this paper, we report our experience in performing the LERV technique in patients with unusual presentations in terms of anatomical difficulty, pregnancy, multiple comorbid diseases, and postlaparotomy. We aim to highlight the effectiveness of the LERV technique in some clinical situations where conventional methods would fail or carry high risks in adequately managing concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis. Methods. Four patients diagnosed to have concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis with associated difficult presentation or comorbid diseases were treated using the LERV technique. One patient presented with difficult anatomy where ERCP failed at initial attempts. Another patient was pregnant (first trimester. A third patient had complex comorbid diseases (bronchial asthma, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis. A fourth patient had previous laparotomy and sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease and had severe hospital phobia. Results. All patients tolerated the LERV technique very well; no intraoperative occurrence was reported. The mean operative time was 86.3±17.2 minutes; mean time of the endoscopic part was 29.4±3.57 minutes. The mean blood loss was 44.3±18.2 mL (range 20–85. Residual stone, postoperative complications, postoperative morbidity, and postoperative mortality were 0 (0%. Postoperative short hospital stay was reported in all patients, average 3 days (range 2–4. Conclusion. LERV procedure is a safe and effective treatment option for the management of concomitant cholecystocholedocholithiasis, even in difficult situations where other methods would fail or carry high risks, or in patients presenting with severe comorbid diseases or pregnancy. This procedure may emerge as an attractive alternative option for high

  12. Cooperatives boost opportunities for Moroccan women | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-22

    Oct 22, 2010 ... Cooperatives boost opportunities for Moroccan women. October 22 ... Substantial support for argan oil development continues with a €12 million grant. Half comes from the ... Research aims to identify and remove barriers faced by Africa's women entrepreneurs ... Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map.

  13. Niacin to Boost Your HDL "Good" Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niacin can boost 'good' cholesterol Niacin is a B vitamin that may raise your HDL ("good") cholesterol. But side effects might outweigh benefits for most ... been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol — the "good" cholesterol that helps remove low-density ...

  14. Quadratic Boost A-Source Impedance Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam Prasad; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chub, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    A novel quadratic boost A-source impedance network is proposed to realize converters that demand very high voltage gain. To satisfy the requirement, the network uses an autotransformer where the obtained gain is quadratically dependent on the duty ratio and is unmatched by any existing impedance...

  15. The Attentional Boost Effect and Context Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Smith, S. Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors--the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is…

  16. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies in high-grade acromioclavicular separation (type III - V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Jochen; Schwarting, Tim; Malcherczyk, Dominik; Peterlein, Christian-Dominik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; El-Zayat, Bilal Farouk

    2017-11-10

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations are common injuries of the shoulder associated with physical activity. The diagnosis of concomitant injuries proves complicated due to the prominent clinical symptoms of acute ACJ dislocation. Because of increasing use of minimally invasive surgery techniques concomitant pathologies are diagnosed more often than with previous procedures. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of concomitant intraarticular injuries in patients with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III - V) as well as to reveal potential risk constellations. The concomitant pathologies were compiled during routine arthroscopically assisted treatment in altogether 163 patients (147 male; 16 female; mean age 36.8 years) with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III: n = 60; Rockwood type IV: n = 6; Rockwood type V: n = 97). Acromioclavicular separation occurred less often in women than men (1:9). In patients under 35, the most common cause for ACJ dislocation was sporting activity (37.4%). Rockwood type V was observed significantly more often than the other types with 57.5% (Rockwood type III = 36.8%, Rockwood type IV 3.7%). Concomitant pathologies were diagnosed in 39.3% of the patients with that number rising to as much as 57.3% in patients above 35 years. Most common associated injuries were rotator cuff injuries (32.3%), chondral defects (30.6%) and SLAP-lesions (22.6%). Of all patients, 8.6% needed additional reconstructive surgery. Glenohumeral injuries are a much more common epiphenomenon during acromioclavicular separation than previously ascertained. High risk group for accompanying injuries are patients above 35 years with preexisting degenerative disease. The increasing use of minimally invasive techniques allows for an easier diagnosis and simultaneous treatment of the additional pathologies.

  17. Modeling and Control of a Dual-Input Isolated Full-Bridge Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a steady-state model, a large-signal (LS) model and an ac small-signal (SS) model for a recently proposed dual-input transformer-isolated boost converter are derived respectively by the switching flow-graph (SFG) nonlinear modeling technique. Based upon the converter’s model...

  18. Extending statistical boosting. An overview of recent methodological developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, A; Binder, H; Gefeller, O; Schmid, M

    2014-01-01

    Boosting algorithms to simultaneously estimate and select predictor effects in statistical models have gained substantial interest during the last decade. This review highlights recent methodological developments regarding boosting algorithms for statistical modelling especially focusing on topics relevant for biomedical research. We suggest a unified framework for gradient boosting and likelihood-based boosting (statistical boosting) which have been addressed separately in the literature up to now. The methodological developments on statistical boosting during the last ten years can be grouped into three different lines of research: i) efforts to ensure variable selection leading to sparser models, ii) developments regarding different types of predictor effects and how to choose them, iii) approaches to extend the statistical boosting framework to new regression settings. Statistical boosting algorithms have been adapted to carry out unbiased variable selection and automated model choice during the fitting process and can nowadays be applied in almost any regression setting in combination with a large amount of different types of predictor effects.

  19. 4 Types of Foods that Boost Your Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your Memory By Marisa Moore, MBA, RDN, LD Published November ... in brain health. The best menu for boosting memory and brain function encourages good blood flow to ...

  20. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

    2009-09-01

    The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April

  1. Experimental results with boosted top quarks in the final state

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    An overview of analyses using data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 8 TeV of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. These analyses use boosted techniques to search for new phenomena involving top quarks and to measure the production of top quarks at high transverse momenta. Such techniques involve top-quark tagging algorithms, boson-tagging algorithms, and strategies for b-tagging and lepton identification in the environment where the top quark decay products are close to each other. The strategies are optimized for the different final states and for different ranges of the transverse momenta of the particles involved, improving on traditional resolved analysis strategies.

  2. Searches for New Physics in boosted topologies at ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The large increase in collision energy that the LHC reached in Run 2  provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Various extensions of the SM predict heavy resonances at the TeV scale, which couple predominantly to the Higgs and electroweak gauge bosons and to top and bottom quarks. At resonance masses well above 1 TeV, these searches face specific challenges and  employ new identification techniques to disentangle the decay products of the boson in highly boosted configurations. This talk will review recent ATLAS Run-2 searches in various possible final states as well as  the dedicated techniques related to the specificity of such event topologies.

  3. A new DC/AC boost transformerless converter in application of photovoltaic power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Mo; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new DC/AC boost transformerless converter in the applications of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. A new circuit topology of single phase full bridge power inverter with additional DC/DC boost stage is proposed. The proposed topology overcomes two commonly existing......, and then converts the DC into AC to supply the load. A special modulation technique is proposed to eliminate the leakage current which is commonly presents in PV transformerless power generation, helps to increase the system efficiency and output performance....

  4. Primary Paralleled Isolated Boost Converter with Extended Operating Voltage Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Sen, Gökhan; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Applications requiring wide input and output voltage range cannot often be satisfied by using buck or boost derived topologies. Primary paralleled isolated boost converter (PPIBC) [1]-[2] is a high efficiency boost derived topology. This paper proposes a new operation mode for extending the input...

  5. Pulse width modulated buck-boost five-level current source inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Gao, F.; Loh, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    , resulting in the natural balance of input current. For maintaining the normalized volt-sec average unchanged, the alternative phase opposition disposition (APOD) modulation scheme with typical gating signal mapping technique from voltage source inverter (VSI) to CSI can be assumed to control the five......This paper presents new five-level current source inverters (CSIs) with voltage/current buck-boost capability. Being different from the existing multilevel CSI, the proposed CSIs were first designed to regulate the flowing path of dc input current by controlling two additional active switches......-level buck-boost CSIs. Next by observing the hidden current charging path during inductive charging interval under APOD modulation, it is noted that the buck-boost five-level CSI can then be further modified with lesser active component without degrading output performance. To verify the theoretical findings...

  6. CMOS single-stage input-powered bridge rectifier with boost switch and duty cycle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzuan, Roskhatijah; Mohd Salleh, Mohd Khairul; Hamzah, Mustafar Kamal; Ab Wahab, Norfishah

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a single-stage input-powered bridge rectifier with boost switch for wireless-powered devices such as biomedical implants and wireless sensor nodes. Realised using CMOS process technology, it employs a duty cycle switch control to achieve high output voltage using boost technique, leading to a high output power conversion. It has only six external connections with the boost inductance. The input frequency of the bridge rectifier is set at 50 Hz, while the switching frequency is 100 kHz. The proposed circuit is fabricated on a single 0.18-micron CMOS die with a space area of 0.024 mm2. The simulated and measured results show good agreement.

  7. Application of Boosting Regression Trees to Preliminary Cost Estimation in Building Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonseok Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the recent data mining techniques available, the boosting approach has attracted a great deal of attention because of its effective learning algorithm and strong boundaries in terms of its generalization performance. However, the boosting approach has yet to be used in regression problems within the construction domain, including cost estimations, but has been actively utilized in other domains. Therefore, a boosting regression tree (BRT is applied to cost estimations at the early stage of a construction project to examine the applicability of the boosting approach to a regression problem within the construction domain. To evaluate the performance of the BRT model, its performance was compared with that of a neural network (NN model, which has been proven to have a high performance in cost estimation domains. The BRT model has shown results similar to those of NN model using 234 actual cost datasets of a building construction project. In addition, the BRT model can provide additional information such as the importance plot and structure model, which can support estimators in comprehending the decision making process. Consequently, the boosting approach has potential applicability in preliminary cost estimations in a building construction project.

  8. CONCOMITANT HELMINTHIC AND ENTERO-PROTOZOAL INFESTATION IN INDIAN PEAFOWL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dutta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant infestation of Ascaridia spp. along with Raillietina spp. and Emeria spp. has been identified in Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus of Ramnabagan Mini Zoo, Burdwan, West Bengal, India.

  9. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant Urethral Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ra

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... 2, 2009. 103. 103-106. Case Report. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant. Urethral ... Examination revealed ecchymosis and swelling of the proximal shaft and ... of impotence due to infection and cavernosal.

  10. Concomitant medication of psychoses in a lifetime perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vares, Maria; Saetre, Peter; Strålin, Pontus; Levander, Sten; Lindström, Eva; Jönsson, Erik G

    2011-01-01

    Objective Patients treated with antipsychotic drugs often receive concomitant psychotropic compounds. Few studies address this issue from a lifetime perspective. Here, an analysis is presented of the prescription pattern of such concomitant medication from the first contact with psychiatry until the last written note in the case history documents, in patients with a diagnosis of psychotic illness. Methods A retrospective descriptive analysis of all case history data of 66 patients diagnosed w...

  11. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  12. Boosting Big National Lab Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-02-21

    tissue sample and the gradual effect is observed as more of the substance is injected, providing better insights into the natural processes that are occurring, as well as result driven sampling adjustment to capture particularly interesting features --- as they emerge. The Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is recognized for it’s expertise in the development of new measurement techniques and their application to challenges of national importance. So it was obvious to us to address the need for in-situ analysis of large scale experimental data. We have a wide range of experimental instruments on site, in facilities such as DOE’s national scientific user facility, the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). Commonly, scientists would create an individual analysis pipeline for each of those instruments; but even the same type of instrument would not necessarily share the same analysis tools. With the rapid increase of data volumes and rates we were facing two key challenges: how to bring a wider set of capabilities to bear to achieve in-situ analysis, and how to do so across a wide range of heterogeneous instruments at affordable costs and in a reasonable timeframe. We decided to take an unconventional approach to the problem, rather than developing customized, one-off solutions for specific instruments we wanted to explore if a more common solution could be found that would go beyond shared, basic infrastructures such as data movement and workflow engines.

  13. Substructure of Highly Boosted Massive Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alon, Raz [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2012-10-01

    Modern particle accelerators enable researchers to study new high energy frontiers which have never been explored before. This realm opens possibilities to further examine known fields such as Quantum Chromodynamics. In addition, it allows searching for new physics and setting new limits on the existence of such. This study examined the substructure of highly boosted massive jets measured by the CDF II detector. Events from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider were collected out of a total integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb$^{-1}$. They were selected to have at least one jet with transverse momentum above 400 GeV/c. The jet mass, angularity, and planar flow were measured and compared with predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics, and were found to be consistent with the theory. A search for boosted top quarks was conducted and resulted in an upper limit on the production cross section of such top quarks.

  14. Does concomitant anterior fundoplication promote dysphagia after laparoscopic Heller myotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Donovan; Morton, Connor; Kraemer, Emily; Villadolid, Desiree; Ross, Sharona B; Cowgill, Sarah M; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2008-07-01

    Concerns for gastroesophageal reflux after laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia justify considerations of concomitant anterior fundoplication. This study was undertaken to determine if concomitant anterior fundoplication reduces symptoms of reflux after myotomy without promoting dysphagia. From 1992 to 2004, 182 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy without fundoplication. After a prospective randomized trial justified its concomitant application, anterior fundoplication was undertaken with laparoscopic Heller myotomy in 171 patients from 2004 to 2007. All patients have been prospectively followed. Pre and postoperatively, patients scored the frequency and severity of symptoms of achalasia (including dysphagia, choking, vomiting, regurgitation, chest pain, and heartburn) using a Likert Scale (0 = never/not bothersome to 10 = always/very bothersome). Before myotomy, symptoms of achalasia were frequent and severe for all patients. After myotomy, the frequency and severity of all symptoms of achalasia significantly decreased for all patients (P Heller myotomy alone, concomitant anterior fundoplication led to significantly less frequent and severe heartburn after myotomy (P Heller myotomy reduces the frequency and severity of symptoms of achalasia. Concomitant anterior fundoplication decreases the frequency and severity of heartburn and dysphagia after laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Concomitant anterior fundoplication promotes salutary relief in the frequency and severity of symptoms after myotomy and is warranted.

  15. Component-Minimized Buck-Boost Voltage Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, F.; Loh, P.C.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design of buck-boost B4 inverters that can be derived from either Ćuk- or SEPIC-derived buck-boost B6 inverters. Unlike traditional inverters, the integration of front-end voltage boost circuitry and inverter circuitry allows it to perform buck-boost voltage inversion...... between capacitors. Modulation wise, the proposed buck-boost B4 inverters can be controlled using a carefully designed carrier-based pulse-width modulation (PWM) scheme that will always ensure balanced threephase outputs as desired, while simultaneously achieving minimal voltage stress across...

  16. Prospective Randomized Trial of Prone Accelerated Intensity Modulated Breast Radiation Therapy With a Daily Versus Weekly Boost to the Tumor Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Benjamin T.; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Li, Xiaochun; Shin, Samuel M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel F.; Hitchen, Christine J.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Dewyngaert, J. Keith; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective randomized trial comparing a daily versus weekly boost to the tumor cavity during the course of accelerated radiation to the breast with patients in the prone position. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2012, 400 patients with stage 0 to II breast cancer who had undergone segmental mastectomy participated in an institutional review board–approved trial testing prone breast radiation therapy to 40.5 Gy in 15 fractions 5 d/wk to the whole breast, after randomization to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy, on Friday. The present noninferiority trial tested the primary hypothesis that a weekly boost produced no more acute toxicity than did a daily boost. The recurrence-free survival was estimated for both treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method; the relative risk of recurrence or death was estimated, and the 2 arms were compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up period of 45 months, no deaths related to breast cancer had occurred. The weekly boost regimen produced no more grade ≥2 acute toxicity than did the daily boost regimen (8.1% vs 10.4%; noninferiority Z = −2.52; P=.006). No statistically significant difference was found in the cumulative incidence of long-term fibrosis or telangiectasia of grade ≥2 between the 2 arms (log-rank P=.923). Two local and two distant recurrences developed in the daily treatment arm and three local and one distant developed in the weekly arm. The 4-year recurrence-free survival rate was not different between the 2 treatment arms (98% for both arms). Conclusions: A tumor bed boost delivered either daily or weekly was tolerated similarly during accelerated prone breast radiation therapy, with excellent control of disease and comparable cosmetic results.

  17. Prospective Randomized Trial of Prone Accelerated Intensity Modulated Breast Radiation Therapy With a Daily Versus Weekly Boost to the Tumor Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Benjamin T.; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Shin, Samuel M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hitchen, Christine J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenstein, Barry S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Dewyngaert, J. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective randomized trial comparing a daily versus weekly boost to the tumor cavity during the course of accelerated radiation to the breast with patients in the prone position. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2012, 400 patients with stage 0 to II breast cancer who had undergone segmental mastectomy participated in an institutional review board–approved trial testing prone breast radiation therapy to 40.5 Gy in 15 fractions 5 d/wk to the whole breast, after randomization to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy, on Friday. The present noninferiority trial tested the primary hypothesis that a weekly boost produced no more acute toxicity than did a daily boost. The recurrence-free survival was estimated for both treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method; the relative risk of recurrence or death was estimated, and the 2 arms were compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up period of 45 months, no deaths related to breast cancer had occurred. The weekly boost regimen produced no more grade ≥2 acute toxicity than did the daily boost regimen (8.1% vs 10.4%; noninferiority Z = −2.52; P=.006). No statistically significant difference was found in the cumulative incidence of long-term fibrosis or telangiectasia of grade ≥2 between the 2 arms (log-rank P=.923). Two local and two distant recurrences developed in the daily treatment arm and three local and one distant developed in the weekly arm. The 4-year recurrence-free survival rate was not different between the 2 treatment arms (98% for both arms). Conclusions: A tumor bed boost delivered either daily or weekly was tolerated similarly during accelerated prone breast radiation therapy, with excellent control of disease and comparable cosmetic results.

  18. Malampaya to boost flow of foreign investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrebowski, C.

    1995-01-01

    The petroleum industry in the Philippines has recently enjoyed a boost with the commissioning of a new modern refinery, and the development of sophisticated off-shore technology in the Malampaya/Camago oil and gas field. The foreign investment, which has made these initiatives possible, came about because of the countries new found political stability. It also reflects the rapid economic growth which has occurred and the accompanying increase in energy demand. (UK)

  19. The effect of boost pressure on the performance characteristics of a diesel engine: A neuro-fuzzy approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hinti, I.; Sakhrieh, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Samhouri, M.; Al-Ghandoor, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)

    2009-01-15

    This paper uses a neuro-fuzzy interface system (ANFIS) to study the effect of boost pressure on the efficiency, brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of a single cylinder diesel engine. Experimental data were used as inputs to ANFIS to simulate the engine performance characteristics. The experimental as well as the model results emphasize the role of boost pressure in improving the different engine characteristics. The results show that the ANFIS technique can be used adequately to identify the effect of boost pressure on the different engine characteristics. In addition, different data points that were not used for ANFIS training were used to validate the developed models. The results suggest that ANFIS can be used accurately to predict the effect of boost pressure on the different engine characteristics. (author)

  20. Effects of hyperbolic rotation in Minkowski space on the modeling of plasma accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of hyperbolic rotation in Minkowski space resulting from the use of Lorentz boosted frames of calculation on laser propagation in plasmas are analyzed. Selection of a boost frame at the laser group velocity is shown to alter the laser spectrum, allowing the use of higher boost velocities. The technique is applied to simulations of laser driven plasma wakefield accelerators, which promise much smaller machines and whose development requires detailed simulations that challenge or exceed current capabilities. Speedups approaching the theoretical optima are demonstrated, producing the first direct simulations of stages up to 1 TeV. This is made possible by a million times speedup thanks to a frame boost with a relativistic factor γ b as high as 1300, taking advantage of the rotation to mitigate an instability that limited previous work.

  1. Boosted Multivariate Trees for Longitudinal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Amol; Li, Liang; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Ehrlinger, John; Kogalur, Udaya B.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Ishwaran, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning methods provide a powerful approach for analyzing longitudinal data in which repeated measurements are observed for a subject over time. We boost multivariate trees to fit a novel flexible semi-nonparametric marginal model for longitudinal data. In this model, features are assumed to be nonparametric, while feature-time interactions are modeled semi-nonparametrically utilizing P-splines with estimated smoothing parameter. In order to avoid overfitting, we describe a relatively simple in sample cross-validation method which can be used to estimate the optimal boosting iteration and which has the surprising added benefit of stabilizing certain parameter estimates. Our new multivariate tree boosting method is shown to be highly flexible, robust to covariance misspecification and unbalanced designs, and resistant to overfitting in high dimensions. Feature selection can be used to identify important features and feature-time interactions. An application to longitudinal data of forced 1-second lung expiratory volume (FEV1) for lung transplant patients identifies an important feature-time interaction and illustrates the ease with which our method can find complex relationships in longitudinal data. PMID:29249866

  2. Fast neutron boost for the treatment of grade IV astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breteau, N.; Destembert, B.; Favre, A.; Pheline, C.; Schlienger, M.

    1989-01-01

    A previous study, on grade IV astrocytomas, compared a combination of photons and fast neutron boost to photons only, both treatments being delivered following a concentrated irradiation schedule. A slight improvement in survival was observed after neutron boost for non operated patients, but not for operated patients. Since death was always related to local recurrence and since no complication occurred after neutron boost, the neutron dose was increased from 6 to 7 Gy in January 1985. No improvement in survival was observed for patients treated with neutron boost after complete resection. After subtotal resection, the group that was treated with the higher neutron boost (7 Gy) showed a significant benefit in survival at twelve months. When patients had only a biopsy before irradiation, there was a benefit in survival after neutron boost, but no additional benefit was gained when the size of the neutron boost was increased from 6 to 7 Gy. (orig.) [de

  3. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deenen, Maarten J. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dewit, Luc [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boot, Henk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beijnen, Jos H. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schellens, Jan H.M. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke, E-mail: a.cats@nki.nl [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m{sup 2} (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer.

  4. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Dewit, Luc; Boot, Henk; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Cats, Annemieke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m 2 (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m 2 b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer

  5. The concomitant use of indigenous soil bacteria and fungi to enhance the bioremediation of refinery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Carvalho, F.J.P. de [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Usually, the use of indigenous soil bacteria for the remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils was restricted to the biodegradation of low-molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, fuel oil and jet fuel. The advantage of using indigenous microorganisms is the minimization of the impact of the treatment on the microbial diversity. As a rule,these techniques are also well accepted by the public. Other studies have shown that fungi is successful for the bioremediation of heavier-weight contaminants. The concomitant transformation of low-molecular weight and heavier recalcitrant oil fractions to inorganic and humic form can be accomplished with the concomitant action of bacteria and fungi. The development of a soil biotreatment program using this concomitant technique was performed by PETROBRAS Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. - Refinaria Presidente Getulio Vargas in conjunction with the Universidade Federal do Parana. It resulted in a full-scale technology that allows the degradation of oil waste. Approximately two years of treatment are required to achieve the desired results. The use of standard analytical methods and bioindicators used on the treated soil indicated that the treated soil met the standards for agricultural soil quality. A recent oil spill occurred in Araucaria, Brazil and a bioremediation area was inoculated, and to date the results prove the beneficial effects to be derived from the use of inoculation. Some results were presented in table format. 3 tabs.

  6. Role of Brachytherapy in the Boost Management of Anal Carcinoma With Node Involvement (CORS-03 Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence, E-mail: moureaul@ipc.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); Ortholan, Cecile [Department of Radiation Therapy, Monaco (France); Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Teissier, Eric [Azurean Cancer Center, Mougins (France); Cowen, Didier [Department of Radiation Therapy, Timone Academic Hospital and North Academic Hospital, Marseille (France); Department of Radiation Therapy, Val d' Aurelle Cancer Center, Montpellier (France); Salem, Nagi [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); Lemanski, Claire [Catalan Oncology Center, Perpignan (France); Ellis, Steve [French Red Cross Center, Toulon (France); Resbeut, Michel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); French Red Cross Center, Toulon (France)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients, with lymph node involvement, treated with split-course radiation therapy and receiving a boost through external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2005, among 229 patients with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma, a selected group of 99 patients, with lymph node involvement, was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 in 4 patients, T2 in 16 patients, T3 in 49 patients, T4 in 16 patients, and T unknown in 14 patients and as N1 in 67 patients and N2/N3 in 32 patients. Patients underwent a first course of EBRT (mean dose, 45.1 Gy) followed by a boost (mean dose, 18 Gy) using EBRT (50 patients) or BCT (49 patients). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Prognostic factors of cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR), cumulative rate of distant (including nodal) recurrence (CRDR), colostomy-free survival (CFS) rate, and overall survival (OS) rate were analyzed for the overall population and according to the nodal status classification. Results: The median follow-up was 71.5 months. The 5-year CRLR, CRDR, CFS rate, and OS rate were 21%, 19%, 63%, and 74.4%, respectively. In the overall population, the type of node involvement (N1 vs N2/N3) was the unique independent prognostic factor for CRLR. In N1 patients, by use of multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor for CRLR (4% for BCT vs 31% for EBRT; hazard ratio, 0.08; P=.042). No studied factors were significantly associated with CRDR, CFS, and OS. No difference with regard to boost technique and any other factor studied was observed in N2/N3 patients for any kind of recurrence. Conclusion: In anal cancer, even in the case of initial perirectal node invasion, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR, without an influence on OS, suggesting that N1 status should not be a contraindication to

  7. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Jayant S., E-mail: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Baum, Michael [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, Jeffrey S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Wenz, Frederik [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Massarut, Samuele [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Keshtgar, Mohammed [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hilaris, Basil [Radiation Oncology, Our Lady of Mercy, New York Medical College, New York (United States); Saunders, Christobel [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Corica, Tammy [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Roncadin, Mario [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Bulsara, Max [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  9. Control analysis and experimental verification of a practical dc–dc boost converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati Swapna Dash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents detailed open loop and closed loop analysis on boost dc–dc converter for both voltage mode control and current mode control. Here the boost dc–dc converter is a practical converter considering all possible parasitic elements like ESR and on state voltage drops. The open loop control, closed loop current mode control and voltage mode control are verified. The comparative study of all control techniques is presented. The PI compensator for closed loop current mode control is designed using these classical techniques like root locus technique and bode diagram. The simulation results are validated with the experimental results of voltage mode control for both open loop and closed loop control.

  10. Effect of Cisplatin on Parotid Gland Function in Concomitant Radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, Jeremias; Setz, Juergen; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian R.; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin on parotid gland tissue complication probability. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with either radiotherapy (n = 61) or concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin (n = 36) for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively evaluated. The dose and volume distributions of the parotid glands were noted in dose-volume histograms. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before, during the 2nd and 6th weeks and at 4 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. The data were fit using the normal tissue complication probability model of Lyman. Complication was defined as a reduction of the salivary flow rate to less than 25% of the pretreatment flow rate. Results: The normal tissue complication probability model parameter TD 50 (the dose leading to a complication probability of 50%) was found to be 32.2 Gy at 4 weeks and 32.1 Gy at 6 months for concomitant radiochemotherapy and 41.1 Gy at 4 weeks and 39.6 Gy at 6 months for radiotherapy. The tolerated dose for concomitant radiochemotherapy was at least 7 to 8 Gy lower than for radiotherapy alone at TD 50 . Conclusions: In this study, the concomitant radiochemotherapy tended to cause a higher probability of parotid gland tissue damage. Advanced radiotherapy planning approaches such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy may be partiticularly important for parotid sparing in radiochemotherapy because of cisplatin-related increased radiosensitivity of glands.

  11. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  12. Experimental Research in Boost Driver with EDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    The supply used in servo systems tends to have a high voltage in order to reduce loss and improve the response of motor drives. We propose a new boost motor driver that comprises EDLCs. The proposed driver has a simple structure, wherein the EDLCs are connected in series to the supply, and comprises a charge circuit to charge the EDLCs. The proposed driver has three advantages over conventional boost drivers. The first advantage is that the driver can easily attain the stable boost voltage. The second advantage is that the driver can reduce input power peaks. In a servo system, the input power peaks become greater than the rated power in order to accelerate the motor rapidly. This implies that the equipments that supply power to servo systems must have sufficient power capacity to satisfy the power peaks. The proposed driver can suppress the increase of the power capacity of supply facilities. The third advantage is that the driver can store almost all of the regenerative energy. Conventional drivers have a braking resistor to suppress the increase in the DC link voltage. This causes a considerable reduction in the efficiency. The proposed driver is more efficient than conventional drivers. In this study, the experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed driver and showed that the drive performance of the proposed driver is the same as that of a conventional driver. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the results of the simulation of a model of the EDLC module, whose capacitance is dependent on the frequency, correspond well with the experimental results.

