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Sample records for concerted proton-coupled electron

  1. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gilbert J; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C; Gu, Carol J; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process-a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction-amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  2. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) is found in a range of oxidation-reduction reactions in biology.1 This mechanism is of interest for applications in energy conversion processes. The PCET reaction has been shown to be facilitated when the proton is transferred to an intramolecular basic sit...

  3. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  4. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  5. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  6. Theoretical Analysis of Proton Relays in Electrochemical Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites in a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) system was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wavefunctions and incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The calculated KIEs and relative standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wavefunctions for this system, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in proton relay systems. The theory suggests that the PCET rate constant may be increased by decreasing the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or modifying the thermal motions of the molecule to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. The submission of this journal article in ERIA is a requirement of the EFRC subcontract with Pennsylvania State University collaborators to get publications to OSTI.

  7. Concert

    CERN Multimedia

    Swing de fou

    2011-01-01

    Swing de Fou, JAZZ New Orleans,  en concert Jeudi 24 Novembre - Versoix 20h00 - Les Caves de Bon-Séjour - Sextet 25 Novembre - Chêne-Bourg 20h30 - Salle Point Favre – Octet Concerts exceptionnels, Avec invitée spéciale : Rosana Mancarella, cantatrice Lyrique Mezzo Soprano des théâtres Arena di Verona et La Scala Di Milano Arrangements de Daniele Verdesca, professeur compositeur aux conservatoires de Nyon et Yverdon, & Gérôme Gautschi professeur compositeur de trombone à Genève Info : http://swingdefou.ch/concerts.php

  8. Concert

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Small Capella Friday 2 June at 18.00 CERN Meyrin, Main Auditorium Free admission Moscow chamber choir Small Capella arose within the walls of Children‘s musical school No. 10, and evolved over the years into a mixed choir of people of various age and occupation, open to anyone fond of choral music. The repertoire includes Russian and foreign classical music, sacred music, folk songs, contemporary choral compositions. The concert will include solo vocal and piano pieces.

  9. Chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer of water oxidation on TiO2 anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Li, Ye-Fei; Sit, Patrick; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-12-18

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a prototype, water-splitting (photo)catalyst, but its performance is limited by the large overpotential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We report here a first-principles density functional theory study of the chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which is considered responsible for the large OER overpotential on TiO2. We use a periodic model of the TiO2/water interface that includes a slab of anatase TiO2 and explicit water molecules, sample the solvent configurations by first principles molecular dynamics, and determine the energy profiles of the two electronic states involved in the electron transfer (ET) by hybrid functional calculations. Our results suggest that the first PCET is sequential, with the ET following the proton transfer. The ET occurs via an inner sphere process, which is facilitated by a state in which one electronic hole is shared by the two oxygen ions involved in the transfer.

  10. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  11. Ruthenium and iron complexes with benzotriazole and benzimidazole derivatives as simple models for proton-coupled electron transfer systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Reginaldo C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ruthenium complexes of the type [M-LH]n (where M = RuII,III(NH35(2+,3+, RuII,III(edta2-,- [edta = ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate], or FeII,III(CN5(3-,2- and LH = benzotriazole or benzimidazole were prepared and characterized in aqueous solutions by means of electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical methods. Special emphasis was given to the pH-dependent redox processes, exhibited by all the investigated complexes. From their related Pourbaix diagrams, which displayed a typically Nernstian behavior, the pKa and formal reduction potential values were extracted. In addition, these E1/2 versus pH curves were also used to illustrate the partitioning relationship concerning the redox and acid-base species, and their interconversion equilibria. The active area in which the dependence of the M III/M II couple on the pH takes place, as delimited by pKaIII and pKaII, was taken into account in order to evaluate the usefulness of such simple complexes as models for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET. The results were interpreted in terms of the acceptor/donor electronic character of the ligands and sigma,pi-metal-ligand interactions in both redox states of the metal ion.

  12. Influence of Proton Acceptors on the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Kinetics of a Ruthenium-Tyrosine Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, J Christian; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2017-11-22

    A polypyridyl ruthenium complex with fluorinated bipyridine ligands and a covalently bound tyrosine moiety was synthesized, and its photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactivity in acetonitrile was investigated with transient absorption spectroscopy. Using flash-quench methodology with methyl viologen as an oxidative quencher, a Ru 3+ species is generated that is capable of initiating the intramolecular PCET oxidation of the tyrosine moiety. Using a series of substituted pyridine bases, the reaction kinetics were found to vary as a function of proton acceptor concentration and identity, with no significant H/D kinetic isotope effect. Through analysis of the kinetics traces and comparison to a control complex without the tyrosine moiety, PCET reactivity was found to proceed through an equilibrium electron transfer followed by proton transfer (ET-PT) pathway in which irreversible deprotonation of the tyrosine radical cation shifts the ET equilibrium, conferring a base dependence on the reaction. Comprehensive kinetics modeling allowed for deconvolution of complex kinetics and determination of rate constants for each elementary step. Across the five pyridine bases explored, spanning a range of 4.2 pK a units, a linear free-energy relationship was found for the proton transfer rate constant with a slope of 0.32. These findings highlight the influence that proton transfer driving force exerts on PCET reaction kinetics.

  13. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  14. Proton-coupled electron transfer promotes the reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by uric acid under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zawadzki, Andressa; Cardoso, Daniel R.; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The hypervalent muscle pigment ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O, is not reduced by urate monoanions at physiological conditions despite a strong driving force of around 30 kJ mol1 while for low pH, uric acid was found to reduce protonated ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O,H+, efficiently in a bimolecular...... reaction with k1 ¼ 1.1 0.1 103 L mol1 s1, DH‡ ¼ 66.1 0.1 kJ mol1 and DS‡ ¼ 35.2 0.2 J mol1 K1. For intermediate pH, like for anaerobic muscles and for meat, proton-oupled electron transfer occurs in a transition state, {MbFe(IV)]O/H+/urate}‡, which is concluded to be formed from uric acid and Mb...... in uric acid concentration may serve as an inherent protection against radical formation by ferrylmyoglobin...

  15. Fundamental Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Soybean Lipoxygenase from Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Free Energy Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-02-28

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase has served as a prototype for understanding hydrogen tunneling in enzymes. Herein this PCET reaction is studied with mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations. The free energy surfaces are computed as functions of the proton donor-acceptor (C-O) distance and the proton coordinate, and the potential of mean force is computed as a function of the C-O distance, inherently including anharmonicity. The simulation results are used to calculate the kinetic isotope effects for the wild-type enzyme (WT) and the L546A/L754A double mutant (DM), which have been measured experimentally to be ∼80 and ∼700, respectively. The PCET reaction is found to be exoergic for WT and slightly endoergic for the DM, and the equilibrium C-O distance for the reactant is found to be ∼0.2 Å greater for the DM than for WT. The larger equilibrium distance for the DM, which is due mainly to less optimal substrate binding in the expanded binding cavity, is primarily responsible for its higher kinetic isotope effect. The calculated potentials of mean force are anharmonic and relatively soft at shorter C-O distances, allowing efficient thermal sampling of the shorter distances required for effective hydrogen tunneling. The primarily local electrostatic field at the transferring hydrogen is ∼100 MV/cm in the direction to facilitate proton transfer and increases dramatically as the C-O distance decreases. These simulations suggest that the overall protein environment is important for conformational sampling of active substrate configurations aligned for proton transfer, but the PCET reaction is influenced primarily by local electrostatic effects that facilitate conformational sampling of shorter proton donor-acceptor distances required for effective hydrogen tunneling.

  16. Photocatalytic Conversion of Nitrobenzene to Aniline through Sequential Proton-Coupled One-Electron Transfers from a Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Stephen C. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States; Bettis Homan, Stephanie [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States; Weiss, Emily A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University , 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, United States

    2016-01-28

    This paper describes the use of cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as visible-light photocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline through six sequential photoinduced, proton-coupled electron transfers. At pH 3.6–4.3, the internal quantum yield of photons-to-reducing electrons is 37.1% over 54 h of illumination, with no apparent decrease in catalyst activity. Monitoring of the QD exciton by transient absorption reveals that, for each step in the catalytic cycle, the sacrificial reductant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, scavenges the excitonic hole in ~5 ps to form QD•–; electron transfer to nitrobenzene or the intermediates nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine then occurs on the nanosecond time scale. The rate constants for the single-electron transfer reactions are correlated with the driving forces for the corresponding proton-coupled electron transfers. This result suggests, but does not prove, that electron transfer, not proton transfer, is rate-limiting for these reactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the QD–molecule systems shows that the photoproduct aniline, left unprotonated, serves as a poison for the QD catalyst by adsorbing to its surface. Performing the reaction at an acidic pH not only encourages aniline to desorb but also increases the probability of protonated intermediates; the latter effect probably ensures that recruitment of protons is not rate-limiting.

  17. Electronic Performance Monitoring: An Organizational Justice and Concertive Control Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, G. Stoney; Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1997-01-01

    Applies theories of organizational justice/concertive control to account for contradictions inherent in electronic monitoring of workers by organizations. Argues that results are usually positive when workers are involved in the design and implementation of monitoring systems, and monitoring is restricted to performance-related activities with…

  18. Catalytic Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from Metal Hydrides to Titanocene Amides, Hydrazides and Imides: Determination of Thermodynamic Parameters Relevant to Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-10-03

    The hydrogenolysis of titanium-nitrogen bonds in a series of bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium amides, hydrazides and imides by proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is described. Twelve different N-H bond dissociation free energies (BDFEs) among the various nitrogen-containing ligands were measured or calculated, and effects of metal oxidation state and N-ligand substituent were determined. Two metal hydride complexes, (η 5 -C 5 Me 5 )(py-Ph)Rh-H (py-Ph = 2-pyridylphenyl, [Rh]-H) and (η 5 -C 5 R 5 )(CO) 3 Cr-H ([Cr] R -H, R= H, Me) were evaluated for formal H atom transfer reactivity and were selected due to their relatively weak M-H bond strengths yet ability to activate and cleave molecular hydrogen. Despite comparable M-H BDFEs, disparate reactivity between the two compounds was observed and was traced to the vastly different acidities of the M-H bonds and overall redox potentials of the molecules. With [Rh]-H, catalytic syntheses of ammonia, silylamine and N,N-dimethylhydrazine have been accomplished from the corresponding titanium(IV) complex using H 2 as the stoichiometric H atom source. The data presented in this study provides the thermochemical foundation for the synthesis of NH 3 by proton coupled electron transfer at a well-defined transition metal center.

  19. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  20. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  1. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasović, Brunislav; Bonifačić, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals CO2-rad , rad CH 2OH, rad CH(CH 3)OH, and rad CH(CH 3)O - have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production 60Co γ-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U rad radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U rad radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism ( Matasović and Bonifačić, 2007). Thus, while both rad CH 2OH and rad CH(CH 3)OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm -3 concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of rad CH(CH 3)OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U rad radicals have been estimated to amount to about ≥85 and 1200 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively.

  2. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matasovic, Brunislav [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bonifacic, Marija, E-mail: bonifacic@irb.h [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-06-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals {sup {center_dot}C}O{sub 2}{sup -}, {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH, {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH, and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})O{sup -} have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U{sup {center_dot}} radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U{sup {center_dot}} radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism (). Thus, while both {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm{sup -3} concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U{sup {center_dot}} radicals have been estimated to amount to about {>=}85 and 1200 dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1

  3. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Tyrosine-Histidine Pair in a Photosystem II-Inspired β-Hairpin Maquette: Kinetics on the Picosecond Time Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagba, Cynthia V; McCaslin, Tyler G; Chi, San-Hui; Perry, Joseph W; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-02-25

    Photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase employ oxidation and reduction of the tyrosine aromatic ring in radical transport pathways. Tyrosine-based reactions involve either proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) or electron transfer (ET) alone, depending on the pH and the pKa of tyrosine's phenolic oxygen. In PSII, a subset of the PCET reactions are mediated by a tyrosine-histidine redox-driven proton relay, YD-His189. Peptide A is a PSII-inspired β-hairpin, which contains a single tyrosine (Y5) and histidine (H14). Previous electrochemical characterization indicated that Peptide A conducts a net PCET reaction between Y5 and H14, which have a cross-strand π-π interaction. The kinetic impact of H14 has not yet been explored. Here, we address this question through time-resolved absorption spectroscopy and 280-nm photolysis, which generates a neutral tyrosyl radical. The formation and decay of the neutral tyrosyl radical at 410 nm were monitored in Peptide A and its variant, Peptide C, in which H14 is replaced by cyclohexylalanine (Cha14). Significantly, both electron transfer (ET, pL 11, L = lyonium) and PCET (pL 9) were accelerated in Peptide A and C, compared to model tyrosinate or tyrosine at the same pL. Increased electronic coupling, mediated by the peptide backbone, can account for this rate acceleration. Deuterium exchange gave no significant solvent isotope effect in the peptides. At pL 9, but not at pL 11, the reaction rate decreased when H14 was mutated to Cha14. This decrease in rate is attributed to an increase in reorganization energy in the Cha14 mutant. The Y5-H14 mechanism in Peptide A is reminiscent of proton- and electron-transfer events involving YD-H189 in PSII. These results document a mechanism by which proton donors and acceptors can regulate the rate of PCET reactions.

  4. Redox modulation of flavin and tyrosine determines photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer and photoactivation of BLUF photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathes, T.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Stierl, M.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in biological systems, especially in proteins, is a highly intriguing matter. Its mechanistic details cannot be addressed by structural data obtained by crystallography alone because this provides only static information on a given redox system. In combination with

  5. Tunneling Kinetics and Nonadiabatic Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Proteins: The Effect of Electric Fields and Anharmonic Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Russo, Douglas; Champion, Paul M

    2017-07-20

    A proper description of proton donor-acceptor (D-A) distance fluctuations is crucial for understanding tunneling in proton-coupled electron transport (PCET). The typical harmonic approximation for the D-A potential results in a Gaussian probability distribution, which does not appropriately reflect the electronic repulsion forces that increase the energetic cost of sampling shorter D-A distances. Because these shorter distances are the primary channel for thermally activated tunneling, the analysis of tunneling kinetics depends sensitively on the inherently anharmonic nature of the D-A interaction. Thus, we have used quantum chemical calculations to account for the D-A interaction and developed an improved model for the analysis of experimental tunneling kinetics. Strong internal electric fields are also considered and found to contribute significantly to the compressive forces when the D-A distance distribution is positioned below the van der Waals contact distance. This model is applied to recent experiments on the wild type (WT) and a double mutant (DM) of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO). The compressive force necessary to prepare the tunneling-active distribution in WT SLO is found to fall in the ∼ nN range, which greatly exceeds the measured values of molecular motor and protein unfolding forces. This indicates that ∼60-100 MV/cm electric fields, aligned along the D-A bond axis, must be generated by an enzyme conformational interconversion that facilitates the PCET tunneling reaction. Based on the absolute value of the measured tunneling rate, and using previously calculated values of the electronic matrix element, the population of this tunneling-active conformation is found to lie in the range 10 -5 -10 -7 , indicating this is a rare structural fluctuation that falls well below the detection threshold of recent ENDOR experiments. Additional analysis of the DM tunneling kinetics leads to a proposal that a disordered (high entropy) conformation could be

  6. Hangman Catalysis for Photo–and Photoelectro–Chemical Activation of Water Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms of Small Molecule Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocera, Daniel G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The weakest link for the large-scale deployment of solar energy and for that matter, any renewable energy source, is its storage. The energy needs of future society demands are so large that storage must be in the form of fuels owing to their high energy density. Indeed, society has intuitively understood this disparity in energy density as it has developed over the last century as all large-scale energy storage in our society is in the form of fuels. But these fuels are carbon-based. The imperative for the discipline of chemistry, and more generally science, is to develop fuel storage methods that are easily scalable, carbon-neutral and sustainable. These methods demand the creation of catalysts to manage the multi-electron, multi-proton transformations of the conversion of small molecules into fuels. The splitting of water using solar light is a fuel-forming reaction that meets the imperative of large scale energy storage. As light does not directly act on water to engender its splitting into its elemental components, we have designed “hangman” catalysts to effect the energy conversion processes needed for the fuel forming reactions. The hangman construct utilizes a pendant acid/base functionality within the secondary coordination sphere that is “hung” above the redox platform onto which substrate binds. In this way, we can precisely control the delivery of a proton to the substrate, thus ensuring efficient coupling between the proton and electron. An emphasis was on the coupling of electron and proton in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ni, Co and Fe porphyrin platforms. Electrokinetic rate laws were developed to define the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The HER of Co and Fe porphyrins was metal-centered. Surprisingly, HER this was not the case for Ni porphyrins. In this system, the PCET occurred at the porphyrin platform to give rise to a phlorin. This is one of the first examples of an HER occurring via ligand non

  7. Impact of OH Radical-Initiated H2CO3 Degradation in the Earth's Atmosphere via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Sourav; Hazra, Montu K

    2016-02-04

    The decomposition of isolated carbonic acid (H2CO3) molecule into CO2 and H2O (H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O) is prevented by a large activation barrier (>35 kcal/mol). Nevertheless, it is surprising that the detection of the H2CO3 molecule has not been possible yet, and the hunt for the free H2CO3 molecule has become challenging not only in the Earth's atmosphere but also on Mars. In view of this fact, we report here the high levels of quantum chemistry calculations investigating both the energetics and kinetics of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation reaction to interpret the loss of the H2CO3 molecule in the Earth's atmosphere. It is seen from our study that proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are the two mechanisms by which the OH radical initiates the degradation of the H2CO3 molecule. Moreover, the PCET mechanism is potentially the important one, as the effective barrier, defined as the difference between the zero point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state and the total energy of the isolated starting reactants in terms of bimolecular encounters, for the PCET mechanism at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory is ∼3 to 4 kcal/mol lower than the effective barrier height associated with the HAT mechanism. The CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level predicted effective barrier heights for the degradations of the two most stable conformers of H2CO3 molecule via the PCET mechanism are only ∼2.7 and 4.3 kcal/mol. A comparative reaction rate analysis at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory has also been carried out to explore the potential impact of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation relative to that from water (H2O), formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and sulfuric acid (SA) assisted H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O decomposition reactions in both the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. The comparison of the reaction rates reveals that, although the atmospheric concentration of the OH radical is

  8. Kinetic Effects Of Increased Proton Transfer Distance On Proton-Coupled Oxidations Of Phenol-Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    To test the effect of varying the proton donor-acceptor distance in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, the oxidation of a bicyclic amino-indanol (2) is compared with that of a closely related phenol with an ortho CPh2NH2 substituent (1). Spectroscopic, structural, thermochemical and computational studies show that the two amino-phenols are very similar, except that the O⋯N distance (dON) is >0.1 Å longer in 2 than in 1. The difference in dON is 0.13 ± 0.03 Å from X-ray crystallography and 0.165 Å from DFT calculations. Oxidations of these phenols by outer-sphere oxidants yield distonic radical cations •OAr–NH3+ by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). Simple tunneling and classical kinetic models both predict that the longer donor-acceptor distance in 2 should lead to slower reactions, by ca. two orders of magnitude, as well as larger H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, kinetic studies show that the compound with the longer proton-transfer distance, 2, exhibits smaller KIEs and has rate constants that are quite close to those of 1. For example, the oxidation of 2 by the triarylamminium radical cation N(C6H4OMe)3•+ (3a+) occurs at (1.4 ± 0.1) × 104 M-1 s-1, only a factor of two slower than the closely related reaction of 1 with N(C6H4OMe)2(C6H4Br)•+ (3b+). This difference in rate constants is well accounted for by the slightly different free energies of reaction: ΔG°(2 + 3a+) = +0.078 V vs. ΔG°(1 + 3b+) = +0.04 V. The two phenol-amines do display some subtle kinetic differences: for instance, compound 2 has a shallower dependence of CPET rate constants on driving force (Brønsted α, Δln(k)/Δln(Keq)). These results show that the simple tunneling model is not a good predictor of the effect of proton donor-acceptor distance on concerted-electron transfer reactions involving strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. Computational analysis of the observed similarity of the two phenols emphasizes the importance of the highly

  9. Concert Club

    CERN Document Server

    Concert Club

    2010-01-01

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) Entrée B - Bâtiment 500 - Amphithéâtre Mardi 26 janvier à 20 h 30 Le quintette Liliane JAQUES, flûte traversière Jade AZKOUL, guitare Gaëlle POIRIER, accordéon Mirella VEDEVA, contrebasse Gueorgui POPOV, piano Au programme Portraits d’Astor PIAZZOLLA Entrée libre Nos concerts sur notre site : www.concerts-cern.com et sur les sites : www.whys.org et www.agendadegeneve.ch