  13. Can role models boost entrepreneurial attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellnhofer, Katharina; Puumalainen, Kaisu

    2017-01-01

    This multi-country study used role models to boost perceptions of entrepreneurial feasibility and desirability. The results of a structural equation model based on a sample comprising 426 individuals who were primarily from Austria, Finland and Greece revealed a significant positive influence on perceived entrepreneurial desirability and feasibility. These findings support the argument for embedding entrepreneurial role models in entrepreneurship education courses to promote entrepreneurial activities. This direction is not only relevant for the academic community but also essential for nascent entrepreneurs, policymakers and society at large.

  14. The influence of the boost in breast-conserving therapy on cosmetic outcome in the EORTC 'boost versus no boost' trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrieling, Conny; Collette, Laurence; Fourquet, Alain; Hoogenraad, Willem J.; Horiot, Jean-Claude; Jager, Jos J.; Pierart, Marianne; Poortmans, Philip M.; Struikmans, Henk; Hulst, Marleen van der; Schueren, Emmanuel van der; Bartelink, Harry

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a radiotherapy boost on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years of follow-up in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: In EORTC trial 22881/10882, 5569 Stage I and II breast cancer patients were treated with tumorectomy and axillary dissection, followed by tangential irradiation of the breast to a dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks, at 2 Gy per fraction. Patients having a microscopically complete tumor excision were randomized between no boost and a boost of 16 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by a panel, scoring photographs of 731 patients taken soon after surgery and 3 years later, and by digitizer measurements, measuring the displacement of the nipple of 3000 patients postoperatively and of 1141 patients 3 years later. Results: There was no difference in the cosmetic outcome between the two treatment arms after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy. At 3-year follow-up, both the panel evaluation and the digitizer measurements showed that the boost had a significant adverse effect on the cosmetic result. The panel evaluation at 3 years showed that 86% of patients in the no-boost group had an excellent or good global result, compared to 71% of patients in the boost group (p = 0.0001). The digitizer measurements at 3 years showed a relative breast retraction assessment (pBRA) of 7.6 pBRA in the no-boost group, compared to 8.3 pBRA in the boost group, indicating a worse cosmetic result in the boost group at follow-up (p = 0.04). Conclusions: These results showed that a boost dose of 16 Gy had a negative, but limited, impact on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years

  15. Concomitant Rotavirus and Salmonella Infections in Children with Acute Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tzong Lan

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Concomitant rotavirus and Salmonella infections accounted for 3.7% of cases in this study. Patients in group C (30.0% had a significantly higher incidence of hypokalemia than group R (7.3% or S (8.8%. Group C consisted of 33 cases of the 895 reviewed cases (3.7%. In a child with rotavirus gastroenteritis, concomitant infection with Salmonella should be considered if the child has sustained a high fever (≥ 39°C for over 4 days and a green stool with mucus and blood.

  16. Boosted searches for new physics at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaffer, Matthias J.

    2015-09-01

    During the first run of the LHC, no apparent signs of new physics beyond the Standard Model were discovered, but rather the Standard Model-like properties of the Higgs particle confirmed. Therefore, new and powerful methods are needed to disclose the traces of new physics, which is expected to be at the TeV scale in order to solve the hierarchy problem. In this thesis, we propose two complementary strategies for the quest for new physics at the LHC. First, we show how a very boosted Higgs in association with a hard jet can be used to determine the important top Yukawa coupling in gluon fusion. In the inclusive gluon fusion process this is not feasible since possible deviations from its Standard Model value are combined and can even cancel with the effective Higgs-gluon interaction mediated by new top partners. This cancellation is motivated within minimal composite Higgs models but also in certain regions of the MSSM parameter space and can lead to a Standard Model-like inclusive cross section that allows no conclusions on the mass spectrum of the new physics. We work out in detail how this degeneracy can be broken in the boosted Higgs channel and find that even in the worst case scenario with a Standard Model-like inclusive cross section, the top Yukawa coupling can be constrained to 0.8-1.3 times its Standard Model value at 95% CL with an integrated luminosity of 3 000 fb -1 . The second strategy is targeted at direct stop and sbottom searches in the fully hadronic top decay channel. Since the stop, sbottom and neutralino masses are unknown, very different event shapes are imaginable, ranging from unboosted top quarks and low missing energy to highly boosted top quarks and large missing energy in the final state. In order to cover a wide range of possible event shapes and consequently stop, sbottom, and neutralino masses, we combine several top taggers based on jet substructure techniques to obtain a scale invariant search strategy. The performance of this

  17. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-01-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experimen...

  18. Single-shot imaging with higher-dimensional encoding using magnetic field monitoring and concomitant field correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, Frederik; Gallichan, Daniel; Layton, Kelvin J; Barmet, Christoph; Welz, Anna M; Dewdney, Andrew; Cocosco, Chris A; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    PatLoc (Parallel Imaging Technique using Localized Gradients) accelerates imaging and introduces a resolution variation across the field-of-view. Higher-dimensional encoding employs more spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs) than the corresponding image dimensionality requires, e.g. by applying two quadratic and two linear spatial encoding magnetic fields to reconstruct a 2D image. Images acquired with higher-dimensional single-shot trajectories can exhibit strong artifacts and geometric distortions. In this work, the source of these artifacts is analyzed and a reliable correction strategy is derived. A dynamic field camera was built for encoding field calibration. Concomitant fields of linear and nonlinear spatial encoding magnetic fields were analyzed. A combined basis consisting of spherical harmonics and concomitant terms was proposed and used for encoding field calibration and image reconstruction. A good agreement between the analytical solution for the concomitant fields and the magnetic field simulations of the custom-built PatLoc SEM coil was observed. Substantial image quality improvements were obtained using a dynamic field camera for encoding field calibration combined with the proposed combined basis. The importance of trajectory calibration for single-shot higher-dimensional encoding is demonstrated using the combined basis including spherical harmonics and concomitant terms, which treats the concomitant fields as an integral part of the encoding. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Li, Xiaochun; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  20. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  1. Multiclass AdaBoost ELM and Its Application in LBP Based Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme learning machine (ELM is a competitive machine learning technique, which is simple in theory and fast in implementation; it can identify faults quickly and precisely as compared with traditional identification techniques such as support vector machines (SVM. As verified by the simulation results, ELM tends to have better scalability and can achieve much better generalization performance and much faster learning speed compared with traditional SVM. In this paper, we introduce a multiclass AdaBoost based ELM ensemble method. In our approach, the ELM algorithm is selected as the basic ensemble predictor due to its rapid speed and good performance. Compared with the existing boosting ELM algorithm, our algorithm can be directly used in multiclass classification problem. We also carried out comparable experiments with face recognition datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only make the predicting result more stable, but also achieve better generalization performance.

  2. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information. Tungadri Bose ... Data archival; data dissemination; file format; RNA; RNA secondary structure ... Bio-Sciences R&D Division, TCS Innovation Labs, Tata Consultancy Services Limited, Pune 411 013, India ...

  3. The impact of haemoglobin level and concomitant infections on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of paroxysm during Plasmodium infection. Likewise, the presence of concomitant infections in the clinically ill subjects quickened the on-set of clinical signs. The need for proper laboratory diagnosis to ascertain real cause/s of fever during malaria attack so as to avoid wrong treatment/under treatment, and balanced diet to ...

  4. Pattern of Midface Trauma with Associated Concomitant Injuries in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognizing concomitant injuries in patients with facial fracture is important for rapid assessment and further management of these patients. These results support the use of head computed tomography scan and cervical spine radiographs in most general trauma work‑ups, but specifically validates their use in patients with.

  5. Influenza B pneumonia with Staphylococcus aureus superinfection associated with parvovirus B19 and concomitant agranulocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, S; Adams, I; Arnold, U; Kalinski, T; Aumann, V; König, W; König, B

    2003-10-01

    An 11-year-old patient with anamnestic fever for 3 days and signs of upper respiratory tract infection underwent fulminant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with concomitant agranulocytosis. From autopsia influenza B virus and parvovirus B19 were detected by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT). Specific IgG but no IgM points to preexisting parvovirus B19 infection. Whether in this case agranulocytosis can be interpreted as early manifestation of reactivated parvovirus B19 infection is under discussion. Therefore, parvovirus B19 could have provoked a foudroyant course of influenza B pneumonia which was superinfected with S. aureus.

  6. Giving top quark effective operators a boost

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the prospects to systematically improve generic effective field theory-based searches for new physics in the top sector during LHC run 2 as well as the high luminosity phase. In particular, we assess the benefits of high momentum transfer final states on top EFT-fit as a function of systematic uncertainties in comparison with sensitivity expected from fully-resolved analyses focusing on $t\\bar t$ production. We find that constraints are typically driven by fully-resolved selections, while boosted top quarks can serve to break degeneracies in the global fit. This demystifies and clarifies the importance of high momentum transfer final states for global fits to new interactions in the top sector from direct measurements.

  7. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Garrett, Travis

    2011-08-02

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux.

  8. Very boosted Higgs in gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grojean, Christophe; Schlaffer, Matthias; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Higgs production and decay rates offer a new way to probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. While dynamics aiming at alleviating the hierarchy problem generically predict deviations in the Higgs rates, the current experimental analyses cannot resolve the long- and short-distance contributions to the gluon fusion process and thus cannot access directly the coupling between the Higgs and the top quark. We investigate the production of a boosted Higgs in association with a high-transverse momentum jet as an alternative to the $t\\bar{t}h$ channel to pin down this crucial coupling. Presented first in the context of an effective field theory, our analysis is then applied to models of partial compositeness at the TeV scale and of natural supersymmetry.

  9. A boost to the French hydraulic plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    A plan for boosting the hydroelectric power generation in France is presented, the first step of an energy policy based on the conclusions of the Grenelle Environnement Forum which targets a 23 percent objective for the renewable energies in France by 2020. Hydroelectricity represents nowadays 12 percent of total electric power generation. The plan is composed of three parts: attribution of concessions will be opened to competition (concessions of the 400 largest dams will be renewed); investments in dams will be strongly encouraged and assisted by the government in order to increase France's hydraulic power generation capacities and enhance its security of power supply - small and micro hydraulic power generation is to be developed; the quality of river waters will be improved

  10. Boost Converter with Active Snubber Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HIMMELSTOSS, F. A.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new concept for reducing the losses in a boost converter is described. With the help of an auxiliary switch and a resonant circuit, zero-voltage switching at turn-off and zero-current switching during turn-on are achieved. The modes of the circuit are shown in detail. The energy recovery of the turn-off is analyzed and the recovered energy is calculated; an optimized switching concept therefore is described. The influence of the parasitic capacity of the switch is discussed. Dimensioning hints for the converter and the design of the recuperation circuit are given. A bread-boarded design shows the functional efficiency of the concept.

  11. Very boosted Higgs in gluon fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grojean, C. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain). ICREA at IFAE; Salvioni, E. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomica; INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy); Schlaffer, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Weiler, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    The Higgs production and decay rates offer a new way to probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. While dynamics aiming at alleviating the hierarchy problem generically predict deviations in the Higgs rates, the current experimental analyses cannot resolve the long- and short-distance contributions to the gluon fusion process and thus cannot access directly the coupling between the Higgs and the top quark. We investigate the production of a boosted Higgs in association with a high-transverse momentum jet as an alternative to the t anti th channel to pin down this crucial coupling. Presented rst in the context of an effective field theory, our analysis is then applied to models of partial compositeness at the TeV scale and of natural supersymmetry.

  12. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Tovy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS. The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP, a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1 which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5, two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon.

  13. The attentional boost effect and context memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Smith, S Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors-the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is unclear if context memory is likewise affected. Some accounts suggest enhanced perceptual encoding or associative binding, predicting an ABE on context memory, whereas other evidence suggests a more abstract, amodal basis of the effect. In Experiment 1, context memory was assessed in terms of an intramodal perceptual detail, the font and color of the study word. Experiment 2 examined context memory cross-modally, assessing memory for the modality (visual or auditory) of the study word. Experiments 3 and 4 assessed context memory with list discrimination, in which 2 study lists are presented and participants must later remember which list (if either) a test word came from. In all experiments, item (recognition) memory was also assessed and consistently displayed a robust ABE. In contrast, the attentional-boost manipulation did not enhance context memory, whether defined in terms of visual details, study modality, or list membership. There was some evidence that the mode of responding on the detection task (motoric response as opposed to covert counting of targets) may impact context memory but there was no evidence of an effect of target detection, per se. In sum, the ABE did not occur in context memory with verbal materials. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Boosting aquaculture production systems in Osun state: Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This scenario leaves a high percentage of the population who depend on fish and fish products food insecure, and thus, the need to boost aquaculture production to argument the supply from the wild. The study therefore looks into the possibility of boosting the production systems through the use of micro-credit and ...

  15. Diode-Assisted Buck-Boost Current Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, F.; Cai, Liang; Loh, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a couple of novel current source inverters (CSIs) with the enhanced current buckboost capability. With the unique diode-inductor network added between current source inverter circuitry and current boost elements, the proposed buck-boost current source inverters demonstrate...... uninfluenced. Lastly, all theoretical findings were verified experimentally using constructed laboratory prototypes....

  16. Boost.Unicode : a Unicode library for C++

    OpenAIRE

    Wien, Erik; Gigstad, Lars Erik

    2005-01-01

    The project has resulted in a Unicode string library for C++ that abstracts away the complexity of working with Unicode text. The idea behind the project originated from the Boost community's developer mailings lists, and is developed with inclusion into the Boost library collection in mind.

  17. Solar-Based Boost Differential Single Phase Inverter | Eya | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar-Based Boost Differential Single Phase Inverter. ... Solar-based boost differential inverter is reduced down to 22.37% in closed loop system with the aid of Proportional –integral-Differential (PID) ... The dc power source is photovoltaic cell.

  18. Extracting Baseline Electricity Usage Using Gradient Tree Boosting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehoon [Ulsan Nat. Inst. of Sci. & Tech., Ulsan (South Korea); Lee, Dongeun [Ulsan Nat. Inst. of Sci. & Tech., Ulsan (South Korea); Choi, Jaesik [Ulsan Nat. Inst. of Sci. & Tech., Ulsan (South Korea); Spurlock, Anna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Todd, Annika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    To understand how specific interventions affect a process observed over time, we need to control for the other factors that influence outcomes. Such a model that captures all factors other than the one of interest is generally known as a baseline. In our study of how different pricing schemes affect residential electricity consumption, the baseline would need to capture the impact of outdoor temperature along with many other factors. In this work, we examine a number of different data mining techniques and demonstrate Gradient Tree Boosting (GTB) to be an effective method to build the baseline. We train GTB on data prior to the introduction of new pricing schemes, and apply the known temperature following the introduction of new pricing schemes to predict electricity usage with the expected temperature correction. Our experiments and analyses show that the baseline models generated by GTB capture the core characteristics over the two years with the new pricing schemes. In contrast to the majority of regression based techniques which fail to capture the lag between the peak of daily temperature and the peak of electricity usage, the GTB generated baselines are able to correctly capture the delay between the temperature peak and the electricity peak. Furthermore, subtracting this temperature-adjusted baseline from the observed electricity usage, we find that the resulting values are more amenable to interpretation, which demonstrates that the temperature-adjusted baseline is indeed effective.

  19. Introducing state-trajectory control for the synchronous interleaved boost converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Alzola, Rafael; Ksiazek, Peter; Ordonez, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous interleaved boost converters (SIBCs) result in lower ripple currents and bidirectional power flow. The boost topology has a non-minimum phase characteristic, producing instability problems when a large bandwidth is required. Linear controllers inherently limit the boost controller...

  20. Local anesthesia selection algorithm in patients with concomitant somatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, E N; Sokhov, S T; Letunova, N Y; Orekhova, I V; Gromovik, M V; Erilin, E A; Ryazantsev, N A

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents basic principles of local anesthesia selection in patients with concomitant somatic diseases. These principles are history taking; analysis of drugs interaction with local anesthetic and sedation agents; determination of the functional status of the patient; patient anxiety correction; dental care with monitoring of hemodynamics parameters. It was found that adhering to this algorithm promotes prevention of urgent conditions in patients in outpatient dentistry.

  1. Efficient Smoothed Concomitant Lasso Estimation for High Dimensional Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Eugene; Fercoq, Olivier; Gramfort, Alexandre; Leclère, Vincent; Salmon, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    In high dimensional settings, sparse structures are crucial for efficiency, both in term of memory, computation and performance. It is customary to consider ℓ 1 penalty to enforce sparsity in such scenarios. Sparsity enforcing methods, the Lasso being a canonical example, are popular candidates to address high dimension. For efficiency, they rely on tuning a parameter trading data fitting versus sparsity. For the Lasso theory to hold this tuning parameter should be proportional to the noise level, yet the latter is often unknown in practice. A possible remedy is to jointly optimize over the regression parameter as well as over the noise level. This has been considered under several names in the literature: Scaled-Lasso, Square-root Lasso, Concomitant Lasso estimation for instance, and could be of interest for uncertainty quantification. In this work, after illustrating numerical difficulties for the Concomitant Lasso formulation, we propose a modification we coined Smoothed Concomitant Lasso, aimed at increasing numerical stability. We propose an efficient and accurate solver leading to a computational cost no more expensive than the one for the Lasso. We leverage on standard ingredients behind the success of fast Lasso solvers: a coordinate descent algorithm, combined with safe screening rules to achieve speed efficiency, by eliminating early irrelevant features.

  2. A novel circuit topology of modified switched boost hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Ananyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel circuit topology of modified switched boost high frequency hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment is presented in this paper for efficient induction heating. Recently, induction heating technique is becoming very popular for both domestic and industrial purposes because of its high energy efficiency and controllability. Generally in induction heating, a high frequency alternating magnetic field is required to induce the eddy currents in the work piece. High frequency resonant inverters are incorporated in induction heating equipment which produce a high frequency alternating magnetic field surrounding the coil. Previously this high frequency alternating magnetic field was produced by voltage source inverters. But VSIs have several demerits. So, in this paper, a new scheme of modified switched boost high frequency hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment has been depicted which enhances the energy efficiency and controllability and the same is validated by PSIM.

  3. A Zero Input Current Ripple ZVS/ZCS Boost Converter with Boundary-Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ming Lai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, in order to achieve zero ripple conditions, the use of a ripple mirror (RM circuit for the boost converter is proposed. The operation modes are studied and steady-state analyses performed to show the merits of the proposed converter. It is found that the proposed RM circuit technique can provide much better flexibility than the two-phase interleaved boost converter for locating the zero ripple operating point in the design stage. In addition, the choice of using a boundary-mode control is mainly based on the consideration of achieving both ZVS (zero voltage switching/ZCS (zero current switching soft-switching and constant on-time control for the converter. To verify the performance of the proposed converter, a 48 V input and 200 W/200 V output prototype is constructed. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed converter.

  4. Simulation comparison of proportional integral derivative and fuzzy logic in controlling AC-DC buck boost converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, A.; Hasan, S.; Suherman

    2018-03-01

    AC-DC converter is widely used in the commercial industry even for daily purposes. The AC-DC converter is used to convert AC voltage into DC. In order to obtain the desired output voltage, the converter usually has a controllable regulator. This paper discusses buck boost regulator with a power MOSFET as switching component which is adjusted based on the duty cycle of pulse width modulation (PWM). The main problems of the buck boost converter at start up are the high overshoot, the long peak time and rise time. This paper compares the effectiveness of two control techniques: proportional integral derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic control in controlling the buck boost converter through simulations. The results show that the PID is more sensitive to voltage change than fuzzy logic. However, PID generates higher overshoot, long peak time and rise time. On the other hand, fuzzy logic generates no overshoot and shorter rise time.

  5. EORTC 22972-26991/MRC BR10 trial: Fractionated stereotactic boost following conventional radiotherapy of high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, Brigitta G.; Brada, Michael; Bernier, Jacques; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Collette, Laurence; Davis, J. Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The EORTC trial No. 22972 investigated the role of an additional fractionated stereotactic boost (fSRT) to conventional radiotherapy for patients with high grade gliomas. A quality-assurance (QA) programme was run in conjunction with the study and was the first within the EORTC addressing the quality of a supposedly highly accurate treatment technique such as stereotactic radiotherapy. A second aim was to investigate a possible relation between the clinical results of the stereotactic boost arm and the results of the QA. Materials and methods: The trial was closed in 2001 due to low accrual. In total, 25 patients were randomized: 14 into the experimental arm and 11 into the control arm. Six centres randomized patients, 8 centres had completed the dummy run (DR) for the stereotactic boost part. All participating centres (9) were asked to complete a quality-assurance questionnaire. The DR consisted of treatment planning according to the guidelines of the protocol on 3 different tumour volumes drawn on CT images of a humanized phantom. The SRT technique to be used was evaluated by the questionnaire. Clinical data from patients recruited to the boost arm from 6 participating centres were analysed. Results: There was a full compliance to the protocol requirements for 5 centres. Major and minor deviations in conformality were observed for 2 and 3 centres, respectively. Of the 8 centres which completed the DR, one centre did not comply with the requirements of stereotactic radiotherapy concerning accuracy, dosimetry and planning. Median follow-up and median overall survival were 39.2 and 21.4 months, respectively. Acute and late toxicities of the stereotactic boost were low. One radiation necrosis was seen for a patient who has not received the SRT boost. Three reported serious adverse events were all seizures and probably therapy-related. Conclusions: Overall compliance was good but not ideal from the point of view of this highly precise radiation

  6. Pilot study of an 'integrated boost' with fractionation into four weekly sessions in breast radiotherapy; etude pilote de 'boost integre' avec fractionnement en quatre seances hebdomadaires dans la radiotherapie du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabelle-Flandin, I.; Beneyton, V.; Dusserre, A.; Sihanath, R.; Villele, C. de; Henry, I.; Vassal, S.; Tessier, A.; Giraud, J.Y. [CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Balosso, J. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a pilot study which aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of an 'integrated boost' technique within a treatment comprising four sessions a week, in order to increase machine availability. The reduction of the number of sessions resulted in 20 to 30 per cent increase of machine availability. The technique does not increase acute toxicity. Late toxicity is still to be assessed. Short communication

  7. Holocraneal irradiation with boost integrated simultaneous of oligo metastases using Exa frame and Exa skin with VMAI-IGRT; Irradiacion holocraneal con boost integrado simultaneo de oligometastasis usando Exaframe y Exaskin con VMAT-IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Montero Perea, E.; Ortiz Seidel, M.

    2013-07-01

    The described technique of prophylaxis back hippo-fractionated with simultaneous integrated boost presents advantages in terms of reduction of treatment time total, fast local effect on the oligo metastases and possible prevention of the emergence of new cranial metastasis. The possible impact on long-term survival remains to be determined. In any case, this technique is presented as a valid alternative in terms of clinical outcomes and toxicity to stereotaxic standard treatments. (Author)

  8. Three-level boost converter with zero voltage transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ing Hwu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As compared with the traditional boost converter, the three-level boost converter possesses several advantages, such as lower switch voltage stresses and lower inductor current ripple. To improve the efficiency, this paper proposes a zero voltage transition (ZVT three-level boost converter. With the proposed ZVT circuit, the switches can achieve soft switching. Moreover, by using the voltage balance control, the output voltage can be equally across the output capacitors. In this study, the effectiveness of the proposed topology is verified by the experimental results based on the field-programmable gate array control.

  9. Identification of Ultra-Boosted Higgs$\\rightarrow bb$ Jets Using Subjet B-Tagging with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meehan, Samuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many physics searches in Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider involve boosted Higgs bosons, which decay to two b-quarks with a large branching ratio. The Higgs boson is reconstructed as a large-R jet and the b-quarks are reconstructed as a pair of b-tagged subjets. This note documents alternative subjet techniques to reconstruct and identify the two b-jets from highly-boosted Higgs boson decays. New subjet tagging techniques are investigated, including the use of variable radius trackjets, exclusive kt calorimeter subjets, and calorimeter subjets reconstructed in the center of mass frame of the Higgs jet. For Higgs jets with large transverse momenta (>1 TeV), these three new techniques significantly outperform the fixed radius trackjet tagging technique currently used as the standard method in ATLAS.

  10. SMART STRATEGY TO BOOST STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Lukman Syafi’i

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reading as one of language skills plays significant roles in the teaching English as a foreign language. Since the teacher still uses the conventional way to teach reading, students‘ ability in reading comprehension seems still unsatisfactory yet. So, teacher should explore and develop new strategies. One of strategies in reading comprehension that can trigger our students to attain that purpose is SMART (Self Monitoring Approach for Reading and Thinking strategy. This study is developing SMART strategy to boost the reading comprehension achievement of the ninth grade students. The research applies a collaborative classroom action research design in which the researcher and the collaborative teacher work together in preparing a suitable procedure of SMART strategy, designing the lesson plan, determining the criteria of success, implementing the action, observing, and doing reflection. The finding indicated that SMART strategy was successful to enhance students‘ motivation to be actively involved in the instructional process. The improvement on the students‘ participation was 75% in Cycle 1 and 87% in Cycle 2.

  11. A boost for the ISOLDE beams

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    The first HIE-ISOLDE cryomodule was commissioned at the end of October. The radioactive ion beams can now be accelerated to 4.3 MeV per nucleon.   The ISOLDE beamline that supplies the Miniball array. The first HIE-ISOLDE cryomodule can be seen in the background, in its light-grey cryostat. ISOLDE is getting an energy boost. The first cryomodule of the new superconducting linear accelerator HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE), located downstream of the REX-ISOLDE accelerator, increases the energy of the radioactive ion beams from 3 to 4.3 MeV per nucleon. It supplies the Miniball array, where an experiment using radioactive zinc ions (see box) began at the end of October. This is the first stage in the commissioning of HIE-ISOLDE. The facility will ultimately be equipped with four cryomodules that will accelerate the beams to 10 MeV per nucleon. Each cryomodule has five accelerating cavities and a solenoid, which focuses the beam. All of these components are superconducting. This first ...

  12. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki Albers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  13. Repeat Operation for Pseudoaneurysm of Left Ventricular Outflow in a Patient with Concomitant Takayasu’s Arteritis and Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashiro, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Arakaki, Katsuya; Nagano, Takaaki; Kise, Yuya

    2011-01-01

    We describe concomitant Marfan syndrome and Takayasu’s arteritis complicating a pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricular outflow that developed after aortic root reconstruction. A patient was admitted with a high fever four months after initial root reconstruction that included valve sparing (reimplantation) as well as coronary artery reconstruction using a Carrel’s button technique. Computed tomography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the posterior side of the aortic root. We applie...

  14. ArborZ: PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS USING BOOSTED DECISION TREES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single 'best estimate' and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  15. Holocraneal irradiation with boost integrated simultaneous of oligo metastases using Exa frame and Exa skin with VMAI-IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Montero Perea, E.; Ortiz Seidel, M.

    2013-01-01

    The described technique of prophylaxis back hippo-fractionated with simultaneous integrated boost presents advantages in terms of reduction of treatment time total, fast local effect on the oligo metastases and possible prevention of the emergence of new cranial metastasis. The possible impact on long-term survival remains to be determined. In any case, this technique is presented as a valid alternative in terms of clinical outcomes and toxicity to stereotaxic standard treatments. (Author)

  16. Differentiated treatment of patients with acne and concomitant candida infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakubi Randa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of works, which are devoted to the study of acne, but these data are often contradictory on the issue of interrelationship and interdependence of clinical manifestations, course and some factors in the pathogenesis of acne and candida infection. Aim of the research was to study the effect of the recommended differentiated therapy on the pathogenetic disorders in patients with acne and concomitant Candida infection. Methods and results. 120 patients with acne were examined. In 100 of them concomitant skin malasseziosis was set in the form of pityriasis rosea, kerosis, comedones, folliculitis, seborrhea, multicolored zoster, with some features, as well as candidiasis. Methods of the research – bacterioscopic, bacteriological, study of skin oiliness and moisture, skin pH, the level of Ca ++, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. In patients with acne significant shifts in the composition of water-lipid mantle, increased oiliness and decreased moisture of skin, pH changes with a shift to the alkaline side were revealed, the most pronounced – in acne patients with Candida infection. The content of Ca ++ in the organism, as well as parathyroid hormone and calcitonin was increased and also the most indicative it was in patients with acne and concomitant Candida infection. After the comparative analysis on the basis of different levels of clinical and laboratory violations two clinical-therapeutic groups were distinguished, in accordance with that the differentiated therapy offered by us was conducted. Increased oiliness and Рh of skin, decline of moisture before the treatment, especially in patients with III and IV stages of acne, complicated by Candida infection, were normalized after treatment, unlike in patients treated traditionally. Conclusion. After treatment intensity of microbal colonization and also microbal associations of skin was diminished, the level of Ca++, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin went down.

  17. Concomitant Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, presenting as primary hypothyroidism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Hypothyroidism in patients with Graves\\' disease is usually the result of ablative treatment. We describe a 58 year old man with Graves\\' ophthalmopathy and pre-tibial myxoedema, who presented with spontaneous primary hypothyroidism. Circulating TSH receptor antibody activity was increased, while thyroid microsomal antibody was detectable in titres greater than one in one hundred thousand. It is likely that the TSH receptor antibody of Graves\\' disease was ineffective in stimulating hyperthyroidism because of concomitant thyroid destruction due to Hashimoto\\'s disease. Alternatively, primary hypothyroidism could have resulted from the effects of a circulating TSH receptor blocking antibody.

  18. Successful Treatment of Ptyalism Gravidarum With Concomitant Hyperemesis Using Hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Zuhrah; Low, Wah Yun; Hassan, Jamiyah

    2015-10-01

    Ptyalism gravidarum, or sialorrhea, is the excessive secretion of saliva during pregnancy. Treatment of ptyalism gravidarum is often challenging due to its unknown etiologies. This article discusses a case of ptyalism gravidarum with concomitant hyperemesis in which the condition was successfully treated with hypnosis. A 28-year-old woman presented with ptyalism 2 months into her pregnancy and hyperemesis 3 months into pregnancy with associated vomiting that occurred following every meal. Hypnosis was administered at week 16 of pregnancy to eliminate ptyalism and hyperemesis, to prepare for childbirth, and to increase overall psychological well-being. Ptyalism resolved by week 36, concurrent with the final hypnosis session.

  19. Concomitant Glomus Tumor with CRPS in the Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Chan Mi; Yoon, Duck Mi; Yoon, Kyung Bong

    2013-07-01

    Glomus tumors are benign tumors that account for 1% to 5% of all soft tissue tumors of the hand and are characterized by a triad of sensitivity to cold, localized tenderness and severe paroxysmal pain. Paroxysmal pain is a symptom common not only in glomus tumors but also in CRPS, and the hand is one of the commonly affected sites in patients with both glomus tumors and CRPS. Therefore, it is not easy to clinically diagnose glomus tumors superimposed on already affected region of CRPS patients. We report a case of glomus tumor concomitantly originating with CRPS at the hand.

  20. How 5G Wireless (and Concomitant Technologies) Will Revolutionize Healthcare?

    OpenAIRE

    Siddique Latif; Junaid Qadir; Shahzad Farooq; Muhammad Ali Imran

    2017-01-01

    The need to have equitable access to quality healthcare is enshrined in the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which defines the developmental agenda of the UN for the next 15 years. In particular, the third SDG focuses on the need to “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”. In this paper, we build the case that 5G wireless technology, along with concomitant emerging technologies (such as IoT, big data, artificial intelligence and machine learn...

  1. Protecting livelihoods, boosting food security in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-05-21

    May 21, 2015 ... Protecting livelihoods, boosting food security in Kenya ... America, and the Caribbean with funds from the Government of Canada's fast-start financing. ... Water management and food security in vulnerable regions of China.

  2. A THREE-PHASE BOOST DC-AC CONVERTER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dc-ac converter (inverter) based on the dc-dc boost converters. ... Sliding mode controllers are designed to perform a robust control for the ... Computer simulations and spectral analysis demon- ... the conventional three-phase buck inverter,.

  3. Simple grain mill boosts production and eases women's workload ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... grain mill boosts production and eases women's workload. 11 janvier 2013. Image ... It aims to increase the production, improve the processing, develop new ... farmer societies, women's self-help groups, and the food-processing industry.

  4. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-05-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experiments, but require unconventional searches for energetic recoil electrons in coincidence with displaced multi-track events. Related experimental strategies can also be used to probe MeV-range boosted dark matter via their interactions with electrons inside the target material.

  5. Boosting youth employment in agri-business | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Boosting youth employment in agri-business ... economic importance and could provide jobs for women and youth while increasing food security. ... “The main challenge youth face is poor access to credit and extension services,” she says.

  6. Superconducting Electric Boost Pump for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A submersible, superconducting electric boost pump sized to meet the needs of future Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems in the 25,000 lbf thrust range is proposed....

  7. Solid state light source driver establishing buck or boost operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Fred

    2017-08-29

    A solid state light source driver circuit that operates in either a buck convertor or a boost convertor configuration is provided. The driver circuit includes a controller, a boost switch circuit and a buck switch circuit, each coupled to the controller, and a feedback circuit, coupled to the light source. The feedback circuit provides feedback to the controller, representing a DC output of the driver circuit. The controller controls the boost switch circuit and the buck switch circuit in response to the feedback signal, to regulate current to the light source. The controller places the driver circuit in its boost converter configuration when the DC output is less than a rectified AC voltage coupled to the driver circuit at an input node. The controller places the driver circuit in its buck converter configuration when the DC output is greater than the rectified AC voltage at the input node.

  8. Protecting livelihoods, boosting food security in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-05-21

    May 21, 2015 ... Protecting livelihoods, boosting food security in Kenya ... livestock fodder, with important outcomes for household food security. ... and all counties have since committed funding toward scaling up successful technologies.

  9. Boosted dark matter signals uplifted with self-interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Park, Jong-Chul

    2018-01-01

    We explore detection prospects of a non-standard dark sector in the context of boosted dark matter. We focus on a scenario with two dark matter particles of a large mass difference, where the heavier candidate is secluded and interacts with the standard model particles only at loops, escaping existing direct and indirect detection bounds. Yet its pair annihilation in the galactic center or in the Sun may produce boosted stable particles, which could be detected as visible Cherenkov light in l...

  10. The Synergy Between PAV and AdaBoost

    OpenAIRE

    WILBUR, W. JOHN; YEGANOVA, LANA; KIM, WON

    2005-01-01

    Schapire and Singer’s improved version of AdaBoost for handling weak hypotheses with confidence rated predictions represents an important advance in the theory and practice of boosting. Its success results from a more efficient use of information in weak hypotheses during updating. Instead of simple binary voting a weak hypothesis is allowed to vote for or against a classification with a variable strength or confidence. The Pool Adjacent Violators (PAV) algorithm is a method for converting a ...

  11. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  12. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grotec, D. P.

    2010-06-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  13. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference (1) is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accommodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  14. A Reconfigurable Buck, Boost, and Buck-Boost Converter: Unified Model and Robust Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Antonio Rodríguez Licea

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for reconfigurable, high power density, and low-cost configurations of DC-DC power electronic converters (PEC in areas such as the transport electrification and the use of renewable energy has spread out the requirement to incorporate in a single circuit several topologies, which generally result in an increment of complexity about the modeling, control, and stability analyses. In this paper, a reconfigurable topology is presented which can be applied in alterative/changing power conversion scenarios and consists of a reconfigurable Buck, Boost, and Buck-Boost DC-DC converter (RBBC. A unified averaged model of the RBBC is obtained, a robust controller is designed through a polytopic representation, and a Lyapunov based switched stability analysis of the closed-loop system is presented. The reported RBBC provides a wide range of voltage operation, theoretically from -∞ to ∞ volts with a single power source. Robust stability, even under arbitrarily fast (bounded parameter variations and reconfiguration changes, is reported including numerical and experimental results. The main advantages of the converter and the robust controller proposed are simple design, robustness against abrupt changes in the parameters, and low cost.

  15. EFFECTS OF PLYOMETRIC EXERCISE ON CONCOMITANTS OF FITNESS AND METABOLIC PROFILE IN TYPE 2 DIABETES PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadas Akindele

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been on the increase both in high and medium/low income countries. This increase is associated with health and economic consequences, especially in low sub-Saharan Africa that is resource stricken. Availability of affordable and easy to implement treatment intervention will surely reduce these health and economic sequealae of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of plyometric exercise on concomitants of fitness and metabolic profile in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods: Simple random sampling technique was employed to recruit participants (n=27 for this study after meeting the inclusion criteria. Physical and physiological measurements were taken from the participants before and after six weeks of plyometric exercise for the experimental group and the control who did not participate in plyometric exercise. Results: A total number of twenty seven (control= 13 participated in the study and there are not significant differences in the physical and physiological parameters of the two groups. There are significant differences in the physiological parameter after six (6 weeks of plyometric exercise among the experimental groups while there are no significant differences among the control group. The eta squared statistics of few parameters show that the effect sizes range between medium and large association. Conclusion: It is concluded that among the concomitants of fitness, plyometric exercise is effective only in improving muscle fitness and body composition.

  16. A Comparison Study on Rule Extraction from Neural Network Ensembles, Boosted Shallow Trees, and SVMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Bologna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One way to make the knowledge stored in an artificial neural network more intelligible is to extract symbolic rules. However, producing rules from Multilayer Perceptrons (MLPs is an NP-hard problem. Many techniques have been introduced to generate rules from single neural networks, but very few were proposed for ensembles. Moreover, experiments were rarely assessed by 10-fold cross-validation trials. In this work, based on the Discretized Interpretable Multilayer Perceptron (DIMLP, experiments were performed on 10 repetitions of stratified 10-fold cross-validation trials over 25 binary classification problems. The DIMLP architecture allowed us to produce rules from DIMLP ensembles, boosted shallow trees (BSTs, and Support Vector Machines (SVM. The complexity of rulesets was measured with the average number of generated rules and average number of antecedents per rule. From the 25 used classification problems, the most complex rulesets were generated from BSTs trained by “gentle boosting” and “real boosting.” Moreover, we clearly observed that the less complex the rules were, the better their fidelity was. In fact, rules generated from decision stumps trained by modest boosting were, for almost all the 25 datasets, the simplest with the highest fidelity. Finally, in terms of average predictive accuracy and average ruleset complexity, the comparison of some of our results to those reported in the literature proved to be competitive.

  17. Dose analysis of boost irradiation of parapharyngeal space in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, V.W.C.

    2000-01-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) is one of the common spreads of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Since early eighties boost treatment has been routinely given to patients with PPS involvement. The use of oblique facio-cervical field in this treatment posed difficulty in assessing the dose distribution before the 3-D computer systems are available. This study evaluated the variations of dose distribution by different boost techniques on fifteen patients with PPS involvement using 3-D computer planning system. Comparisons were made between different radiation types, photon energies and modes of collimation respectively. Results showed that the dose distributions in the boost treatment were acceptable, as they did not bring the total doses of the normal structures exceeding their tolerance. There was little difference between 6 and 10 MV photons, but significant differences were found between photon and electron beams. Photon beams were better than the electron beams in giving lower doses to the spinal cord and the TM joint with more homogeneous dose to the target volume, whereas electron beams gave better sparing of the lens and temporal lobe. For the photon beams, half-blocked beam was superior to symmetrical beam in reducing the brain stem dose, but there was no advantage to the rest of normal structures. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Radiography

  18. Experimental studies of unbiased gluon jets from $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations using the jet boost algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    We present the first experimental results based on the jet boost algorithm, a technique to select unbiased samples of gluon jets in e+e- annihilations, i.e. gluon jets free of biases introduced by event selection or jet finding criteria. Our results are derived from hadronic Z0 decays observed with the OPAL detector at the LEP e+e- collider at CERN. First, we test the boost algorithm through studies with Herwig Monte Carlo events and find that it provides accurate measurements of the charged particle multiplicity distributions of unbiased gluon jets for jet energies larger than about 5 GeV, and of the jet particle energy spectra (fragmentation functions) for jet energies larger than about 14 GeV. Second, we apply the boost algorithm to our data to derive unbiased measurements of the gluon jet multiplicity distribution for energies between about 5 and 18 GeV, and of the gluon jet fragmentation function at 14 and 18 GeV. In conjunction with our earlier results at 40 GeV, we then test QCD calculations for the en...

  19. A 1 MEGAWATT POLYPHASE BOOST CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR KLYSTRON PULSE APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Doss, J.D.; Gribble, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes electrical design criteria and first operational results a 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter/modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2300 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. PWM (pulse width modulation) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt-peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. A review of these design parameters and the first results of the performance characteristics will be presented

  20. adabag: An R Package for Classification with Boosting and Bagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Alfaro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Boosting and bagging are two widely used ensemble methods for classification. Their common goal is to improve the accuracy of a classifier combining single classifiers which are slightly better than random guessing. Among the family of boosting algorithms, AdaBoost (adaptive boosting is the best known, although it is suitable only for dichotomous tasks. AdaBoost.M1 and SAMME (stagewise additive modeling using a multi-class exponential loss function are two easy and natural extensions to the general case of two or more classes. In this paper, the adabag R package is introduced. This version implements AdaBoost.M1, SAMME and bagging algorithms with classification trees as base classifiers. Once the ensembles have been trained, they can be used to predict the class of new samples. The accuracy of these classifiers can be estimated in a separated data set or through cross validation. Moreover, the evolution of the error as the ensemble grows can be analysed and the ensemble can be pruned. In addition, the margin in the class prediction and the probability of each class for the observations can be calculated. Finally, several classic examples in classification literature are shown to illustrate the use of this package.

  1. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Rémi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified “field-in-field” technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347–1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349–1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0–63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0–57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  2. Significance of breast boost volume changes during radiotherapy in relation to current clinical interobserver variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen; Admiraal, Marjan; Sangen, Maurice van der; Dijkmans, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nowadays, many departments introduce CT images for breast irradiation techniques, aiming to obtain a better accuracy in the definition of the relevant target volumes. However, the definition of the breast boost volume based on CT images requires further investigation, because it may not only vary between observers, but it may also change during the course of treatment. This study aims to quantify the variability of the CT based visible boost volume (VBV) during the course of treatment in relation to the variability between observers. Materials and methods: Ten patients with stage T1-2 invasive breast cancer treated with breast conservative surgery and post surgical radiotherapy were included in this study. In addition to the regular planning CT which is obtained several days prior to radiotherapy, three additional CT scans were acquired 3, 5 and 7 weeks after the planning CT scan. Four radiation oncologists delineated the VBV in all scans. Conformity of the delineations was analysed both between observers, and between scans taken at different periods of the radiotherapy treatment. Results: The VBV averaged over all patients decreased during the course of the treatment from an initial 40 cm 3 to 28 cm 3 , 27 cm 3 and 25 cm 3 after 3, 5 and 7 weeks, respectively. Assuming the VBV to be spherical, this corresponds to a reduction in diameter of 5-6 mm. More detailed analysis revealed that this reduction was more pronounced when radiotherapy started within 30 days after surgery. These boost volume changes over time were found to be significant (p = 0.02) even in the presence of interobserver variations. Moreover, the conformity index (CI) for the volume changes was of the same magnitude as the conformity index for the interobserver variation (0.25 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusions: Breast boost volume variations during a course of radiotherapy are significant in relation to current clinical interobserver variations. This is an important

  3. Mono centric evaluation of the skin and cardiac toxicities of the concomitant administration of trastuzumab and radiotherapy; Evaluation monocentrique de la tolerance de l'association concomitante de trastuzumab et de radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Caussa, L.; Dendale, R.; Campana, F.; Tournat, H.; Fourquet, A.; Bollet, M.A. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Granger, B.; Savignoni, A. [Institut Curie, Service de Bio-Statistique, 75 - Paris (France); Pierga, J.Y. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-Medicale, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose Prospective mono centric study of the skin and heart tolerance of a concurrent administration of trastuzumab (T) and radiotherapy (R.T.) for breast cancer (B.C.). Patients and methods From February 2004 to January 2007, 57 patients (pts), were treated by a concomitant administration of T and normo-fractionated R.T. of either whole breast ({+-} boost) or chest. The perfusion of T started either with or after chemotherapy (CT). Left ventricular ejection fractions (L.E.V.F.), assessed at baseline, before start of R.T., after completion of R.T. and then every four to six months with either echocardiography or multiple gated acquisition scanning, were considered normal if greater or equal to 50% or stated so by the cardiologist. Inclusion criteria included a normal L.V.E.F. at baseline. Skin toxicity was evaluated using C.T.C.A.E., V.3 ( for common terminology criteria for adverse events, version 3.0). Median age was 49 years (25-80). CT with anthracycline was administered in 84% (total dose 300 mg/m2). All but one patient (treated weekly) received T every three weeks (8 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg) for a median duration of 12 months (6-33). The internal mammary chain was irradiated in 88% of cases. Median follow-up for L.V.E.F. assessment was 13 months (2-33). Results L.V.E.F. at pre-R.T. were normal in 54 pts (100%, three Missing Data [M.D.]), at post-R.T. in 56 pts (98%, no M.D.) and at last follow-up in 53 pts (95%, one M.D.). There were two grade 0, 44 grade I and 11 grade II skin reactions. For the 27 patients with a skin toxicity assessment after six months, late skin toxicity was grade 0 in 22 pts, grade 1 in four, grade 2 in one. Conclusion Provided that the technique is adapted, the acute skin and heart toxicities of the concomitant administration of T-R.T. appeared satisfactory. More patients and longer follow-up are still mandatory. (authors)

  4. Concomitant pharmacoroentgenological study of the biliferous tract and alimentary canal in the diagnosis of of cholecystitis and the postcholecystectomy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyak, E.Z.; Trigubchak, D.I.

    1984-01-01

    The cholecystocholangiography technique concomitant with X-ray examination of the alimentary canal under the conditions of hypotension realized by administration neostigmine methylsulfate is developed. 154 patients have been examined, including 69 patients with postcholecystectomy syndrome, 45-with calculouless cholecystitis and 40-with calculous cholecystitis. Utilization of neurotropic preparations, single-moment investigation of biliferous tracts, stomack and duodenum under the conditions of their functional interrelation permit to study X-ray functional symptoms of cholangitis and papillitis, specify X-ray cholecistitis and pancreatitis semiotics. The proposed technique is simple for realization and its application is quite accessible under ambulatory conditions

  5. Canadian operators boost heavy oil production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdue, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent technological advances in slurry pipelining, horizontal wells, and thermal recovery techniques have made recovery of Canadian heavy oil resources more economical. In addition, reduced government royalties have made investment in these difficult reservoirs more attractive. As a result, activity has increased in heavy-oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This paper review the various oil sand recovery projects under development in the area and the current government policies which are helping to develop them. The paper also provides brief descriptions of the equipment and technologies that have allowed a reduced cost in the development. Items discussed include surface mining techniques, horizontal drilling, reservoir engineering techniques, separation processes, and thermal recovery

  6. Concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery for people undergoing cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Berendsen, Mark A; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Kruse, Jane; McCarthy, Patrick M; Malaisrie, S C

    2016-01-01

    Background People with atrial fibrillation (AF) often undergo cardiac surgery for other underlying reasons and are frequently offered concomitant AF surgery to reduce the frequency of short- and long-term AF and improve short- and long-term outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of concomitant AF surgery among people with AF who are undergoing cardiac surgery on short-term and long-term (12 months or greater) health-related outcomes, health-related quality of life, and costs. Search methods Starting from the year when the first “maze” AF surgery was reported (1987), we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (March 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (March 2016), Embase Ovid (March 2016), Web of Science (March 2016), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE, April 2015), and Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA, March 2016). We searched trial registers in April 2016. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of any concomitant AF surgery compared with no AF surgery among adults with preoperative AF, regardless of symptoms, who were undergoing cardiac surgery for another indication. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We evaluated the risk of bias using the Cochrane ‘Risk of bias’ tool. We included outcome data on all-cause and cardiovascular-specific mortality, freedom from atrial fibrillation, flutter, or tachycardia off antiarrhythmic medications, as measured by patient electrocardiographic monitoring greater than three months after the procedure, procedural safety, 30-day rehospitalisation, need for post-discharge direct current cardioversion, health-related quality of life, and direct costs. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a fixed-effect model when heterogeneity was low (I2 ≤ 50%) and random

  7. Concomitant Imperforate Hymen and Transverse Vaginal Septum Complicated with Pyocolpos and Abdominovaginal Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Dilbaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old patient with a complaint of worsening lower abdominal pain during the past 4 months was admitted to the emergency department. An abdominopelvic ultrasound scan revealed a distended uterocervical cavity suggestive of hematometrocolpos. Imperforate hymen was observed on examination of the external genitalia. MRI scan revealed an air-fluid level representing pyometrocolpos within a distended vagina. Posterior vaginal extraperitoneal leakage as the sign of a fistula between the vagina and the rectovaginal space was detected. Although laparoscopic approach was planned, malodorous pus expelled after the insertion of the Veress needle, it was decided to proceed to laparotomy. Pus with peritoneal microabscess formations was observed at laparotomy. The imperforate hymen and TVS were excised vaginally. A more complex anomaly should be suspected in cases with hematometra and concomitant imperforated hymen without any bulging and thorough evaluation using radiological imaging techniques should be performed before surgical approach.

  8. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  9. High Resolution Radar Imaging using Coherent MultiBand Processing Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Ebeling, R.P.; Huizing, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution radar imaging techniques can be used in ballistic missile defence systems to determine the type of ballistic missile during the boost phase (threat typing) and to discriminate different parts of a ballistic missile after the boost phase. The applied radar imaging technique is 2D

  10. Identification of boosted top quarks and W bosons with Machine learning in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Majersky, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present techniques for the identification of hadronically-decaying W bosons and top quarks using high-level features as inputs to boosted decision trees and deep neural networks in the ATLAS experiment at sqrt(s)=13 TeV. The performance of these machine learning based taggers is compared in Monte Carlo simulation with various different tagging algorithms. An improvement in background rejection with respect to different taggers is observed. In addition, the performance of the machine learning taggers is examined in full Run-II data set in top quark pair, dijet and photon+jet topologies.

  11. Simulating relativistic beam and plasma systems using an optimal boosted frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Fawley, W. M.; Martins, S. F.; Cary, J. R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Fonseca, R. A.; Furman, M. A.; Lu, W.; Mori, W. B.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-01

    It was shown recently that it may be computationally advantageous to perform computer simulations in a Lorentz boosted frame for a certain class of systems. However, even if the computer model relies on a covariant set of equations, it was pointed out that algorithmic difficulties related to discretization errors may have to be overcome in order to take full advantage of the potential speedup. In this paper, we summarize the findings, the difficulties and their solutions, and review the applications of the technique that have been performed to date.

  12. Speeding Up Simulations of Relativistic Systems using an Optimal Boosted Frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Fawley, W.M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    It can be computationally advantageous to perform computer simulations in a Lorentz boosted frame for a certain class of systems. However, even if the computer model relies on a covariant set of equations, it has been pointed out that algorithmic difficulties related to discretization errors may have to be overcome in order to take full advantage of the potential speedup. We summarize the findings, the difficulties and their solutions, and show that the technique enables simulations important to several areas of accelerator physics that are otherwise problematic, including self-consistent modeling in three-dimensions of laser wokefield accelerator stages at energies of 10 GeV and above.

  13. Novel Family of modified qZS buck-boost multilevel inverters with reduced switch count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husev, Oleksandr; Strzelecki, Ryszard; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a novel family of modified quasi-Z-source buck-boost multilevel inverters with reduced switch count. The inverters are derived by means of the modified inverter configuration with quasi-Z-source networks. The main benefits of the proposed solutions lie in the increased amount...... of levels with all possible sequences: reduced THD, reduced voltage stress on the transistors and size of the output filter. Also their modulation techniques are proposed and described. Simulation results have confirmed all theoretical predictions. The pros and cons are discussed in the conclusions....

  14. Enhanced Buck–Boost Neutral-Point-Clamped Inverters With Simple Capacitive-Voltage Balancing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Kuan Khoon; Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2010-01-01

    introduced for extending the inverters’ variation range to include voltageboost operation, but they generally require the inclusion of large passive components or have not yet been optimized in terms of waveform quality. The balancing of their capacitive voltages using a simple technique has also not yet...... simultaneously, two new buck–boost NPC inverters with simple capacitive-voltage-balancing capability are proposed. Both inverters are demonstrated to exhibit a doubling of voltage gain, with one of them also shown to produce a better output waveform quality. Simulation and experimental results are provided...

  15. Concomitant prostatic schistosomiasis and sdenocarcinoma: case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Basílio-de-Oliveira

    Full Text Available The term schistosomiasis encompasses a group of infectious disorders caused by five species of the genus Schistosoma, a blood trematode of outstanding importance in tropical areas. Some of these disorders have long been associated with malignant neoplasia, the most striking association being between disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium, the predominant etiological agent of urinary schistosomiasis, and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder, a relatively uncommon vesical cancer in non-endemic areas. Four cases of simultaneous adenocarcinoma and schistosomiasis of the prostate have been previously reported (S. haematobium in three and S. mansoni in one. We report a fifth case of concomitant adenocarcinoma and schistosomiasis of the prostate in a 68-year-old Brazilian patient infected with S. mansoni. We also review the medical literature on the association between schistosomiasis and cancer.

  16. Concomitant achondroplasia and developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennison L. Malcolm, MD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia (ACH is the most common form of hereditary dwarfism and presents with multiple musculoskeletal anomalies but is not normally associated with premature hip arthritis. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH is a spectrum of disease resulting in shallow acetabular depth and a propensity for chronic femoral subluxation or dislocation; it is among the most common causes of premature arthritis. This case report describes the diagnosis of symptomatic DDH in a patient with ACH and highlights difficulties of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA as a treatment option. Intraoperative radiographic imaging is advised to ensure proper prosthesis placement. Femoral osteotomy may aid visualization, reduction, and avoidance of soft tissue injury. Concomitant ACH and DDH is a challenging problem that can be successfully treated with modified THA.

  17. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with concomitant renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Davide; Santos, Beatriz; Costa, Cátia; Durão, David; Alves, Miguel; Monteiro, Isabel; Pitta, Luz; Leal, Margarida

    2015-12-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is defined as non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving the heart and/or pericardium. It is a rare cancer that primarily affects the right heart and in particular the right atrium. By contrast, renal cell carcinoma is a relatively common cancer, which in rare circumstances can metastasize to the heart. It is now known that there is an association between non-Hodgkin lymphoma and renal cell carcinoma, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The authors present a case of primary cardiac non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and explore the possible reasons for this association. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. The importance of calorimetry for highly-boosted jet substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Evan [Brown U.; Freytsis, Marat [Oregon U.; Hinzmann, Andreas [Hamburg U.; Narain, Meenakshi [Brown U.; Thaler, Jesse [MIT, Cambridge, CTP; Tran, Nhan [Fermilab; Vernieri, Caterina [Fermilab

    2017-09-25

    Jet substructure techniques are playing an essential role in exploring the TeV scale at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), since they facilitate the efficient reconstruction and identification of highly-boosted objects. Both for the LHC and for future colliders, there is a growing interest in using jet substructure methods based only on charged-particle information. The reason is that silicon-based tracking detectors offer excellent granularity and precise vertexing, which can improve the angular resolution on highly-collimated jets and mitigate the impact of pileup. In this paper, we assess how much jet substructure performance degrades by using track-only information, and we demonstrate physics contexts in which calorimetry is most beneficial. Specifically, we consider five different hadronic final states - W bosons, Z bosons, top quarks, light quarks, gluons - and test the pairwise discrimination power with a multi-variate combination of substructure observables. In the idealized case of perfect reconstruction, we quantify the loss in discrimination performance when using just charged particles compared to using all detected particles. We also consider the intermediate case of using charged particles plus photons, which provides valuable information about neutral pions. In the more realistic case of a segmented calorimeter, we assess the potential performance gains from improving calorimeter granularity and resolution, comparing a CMS-like detector to more ambitious future detector concepts. Broadly speaking, we find large performance gains from neutral-particle information and from improved calorimetry in cases where jet mass resolution drives the discrimination power, whereas the gains are more modest if an absolute mass scale calibration is not required.