  10. CONCERT CLUB

    CERN Document Server

    Concert club

    2010-01-01

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) entrée B - bâtiment 500 - amphithéâtre Mardi 19 janvier 2010 à 20 h 30 Klaus MAURER violon Joanna BRZEZINSKA piano Au programme : Chopin, Rodrigo * * * * * Mardi 26 janvier 2010 à 20 h 30 Le quintette Liliane JAQUES flûte traversière Jade AZKOUL guitare Gaëlle POIRIER accordéon Mirella VEDEVA contrebasse Gueorgui POPOV piano Au programme : Portraits d’Astor Piazzlla   entrée libre Nos concerts sur notre site : www.concerts-cern.com et sur les sites : www.whys.org et www.agendadegeneve.ch

  11. Concerts & Opera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Kristjan Järvi dirigeerimas Vienna Tonkünstler Orchestra't 16. veebr. Leedsis Town Hallis (esitusel ka Arvo Pärdi Symphony No. 3), 20. veebr. Bristolis ja 23. veebr. Basingstoke'is. Neeme Järvi dirigeerimas Royal Scottish National Orcestra't 23. veebr. Glasgowis Royal Concert Hallis ja 24. veebr. Edinburghis Queens Hallis

  12. Concert Club

    CERN Document Server

    Concert Club

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) Entrée B - bâtiment 500 - Amphithéâtre Mardi 1er Décembre 2009 à 20 h 30 Patrick VO VANG PHUC piano Au programme : Scarlatti, Mozart, Schubert, Debussy * * * * * Mardi 8 Décembre 2009 à 20 h 30 « CRESCENDO » duo de guitares avec Danielle VILLARD et Luciano ROSSETTI Au programme : Johnson, J.S Bach, Vivaldi, Scheidler, Pujol, Albeniz, Granados, Rizzuti, Satie, Rivoal * * * * * Dimanche 13 décembre 2009 à 17 h 00 piano à 4 mains avec Christel BARBERI et Jean-Pierre VARONE Au programme : Brahms, Schubert, Rachmaninov Entrée libre Nos concerts sur notre site : www.concerts-cern.com et sur les sites : www.whys.org et www.agendadegeneve.ch  

  13. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  14. Niš music festival and avant-garde music: Case studies concert of the Radio Belgrade Electronic Studio and 'John Cage's Evening'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Sonja S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the period of domination of socialist realism and moderate modernism, which meant for the Serbian post-war musical creativity isolation from the European and world trends of musical avant-garde, during the sixties and seventies of the twentieth century music of the Serbian and Yugoslav composers of the younger generation becomes more open to a new sound concepts of serialism, aleatory, electronic media and minimalism. A radical break with tradition and changes in almost all aspects of the new music - aesthetics, notation, sound realization - made difficult to establish a clear criteria for its evaluation and therefore, the general reception of the most actual tendencies. Beside two institutional musical places where the contemporary world and national music was performed and promoted - International Music Biennale Zagreb, founded in 1961 and annual Review of Yugoslav Music in Opatija, founded in 1964 (since 1979 under the name Review of Musical Creativity of Yugoslavia, concert and festival stages in the leading musical centers in former Yugoslavia have shown considerable restraint to the contemporary music. In the case of the reception of electro-acoustic compositions created in the Radio Belgrade Electronic Studio and John Cage's sonatas for prepared piano that were performed at the Niš (October Music Festival during the eighties of the 20th century, the paper discusses about the representation of avant-garde music at this manifestation and openness of the local public towards the contemporary compositional streams. At the concert held in 1981 in the hall of the Niš Symphony Orchestra were presented the latest achievements of the composers Miloš Petrović (Anton with or without Webern, 1981, Paul Pignon (Cartoon, 1980, Janez Matičič (Fusions, 1979, Vladan Radovanović (Audiospacial, 1975-78 and Dragoslav Ortakov (Eleorp, 1976 realized in the Radio Belgrade Electronic Studio founded in 1971. Serbian pianist Nada Kolundžija performed in

  15. Acetylacetone as an efficient electron shuttle for concerted redox conversion of arsenite and nitrate in the opposite direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Song, Xiaojie; Zhang, Shujuan; Wu, Bingdang; Zhang, Guoyang; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-11-01

    The redox conversion of arsenite and nitrate has direct effects on their potential environment risks. Due to the similar reduction potentials, there are few technologies that can simultaneously oxidize arsenite and reduce nitrate in one process. Here, we demonstrate that a diketone-mediated photochemical process could efficiently do this. A combined experimental and theoretical investigation was conducted to elucidate the mechanisms behind the redox conversion in the UV/acetylacetone (AA) process. Our key finding is that UV irradiation significantly changed the redox potential of AA. The excited AA, 3 (AA)*, acted as a semiquinone radical-like electron shuttle. For arsenite oxidation, the efficiency of 3 (AA)* was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those of quinone-type electron shuttles, whereas the consumption of AA was 2-4 orders of magnitude less than those of benzonquinones. The oxidation of arsenite and reduction of nitrate could be both accelerated when they existed together in UV/AA process. The results indicate that small diketones are some neglected but potent electron shuttles of great application potential in regulating aquatic redox reactions with the combination of UV irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Musical Students’ Concert Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr S. Plokhotnyuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available . The article presents detailed analysis of performance training of future teachers of music at higher educational establishments and offers ways to overcome the problem of musical students’ concert practice organization.

  17. Cyclization in concert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The berberine bridge enzyme catalyzes the crucial step in the biosynthesis of an important class of alkaloids through a reaction that cannot be carried out using conventional organic chemistry tools. Characterization of the enzyme demonstrates a concerted mechanism that couples two distinct chemical

  18. Concerts-club

    CERN Multimedia

    Concerts-club

    2012-01-01

      Avis à tous les musiciens et mélomanes Le Concerts-Club du CERN reprend du service ! Après une longue pause due, entre autres, aux travaux de rénovation de l’Amphithéâtre, une nouvelle équipe s’est lancée dans la reprise de l’organisation du Concerts-Club, à raison d’un concert par mois. 1er concert : mardi 20 mars à 20h30 Lieu : CERN-Meyrin : Entrée B – Bâtiment 500 – Amphithéâtre Prochaines dates : Mardi 24 avril 2012 Mardi 15 mai  2012 Mardi 19 juin  2012 Pour donner au Club l’élan nécessaire au redémarrage, les changements suivants ont été mis en place : – Possibilité d’être membre du Club : carte à Fr 25.00 par an. – Entr&e...

  19. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  20. The prototypical proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR from Escherichia coli facilitates chloramphenicol uptake into bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Sharma, Neha

    2018-01-01

    . However, to date no report exists on any specific transport protein that facilitates Cam uptake. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) YdgR from Escherichia coli is a prototypical member of the POT family, functioning in proton-coupled uptake of di- and tripeptides. By following bacterial...

  1. Teaching bioinformatics in concert.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya L Goodman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Can biology students without programming skills solve problems that require computational solutions? They can if they learn to cooperate effectively with computer science students. The goal of the in-concert teaching approach is to introduce biology students to computational thinking by engaging them in collaborative projects structured around the software development process. Our approach emphasizes development of interdisciplinary communication and collaboration skills for both life science and computer science students.

  2. Film in concert

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    From the very beginning of cinema, music always played an important role in the history of filmmaking. Nonetheless, film music is judged by critics as a kind of low-grade art form. However, the majority of film score composers enjoyed a classical education and composed as well for the silver screen as for the concert hall. Film music also has its roots in the musical era of romanticism. Therefore, symphonic film scores can be regarded as program music in a broader sense. These scores were inf...

  3. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca2+ exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Hirschi, Kendal D; Pittman, Jon K

    2008-01-01

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca2+ transporters encoded by cation/H+ exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca2+ into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca2+ release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevations. Recent analysis of Arabidopsis CAX knockout mutants, particularly cax1 and cax3, identified a variety of phenotypes including sensitivity to abiotic stresses, which indicated that these transporters might play a ...

  4. Concert: Harvestehuder Kammersymphonie

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Harvestehuder Kammersymphonie (Hamburg) Tuesday 23 May at 18.00 Main Auditorium (CERN Meyrin)   Tradition et modernité constituent le lien entre tous les musiciens de l’orchestre. La littérature orchestrale de la période classique à l’époque moderne figure régulièrement à leurs programmes. Composé de près d’une centaine d’instrumentistes de toutes professions, l'enthousiasme et la qualité musicale constituent la priorité absolue de leur activité. Après des voyages gagnant en Brésil et Angleterre, une délégation de cet ensemble est de passage dans la région. Ils sont très heureux de pouvoir donner un concert au CERN.

  5. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary Meeting on 11 May 2009 The meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee held on 11 May 2009 was entirely dedicated to the preparation of the TREF meeting on 19 & 20 May 2009. The Committee took note, discussed and agreed on some clarifications on a number of documents and presentations that the Management planned to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: • Personnel statistics 2008: J. Purvis presented the Personnel Statistics for 2008 prepared by HR Department. In line with the previous year, key messages were firstly, a general reduction in staff (2544 to 2400, - 6%), secondly, a reduction in administrative services personnel (from 422 to 387, - 8%) and thirdly, a marked increase in the number of Users and Unpaid Associates (from 8369 to 9140, + 9%) • Five-Yearly Review 2010: A series of draft documents were submitted for discussion, comprising an introductory document explaining the statutory basis for the following four document...

  6. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee in the first quarter of 2009 included: Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) 2009 exercise The committee took note of 2009 MARS ceiling guidelines giving the advancement budget by career path and amounting to approx 1.80% of the basic salary bill. To this will be added 250 steps CERN-wide, financed by savings from implementation of the international indemnity for 2007, 2008 and the first half of 2009. The specific Senior Staff Guidelines, including the proposed number of promotions from Career Path E to F, were also noted. The guidelines with respect to step distribution were also noted: the minima and maxima remain the same as in previous years. Compliance with the guidelines will continue to be monitored closely (more details, including a frequently asked questions section). It was also noted that Financial Awards (awards for extraordinary service and responsibility allowances) may b...

  7. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  8. Standing Concertation Commmittee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 2 november 2007 Extraordinary meeting on 12 November 2007 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 2 November 2007 and 12 November included: Restaurants Supervisory Committee Report The committee took note of the report by the chairman of the Restaurants Supervisory Committee (RSC), T. Lagrange. In particular, it was recorded that, in Restaurant No. 1, the new kitchen and free flow arrangements had been inaugurated and all works had been commissioned on schedule in October 2007.The contractor, Novae, had taken over maintenance of the new kitchen. Some price increases were to be expected in the coming months due mainly to strong increases in the cost of basic ingredients. A problem with bad smells in the area of Restaurant No. 1 was being taken care of by tuning the ventilation system. The RSC wished to thank the management and staff of Restaurant No. 2 for their cooperation while Restaurant No 1 was ...

  9. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had subscribed to the short-term saved leave scheme: approx 58% had subscribed 1 slice, 14% two slices, 5% three slices and 23% four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme to the Director-General for approval. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract to the Director-General for approval. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) was extended for a further year to 3...

  10. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  11. Concert Viewing Headphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Atsuta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An audiovisual interface equipped with a projector, an inclina-tion sensor, and a distance sensor for zoom control has been developed that enables a user to selectively view and listen to specific performers in a video-taped group performance. Dubbed Concert Viewing Headphones, it has both image and sound processing functions. The image processing extracts the portion of the image indicated by the user and projects it free of distortion on the front and side walls. The sound processing creates imaginary microphones for those performers without one so that the user can hear the sound from any performer. Testing using images and sounds captured using a fisheye-lens camera and 37 lavalier microphones showed that sound locali-zation was fastest when an inverse square function was used for the sound mixing and that the zoom function was useful for locating the desired sound performance.

  12. Choeur du CERN : Concert

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Choir

    2017-01-01

    Une œuvre à découvrir! La grande Missa pro defunctis de François-Joseph Gossec (1734-1829) est le chef-d’œuvre tôt venu (à vingt-cinq ans) d’un compositeur qui vivra encore 70 ans après sa création. Elle a connu la gloire, puis s’est fait un peu oublier. Pas du tout le monde cependant : des musicologues ont montré ce que le Requiem de Mozart lui devait ; et il suffit de l’avoir entendue pour comprendre pourquoi Berlioz (qui avait vingt-six ans à la mort de Gossec) en a été impressionné : les nombreux cuivres et bois répartis dans des endroits plus ou moins cachés de la salle de concert pour exprimer les frayeurs du Jugement dernier annoncent son Requiem – et celui de Verdi. Mais « plus encore que par...

  13. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 30 January 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement measure...

  14. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 30 JANUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The Committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement mea...

  15. Standing Concertation Commmittee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 27 February 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members: M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines : in the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff Associatio...

  16. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  17. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 29 SEPTEMBER 2003 Original: English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1 Follow-up from the meetings of TREF and the Finance Committee in September 2003 The last meeting of TREF had been devoted to presentations and clarifications on the 5-Yearly Review process. The content and planning of the 2005 Review are matters for the next Management, which will be presented to TREF next year. Underlining that due account has to be taken of the limited resources available to conduct such an exercise, the Staff Association stated that it looks forward to the concertation process at the SCC in preparing the next 5-Yearly Review to define an optimum set of topics in order to ensure that CERN can attract, retain and motivate the personnel that it needs to remain a centre of excellence. The Chairman of the SCC recalled that an information document on the Cost-Variation Index for 2004 had been transmitted to the Finance Committee last September and that complete information o...

  18. Standing concertation commmittee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    MEETINGS ON 2 AND 9 DECEMBER 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 2 and 9 December 2008 included: Medical Service Report 2007 The Committee took note of the report by Dr. E. Reymond (see http://sc-me.web.cern.ch/sc-me/fr/indexFR.htm) and of a number of points raised during the discussion. It was noted that the number of professional accidents declined in 2007 (361 accidents) in comparison with 2006 (483), as well as their gravity and frequency. The CERN Medical Service carried out a study on cancer prevalence (number of cases) and incidence (new cases per year per 100000 people), between 1993 and 2007, which identified some prostate, breast and colorectal cancers, though less than in the two Host States. Specific preventive actions will be promoted by the CERN CHISboard and the Medical Service in this context as well as in other areas. The committee expressed its thanks to all members of the Medical Service for their work i...

  19. A Concert with Striking Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    An hour before the percussion concert, members of the audience are already filling the foyer of the Copenhagen Opera House. Something special is to happen before the doors to the concert hall open. Percussion instruments—bass drums, bongos, and even a marimba—are exhibited, and people are encoura...

  20. Human proton coupled folic acid transporter is a monodisperse oligomer in the lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol solubilized state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduri, Nanda G; Ernst, Heidi A; Prabhala, Bala K; Bhatt, Shweta; Boesen, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Mirza, Osman

    2018-01-08

    The human proton coupled folic acid transporter PCFT is the major import route for dietary folates. Mutations in the gene encoding PCFT cause hereditary folic acid malabsorption, which manifests itself by compromised folate absorption from the intestine and also in impaired folate transport into the central nervous system. Since its recent discovery, PCFT has been the subject of numerous biochemical studies aiming at understanding its structure and mechanism. One major focus has been its oligomeric state, with some reports supporting oligomers and others a monomer. Here, we report the overexpression and purification of recombinant PCFT. Following detergent screening, n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) were chosen for further work as they exhibited the most optimal solubilization. We found that purified detergent solubilized PCFT was able to bind folic acid, thus indicating a functionally active protein. Size exclusion chromatography showed that PCFT in DDM was polydisperse; the LMNG preparation was clearly monodisperse but with shorter retention time than the major DDM peak. To assess the oligomeric state negative stain electron microscopy was performed which showed a particle with the size of a PCFT dimer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. AIDA: concerted calorimeter development

    CERN Multimedia

    Felix Sefkow

    2013-01-01

    AIDA – the EU-funded project bringing together more than 80 institutes worldwide – aims at developing new detector solutions for future accelerators. Among the highlights reported at AIDA’s recent annual meeting in Frascati was the completion of an impressive calorimeter test beam programme, conducted by the CALICE collaboration over the past two years at CERN’s PS and SPS beam lines.   The CALICE tungsten calorimeter prototype under test at CERN. This cubic-metre hadron calorimeter prototype has almost 500,000 individually read-out electronics channels – more than all the calorimeters of ATLAS and CMS put together. Calorimeter development in AIDA is mainly motivated by experiments at possible future electron-positron colliders, namely ILC or CLIC. The physics requirements of such future machines demand extremely high-performance calorimetry. This is best achieved using a finely segmented system that reconstructs events using the so-called pa...

  2. E-Infrastructure Concertation Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The 8th e-Infrastructure Concertation Meeting was held in the Globe from 4 to 5 November to discuss the development of Europe’s distributed computing and storage resources.   Project leaders attend the E-Concertation Meeting at the Globe on 5 November 2010. © Corentin Chevalier E-Infrastructures have become an indispensable tool for scientific research, linking researchers to virtually unlimited e-resources like the grid. The recent e-Infrastructure Concertation Meeting brought together e-Science project leaders to discuss the development of this tool in the European context. The meeting was part of an ongoing initiative to develop a world-class e-infrastructure resource that would establish European leadership in e-Science. The e-Infrastructure Concertation Meeting was organised by the Commission Services (EC) with the support of e-ScienceTalk. “The Concertation meeting at CERN has been a great opportunity for e-ScienceTalk to meet many of the 38 new proje...

  3. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) in Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    actuated) by a counterbalanced hydrogen bond located farther away. To realize such goals, it is necessary to study this effect further. In particular, if...Thus in direct analogy to photoconductivity in a semiconductor, one arrives at a proton photoconductivity effect . We have exploited this analogy to

  4. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  5. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Hirschi, Kendal D; Pittman, Jon K

    2008-05-01

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+)exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recent analysis of Arabidopsis CAX knockout mutants, particularly cax1 and cax3, identified a variety of phenotypes including sensitivity to abiotic stresses, which indicated that these transporters might play a role in mediating the plant's stress response. A common feature of these mutants was the perturbation of H(+)-ATPase activity at both the tonoplast and the plasma membrane, suggesting a tight interplay between the Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers and H(+) pumps. We speculate that indirect regulation of proton flux by the exchangers may be as important as the direct regulation of Ca(2+) flux. These results suggest cautious interpretation of mutant Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger phenotypes that may be due to either perturbed Ca(2+) or H(+) transport.

  6. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  7. Native Frames: Disentangling Sequential from Concerted Three-Body Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Severt, T.; Berry, Ben; Jochim, Bethany; Feizollah, Peyman; Kaderiya, Balram; Zohrabi, M.; Ablikim, U.; Ziaee, Farzaneh; Raju P., Kanaka; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2018-03-01

    A key question concerning the three-body fragmentation of polyatomic molecules is the distinction of sequential and concerted mechanisms, i.e., the stepwise or simultaneous cleavage of bonds. Using laser-driven fragmentation of OCS into O++C++S+ and employing coincidence momentum imaging, we demonstrate a novel method that enables the clear separation of sequential and concerted breakup. The separation is accomplished by analyzing the three-body fragmentation in the native frame associated with each step and taking advantage of the rotation of the intermediate molecular fragment, CO2 + or CS2 + , before its unimolecular dissociation. This native-frame method works for any projectile (electrons, ions, or photons), provides details on each step of the sequential breakup, and enables the retrieval of the relevant spectra for sequential and concerted breakup separately. Specifically, this allows the determination of the branching ratio of all these processes in OCS3 + breakup. Moreover, we find that the first step of sequential breakup is tightly aligned along the laser polarization and identify the likely electronic states of the intermediate dication that undergo unimolecular dissociation in the second step. Finally, the separated concerted breakup spectra show clearly that the central carbon atom is preferentially ejected perpendicular to the laser field.

  8. Not your grandfather's concert hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Russell; Malenka, Richard; Griffith, Charles; Friedlander, Steven

    2004-05-01

    The opening of Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall on 12 September 2003, restores Andrew Carnegie's original 1891 concept of having three outstanding auditoriums of different sizes under one roof, and creates a 21st-century venue for music performance and education. With concerts ranging from early music to avant-garde multimedia productions, from jazz to world music, and from solo recitals to chamber music, Zankel Hall expands the breadth and depth of Carnegie Hall's offerings. It allows for the integration of programming across three halls with minifestivals tailored both to the size and strengths of each hall and to the artists and music to be performed. The new flexible space also provides Carnegie Hall with an education center equipped with advanced communications technology. This paper discusses the unique program planned for this facility and how the architects, theatre consultants, and acousticians developed a design that fulfilled the client's expectations and coordinated the construction of the facility under the floor of the main Isaac Stern Auditorium without having to cancel a single performance.