  19. Symmetry boost of the fidelity of Shor factoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Y. S.; Blümel, R.

    2018-05-01

    In Shor's algorithm quantum subroutines occur with the structure F U F-1 , where F is a unitary transform and U is performing a quantum computation. Examples are quantum adders and subunits of quantum modulo adders. In this paper we show, both analytically and numerically, that if, in analogy to spin echoes, F and F-1 can be implemented symmetrically when executing Shor's algorithm on actual, imperfect quantum hardware, such that F and F-1 have the same hardware errors, a symmetry boost in the fidelity of the combined F U F-1 quantum operation results when compared to the case in which the errors in F and F-1 are independently random. Running the complete gate-by-gate implemented Shor algorithm, we show that the symmetry-induced fidelity boost can be as large as a factor 4. While most of our analytical and numerical results concern the case of over- and under-rotation of controlled rotation gates, in the numerically accessible case of Shor's algorithm with a small number of qubits, we show explicitly that the symmetry boost is robust with respect to more general types of errors. While, expectedly, additional error types reduce the symmetry boost, we show explicitly, by implementing general off-diagonal SU (N ) errors (N =2 ,4 ,8 ), that the boost factor scales like a Lorentzian in δ /σ , where σ and δ are the error strengths of the diagonal over- and underrotation errors and the off-diagonal SU (N ) errors, respectively. The Lorentzian shape also shows that, while the boost factor may become small with increasing δ , it declines slowly (essentially like a power law) and is never completely erased. We also investigate the effect of diagonal nonunitary errors, which, in analogy to unitary errors, reduce but never erase the symmetry boost. Going beyond the case of small quantum processors, we present analytical scaling results that show that the symmetry boost persists in the practically interesting case of a large number of qubits. We illustrate this result

  20. Substructure boosts to dark matter annihilation from Sommerfeld enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced Sommerfeld enhancement of the dark matter annihilation cross section has important implications for the detection of dark matter annihilation in subhalos in the Galactic halo. In addition to the boost to the dark matter annihilation cross section from the high densities of these subhalos with respect to the main halo, an additional boost caused by the Sommerfeld enhancement results from the fact that they are kinematically colder than the Galactic halo. If we further believe the generic prediction of the cold dark matter paradigm that in each subhalo there is an abundance of substructure which is approximately self-similar to that of the Galactic halo, then I show that additional boosts coming from the density enhancements of these small substructures and their small velocity dispersions enhance the dark matter annihilation cross section even further. I find that very large boost factors (10 5 to 10 9 ) are obtained in a large class of models. The implications of these boost factors for the detection of dark matter annihilation from dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Galactic halo are such that, generically, they outshine the background gamma-ray flux and are detectable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  1. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  2. Simultaneous integrated vs. sequential boost in VMAT radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzin, Mostafa [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Tehran University of Medical Science, Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Molls, Michael; Astner, Sabrina; Oechsner, Markus [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Rondak, Ina-Christine [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In 20 patients with high-grade gliomas, we compared two methods of planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT): simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) vs. sequential boost (SEB). The investigation focused on the analysis of dose distributions in the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs). After contouring the target volumes [planning target volumes (PTVs) and boost volumes (BVs)] and OARs, SIB planning and SEB planning were performed. The SEB method consisted of two plans: in the first plan the PTV received 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a 2-Gy dose per fraction. In the second plan the BV received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose per fraction of 2 Gy. The doses of both plans were summed up to show the total doses delivered. In the SIB method the PTV received 54 Gy in 30 fractions with a dose per fraction of 1.8 Gy, while the BV received 60 Gy in the same fraction number but with a dose per fraction of 2 Gy. All of the OARs showed higher doses (D{sub max} and D{sub mean}) in the SEB method when compared with the SIB technique. The differences between the two methods were statistically significant in almost all of the OARs. Analysing the total doses of the target volumes we found dose distributions with similar homogeneities and comparable total doses. Our analysis shows that the SIB method offers advantages over the SEB method in terms of sparing OARs. (orig.) [German] Es wurden 2 Arten der Planung fuer die volumetrisch modulierte Rotationsbestrahlung (VMAT) bei 20 Patienten mit hochgradigen Gliomen verglichen: simultan integrierter Boost (SIB) und sequenzieller Boost (SEB). Dazu wurde die Dosisverteilung in den Zielvolumina und den Risikoorganen analysiert. Es wurden Planungsvolumina (PTV), Boostvolumina (BV) und Risikoorgane konturiert sowie SIB- und SEB-Plaene erstellt. Der SEB besteht aus 2 Plaenen. Im ersten Plan erhaelt das PTV 50 Gy in 25 Fraktionen. Im zweiten Plan erhaelt das Boostvolumen 10 Gy in 5 Fraktionen (Einzeldosis jeweils 2 Gy). Die Dosis

  3. Estimation of reliability of a interleaving PFC boost converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulam Amer Sandepudi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability plays an important role in power supplies. For other electronic equipment, a certain failure mode, at least for a part of the total system, can often be employed without serious (critical effects. However, for power supply no such condition can be accepted, since very high demands on its reliability must be achieved. At higher power levels, the continuous conduction mode (CCM boost converter is preferred topology for implementation a front end with PFC. As a result, significant efforts have been made to improve the performance of high boost converter. This paper is one of the efforts for improving the performance of the converter from the reliability point of view. In this paper, interleaving boost power factor correction converter is simulated with single switch in continuous conduction mode (CCM, discontinuous conduction mode (DCM and critical conduction mode (CRM under different output power ratings. Results of the converter are explored from reliability point of view.

  4. Natural working fluids for solar-boosted heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaichana, C.; Lu Aye [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia). International Technologies Centre, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Charters, W.W.S. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia). Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2003-09-01

    The option of using natural working fluids as a substitute of R-22 for solar-boosted heat pumps depends not only upon thermal performance and hazardous rating but also on potential impacts on the environment. This paper presents the comparative assessment of natural working fluids with R-22 in terms of their characteristics and thermophysical properties, and thermal performance. Some justification is given for using natural working fluids in a solar boosted heat pump water heater. The results show that R-744 is not suitable for solar-boosted heat pumps because of its low critical temperature and high operational pressures. On the other hand, R-717 seems to be a more appropriate substitute in terms of operational parameters and overall performance. However, major changes in the heat pumps are required. R-290 and R-1270 are identified as candidates for direct drop-in substitutes for R-22. (author)

  5. Boosting instance prototypes to detect local dermoscopic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Ning; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Local dermoscopic features are useful in many dermoscopic criteria for skin cancer detection. We address the problem of detecting local dermoscopic features from epiluminescence (ELM) microscopy skin lesion images. We formulate the recognition of local dermoscopic features as a multi-instance learning (MIL) problem. We employ the method of diverse density (DD) and evidence confidence (EC) function to convert MIL to a single-instance learning (SIL) problem. We apply Adaboost to improve the classification performance with support vector machines (SVMs) as the base classifier. We also propose to boost the selection of instance prototypes through changing the data weights in the DD function. We validate the methods on detecting ten local dermoscopic features from a dataset with 360 images. We compare the performance of the MIL approach, its boosting version, and a baseline method without using MIL. Our results show that boosting can provide performance improvement compared to the other two methods.

  6. Radiotherapy Boost Following Conservative Surgery for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Ospino, Rosalba; Torres, Felipe; Cotes, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Nearly half of breast cancer patients in developing countries present with a locally advanced cancer. Treatment is centered on a multimodal approach based on chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. The growing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a more conservative surgical approach; nonetheless, it is not yet considered as a standard. There are no clear recommendations on the use of a radiotherapy boost in such situation. A Medline search was developed. Most articles are retrospective series. Survival free of locoregional relapse in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy is good. All articles described a boost administered to nearly all patients without regard to their prognostic factors, given that a locally advanced tumor is already considered as a poor prognostic factor. Even tough the poor level of evidence, a recommendation can be made: radiotherapy boost should be administered to all patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast conserving surgery.

  7. Active pre-filters for dc/dc Boost regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Ramos-Paja

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an active pre-filter to mitigate the current harmonics generated by classical dc/dc Boost regulators, which generate current ripples proportional to the duty cycle. Therefore, high output voltage conditions, i.e., high voltage conversion ratios, produce high current harmonics that must be filtered to avoid damage or source losses. Traditionally, these current components are filtered using electrolytic capacitors, which introduce reliability problems because of their high failure rate. The solution introduced in this paper instead uses a dc/dc converter based on the parallel connection of the Boost canonical cells to filter the current ripples generated by the Boost regulator, improving the system reliability. This solution provides the additional benefits of improving the overall efficiency and the voltage conversion ratio. Finally, the solution is validated with simulations and experimental results.

  8. Interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy as boost for anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander Tuan; Claren, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; François, Eric; Gautier, Mathieu; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes of patients treated with a high-dose rate brachytherapy boost for anal canal cancer (ACC). From August 2005 to February 2013, 28 patients presenting an ACC treated by split-course external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy in a French regional cancer center in Nice were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 60.6 years [34 – 83], 25 patients presented a squamous cell carcinoma and 3 an adenocarcinoma; 21 received chemotherapy. Median dose of EBRT was 45 Gy [43.2 – 52]. Median dose of HDR brachytherapy was 12 Gy [10 - 15] with a median duration of 2 days. Median overall treatment time was 63 days and median delay between EBRT and brachytherapy was 20 days. Two-year local relapse free, metastatic free, disease free and overall survivals were 83%, 81.9%, 71.8% and 87.7% respectively. Acute toxicities were frequent but not severe with mostly grade 1 toxicities: 37% of genito-urinary, 40.7% of gastro-intestinal and 3.7% of cutaneous toxicities. Late toxicities were mainly G1 (43.1%) and G2 (22%). Two-year colostomy-free survival was 75.1%, one patient had a definitive sphincter amputation. High-dose rate brachytherapy for anal canal carcinoma as boost represents a feasible technique compared to low or pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy. This technique remains an excellent approach to precisely boost the tumor in reducing the overall treatment time

  9. Intra-operative implantation of Gliadel (BCNU, carmustine) wafers in patients suffering from a multiform glioblastoma and which are to be submitted to a concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy by temozolomide according to the Stupp protocol: efficiency and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, P.; Bouchekoua, M.; Rousseau, B.; Malhaire, J.P.; Pradier, O.

    2010-01-01

    The author report a study aimed at assessing the tolerance and efficiency of a technique which has been used for some years and which comprises the implantation of Gliadel wafers in the operative bed before performing a concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by six adjuvant chemotherapy sessions with the Stupp protocol. Four women and seven men have been implanted with Gliadel wafers. Only one patient did not have the concomitant chemo-radiotherapy. The global survival and global survival without progression have been assessed. Even though the obtained results are encouraging, the concomitant chemo-radiotherapy had to be stopped for three patients due to haematological consequences. Short communication

  10. A comprehensive analysis and hardware implementation of control strategies for high output voltage DC-DC boost power converter

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar; Grandi, Gabriele; Blaabjerg, Frede; Wheeler, Patrick; Siano, Pierluigi; Hammami, Manel

    2017-01-01

    Classical DC-DC converters used in high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission systems, lack in terms of efficiency, reduced transfer gain and increased cost with sensor (voltage/current) numbers. Besides, the internal self-parasitic behavior of the power components reduces the output voltage and efficiency of classical HV converters. This paper deals with extra high-voltage (EHV) dc-dc boost converter by the application of voltage-lift technique to overcome the aforementioned defic...

  11. Buck-Boost DC-DC Converter Control by Using the Extracted Model from Signal Flow Graph Method

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadian, Leila; Babaei, Ebrahim; Bannae Sharifian, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the signal flow graph technique and Mason gain formula are applied for extracting the model and transfer functions from control to output and from input to output of a buck-boost converter. In order to investigate a controller necessity for the converter of assumed parameters, the frequency and time domain analysis are done and the open loop system characteristics are verified and the needed closed loop controlled system specifications are determined. Finally designing a contro...

  12. Early boost and slow consolidation in motor skill learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; Maertens de Noordhout, Alain; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as 5-30 min after training but no longer observed 4 h later. This early boost is predictive of the performance achieved 48 h later, suggesting its functional relevance for memory processes.

  13. Higgs boson creation in laser-boosted lepton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Sarah J.; Keitel, Christoph H.; Müller, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Electroweak processes in high-energy lepton collisions are considered in a situation where the incident center-of-mass energy lies below the reaction threshold, but is boosted to the required level by subsequent laser acceleration. Within the framework of laser-dressed quantum field theory, we study the laser-boosted process ℓ + ℓ − →HZ 0 in detail and specify the technical demands needed for its experimental realization. Further, we outline possible qualitative differences to field-free processes regarding the detection of the produced Higgs bosons.

  14. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  15. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alwakeel Jamal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macrovascular complica-tions of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1% patients (294 (47% were males who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 ± 11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 ± 7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 ± 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 ± 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%, acute coronary syndrome (36.1%, peripheral neuropathy (24.9%, myocardial infarction (24.1%, background retinopathy (22.4%, stroke (17.6%, proliferative retinopathy (11.7%, foot infection (7.3%, limb amputation (3.7% and blindness (3%. Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2% patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5% and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%. There were 148 (23.6% patients with one complication, 81 (12.9% with two, 83 (13.3% with three, and 61 (9.7% with four or more. Dete-rioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74% patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%, while 95 (15.2% developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD at the end of study and 79 (12.6% required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05. Relative risks of developing com-plications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41, MI (1.49, stroke (1.48, diabetic foot (1.6, amputation (1.58 and death (1.93. We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggre-ssive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate progression

  16. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; AlSuwaida, Abdulkareem; Isnani, Arthur C; AlHarbi, Ali; Alam Awatif

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macro vascular complications of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1%) patients (294 (47%) were males) who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 + -11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 + -7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 + - 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 + - 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%), acute coronary syndrome (36.1%), peripheral neuropathy (24.9%), myocardial infarction (24.1%), background retinopathy (22.4%), stroke (17.6%), proliferative retinopathy (11.7%), foot infection (7.3%), limb amputation (3.7%) and blindness (3%). Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2%) patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5%) and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%). There were 148 (23.6%) patients with one complication, 81 (12.9%) with two, 83 (13.3%) with three, and 61 (9.7%) with four or more. Deterioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74%) patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%), while 95 (15.2%) developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the end of study and 79 (12.6%) required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05). Relative risks of developing complications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41), MI (1.49), stroke (1.48), diabetic foot (1.6), amputation (1.58) and death (1.93). We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggressive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate

  17. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; AlSuwaida, Abdulkareem [Div. of Nephrology, Dept. of Medicine, King Khalid Univ., Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Isnani, Arthur C [Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); AlHarbi, Ali [Coll. of Medicine and Research Center, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Awatif, Alam [Div. of Nephrology, Dept. of Medicine, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macro vascular complications of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1%) patients (294 (47%) were males) who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 + -11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 + -7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 + - 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 + - 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%), acute coronary syndrome (36.1%), peripheral neuropathy (24.9%), myocardial infarction (24.1%), background retinopathy (22.4%), stroke (17.6%), proliferative retinopathy (11.7%), foot infection (7.3%), limb amputation (3.7%) and blindness (3%). Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2%) patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5%) and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%). There were 148 (23.6%) patients with one complication, 81 (12.9%) with two, 83 (13.3%) with three, and 61 (9.7%) with four or more. Deterioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74%) patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%), while 95 (15.2%) developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the end of study and 79 (12.6%) required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05). Relative risks of developing complications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41), MI (1.49), stroke (1.48), diabetic foot (1.6), amputation (1.58) and death (1.93). We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggressive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate

  18. Buck-Boost Current-Source Inverters With Diode-Inductor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Feng; Liang, Chao; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a number of novel currentsource inverters (CSIs) with enhanced current buck-boost capability. By adding a unique diode-inductor network between the inverter circuitry and current-boost elements, the proposed buck-boost CSIs demonstrate a doubling of current-boost capability......, as compared with other recently reported buck-boost CSIs. For controlling the proposed CSIs, two modulation schemes are designed for achieving either optimized harmonic performance or minimized commutation count without influencing the inverter current buck-boost gain. These theoretical findings were...

  19. Modeling and Implementing Two-Stage AdaBoost for Real-Time Vehicle License Plate Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Kyou Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available License plate (LP detection is the most imperative part of the automatic LP recognition system. In previous years, different methods, techniques, and algorithms have been developed for LP detection (LPD systems. This paper proposes to automatical detection of car LPs via image processing techniques based on classifier or machine learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose a real-time and robust method for LPD systems using the two-stage adaptive boosting (AdaBoost algorithm combined with different image preprocessing techniques. Haar-like features are used to compute and select features from LP images. The AdaBoost algorithm is used to classify parts of an image within a search window by a trained strong classifier as either LP or non-LP. Adaptive thresholding is used for the image preprocessing method applied to those images that are of insufficient quality for LPD. This method is of a faster speed and higher accuracy than most of the existing methods used in LPD. Experimental results demonstrate that the average LPD rate is 98.38% and the computational time is approximately 49 ms.

  20. OKVAR-Boost: a novel boosting algorithm to infer nonlinear dynamics and interactions in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Néhémy; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Michailidis, George; d'Alché-Buc, Florence

    2013-06-01

    Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks remains a central challenge in computational systems biology, despite recent advances facilitated by benchmark in silico challenges that have aided in calibrating their performance. A number of approaches using either perturbation (knock-out) or wild-type time-series data have appeared in the literature addressing this problem, with the latter using linear temporal models. Nonlinear dynamical models are particularly appropriate for this inference task, given the generation mechanism of the time-series data. In this study, we introduce a novel nonlinear autoregressive model based on operator-valued kernels that simultaneously learns the model parameters, as well as the network structure. A flexible boosting algorithm (OKVAR-Boost) that shares features from L2-boosting and randomization-based algorithms is developed to perform the tasks of parameter learning and network inference for the proposed model. Specifically, at each boosting iteration, a regularized Operator-valued Kernel-based Vector AutoRegressive model (OKVAR) is trained on a random subnetwork. The final model consists of an ensemble of such models. The empirical estimation of the ensemble model's Jacobian matrix provides an estimation of the network structure. The performance of the proposed algorithm is first evaluated on a number of benchmark datasets from the DREAM3 challenge and then on real datasets related to the In vivo Reverse-Engineering and Modeling Assessment (IRMA) and T-cell networks. The high-quality results obtained strongly indicate that it outperforms existing approaches. The OKVAR-Boost Matlab code is available as the archive: http://amis-group.fr/sourcecode-okvar-boost/OKVARBoost-v1.0.zip. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. How 5G Wireless (and Concomitant Technologies Will Revolutionize Healthcare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddique Latif

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The need to have equitable access to quality healthcare is enshrined in the United Nations (UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, which defines the developmental agenda of the UN for the next 15 years. In particular, the third SDG focuses on the need to “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”. In this paper, we build the case that 5G wireless technology, along with concomitant emerging technologies (such as IoT, big data, artificial intelligence and machine learning, will transform global healthcare systems in the near future. Our optimism around 5G-enabled healthcare stems from a confluence of significant technical pushes that are already at play: apart from the availability of high-throughput low-latency wireless connectivity, other significant factors include the democratization of computing through cloud computing; the democratization of Artificial Intelligence (AI and cognitive computing (e.g., IBM Watson; and the commoditization of data through crowdsourcing and digital exhaust. These technologies together can finally crack a dysfunctional healthcare system that has largely been impervious to technological innovations. We highlight the persistent deficiencies of the current healthcare system and then demonstrate how the 5G-enabled healthcare revolution can fix these deficiencies. We also highlight open technical research challenges, and potential pitfalls, that may hinder the development of such a 5G-enabled health revolution.

  2. Apolipoprotein E genotypes associated with Alzheimer disease and concomitant stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Klai, Sarra; Mrad, Meriem; Mansour, Malek; Zaouali, Jamel; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2014-04-01

    The ɛ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is a well-characterized genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). The association between stroke and a higher risk for AD has also been reported. Our study sought to determine the relationship between the APOE gene and AD and the comorbid risk of stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of 48 patients with AD and 48 members of a control group. All subjects were genotyped for APOE. The results clearly show a significant increased risk of AD in carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .003, odds ratio [OR] = 4.1) or ε4 allele (P = .001, OR = 4.2). The risk for stroke in AD patients was also increased for carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .02, OR = 9.0) and for carriers of the APOE ε4 allele (P = .004, OR = 5.5). The present study is the first to establish a relationship between APOE ε4 and concomitant AD and stroke in the Tunisian population. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiotoxicity of concomitant radiotherapy and trastuzumab for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinko, Tanja; Dolenc, Jure; Bilban-Jakopin, Cvetka

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab therapy given in combination with one of several chemotherapy regimens is currently considered the standard of care for the treatment of early-stage, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. The treatment with trastuzumab is due to a significant impact on the survival part of the standard adjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Patients treated with postoperative breast or chest wall irradiation receive trastuzumab concomitant with radiotherapy. In a small proportion of patients trastuzumab causes cardiotoxicity. Preclinical findings indicate a radiosensibilizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer cells, but it is not yet clear whether it radiosensibilizes cells of healthy tissues too. Special attention is required when left breast or left thoracic wall is irradiated in patient receiving trastuzumab, because long-term effects of the concurrent treatment with trastuzumab and radiotherapy are not yet known. In an era where more patients are surviving a diagnosis of breast cancer, better understanding and earlier detection of therapy-induced cardiac toxicity will be of paramount importance

  4. Cardiotoxicity of concomitant radiotherapy and trastuzumab for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinko, Tanja; Dolenc, Jure; Bilban-Jakopin, Cvetka

    2014-06-01

    Trastuzumab therapy given in combination with one of several chemotherapy regimens is currently considered the standard of care for the treatment of early-stage, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. The treatment with trastuzumab is due to a significant impact on the survival part of the standard adjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Patients treated with postoperative breast or chest wall irradiation receive trastuzumab concomitant with radiotherapy. In a small proportion of patients trastuzumab causes cardiotoxicity. Preclinical findings indicate a radiosensibilizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer cells, but it is not yet clear whether it radiosensibilizes cells of healthy tissues too. Special attention is required when left breast or left thoracic wall is irradiated in patient receiving trastuzumab, because long-term effects of the concurrent treatment with trastuzumab and radiotherapy are not yet known. In an era where more patients are surviving a diagnosis of breast cancer, better understanding and earlier detection of therapy-induced cardiac toxicity will be of paramount importance.

  5. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  6. Celiac Disease and Concomitant Conditions: A Case-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad Uzair; Stammann, Tracy; Kuzel, Aaron R; Syed, Intekhab Askari; Ishtiaq, Rizwan; Rahim, Mustafa

    2018-02-02

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease with genetic predisposition, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has a wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic forms to classic presentation of malabsorption with diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Celiac disease can also present with several other concomitant disorders (at the time of diagnosis or during the course of celiac disease) such as: type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disorders, nutritional deficiencies, and gram-negative sepsis. We present a 57-year-old female with past medical history of rheumatoid arthritis, who presented to the emergency department with a complaint of chronic diarrhea, complicated by gram-negative sepsis. The family history of the patient was significant for celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. The patient was closely monitored and treated appropriately. In this case-based review, we explore different associated conditions of celiac disease in the literature, as well as the patient's risk of developing malignancy.

  7. Lipid Adjustment for Chemical Exposures: Accounting for Concomitant Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daniel; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Some environmental chemical exposures are lipophilic and need to be adjusted by serum lipid levels before data analyses. There are currently various strategies that attempt to account for this problem, but all have their drawbacks. To address such concerns, we propose a new method that uses Box-Cox transformations and a simple Bayesian hierarchical model to adjust for lipophilic chemical exposures. Methods We compared our Box-Cox method to existing methods. We ran simulation studies in which increasing levels of lipid-adjusted chemical exposure did and did not increase the odds of having a disease, and we looked at both single-exposure and multiple-exposures cases. We also analyzed an epidemiology dataset that examined the effects of various chemical exposures on the risk of birth defects. Results Compared with existing methods, our Box-Cox method produced unbiased estimates, good coverage, similar power, and lower type-I error rates. This was the case in both single- and multiple-exposure simulation studies. Results from analysis of the birth-defect data differed from results using existing methods. Conclusion Our Box-Cox method is a novel and intuitive way to account for the lipophilic nature of certain chemical exposures. It addresses some of the problems with existing methods, is easily extendable to multiple exposures, and can be used in any analyses that involve concomitant variables. PMID:24051893

  8. Delirium and concomitant use of lithium+electroconvulsive therapy (ECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi M

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant use of lithium and E.C.T has always been accused to cause delirium in patients receiving such a combination. In this study incidence of delirium in patients who receive lithium+E.C.T. concurrently has been compared with those who have been treated with E.C.T. only. Of 49 patients who had Bipolar Mood Disorder (B.M.D. 1 disorder (manic episode 24 were given E.C.T.+lithium and 25 were treated with E.C.T. Only, 3 patients of the first group and 2 patients of the second group developed delirium. The difference between two groups was not statistically significant. Another finding was that all cases of delirium developed in patients who were above 35 years old (P value=0.001. These findings show that combination of E.C.T. and Lithium may not be so harmful as it was once considered. On the other hand it could be concluded that increased age may be a risk factor for delirium in such a combination.

  9. Concomitant Hamiltonian and topological structures of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingam, Manasvi, E-mail: mlingam@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Miloshevich, George, E-mail: gmilosh@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Morrison, Philip J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Common Hamiltonian structure of the extended MHD models presented. • The generalized helicities of extended MHD shown to be topological invariants analogous to fluid/magnetic helicity. • Generalized helicities can be studied through powerful topological and knot-theoretic methods such as the Jones polynomial. • Each extended MHD model shown to possess two Lie-dragged 2-forms, which are interpreted as the generalized vorticity fluxes. - Abstract: The paper describes the unique geometric properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and demonstrates how such features are inherited by extended MHD, viz. models that incorporate two-fluid effects (the Hall term and electron inertia). The generalized helicities, and other geometric expressions for these models are presented in a topological context, emphasizing their universal facets. Some of the results presented include: the generalized Kelvin circulation theorems; the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms; and two concomitant helicities that can be studied via the Jones polynomial, which is widely utilized in Chern–Simons theory. The ensuing commonality is traced to the existence of an underlying Hamiltonian structure for all the extended MHD models, exemplified by the presence of a unique noncanonical Poisson bracket, and its associated energy.

  10. BioBoost. Biomass based energy intermediates boosting bio-fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebel, Andreas [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Katalyseforschung und -technologie (IKFT)

    2013-10-01

    To increase the share of biomass for renewable energy in Europe conversion pathways which are economic, flexible in feedstock and energy efficient are needed. The BioBoost project concentrates on dry and wet residual biomass and wastes as feedstock for de-central conversion by fast pyrolysis, catalytic pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization to the intermediate energy carriers oil, coal or slurry. Based on straw the energy density increases from 2 to 20-30 GJ/m{sup 3}, enabling central GW scale gasification plants for bio-fuel production. A logistic model for feedstock supply and connection of de-central with central conversion is set up and validated allowing the determination of costs, the number and location of de-central and central sites. Techno/economic and environmental assessment of the value chain supports the optimization of products and processes. The utilization of energy carriers is investigated in existing and coming applications of heat and power production and synthetic fuels and chemicals. (orig.)

  11. Individualized planning target volumes for intrafraction motion during hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Patrick; Sixel, Katharina; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Tirona, Romeo; Pang, Geordi; Choo, Richard; Szumacher, Ewa; DeBoer, Gerrit; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to access toxicities of delivering a hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost with individualized intrafraction planning target volume (PTV) margins and daily online correction for prostate position. Methods and materials: Phase I involved delivering 42 Gy in 21 fractions using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, followed by a Phase II IMRT boost of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Digital fluoroscopy was used to measure respiratory-induced motion of implanted fiducial markers within the prostate. Electronic portal images were taken of fiducial marker positions before and after each fraction of radiotherapy during the first 9 days of treatment to calculate intrafraction motion. A uniform 10-mm PTV margin was used for the first phase of treatment. PTV margins for Phase II were patient-specific and were calculated from the respiratory and intrafraction motion data obtained from Phase I. The IMRT boost was delivered with daily online correction of fiducial marker position. Acute toxicity was measured using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: In 33 patients who had completed treatment, the average PTV margin used during the hypofractionated IMRT boost was 3 mm in the lateral direction, 3 mm in the superior-inferior direction, and 4 mm in the anteroposterior direction. No patients developed acute Grade 3 rectal toxicity. Three patients developed acute Grade 3 urinary frequency and urgency. Conclusions: PTV margins can be reduced significantly with daily online correction of prostate position. Delivering a hypofractionated boost with this high-precision IMRT technique resulted in acceptable acute toxicity

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost for gynecologic tumors: An alternative to brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, Meritxell; Escude, Lluis D.; Nouet, Philippe; Popowski, Youri D.Sc.; Hidalgo, Alberto; Rouzaud, Michel; Linero, Dolores; Miralbell, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A brachytherapy (BT) boost to the vaginal vault is considered standard treatment for many endometrial or cervical cancers. We aimed to challenge this treatment standard by using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a linac-based micromultileaf collimator technique. Methods and Materials: Since January 2002, 16 patients with either endometrial (9) or cervical (7) cancer have been treated with a final boost to the areas at higher risk for relapse. In 14 patients, the target volume included the vaginal vault, the upper vagina, the parametria, or (if not operated) the uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]). In 2 patients with local relapse, the CTV was the tumor in the vaginal stump. Margins of 6-10 mm were added to the CTV to define the planning target volume (PTV). Hypofractionated dynamic-arc or intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques were used. Postoperative treatment was delivered in 12 patients (2 x 7 Gy to the PTV with a 4-7-day interval between fractions). In the 4 nonoperated patients, a dose of 4 Gy/fraction in 5 fractions with 2 to 3 days' interval was delivered. Patients were immobilized in a customized vacuum body cast and optimally repositioned with an infrared-guided system developed for extracranial SRT. To further optimize daily repositioning and target immobilization, an inflated rectal balloon was used during each treatment fraction. In 10 patients, CT resimulation was performed before the last boost fraction to assess for repositioning reproducibility via CT-to-CT registration and to estimate PTV safety margins around the CTV. Finally, a comparative treatment planning study between BT and SRT was performed in 2 patients with an operated endometrial Stage I cancer. Results: No patient developed severe acute urinary or low-intestinal toxicity. No patient developed urinary late effects (>6 months). One patient with a vaginal relapse previously irradiated to the pelvic region presented with Grade 3 rectal bleeding 18 months after retreatment

  13. Searches with boosted objects at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Dermot Anthony

    2018-01-01

    An overview of searches for beyond the standard model physics using boosted objects is presented. The searches are based on proton-proton collision data collected with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC during the 2015 and 2016 running periods.

  14. Higher-Order Hybrid Gaussian Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we shall use higher-order hybrid Gaussian kernel in a meshsize boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. Bias reduction is guaranteed in this scheme like other existing schemes but uses the higher-order hybrid Gaussian kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. A numerical verification of this scheme ...

  15. Boosted jet identification using particle candidates and deep neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This note presents developments for the identification of hadronically decaying top quarks using deep neural networks in CMS. A new method that utilizes one dimensional convolutional neural networks based on jet constituent particles is proposed. Alternative methods using boosted decision trees based on jet observables are compared. The new method shows significant improvement in performance.

  16. Early Boost and Slow Consolidation in Motor Skill Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; de Noordhout, Alain Maertens; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motor skill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as…

  17. Modeling and Control of Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Sen, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper state space modeling and closed loop controlled operation have been presented for primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) topology as a battery charging unit. Parasitic resistances have been included to have an accurate dynamic model. The accuracy of the model has been...

  18. Search for new resonances with boosted signatures at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The LHC and its experiments are ideally suited to search for these new resonances in order to validate or constrain the corresponding theories. At resonance masses well above 1 TeV, these searches face specific challenges. The decay products have large Lorentz boosts, resulting in very collimated final state topologies. Jet substructure methods and the use of non-isolate...

  19. Multistage switched inductor boost converter for renewable energy application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroti, Pandav Kiran; Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar; Bhaskar, Mahajan Sagar

    2017-01-01

    In this paper Multistage Switched Inductor Boost Converter (Multistage SIBC) is uttered for renewable energy applications. The projected converter is derived from an amalgamation of the conventional step-up converter and inductor stack. The number of inductor and duty ratio decides the overall...

  20. Boosting food security in sub-Saharan Africa through cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boosting food security in sub-Saharan Africa through cassava production: a case study of Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Economic History ... The paper argues that cassava which is widely grown in Sub-Saharan Africa with a lot of variety of food derivatives from it can reduce to the barest minimum the present state of food ...

  1. Novel process windows, part 1: Boosted micro process technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, V.; Wang, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Novel Process Windows (NPW) is the use of highly intensified, unusual and typically harsh process conditions to boost micro process technology and flow chemistry for the production of high-added value fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, etc.. It is far from conventional processing and also from

  2. Biochar boosts tropical but not temperate crop yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, Simon; Abalos Rodriguez, Diego; Prodana, Marija; Bastos, Ana Catarina; Groenigen, van Jan Willem; Hungate, Bruce A.; Verheijen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Applying biochar to soil is thought to have multiple benefits, from helping mitigate climate change [1, 2], to managing waste [3] to conserving soil [4]. Biochar is also widely assumed to boost crop yield [5, 6], but there is controversy regarding the extent and cause of any yield benefit [7].

  3. Adaptive Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm in KDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper proposes the use of adaptive kernel in a meshsize boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. The algorithm is a bias reduction scheme like other existing schemes but uses adaptive kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. An empirical study for this scheme is conducted and the findings are comparatively ...

  4. Adaptive Kernel In The Bootstrap Boosting Algorithm In KDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper proposes the use of adaptive kernel in a bootstrap boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. The algorithm is a bias reduction scheme like other existing schemes but uses adaptive kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. An empirical study for this scheme is conducted and the findings are comparatively ...

  5. Image objects detection based on boosting neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, N.; Hegt, J.A.; Mladenov, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of object area detection of video frames. The goal is to design a pixel accurate detector for grass, which could be used for object adaptive video enhancement. A boosting neural network is used for creating such a detector. The resulted detector uses both textural

  6. Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter with Bidirectional Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Sen, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a bidirectional dc/dc converter operated with batteries both in the input and output. Primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) with transformer series connection on the high voltage side is preferred due to its ability to handle high currents in the low voltage side. ...... and output battery banks with a defined ramp....

  7. Simple grain mill boosts production and eases women's workload ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-01-11

    Jan 11, 2013 ... Simple grain mill boosts production and eases women's workload ... Farmers also like the design because, unlike other machines, it can be easily adjusted for different millet varieties and sizes. ... Local manufacturing. Discussions have begun with local entrepreneurs to manufacture the grain mill, which ...

  8. Integrated Current Balancing Transformer for Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Gökhan; Ouyang, Ziwei; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    A simple, PCB compatible integrated solution is proposed for the current balancing requirement of the primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC). Input inductor and the current balancing transformer are merged into the same core, which reduces the number of components allowing a cheaper...

  9. Award-winning machine boosts sorghum farming in Sudan | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-28

    Apr 28, 2016 ... Award-winning machine boosts sorghum farming in Sudan ... The new planter, developed by researchers at Sudan's Agricultural ... Senegal: Staying home at all costs ... This ICT4D article series features results from innovative research on participatory geographic information systems (P-GIS) in Africa.

  10. Nudging and Boosting: Steering or Empowering Good Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwig, Ralph; Grüne-Yanoff, Till

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, policy makers worldwide have begun to acknowledge the potential value of insights from psychology and behavioral economics into how people make decisions. These insights can inform the design of nonregulatory and nonmonetary policy interventions-as well as more traditional fiscal and coercive measures. To date, much of the discussion of behaviorally informed approaches has emphasized "nudges," that is, interventions designed to steer people in a particular direction while preserving their freedom of choice. Yet behavioral science also provides support for a distinct kind of nonfiscal and noncoercive intervention, namely, "boosts." The objective of boosts is to foster people's competence to make their own choices-that is, to exercise their own agency. Building on this distinction, we further elaborate on how boosts are conceptually distinct from nudges: The two kinds of interventions differ with respect to (a) their immediate intervention targets, (b) their roots in different research programs, (c) the causal pathways through which they affect behavior, (d) their assumptions about human cognitive architecture, (e) the reversibility of their effects, (f) their programmatic ambitions, and (g) their normative implications. We discuss each of these dimensions, provide an initial taxonomy of boosts, and address some possible misconceptions.

  11. Congress OKs $2 Billion Boost for the NIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    President Donald Trump last week signed a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal year 2017, including a welcome $2 billion boost for the NIH that will support former Vice President Joe Biden's Cancer Moonshot initiative, among other priorities. However, researchers who rely heavily on NIH grant funding remain concerned about proposed cuts for 2018. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Tricky treats: how and when temptations boost self-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, F.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313869871

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore how and when temptations boost self-control. More specifically, we aimed to a) replicate and extend previous findings showing that temptations yield enhanced self-control on cognitive as well as behavioral measures; b) examine the role of

  13. 438 Adaptive Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm in KDE (Pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... Birke, Melanie (2009). “Shape constrained KDE.” Journal of Statistical. Planning & Inference, vol 139, issue 8 , August 2009, pg 2851 –. 2862. Duffy, N. and Hemlbold, D. (2000). “Potential bosters? Advances in Neural info.” Proc. Sys. 12, 258 – 264. Freund, Y. (1995). “Boosting a Weak Learning Algorithm ...

  14. A nonaxial boost may reduce late complications of radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Josef, E; Mesina, C F; Choi, J; Forman, J D

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: The nonaxial external beam (NAEBT) prostate boost technique was designed to reduce late complications of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It has been previously shown that with this beam arrangement, the volumes of bladder and rectum receiving high doses could be substantially reduced. This study was undertaken to find if these advantages in dose distribution would translate into clinically significant benefits. Materials and Methods: Follow-up was obtained on 106 prostate cancer patients who had been treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy. Late complications were scored using the RTOG scale. A standard four-field axial (STD) technique had been used to deliver 45 Gy to the prostate, seminal vesicles and periprostatic lymph-nodes. A subsequent 24 Gy boost had been delivered using a STD technique (58 patients) or a NAEBT technique (48 patients). In the latter, the opposing anterior and posterior pair of beams had been substituted for a right and left anterior infero-superior pair. Actuarial probabilities of developing late complications were calculated by the life-table method. The Mantel-Haenszel test was used to compare these probabilities between the two groups. Results: The groups were comparable in regard to age, race, pretreatment serum PSA, stage distribution and dose to prostate. With a median follow-up of 21 months, 18 patients have developed grade 1-2 gastrointestinal or genitourinary complications (14 in the STD group, 4 in the NAEBT group). There were no grade 3-4 complications. The actuarial 3-year complication probability was 58% and 11% in the STD and NAEBT groups, respectively. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary complications were reduced from 12.1% to 6.2% and from 15.5% to 4.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The use of a nonaxial boost technique has resulted in fewer complications in patients treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The greater reduction

  15. Clustering Using Boosted Constrained k-Means Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Okabe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a constrained clustering algorithm with competitive performance and less computation time to the state-of-the-art methods, which consists of a constrained k-means algorithm enhanced by the boosting principle. Constrained k-means clustering using constraints as background knowledge, although easy to implement and quick, has insufficient performance compared with metric learning-based methods. Since it simply adds a function into the data assignment process of the k-means algorithm to check for constraint violations, it often exploits only a small number of constraints. Metric learning-based methods, which exploit constraints to create a new metric for data similarity, have shown promising results although the methods proposed so far are often slow depending on the amount of data or number of feature dimensions. We present a method that exploits the advantages of the constrained k-means and metric learning approaches. It incorporates a mechanism for accepting constraint priorities and a metric learning framework based on the boosting principle into a constrained k-means algorithm. In the framework, a metric is learned in the form of a kernel matrix that integrates weak cluster hypotheses produced by the constrained k-means algorithm, which works as a weak learner under the boosting principle. Experimental results for 12 data sets from 3 data sources demonstrated that our method has performance competitive to those of state-of-the-art constrained clustering methods for most data sets and that it takes much less computation time. Experimental evaluation demonstrated the effectiveness of controlling the constraint priorities by using the boosting principle and that our constrained k-means algorithm functions correctly as a weak learner of boosting.

  16. Bahrain workovers boost output, reduce operating costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R A

    1968-08-01

    An intensive workover program in Bahrain field is avoiding forced premature abandonment of wells due to casing failure. Moreover, daily oil production has been increased from 55,000-70,000 bpd by the workovers. When the current workover schedule is complete, most changes of producing zone will be accomplished by wire line work alone. The 5 zones which constitute Bahrain field's second-pay series account for 60,000 bpd (86%) of production. Many second-pay wells contain unperforated pay zones, although the majority are dual completions. With the new recompletion methods, it is possible to commingle production down-hole and make triple and quadruple completions. Moreover, gas from the gas cap is being used for continuous internal gas lift of lower zones. This technique is simply the controlled injection of free gas into production tubing via a flow-choke assembly in order to lighten the oil column and stimulate producing rates. The workover program is described.

  17. Simultaneous integrated vs. sequential boost in VMAT radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Mostafa; Molls, Michael; Astner, Sabrina; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Oechsner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    In 20 patients with high-grade gliomas, we compared two methods of planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT): simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) vs. sequential boost (SEB). The investigation focused on the analysis of dose distributions in the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs). After contouring the target volumes [planning target volumes (PTVs) and boost volumes (BVs)] and OARs, SIB planning and SEB planning were performed. The SEB method consisted of two plans: in the first plan the PTV received 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a 2-Gy dose per fraction. In the second plan the BV received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose per fraction of 2 Gy. The doses of both plans were summed up to show the total doses delivered. In the SIB method the PTV received 54 Gy in 30 fractions with a dose per fraction of 1.8 Gy, while the BV received 60 Gy in the same fraction number but with a dose per fraction of 2 Gy. All of the OARs showed higher doses (Dmax and Dmean) in the SEB method when compared with the SIB technique. The differences between the two methods were statistically significant in almost all of the OARs. Analysing the total doses of the target volumes we found dose distributions with similar homogeneities and comparable total doses. Our analysis shows that the SIB method offers advantages over the SEB method in terms of sparing OARs.

  18. Wide Temperature Range DC-DC Boost Converters for Command/Control/Drive Electronics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We shall develop wide temperature range DC-DC boost converters that can be fabricated using commercial CMOS foundries. The boost converters will increase the low...

  19. Assessment of concomitant testicular dose with radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricker, Katherine; Thompson, Christine; Meyer, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    To assess the suitability of EBT2 and XRQA2 Gafchromic film for measuring low doses in the periphery of treatment fields, and to measure the accumulative concomitant dose to the contralateral testis resulting from CT imaging, pre-treatment imaging (CBCT) and seminoma radiotherapy with and without gonadal shielding. Superficial peripheral dose measurements made using EBT2 Gafchromic film on the surface of water equivalent material were compared to measurements made with an ionisation chamber in a water phantom to evaluate the suitability and accuracy of the film dosimeter for such measurements. Similarly, XRQA2 was used to measure surface doses within a kilovoltage beam and compared with ionisation chamber measurements. Gafchromic film was used to measure CT, CBCT and seminoma treatment related testicular doses on an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses were assessed for two clinical plans, both with and without gonadal shielding. Testicular doses resulting from the treatment of up to 0.83 ± 0.17 Gy were measured per treatment. Additional doses of up to 0.49 ± 0.01 and 2.35 ± 0.05 cGy were measured per CBCT and CT image, respectively. Reductions in the testicular dose in the order of 10, 36 and 78 % were observed when gonadal shielding was fitted for treatment, CT and CBCT imaging, respectively. Gafchromic film was found to be suitable for measuring dose in the periphery of treatment fields. The dose to the testis should be limited to minimise the risk of radiation related side effects. This can be achieved by using appropriate gonadal shielding, irrespective of the treatment fields employed.

  20. [The spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, K; Aliyeva, G; Gadjiyeva, N

    2010-02-01

    The aim of research is to study of the spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis. There are 81 patients aged from 5 to 61 years (male 43, female 38) were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 group - patients treated only with bronchodilator therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 14 - with helminth, 12 - with combination of parasitosis); 2 group - patients treated with bronchodilator therapy in common with anti-parasitic therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 17 - with helminth, 10 - with combination of parasitosis). There are 22 patients with bronchoobstructive syndrome without parasites were included in control group. Functional disorders at the initial examination are not significantly distinguished between patients with protozoa, helminth, with combined parasitosis and patients without parasites. Considerable differences manifested in dynamics after treatment: only bronchodilator therapy of patients infected with parasites is not lead to sufficient increase of the indices of external respiration function, even the decreasing of the most parameters were observed in patients with helminth. The least growth of spirometric indices were observed in patients from group 1 - 2,17/ 5,09% predicted volumes (-6,81min; 10,54max), the highest growth were observed in patients from group 2 - 20,26/ 12,45% p.v. (2,77min; 43,85max). The spirographic indicators increase after treatment in the control group was more moderate in comparison with 1 and 2 groups - 5,96/ 2,97% p.v. (0,39min; 9,59max). Thus, using antiparasitic therapy in common with bronchodilator therapy in treatment of patients with intestinal parasitosis (group 2) is lead to the reliably significant positive dynamic of spirometry parameters in comparison not only to 1 group (<0,05 for many parameters) but also to control group (<0,01 for many parameters).

  1. Jet-substructure tools and boosted hadronic boson identification in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvetsov, Ivan; Mozer, Matthias; Mueller, Thomas [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), KIT (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the double central-mass energy in Run II boosted hadronic vector boson decays will be of greater importance than in Run I. One of the main challenges for the reconstruction of such hadronic decays in the coming LHC run will be increase of instantaneous luminosity which will result in a large number of additional proton-proton interactions (pileup). In particular the high pileup environment degrades the reconstruction of jet properties. In this talk the performance of several pileup mitigation tools such as charge hadron subtraction, pileup per particle identification (PUPPI) and grooming techniques is presented. Improvements of techniques for the identification of hadronically decaying vector bosons under the challenging conditions of Run II are also discussed.

  2. Boosted Jet Tagging with Jet-Images and Deep Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Michael; Oliveira, Luke de; Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Building on the jet-image based representation of high energy jets, we develop computer vision based techniques for jet tagging through the use of deep neural networks. Jet-images enabled the connection between jet substructure and tagging with the fields of computer vision and image processing. We show how applying such techniques using deep neural networks can improve the performance to identify highly boosted W bosons with respect to state-of-the-art substructure methods. In addition, we explore new ways to extract and visualize the discriminating features of different classes of jets, adding a new capability to understand the physics within jets and to design more powerful jet tagging methods

  3. 39% access time improvement, 11% energy reduction, 32 kbit 1-read/1-write 2-port static random-access memory using two-stage read boost and write-boost after read sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasue; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Kawasumi, Atsushi; Miyano, Shinji; Shinohara, Hirofumi

    2016-04-01

    We propose novel circuit techniques for 1 clock (1CLK) 1 read/1 write (1R/1W) 2-port static random-access memories (SRAMs) to improve read access time (tAC) and write margins at low voltages. Two-stage read boost (TSR-BST) and write word line boost (WWL-BST) after the read sensing schemes have been proposed. TSR-BST reduces the worst read bit line (RBL) delay by 61% and RBL amplitude by 10% at V DD = 0.5 V, which improves tAC by 39% and reduces energy dissipation by 11% at V DD = 0.55 V. WWL-BST after read sensing scheme improves minimum operating voltage (V min) by 140 mV. A 32 kbit 1CLK 1R/1W 2-port SRAM with TSR-BST and WWL-BST has been developed using a 40 nm CMOS.

  4. Desain dan Implementsi Soft Switching Boost Konverter dengan Simple Auxillary Resonant Switch (Sarc)

    OpenAIRE

    Saputra, Dimas Bagus; Suryoatmojo, Heri; Musthofa, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Boost konverter merupakan penaik tegangan DC ke tegangan DC yang mempunyai tegangan output yang lebih tinggi dibanding inputnya. Penggunaan boost konverter diera modern semakin meningkat dan dibuat dengan dimensi yang lebih kecil, berat yang lebih ringan dan efisiensi yang lebih tinggi dibanding dengan boost konverter generasi terdahulu. Tetapi rugi-rugi periodik saat on/off meningkat. Untuk meraih kriteria tersebut, teknik hard switching boost konverter berevolusi menjadi teknik soft switchi...

  5. StentBoost Visualization for the Evaluation of Coronary Stent Expansion During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Fernando; Albertal, Mariano; Candiello, Alfonsina; Nau, Gerardo; Bonvini, Victor; Tricherri, Hernan; Padilla, Lucio T.; Belardi, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate stent implantation is associated with stent thrombosis and restenosis. StentBoost can enhance stent visualization and evaluate stent expansion. Currently, there are limited comparison studies between StentBoost and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We aimed to test the correlation and agreement between IVUS and StentBoost measurements. Methods From December 2010 to December 2011, 38 patients (54 stents) were analyzed using IVUS and StentBoost. Minimal stent diameter and...

  6. Boosting physics education through mobile augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crǎciun, Dana; Bunoiu, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-12-01

    The integration of collaborative applications, based on modern learning technologies and the Internet, of various visualization techniques and digital strategies in open, flexible modern learning environments which facilitate access to resources, represents a challenge for physics teachers in Romania in general, and for novice teachers in particular. Although large efforts have been made worldwide to invest in educational technologies, their impact on the students' learning outcomes is quite modest. In this paper, we describe and analyze various curricular and extracurricular activities specifically designed for and undertaken by pre-service physics teachers. These activities employ new educational technologies, mobile augmented reality (MAR) and are based on modern teaching and learning theories. MAR is an extension for mobile devices of augmented reality, an interactive and in real time combination, of real and virtual objects overlaid in the real environment. The obtained results show that pre-service physics teachers are confident in using MAR in their teaching and learning activities, and consider that the activities performed helped them develop the skills necessary for science teachers in a technology-based society and to reflect upon the role of technology in the current Romanian educational context.

  7. Significant clinical differences in primary hyperparathyroidism between patients with and those without concomitant thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masatsugu, Toshihiro; Kuroki, Syoji; Tanaka, Masao

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the differences in diagnosis and treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) in patients with and those without concomitant thyroid disease. One hundred and ten patients with pHPT underwent parathyroid localization and thyroid examination by ultrasonography (US) and sestamibi scintigraphy (MIBI). The clinical and biochemical findings, parathyroid localization, and operations performed were compared in 49 patients without thyroid disease and 61 patients with thyroid disease. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia was significantly more prevalent in patients with concomitant thyroid disease (88.5%) than in those without thyroid disease (49.0%) (P<0.01). The mean serum calcium was significantly higher and the inorganic phosphate level was significantly lower in patients without concomitant thyroid disease than in those with concomitant thyroid disease (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively). The pathologic parathyroid gland was identified significantly more often in patients without concomitant thyroid disease than in those with concomitant thyroid disease both by US and MIBI (P<0.05). Unilateral exploration was performed more often in patients without thyroid disease than in those with thyroid disease (P<0.01). Primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed at an earlier stage in patients with concomitant thyroid disease. Thyroid disease concomitant with pHPT influenced parathyroid localization as well as the indication for minimally invasive parathyroidectomy. (author)

  8. Apixaban vs. warfarin with concomitant aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, J.H.; Lopes, R.D.; Thomas, L.; Alings, M.; Atar, D.; Aylward, P.; Goto, S.; Hanna, M.; Huber, K.; Husted, S.; Lewis, B.S.; McMurray, J.J.; Pais, P.; Pouleur, H.; Steg, P.G.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Granger, C.B.; Wallentin, L.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: We assessed the effect of concomitant aspirin use on the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: In ARISTOTLE, 18 201 patients were randomized to apixaban 5 mg twice daily or warfarin. Concomitant aspirin use was

  9. Single Phase Transformer-less Buck-Boost Inverter with Zero Leakage Current for PV Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostaan, Ali; Abdelhakim, Ahmed; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel single-stage single-phase transformer-less buck-boost inverter is proposed, in which a reduced number of passive components is used. The proposed inverter combines the conventional buck, boost, and buck-boost converters in one converter in order to obtain a sinusoidal output...

  10. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  11. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  12. Neural Network Based Maximum Power Point Tracking Control with Quadratic Boost Converter for PMSG—Wind Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Tiwari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an artificial neural network (ANN based maximum power point tracking (MPPT control strategy for wind energy conversion system (WECS implemented with a DC/DC converter. The proposed topology utilizes a radial basis function network (RBFN based neural network control strategy to extract the maximum available power from the wind velocity. The results are compared with a classical Perturb and Observe (P&O method and Back propagation network (BPN method. In order to achieve a high voltage rating, the system is implemented with a quadratic boost converter and the performance of the converter is validated with a boost and single ended primary inductance converter (SEPIC. The performance of the MPPT technique along with a DC/DC converter is demonstrated using MATLAB/Simulink.

  13. Searches for diboson resonances with boosted W/Z boson tagging with the ATLAS detector at LHC Run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Delitzsch, Chris Malena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resonant production of two electroweak gauge bosons (WW, WZ, ZZ) is a smoking gun signature for physics beyond the Standard Model, and various possibilities resulting in such signatures have been proposed, e.g. Extended Gauge Models with heavy charged/neutral bosons (W', Z'), bulk Randall-Sundum excitation of the graviton (G*) in extra dimensions, and strongly coupled theories such as Technicolor (e.g. techni-rho meson). Searches for such high-mass resonances can obtain a significant sensitivity gain by exploiting techniques to identify the hadronic decay of boosted W and Z bosons. This talk summarizes ATLAS searches for diboson resonances in final states including hadronic jets with boosted W/Z boson tagging at LHC Run 1.

  14. PI and Fuzzy Control Strategies for High Voltage Output DC-DC Boost Power Converter - Hardware Implementation and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padmanaban, Sanjeevi Kumar; Blaabjerg, Frede; Siano, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the control strategies by Proportional-Integral (P-I) and Fuzzy Logic (FL) for a DC-DC boost power converter for high output voltage configuration. Standard DC-DC converters are traditionally used for high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission systems. But, lack its...... converter with inbuilt voltage-lift technique and overcome the aforementioned deficiencies. Further, the control strategy is adapted based on proportional-integral (P-I) and fuzzy logic, closed-loop controller to regulate the outputs and ensure the performances. Complete hardware prototype of EHV converter...... performances in terms of efficiency, reduced transfer gain and increased cost with sensor units. Moreover, the internal self-parasitic components reduce the output voltage and efficiency of classical high voltage converters (HVC). This investigation focused on extra high-voltage (EHV) DC-DC boost power...

  15. Studying the effect of over-modulation on the output voltage of three-phase single-stage grid-connected boost inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abbas Elserougi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage boosting is very essential issue in renewable-energy fed applications. The classical two-stage power conversion process is typically used to interface the renewable energy sources to the grid. For better efficiency, single-stage inverters are recommended. In this paper, the performance of single-stage three-phase grid-connected boost inverter is investigated when its gain is extended by employing over-modulation technique. Using of over-modulation is compared with the employment of third order harmonic injection. The latter method can increase the inverter gain by 15% without distorting the inverter output voltage. The performance of extended gain grid-connected boost inverter is also tested during normal operation as well as in the presence of grid side disturbances. Simulation and experimental results are satisfactory.

  16. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; van Os, Rob M; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2016-03-18

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55-60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers.

  17. Conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation and integrated boost in the head and neck cancers: experience of the Curie Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, I.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.; Graff, P.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.

    2009-01-01

    The modulated intensity radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) is used in the treatment of cancers in superior aero digestive tracts to reduce the irradiation of parotids and to reduce the delayed xerostomia. This retrospective study presents the results got on the fourteen first patients according an original technique of I.M.R.T. with integrated boost. It appears that this technique is feasible and allows to reduce the xerostomia rate without modifying the local control rate. To limit the average dose to the parotids under 30 Gy seems reduce the incidence of severe xerostomia. (N.C.)