  9. Chinese Islam: A Complete Concert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ben-Dor Benite

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthew S. Erie, China and Islam: The Prophet, the Party, and Law. Cambridge University Press, 2016. 472 pp. $140 (cloth/e-book. Jonathan Lipman, ed., Islamic Thought in China: Sino-Muslim Intellectual Evolution from the 17th to the 20th Century. Edinburgh University Press, 2016. 288 pp. £70 (cloth; e-book. Roberta Tontini, Muslim Sanzijing: Shifts and Continuities in the Definition of Islam in China. Brill, 2016. 238 pp. $125 (cloth. Why study a Chinese “minority” and its history? The task of scholars of Chinese Islam since the 1990s has been twofold: on the one hand, we have wanted to study Islam in China in its Chinese social and cultural context, as opposed to imagining it as a single separate entity, and to show that its history is relevant and meaningful for Chinese history in general. One could almost say that this goal was achieved a while ago. The next task has been to make the study of Chinese Islam and its history meaningful and useful for the greater community of scholars of Islam in general. It seems to me that with the books reviewed here, and with others in the making, we are getting close to reaching this target. In 1910, Marshall Broomhall’s Islam in China declared that Chinese Islam was a “neglected problem.” These books show that it is no longer neglected, and no longer a “problem”; rather, it is an exciting topic. Indeed, a complete, even if not harmonious, concert.

  10. Concertation or Consultation. That is the question.

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    In April 2017 (as reported in Echo No. 268), the Staff Association, when invited to an Enlarged Directorate meeting, stressed that “concertation requires a positive attitude and mutual trust. […] The Staff Association is firmly committed in this respect but does not consider that the concertation process is as effective as we should like”. The continued lack, for the Staff Association, of an effective concertation process led to a revisiting of the situation in June 2017 (Echo No. 271), in an article that stressed the importance of the concertation process at CERN since it was introduced in 1983, the year in which the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) replaced the Standing Consultation Committee. The importance of concertation was also highlighted by Mr Bernard Dormy, Chair of TREF, in an interview he gave to the Staff Association at the end of January 2018 (Echo No. 284), when he retired from his position as the Chair of the Forum. “To sum it up, I would certainl...

  11. Substance use patterns and in-hospital care of adolescents and young adults attending music concerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruest, Stephanie M; Stephan, Alexander M; Masiakos, Peter T; Biddinger, Paul D; Camargo, Carlos A; Kharasch, Sigmund

    2018-01-09

    Few studies describe medical complaints and substance use patterns related to attending music concerts. As such, the objective of this study is to describe patient demographics, substance use and intoxication patterns, and medical interventions provided to adolescents and young adults assessed in an emergency department (ED) for complaints directly related to concert attendance. A retrospective chart review of patients 13-30 years old who were transported to the ED directly from music concerts between January 2011 and December 2015 was conducted. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyze patient demographic, intervention, and substance use data. There were 115 concerts identified, of which 48 (42%) were linked to 142 relevant ED visits; the total number of attendees at each concert is unknown. The mean age of the 142 described patients was 19.5 years (SD 3.3) with 72% pop and electronic dance music concerts was associated with the widest ranges of GCS scores (8-15 and 6-14 respectively), mass casualty incident declarations, and among the highest mean blood alcohol levels (246 and 244 mg/dL, respectively). Substance use is the predominant reason for music concert related ED visits and patients may have serious levels of intoxication, receiving multiple medical interventions. These data demonstrate the need for additional large-scale studies to confirm trends and increase awareness of this important public health problem.

  12. Two-electron Oxidation of a Twisted Non Anti-aromatic 40π ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conjugated pathway and exhibit properties similar to that of a porphyrin,. 2. In stark contrast to a porphyrin, expanded porphyrins7 15 are more vulnerable to redox reactions which are gener- ally proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms.16 18.

  13. Function and expression of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter Slc36a1 along the rat gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, M. L.; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Tønsberg, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intestinal absorption via membrane transporters may determine the pharmacokinetics of drug compounds. The hypothesis is that oral absorption of gaboxadol (4, 5, 6, 7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c] pyridine-3-ol) in rats occurs via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter, r....... The intestinal expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (q-RT-PCR). Furthermore, the hPAT1-/rPAT1-mediated transport of gaboxadol or L-proline was studied in hPAT1-expressing X. laevis oocytes, Caco-2 cell monolayers and excised segments of the rat intestine. KEY RESULTS......). The in vitro carrier-mediated uptake rate of L-proline in the excised intestinal segments was highest in the mid jejunum and low in the colon. The in vitro uptake and the in vivo absorption correlated with the expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA along the rat intestine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The results...

  14. Concertation rather than Consultation or Negotiation!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, the Concertation between the Management and the Personnel has been in effect since 1983, the year in which the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) came to replace the Standing Consultation Committee. Since then, the concertation process has been enshrined in the Staff Rules and Regulations, which define its scope of application: “Any proposed measures of a general nature regarding the conditions of employment or association of members of the personnel shall be the subject of discussion within the SCC” (S VII 1.08). More generally, all questions relating to the employment and working conditions of the members of personnel are discussed in the SCC, including in particular issues of remuneration, social protection (CHIS and Pension Fund), career evolution... In Article S VII 1.07 of the Staff Rules and Regulations it is also stated that: “Discussion shall mean a procedure whereby the Director-General and the Staff Association concert together to try to reach a common po...

  15. CONCERT MANAGEMENT IN CROATIA: OBSTACLES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Basara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of concert management in the Republic of Croatia encounters numerous obstacles in any attempt to institutionalize it. Unlike other countries in the European Union, there is no register of the concert stages, venues as well as facilities for the provision of hearing / consumption of music in the form of performances. Process management organization is incomplete, and institutions that are closely associated with such events do not carry out the classification, categorization and analysis of events that are within the concerts' domain. Commercial music, economically far most cost-effective, is completely ignored and within the framework of cultural events not even the slightest attention is given to it. On the contrary, it is considered the music of poor quality and completely irrelevant. This paper tries to frame the mentioned genre, which includes various musical directions that economically bring significant benefits and help the survival of these related activities indirectly, and ultimately have a positive impact on the economy. Comparing global trends it speaks about the position of the Croatian music industry and lists the main obstacles for setting up a solid foundation for the construction of an adequate system of indexation of concert businesses that, as part of the creative industries records a meteoric economic growth.

  16. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  17. Proton-coupled organic cation antiporter-mediated uptake of apomorphine enantiomers in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    R(-)-Apomorphine is a dopamine agonist used for rescue management of motor function impairment associated with levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease patients. The aim of this study was to examine the role of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in uptake of R(-)-apomorphine and its S-enantiomer in human brain, using human endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 as a model. Uptake of R(-)- or S(+)-apomorphine into hCMEC/D3 cells was measured under various conditions to evaluate its time-, concentration-, energy- and ion-dependency. Inhibition by selected organic cations was also examined. Uptakes of both R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine increased with time. The initial uptake velocities of R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine were concentration-dependent, with similar Km and Vmax values. The cell-to-medium (C/M) ratio of R(-)-apomorphine was significantly reduced by pretreatment with sodium azide, but was not affected by replacement of extracellular sodium ion with N-methylglucamine or potassium. Intracellular alkalization markedly reduced the uptake, while intracellular acidification increased it, suggesting that the uptake is driven by an oppositely directed proton gradient. The C/M ratio was significantly decreased by amantadine, verapamil, pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (substrates or inhibitors of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter), while tetraethylammonium (substrate of organic cation transporters (OCTs)) and carnitine (substrate of carnitine/organic cation transporter 2; (OCTN2)) had no effect. R(-)-Apomorphine uptake was competitively inhibited by diphenhydramine. Our results indicate that R(-)-apomorphine transport in human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model cells is similar to S(+)-apomorphine uptake. The transport was dependent on an oppositely directed proton gradient, but was sodium- or membrane potential-independent. The transport characteristics were consistent with involvement of the previously reported proton-coupled organic cation antiporter.

  18. ANALYSIS MUSIC CONCERTS ADOPTING THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF HIT PHENOMENA

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahata Yasuko; Genda Etsuo; Ishii Akira

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the hit phenomenon in entertainment within a society is presented as a stochastic process of interactions of human dynamics. In this paper, we analyzed music to the concert.Knowing the cost of advertising the concert is difficult. But exposure to the media of the artist can be seen. We tried to analysis of music concert itself by performing a prediction of reputation of artists during the concert tour from this exposure.In this paper, The world most pop...

  19. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancelation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multi-drug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications.

  20. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancelation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multi-drug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications. PMID:25022769

  1. The Flux Database Concerted Action (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The background to the IUR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems is summarised. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative, outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation, and presents findings from the working group's activities. The aim of the IUR flux database working group is to bring together researchers to collate data from current experimental studies investigating aspects of radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The database will incorporate parameters describing the time-dependent transfer of radionuclides between soil, plant and animal compartments. Work under the EC Concerted Action considers soil-plant interactions. This initiative has become known as the radionuclide flux database. It is emphasised that the word flux is used in this case simply to indicate the flow of radionuclides between compartments in time. (author)

  2. Acoustic investigations of concert halls for rock music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    Objective measurement data and subjective evaluations have been collected from 20 small-/medium-sized halls in Denmark used for amplified rhythmic music concerts (pop, rock, jazz). The purpose of the study was to obtain knowledge about optimum acoustic conditions for this type of hall. The study...... is motivated by the fact that most concert tickets sold in Denmark relate to concerts within these genres in this kind of venue. The subjective evaluations were carried out by professional musicians and sound engineers who responded on the basis of their experiences working in these (and other) halls. From...

  3. Cosmos in Concert: Combining astronomy and classical music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    Cosmos in Concert is an outreach initiative designed to combine astronomy education with classical music. Over the past several years, this program has presented large-scale multimedia shows for symphony orchestras, educational programs at K-12 schools, and research-oriented university collaborations designed to develop techniques for the sonification of data. Cosmos in Concert has collaborated with institutions including Fermi National Lab, the Adler Planetarium, the Bienen School of Music, and the Colburn School of Music. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of some of the main Cosmos in Concert initiatives and discuss ways these initiatives may be implemented at other institutions.

  4. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  5. Concert | United Nations Orchestra at CERN | 19 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The United Nations Orchestra will give a concert on the occasion of CERN’s 60th anniversary.   Under the baton of conductor and artistic director Antoine Marguier, the Orchestra will have the pleasure to accompany the soloist Maestro Matteo Fedeli, who, under the patronage of the Permanent Mission of Italy to the United Nations, will perform on a Stradivarius violin. The programme for the concert comprises: Jacques Offenbach, Orpheus in the Underworld Overture Franz von Suppé, Poet and Peasant Overture Camille Saint-Saëns, Introduction & Rondo Capriccioso for solo violin and orchestra Georges Bizet, Carmen Suite No. 1 Franz Lehár, Gold and Silver Waltz Gioachino Rossini, William Tell Overture   Doors open at 6 p.m. The concert will take place in a marquee behind the Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN Book your ticket here.

  6. A quantum chemical study of the mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer leading to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    2010-10-01

    The proton pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, has been investigated using hybrid DFT with large chemical models. In previous studies, a gating mechanism was suggested based on electrostatic interpretations of kinetic experiments. The predictions from that analysis are tested here. The main result is that the suggestion of a positively charged transition state for proton transfer is confirmed, while some other suggestions for the gating are not supported. It is shown that a few critical relative energy values from the earlier studies are reproduced with quite high accuracy using the present model calculations. Examples are the forward barrier for proton transfer from the N-side of the membrane to the pump-loading site when the heme a cofactor is reduced, and the corresponding back leakage barrier when heme a is oxidised. An interesting new finding is an unexpected double-well potential for proton transfer from the N-side to the pump-loading site. In the intermediate between the two transition states found, the proton is bound to PropD on heme a. A possible purpose of this type of potential surface is suggested here. The accuracy of the present values are discussed in terms of their sensitivity to the choice of dielectric constant. Only one energy value, which is not critical for the present mechanism, varies significantly with this choice and is therefore less certain.

  7. Gala Concert for the 50th Anniversary of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The CERN 50th Anniversary celebrations will wrap up with music on 18 December with a Gala Concert by the Philharmonic Orchestra of London in Victoria Hall, Geneva. The orchestra will be directed by Tommaso Placidi, a young talented conductor, and will also enjoy the presence of Maxim Vengerov as first violin. This evening is organised by Mrs Suzanne Hurter, with the support of private companies as well as of the city and the canton of Geneva. The concert will begin with the Overture of Wagner's Flying Dutchman. Maxim Vengerov will then interpret Beethoven's Concert for violin and orchestra. The second part of the concert will be devoted to Tschaikovsky's Fourth Symphony. Tickets cost between 35CHF and 140 CHF according to the seat. People working at CERN will have a 10% discount. You may buy your tickets at the Kiosque FK inside the building Pfister Meubles in Meyrin (ch de Rianbosson 5-9) and get your discount by showing your CERN card. Find out more about the seats available, go to the Resaplus Ticket Book...

  8. Concerted Cultivation and Music Learning: Global Issues and Local Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    "Concerted cultivation" has been described as a common, urban middle-class practice concerning the enrollment of children in a variety of age-specific activities that may promote the learning of valuable life skills as well as the development of individual abilities (Lareau, 2003). Music is one such activity. This study investigated the…

  9. Family Music Concerts: Bringing Families, Music Students, and Music Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how conductors of the top performing groups and music education faculty at one university collaborated to create a Family Concert Series for parents and children of all ages, including infants in arms. Recognizing the conflict between "The first three years of life are the most important for educating a young child in…

  10. Parenting Priorities and Pressures: Furthering Understanding of "Concerted Cultivation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Carol; Maxwell, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper re-examines the purposes of a planned and intentional parenting style--"concerted cultivation"--for different middle-class groups, highlighting that social class fraction, ethnicity, and also individual family disposition, guides understandings of the purposes of enrolling children in particular enrichment activities. We…

  11. THE ORIGIN OF CONCERT MUSIC IN NIGERIA, 1850 - 1920 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitch

    Studies on the origins of concert music in Nigeria often dwell on aspects of the ... chronicle its development from its earliest beginnings to the present. ... their children, trying to live as much as possible like Victoria gentlemen.' (Ajayi .... entertainment began in 1822 the movement for a public hall that bore fruit in the building.

  12. Information concerning the results of the concerted work stoppage on 22 June 2011 (from 8-30 to 12-30)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2011-01-01

     Following the concerted work stoppage called by the Staff Association for 22 June 2011 concerning the measures aimed at restoring the financial equilibrium of the Pension Fund, HR Department invited staff members and fellows to declare whether or not they had participated in this action. As indicated in the communication sent to the persons concerned, it was assumed that those who did not complete the electronic declaration form did not take part in the work stoppage. The results are as follows:     Staff and fellows Declarations: Yes (took part in the concerted work stoppage) 373 Declarations: No (did not take part in the concerted work stoppage) 386 Those requisitioned 120 Those not able to participate in the concerted work stoppage (leave, absence, training…) ...

  13. Prehospital severity scoring at major rock concert events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, T B; Koenigsberg, M; Bunney, E B; Schurgin, B; Levy, P; Willens, J; Tanner, L

    1997-01-01

    Rock and contemporary music concerts are popular, recurrent events requiring on-site medical staffing. To describe a novel severity score used to stratify the level of acuity of patients presenting to first-aid stations at these events. Retrospective review of charts generated at the first-aid stations of five major rock concerts within a 60,000 spectator capacity, outdoor, professional sports stadium. Participants included all concert patrons presenting to the stadium's first-aid stations as patients. Data were collected on patient demographics, history of drug or ethanol usage while at the concert event, first-aid station time, treatment rendered, diagnosis, and disposition. All patients evaluated were retrospectively assigned a "DRUG-ROCK" Injury Severity Score (DRISS) to stratify their level of acuity. Individual concert events and patient dispositions were compared statistically using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and the ANOVA Mean tests. Approximately 250,000 spectators attended the five concert events. First-aid stations evaluated 308 patients (utilization rate of 1.2 per 1,000 patrons). The most common diagnosis was minor trauma (130; 42%), followed in frequency by ethanol/illicit drug intoxication (98; 32%). The average time in the first-aid station was 23.5 +/- 22.5 minutes (+/- standard deviation; range: 5-150 minutes). Disposition of patients included 100 (32.5%) who were treated and released; 98 (32%) were transported by paramedics to emergency departments (EDs); and 110 (35.5%) signed-out against medical advise (AMA), refusing transport. The mean DRISS was 4.1 (+/- 2.65). Two-thirds (67%) of the study population were ranked as mild by DRISS criteria (score = 1-4), with 27% rated as moderate (score = 5-9), and 6% severe (score > 10). The average of severity scores was highest (6.5) for patients transported to hospitals, and statistically different from the scores of the average of the treated and released and AMA groups (p rock concerts.

  14. Conformational analysis of the deoxyribofuranose ring in DNA by means of sums of proton-proton coupling constants: A graphical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkel, L.J.; Altona, C.

    1987-01-01

    A graphical method is presented for the conformational analysis of the sugar ring in DNA fragments by means of proton-proton couplings. The coupling data required for this analysis consist of sums of couplings, which are referred to as sigma 1' (= J1'2' + J1'2''), sigma 2' (= J1'2' + J2'3' + J2'2''), sigma 2'' (= J1'2'' + J2''3' + J2'2'') and sigma 3' (= J2'3' + J2''3' + J3'4'). These sums of couplings correspond to the distance between the outer peaks of the H1', H2', H2'' and H3' [31P] resonances, respectively, (except for sigma 2' and sigma 2'' in the case of a small chemical shift difference between the H2' and H2'' resonances) and can often be obtained from 1H-NMR spectra via first-order measurement, obviating the necessity of a computer-assisted simulation of the fine structure of these resonances. Two different types of graphs for the interpretation of the coupling data are discussed: the first type of graph serves to probe as to whether or not the sugar ring occurs as a single conformer, and if so to analyze the coupling data in terms of the geometry of this sugar ring. In cases where the sugar ring does not occur as a single conformer, but as a blend of N- and S-type sugar puckers, the second type of graph is used to analyze the coupling data in terms of the geometry and population of the most abundant form. It is shown that the latter type of analysis can be carried out on the basis of experimental values for merely sigma 1',sigma 2' and sigma 2'', without any assumptions or restrictions concerning a relation between the geometry of the N- and S-type conformer. In addition, the question is discussed as to how insight can be gained into the conformational purity of the sugar ring from the observed fine structure of the H1' resonance

  15. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L-90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended...

  16. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Pierre; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended....

  17. Standing Concertation Committee: Ordinary Meeting on 1 September 2004

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Original: English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. Preparation for the 5-Yearly Review 2005 The Committee took note that preparatory work had started over the summer months on various topics for the 5-Yearly Review, in line with the internal planning presented to the SCC last June. Concertation process and working procedures Referring to its recent publications, the Staff Association raised this subject in connection with the organization and procedures of the HR study teams and CFO discussion group working on the various topics which are to be covered in the 5-Yearly Review. After some debate, both the Management and the Staff Association underlined the importance that they attach to an efficient concertation process. Both parties agreed to continue the discussion after the meeting. Data collection questionnaire The SCC discussed the content of the questionnaire for the data collection enquiry to be launched this autumn. Subject to some further clarifications and improv...

  18. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE: ORDINARY MEETING ON 5 FEBRUARY 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Original : English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1-The internal concertation process Responding to various questions in this connection raised by the Staff Association, the Chairman stated that the Management wishes to diminish in no way the role of the SCC in the internal concertation process, as set out in chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. On the contrary, he underlined the importance of ensuring this process to debate strategic issues concerning employment conditions, prior to decisions taken by the Director-General. On a point of clarification, he confirmed that, as discussed at the January meeting of the Executive Board, the Management wishes to abolish the Long-Term Contract Board and the Senior Staff Advancement Committee; the SCC took note of this intention. Simplified procedures without the Committees would be presented as soon as possible to the SCC, together with amendments to the relevant Administrative Circulars. 2-MAPS The Committee discussed th...

  19. Blind Concert: The World and Its Transformation through Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Milović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of a Blind Concert held in Belgrade. In a Blind Concert performance, the concept of “space” transforms not for the sake of transformation itself, but because of the effect it strives to achieve. This eliminates the predominance of an institution of art dictating how a musical work should be approached. Accompanying the interpretation of piano compositions, the vocalist let out screams, voices, and noises, which, one may say, could not be summoned inside us, because they have yet to be articulated. I will articulate the effects of the desired transitional forms that have remained trapped and unrepresented in social standardization in terms of Badiou’s inaesthetics.

  20. Practicing perfection: How concert soloists prepare for performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chaffin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Musical performances by concert soloists in the Western classical tradition are normally memorized. For memory to work reliably under the pressures of the concert stage, the performance must be practiced until it is thoroughly automatic. At the same time, the performance must be fresh and spontaneous in order to communicate emotionally with the audience. The resolution of this apparent contradiction is provided by longitudinal case studies of concert soloists preparing new works for performance. Like expert memorists in other domains, experienced musicians use highly practiced retrieval schemes to accomplish their extraordinary feats of memory. Performers have a mental map of the piece in mind as they perform that tells them where they are and what comes next - a series of landmarks, hierarchically organized by the sections and subsections of the music. The musician attends to these performance cues in order to ensure that the performance unfolds as planned. Performance cues are established by thinking about a particular feature of the music during practice so that it later comes to mind automatically. Performance cues help the soloist consciously monitor and control the rapid, automatic actions of playing, while adjusting to the needs of the moment. During practice, the musician attends mostly to basic performance cues representing critical technical features (e.g., fingerings,andinterpretive performance cues, representing phrasings, and changes in dynamics, tempo, and timbre. During performance, the musician hopes to attend mainly to expressive performance cues representing the musical feelings to be conveyed to the audience (e.g. excitement. We illustrate this analysis with a typical case study of a concert pianist learning J.S. Bach's Italian Concerto (Presto.

  1. Concerted orientation induced unidirectional water transport through nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Lu, Hangjun; Li, Jinyuan; Bao, Jingdong; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2009-11-14

    The dynamics of water inside nanochannels is of great importance for biological activities as well as for the design of molecular sensors, devices, and machines, particularly for sea water desalination. When confined in specially sized nanochannels, water molecules form a single-file structure with concerted dipole orientations, which collectively flip between the directions along and against the nanotube axis. In this paper, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we observed a net flux along the dipole-orientation without any application of an external electric field or external pressure difference during the time period of the particular concerted dipole orientations of the molecules along or against the nanotube axis. We found that this unique special-directional water transportation resulted from the asymmetric potential of water-water interaction along the nanochannel, which originated from the concerted dipole orientation of the water molecules that breaks the symmetry of water orientation distribution along the channel within a finite time period. This finding suggests a new mechanism for achieving high-flux water transportation, which may be useful for nanotechnology and biological applications.

  2. Statistics regarding the concerted work stoppage of 28 April 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following the concerted work stoppage of Friday, 28 April, HR Department sent out a questionnaire to all staff members in order to determine the number of those who participated. Questionnaires sent out : 2665 Staff members asked not to return the questionnaire: (on official duty/special leave/sick leave/annual leave) -1006 of which, those who took one day only of annual leave linked to the weekend of 1st May [430] Staff members called upon to perform their duties: -217 Total number of forms expected to be returned 1442 It was presumed that all those who had not returned their forms had not taken part in the work stoppage. After a count and verification of the questionnaires (returned up to 11 May) together with a representative of the Staff Association, the results are the following: Those who specifically indicated that they took part in the concerted work stoppage: 166 11.5% YES Non-participation 1276 88.5% NO of which, those who wanted to indicate that they did not ta...

  3. The European concerted action on air pollution epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann-Liebrich, U [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Social and Preventive Medicine

    1996-12-31

    The European Concerted Action on Air Pollution Epidemiology was started in 1990 with the aim of bringing together European researchers in the field and improving research through collaboration and by preparing documents which would help to this end and by organizing workshops. A further aim was to stimulate cooperative research. Air pollution epidemiology investigates human effects of community air pollution by epidemiological methods. Epidemiology in general investigates the distribution and determinants of health-related states and events in populations. Diseases in which air pollution may play a significant role are mainly diseases of the respiratory system, for example chronic non-specific lung disease and lung cancer. Most diseases caused by air pollution can also be caused by other factors. Air pollution epidemiology is therefore specific in the expo variable (community air pollution) rather than in the type of health effects being studied. Air pollution epidemiology is beset with some specially challenging difficulties: ubiquitous exposure and as a consequence limited heterogeneity in exposure, low relative risks, few or specific health end points, and strong confounding. Further on the exposure-effect relationship is complicated by assumptions inherent to different study designs which relate to the exposure duration necessary to produce a certain health effect. In reports and workshops the concerted action tries to propose strategies to deal with these problems. (author)

  4. The European concerted action on air pollution epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann-Liebrich, U. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Social and Preventive Medicine

    1995-12-31

    The European Concerted Action on Air Pollution Epidemiology was started in 1990 with the aim of bringing together European researchers in the field and improving research through collaboration and by preparing documents which would help to this end and by organizing workshops. A further aim was to stimulate cooperative research. Air pollution epidemiology investigates human effects of community air pollution by epidemiological methods. Epidemiology in general investigates the distribution and determinants of health-related states and events in populations. Diseases in which air pollution may play a significant role are mainly diseases of the respiratory system, for example chronic non-specific lung disease and lung cancer. Most diseases caused by air pollution can also be caused by other factors. Air pollution epidemiology is therefore specific in the expo variable (community air pollution) rather than in the type of health effects being studied. Air pollution epidemiology is beset with some specially challenging difficulties: ubiquitous exposure and as a consequence limited heterogeneity in exposure, low relative risks, few or specific health end points, and strong confounding. Further on the exposure-effect relationship is complicated by assumptions inherent to different study designs which relate to the exposure duration necessary to produce a certain health effect. In reports and workshops the concerted action tries to propose strategies to deal with these problems. (author)

  5. Non-concerted ITS evolution in Mammillaria (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpke, Doerte; Peterson, Angela

    2006-12-01

    Molecular studies of 21 species of the large Cactaceae genus Mammillaria representing a variety of intrageneric taxonomic levels revealed a high degree of intra-individual polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2). Only a few of these ITS copies belong to apparently functional genes, whereas most are probably non-functional (pseudogenes). As a multiple gene family, the ITS region is subjected to concerted evolution. However, the high degree of intra-individual polymorphism of up to 36% in ITS1 and up to 35% in ITS2 suggests a non-concerted evolution of these loci in Mammillaria. Conserved angiosperm motifs of ITS1 and ITS2 were compared between genomic and cDNA ITS clones of Mammillaria. Some of these motifs (e.g., ITS1 motif 1, 'TGGT' within ITS2) in combination with the determination of GC-content, length comparisons of the spacers and ITS2 secondary structure (helices II and III) are helpful in the identification of pseudogene rDNA regions.

  6. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE - ORDINARY MEETING ON 26 JUNE 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 June 2007 included: Mutual Aid Fund The Committee took note of the annual report for 2006 by the Chairman of the Mutual Aid Fund and approved contributions to the Fund’s budget from the Management and the Staff Association and thanked the members of the Fund for their work. Administrative Circular No. 12 A (Rev. 1) - Education Fees The Committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 12 A entitled "Education Fees" to the Director-General for approval. The circular is applicable to staff, fellows and scientific associates recruited from 1st January 2007 and to staff who were recruited as Local Staff before that date. Further details of reimbursement of school fees will shortly be available in the form of Frequently Asked Questions on the HR Department website. Administrative Circular No. 31 (Rev. 1) - International Indemnity and Non-Resident Allowance The Committee agreed to reco...

  7. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary Meeting on 3 September 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 3 September 2008 included: Education fees: Indexation of the amounts for accommodation and meals The Committee approved the indexation calculations for accommodation and meals for the academic year 2008-2009. With the indexation of the lump sum payments, accommodation costs for the academic year 2007-2008 will be reimbursed at 529 CHF per month (previously CHF 500). Meals will be reimbursed at 17.50 CHF per meal (unchanged). The ceiling for school transport has been increased from 600 CHF to 622 CHF. Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev. 8) The Committee took note of the modifications to Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev. 8) ‘Recognition of merit of staff members’, concerning provision for the award of exceptional advancement outside the annual advancement exercise to recognize, for example, the completion of a major project. HR Survey The Committee took note of the Head of HR Department...

  8. Crisis behavior: An exploration of theories in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Jason B; Crudo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    How might prominent existing communication theory better explain behavior in a crisis context, when considered in concert with one another? This theoretical work highlights the insight to be gained using Situational Crisis Communication Theory and Bandura's notions of self-efficacy to heighten the explanatory power of the Theory of Planned Behavior as applied to communication during times of crisis. Situational Crisis Communication Theory better explains how past experience with crisis influences the attitudes and social norms of crisis behavior, while Bandura's notion of self-efficacy speaks more directly to the availability of resources as contributing factors to perceived behavioral control in a crisis situation. As such, the incorporation of these well-developed notions into the broader framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior affords greater understanding of the relationship between communication and behavior during a crisis. Further exploration of this theoretical relationship is warranted.

  9. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE - ORDINARY MEETING ON 28 AUGUST 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 28 August 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 12 A (Rev. 1) - Education Fees The Committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 12 A, "Education Fees", to the Director-General for approval. The circular is applicable to staff, fellows and scientific associates recruited before 1 January 2007 (except for local staff). Administrative Circular No. 12 B applies to those recruited from 1 January 2007 and was examined by the Committee in June 2007. It was noted that, at the initiative of HR Department, a number of important simplifications have been introduced. These cover, in particular, lump-sum payments to compensate for accommodation, meals and journey expenses. Further details of payment of education fees will shortly be available in the form of Frequently Asked Questions on the HR Department website. The Chairman thanked HR Department as well as "Team 7" members for init...

  10. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE - ORDINARY MEETING ON 28 AUGUST 2007

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 28 August 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 12 A (Rev. 1) - Education Fees The committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 12 A, Education Fees, to the Director-General for approval. The circular is applicable to staff, fellows and scientific associates recruited before 1 January 2007 (except for local staff). Administrative Circular No. 12 B applies to those recruited from 1 January 2007 and was considered by the committee in June 2007. It was noted that, at the initiative of HR Department, a number of important simplifications have been introduced. These cover in particular lump sum payments to compensate for accommodation, meals and journey expenses. Further details of payment of education fees will shortly be available in the form of Frequently Asked Questions on the HR Department website. The Chairman thanked HR Department as well as "Team 7" members for initiating these simp...

  11. Standing Concertation Commmittee - Ordinary meeting on 10 May 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At its meeting on 10 May 2007, the Standing Concertation Committee discussed the Management’s proposal for the revision of Annex A 1 of the Staff Rules and Regulations. Annex A 1 sets out the principles for future periodic reviews of the personnel’s financial and social conditions and the revision reflects the modifications to review methods decided by the CERN Council in December 2006. The aim is to simplify the processes involved and rationalize the use of resources. The data collection process will be outsourced to a greater extent. The new methods also aim to reduce the overall time required to complete future reviews. Details of procedure will be addressed in subsequent discussions. The Committee approved the document for submission to the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) at its meeting on 31 May and 1 June 2007.

  12. Standing Concertation Commmittee - Ordinary meeting on 27 March 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 March 2007 included: Merit Recognition Guidelines In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the documents entitled 'MARS Guidelines 2007' and the 'Guidelines for Senior Staff Advancement 2007'. Follow-up of Finance Committee and Council meetings The Committee took note of the information provided by S. Lettow, the Director for Finance and Human Resources, including the possibility for a phased increase in Member State contributions from 2008. Registered partnerships It was agreed that staff members with registered partners should be reminded of the social cover available to their partners. Cover is limited to the CERN Health Insurance Scheme and partners may be covered by the Scheme only while the staff member is working. On the staff member's retirement or other change in status, or death, partners are no longer eligible for CHIS cover. Retirement semi...

  13. Standing Concertation Commmittee - Ordinary meeting on 27 March 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 March 2007 included: Merit Recognition Guidelines : in the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the documents entitled MARS Guidelines 2007 and the Guidelines for Senior Staff Advancement 2007. Follow-up of Finance Committee and Council meetings The Committee took note of the information provided by S. Lettow, the Director for Finance and Human Resources, including the possibility for a phased increase in Member State contributions from 2008. Registered partnerships It was agreed that staff members with registered partners should be reminded of the social cover available to their partners. Cover is limited to the CERN Health Insurance Scheme and partners may be covered by the Scheme only while the staff member is working. On the staff members retirement or other change in status, or death, partners are no longer eligible for CHIS cover. Retirement seminars It...

  14. Standing Concertation Commmittee - Ordinary meeting on 10 May 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    At its meeting on 10 May 2007, the Standing Concertation Committee discussed the Management's proposal for the revision of Annex A 1 of the Staff Rules and Regulations. Annex A 1 sets out the principles for future periodic reviews of the personnel's financial and social conditions and the revision reflects the modifications to review methods decided by the CERN Council in December 2006. The aim is to simplify the processes involved and rationalize the use of resources. The data collection process will be outsourced to a greater extent. The new methods also aim to reduce the overall time required to complete future reviews. Details of procedure will be addressed in subsequent discussions. The Committee approved the document for submission to the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) at its meeting on 31 May and 1 June 2007.

  15. Concerted diurnal patterns in riverine nutrient concentrations and physical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholefield, David; Le Goff, Thierry; Braven, Jim; Ebdon, Les; Long, Terry; Butler, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Several long-term sets of hourly nitrate concentration data were obtained through deployment of a nitrate sensor in an upper reach of the River Taw, a small moorland-fed river in the South West of the UK. Examination of the data obtained during periods of low flow and the absence of rainfall in the catchment revealed the presence of marked diurnal cycles, which were in concert and negatively correlated with diurnal cycles in water temperature. After verifying that these cycles were natural, an intensive 90-h field monitoring campaign was conducted, in which river water was sampled hourly and immediately analysed in the laboratory for molybdate-reactive phosphorus (P), nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and pH. Coincident measurements of water temperature, river discharge and solar energy were also taken at, or close to, the site. All measurements revealed diurnal patterns and all patterns were concerted. The cycles of P, nitrate, nitrite, and discharge had two maxima and minima per 24 h, while the cycle of water temperature had one, with a maximum at 20.00 and a minimum at 08.00. The amplitudes of the cycles of P and nitrate were each about 30% of the mean values, while the amplitude of the nitrite cycle was as great as 80% of the mean value on occasions. Both biological and physical mechanisms for the cycling could operate through water temperature and/or incident radiation to account for the observed phenomenon, but there remains uncertainty of which is the more important. The observations have important implications for both the accuracy of pollution assessment in rivers and the physiological rhythms of riverine organisms

  16. Concerted diurnal patterns in riverine nutrient concentrations and physical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, David; Le Goff, Thierry; Braven, Jim; Ebdon, Les; Long, Terry; Butler, Mark

    2005-05-15

    Several long-term sets of hourly nitrate concentration data were obtained through deployment of a nitrate sensor in an upper reach of the River Taw, a small moorland-fed river in the South West of the UK. Examination of the data obtained during periods of low flow and the absence of rainfall in the catchment revealed the presence of marked diurnal cycles, which were in concert and negatively correlated with diurnal cycles in water temperature. After verifying that these cycles were natural, an intensive 90-h field monitoring campaign was conducted, in which river water was sampled hourly and immediately analysed in the laboratory for molybdate-reactive phosphorus (P), nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and pH. Coincident measurements of water temperature, river discharge and solar energy were also taken at, or close to, the site. All measurements revealed diurnal patterns and all patterns were concerted. The cycles of P, nitrate, nitrite, and discharge had two maxima and minima per 24 h, while the cycle of water temperature had one, with a maximum at 20.00 and a minimum at 08.00. The amplitudes of the cycles of P and nitrate were each about 30% of the mean values, while the amplitude of the nitrite cycle was as great as 80% of the mean value on occasions. Both biological and physical mechanisms for the cycling could operate through water temperature and/or incident radiation to account for the observed phenomenon, but there remains uncertainty of which is the more important. The observations have important implications for both the accuracy of pollution assessment in rivers and the physiological rhythms of riverine organisms.

  17. Muddle or march: China and the 21st century Concert of Powers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhun Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concert of Powers has emerged as an attractive modality in global governance. As an emerging power, China must seriously take this template into account. This article seeks to analyze the incentives, possibilities, and uncertainties for China to participate in Concert with reference to China's history memory on Concert, China's intellectual endeavors, as well as China's evolving foreign preferences. It concludes that China is generally qualified and capable of being a key participant in Concert of Powers with increasing willingness. Yet, China's involvement depends on 1 if Concert template can overcome its own deficiencies; 2 if Concert have competitive advantages compared with other governance alternatives for China; and 3 if China can keep its momentum on both willingness and capacity in power transition.

  18. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms in cycloaddition reactions: potential surfaces and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houk, K.N.; Yi Li; Storer, Joey; Raimondi, Laura; Beno, Brett

    1994-01-01

    CASSCF/6-31G * calculations have been performed on concerted and stepwise Diels-Alder reactions of butadiene with ethene, the dimerization of butadiene, and the dimerization of cyclobutadiene. The relative energies of concerted and stepwise mechanisms are compared, and the factors influencing these ''energies of concert'' are discussed. The comparison of calculated isotope effects to experimental data provides support for theoretical results. (Author)

  19. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary Meeting on 4 December 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 4 December 2007 included: 2006 Medical Service Annual Report The Committee took note of the report by the head of the Medical Service, Dr V. Fassnacht, (see http://sc-me.web.cern.ch/sc-me/index.html) and of a number of points raised during the discussion, including the importance of further prevention measures. The Committee expressed its thanks to all members of the Medical Service for their work in 2006 and over the past year. Short-Term Saved leave Scheme As announced in Weekly Bulletins Nos. 28/2007 and 51/2007, the Saved Leave Scheme will be succeeded from 1 January 2008 by the Short-Term Saved Leave Scheme (see also https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/sls_shortterm.asp). The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to adopt the relevant procedure. It was noted that staff could apply immediately to participate from 1 January 2008 and that applications to pa...

  20. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE - ORDINARY MEETING ON 3 APRIL 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 3 April 2008 included: External mobility The Committee took note of a progress report on external mobility after a run-in period of about six months. Based on the experience gained, it was agreed to broaden the scope of the programme and in particular to extend eligibility conditions to include: All staff members whose limited duration contract will end in less than one year, as well as all those with indefinite contracts; Fellows who have been employed by CERN for more than 18 months; Doctoral students who have been in the CERN doctoral programme for more than 2.5 years; Apprentices in the final year of their apprenticeship; Ex-members of the personnel who are receiving CERN unemployment benefits. An article in the Weekly Bulletin will follow and the relevant web pages will be updated. LHC achievement awards The Committee took note of the outcome of discussions between the Management and t...

  1. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE: ORDINARY MEETING ON 15 JANUARY 2004

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Original: English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1-Introduction by the Director-General Conveying his best wishes for the New Year to SCC members, the Director-General underlined the importance which he attaches to good relations with the staff and their representatives in the Staff Association. He would ensure open dialogue and make every effort to attend the SCC, at the request of the Staff Association or the Management representatives. The concertation process at the SCC and TREF is a most useful and necessary one for the Management in drawing up strategies that are clearly announced and understood by all parties. He trusted that the SCC would play a vital role in realising related programmes and in optimising their implementation. He also wished to pass a message to the staff at large on the importance of good, efficient management, understood in its widest sense and at all levels. The role of supervisors is not only to lead their teams in the scientific and technical doma...

  2. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary meeting on 25 June 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 25 June 2008 included: Mutual Aid Fund The committee took note of the annual report for 2007 by the chairman of the Mutual Aid Fund and approved contributions to the Fund’s 2008 budget from the Management and the Staff Association. Results of 2008 MARS exercise and LHC achievement awards The committee took note of the Head of HR Department’s presentation of the results of the 2008 MARS exercise and the distribution of LHC achievement awards. It was noted that these awards would be granted with effect from 1 October 2008 (see Bulletin 18&19). The results show agreement with the 2008 MARS guidelines (see Bulletin 10&11) for the advancement ceilings per career path, the number of awards for extraordinary service, as well as the distribution of steps for the recognition of merit as shown in the SCC of 27 February (see Bulletin 14&15). Follow-up of Finance Committee and Council...

  3. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE ORDINARY MEETING ON 24 JANUARY 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    This meeting was mainly devoted to follow-up from the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in December 2000, as well as to the work planning of the SCC for 2001. The newly-appointed Chairman of SCC, J. van der Boon, welcomed the Director-General and members to this first meeting of the new year, underlining his objective of maintaining a positive climate of concertation in the best interests of the Organization and its personnel. The President of the Staff Association declared that the latter would actively pursue its role in the same spirit. 1. Follow-up from the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in December 2000 The Director-General, underlining the positive outcome of the 5-yearly review, conveyed his thanks to all parties that had taken part and, in particular, to the Staff Association for its constructive contribution to reach the compromise accepted by the three parties. After discussion of decisions on the package of measures approved by Council last December and on related impleme...

  4. Distinct mechanisms act in concert to mediate cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toettcher, Jared E; Loewer, Alexander; Ostheimer, Gerard J; Yaffe, Michael B; Tidor, Bruce; Lahav, Galit

    2009-01-20

    In response to DNA damage, cells arrest at specific stages in the cell cycle. This arrest must fulfill at least 3 requirements: it must be activated promptly; it must be sustained as long as damage is present to prevent loss of genomic information; and after the arrest, cells must re-enter into the appropriate cell cycle phase to ensure proper ploidy. Multiple molecular mechanisms capable of arresting the cell cycle have been identified in mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether each mechanism meets all 3 requirements or whether they act together to confer specific functions to the arrest. To address this question, we integrated mathematical models describing the cell cycle and the DNA damage signaling networks and tested the contributions of each mechanism to cell cycle arrest and re-entry. Predictions from this model were then tested with quantitative experiments to identify the combined action of arrest mechanisms in irradiated cells. We find that different arrest mechanisms serve indispensable roles in the proper cellular response to DNA damage over time: p53-independent cyclin inactivation confers immediate arrest, whereas p53-dependent cyclin downregulation allows this arrest to be sustained. Additionally, p21-mediated inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity is indispensable for preventing improper cell cycle re-entry and endoreduplication. This work shows that in a complex signaling network, seemingly redundant mechanisms, acting in a concerted fashion, can achieve a specific cellular outcome.