  18. ATLAS Jet Reconstruction, Calibration, and Tagging of Lorentz-boosted Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet reconstruction in the ATLAS detector takes multiple forms, as motivated by the intended usage of the jet. Different jet definitions are used in particular for the study of QCD jets and jets containing the hadronic decay of boosted massive particles. These different types of jets are calibrated through a series of mostly sequential steps, providing excellent uncertainties, including a first in situ calibration of the jet mass scale. Jet tagging is investigated, including both not-top-quark vs gluon discrimination as well as W/Z boson, H$\\to$bb, and top-quark identification. This includes a first look at the use of Boosted Decision Trees and Deep Neural Networks built from jet substructure variables, as well as Convolutional Neural Networks built from jet images. In all cases, these advanced techniques are seen to provide gains over the standard approaches, with the magnitude of the gain depending on the use case. Future methods for improving jet tagging are briefly discussed, including jet substructure-ori...

  19. Results of aortic root reimplantation in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The research was designed to evaluate the results of valve-sparing operations: aortic root reimplantation versus aortic valve reimplantation when repairing an ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods. Within a blind prospective randomized study conducted over a period from 2011 to 2015, 64 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery. The inclusion criteria were the presence of an aortic aneurysm of the ascending aorta exceeding 4.5 cm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. All patients were divided into two groups: FS-group, aortic root reimplantation (modified Florida Sleeve technique (n = 32 and D-group, aortic valve reimplantation (David procedure (n = 32. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23–73 years in the FS-group and 55±11 (15–72 years in the D-group (p = 0.54. Both groups had 78% of males (p>0.99. A Marfan syndrome was identified in 6% and 9% in the FS-group and D-group respectively (p>0.99. Mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 51±7 mm and 56±10 mm (p = 0.09, aortic insufficiency 2.6±0.7 and 2.8±0.8 (p = 0.15 in the FS-group and D-group respectively. In the FS-group and D-group LVEDD amounted to 5.5±0.7 mm and 5.9±1.0 mm (p = 0.09 respectively. All patients took echocardiography in the preoperative, postoperative and follow-up periods.Results. In the long-term period, the degree of aortic regurgitation was 1.2±0.1 in the FS-group and 1.3±0.6 in the D-group (p = 0.72. LVEDD was 123±23 mm in the FS-group and 139.6±80 mm in the D-group at follow-up (p = 0.77. There were no statistically significant differences in the analysis of complications. Overall 30-day in-hospital mortality was 7.8%. There were 2 (6.3% deaths in the FS-group and 3 (9.4% in the D-group (p = 0.5.Late mortality was 6.3% in the FS-group and 3.1% in the D-group (p>0.99. Cumulative survival at 4 years was 84.3% and 84.8% in the FS-group and the D-group respectively (p = 0.94. Cumulative freedom from

  20. Black brane entropy and hydrodynamics: The boost-invariant case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Spalinski, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The framework of slowly evolving horizons is generalized to the case of black branes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spaces in arbitrary dimensions. The results are used to analyze the behavior of both event and apparent horizons in the gravity dual to boost-invariant flow. These considerations are motivated by the fact that at second order in the gradient expansion the hydrodynamic entropy current in the dual Yang-Mills theory appears to contain an ambiguity. This ambiguity, in the case of boost-invariant flow, is linked with a similar freedom on the gravity side. This leads to a phenomenological definition of the entropy of black branes. Some insights on fluid/gravity duality and the definition of entropy in a time-dependent setting are elucidated.

  1. Closed-loop waveform control of boost inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guo Rong; Xiao, Cheng Yuan; Wang, Haoran

    2016-01-01

    The input current of single-phase inverter typically has an AC ripple component at twice the output frequency, which causes a reduction in both the operating lifetime of its DC source and the efficiency of the system. In this paper, the closed-loop performance of a proposed waveform control method...... to eliminate such a ripple current in boost inverter is investigated. The small-signal stability and the dynamic characteristic of the inverter system for input voltage or wide range load variations under the closed-loop waveform control method are studied. It is validated that with the closedloop waveform...... control, not only was stability achieved, the reference voltage of the boost inverter capacitors can be instantaneously adjusted to match the new load, thereby achieving improved ripple mitigation for a wide load range. Furthermore, with the control and feedback mechanism, there is minimal level of ripple...

  2. Boosting bonsai trees for handwritten/printed text discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricquebourg, Yann; Raymond, Christian; Poirriez, Baptiste; Lemaitre, Aurélie; Coüasnon, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    Boosting over decision-stumps proved its efficiency in Natural Language Processing essentially with symbolic features, and its good properties (fast, few and not critical parameters, not sensitive to over-fitting) could be of great interest in the numeric world of pixel images. In this article we investigated the use of boosting over small decision trees, in image classification processing, for the discrimination of handwritten/printed text. Then, we conducted experiments to compare it to usual SVM-based classification revealing convincing results with very close performance, but with faster predictions and behaving far less as a black-box. Those promising results tend to make use of this classifier in more complex recognition tasks like multiclass problems.

  3. Soft switching PWM isolated boost converter for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, M.; Adib, E. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation introduced a newly developed soft switching, isolated boost type converter for fuel cell applications. With a simple PWM control circuit, the converter achieves zero voltage switching the main switch. Since the auxiliary circuit is soft switched, the converter can operate at high powers which make it suitable for fuel cell applications. In particular, the converter is suitable for the interface of fuel cell and inverters because of its high voltage gain and isolation between input and output sources. In addition, the input current of the converter (current drained from the fuel cell) is almost constant since it is a boost type converter. The converter was analyzed and the simulation results validate the theoretical analysis.

  4. Boosted H­->bb Tagger In Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sahinsoy, Merve; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Several searches for Higgs bosons decaying to b­quark pairs benefit from the increased Run II centre­of­mass energy by exploiting the large transvers­momentum (boosted) Higgs boson regime, where the two b­jets are merged into one large­radius jet. ATLAS uses a boosted H­>bb tagger algorithm to separate the Higgs signal from the background processes (QCD, W and Z bosons, top quarks). The tagger takes as input a large­R=1.0 jet calibrating the pseudorapidity, energy and mass scale. The tagger employs b­tagging, Higgs candidate mass, and substructure information. The performance of several operating points in Higgs boson signal and QCD and ttbar all­hadronic backgrounds are presented. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated so that this tagger can be used in analyses.

  5. Feasibility of an Adaptive Strategy in Preoperative Radiochemotherapy for Rectal Cancer With Image-Guided Tomotherapy: Boosting the Dose to the Shrinking Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passoni, Paolo; Fiorino, Claudio; Slim, Najla; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Di Palo, Saverio; De Nardi, Paola; Orsenigo, Elena; Tamburini, Andrea; De Cobelli, Francesco; Losio, Claudio; Iacovelli, Nicola A.; Broggi, Sara; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m 2 on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m 2 /d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV) defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV adapt was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV adapt while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV adapt . Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or cCR rates

  6. The chinese nuclear prepare its boosting on a large scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemain, A.

    2004-01-01

    The CNDR (state commission for the development and the reform) defined a long-dated plan for the nuclear energy. In 2020 the chinese reactor will reach a capacity of 36000 M watts. To realize this objective the China had to build two reactors every two years from 2004 to 2020. The chinese nuclear industry and the boost program are analyzed, in particular the choice of the reactor technology. (A.L.B.)

  7. Motivating quantum field theory: the boosted particle in a box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vutha, Amar C

    2013-01-01

    It is a maxim often stated, yet rarely illustrated, that the combination of special relativity and quantum mechanics necessarily leads to quantum field theory. An elementary illustration is provided using the familiar particle in a box, boosted to relativistic speeds. It is shown that quantum fluctuations of momentum lead to energy fluctuations, which are inexplicable without a framework that endows the vacuum with dynamical degrees of freedom and allows particle creation/annihilation. (letters and comments)

  8. Designing signal-enriched triggers for boosted jets.

    CERN Document Server

    Toumazou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Triggers designed to favour the selection of hadronically decaying massive particles have been studied. Both triggers using solely ET and mass cuts (similar to new 2017 triggers) and triggers exploiting polarization information have been studied. The mass cut triggers show substantial gains in rate reduction, while the benefits of polarization triggers are less obvious. The final conclusion is that it is more useful to identify and trigger on generic boosted decays, irrespective of the polarization of the decaying particle

  9. Passive vs Active Knowledge Transfer: boosting grant proposal impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Murphy, David

    2017-01-01

    Research funders are increasingly concerned with measurable socio-economic impact of investment in research, and on increasingly shorter timescales. Innovation, and “open innovation” are the policy priorities of the moment and optimising the flow of ideas along the lab-2-market spectrum...... is essential for re-use of results, fuelling open innovation, and boosting socio-economic impact or public funded research....

  10. Optimal infrastructure selection to boost regional sustainable economy

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Utrillas, Manuel Guzmán; Juan-Garcia, F.; Cantó Perelló, Julián; Curiel Esparza, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The role of infrastructures in boosting the economic growth of the regions is widely recognized. In many cases, an infrastructure is selected by subjective reasons. Selection of the optimal infrastructure for sustainable economic development of a region should be based on objective and founded reasons, not only economical, but also environmental and social. In this paper is developed such selection through a hybrid method based on Delphi, analytical hierarchy process (AHP), and VIKOR (from Se...

  11. Boosting structured additive quantile regression for longitudinal childhood obesity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Nora; Fahrmeir, Ludwig; Hothorn, Torsten; Rzehak, Peter; Höhle, Michael

    2013-07-25

    Childhood obesity and the investigation of its risk factors has become an important public health issue. Our work is based on and motivated by a German longitudinal study including 2,226 children with up to ten measurements on their body mass index (BMI) and risk factors from birth to the age of 10 years. We introduce boosting of structured additive quantile regression as a novel distribution-free approach for longitudinal quantile regression. The quantile-specific predictors of our model include conventional linear population effects, smooth nonlinear functional effects, varying-coefficient terms, and individual-specific effects, such as intercepts and slopes. Estimation is based on boosting, a computer intensive inference method for highly complex models. We propose a component-wise functional gradient descent boosting algorithm that allows for penalized estimation of the large variety of different effects, particularly leading to individual-specific effects shrunken toward zero. This concept allows us to flexibly estimate the nonlinear age curves of upper quantiles of the BMI distribution, both on population and on individual-specific level, adjusted for further risk factors and to detect age-varying effects of categorical risk factors. Our model approach can be regarded as the quantile regression analog of Gaussian additive mixed models (or structured additive mean regression models), and we compare both model classes with respect to our obesity data.

  12. Boosted dark matter signals uplifted with self-interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Kyoungchul, E-mail: kckong@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Mohlabeng, Gopolang, E-mail: mohlabeng319@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Park, Jong-Chul, E-mail: log1079@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-09

    We explore detection prospects of a non-standard dark sector in the context of boosted dark matter. We focus on a scenario with two dark matter particles of a large mass difference, where the heavier candidate is secluded and interacts with the standard model particles only at loops, escaping existing direct and indirect detection bounds. Yet its pair annihilation in the galactic center or in the Sun may produce boosted stable particles, which could be detected as visible Cherenkov light in large volume neutrino detectors. In such models with multiple candidates, self-interaction of dark matter particles is naturally utilized in the assisted freeze-out mechanism and is corroborated by various cosmological studies such as N-body simulations of structure formation, observations of dwarf galaxies, and the small scale problem. We show that self-interaction of the secluded (heavier) dark matter greatly enhances the capture rate in the Sun and results in promising signals at current and future experiments. We perform a detailed analysis of the boosted dark matter events for Super-Kamiokande, Hyper-Kamiokande and PINGU, including notable effects such as evaporation due to self-interaction and energy loss in the Sun.

  13. Shrinkage Degree in $L_{2}$ -Rescale Boosting for Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Lin, Shaobo; Wang, Yao; Xu, Zongben

    2017-08-01

    L 2 -rescale boosting ( L 2 -RBoosting) is a variant of L 2 -Boosting, which can essentially improve the generalization performance of L 2 -Boosting. The key feature of L 2 -RBoosting lies in introducing a shrinkage degree to rescale the ensemble estimate in each iteration. Thus, the shrinkage degree determines the performance of L 2 -RBoosting. The aim of this paper is to develop a concrete analysis concerning how to determine the shrinkage degree in L 2 -RBoosting. We propose two feasible ways to select the shrinkage degree. The first one is to parameterize the shrinkage degree and the other one is to develop a data-driven approach. After rigorously analyzing the importance of the shrinkage degree in L 2 -RBoosting, we compare the pros and cons of the proposed methods. We find that although these approaches can reach the same learning rates, the structure of the final estimator of the parameterized approach is better, which sometimes yields a better generalization capability when the number of sample is finite. With this, we recommend to parameterize the shrinkage degree of L 2 -RBoosting. We also present an adaptive parameter-selection strategy for shrinkage degree and verify its feasibility through both theoretical analysis and numerical verification. The obtained results enhance the understanding of L 2 -RBoosting and give guidance on how to use it for regression tasks.

  14. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Uc-Cetina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1 Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2 AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods.

  15. Perinatal Outcomes in HIV Positive Pregnant Women with Concomitant Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Burnett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate whether HIV infected pregnant women with concomitant sexually transmitted infection (STIs are at increased risk of adverse perinatal and neonatal outcomes. Methods. We conducted a cohort study of HIV positive women who delivered at an inner-city hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, from 2003 to 2013. Demographics, presence of concomitant STIs, prenatal care information, and maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected. The outcomes examined were the association of the presence of concomitant STIs on the risk of preterm birth (PTB, postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low Apgar scores, and neonatal intensive care admission. Multiple logistic regression was performed to adjust for potential confounders. Results. HIV positive pregnant women with concomitant STIs had an increased risk of spontaneous PTB (odds ratio (OR 2.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12–3.97. After adjusting for a history of preterm birth, maternal age, and low CD4+ count at prenatal care entry the association between concomitant STIs and spontaneous PTB persisted (adjusted OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.01–3.78. Conclusions. HIV infected pregnant women with concomitant STIs relative to HIV positive pregnant women without a concomitant STI are at increased risk of spontaneous PTB.

  16. Repeat Operation for Pseudoaneurysm of Left Ventricular Outflow in a Patient with Concomitant Takayasu’s Arteritis and Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Arakaki, Katsuya; Nagano, Takaaki; Kise, Yuya

    2011-01-01

    We describe concomitant Marfan syndrome and Takayasu’s arteritis complicating a pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricular outflow that developed after aortic root reconstruction. A patient was admitted with a high fever four months after initial root reconstruction that included valve sparing (reimplantation) as well as coronary artery reconstruction using a Carrel’s button technique. Computed tomography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the posterior side of the aortic root. We applied a modified Bentall procedure including coronary artery reconstruction using the Piehler technique. Pathological assessment of a specimen of the aorta revealed no central medial necrosis, but significant lymphocytic infiltration and thick fibrous adventitia indicating Takayasu’s arteritis. This case was unique in terms of having simultaneous Takayasu’s arteritis and cardiovascular manifestations of Marfan syndrome that were surgically treated. PMID:23555475

  17. Repeat Operation for Pseudoaneurysm of Left Ventricular Outflow in a Patient with Concomitant Takayasu's Arteritis and Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Arakaki, Katsuya; Nagano, Takaaki; Kise, Yuya

    2011-01-01

    We describe concomitant Marfan syndrome and Takayasu's arteritis complicating a pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricular outflow that developed after aortic root reconstruction. A patient was admitted with a high fever four months after initial root reconstruction that included valve sparing (reimplantation) as well as coronary artery reconstruction using a Carrel's button technique. Computed tomography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the posterior side of the aortic root. We applied a modified Bentall procedure including coronary artery reconstruction using the Piehler technique. Pathological assessment of a specimen of the aorta revealed no central medial necrosis, but significant lymphocytic infiltration and thick fibrous adventitia indicating Takayasu's arteritis. This case was unique in terms of having simultaneous Takayasu's arteritis and cardiovascular manifestations of Marfan syndrome that were surgically treated.

  18. Experimental investigation of the concomitant injection of gasoline and CNG in a turbocharged spark ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni Movahed, M.; Basirat Tabrizi, H.; Mirsalim, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Concomitant injection of gasoline and CNG is compared with gasoline and CNG modes. • BSFC, HC and CO emissions of the concomitant injection are lower than gasoline mode. • Deteriorations of the concomitant injection are negligible compared to gasoline mode. • Cylinder peak pressure and heat loss to coolant of the concomitant injection are lower than CNG mode. • Some shortcomings in CNG mode can be solved by changing the spark timing and lambda. - Abstract: Concomitant injection of gasoline and CNG is a new concept to overcome problems of bi-fueled spark ignition engines, which operate in single fuel mode, either in gasoline or in CNG mode. This experimental study indicates how some problems of gasoline mode such as retarded ignition timings for knock prevention and rich air–fuel mixture for component protection can be resolved with the concomitant injection of gasoline and CNG. Results clearly show that the concomitant injection improves thermal efficiency compared to gasoline mode. On the other hand, simultaneous injection of gasoline and CNG reduces some problems of CNG mode such as high cylinder pressure and heat loss to the engine coolant. This decreases the stringent requirements for thermal and mechanical strength of the engine components in CNG mode. In addition, it is shown that by modifying the spark advance and air fuel ratio in CNG mode, the engine operation improves in terms of NOx emissions and maximum in-cylinder pressure as the concomitant injection does. Nevertheless, new requirements such as an intercooler with higher cooling capacity are implied to the engine configuration. Finally, the most important concerns in control strategies of the engine control unit for a vehicle with concomitant injection of gasoline and CNG are discussed

  19. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies associated with acute and chronic grade III and grade V acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gunnar; Millett, Peter J; Tahal, Dimitri S; Al Ibadi, Mireille; Lill, Helmut; Katthagen, Jan Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies with acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III and V. Patients who underwent arthroscopically-assisted stabilization of acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III or grade V between 01/2007 and 12/2015 were identified in the patient databases of two surgical centres. Gender, age at index surgery, grade of acromioclavicular joint injury (Rockwood III or Rockwood V), and duration between injury and index surgery (classified as acute or chronic) were of interest. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies were noted and their treatment was classified as debridement or reconstructive procedure. A total of 376 patients (336 male, 40 female) were included. Mean age at time of arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction surgery was 42.1 ± 14.0 years. Overall, 201 patients (53%) had one or more concomitant glenohumeral pathologies. Lesions of the biceps tendon complex and rotator cuff were the most common. Forty-five patients (12.0%) had concomitant glenohumeral pathologies that required an additional repair. The remaining 156 patients (41.5%) received a debridement of their concomitant pathologies. Rockwood grade V compared to Rockwood grade III (p = 0.013; odds ratio 1.7), and chronic compared to acute injury were significantly associated with having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology (p = 0.019; odds ratio 1.7). The probability of having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology was also significantly associated with increasing age (p acromioclavicular joint injury of either grade III or V. Twenty-two percent of these patients with concomitant glenohumeral pathologies received an additional dedicated repair procedure. Although a significant difference in occurrence of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies was seen between Rockwood grades III and V, and between acute and chronic lesions, increasing age was identified as the most dominant predictor. Level IV, case series.

  20. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a simple form of posterior spinal surgery for patients with tuberculous ... malnutrition and other concomitant diseases tuberculosis (T B) of ... Positioning: We use the prone position with hip and .... can fracture, get absorbed or slip.

  1. Concomitant Persistent Pain in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia – Evidence for Different Subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Gozalov, Aydin; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

    and clinical importance of concomitant persistent pain in TN. This has led to subgrouping of TN into forms with and without concomitant persistent pain in the recent 3rd International Classification of Headache Disorders beta classification. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data on the clinical...... to sodium channel blockers (P = .001). There were no significant differences in other clinical characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant persistent pain is very prevalent in TN and is not a consequence of paroxysmal pain. Findings support that the 3rd International Classification of Headache Disorders beta...

  2. Biological effects of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical factors. (Experimental research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Remote consequences of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical hazards substances, modeling the ecological situation at the territory of the Altaj region after the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk test site is studied on the mice. Negative effect of the concomitant impact of radioactive and hazardous chemical substances on the basic morpho-functional systems of animals is revealed; the reproduction function proved to be the most sensitive one. It is noted that the radiation factor constitutes the basis of all violations of bone marrow blood-producing function by concomitant influence

  3. Cardiovascular outcomes associated with concomitant use of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Fang; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Gau, Churn-Shiouh

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Our study aimed to examine the impact of concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with clopidogrel on the cardiovascular outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Furthermore, we sought to quantify the effects of five individual PPIs when used concomitantly with clopidogrel. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients who were newly hospitalized for ACS between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2007 retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) and who were prescribed clopidogrel (n= 37 099) during the follow-up period. A propensity score technique was used to establish a matched cohort in 1:1 ratio (n= 5173 for each group). The primary clinical outcome was rehospitalization for ACS, while secondary outcomes were rehospitalization for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) with stent, PTCA without stent and revascularization (PTCA or coronary artery bypass graft surgery) after the discharge date for the index ACS event. RESULTS The adjusted hazard ratio of rehospitalization for ACS was 1.052 (95% confidence interval, 0.971–1.139; P= 0.214) in the propensity score matched cohort. Among all PPIs, only omeprazole was found to be statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for ACS (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.226; 95% confidence interval, 1.066–1.410; P= 0.004). Concomitant use of esomeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and lansoprazole did not increase the risk. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicated no statistically significant increase in the risk of rehospitalization for ACS due to concurrent use of clopidogrel and PPIs overall. Among individual PPIs, only omeprazole was found to be statistically significantly associated with increased risk of rehospitalization for ACS. PMID:22364155

  4. A Sensorless Predictive Current Controlled Boost Converter by Using an EKF with Load Variation Effect Elimination Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qiaoling; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Qiao; Zou, Xuecheng

    2015-04-28

    To realize accurate current control for a boost converter, a precise measurement of the inductor current is required to achieve high resolution current regulating. Current sensors are widely used to measure the inductor current. However, the current sensors and their processing circuits significantly contribute extra hardware cost, delay and noise to the system. They can also harm the system reliability. Therefore, current sensorless control techniques can bring cost effective and reliable solutions for various boost converter applications. According to the derived accurate model, which contains a number of parasitics, the boost converter is a nonlinear system. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for inductor current estimation and output voltage filtering. With this approach, the system can have the same advantages as sensored current control mode. To implement EKF, the load value is necessary. However, the load may vary from time to time. This can lead to errors of current estimation and filtered output voltage. To solve this issue, a load variation elimination effect elimination (LVEE) module is added. In addition, a predictive average current controller is used to regulate the current. Compared with conventional voltage controlled system, the transient response is greatly improved since it only takes two switching cycles for the current to reach its reference. Finally, experimental results are presented to verify the stable operation and output tracking capability for large-signal transients of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Evaluation of the concomitant use of two different EIA tests for HIV screening in blood banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otani Marcia M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In 1998, the Brazilian Ministry of Health made it mandatory for all blood banks in the country to screen donated blood for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV concomitantly using two different enzyme immunoassay (EIA tests. Concerned with the best use of available resources, our objective with this study was to evaluate the usefulness of conducting two EIA screening tests instead of just one. METHODS: We analyzed data from 1999 through 2001 obtained by testing 698 191 units of donated blood using two EIA HIV screening tests concomitantly at the Pro-Blood Foundation/Blood Center of São Paulo (Fundação Pró-Sangue/Hemocentro de São Paulo, which is a major blood center in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. All samples reactive in at least one of the two EIA tests were submitted for confirmation by a Western blot (WB test, and the persons who had donated those samples were also asked to return and provide a follow-up sample. RESULTS: Out of the 698 191 blood units that were donated, 2 718 of them (0.4% had to be discarded because they were reactive to at least one of the EIA tests. There were two WB-positive donation samples that were reactive in only one HIV EIA screening test. On their follow-up samples, both donors tested WB-negative. These cases were considered false positive results at screening. Of the 2 718 donors who were asked to return and provide a follow-up sample, 1 576 of them (58% did so. From these 1 576 persons, we found that there were two individuals who had been reactive to only one of the two EIA screening tests and who had also been negative on the WB at screening but who were fully seroconverted on the follow-up sample. We thus estimated that, in comparison to the use of a single EIA screening test, the use of two EIA screening tests would detect only one extra sample out of 410 700 units of blood. CONCLUSIONS: Our data do not support the use of two different, concomitant EIA screening tests for HIV. The great

  6. Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT Pada Sistem Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Angin Menggunakan Buck-Boost Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Otong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the implementation of the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT technique is developed using buck-boost converter. Perturb and observe (P&O MPPT algorithm is used to searching maximum power from the wind power plant for charging of the battery. The model used in this study is the Variable Speed Wind Turbine (VSWT with a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG. Analysis, design, and modeling of wind energy conversion system has done using MATLAB/simulink. The simulation results show that the proposed MPPT produce a higher output power than the system without MPPT. The average efficiency that can be achieved by the proposed system to transfer the maximum power into battery is 90.56%.

  7. The Decoy Effect as a Nudge: Boosting Hand Hygiene With a Worse Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Sun, Yan; Chen, Hui

    2018-05-01

    This article provides the first test of the decoy effect as a nudge to influence real-world behavior. The decoy effect is the phenomenon that an additional but worse option can boost the appeal of an existing option. It has been widely demonstrated in hypothetical choices, but its usefulness in real-world settings has been subject to debate. In three longitudinal experiments in food-processing factories, we tested two decoy sanitation options that were worse than the existing sanitizer spray bottle. Results showed that the presence of a decoy, but not an additional copy of the original sanitizer bottle in a different color, drastically increased food workers' hand sanitizer use from the original sanitizer bottle and, consequently, improved workers' passing rate in hand sanitary tests from 60% to 70% to above 90% for 20 days. These findings indicate that the decoy effect can be a powerful nudge technique to influence real-world behavior.

  8. Prediction of novel pre-microRNAs with high accuracy through boosting and SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Yang, Yifan; Zhang, Huan; Jiang, Xiaohua; Xu, Bo; Xue, Yu; Cao, Yunxia; Zhai, Qian; Zhai, Yong; Xu, Mingqing; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-05-15

    High-throughput deep-sequencing technology has generated an unprecedented number of expressed short sequence reads, presenting not only an opportunity but also a challenge for prediction of novel microRNAs. To verify the existence of candidate microRNAs, we have to show that these short sequences can be processed from candidate pre-microRNAs. However, it is laborious and time consuming to verify these using existing experimental techniques. Therefore, here, we describe a new method, miRD, which is constructed using two feature selection strategies based on support vector machines (SVMs) and boosting method. It is a high-efficiency tool for novel pre-microRNA prediction with accuracy up to 94.0% among different species. miRD is implemented in PHP/PERL+MySQL+R and can be freely accessed at http://mcg.ustc.edu.cn/rpg/mird/mird.php.