  5. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE ORDINARY MEETING ON 4 SEPTEMBER 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1. Information on the Organization's Human Resources Plan The SCC took note of the Chairman's presentation summarising the content of the HR Plan and the internal process that had been followed in drawing it up for approval by Council at the end of last year. The Staff Association expressed criticism concerning the lack of concertation in this process and, in particular, the Management's declared objective of achieving an overall 2:1 ratio of indefinite contracts to limited contracts of the staff by 2010, which it considers is not based on objective grounds. More importantly, the Staff Association criticised the fact that this ratio can only be arrived at under the assumption that no new project is initiated before 2010. The Management, recalling that planning issues are not in the remit of the SCC, underlined that this ratio concerning staff contracts is indeed the result of an analysis in the Divisions and, in any case, is considered as a guidel...

  6. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary Meeting on 30 September 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 September 2008 included: Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to extend the scheme of part-time work as a pre-retirement measure by one year, i.e. until 31 December 2009. Preparation of TREF on 7 October 2008 The Committee took note that the TREF agenda would cover: Annual salary adjustment; Voluntary programmes; Five-yearly review of financial & social conditions of members of the personnel; Update on 2005 review; Preparation for 2010 review; TREF workplan 2009; Update on CHIS actuarial study. The proposals and presentations which the Management planned to present to TREF were discussed and some clarifications were agreed. Follow-up of Finance Committee and Council The Committee took note of a report by the Chairman of points related to personnel matters discussed in those committees. He mentioned in particular the annu...

  7. Interrupting the Symphony: Unpacking the Importance Placed on Classical Concert Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Juliet

    2018-01-01

    The Toronto Symphony Orchestra presents a series of youth concerts each year to introduce and attract younger audiences to the symphony. Music teachers often attend these concerts with students, and the importance of such experiences is frequently emphasised and normalised. This article explores the historical roots of the following relations,…

  8. Sound Design in Virtual Reality Concert Experiences using a Wave Field Synthesis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Rasmus Bloustrød; Milesen, Victor; Smed, Dina Madsen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose an experiment that evaluates the influence of audience noise on the feeling of presence and the perceived quality in a virtual reality concert experience delivered using Wave Field Synthesis. A 360 degree video of a live rock concert from a local band was recorded. Single...

  9. Sugar Radical Formation by a Proton Coupled Hole Transfer in 2′-Deoxyguanosine Radical Cation (2′-dG•+): A Theoretical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical work has established that electronic excitation of a guanine cation radical in nucleosides or in DNA itself leads to sugar radical formation by deprotonation from the dexoxyribose sugar. In this work we investigate a ground electronic state pathway for such sugar radical formation in a hydrated one electron oxidized 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG•+ + 7H2O), using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31G* basis set. We follow the stretching of the C5′-H bond in dG•+ to gain an understanding of the energy requirements to transfer the hole from the base to sugar ring and then to deprotonate to proton acceptor sites in solution and on the guanine ring. The geometries of reactant (dG•+ + 7H2O), transition state (TS) for deprotonation of C5′ site and product (dG(•C5′, N7-H+) + 7 H2O) were fully optimized. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected activation energy (TS) for the proton transfer (PT) from C5′ is calculated to be 9.0 kcal/mol and is achieved by stretching the C5′-H bond by 0.13 Å from its equilibrium bond distance (1.099 Å). Remarkably, this small bond stretch is sufficient to transfer the “hole” (positive charge and spin) from guanine to the C5′ site on the deoxyribose group. Beyond the TS, the proton (H+) spontaneously adds to water to form a hydronium ion (H3O+) as an intermediate. The proton subsequently transfers to the N7 site of the guanine (product). The 9 kcal/mol barrier suggests slow thermal conversion of the cation radical to the sugar radical but also suggests that localized vibrational excitations would be sufficient to induce rapid sugar radical formation in DNA base cation radicals. PMID:19754084

  10. [Public music concerts in a psychiatric hospital: effects on public opinion and as therapy for patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaka, Y; Yokota, O; Tanioka, T; Nagata, K; Yasuoka, K; Toda, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of music therapy concerts, which were held 60 times over a four year period, 1992 to 1996, in Geiyo Psychiatric Hospital, Kochi Prefecture and found that; 1) Musicians who performed at the concerts were not only from Kochi prefecture but also from other prefectures (10 times) and from four foreign countries (7 times). 2) Live concerts in a small hall had a positive influence on patients and drew the patient's attention and interest away from their hallucinations and delusions to the real world. Moreover, the concerts provided the patients with chances to acquire social graces such as being well-groomed. 3) Explanations by the musicians, interviews with the musicians and the seasonal choruses accompanied by the musicians were helpful to give the patients motives for recovering communication skills and to interact with society. 4) Inquiries to the patients about the concerts indicated discrepancies between the poor observed estimations during the concerts (83.3%) and the good subjective impressions expressed by the patients (82.0%), suggesting that the patients were not good at expressing their internal emotions through facial expressions or attitudes. 5) Many citizens including children came to the concerts and/or gave aid to the hospital because the concerts were open to the public and we suggest that this contributed to improving the general publics' image of psychiatric hospitals. Questionnaires revealed that 90% of people in a control group had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals in Japan, but only 32% of the members of the general public who attended our concerts had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, the revolving ratio of the hospital beds rose from 0.4 to 1.2 over the four years, which also suggests a beneficial effect on the patients.

  11. Women's Month 2006 to include a tribute concert to women composers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenby, Jenna

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech will commemorate Women's Month 2006 in March with a variety of events and programs. Festivities will include a special concert to be held Wednesday, March 1 at 8 p.m. in the Squires Student Center Recital Salon. This concert will pay tribute to 400 years of women composers by featuring performances by Virginia Tech faculty, students, and guests. Admission to the concert is free, though a free-will donation will be taken to support the work of the Women's Resource Center of the N...

  12. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  13. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  14. Evidence for concerted ring opening and C–Br bond breaking in UV-excited bromocyclopropane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Preston, Thomas J.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J., E-mail: a.orr-ewing@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); King, Simon J.; Vallance, Claire [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Photodissociation of gaseous bromocyclopropane via its A-band continuum has been studied at excitation wavelengths ranging from 230 nm to 267 nm. Velocity-map images of ground-state bromine atoms (Br), spin-orbit excited bromine atoms (Br{sup ∗}), and C{sub 3}H{sub 5} hydrocarbon radicals reveal the kinetic energies of these various photofragments. Both Br and Br{sup ∗} atoms are predominantly generated via repulsive excited electronic states in a prompt photodissociation process in which the hydrocarbon co-fragment is a cyclopropyl radical. However, the images obtained at the mass of the hydrocarbon radical fragment identify a channel with total kinetic energy greater than that deduced from the Br and Br{sup ∗} images, and with a kinetic energy distribution that exceeds the energetic limit for Br + cyclopropyl radical products. The velocity-map images of these C{sub 3}H{sub 5} fragments have lower angular anisotropies than measured for Br and Br{sup ∗}, indicating molecular restructuring during dissociation. The high kinetic energy C{sub 3}H{sub 5} signals are assigned to allyl radicals generated by a minor photochemical pathway which involves concerted C–Br bond dissociation and cyclopropyl ring-opening following single ultraviolet (UV)-photon absorption. Slow photofragments also contribute to the velocity map images obtained at the C{sub 3}H{sub 5} radical mass, but the corresponding slow Br atoms are not observed. These features in the images are attributed to C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +} from the photodissociation of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}Br{sup +} molecular cation following two-photon ionization of the parent compound. This assignment is confirmed by 118-nm vacuum ultraviolet ionization studies that prepare the molecular cation in its ground electronic state prior to UV photodissociation.

  15. Evidence for concerted ring opening and C-Br bond breaking in UV-excited bromocyclopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Preston, Thomas J; King, Simon J; Vallance, Claire; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-06-28

    Photodissociation of gaseous bromocyclopropane via its A-band continuum has been studied at excitation wavelengths ranging from 230 nm to 267 nm. Velocity-map images of ground-state bromine atoms (Br), spin-orbit excited bromine atoms (Br(∗)), and C3H5 hydrocarbon radicals reveal the kinetic energies of these various photofragments. Both Br and Br(∗) atoms are predominantly generated via repulsive excited electronic states in a prompt photodissociation process in which the hydrocarbon co-fragment is a cyclopropyl radical. However, the images obtained at the mass of the hydrocarbon radical fragment identify a channel with total kinetic energy greater than that deduced from the Br and Br(∗) images, and with a kinetic energy distribution that exceeds the energetic limit for Br + cyclopropyl radical products. The velocity-map images of these C3H5 fragments have lower angular anisotropies than measured for Br and Br(∗), indicating molecular restructuring during dissociation. The high kinetic energy C3H5 signals are assigned to allyl radicals generated by a minor photochemical pathway which involves concerted C-Br bond dissociation and cyclopropyl ring-opening following single ultraviolet (UV)-photon absorption. Slow photofragments also contribute to the velocity map images obtained at the C3H5 radical mass, but the corresponding slow Br atoms are not observed. These features in the images are attributed to C3H5 (+) from the photodissociation of the C3H5Br(+) molecular cation following two-photon ionization of the parent compound. This assignment is confirmed by 118-nm vacuum ultraviolet ionization studies that prepare the molecular cation in its ground electronic state prior to UV photodissociation.

  16. Functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, a human blood–brain barrier model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimomura Keita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the molecular basis and transport function of the human blood–brain barrier (BBB is important for not only understanding human cerebral physiology, but also development of new central nervous system (CNS-acting drugs. However, few studies have been done using human brain capillary endothelial cells, because human brain materials are difficult to obtain. The purpose of this study is to clarify the functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, which has been recently developed as an in vitro human BBB model. Methods Diphenhydramine, [3H]pyrilamine and oxycodone were used as cationic drugs that proved to be H+/OC antiporter substrates. The in vitro uptake experiments by hCMEC/D3 cells were carried out under several conditions. Results Diphenhydramine and [3H]pyrilamine were both transported into hCMEC/D3 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with Km values of 59 μM and 19 μM, respectively. Each inhibited uptake of the other in a competitive manner, suggesting that a common mechanism is involved in their transport. The diphenhydramine uptake was significantly inhibited by amantadine and quinidine, but not tetraethylammonium and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (substrates for well-known organic cation transporters. The uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors, but was insensitive to extracellular sodium and membrane potential. Further, the uptake was increased by extracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification. These transport properties are completely consistent with those of previously characterized H+/OC antiporter in rat BBB. Conclusions The present results suggest that H+/OC antiporter is functionally expressed in hCMEC/D3 cells.

  17. Intramolecular, Exciplex-Mediated, Proton-Coupled, Charge-Transfer Processes in N,N-Dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium Cations: Influence of Anion, Solvent Polarity, and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safko, Trevor M; Faleiros, Marcelo M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Weiss, Richard G

    2016-06-16

    An intramolecular exciplex-mediated, proton-coupled, charge-transfer (PCCT) process has been investigated for a series of N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium cations with different anions (PyS) in solvents of low to intermediate polarity over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediates both the equilibrium between conformations of the cation that place the pyrenyl and ammonium groups in proximity (conformation C) or far from each other (conformation O) and the ability of the ammonium group to transfer a proton adiabatically in the PyS excited singlet state. Thus, exciplex emission, concurrent with the PCCT process, was observed only in hydrogen-bond accepting solvents of relatively low polarity (tetrahydrofuran, ethyl acetate, and 1,4-dioxane) and not in dichloromethane. From the exciplex emission and other spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, the acidity of the ammonium group in conformation C of the excited singlet state of PyS (pKa*) has been estimated to be ca. -3.4 in tetrahydrofuran. The ratios between the intensities of emission from the exciplex and the locally excited state (IEx/ILE) appear to be much more dependent on the nature of the anion than are the rates of exciplex formation and decay, although the excited state data do not provide a quantitative measure of the anion effect on the C-O equilibrium. The activation energies associated with exciplex formation in THF are calculated to be 0.08 to 0.15 eV lower than for the neutral amine, N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-amine. Decay of the exciplexes formed from the deprotonation of PyS is hypothesized to occur through charge-recombination processes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which photoacidity and intramolecular exciplex formation (i.e., a PCCT reaction) are coupled.

  18. Consumers’ Attitude to the Protest Against Lady Gaga’s Concert: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresno Agus Hendarto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lady gaga is an American singer who has won 5 Grammy Awards. In the middle of 2012, she was requested to have concert in Jakarta with the contract value of tens billion. The concert was protested by a number of groups. The promoter had approached the pressure groups and negotiated the dressing. However, Lady Gaga’s management canceled the concert for security consideration. The objectives of the study are: (1 to explore consumers’ attitude to the protest for the cancelation of Lady Gaga’s concert; and (2 using classical conditioning and expectancy-value theory, to explain consumers’ attitude to the protest. The study used focus group to collect data. The collected data was then transcribed and analyzed by content analysis. The results show that informants’ opinions can be classified into two groups: agreement and disagreement with the protest for the cancelation of Lady Gaga’s concert. Informants either agree or disagree for some reasons. Classical conditioning theory can explain either consumer’s attitude. The difference is the object of consumers’ attitude who agreed was Lady Gaga herself, while the object of disagreement was the pressure group that sponsored the protest. The attitude of the disagreement can also be explained by expectancy-value theory.

  19. Exploring the impact of music concerts in promoting well-being in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, Kagari; Marshall, Nigel A

    2017-05-01

    This study explores the specific effects of live music concerts on the clients with dementia, their families and nursing staff/caregivers. Researchers attended 22 concerts in care facilities in England and Japan. Interviews were carried out with clients with dementia, nursing staff and family members. Observations were also carried out before, during and after the concerts. All observations were recorded in field notes. The effect of the concerts in both countries was seen to be beneficial to all clients and nursing staff, whether or not they attended the concert. Interviews with clients with mild to mid-stage dementia noted increased levels of cooperation, interaction and conversation. Those with more advanced forms of dementia exhibited decreased levels of agitation and anti-social behaviour. Staff members reported increased levels of care, cooperation and opportunities for assessment. Family members noted an increase in the levels of well-being in their partner/parent as well as in themselves. The study also suggested that the knowledge of musical components, an awareness of the rules of music and specific musical preferences appear to remain well beyond the time when other cognitive skills and abilities have disappeared. This initial study provided some further indication in terms of the uses of music as a non-pharmacological intervention for those living with all stages of dementia. These included opportunities for assessment of physical abilities as well as facilitating an increasing level of care.

  20. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  1. Between Two Worlds: Concert-giving and Rioting in the Post-Yugoslav Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Petrov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting in the late 1990s, some musicians from the territory of former Yugoslavia gradually embarked on the project of giving concerts in Belgrade, the capital of the former country. Others refused to perform in Serbia after the wars, which fuelled a negative attitude toward these musicians. In this paper I deal with the reception of those concerts, pointing to the ways they have become specific affective sites of memory. I focus on two major issues: the discourse produced in the concerts by the performers themselves and members of the audience and the discourse produced by various protest groups (which resulted in the organization of protests in Belgrade against performances by musicians who ‘hate Serbs’.

  2. Christian rock concerts as a meeting between religion and popular culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Häger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of artistic expression play a vital role in religious practices of the most diverse traditions. One very important such expression is music. This paper deals with a contemporary form of religious music, Christian rock. Rock or popular music has been used within Christianity as a means for evangelization and worship since the end of the 1960s. The genre of "contemporary Christian music", or Christian rock, stands by definition with one foot in established institutional (in practicality often evangelical Christianity, and the other in the commercial rock musicindustry. The subject of this paper is to study how this intermediate position is manifested and negotiated in Christian rock concerts. Such a performance of Christian rock music is here assumed to be both a rock concert and a religious service. The paper will examine how this duality is expressed in practices at Christian rock concerts.

  3. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruschka, Daniel J; Branford, Simon; Smith, Eric D; Wilkins, Jon; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2015-01-05

    Concerted evolution is normally used to describe parallel changes at different sites in a genome, but it is also observed in languages where a specific phoneme changes to the same other phoneme in many words in the lexicon—a phenomenon known as regular sound change. We develop a general statistical model that can detect concerted changes in aligned sequence data and apply it to study regular sound changes in the Turkic language family. Linguistic evolution, unlike the genetic substitutional process, is dominated by events of concerted evolutionary change. Our model identified more than 70 historical events of regular sound change that occurred throughout the evolution of the Turkic language family, while simultaneously inferring a dated phylogenetic tree. Including regular sound changes yielded an approximately 4-fold improvement in the characterization of linguistic change over a simpler model of sporadic change, improved phylogenetic inference, and returned more reliable and plausible dates for events on the phylogenies. The historical timings of the concerted changes closely follow a Poisson process model, and the sound transition networks derived from our model mirror linguistic expectations. We demonstrate that a model with no prior knowledge of complex concerted or regular changes can nevertheless infer the historical timings and genealogical placements of events of concerted change from the signals left in contemporary data. Our model can be applied wherever discrete elements—such as genes, words, cultural trends, technologies, or morphological traits—can change in parallel within an organism or other evolving group. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. “The Concert of Europe” In 20th Century British and American Historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Romanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a critical analysis of the interpretations of the Concert of Europe by British and American historians of the XXth century. The interest in the study of this phenomenon is rooted in its relation to the problems of the maintenance of international order and stability. It is not only academic, being partly determined by the fact that throughout the XX century first Britain and then the USA was at the top of the world hierarchy, and accordingly played a leading role in the construction and maintenance of the European order. Current international environment, the experience of the two World Wars of the XXth century determined the angle from which the phenomenon of the Concert of Europe was studied. Whereas in the second half of the 1910s - early 1920s historians pointed to the deficiencies of the international system of the preceding century (and in particular, the institution of the Concert of Europe, the students of the Vienna system working after the Second World War regarded the period of 1815-1914 as relatively stable, compared to the short interwar interlude. The Concert of Europe was named as one of the factors contributing to stability and peace. Certain logic can be discerned in the development of the historiography of the problem, which to some degree reflected the evolution of ideas about international relations management. At the same time, the differences in the interpretations of the Concert of Europe derive from the fact that this very concept in the XIXth century was not fixed and static. Great Powers' readiness to cooperation did not mean that there were no conflicts of interests. They struggled for leadership within the Concert and sought to impart to it their own interpretation.

  5. Music Genre as a Predictor of Resource Utilization at Outdoor Music Concerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrol, Michael S; Koneru, Susmith; McIntyre, Norah; Caruso, Andrew T; Arshad, Faizan H; Merlin, Mark A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the various modern music genres and their effect on the utilization of medical resources with analysis and adjustment for potential confounders. A retrospective review of patient logs from an open-air, contemporary amphitheater over a period of 10 years was performed. Variables recorded by the medical personnel for each concert included the attendance, description of the weather, and a patient log in which nature and outcome were recorded. The primary outcomes were associations of genres with the medical usage rate (MUR). Secondary outcomes investigated were the association of confounders and the influences on the level of care provided, the transport rate, and the nature of medical complaint. A total of 2,399,864 concert attendees, of which 4,546 patients presented to venue Emergency Medical Services (EMS) during 403 concerts with an average of 11.4 patients (annual range 7.1-17.4) each concert. Of potential confounders, only the heat index ≥90°F (32.2°C) and whether the event was a festival were significant (P=.027 and .001, respectively). After adjustment, the genres with significantly increased MUR in decreasing order were: alternative rock, hip-hop/rap, modern rock, heavy metal/hard rock, and country music (Pmusic (P=.033). Alternative rock, hip-hop/rap, modern rock, heavy metal/hard rock, and country music concerts had higher levels of medical resource utilization. High heat indices and music festivals also increase the MUR. This information can assist event planners with preparation and resource utilization. Future research should focus on prospective validation of the regression equation. Westrol MS , Koneru S , McIntyre N , Caruso AT , Arshad FH , Merlin MA . Music genre as a predictor of resource utilization at outdoor music concerts. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(3):289-296.

  6. Trends in preference, programming and design of concert halls for symphonic music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution in taste regarding concert hall acoustics and how this can be reflected in the new halls being built today. The clients' and listener's preferences are not only based on listening in existing halls; but also on listening to reproduced music recorded with microph......This paper discusses the evolution in taste regarding concert hall acoustics and how this can be reflected in the new halls being built today. The clients' and listener's preferences are not only based on listening in existing halls; but also on listening to reproduced music recorded...

  7. The impact of local government cultural policies on the sales of tickets for private music concerts in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    谷口, みゆき

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine the effect of public cultural policy on the sales of tickets for private music concerts in Japan. In particular, it focuses on how the introduction of the Designated Manager System (DMS) in 2006 influenced the sales of tickets for private music concerts. The hypothesis that both local governments' cultural investments and the DMS have increased the sales of tickets for private music concerts is examined. Data from the Private Music Live Entertainment 2000-2008 i...

  8. Concerted action on the retrievability of long lived radioactive waste in deep underground repositories - progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    Within the EURATOM Framework Programme: Nuclear Fission Safety, a Concerted Action on the retrievability of long lived radioactive waste in deep underground repositories is being carried out. This Concerted Action commenced on the 1st of January 1998 and involves experts from nine different European countries. The Concerted Action will be completed by the 31st of December 1999. This paper gives a brief overview of the objectives of the Concerted Action, the work programme that has been defined to meet these objectives, the work performed to date, and the remaining work programme. (author)

  9. A tablet app to enrich the live and post-live experience of classical concerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melenhorst, M.S.; Van der Sterren, R.; Arzt, A.; Martorell, A.; Liem, C.C.S.

    2015-01-01

    This demonstration paper describes a tablet application that is developed to make classical concerts more accessible and more enjoyable for a broader audience. The app offers interactive visualizations of a symphony’s instrumentation and its score. It also offers timed background information about

  10. Unequal Academic Achievement in High School: The Mediating Roles of Concerted Cultivation and Close Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Brian V.

    2016-01-01

    Building from the classic Wisconsin model of status attainment, this study examines whether a specific style of parenting, concerted cultivation, and a close friend's school-related attitudes and behaviors mediate the relationship between a family's socioeconomic status and their child's academic achievement in the United States. Using a recursive…

  11. Density functional theory study of the concerted pyrolysis mechanism for lignin models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Ariana Beste

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Studies on the pyrolysis mechanisms of lignin model compounds have largely focused on initial homolytic cleavage reactions. It has been noted, however, that concerted mechanisms may also account for observed product formation. In the current work, the latter processes are examined and compared to the former, by the application of density functional theory...

  12. Stepwise or concerted? DFT study on the mechanism of ionic Diels-Alder reaction of chromanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghdadi Mina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise and concerted Ionic Diels-Alder reaction between phenyl (pyridin-2-ylmethylene oxonium and styrene derivatives are explored using theoretical method. The results support using computational method via persistent intermediates. The DFT method was essential to reproduce a reasonable potential energy surface for these challenging systems.

  13. The virtual reconstruction of the ancient Roman concert hall in Aphrodisias, Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Gade, Anders Christian; Nielsen, Martin Lisa

    2006-01-01

    About two thousand years ago one of the world’s earliest and most beautiful concert halls were built in the city Aphrodisias, named after the goddess Aphrodite. It was a rich society, renowned for its marble and mastery in sculptures. Like many other cities in the Roman Empire there was an open...

  14. Living Room vs. Concert Hall: Patterns of Music Consumption in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Henk; Stichele, Alexander Vander

    2010-01-01

    In this article we probe the interplay between public and private music consumption using a large-scale survey of the Flemish population in Belgium. We analyze whether public and private music consumption have different correlates and to what extent there is convergence between the genres that people listen to at home and at concerts. Results show…

  15. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.

    1993-01-01

    as for entire rooms. Measurements data from all three teams were used in the models to assess the sensitivity of the models to expect variations in measurements. The results were compared to the previous work of Barron, Gade, and Hook among others. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Concert...

  16. Design of concert hall in uremia based on notification to hidden role ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of sound in a concert hall is reviewed with emphasis on hearing the direct sound clearly. Architecture in its daily means provides renewed space and is replaced within a larger space and people are moving in it and in it's around. Music is purely mechanical conception, organized and deliberate scattering of ...

  17. An adaptive, data driven sound field control strategy for outdoor concerts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuchel, Franz Maria; Caviedes Nozal, Diego; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    One challenge of outdoor concerts is to ensure adequate levels for the audience while avoiding disturbance of the surroundings. We outline the initial concept of a sound field control (SFC) system for tackling this issue using sound-zoning. The system uses Bayesian inference to update a sound...

  18. Tightening the Iron Cage: Concertive Control in Self-Managing Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Describes how an (industrial) organization's control system evolved in response to a managerial change from hierarchical, bureaucratic control to concertive control via self-management teams. The organization's members developed a system of value-based normative rules that controlled their actions more powerfully and completely than did the former…

  19. A new concert hall for the city of Eindhoven : design and model tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat-Eggen, P.E.; van Luxemburg, Renz; Booy, L.G.; de Lange, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    A music centre containing a large (1300 seats) and a small (400 seats) concert hall has been built in the city of Eindhoven. The music centre is integrated into a larger building complex, called the ‘Heuvel-Galerie’, with shopping area (malls), recreational facilities, parking, offices and

  20. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH3Co(CO)4 via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-01

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH3Co(CO)4 indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH3 and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  1. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH(3)Co(CO)(4) via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-07

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH(3)Co(CO)(4) indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH(3) and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  2. CONCERT. ''European joint programme for the integration of radiation protection research''; CONCERT. Gemeinsame Europaeische Forschungsfoerderung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Hannig, A.; Birschwilks, M.; Jung, T. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    CONCERT is a joint project of the EU and its member states which assume joint financing: Over the next five years the largest European radiation protection programme so far will have available about 28 Million Euros for research and integrative measures, whereby the European Commission will bear 70 per cent of the costs. Integrative measures include, among others, targeted vocational education and training of junior researchers in radiation protection, better access to research and irradiation facilities for scientists, as well as a stronger connection of universities and research centres in radiation protection research.

  3. Interactive painting. An evolving study to facilitate reduced exclusion from classical music concerts for the deaf community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Exclusion from the joy of experiencing music, especially in concert venues, is especially applicable to those with an auditory impairment. There have been limited investigations into how to reduce the exclusion for this community in attending classical orchestra music concerts. Through utilizing ...

  4. Concert Club

    CERN Document Server

    Concert Club

    2010-01-01

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) entrée B - bâtiment 500 - amphithéâtre Mardi 9 Février 2010 à 20 h 30 ”La fontaine aux larmes” Les pays de l’est et le choeur féminin Ensemble vocal féminin Polhymnia Célia Perrard, harpe Camille Girod, flûte Christophe Sturzenegger, piano Quartet Elixir Eléonore Giroud, violon Delphine Touzery, violon Priscille Oehninger, alto Elsa Dorbath, violoncelle Direction : Franck Marcon Au programme : Kodaly – Bartok – Donceanu - Janacek Francesco Hoch (création) ...

  5. Concerts & Opera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Arvo Pärdi teos "Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten" esitusel 2. dets. Aldeburghis, Pärdi "Annum per annum" 7. dets. Birminghamis, Kristjan Järvi dirigeerimas 7. dets. Liverpoolis, Neeme Järvi diregeerimas 15. dets. Edinburghis ja 16. dets. Glasgowis

  6. Concerts & Opera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Kammerorkestri Kremerata Baltica kontserdid: 19. apr. Londonis LSO St Lukesis, 21. apr. Oxfordis Sheldonian Theatre'is, 17. apr. Aldeburghis, 20. apr. Manchesteris Bridgewater Hallis, 23. apr. Wales Millennium Centre'is, 22. apr. Edinburghis Usher Hallis

  7. Concert club

    CERN Multimedia

    Concert club

    2010-01-01

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) entrée B - bâtiment 500 - amphithéâtre mardi 23 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 Eric Schmid, clarinette Muriel Slatkine, piano Au programme : Danzi, Delibes, Gounod, Lovreglio (Verdi), Poulenc, Rossini, Schubert * * * * * samedi 27 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 « Quart de ton » Orchestre et solistes Au programme : Leung Xiao, Lan www.myspace.com/lecardethon * * * * * Dimanche 28 mars 2010 à 17 h 00 et 19 h 00 Rachel Kolly d’Alba, violon Au programme : Bach, Ysaïe * * * * * mardi 30 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 ...

  8. Concert club

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    CERN MEYRIN (terminus bus 56-CERN) entrée B - bâtiment 500 - amphithéâtre mardi 9 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 Le trio «Impressions» avec Liliane Jaques, flûte traversière Isabelle Martin-Achard, harpe John Devore, violoncelle Au programme : Bolling, Dewey, Ibert, Vellon, Vellones, Molnar, Andres * * * * * mardi 16 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 Irina Chkourindina, piano Au programme : Chopin, Liszt, Schumann * * * * * vendredi 19 mars 2010 à 20 h 30 Pascal Salomon, piano Au programme : J. Brahms, F.Chopin, M. Ravel, S. Rachmaninoff * * * * * ...

  9. Concerts & Opera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Arvo Pärdi muusika esitusel 4. mail Londonis St Giles Cripplegate'is, 14. mail Queen Elizabeth Hallis, 3. mail Oxfordis; Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor esitab Cyrillus Kreegi "Requiemi" 11. mail Manchesteris Bridgewater Hallis; Olari Elts dirigeerimas 10. mail Edinburghis Usher Hallis, 11. mail Glasgowis ja 12. mail Aberdeenis

  10. Concert | The CERN Choir hits the high notes | Victoria Hall | 30 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    60 – 40 – 25: a series of numbers that have inspired an exceptional concert. They refer to the 60th anniversary of CERN, the 40th anniversary of the CERN Choir and the 25th anniversary of its direction by Gonzalo Martinez. On the occasion of this collision of anniversaries, the Committee of this CERN club decided to organise an appropriately significant event to celebrate the important worldwide role that CERN has played for 60 years, the fact that the CERN Choir has brought together amateur singers for 40 years, and finally the decisive role in the Choir’s history of its director, Gonzalo Martinez.   The work chosen for this concert also had to be something exceptional. A work which, through its monumental status, its brilliance, its innovation, its originality and its energy, symbolises CERN’s scientific discoveries, reflects the genius of its creator and represents the highest creative ambitions: Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis.  Perfor...

  11. Concert | The CERN Choir hits the high notes | Victoria Hall | 30 September

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    60 – 40 – 25: a series of numbers that have inspired an exceptional concert. They refer to the 60th anniversary of CERN, the 40th anniversary of the CERN Choir and the 25th anniversary of its direction by Gonzalo Martinez. On the occasion of this collision of anniversaries, the Committee of this CERN club decided to organise an appropriately significant event to celebrate the important worldwide role that CERN has played for 60 years, the fact that the CERN Choir has brought together amateur singers for 40 years, and finally the decisive role in the Choir’s history of its director, Gonzalo Martinez.   The work chosen for this concert also had to be something exceptional. A work which, through its monumental status, its brilliance, its innovation, its originality and its energy, symbolises CERN’s scientific discoveries, reflects the genius of its creator and represents the highest creative ambitions: Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis.  Perfo...

  12. An Interactive Concert Program Based on Infrared Watermark and Audio Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsi-Chun; Lee, Wen-Pin Hope; Liang, Feng-Ju

    The objective of this research is to propose a video/audio system which allows the user to listen the typical music notes in the concert program under infrared detection. The system synthesizes audio with different pitches and tempi in accordance with the encoded data in a 2-D barcode embedded in the infrared watermark. The digital halftoning technique has been used to fabricate the infrared watermark composed of halftone dots by both amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). The results show that this interactive system successfully recognizes the barcode and synthesizes audio under infrared detection of a concert program which is also valid for human observation of the contents. This interactive video/audio system has greatly expanded the capability of the printout paper to audio display and also has many potential value-added applications.

  13. Measured Early Lateral Energy Fractions in Concert Halls and Opera Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRON, M.

    2000-04-01

    In the 30 years since early lateral reflections were first suggested as important for concert halls, spatial impression and source broadening have become almost universally accepted as essential characteristics of halls with good acoustics. Two objective measures of source broadening have been proposed. Measured values of the best defined of these measures, the early lateral energy fraction (LF), are considered here. Results from two independent measurement surveys are discussed. Comparisons of LF values by hall show a significant link between hall mean LF and hall width. There is however considerable overlap between measured LF values in different halls so the relevance of describing halls by their mean early lateral energy fraction values is questionable. The behaviour of LF values within auditoria is discussed for different concert hall plan forms and within opera houses. A measure of source broadening including sound level is proposed and results considered in the context of auditorium design.

  14. The Concert system - Compiler and runtime technology for efficient concurrent object-oriented programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Andrew A.; Karamcheti, Vijay; Plevyak, John; Sahrawat, Deepak

    1993-01-01

    Concurrent object-oriented languages, particularly fine-grained approaches, reduce the difficulty of large scale concurrent programming by providing modularity through encapsulation while exposing large degrees of concurrency. Despite these programmability advantages, such languages have historically suffered from poor efficiency. This paper describes the Concert project whose goal is to develop portable, efficient implementations of fine-grained concurrent object-oriented languages. Our approach incorporates aggressive program analysis and program transformation with careful information management at every stage from the compiler to the runtime system. The paper discusses the basic elements of the Concert approach along with a description of the potential payoffs. Initial performance results and specific plans for system development are also detailed.

  15. Optimal Volume for Concert Halls Based on Ando’s Subjective Preference and Barron Revised Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Cerdá

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ando-Beranek’s model, a linear version of Ando’s subjective preference theory, obtained by the authors in a recent work, was combined with Barron revised theory. An optimal volume region for each reverberation time was obtained for classical music in symphony orchestra concert halls. The obtained relation was tested with good agreement with the top rated halls reported by Beranek and other halls with reported anomalies.

  16. Ethanol dehydration in HZSM-5 studied by density functional theory: evidence for a concerted process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Beckham, Gregg T; Paton, Robert S; Nimlos, Mark R

    2015-04-16

    Dehydration over acidic zeolites is an important reaction class for the upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors to hydrocarbon fuels or to precursors for myriad chemical products. Here, we examine the dehydration of ethanol at a Brønsted acid site, T12, found in HZSM-5 using density functional theory (DFT). The geometries of both cluster and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) models are prepared from the ZSM-5 crystal structure. Comparisons between these models and different DFT methods are conducted to show similar results among the models and methods used. Inclusion of the full catalyst cavity through a QM:MM approach is found to be important, since activation barriers are computed on average as 7 kcal mol(-1) lower than those obtained with a smaller cluster model. Two different pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been considered when examining dehydration and deprotonation steps. The current study shows that a concerted dehydration process is possible with a lower (4-5 kcal mol(-1)) activation barrier while previous literature studies have focused on a stepwise mechanism. Overall, this work demonstrates that fairly high activation energies (∼50 kcal mol(-1)) are required for ethanol dehydration. A concerted mechanism is favored over a stepwise mechanism because charge separation in the transition state is minimized. QM:MM approaches appear to provide superior results to cluster calculations due to a more accurate representation of charges on framework oxygen atoms.

  17. Exposure and materiality of the secondary room and its impact on the impulse response of coupled-volume concert halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Michael; Johnson, Marty

    2005-06-01

    How does sound decay when one room is partially exposed to another (acoustically coupled)? More specifically, this research aims to quantify how operational and design decisions impact sound fields in the design of concert halls with acoustical coupling. By adding a second room to a concert hall, and designing doors to control the sonic transparency between the two rooms, designers can create a new, coupled acoustic. Concert halls use coupling to achieve a variable, longer, and distinct reverberant quality for their musicians and listeners. For this study a coupled-volume shoebox concert hall is conceived with a fixed geometric volume, form, and primary-room sound absorption. Aperture size and secondary-room sound absorption levels are established as variables. Statistical analysis of sound decay in this simulated hall suggests a highly sensitive relationship between the double-sloped condition and (1) architectural composition, as defined by the aperture size exposing the chamber and (2) materiality, as defined by the sound absorptance in the coupled volume. The theoretical, mathematical predictions are compared with coupled-volume concert hall field measurements and guidelines are suggested for future designs of coupled-volume concert halls.

  18. Concerted evolution of sea anemone neurotoxin genes is revealed through analysis of the Nematostella vectensis genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Yehu; Weinberger, Hagar; Sullivan, James C; Reitzel, Adam M; Finnerty, John R; Gurevitz, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Gene families, which encode toxins, are found in many poisonous animals, yet there is limited understanding of their evolution at the nucleotide level. The release of the genome draft sequence for the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis enabled a comprehensive study of a gene family whose neurotoxin products affect voltage-gated sodium channels. All gene family members are clustered in a highly repetitive approximately 30-kb genomic region and encode a single toxin, Nv1. These genes exhibit extreme conservation at the nucleotide level which cannot be explained by purifying selection. This conservation greatly differs from the toxin gene families of other animals (e.g., snakes, scorpions, and cone snails), whose evolution was driven by diversifying selection, thereby generating a high degree of genetic diversity. The low nucleotide diversity at the Nv1 genes is reminiscent of that reported for DNA encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) and 2 hsp70 genes from Drosophila, which have evolved via concerted evolution. This evolutionary pattern was experimentally demonstrated in yeast rDNA and was shown to involve unequal crossing-over. Through sequence analysis of toxin genes from multiple N. vectensis populations and 2 other anemone species, Anemonia viridis and Actinia equina, we observed that the toxin genes for each sea anemone species are more similar to one another than to those of other species, suggesting they evolved by manner of concerted evolution. Furthermore, in 2 of the species (A. viridis and A. equina) we found genes that evolved under diversifying selection, suggesting that concerted evolution and accelerated evolution may occur simultaneously.

  19. COELIAC DISEASE IN CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA: time for a concerted approach to its epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affifa FARRUKH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Central and South America offer an opportunity to resolve some of the current controversies that surround the epidemiology of celiac disease. Through a concerted action which brings together clinicians, researchers and patients there is an opportunity to establish robust data sets which will allow detailed analysis of environmental and genetic factors. In this review available data from the continent together with data from Spain and Italy are drawn together to give a current picture in the hope that it will stimulate further research.

  20. Ventilating plant in the large concert hall of the music centre at Vredenburg/Utrecht, Holland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmeyer, H.; Detzer, R.; van Dijk, A.E.; Kouffeld, R.W.J.

    1979-01-01

    To form an opinion on the thermo-dynamic and flow-pattern conditions in large halls for air conditioning like e.g. concert halls, one will refer to the study of models which normally are prepared in a reduced scale. Comparisons between model studies and the executed object indicate that, even with difficult boundary conditions, reproducible data can be prepared the deviations being only minute. Presented are the results of a model study and the data of the executed plant of a large music centre in the Netherlands.

  1. Early reflection energy in concert halls: how much, how early, and from where (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2001-01-01

    Today, the importance of distributing early reflection energy to listeners and performers in concert halls is well understood and accepted—also among architects. Still, implementation in the practical design of a large hall is not easy, partly because we still have difficulties quantifying...... to decide how far to promote the good cause on the basis of his/her experience, taste, and talent in influencing the decision process. The aural presentation will focus on the current limitations in our knowledge regarding the musicians' need for early reflections, which is a special challenge in the design...

  2. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  3. Bringing Astronomy Directly to New Audiences (50,000 People) at Outdoor Concerts and Music Festivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.

    2014-07-01

    My NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) has brought astronomy to 50,000 music lovers at the National Mall (co-sponsor OSTP); Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood music festivals; and classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts in parks assisted by astronomy clubs (55 events since 2009). Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Tony Orlando, and Wilco performed at these events. MAUS combines solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; large posters/banners (From the Earth to the Universe; Visions of the Universe); videos; hands-on activities (Night Sky Network; Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); imaging with a cell phone mount; and hand-outs (info on science museums, astronomy clubs, and citizen science) before and after the concerts or at intermission. MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large enthusiastic crowds. Many young children participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. Outcomes: While education!

  4. CONCERT-'European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research'; CONCERT-''European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birschwilks, Mandy; Schmitt-Hannig, Annemarie [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Internationale und Nationale Zusammenarbeit im Strahlenschutz; Jung, Thomas [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit

    2016-08-01

    In 2009 the High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on low dose research recommended the development of a scientific platform for low dose radiation research. The foundation of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) occurred in 2010. In 2015 a new project on radiation protection research was established: CONCERT (European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research). The aim is the coordination of the already existing scientific platforms MELODI (radiation effects and interactions), ALLIANCE (radioecology), NERIS (nuclear and radiological emergency protection) and EURADOS (radiation dosimetry). With CONCERT an efficient use of this infrastructure for research cooperation and transparency is intended.