  9. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  10. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  11. SCALCE: boosting sequence compression algorithms using locally consistent encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hach, Faraz; Numanagic, Ibrahim; Alkan, Can; Sahinalp, S Cenk

    2012-12-01

    The high throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for the computational infrastructure. Data management, storage and analysis have become major logistical obstacles for those adopting the new platforms. The requirement for large investment for this purpose almost signalled the end of the Sequence Read Archive hosted at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which holds most of the sequence data generated world wide. Currently, most HTS data are compressed through general purpose algorithms such as gzip. These algorithms are not designed for compressing data generated by the HTS platforms; for example, they do not take advantage of the specific nature of genomic sequence data, that is, limited alphabet size and high similarity among reads. Fast and efficient compression algorithms designed specifically for HTS data should be able to address some of the issues in data management, storage and communication. Such algorithms would also help with analysis provided they offer additional capabilities such as random access to any read and indexing for efficient sequence similarity search. Here we present SCALCE, a 'boosting' scheme based on Locally Consistent Parsing technique, which reorganizes the reads in a way that results in a higher compression speed and compression rate, independent of the compression algorithm in use and without using a reference genome. Our tests indicate that SCALCE can improve the compression rate achieved through gzip by a factor of 4.19-when the goal is to compress the reads alone. In fact, on SCALCE reordered reads, gzip running time can improve by a factor of 15.06 on a standard PC with a single core and 6 GB memory. Interestingly even the running time of SCALCE + gzip improves that of gzip alone by a factor of 2.09. When compared with the recently published BEETL, which aims to sort the (inverted) reads in lexicographic order for improving bzip2, SCALCE + gzip

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  13. A new method of boosting irradiation for breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Li Gaofeng; Liu Mingyuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Based on the position of postoperative surgical clips and scars, a new boost irradiation technique for breast cancer after conservative surgery is devised. Methods: Tenty-six patients with early breast cancer after conservative surgery, were investigated. The medial, lateral, superior, inferior incisional margin of all tumor beds were marked by surgical clips, but posterior incisional margin was not marked before CT simulation. The postoperative scars were tagged by lead wires. After CT sanning, the nipple, clips and scars were delineated. Vitural simulation was implemented as follows: first, when the gantry was zero, place the center of beam in the center of clips marking the incisional margin, then rotate the gantry toward the medial or lateral tangent direction till more than three clips project lining on the beam eye view, second, rerotate gantry by orthogonal angle, then adjust the fields including the clips and scars. Results: More than 85% (88/103) of clips were placed on the surface of pectoralis major and ribs. The type of lining clips projection on the beam: 14 patients showed three clips lining, in the other's 12 patients revealed four clips lining. The mean depth of tumor bed was 4.37 cm, 95% confidence interal of depth varied from 3.98 to 4.96 cm, the range of depth varied from 2.40-6.20 cm, showing the depth of tumor bed less than 5 cm in 77% (20/26) of patients. Conclusion: The boost irradiation technique suggested in this paper is based on surgical scar's to irradiate the three dimensional tumor bed accurately. The aim of this work is not to miss the tumor three dimensionally including the operative scars. (authors)

  14. Concomitant fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with the more frequent use of biological therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask Lage-Hansen, Philip; Chrysidis, S; Lage-Hansen, M

    2016-01-01

    identified. No group differences were found regarding disease duration, age, gender, and serological status. Of the RA patients with concomitant FM, 64% were treated with biological therapy vs. 32% of RA patients without concomitant FM (p = 0.002). The mean DAS28 in the FM group was 4.4 compared to 2......OBJECTIVES: To compare the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and its components in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with and without concomitant fibromyalgia (FM), and to investigate the use of biological treatment in the two groups. METHOD: Questionnaires developed to diagnose FM were...... applied to investigate group differences in the use of biological therapy, baseline characteristics, patient-reported outcomes, and DAS28 between groups when appropriate. RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 162 out of 264 (61%) patients. Twenty-five patients (15.4%) with concomitant FM were...

  15. Concomitant medication polypharmacy, interactions and imperfect adherence are common in Australian adults on suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siefried, Krista J; Mao, Limin; Cysique, Lucette A; Rule, John; Giles, Michelle L; Smith, Don E; McMahon, James E.; Read, Tim R; Ooi, Catriona; Tee, Ban K; Bloch, Mark; de Wit, John; Carr, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We quantified concomitant medication polypharmacy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions, adverse effects and adherence in Australian adults on effective antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. METHODS: Patients recruited into a nationwide cohort and assessed for

  16. ACCELERATED ONSET OF RETINAL TOXICITY FROM HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE USE WITH CONCOMITANT BREAST CANCER THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aman; Maiz, Alejandra M; Tucker, William R; Cukras, Catherine

    2018-05-16

    To report a case of accelerated retinal toxicity due to hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) use for treatment of Sjögren syndrome in a patient treated with concomitant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Observational case report. A 56-year-old white woman using 400 mg HCQ (7.1 mg/kg real body weight) daily for a total of 2 years and 10 months for treatment of Sjögren syndrome with concomitant use of docetaxel and cyclophosphamide therapy (21-day cycle, 4 cycles) followed by anastrozole for breast cancer, presented with visual complaints and findings of severe HCQ toxicity. Concomitant breast cancer therapy may have a synergistic effect with HCQ leading to accelerated retinal toxicity. As such potential acceleration is poorly understood, patients on HCQ who are treated with concomitant chemotherapy should be considered for more frequent retinal screenings to maximize safety and preservation of vision.

  17. Pain in adolescent girls receiving human papillomavirus vaccine with concomitantly administered vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Emmanuel B; Kemper, Alex R; Dolor, Rowena J; Dunne, Eileen F

    2015-02-01

    Using the Faces Pain Scale - Revised, we assessed injection site pain 10 minutes after vaccination in young females randomized to receive either quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) before or after concomitantly administered vaccines. Although pain was modestly more after HPV4 injection than after other vaccines, the pain intensity after HPV4 injection was significantly less in those who received HPV4 before receiving other concomitant vaccines.

  18. Residual and Past Entropy for Concomitants of Ordered Random Variables of Morgenstern Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Mohie EL-Din

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For a system, which is observed at time t, the residual and past entropies measure the uncertainty about the remaining and the past life of the distribution, respectively. In this paper, we have presented the residual and past entropy of Morgenstern family based on the concomitants of the different types of generalized order statistics (gos and give the linear transformation of such model. Characterization results for these dynamic entropies for concomitants of ordered random variables have been considered.

  19. Concomitant sensitization to glutaraldehyde and methacrylic monomers among dentists and their patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Grigorievna Lyapina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A multitude of methacrylic monomers is used in dentistry. Glutaraldehyde (G is used in dental practice and consumer products as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the frequency and the risk of concomitant sensitization to some methacrylic monomers (methyl methacrylate (MMA, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, 2,2-bis-[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacrylo-xypropoxyphenyl]-propane (Bis-GMA, 2-hydroxy-ethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate (THFMA and glutaraldehyde in students of dentistry, students from the dental technician school, dental professionals and dental patients. Material and Methods: A total of 262 participants were included in the study: students of dentistry, students from the dental technician school, dental professionals, and dental patients as a control group. All were patch-tested with methacrylic monomers and glutaraldehyde. The results were subject to the statistical analysis (p < 0.05. Results: Among the group of dental students, the highest frequency of concomitant sensitization was to TEGDMA and G (15.5%. In the group of patients the highest frequency of concomitant sensitization was to EGDMA and G (16.4%. The frequency of concomitant sensitization among dental professionals was much lower, with the highest rate to TEGDMA and G (7.7%, too. We consider the students from the dental technician school, where the exposure to glutaraldehyde is less likely, to be the group at a lesser risk of concomitant sensitization. Conclusions: Dental students and dental patients could be outlined as groups at the risk of concomitant sensitization to glutaraldehyde and methacrylic monomers. For dental professionals, we assumed an increased risk for concomitant sensitization to TEGDMA and aldehydes that are commonly used in dentistry. We consider the students from the dental technician school to be the group at a lesser risk of

  20. Prevalence of Concomitant Sacroiliac joint Dysfunction in Patients With Image Proven Herniated Lumbar Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Salah Alalawi; Ali akbar Jafarian; Seyed Pezhman Madani; Mohammad Dadian; Keykavous Firouznia

    2009-01-01

    Background:Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction is a widely known but poorly defined cause of low back pain. To our knowledge, few published studies have been conducted to evaluate systematically the prevalence and significance of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with herniated lumbar discs. As concomitant SIJ dysfunction in low back pain patients is likely to respond to particular noninvasive interventions such as manipulation,improved understanding of the relationship bet...

  1. Pneumonia due to Talaromyces marneffei in a Dog from Southern Brazil with Concomitant Canine Distemper Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, S A; Pretto-Giordano, L G; Lima, S C; Suhett, W G; Pereira, A H T; Freitas, L A; Suphoronski, S A; Oliveira, T E S; Alfieri, A F; Pereira, E C; Vilas-Boas, L A; Alfieri, A A

    2017-07-01

    The pathological and molecular findings associated with Talaromyces marneffei-induced pneumonia with concomitant infection by canine distemper virus (CDV) are described in a dog. The principal pathological alteration occurred in the lungs. Histopathology confirmed multifocal granulomatous pneumonia associated with numerous intralesional and intracellular septate fission cells consistent with T. marneffei. A molecular assay designed to amplify a partial fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of T. marneffei provided positive results from two fungal cultures derived from the lung. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses confirmed the results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Furthermore, antigens of the CDV N protein were identified within the bronchial epithelium by immunohistochemistry and a PCR assay amplified the CDV N gene from hepatic and pulmonary fragments. Collectively, the pathological and molecular techniques confirmed a diagnosis of T. marneffei-induced pneumonia with concomitant infection by CDV. These findings represent the first description of pulmonary penicilliosis in the dog and extend the geographical niche of this emerging infectious pathogen. In this case, infection by CDV may have induced immunosuppression, which facilitated the development of pulmonary penicilliosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  3. Differences Between Snakebites with Concomitant Use of Alcohol or Drugs and Single Snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Joann; Kleinschmidt, Kurt C; Domanski, Kristina; Smith, Eric Anthony; Haynes, Ashley; Roth, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Published reports have suggested that the concurrent use of alcohol or drugs occurs among some snakebite victims, but no national assessment of such data exists. We used data from US poison control centers collected during telephone calls in calendar years 2000-2013 to compare snake envenomations with concomitant use of drugs, alcohol, or both to snakebites lacking such use. A total of 608 snakebites with 659 instances of concomitant alcohol/drug use were reported, which represent approximately 1% of 92,751 snakebites reported to US poison control centers. An annual mean of 48 snakebites with concomitant use of alcohol/drugs was reported, compared with a mean of 6625 snakebites per year with no concomitant use of alcohol/drugs. Most cases involved men, peaked during the summer months, and involved copperheads or rattlesnakes, which mirrored overall trends. Snakebite victims who also used alcohol/drugs were more likely than victims with only a snakebite reported to be bitten by rattlesnakes, to be admitted to the hospital, and die. Alcohol was the most common reported concomitant substance, but other substances were reported. Snakebites with concomitant use of alcohol/drugs are uncommon, accounting for approximately 1% of the snakebite envenomations reported annually to US poison control centers; however, snakebite victims also reporting alcohol/drug use are more likely to be bitten by rattlesnakes, be admitted to a healthcare facility, and die.

  4. Intraoperative HDR implant boost for breast cancer (preliminary results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Gonzalez, E.; Bourel, V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: In spite of the fact that it is been discussed whether or not a boost is necessary for all conservative treated breast cancer patients, it is a generalized radiotherapy practice. Since september 1993 we developed a breast conservative protocol for early stage breast cancer (T1-T2) with intraoperative HDR implant boost. Side effects, cosmetic results and recurrence rates are reviewed. Method and Material: From September 1993 we treated 55 patients with intraoperative HDR implant boost to the lumpectomy site for clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer, followed by external megavoltage radiotherapy to the entire breast. We used the Nucletron microselectron HDR remote afterloading system with flexible implant tubes. The geometric distribution of the tubes was performed according to the 'Paris' configuration. Each implant was evaluated by calculating the dose-volume natural histograms. The HDR fractionation schedule consists of three fractions of 4.5Gy each given at least 48 hs apart, and starting between 48-72hs from surgical procedure. The external radiotherapy to the entire breast started one week after the completion of brachytherapy, using conventional fractionation of 5 fractions per week, 1,8Gy per fraction up to 45-50Gy. Results: So far there is not any local recurrence, but medium follow up is only 18 months. We did not observe any acute damage and the cosmetic outcome was 60% excellent, 30% good and 10% acceptable. Two patients developed localized fibrosis, in both the implant involved the submamary fold. Conclusion: The intraoperative implant is the most accurate way to localize the lumpectomy site, to define the target volume, decrease the total treatment time and avoid a second anesthetic procedure without delaying the inpatient time or the initial wound healing process

  5. Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage Equality in Rhode Island

    OpenAIRE

    Kastanis, Angeliki; Badgett, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Extending marriage rights to same-sex couples in Rhode Island would bring an estimated $7 million to the state and local economy, including $5.5 million in additional wedding spending and $1.5 million in tourism expenditures made by out-of-town guests. Based on Rhode Island’s rates of 7 percent sales tax and 6 percent hotel and lodging tax, $530,000 in tax revenue will be generated for the state in the first three years same-sex couples may marry. The boost in travel spending will generate ap...

  6. Distributed Generation using Indirect Matrix Converter in Boost Operating Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiong; Loh, Poh Chiang; Wang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    , reverse power flow operation of IMC can be implemented to meet voltage boost requirement, where the input ac source is connected to the converter's voltage source side and the output utility grid or load is connected to the current source side. This paper proposes control schemes of IMC under reverse...... power flow operation for both grid-connected and isolated modes with distributed generation suggested as a potential application. In grid-connected mode, the commanded power must be extracted from the input ac source to the grid, in addition to guarantee sinusoidal input/output waveforms, unity input...

  7. Dimensional Representation and Gradient Boosting for Seismic Event Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmelmayer, F. C.; Kappedal, R. D.; Magana-Zook, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this research, we conducted experiments of representational structures on 5009 seismic signals with the intent of finding a method to classify signals as either an explosion or an earthquake in an automated fashion. We also applied a gradient boosted classifier. While perfect classification was not attained (approximately 88% was our best model), some cases demonstrate that many events can be filtered out as very high probability being explosions or earthquakes, diminishing subject-matter experts'(SME) workload for first stage analysis. It is our hope that these methods can be refined, further increasing the classification probability.

  8. Priorities for Boosting Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Should policy-makers, including foreign donors, focus employment strategies in sub-Saharan Africa on strengthening access to formal wage employment or on raising productivity in the informal sector? We examine the evidence in Mozambique and show that crude distinctions between formality...... and informality are not illuminating. The observed welfare advantage of formal sector workers essentially derives from differences in endowments and local conditions. Non-agricultural informal work can yield higher returns than formal work. The implication is that the informal sector must not be marginalized......; and raising productivity in agriculture must be accorded a central place in boosting employment....

  9. High Efficiency Boost Converter with Three State Switching Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimczak, Pawel; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    is on performance improvement of this type of the converter. Use of foil windings helps to reduce conduction losses in magnetic components and to reduce size of these components. Also it has been demonstrated that the regulation range of this type of converter can be increased by operation with duty cycle lower......The boost converter with the three-state switching cell seems to be a good candidate for a dc-dc stage for non-isolated generators based on alternative energy sources. It provides a high voltage gain, a reduced voltage stress on transistors and limited input current ripples. In this paper the focus...

  10. ZVS Operating Region of Multiresonant DC/DC Boost Conveter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Szychta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic phenomena that occur during stable operation in resonant circuits of multiresonant ZVS boost converter are described, which can be applied in many fields of the needs of DC voltage electricity. The operating region of the converter is defined which assures the circuit’s operation in which semiconductor elements are switched at zero voltage (ZVS. Conditions delimiting the ZVS operating region are provided. Analysis of the circuit’s operation is based on results of simulation testing by means of Simplorer software.

  11. A comprehensive analysis and hardware implementation of control strategies for high output voltage DC-DC boost power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar; Grandi, Gabriele; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    voltage and efficiency of classical HV converters. This paper deals with extra high-voltage (EHV) dc-dc boost converter by the application of voltage-lift technique to overcome the aforementioned deficiencies. The control strategy is based on classical proportional-integral (P-I) and fuzzy logic closed...... are performed by the DSP. The experimental results provided show good conformity with developed hypothetical predictions. Additionally, the presented study confirms that the fuzzy logic controller provides better performance than classical P-I controller under different perturbation conditions....

  12. Application of a synchronous generator with a boost converter in wind turbines: an experimental overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ranjan; Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2012-01-01

    An electrical structure of a variable-speed wind turbine based on an externally excited synchronous generator; a passive diode rectifier; and a boost converter is discussed in this study. The clear advantage of such a system is its lower-semi-conductor devices count. A brief theoretical explanation...... of such a system is included. A boost converter normally utilies an inductor (energy storage) to boost the voltage level from its input to a higher output value. This study analyses the possibility of using the generator inductance as a boost inductor. It is discussed and verified in the study that for the given...... switching frequency of the boost converter (fs=1= kHz), the generator sub-transient inductance (not the synchronous inductance) appears as an equivalent inductance seen by the boost converter. The parasitic capacitors present in the generator terminals are often neglected from design issues. It is presented...

  13. Topological Design and Modulation Strategy for Buck-Boost Three-Level Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    To date, designed topologies for dc-ac inversion with both voltage buck and boost capabilities are mainly focused on two-level circuitries with extensions to three-level possibilities left nearly unexplored. Contributing to this area of research, this paper presents the design of a number of viable...... can perform distinct five-level line voltage and three-level phase voltage switching by simply controlling the active switches located in the designed voltage boost section of the circuits. As a cost saving option, one active switch can further be removed from the voltage boost section of the circuits...... buck-boost threelevel inverters that can also support bidirectional power conversion. The proposed front-end circuitry is developed from the C´ ukderived buck-boost two-level inverter, and by using the "alternative phase opposition disposition" modulation scheme, the buck-boost three-level inverters...

  14. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  15. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sébastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Després, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulières, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  16. Markers of Brain Damage in Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Grigoryev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of early enteral feeding with an immune formula in a patient with significant heart failure after cardiosurgical intervention who is on venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The safety and efficiency of nutritional support were monitored, by estimating blood acid-base balance and oxygenation level and by controlling the residual gastric volume, which enabled the volume of the given enteral mixture to be increased up to 2600 kcal by day 3, by providing the body’s energy needs determined by calculation techniques. On postoperative day 4 when hemodynamic parameters were satisfactory, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was disconnected; following 7 days the patient was weaned from artificial ventilation. The length of intensive care unit stay was 14 days. The patient was discharged from hospital in a satisfactory condition. Thus, early enteral feeding may be a safe and effective method of nutritional support in patients on extracorporeal circulation. Key words: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, early enteral feeding, immune nutrition, cardiosurgery.

  17. AlignerBoost: A Generalized Software Toolkit for Boosting Next-Gen Sequencing Mapping Accuracy Using a Bayesian-Based Mapping Quality Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of next-generation sequencing (NGS reads to reference genomes is crucial for almost all NGS applications and downstream analyses. Various repetitive elements in human and other higher eukaryotic genomes contribute in large part to ambiguously (non-uniquely mapped reads. Most available NGS aligners attempt to address this by either removing all non-uniquely mapping reads, or reporting one random or "best" hit based on simple heuristics. Accurate estimation of the mapping quality of NGS reads is therefore critical albeit completely lacking at present. Here we developed a generalized software toolkit "AlignerBoost", which utilizes a Bayesian-based framework to accurately estimate mapping quality of ambiguously mapped NGS reads. We tested AlignerBoost with both simulated and real DNA-seq and RNA-seq datasets at various thresholds. In most cases, but especially for reads falling within repetitive regions, AlignerBoost dramatically increases the mapping precision of modern NGS aligners without significantly compromising the sensitivity even without mapping quality filters. When using higher mapping quality cutoffs, AlignerBoost achieves a much lower false mapping rate while exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity compared to the aligner default modes, therefore significantly boosting the detection power of NGS aligners even using extreme thresholds. AlignerBoost is also SNP-aware, and higher quality alignments can be achieved if provided with known SNPs. AlignerBoost's algorithm is computationally efficient, and can process one million alignments within 30 seconds on a typical desktop computer. AlignerBoost is implemented as a uniform Java application and is freely available at https://github.com/Grice-Lab/AlignerBoost.

  18. AlignerBoost: A Generalized Software Toolkit for Boosting Next-Gen Sequencing Mapping Accuracy Using a Bayesian-Based Mapping Quality Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Accurate mapping of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads to reference genomes is crucial for almost all NGS applications and downstream analyses. Various repetitive elements in human and other higher eukaryotic genomes contribute in large part to ambiguously (non-uniquely) mapped reads. Most available NGS aligners attempt to address this by either removing all non-uniquely mapping reads, or reporting one random or "best" hit based on simple heuristics. Accurate estimation of the mapping quality of NGS reads is therefore critical albeit completely lacking at present. Here we developed a generalized software toolkit "AlignerBoost", which utilizes a Bayesian-based framework to accurately estimate mapping quality of ambiguously mapped NGS reads. We tested AlignerBoost with both simulated and real DNA-seq and RNA-seq datasets at various thresholds. In most cases, but especially for reads falling within repetitive regions, AlignerBoost dramatically increases the mapping precision of modern NGS aligners without significantly compromising the sensitivity even without mapping quality filters. When using higher mapping quality cutoffs, AlignerBoost achieves a much lower false mapping rate while exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity compared to the aligner default modes, therefore significantly boosting the detection power of NGS aligners even using extreme thresholds. AlignerBoost is also SNP-aware, and higher quality alignments can be achieved if provided with known SNPs. AlignerBoost's algorithm is computationally efficient, and can process one million alignments within 30 seconds on a typical desktop computer. AlignerBoost is implemented as a uniform Java application and is freely available at https://github.com/Grice-Lab/AlignerBoost.

  19. Playing tag with ANN: boosted top identification with pattern recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Leandro G.; Backović, Mihailo; Cliche, Mathieu; Lee, Seung J.; Perelstein, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Many searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rely on top tagging algorithms, which discriminate between boosted hadronic top quarks and the much more common jets initiated by light quarks and gluons. We note that the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) effectively takes a “digital image" of each jet, with pixel intensities given by energy deposits in individual HCAL cells. Viewed in this way, top tagging becomes a canonical pattern recognition problem. With this motivation, we present a novel top tagging algorithm based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), one of the most popular approaches to pattern recognition. The ANN is trained on a large sample of boosted tops and light quark/gluon jets, and is then applied to independent test samples. The ANN tagger demonstrated excellent performance in a Monte Carlo study: for example, for jets with p T in the 1100–1200 GeV range, 60% top-tag efficiency can be achieved with a 4% mis-tag rate. We discuss the physical features of the jets identified by the ANN tagger as the most important for classification, as well as correlations between the ANN tagger and some of the familiar top-tagging observables and algorithms.

  20. Boosted food web productivity through ocean acidification collapses under warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Silvan U; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Ferreira, Camilo M; Ullah, Hadayet; Connell, Sean D

    2017-10-01

    Future climate is forecast to drive bottom-up (resource driven) and top-down (consumer driven) change to food web dynamics and community structure. Yet, our predictive understanding of these changes is hampered by an over-reliance on simplified laboratory systems centred on single trophic levels. Using a large mesocosm experiment, we reveal how future ocean acidification and warming modify trophic linkages across a three-level food web: that is, primary (algae), secondary (herbivorous invertebrates) and tertiary (predatory fish) producers. Both elevated CO 2 and elevated temperature boosted primary production. Under elevated CO 2 , the enhanced bottom-up forcing propagated through all trophic levels. Elevated temperature, however, negated the benefits of elevated CO 2 by stalling secondary production. This imbalance caused secondary producer populations to decline as elevated temperature drove predators to consume their prey more rapidly in the face of higher metabolic demand. Our findings demonstrate how anthropogenic CO 2 can function as a resource that boosts productivity throughout food webs, and how warming can reverse this effect by acting as a stressor to trophic interactions. Understanding the shifting balance between the propagation of resource enrichment and its consumption across trophic levels provides a predictive understanding of future dynamics of stability and collapse in food webs and fisheries production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Playing tag with ANN: boosted top identification with pattern recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Leandro G. [Institut de Biologie de l’École Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Inserm 1024- CNRS 8197,46 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Backović, Mihailo [Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology - CP3,Universite Catholique de Louvain,Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Cliche, Mathieu [Laboratory for Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lee, Seung J. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Perelstein, Maxim [Laboratory for Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    Many searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rely on top tagging algorithms, which discriminate between boosted hadronic top quarks and the much more common jets initiated by light quarks and gluons. We note that the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) effectively takes a “digital image' of each jet, with pixel intensities given by energy deposits in individual HCAL cells. Viewed in this way, top tagging becomes a canonical pattern recognition problem. With this motivation, we present a novel top tagging algorithm based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), one of the most popular approaches to pattern recognition. The ANN is trained on a large sample of boosted tops and light quark/gluon jets, and is then applied to independent test samples. The ANN tagger demonstrated excellent performance in a Monte Carlo study: for example, for jets with p{sub T} in the 1100–1200 GeV range, 60% top-tag efficiency can be achieved with a 4% mis-tag rate. We discuss the physical features of the jets identified by the ANN tagger as the most important for classification, as well as correlations between the ANN tagger and some of the familiar top-tagging observables and algorithms.

  2. Comparison of posterior fossa and tumor bed boost in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A C; Saw, C B; Wen, B C

    2000-10-01

    To quantify the difference between the area of brain irradiated using the posterior fossa boost (PFB) and tumor bed boost (TBB) in medulloblastoma, we studied 15 simulation radiographs of patients treated in our institution from 1990 and 1999. The PFB was compared with the TBB, which was defined as the tumor bed plus 2-cm margin as demonstrated by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The PFB field treated a mean area of 9.43 cm2 more brain than the TBB. In 3 patients (20%), the area of the brain in the TBB was larger than the PFB. In 11 patients (73.3%), the PFB field had more than 10% more brain than the TBB. The cochlea was in the PFB and TBB field in all patients. In more than two thirds of patients, the area of brain irradiated with the PFB was at least 10% greater than the TBB. Future studies are needed to determine whether the TBB can replace the PFB in patients with medulloblastoma.

  3. Endopulmonary Bronchoalveolar Lavage Cytogram in the Prediction of Infective Pulmonary Complications in Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kartavenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the time course of changes in the cellular composition of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid to assess the possibilities of using the values of an endopulmonary cytogram (EPC for the prediction of the development of infectious pulmonary complications and death in victims with severe concomitant injury. Sixty-three victims divided into 2 groups by the injury severity scale (ISS (Beaker et al., 1974 were examined. For BAL sampling, a BF-XT40 endoscope (Olympus, Japan was applied to bronchofibroscopy. To study BAL, the authors used the routine cyto-logical techniques and compared the latter’s results with those of EPC. The data were statistically processed, by employing the Statistica 6.0 programs; p Kozlov I. A., Poptsov V. N. Combined Therapy with Nitric Oxide and Surfactant-BL for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome After Operations Using Extracorporeal Circulation ….15 Abstract Выбрать Показать The present study was undertaken to comparatively evaluate the efficacy of inhalational nitric oxide alone and in combination with surfactant-BL in the complex therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS after surgery under extracorporeal circulation (EC. The study included 53 patients aged 21 to 76 years. It has revealed that in ARDS that complicates operations under EC, the use of surfactant-BL during therapy with inhalational nitric oxide enhances the latter’s effects on arterial oxygenation, accelerates the regression of pulmonary oxygenizing dysfunction, and reduces the duration of artificial ventilation and the length of stay in an intensive care unit.

  4. Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Modeling Using the Data Mining Models Artificial Neural Network and Boosted Tree

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    Hyun-Joo Oh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to present some potential applications of sophisticated data mining techniques, such as artificial neural network (ANN and boosted tree (BT, for landslide susceptibility modeling in the Yongin area, Korea. Initially, landslide inventory was detected from visual interpretation using digital aerial photographic maps with a high resolution of 50 cm taken before and after the occurrence of landslides. The debris flows were randomly divided into two groups: training and validation sets with a 50:50 proportion. Additionally, 18 environmental factors related to landslide occurrence were derived from the topography, soil, and forest maps. Subsequently, the data mining techniques were applied to identify the influence of environmental factors on landslide occurrence of the training set and assess landslide susceptibility. Finally, the landslide susceptibility indexes from ANN and BT were compared with a validation set using a receiver operating characteristics curve. The slope gradient, topographic wetness index, and timber age appear to be important factors in landslide occurrence from both models. The validation result of ANN and BT showed 82.25% and 90.79%, which had reasonably good performance. The study shows the benefit of selecting optimal data mining techniques in landslide susceptibility modeling. This approach could be used as a guideline for choosing environmental factors on landslide occurrence and add influencing factors into landslide monitoring systems. Furthermore, this method can rank landslide susceptibility in urban areas, thus providing helpful information when selecting a landslide monitoring site and planning land-use.

  5. Data to support "Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed Nutrient Concentrations & Biological Condition"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Spreadsheets are included here to support the manuscript "Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Condition". This...