  5. State-of-the-art research: Reflections on a concerted Nordic-Baltic nuclear energy effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husdal, Lars; Tveit, Jesper; Vaagen, Jan S; Ridikas, Danas

    2009-09-15

    Quite a few hold the view that nuclear energy will have its renaissance in the not too distant future. Technology is, however, a necessary, but not sufficient condition. The needed prerequisites represent a complex issue. With increasing energy demand and depletion of non-renewable energy resources, nuclear will have to prove its role in an increasing energy mix, globally, regionally and often also nationally. Based on its history, experience with coordinated interplay in electricity production from a variety of energy sources, and science engagements, we argue for a future Nordic/Baltic SHOWCASE: A nuclear weapons free and proliferation safe nuclear energy supplier in the region, with a concerted role in competence building and in international ventures, and with focus on operation, safety, economy and societal aspects. (Author)

  6. Rainforests as concert halls for birds: Are reverberations improving sound transmission of long song elements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Erwin; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pedersen, Simon Boel

    2006-01-01

    that longer sounds are less attenuated. The results indicate that higher sound pressure level is caused by superimposing reflections. It is suggested that this beneficial effect of reverberations explains interspecific birdsong differences in element length. Transmission paths with stronger reverberations......In forests reverberations have probably detrimental and beneficial effects on avian communication. They constrain signal discrimination by masking fast repetitive sounds and they improve signal detection by elongating sounds. This ambivalence of reflections for animal signals in forests is similar...... to the influence of reverberations on speech or music in indoor sound transmission. Since comparisons of sound fields of forests and concert halls have demonstrated that reflections can contribute in both environments a considerable part to the energy of a received sound, it is here assumed that reverberations...

  7. DRAWING MUSIC! ANAL Y Z ING AN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY OF VISUALI Z ING A CONCERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Váradi, Judit

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature and recent studies, a high number of encounters with classical music during childhood and adolescence in the context of positive feelings closely correlates with the formation of classical music competencies. During the investigation of primary students’ attitudes towards classical music, it has been revealed that those who have more opportunities to enter music education will come closer to understanding classical music. At the University of Debrecen Faculty of Music, we have organised and staged various educational youth performances in the last decades. Our goal is to get elementary school children acquainted with live music, classical instruments. A key element of our mission is to form the preferences of children and young people who do not participate in art education, so that they may become interested and sophisticated adults. In our paper we analysis the creations of the drawing competition what connects in theme with the youth concert.

  8. An analysis of concert saxophone vibrato through the examination of recordings by eight prominent soloists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinninger, Thomas

    This study examines concert saxophone vibrato through the analysis of several recordings of standard repertoire by prominent soloists. The vibrato of Vincent Abato, Arno Bornkamp, Claude Delangle, Jean-Marie Londeix, Marcel Mule, Otis Murphy, Sigurd Rascher, and Eugene Rousseau is analyzed with regards to rate, extent, shape, and discretionary use. Examination of these parameters was conducted through both general observation and precise measurements with the aid of a spectrogram. Statistical analyses of the results provide tendencies for overall vibrato use, as well as the effects of certain musical attributes (note length, tempo, dynamic, range) on vibrato. The results of this analysis are also compared among each soloist and against pre-existing theories or findings in vibrato research.

  9. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers’ Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Charron

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing consumers’ motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans’ preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation, but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music.

  10. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers' Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Reviewing consumers' motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans' preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation), but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music.

  11. Efficacy of Role Play in Concert with Lecture to Enhance Student Learning of Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L. Elliott

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous reports that active learning increases student understanding, many barriers still exist that prevent faculty from shedding the traditional passive lecture and adopting active learning strategies in the classroom. This study looks at the use of role play as an active learning technique to convey new material, or as reinforcement to traditional lecture. A pre- and post-test survey was utilized to determine student learning gains, along with an anonymous survey to determine student attitudes about role play. Student learning gains are similar regardless of class size, role-playing participation or learning style, and reflect an increase in lower order cognition. Attitudes and learning gains indicate role play is preferable as a reinforcement technique, although the order does not matter if both lecture and role play are utilized to convey information. These data provide insight into the best practices of role-playing implementation in concert with traditional lecture format.

  12. State-of-the-art research: Reflections on a concerted Nordic-Baltic nuclear energy effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husdal, Lars; Tveit, Jesper; Vaagen, Jan S.; Ridikas, Danas

    2009-09-01

    Quite a few hold the view that nuclear energy will have its renaissance in the not too distant future. Technology is, however, a necessary, but not sufficient condition. The needed prerequisites represent a complex issue. With increasing energy demand and depletion of non-renewable energy resources, nuclear will have to prove its role in an increasing energy mix, globally, regionally and often also nationally. Based on its history, experience with coordinated interplay in electricity production from a variety of energy sources, and science engagements, we argue for a future Nordic/Baltic SHOWCASE: A nuclear weapons free and proliferation safe nuclear energy supplier in the region, with a concerted role in competence building and in international ventures, and with focus on operation, safety, economy and societal aspects. (Author)

  13. CONCERT A high power proton accelerator driven multi-application facility concept

    CERN Document Server

    Laclare, J L

    2000-01-01

    A new generation of High Power Proton Accelerator (HPPA) is being made available. It opens new avenues to a long series of scientific applications in fundamental and applied research, which can make use of the boosted flux of secondary particles. Presently, in Europe, several disciplines are preparing their project of dedicated facility, based on the upgraded performances of HPPAs. Given the potential synergies between these different projects, for reasons of cost effectiveness, it was considered appropriate to look into the possibility to group a certain number of these applications around a single HPPA: CONCERT project left bracket 1 right bracket . The ensuing 2-year feasibility study organized in collaboration between the European Spallation Source and the CEA just started. EURISOL left bracket 2 right bracket project and CERN participate in the steering committee.

  14. Parametrization in models of subcritical glass fracture: Activation offset and concerted activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno Poletto; Hühn, Carolin; Erlebach, Andreas; Mey, Dorothea; Sierka, Marek; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    There are two established but fundamentally different empirical approaches to parametrize the rate of subcritical fracture in brittle materials. While both are relying on a thermally activated reaction of bond rupture, the difference lies in the way as to how the externally applied stresses affect the local energy landscape. In the consideration of inorganic glasses, the strain energy is typically taken as an off-set on the activation barrier. As an alternative interpretation, the system’s volumetric strain-energy is added to its thermal energy. Such an interpretation is consistent with the democratic fiber bundle model. Here, we test this approach of concerted activation against macroscopic data of bond cleavage activation energy, and also against ab initio quantum chemical simulation of the energy barrier for cracking in silica. The fact that both models are able to reproduce experimental observation to a remarkable degree highlights the importance of a holistic consideration towards non-empirical understanding.

  15. Hierarchical Oct4 Binding in Concert with Primed Epigenetic Rearrangements during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The core pluripotency factor Oct4 plays key roles in somatic cell reprogramming through transcriptional control. Here, we profile Oct4 occupancy, epigenetic changes, and gene expression in reprogramming. We find that Oct4 binds in a hierarchical manner to target sites with primed epigenetic modifications. Oct4 binding is temporally continuous and seldom switches between bound and unbound. Oct4 occupancy in most of promoters is maintained throughout the entire reprogramming process. In contrast, somatic cell-specific enhancers are silenced in the early and intermediate stages, whereas stem cell-specific enhancers are activated in the late stage in parallel with cell fate transition. Both epigenetic remodeling and Oct4 binding contribute to the hyperdynamic enhancer signature transitions. The hierarchical Oct4 bindings are associated with distinct functional themes at different stages. Collectively, our results provide a comprehensive molecular roadmap of Oct4 binding in concert with epigenetic rearrangements and rich resources for future reprogramming studies.

  16. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers’ Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Reviewing consumers’ motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans’ preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation), but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music. PMID:28588528

  17. An efficient algorithm to perform local concerted movements of a chain molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Zamuner

    Full Text Available The devising of efficient concerted rotation moves that modify only selected local portions of chain molecules is a long studied problem. Possible applications range from speeding the uncorrelated sampling of polymeric dense systems to loop reconstruction and structure refinement in protein modeling. Here, we propose and validate, on a few pedagogical examples, a novel numerical strategy that generalizes the notion of concerted rotation. The usage of the Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for chain description allows all possible choices for the subset of degrees of freedom to be modified in the move. They can be arbitrarily distributed along the chain and can be distanced between consecutive monomers as well. The efficiency of the methodology capitalizes on the inherent geometrical structure of the manifold defined by all chain configurations compatible with the fixed degrees of freedom. The chain portion to be moved is first opened along a direction chosen in the tangent space to the manifold, and then closed in the orthogonal space. As a consequence, in Monte Carlo simulations detailed balance is easily enforced without the need of using Jacobian reweighting. Moreover, the relative fluctuations of the degrees of freedom involved in the move can be easily tuned. We show different applications: the manifold of possible configurations is explored in a very efficient way for a protein fragment and for a cyclic molecule; the "local backbone volume", related to the volume spanned by the manifold, reproduces the mobility profile of all-α helical proteins; the refinement of small protein fragments with different secondary structures is addressed. The presented results suggest our methodology as a valuable exploration and sampling tool in the context of bio-molecular simulations.

  18. A concerted kinase interplay identifies PPARgamma as a molecular target of ghrelin signaling in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Demers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor PPARgamma plays an essential role in vascular biology, modulating macrophage function and atherosclerosis progression. Recently, we have described the beneficial effect of combined activation of the ghrelin/GHS-R1a receptor and the scavenger receptor CD36 to induce macrophage cholesterol release through transcriptional activation of PPARgamma. Although the interplay between CD36 and PPARgamma in atherogenesis is well recognized, the contribution of the ghrelin receptor to regulate PPARgamma remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ghrelin triggers PPARgamma activation through a concerted signaling cascade involving Erk1/2 and Akt kinases, resulting in enhanced expression of downstream effectors LXRalpha and ABC sterol transporters in human macrophages. These effects were associated with enhanced PPARgamma phosphorylation independently of the inhibitory conserved serine-84. Src tyrosine kinase Fyn was identified as being recruited to GHS-R1a in response to ghrelin, but failure of activated Fyn to enhance PPARgamma Ser-84 specific phosphorylation relied on the concomitant recruitment of docking protein Dok-1, which prevented optimal activation of the Erk1/2 pathway. Also, substitution of Ser-84 preserved the ghrelin-induced PPARgamma activity and responsiveness to Src inhibition, supporting a mechanism independent of Ser-84 in PPARgamma response to ghrelin. Consistent with this, we found that ghrelin promoted the PI3-K/Akt pathway in a Galphaq-dependent manner, resulting in Akt recruitment to PPARgamma, enhanced PPARgamma phosphorylation and activation independently of Ser-84, and increased expression of LXRalpha and ABCA1/G1. Collectively, these results illustrate a complex interplay involving Fyn/Dok-1/Erk and Galphaq/PI3-K/Akt pathways to transduce in a concerted manner responsiveness of PPARgamma to ghrelin in macrophages.

  19. Music and politics after the Holocaust: Menuhin’s Berlin concerts of 1947 and their aftermath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frühauf, Tina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Between September 27 and October 3, 1947, Yehudi Menuhin gave six performances in Berlin, two of them together with Wilhelm Furtwängler, who had just been cleared by the denazification tribunals in Austria and Germany. Because of the German audience and the Furtwängler collaboration, these concerts led to a scandal in the Jewish community and the Displaced Persons camp in Germany as well as Jewish communities abroad. I turn first to the historical background of these performances, specifically the position of Menuhin and Furtwängler toward each other and their roles in postwar Germany. I will then chronicle the events of September and October 1947 through the lenses of Abraham S. Hyman, legal consultant to the American Advisers on Jewish Affairs in Germany, and Yehudi Menuhin and his biographers, to reveal the complexity of the events. Lastly, I will scrutinize the reception of the concerts to shed light on the reasons for and impact of the scandal. I argue that these concerts were mishandled in their organization and aims, in that politics played too large a role in the events during a time when the Jewish people suffered severe trauma in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

    Entre el 27 de septiembre y el 3 de octubre del 1947, Yehudi Menuhin ofreció seis conciertos en Berlín, dos de ellos con Wilhelm Furtwängler, quien acababa de ser declarado inocente por los tribunales de “desnazificación” en Austria y Alemania. Debido a que el público era alemán y a la participación de Furtwängler, estos conciertos provocaron un fuerte escándalo entre la comunidad judía y la población desplazada de los campos en Alemania, así como entre las comunidades judías en el extranjero. Mi investigación se centra, primero, en el contexto histórico de estos conciertos y, concretamente, la posición de Menuhin y Furtwängler hacia el uno al otro, así como sus respectivos papeles en la Alemania de la postguerra. Posteriormente ofrezco una relaci

  20. The American Board of Emergency Medicine ConCert Examination: Emergency Physicians' Perceptions of Learning and Career Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Wahl, Robert P; Counselman, Francis L; Heller, Barry N; Harvey, Anne L; Joldersma, Kevin B; Kowalenko, Terry; Coombs, Andrea B; Reisdorff, Earl J

    2016-09-01

    As part of the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program, ABEM-certified physicians are required to pass the Continuous Certification (ConCert) examination at least every 10 years. With the 2015 ConCert examination, ABEM sought to better understand emergency physicians' perceptions of the benefits of preparing for and taking the examination and the career benefits of staying ABEM-certified. This was a prospective survey study. A voluntary postexamination survey was administered at the end of the 2015 ABEM ConCert examination (September 21-26, 2015). Physicians were asked about the benefits of preparing for the examination and maintaining ABEM certification. Examination performance was compared to perceptions of learning and career benefits. Of the 2,601 on-time test takers, 2,511 respondents participated (96.5% participation rate). The majority of participants (92.0%) identified a benefit to preparing for the ConCert examination, which included reinforced medical knowledge (73.9%), increased knowledge (66.8%), and making them a better clinician (39.4%). The majority of respondents (90.8%) identified a career benefit of maintaining ABEM certification, which included more employment options (73.8%), more positively viewed by other physicians (56.8%), and better financial outcomes (29.8%). There was a statistically significant association between the perception of knowledge reinforcement and examination performance (p Medicine.

  1. Creating personalized memories from social events: community-based support for multi-camera recordings of school concerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Guimarães (Rodrigo); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); V. Zsombori; I. Kegel

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe wide availability of relatively high-quality cameras makes it easy for many users to capture video fragments of social events such as concerts, sports events or community gatherings. The wide availability of simple sharing tools makes it nearly as easy to upload individual fragments

  2. "Posh Music Should Equal Posh Dress": An Investigation into the Concert Dress and Physical Appearance of Female Soloists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Noola K.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of concert dress and physical appearance on perceptions of female classical soloists' musical abilities over a range of genres. Four female violinists were recorded playing three pieces, in four styles of dress of varying formality. Each combination of performer, piece and dress was recorded twice, once as the…

  3. Warm-Up Activities of Middle and High School Band Directors Participating in State-Level Concert Band Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Justin P.; Hancock, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the warm-ups chosen by concert band directors participating in state-level performance assessments. We observed 29 middle and high school bands and coded the frequency and duration of warm-up activities and behaviors. Results indicated that most bands rehearsed music and played scales, long tones, and…

  4. In-situ observations of young contrails – overview and selected results from the CONCERT campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Voigt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lineshaped contrails were detected with the research aircraft Falcon during the CONCERT – CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT – campaign in October/November 2008. The Falcon was equipped with a set of instruments to measure the particle size distribution, shape, extinction and chemical composition as well as trace gas mixing ratios of sulfur dioxide (SO2, reactive nitrogen and halogen species (NO, NOy, HNO3, HONO, HCl, ozone (O3 and carbon monoxide (CO. During 12 mission flights over Europe, numerous contrails, cirrus clouds and a volcanic aerosol layer were probed at altitudes between 8.5 and 11.6 km and at temperatures above 213 K. 22 contrails from 11 different aircraft were observed near and below ice saturation. The observed NO mixing ratios, ice crystal and soot number densities are compared to a process based contrail model. On 19 November 2008 the contrail from a CRJ-2 aircraft was penetrated in 10.1 km altitude at a temperature of 221 K. The contrail had mean ice crystal number densities of 125 cm−3 with effective radii reff of 2.6 μm. The presence of particles with r>50 μm in the less than 2 min old contrail suggests that natural cirrus crystals were entrained in the contrail. Mean HONO/NO (HONO/NOy ratios of 0.037 (0.024 and the fuel sulfur conversion efficiency to H2SO4S of 2.9 % observed in the CRJ-2 contrail are in the range of previous measurements in the gaseous aircraft exhaust. On 31 October 2010 aviation NO emissions could have contributed by more than 40% to the regional scale NO levels in the mid-latitude lowest stratosphere. The CONCERT observations help to better quantify the climate impact from contrails and will be used to investigate the chemical processing of trace gases on contrails.

  5. Mutational analyses of the core domain of Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Viruses integrase: critical residues for concerted integration and multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Karen; Faure, Claudine; Violot, Sebastien; Gouet, Patrice; Verdier, Gerard; Ronfort, Corinne

    2004-01-01

    During replicative cycle of retroviruses, the reverse-transcribed viral DNA is integrated into the cell DNA by the viral integrase (IN) enzyme. The central core domain of IN contains the catalytic site of the enzyme and is involved in binding viral ends and cell DNA as well as dimerization. We previously performed single amino acid substitutions in the core domain of an Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Virus (ALSV) IN [Arch. Virol. 147 (2002) 1761]. Here, we modeled the resulting IN mutants and analyzed the ability of these mutants to mediate concerted DNA integration in an in vitro assay, and to form dimers by protein-protein cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography. The N197C mutation resulted in the inability of the mutant to perform concerted integration that was concomitant with a loss of IN dimerization. Surprisingly, mutations Q102G and A106V at the dimer interface resulted in mutants with higher efficiencies than the wild-type IN in performing two-ended concerted integration of viral DNA ends. The G139D and A195V mutants had a trend to perform one-ended DNA integration of viral ends instead of two-ended integration. More drastically, the I88L and L135G mutants preferentially mediated nonconcerted DNA integration although the proteins form dimers. Therefore, these mutations may alter the formation of IN complexes of higher molecular size than a dimer that would be required for concerted integration. This study points to the important role of core domain residues in the concerted integration of viral DNA ends as well as in the oligomerization of the enzyme

  6. The Effects of Electronic Communication on American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erin; Kozak, L. Viola; Santiago, Roberto; Stephen, Anika

    2012-01-01

    Technological and language innovation often flow in concert with one another. Casual observation by researchers has shown that electronic communication memes, in the form of abbreviations, have found their way into spoken English. This study focuses on the current use of electronic modes of communication, such as cell smartphones, and e-mail, and…

  7. Radical Abstraction Reactions with Concerted Fragmentation in the Chain Decay of Nitroalkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, E. T.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2018-05-01

    Reactions of the type X• + HCR2CH2NO2 → XH + R2C=CH2 + N•O2 are exothermic, due to the breaking of weak C-N bonds and the formation of energy-intensive C=C bonds. Quantum chemistry calculations of the transition state using the reactions of Et• and EtO• with 2-nitrobutane shows that such reactions can be categorized as one-step, due to the extreme instability of the intermediate nitrobutyl radical toward decay with the formation of N•O2. Kinetic parameters that allow us to calculate the energy of activation and rate constant of such a reaction from its enthalpy are estimated using a model of intersecting parabolas. Enthalpies, energies of activation, and rate constants are calculated for a series of reactions with the participation of Et•, EtO•, RO•2, N•O2 radicals on the one hand and a series of nitroalkanes on the other. A new kinetic scheme of the chain decay of nitroalkanes with the participation of abstraction reactions with concerted fragmentation is proposed on the basis of the obtained data.

  8. Standing Concertation Committee - Meetings held on 6, 20 & 22 May 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 6 May 2008 included: Carry-forward of leave The Committee discussed a proposal to increase, for the period 2008-2009, the carry forward of leave days at the end of the 2008 leave year (30 September 2008) so that staff members working on LHC installation and commissioning do not lose leave. It was agreed that departments would be consulted before finalizing a proposal on the number of extra days of carry-forward. Revision of CHIS Rules The Committee discussed a number of outstanding issues relating to the current revision of the CHIS Rules. This revision should be finalized before a market survey is launched for the service contract for the administration of the CHIS that is foreseen by the end of the year. Preparation for TREF on 28 May The following items were to be discussed at TREF on 28 May 2008: Equal Opportunities Report The Committee took note of the report for 2007 presented by the Equ...

  9. [A concertation experience: prevention of WMSDs in workmanship of Parmigiano-Reggiano].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchi, G

    2012-01-01

    The dairy industry of Parmigiano-Reggiano represents in Emilia a resource and an important source of employment. A Protected Designation of Origin (DOP) regulates all stages of processing of milk into cheese "forms" in excess of 40 kg weight, favouring a "traditional" working which involves various manual steps tiring and stressful. From 2002 to 2008 the Service in charge of the Azienda USL of Reggio Emilia has developed a plan focused on musculoskeletal risks in this sector. The need for comparison on the conservation "craftsmanship" of the complex manufacturing process maintaining high attention to health and safety brought the AUSL of Reggio E. and later the AUSL of Modena and Parma, to choose the path of concertation with the social partners, aiming at substantial and non-formal application of the law. It is thus obtained the adoption of preventive measures in a sector so peculiar, complex and constantly changing. Conciliation remains privileged tool in relations between social partners and AUSL of Reggio E. in dairies.