  6. Estimation of age-specific rates of reactivation and immune boosting of the varicella zoster virus

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    Isabella Marinelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies into the impact of vaccination against the varicella zoster virus (VZV have increasingly focused on herpes zoster (HZ, which is believed to be increasing in vaccinated populations with decreasing infection pressure. This idea can be traced back to Hope-Simpson's hypothesis, in which a person's immune status determines the likelihood that he/she will develop HZ. Immunity decreases over time, and can be boosted by contact with a person experiencing varicella (exogenous boosting or by a reactivation attempt of the virus (endogenous boosting. Here we use transmission models to estimate age-specific rates of reactivation and immune boosting, exogenous as well as endogenous, using zoster incidence data from the Netherlands (2002–2011, n = 7026. The boosting and reactivation rates are estimated with splines, enabling these quantities to be optimally informed by the data. The analyses show that models with high levels of exogenous boosting and estimated or zero endogenous boosting, constant rate of loss of immunity, and reactivation rate increasing with age (to more than 5% per year in the elderly give the best fit to the data. Estimates of the rates of immune boosting and reactivation are strongly correlated. This has important implications as these parameters determine the fraction of the population with waned immunity. We conclude that independent evidence on rates of immune boosting and reactivation in persons with waned immunity are needed to robustly predict the impact of varicella vaccination on the incidence of HZ.

  7. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  8. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  9. Results of brachytherapy boost in high risk breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battermann, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: in breast conserving therapy the role of brachytherapy as a boost after whole breast irradiation is not clear. The series from the Netherlands Cancer Institute show a very high local control rate, but the question could be raised whether all these patients need a brachy boost. Therefore, it was decided at our institute, to deliver a brachy boost only to high risk patients, viz. patients with incomplete resection margins and/or extensive in situ cancer (ECI). Materials and methods: in the period 1988 through 1993 a total of 148 patients with 151 breast tumours received a boost on the tumour bed using brachytherapy. Age varied from 25 till 74 years, with a mean age of 52.3 years. Incomplete resection margins were found in 60 patients, ECI in 31 and both in 49 patients. In the majority of patients, the ECI component was not completely removed. T-stage was unknown in 9 patients. T1 in 83, T2 in 49 and T3 in 10. Nodal status was N0 in 119 and N1 in 33 patients. Infiltrating duct carcinoma was the most common histology. No infiltrating growth was found in 6 patients, but one patient presented a positive node. The interval period between day of operation and day of brachytherapy implantation was between 3 and 4 months in 62%. The mean interval between completion of beam irradiation and day of implantation was 18 days, while 12 patients received their brachytherapy previous to the beam irradiation. External irradiation was with two tangential fields and a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 6 weeks (9 fractions in two weeks). The number of needles in two planes. Most patients were implanted under local anaesthesia. Dose rate in 97 patients was 51 - 60 cGy/h. Results: follow-up for patients alive varied from 2 years till 7 years with a mean follow-up period of 4 years. One hundred and twenty five patients are alive, including 6 patients with manifest metastases. Local recurrence was encountered in 8 patients (interval 14 - 60 months, mean 30 months), with

  10. Genetic and Psychosocial Predictors of Aggression: Variable Selection and Model Building With Component-Wise Gradient Boosting

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    Robert Suchting

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Given datasets with a large or diverse set of predictors of aggression, machine learning (ML provides efficient tools for identifying the most salient variables and building a parsimonious statistical model. ML techniques permit efficient exploration of data, have not been widely used in aggression research, and may have utility for those seeking prediction of aggressive behavior.Objectives: The present study examined predictors of aggression and constructed an optimized model using ML techniques. Predictors were derived from a dataset that included demographic, psychometric and genetic predictors, specifically FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 polymorphisms, which have been shown to alter response to threatening stimuli, but have not been tested as predictors of aggressive behavior in adults.Methods: The data analysis approach utilized component-wise gradient boosting and model reduction via backward elimination to: (a select variables from an initial set of 20 to build a model of trait aggression; and then (b reduce that model to maximize parsimony and generalizability.Results: From a dataset of N = 47 participants, component-wise gradient boosting selected 8 of 20 possible predictors to model Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ total score, with R2 = 0.66. This model was simplified using backward elimination, retaining six predictors: smoking status, psychopathy (interpersonal manipulation and callous affect, childhood trauma (physical abuse and neglect, and the FKBP5_13 gene (rs1360780. The six-factor model approximated the initial eight-factor model at 99.4% of R2.Conclusions: Using an inductive data science approach, the gradient boosting model identified predictors consistent with previous experimental work in aggression; specifically psychopathy and trauma exposure. Additionally, allelic variants in FKBP5 were identified for the first time, but the relatively small sample size limits generality of results and calls for

  11. Genetic and Psychosocial Predictors of Aggression: Variable Selection and Model Building With Component-Wise Gradient Boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchting, Robert; Gowin, Joshua L; Green, Charles E; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Lane, Scott D

    2018-01-01

    Rationale : Given datasets with a large or diverse set of predictors of aggression, machine learning (ML) provides efficient tools for identifying the most salient variables and building a parsimonious statistical model. ML techniques permit efficient exploration of data, have not been widely used in aggression research, and may have utility for those seeking prediction of aggressive behavior. Objectives : The present study examined predictors of aggression and constructed an optimized model using ML techniques. Predictors were derived from a dataset that included demographic, psychometric and genetic predictors, specifically FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) polymorphisms, which have been shown to alter response to threatening stimuli, but have not been tested as predictors of aggressive behavior in adults. Methods : The data analysis approach utilized component-wise gradient boosting and model reduction via backward elimination to: (a) select variables from an initial set of 20 to build a model of trait aggression; and then (b) reduce that model to maximize parsimony and generalizability. Results : From a dataset of N = 47 participants, component-wise gradient boosting selected 8 of 20 possible predictors to model Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) total score, with R 2 = 0.66. This model was simplified using backward elimination, retaining six predictors: smoking status, psychopathy (interpersonal manipulation and callous affect), childhood trauma (physical abuse and neglect), and the FKBP5_13 gene (rs1360780). The six-factor model approximated the initial eight-factor model at 99.4% of R 2 . Conclusions : Using an inductive data science approach, the gradient boosting model identified predictors consistent with previous experimental work in aggression; specifically psychopathy and trauma exposure. Additionally, allelic variants in FKBP5 were identified for the first time, but the relatively small sample size limits generality of results and calls for

  12. Doses to organs and tissues from concomitant imaging in radiotherapy: a suggested framework for clinical justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R M

    2008-12-01

    The increasing use of imaging for localization and verification in radiotherapy has raised issues concerning the justifiable doses to critical organs and tissues from concomitant exposures, particularly when extensive image-guided radiotherapy is indicated. Doses at positions remote from the target volume include components from high-energy leakage and scatter, as well as from concomitant imaging. In this paper, simulated prostate, breast and larynx treatments are used to compare doses from both high-energy and concomitant exposures as a function of distance from the target volume. It is suggested that the fraction, R, of the total dose at any point within the patient that is attributable to concomitant exposures may be a useful aid in their justification. R is small within the target volume and at large distances from it. However, there is a critical region immediately adjacent to the planning target volume where the dose from concomitant imaging combines with leakage and scatter to give values of R that approach 0.5 in the examples given here. This is noteworthy because the regions just outside the target volume will receive total doses in the order of 1 Gy, where commensurately high risk factors may not be substantially reduced because of cell kill. Other studies have identified these regions as sites of second cancers. The justification of an imaging regimen might therefore usefully take into account the maximum value of R encountered from the combination of imaging and radiotherapy for particular treatment sites.

  13. Prevalence of Concomitant Sacroiliac joint Dysfunction in Patients With Image Proven Herniated Lumbar Discs

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    Salah Alalawi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction is a widely known but poorly defined cause of low back pain. To our knowledge, few published studies have been conducted to evaluate systematically the prevalence and significance of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with herniated lumbar discs. As concomitant SIJ dysfunction in low back pain patients is likely to respond to particular noninvasive interventions such as manipulation,improved understanding of the relationship between these two diagnoses would improve clinical decision making and research.Methods:This study was designated to estimate the prevalence of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction in sub acute low back pain patients with image proven discopathy and evaluate the theory that sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be a source of pain and functional disability in discopathy. A total of 202 patients with sub acute radicular back pain and MRI proven herniated lumbar discs underwent standardized   physiatrist history and physical examination, specified for detection of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction.Results: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a concomitant finding in 72.3% of evaluated patients.There was significantly higher SIJ dysfunction prevalence in female patients (p <0.0001. Conclusion: SIJ dysfunction is a significant pathogenic factor with high possibility of occurrence in low back pain. Thus, in the presence of radicular and sacroiliac joint symptoms, SIJ dysfunction, regardless of intervertebral disc pathology, must be considered in clinical decisiomaking.

  14. Prospective Phase II Study of Brachytherapy Boost as a Component of Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-SAYED, M.E.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess the response rate and toxicity profile in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer using brachytherapy (BT) boost following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), concomitant with chemotherapy as a component of the neoadjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective phase II study of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who presented to the department of radiation oncology, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Seventeen patients had been included in the study. Radiation therapy was given as: phase I,45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of EBRT, followed by brachytherapy boost (within one week after the end of EBRT) using high dose rate iridium 192 (Ir 192 ) aiming at 800 c Gy given in 2 fractions (each 400 c Gy) separated by 1 week. All patients received the same concomitant chemotherapy in the form of Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin. The clinical and pathological response rates, together with the toxicity profile were assessed. Results: Seventeen patients had been studied; the majority (14; 82%) were males, while 3 only (18%) were females, their mean age was 57.4 years. All patients had low anterior resection (LAR). The clinical response rate, assessed by digital rectal examination ± endoscopy examination 4 weeks after the end of EBRT and BT, revealed that complete clinical response (cCR) was noted in 3 patients (18%), clinical partial response (cPR) in 14 patients (82%); while the pathological response rate was: complete pathological response (pCR) in 8 patients (47%), pathological partial response (pPR) in 9 patients (53%). The toxicity profile showed that grade III radiation proctitis was seen in one patient (6%), grade III dermatitis in 2 (12%), while no patients developed grade III cystitis. For chemotherapy toxicities, three patients (18%) developed grade III nausea and/or vomiting, 2 (12%) developed grade III diarrhea. Conclusion

  15. Concomitant occurrence of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy and nodal marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Changlee S; Grier, David D; Beaty, Michael W

    2011-03-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), also known as Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare self-limiting disorder of histiocytes with unknown etiology. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is most common in children and young adults and is characterized by painless lymphadenopathy. Histologically there is a proliferation of sinus histiocytes with lymphophagocytosis or emperipolesis. On rare occasions, SHML has been associated with lymphoma, usually involving different anatomic sites and developing at different times. We report a case of concomitant SHML and nodal marginal zone lymphoma involving the same lymph node without involvement of other nodal or extranodal sites. The presence of concomitant SHML within the lymph node involved by nodal marginal zone lymphoma may represent the responsiveness of SHML histiocytes to B-cell-derived cytokines in lymphoproliferative disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first description of concomitant occurrence of SHML and nodal marginal zone lymphoma.

  16. Use of Lactoferrin in the Treatment of Patients with Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kapitonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the degree of activation of lipid peroxidation in patients with severe concomitant injury and to determine whether they could be corrected with the antioxidant agent Laprot. Subjects and methods. The time course of changes in lipid peroxidation parameters and clinical data was studied in 68 patients with severe concomitant injury, in 35 of whom Laprot (made by P. A. Herzen Moscow Oncological Research Institute, Russian Agency for Medical Technologies (Russia, was added to the standard treatment. Results. The significant activation of oxidative processes and lipid peroxi-dation, which was accompanied by antioxidant system imbalance, was ascertained to occur in severe concomitant injury. Key words: injury, lipid peroxidation, lactoferrin.

  17. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penoncello, Gregory P.; Ding, George X.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2 cm"3 for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5 cm"3 for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens.

  18. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penoncello, Gregory P; Ding, George X

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2cm(3) for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5cm(3) for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by

  19. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Gabriela [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kunz, Guntram; Renner, Christoph; Tomuschat, Katja

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in a Caucasian cohort. Outcome was analyzed with respect to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values. Patients and Methods: Between 03/2002 and 01/2008, 39 NPC patients underwent SIB-IMRT (37 Caucasians; 31 males; mean age 53 years [16-78 years]). 41% presented with WHO (World Health Organization) type 1 unfavorable histology, 85% with stage III/IV disease. 19 patients had total gross tumor volume (GTV) 16-70 cm{sup 3} (mean 36 cm{sup 3}), while 16 had GTV > 70 cm{sup 3} (73-217 cm{sup 3}; mean 115 cm{sup 3}). All patients with stage II-IV disease received concomitant cisplatin. The prescribed SIB dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70 Gy (2.00 Gy/fraction) in 17, 69.6 Gy (2.11 Gy/fraction) in 19, and 66 Gy (2.20 Gy/fraction) in three patients. Results: 3-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastases-free, disease-free rates and overall survival were 86%, 89%, 85%, 72%, and 85% (median follow-up 30 months [8-71 months]). Histology was a significant prognostic factor concerning overall survival, with worst prognosis in WHO type 1 compared to type 2/3 (75% vs. 93%; p = 0.03). There was a trend in favor of WHO type 2/3 regarding local control (74% vs. 94%; p = 0.052). The PTV DVHs showed a slight left shift compared to reported series. Three patients developed grade 3 late effects (xerostomia [n=2], dysphagia [n=1], hearing loss [n=1]). Conclusion: In comparison with predominantly Asian NPC IMRT series in the literature, chemo-IMRT in the own Caucasian cohort, characterized by less radioresponsive WHO type 1, was equally effective. Treatment tolerance was excellent. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of closed loop controlled boost converter for solar installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalirasu Athimulam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the shortage of the energy and ever increasing of the oil price, research on the renewable and green energy sources, especially the solar arrays and the fuel cells, becomes more and more important. How to achieve high stepup and high efficiency DC/DC converters is the major consideration in the renewable power applications due to the low voltage of PV arrays and fuel cells. In this paper digital simulation of closed loop controlled boost converter for solar installation is presented. Circuit models for open loop and closed loop controlled systems are developed using the blocks of simulink. The simulation results are compared with the theoretical results. This converter has advantages like improved power factor, fast response and reduced hardware. .

  1. Dark Matter "Collider" from Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2017-10-20

    We propose a novel dark matter (DM) detection strategy for models with a nonminimal dark sector. The main ingredients in the underlying DM scenario are a boosted DM particle and a heavier dark sector state. The relativistic DM impinged on target material scatters off inelastically to the heavier state, which subsequently decays into DM along with lighter states including visible (standard model) particles. The expected signal event, therefore, accompanies a visible signature by the secondary cascade process associated with a recoiling of the target particle, differing from the typical neutrino signal not involving the secondary signature. We then discuss various kinematic features followed by DM detection prospects at large-volume neutrino detectors with a model framework where a dark gauge boson is the mediator between the standard model particles and DM.

  2. An update on Shankhpushpi, a cognition-boosting Ayurvedic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethiya, Neeraj Kumar; Nahata, Alok; Mishra, Sri Hari; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Shankhpushpi is an Ayurvedic drug used for its action on the central nervous system, especially for boosting memory and improving intellect. Quantum of information gained from Ayurvedic and other Sanskrit literature revealed the existence of four different plant species under the name of Shankhpushpi, which is used in various Ayurvedic prescriptions described in ancient texts, singly or in combination with other herbs. The sources comprise of entire herbs with following botanicals viz., Convulvulus pluricaulis Choisy. (Convulvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides Linn. (Convulvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Papilionaceae) and Canscora decussata Schult. (Gentianaceae). A review on the available scientific information in terms of pharmacognostical characteristics, chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, preclinical and clinical applications of controversial sources of Shankhpushpi is prepared with a view to review scientific work undertaken on Shankhpushpi. It may provide parameters of differentiation and permit appreciation of variability of drug action by use of different botanical sources.

  3. Distributed control system for parallel-connected DC boost converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven

    2017-08-15

    The disclosed invention is a distributed control system for operating a DC bus fed by disparate DC power sources that service a known or unknown load. The voltage sources vary in v-i characteristics and have time-varying, maximum supply capacities. Each source is connected to the bus via a boost converter, which may have different dynamic characteristics and power transfer capacities, but are controlled through PWM. The invention tracks the time-varying power sources and apportions their power contribution while maintaining the DC bus voltage within the specifications. A central digital controller solves the steady-state system for the optimal duty cycle settings that achieve a desired power supply apportionment scheme for a known or predictable DC load. A distributed networked control system is derived from the central system that utilizes communications among controllers to compute a shared estimate of the unknown time-varying load through shared bus current measurements and bus voltage measurements.

  4. A mechatronic power boosting design for piezoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haili; Liang, Junrui; Ge, Cong

    2015-01-01

    It was shown that the piezoelectric power generation can be boosted by using the synchronized switch power conditioning circuits. This letter reports a self-powered and self-sensing mechatronic design in substitute of the auxiliary electronics towards a compact and universal synchronized switch solution. The design criteria are derived based on the conceptual waveforms and a two-degree-of-freedom analytical model. Experimental result shows that, compared to the standard bridge rectifier interface, the mechatronic design leads to an extra 111% increase of generated power from the prototyped piezoelectric generator under the same deflection magnitude excitation. The proposed design has introduced a valuable physical insight of electromechanical synergy towards the improvement of piezoelectric power generation

  5. Searches with boosted objects at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00069444; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson confirms the validity of the Standard Model and suggests new physics should exist close to the Higgs mass scale. Since the Higgs mass fine-tuning is proportional to the square of the energy scale of new physics and driven by couplings to the top quark and W, Z and Higgs bosons, searches at high energy with these particles in the final state are of utmost priority. At the LHC, that means these are boosted, and, for their dominant hadronic decays modes, the decay products will be reconstructed as a single jet. Both ATLAS and CMS now use advanced jet substructure tools in the search for new physics at high mass. These tools and some of the searches using them, in particular searches for vector-like quarks and diboson resonances, are described here.

  6. Boosting Discriminant Learners for Gait Recognition Using MPCA Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Lu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a boosted linear discriminant analysis (LDA solution on features extracted by the multilinear principal component analysis (MPCA to enhance gait recognition performance. Three-dimensional gait objects are projected in the MPCA space first to obtain low-dimensional tensorial features. Then, lower-dimensional vectorial features are obtained through discriminative feature selection. These feature vectors are then fed into an LDA-style booster, where several regularized and weakened LDA learners work together to produce a strong learner through a novel feature weighting and sampling process. The LDA learner employs a simple nearest-neighbor classifier with a weighted angle distance measure for classification. The experimental results on the NIST/USF “Gait Challenge” data-sets show that the proposed solution has successfully improved the gait recognition performance and outperformed several state-of-the-art gait recognition algorithms.

  7. A mechatronic power boosting design for piezoelectric generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haili; Liang, Junrui, E-mail: liangjr@shanghaitech.edu.cn; Ge, Cong [School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, No. 8 Building, 319 Yueyang Road, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-10-05

    It was shown that the piezoelectric power generation can be boosted by using the synchronized switch power conditioning circuits. This letter reports a self-powered and self-sensing mechatronic design in substitute of the auxiliary electronics towards a compact and universal synchronized switch solution. The design criteria are derived based on the conceptual waveforms and a two-degree-of-freedom analytical model. Experimental result shows that, compared to the standard bridge rectifier interface, the mechatronic design leads to an extra 111% increase of generated power from the prototyped piezoelectric generator under the same deflection magnitude excitation. The proposed design has introduced a valuable physical insight of electromechanical synergy towards the improvement of piezoelectric power generation.

  8. Usefulness of effective field theory for boosted Higgs production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lewis, I. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zeng, Mao [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The Higgs + jet channel at the LHC is sensitive to the effects of new physics both in the total rate and in the transverse momentum distribution at high pT. We examine the production process using an effective field theory (EFT) language and discussing the possibility of determining the nature of the underlying high-scale physics from boosted Higgs production. The effects of heavy color triplet scalars and top partner fermions with TeV scale masses are considered as examples and Higgs-gluon couplings of dimension-5 and dimension-7 are included in the EFT. As a byproduct of our study, we examine the region of validity of the EFT. Dimension-7 contributions in realistic new physics models give effects in the high pT tail of the Higgs signal which are so tiny that they are likely to be unobservable.

  9. Mutual boosting of the saturation scales in colliding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z., E-mail: bzk@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Instituto de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias e Ingenieria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet, Philosophenweg 19, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Pirner, H.J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet, Philosophenweg 19, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Potashnikova, I.K.; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Instituto de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias e Ingenieria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-03-14

    Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. The DGLAP driven gluon distribution turns out to be suppressed at large x, but significantly enhanced at x<<1. This is a high twist effect. In the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons on both sides get enriched in gluon density at small x, which leads to a further boosting of the saturation scale. We derive reciprocity equations for the saturation scales corresponding to a collision of two nuclei. The solution of these equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of Q{sub sA}{sup 2}, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  10. Link prediction boosted psychiatry disorder classification for functional connectivity network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Mei, Xue; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Jiashuang

    2017-02-01

    Functional connectivity network (FCN) is an effective tool in psychiatry disorders classification, and represents cross-correlation of the regional blood oxygenation level dependent signal. However, FCN is often incomplete for suffering from missing and spurious edges. To accurate classify psychiatry disorders and health control with the incomplete FCN, we first `repair' the FCN with link prediction, and then exact the clustering coefficients as features to build a weak classifier for every FCN. Finally, we apply a boosting algorithm to combine these weak classifiers for improving classification accuracy. Our method tested by three datasets of psychiatry disorder, including Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The experimental results show our method not only significantly improves the classification accuracy, but also efficiently reconstructs the incomplete FCN.

  11. Relapse patterns after radiochemotherapy of glioblastoma with FET PET-guided boost irradiation and simulation to optimize radiation target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Galldiks, Norbert; Pinkawa, Michael; Holy, Richard; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ermert, Johannes; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Shah, N. Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef; Eble, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    .001). In this small study recurrent tumor volume in FET-PET (FET-2) overlapped only to one third with the boost target volume, based on FET-1. The shrinking and shifting of the resection cavity may have an influence considering the limited overlap of initial and relapse tumor volume. A simulated target volume, based on FET-1 with 7 mm margin covered 100 % of relapse volume in median and led to a significantly reduced PTV, compared to MRI-based PTVs. This approach may achieve similar therapeutic efficacy but lower side effects offering a broader window to intensify concomitant systemic treatment focusing distant failures

  12. DESAIN DAN IMPLEMENTSI SOFT SWITCHING BOOST KONVERTER DENGAN SIMPLE AUXILLARY RESONANT SWITCH (SARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Bagus Saputra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boost konverter merupakan penaik tegangan DC ke tegangan DC yang mempunyai tegangan output yang lebih tinggi dibanding inputnya. Penggunaan boost konverter diera modern semakin meningkat dan dibuat dengan dimensi yang lebih kecil, berat yang lebih ringan dan efisiensi yang lebih tinggi dibanding dengan boost konverter generasi terdahulu. Tetapi rugi-rugi periodik saat on/off meningkat. Untuk meraih kriteria tersebut, teknik hard switching boost konverter berevolusi menjadi teknik soft switching dengan menambah rangkaian simple auxiliary resonant circuit (SARC. Karena penambahan rangkaian SARC tersebut konverter bekerja pada kondisi zero-voltage switching switch (ZVS dan zero current switch (ZCS, sehingga saklar semikonduktor tidak bekerja secara hard switching lagi. Pada penelitian ini akan di desain dan diimplementaskan soft switching boost konverter dengan SARC. Kelebihan dari soft switching boost konverter dengan SARC adalah mempunyai efisiensi yang lebih tinggi dibanding dengan boost konverter konventional. Dari hasil implementasi menunjukkan konverter yang diajukan telah meraih zero voltage switch (ZVS. Sehingga boost konverter zero voltage switch (ZVS bisa diaplikasikan pada sistem power suplay yang membutuhkan efisiensi energi yang tinggi terutama pada daya yang tinggi.

  13. Y-Source Boost DC/DC Converter for Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam P.; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a versatile Y-source boost dc/dc converter intended for distributed power generation, where high gain is often demanded. The proposed converter uses a Y-source impedance network realized with a tightly coupled three-winding inductor for high voltage boosting that is presently...

  14. Modeling and Simulation of PMSG Wind Turbine with Boost Converter Working under Discontinuous Conduction Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Nan; Xu, Zhao

    2008-01-01

    in the discontinuous conducting mode (DCM). The new wind turbine model with the variable speed control of the PMSG based on duty cycle control of the boost converter has been developed in Matlab Simulink. Simulation studies show that DCM working mode of the boost converter provides more flexibility in controlling...

  15. Multiclass Boosting with Adaptive Group-Based kNN and Its Application in Text Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei La

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AdaBoost is an excellent committee-based tool for classification. However, its effectiveness and efficiency in multiclass categorization face the challenges from methods based on support vector machine (SVM, neural networks (NN, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbor (kNN. This paper uses a novel multi-class AdaBoost algorithm to avoid reducing the multi-class classification problem to multiple two-class classification problems. This novel method is more effective. In addition, it keeps the accuracy advantage of existing AdaBoost. An adaptive group-based kNN method is proposed in this paper to build more accurate weak classifiers and in this way control the number of basis classifiers in an acceptable range. To further enhance the performance, weak classifiers are combined into a strong classifier through a double iterative weighted way and construct an adaptive group-based kNN boosting algorithm (AGkNN-AdaBoost. We implement AGkNN-AdaBoost in a Chinese text categorization system. Experimental results showed that the classification algorithm proposed in this paper has better performance both in precision and recall than many other text categorization methods including traditional AdaBoost. In addition, the processing speed is significantly enhanced than original AdaBoost and many other classic categorization algorithms.

  16. A Novel Single Switch Transformerless Quadratic DC/DC Buck-Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostaan, Ali; A. Gorji, Saman; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    A novel quadratic buck-boost DC/DC converter is presented in this study. The proposed converter utilizes only one active switch and can step-up/down the input voltage, while the existing single switch quadratic buck/boost converters can only work in step-up or step-down mode. First, the proposed ...

  17. Heterologous Prime-Boost Immunizations with a Virosomal and an Alphavirus Replicon Vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; de Mare, Arjan; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Regts, Joke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Visser, Jeroen T.; Fiedler, Marc; Jansen-Duerr, Pidder; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies in general establish higher frequencies of antigen-specific T lymphocytes than homologous prime-boost protocols or single immunizations. We developed virosomes and recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) as antigen delivery systems, each capable of

  18. Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boost from Existing Medication Spotlight on Research Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication By Colleen Labbe, M.S. | March 1, 2013 A mouse hanging on a wire during a test of muscle strength. Mice with a mutant dystrophin gene, which ...

  19. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Os, Rob M. van; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55–60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0618-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Using boosted decision trees for tau identification in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, Jennifer

    The ATLAS detector will begin taking data from p - p collisions in 2009. This experiment will allo w for man y dif ferent physics measurements and searches. The production of tau leptons at the LHC is a key signature of the decay of both the standard model Higgs (via H ! t t ) and SUSY particles. Taus have a short lifetime ( c t = 87 m m) and decay hadroni- cally 65% of the time. Man y QCD interactions produce similar hadronic sho wers and have cross-sections about 1 billion times lar ger than tau production. Multi variate techniques are therefore often used to distinguish taus from this background. Boosted Decision Trees (BDTs) are a machine-learning technique for developing cut-based discriminants which can signicantly aid in extracting small signal samples from overwhelming backgrounds. In this study , BDTs are used for tau identication for the ATLAS experiment. The y are a fast, exible alternati ve to existing discriminants with comparable or better performance.

  1. INVESTIGATE TECHNO-ECONOMICAL ASPECTS OF PRESSURE BOOSTING STATIONS TO ENHANCE OIL EXTRACTION IN GACHSARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMOOD EGHTESADIFARD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to consider strategies and options for improving the efficiency of the pressure boosting station No. 4 in Gachsaran oil reserve (which is located in south-western of Iran. In order to achieve these objectives, the four rational options from technical and operational views were proposed and then these options went through an economic assessment. Next, by onsidering the other important criteria based on technical conditions (due to the necessity of evaluating other criteria beside economic criterion, decisionmaking techniques were employed. The results of economic evaluation show that the present value of the costs of option 1 is lower than other options and option 2 provides poorer economic status and is ranked last among the recommended options. Therefore, option 1 is 30.5 percent better than option 2. In addition, employing MCDM Technique allocated maximum weight (0.320 to economic evaluation criterion and again option 1 -with the highest weight (0.354- was the best possible option. Regards to purpose of this study, using techno-economical approach leads practitioners to decide based on technical and economic facts simul