  10. Folding and membrane insertion of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin occur as a concerted process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Matthew R; Damianoglou, Angeliki; Rodger, Alison; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2008-11-07

    Many antibiotic peptides function by binding and inserting into membranes. Understanding this process provides an insight into the fundamentals of both membrane protein folding and antibiotic peptide function. For the first time, in this work, flow-aligned linear dichroism (LD) is used to study the folding of the antibiotic peptide gramicidin. LD provides insight into the combined processes of peptide folding and insertion and has the advantage over other similar techniques of being insensitive to off-membrane aggregation events. By combining LD data with conventional measurements of protein fluorescence and circular dichroism, the mechanism of gramicidin insertion is elucidated. The mechanism consists of five separately assignable steps that include formation of a water-insoluble gramicidin aggregate, dissociation from the aggregate, partitioning of peptide to the membrane surface, oligomerisation on the surface and concerted insertion and folding of the peptide to the double-helical form of gramicidin. Measurement of the rates of each step shows that although changes in the fluorescence signal cease 10 s after the initiation of the process, the insertion of the peptide into the membrane is actually not complete for a further 60 min. This last membrane insertion phase is only apparent by measurement of LD and circular dichroism signal changes. In summary, this study demonstrates the importance of multi-technique approaches, including LD, in studies of membrane protein folding.

  11. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N(2) fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N(2)-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N(2) fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism.

  12. Concerted practice and/or conscious parallelism on an oligopolistic market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đuričić Jovana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The competition represents a desirable state of the market in every society. Putting a lot of effort in trying to be better than each other, the competitors of the market, where there is a fair competition, contribute to making that market more advanced than the other one with the weaker competition. However it has become quite frequent to come across the violation of the competition in modern society. It is usually done by making different agreements or with explicit or tacit coordination of conduct on the market. Apart from these, there are many other ways for doing so, with the aim of getting certain benefits, especially making extra profit. In addition to that, there are some restrictions on the competition on oligopolistic markets too, yet, those markets are covered with different market forms which cannot be easily distinguished from the forbidden ones. This paper defines the relation between the concerted practice and conscious parallelism on an oligopolistic market, which is the example of a restricted market conduct, and the one which just seems to be legal, according to the practice of the European Court of Justice.

  13. Conditioning Methodologies for DanceSport: Lessons from Gymnastics, Figure Skating, and Concert Dance Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outevsky, David; Martin, Blake Cw

    2015-12-01

    Dancesport, the competitive branch of ballroom dancing, places high physiological and psychological demands on its practitioners, but pedagogical resources in these areas for this dance form are limited. Dancesport competitors could benefit from strategies used in other aesthetic sports. In this review, we identify conditioning methodologies from gymnastics, figure skating, and contemporary, modern, and ballet dance forms that could have relevance and suitability for dancesport training, and propose several strategies for inclusion in the current dancesport curriculum. We reviewed articles derived from Google Scholar, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Taylor & Francis Online, and Web of Science search engines and databases, with publication dates from 1979 to 2013. The keywords included MeSH terms: dancing, gymnastics, physiology, energy metabolism, physical endurance, and range of motion. Out of 47 papers examined, 41 papers met the inclusion criteria (validity of scientific methods, topic relevance, transferability to dancesport, publication date). Quality and validity of the data were assessed by examining the methodologies in each study and comparing studies on similar populations as well as across time using the PRISMA 2009 checklist and flowchart. The relevant research suggests that macro-cycle periodization planning, aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, range of motion and muscular endurance training, and performance psychology methods have potential for adaptation for dancesport training. Dancesport coaches may help their students fulfill their ambitions as competitive athletes and dance artists by adapting the relevant performance enhancement strategies from gymnastics, figure skating, and concert dance forms presented in this paper.

  14. Concerted bis-alkylating reactivity of clerocidin towards unpaired cytosine residues in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sara N.; Menegazzo, Ileana; Fabris, Daniele; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL) is a topoisomerase II poison, which cleaves DNA irreversibly at guanines (G) and reversibly at cytosines (C). Furthermore, the drug can induce enzyme-independent strand breaks at the G and C level. It has been previously shown that G-damage is induced by alkylation of the guanine N7, followed by spontaneous depurination and nucleic acid cleavage, whereas scission at C is obtained only after treatment with hot alkali, and no information is available to explain the nature of this damage. We present here a systematic study on the reactivity of CL towards C both in the DNA environment and in solution. Selected synthetic derivatives were employed to evaluate the role of each chemical group of the drug. The structure of CL–dC adduct was then characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and NMR: the adduct is a stable condensed ring system resulting from a concerted electrophilic attack of the adjacent carbonyl and epoxide groups of CL towards the exposed NH2 and N3, respectively. This reaction mechanism, shown here for the first time, is characterized by faster kinetic rates than alkylation at G, due to the fact that the rate-determining step, alkylation at the epoxide, is an intramolecular process, provided a Schiff base linking CL and C can rapidly form, whereas the corresponding reaction of G N7 is intermolecular. These results provide helpful hints to explain the reversible/irreversible nature of topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage produced by CL at C/G steps. PMID:15494453

  15. Following Musical Shows: A Study with Focal Groups on Satisfaction of Musical Concerts Regular Visitors and Socialization between Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúmia Massa Garcia Pires

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed to identify which attributes impact more significantly on the satisfaction of concerts’ regular visitors and socialization between them when inserted in these kinds of events. Thus, we used a qualitative methodology, performing focus groups. Among the main results of this study, we found, regarding satisfaction of concerts’ visitors, the attributes that most influence the public are related to services - especially for beverage supply, cleaning of bathrooms and lines formed inside the event - organization, show infrastructure and performance artists. Furthermore, considering the socialization of the visitors, we found that most respondents often go to concerts together with other people, but some did not exclude the possibility to attend the concerts alone when it comes to a familiar artist.

  16. Chinese Dream——Concert in Commemoration of 115th Birth Anniversary of Premier Zhou Enlai Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Our; Staff; Reporter

    2013-01-01

    <正>The theme song of the film The Founding of a Republic sung by male vocalists Dai Yuqiang and Wei Song reverberated in the Opera Hall at the National Center for the Performing Arts on the `evening of March 14. It marked the start of the concert in commemoration of the 115th anniversary of the birth of Premier Zhou Enlai, with "Chinese Dream" as the theme.

  17. Creating personalized memories from social events: Community-based support for multi-camera recordings of school concerts

    OpenAIRE

    Guimaraes R.L.; Cesar P.; Bulterman D.C.A.; Zsombori V.; Kegel I.

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe wide availability of relatively high-quality cameras makes it easy for many users to capture video fragments of social events such as concerts, sports events or community gatherings. The wide availability of simple sharing tools makes it nearly as easy to upload individual fragments to on-line video sites. Current work on video mashups focuses on the creation of a video summary based on the characteristics of individual media fragments, but it fails to address the interpersona...

  18. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF THE MUSICAL LANGUAGE AND TEXTURE IN THE CONCERT WALTZ FOR TWO PIANOS BY OLEG NEGRUTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAMALÂGA MARINA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the Concert Waltz by Oleg Negruta written for piano duet. This work is considered in terms of form and content. Special attention is given to identifying the specificity of the musical language and texture. As a result, the conclusion is that the originality of the composer’s style is manifested in bright melody, relying on the classic-romantic harmony, enriched by jazz elements.

  19. GENESIS OF KHARKOV MUSIC CULTURE IN THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE CITY’S EDUCATION AND CONCERT LIFE FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Kononova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the genesis of Kharkov musical culture from the late 18th to the first half of the 19th century, studying it in terms of two aspects, the formation of education and the emergence of the city’s concert life.The relevance of the research subject chosen by the author is determined by the wish to give the fullest description of the multi-layered process of formation of Kharkov musical culture which played one of the leading roles in the history of Ukrainian culture, and to acquaint the Western public with the most interesting facts of the formation and development of a reputable East-European centre. The main range of issues discussed in the article covers the period of the innitial foundation of artistic education, and its influence on the expansion and perception of music in different social circles, presenting the structures and forms of the nascent musical life of Kharkov. The section "Specific features of the Ukrainian system of education" brings out the facts which indicate the progressive tendencies in education, especially, on the territory of Sloboda Ukraine. The formation of artistic education in the religious schools of the city is covered in the section "Genesis of musical education in Kharkov". One of the most productive periods of the city’s cultivation of concert life associated with the functioning of the University is analyzed in the section "The impact of the University music activities on the city's concert going." The Conclusion emphasizes the interaction of traditional and nontraditional in the musical culture of Kharkov that was clearly manifested in the concert activities of the University, in particular, in popularization of oratorios. Furthermore, it discusses the factors which participated in the development in the field of compositional achievement as well as the performing arts and opened new perspectives in the dynamics of the artistic life of the Ukrainian city.

  20. “AGREEMENTS”, “DECISIONS” AND “CONCERTED PRACTICES”: KEY CONCEPTS IN THE ANALYSIS OF ANTICOMPETITIVE AGREEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA CUCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In their economic activity, undertakings conclude many agreements between them. But agreements between undertakings which can distort the competition -anticompetitive agreements- are prohibited. The Romanian and EU law prohibit “all agreements between undertakings, decisions by associations of undertakings and concerted practices which have as their object or effect the prevention, restriction or distortion of competition”. However, the terms ”agreements”, ”decisions” or ”concerted practices” are nowhere defined in the EU Treaties or in the Romanian law. These terms are key concepts in the analysis of anticompetitive agreements which can distort the competition. In the lack of a legal definition, these concepts have generated a complex body of jurisprudence, which has to be identified. The analysis of these key concepts necessarily entails the conceptual delimitation of the notions. On this purpose, the relevant legal provisions will be identified in the Romanian and EU law, as well as the decisions of the European Court of Justice in this matter. The present paper intends to present the conceptual evolution of the analysed notions, paying special attention to concerted practices and to parallel behaviour in price fixing on the market.

  1. Cross-Modal Perception of Noise-in-Music: Audiences Generate Spiky Shapes in Response to Auditory Roughness in a Novel Electroacoustic Concert Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kongmeng; Lindborg, PerMagnus; Rodrigues, Ruth; Styles, Suzy J

    2018-01-01

    Noise has become integral to electroacoustic music aesthetics. In this paper, we define noise as sound that is high in auditory roughness, and examine its effect on cross-modal mapping between sound and visual shape in participants. In order to preserve the ecological validity of contemporary music aesthetics, we developed Rama , a novel interface, for presenting experimentally controlled blocks of electronically generated sounds that varied systematically in roughness, and actively collected data from audience interaction. These sounds were then embedded as musical drones within the overall sound design of a multimedia performance with live musicians, Audience members listened to these sounds, and collectively voted to create the shape of a visual graphic, presented as part of the audio-visual performance. The results of the concert setting were replicated in a controlled laboratory environment to corroborate the findings. Results show a consistent effect of auditory roughness on shape design, with rougher sounds corresponding to spikier shapes. We discuss the implications, as well as evaluate the audience interface.

  2. Cross-Modal Perception of Noise-in-Music: Audiences Generate Spiky Shapes in Response to Auditory Roughness in a Novel Electroacoustic Concert Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongmeng Liew

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Noise has become integral to electroacoustic music aesthetics. In this paper, we define noise as sound that is high in auditory roughness, and examine its effect on cross-modal mapping between sound and visual shape in participants. In order to preserve the ecological validity of contemporary music aesthetics, we developed Rama, a novel interface, for presenting experimentally controlled blocks of electronically generated sounds that varied systematically in roughness, and actively collected data from audience interaction. These sounds were then embedded as musical drones within the overall sound design of a multimedia performance with live musicians, Audience members listened to these sounds, and collectively voted to create the shape of a visual graphic, presented as part of the audio–visual performance. The results of the concert setting were replicated in a controlled laboratory environment to corroborate the findings. Results show a consistent effect of auditory roughness on shape design, with rougher sounds corresponding to spikier shapes. We discuss the implications, as well as evaluate the audience interface.

  3. Les concerts européens à la radio dans l'entre-deux-guerres : mise en ondes d'une métaphore diplomatique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laborie, L.; Lommers, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    L’expression « concert européen » s’applique à la fois aux relations diplomatiques tissées entre les Etats au xixe siècle et à la diffusion d’émissions musicales à l’échelle continentale entre 1929 et 1939. Au-delà des prouesses techniques, l’ambition culturelle et pacifiste de ces concerts

  4. Outreach for Families and Girls- Astronomy at Outdoor Concerts and at Super Bowl or Halloween Star Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2011-05-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) is a NASA-funded as astronomy outreach program at community parks and music festivals (1000 - 25,000 people/event). While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at sidewalks and parks, this program targets a different audience - music lovers who are attending concerts in community parks or festivals. These music lovers who may not have visited science museums, planetariums, or star parties are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. MAUS includes solar observing, telescope observations including a live imaging system, an astronomical video, astronomy banners/posters, and hands-on activities. MAUS increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. Since 2009 over 50,000 people have participated in these outreach activities including a significant number of families and young girls. In addition to concerts in local Long Island parks, there were MUAS events at Tanglewood (summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra), Jazz in Central Park, and Astronomy Night on the National Mall (co-sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy). In 2011 MUAS will be expanded to include Ravinia (summer home of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra), the Newport Folk Festival, and the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts (site of the 1969 Woodstock festival). According to our survey results, music lovers became more informed about astronomy. Expanding Hofstra University's successful outreach programs, I propose the creation of a National Halloween Stars event targeting children and a National Super Bowl Star Party targeting girls, women, and the 2/3 of Americans who do not watch the Super Bowl. This can be combined with astronomers or amateur astronomers bringing telescopes to Super Bowl parties for football fans to stargaze during

  5. CONCERT. ''European joint programme for the integration of radiation protection research''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Hannig, A.; Birschwilks, M.; Jung, T.

    2016-01-01

    CONCERT is a joint project of the EU and its member states which assume joint financing: Over the next five years the largest European radiation protection programme so far will have available about 28 Million Euros for research and integrative measures, whereby the European Commission will bear 70 per cent of the costs. Integrative measures include, among others, targeted vocational education and training of junior researchers in radiation protection, better access to research and irradiation facilities for scientists, as well as a stronger connection of universities and research centres in radiation protection research.

  6. Nonadiabatic two-electron transfer mediated by an irregular bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Shevchenko, Ye.V.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    Nonadiabatic two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a linear molecular bridge is studied theoretically. Special attention is put on the case of a irregular distribution of bridge site energies as well as on the inter-site Coulomb interaction. Based on the unified description of electron transfer reactions [J. Chem. Phys. 115 (2001) 7107] a closed set of kinetic equations describing the TET process is derived. A reduction of this set to a single exponential donor-acceptor (D-A) TET is performed together with a derivation of an overall D-A TET rate. The latter contains a contribution of the stepwise as well as of the concerted route of D-A TET. The stepwise contribution is determined by two single-electron steps each of them associated with a sequential and a superexchange pathway. A two-electron unistep superexchange transition between the D and A forms the concerted contribution to the overall rate. Both contributions are analyzed in their dependency on the bridge length. The irregular distribution of the bridge site energies as well as the influence of the Coulomb interaction facilitates the D-A TET via a modification of the stepwise and the concerted part of the overall rate. At low temperatures and for short bridges with a single or two units the concerted contribution exceeds the stepwise contribution. If the bridge contains more than two units, the stepwise contribution dominates the overall rate

  7. Computations on the primary photoreaction of Br2 with CO2: stepwise vs concerted addition of Br atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kewei; Korter, Timothy M; Braiman, Mark S

    2015-04-09

    It was proposed previously that Br2-sensitized photolysis of liquid CO2 proceeds through a metastable primary photoproduct, CO2Br2. Possible mechanisms for such a photoreaction are explored here computationally. First, it is shown that the CO2Br radical is not stable in any geometry. This rules out a free-radical mechanism, for example, photochemical splitting of Br2 followed by stepwise addition of Br atoms to CO2-which in turn accounts for the lack of previously observed Br2+CO2 photochemistry in gas phases. A possible alternative mechanism in liquid phase is formation of a weakly bound CO2:Br2 complex, followed by concerted photoaddition of Br2. This hypothesis is suggested by the previously published spectroscopic detection of a binary CO2:Br2 complex in the supersonically cooled gas phase. We compute a global binding-energy minimum of -6.2 kJ mol(-1) for such complexes, in a linear geometry. Two additional local minima were computed for perpendicular (C2v) and nearly parallel asymmetric planar geometries, both with binding energies near -5.4 kJ mol(-1). In these two latter geometries, C-Br and O-Br bond distances are simultaneously in the range of 3.5-3.8 Å, that is, perhaps suitable for a concerted photoaddition under the temperature and pressure conditions where Br2 + CO2 photochemistry has been observed.

  8. Switching of the positive feedback for RAS activation by a concerted function of SOS membrane association domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Hibino, Kayo; Yanagida, Toshio; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Son of sevenless (SOS) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that regulates cell behavior by activating the small GTPase RAS. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that an interaction between SOS and the GTP-bound active form of RAS generates a positive feedback loop that propagates RAS activation. However, it remains unclear how the multiple domains of SOS contribute to the regulation of the feedback loop in living cells. Here, we observed single molecules of SOS in living cells to analyze the kinetics and dynamics of SOS behavior. The results indicate that the histone fold and Grb2-binding domains of SOS concertedly produce an intermediate state of SOS on the cell surface. The fraction of the intermediated state was reduced in positive feedback mutants, suggesting that the feedback loop functions during the intermediate state. Translocation of RAF, recognizing the active form of RAS, to the cell surface was almost abolished in the positive feedback mutants. Thus, the concerted functions of multiple membrane-associating domains of SOS governed the positive feedback loop, which is crucial for cell fate decision regulated by RAS.

  9. Conference-concert with Frédéric Bernachon on Thursday, 8 March at 6 pm

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    The Staff Association is pleased to invite you to an educational conference-concert of classical piano by Frédéric Bernachon « Beethoven : sa vie et son destin au cœur de la sonate Pathétique » on Thursday, 8 March at 6 pm Main Auditorium (500-1-001) Length: 60-90 minutes. Free entrance, cocktails served after the concert. External visitors, please contact the Staff Association for a visitor card: staff.association@cern.ch or +41 22 76 63738 With the help of a piano, Frédéric Bernachon proposes to explain the tragedy of Beethoven, as transmitted in his musical legacy. The listeners will get to experience Ludwig van Beethoven's destiny, suspense, drama and great questions in all their range and variety. After a careful introduction to listening to Sonate Pathétique, Frédéric Bernachon himself interprets this unique piece, through which Beethowen has chosen...

  10. Concerted Electrodeposition and Alloying of Antimony on Indium Electrodes for Selective Formation of Crystalline Indium Antimonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrug, Eli; Rafson, Jessica; Lancaster, Mitchell; Maldonado, Stephen

    2017-09-19

    The direct preparation of crystalline indium antimonide (InSb) by the electrodeposition of antimony (Sb) onto indium (In) working electrodes has been demonstrated. When Sb is electrodeposited from dilute aqueous electrolytes containing dissolved Sb 2 O 3 , an alloying reaction is possible between Sb and In if any surface oxide films are first thoroughly removed from the electrode. The presented Raman spectra detail the interplay between the formation of crystalline InSb and the accumulation of Sb as either amorphous or crystalline aggregates on the electrode surface as a function of time, temperature, potential, and electrolyte composition. Electron and optical microscopies confirm that under a range of conditions, the preparation of a uniform and phase-pure InSb film is possible. The cumulative results highlight this methodology as a simple yet potent strategy for the synthesis of intermetallic compounds of interest.

  11. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  12. Visualization of multivalent histone modification in a single cell reveals highly concerted epigenetic changes on differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Naoko; Niwa, Tohru; Kimura, Kana

    2013-01-01

    . Bivalent modification was clearly visualized by iChmo in wild-type embryonic stem cells (ESCs) known to have it, whereas rarely in Suz12 knockout ESCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts known to have little of it. iChmo was applied to analysis of epigenetic and phenotypic changes of heterogeneous cell......Combinations of histone modifications have significant biological roles, such as maintenance of pluripotency and cancer development, but cannot be analyzed at the single cell level. Here, we visualized a combination of histone modifications by applying the in situ proximity ligation assay, which...... population, namely, ESCs at an early stage of differentiation, and this revealed that the bivalent modification disappeared in a highly concerted manner, whereas phenotypic differentiation proceeded with large variations among cells. Also, using this method, we were able to visualize a combination...

  13. Human breast cancer: concerted role of diet, prolactin and adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J B

    1992-04-01

    The low incidence of breast cancer in Japan disappears within 2 generations in migrant Japanese in the USA. This is of fundamental importance if we are to understand, and perhaps reverse, the high rate seen in Western countries. Diet is the most likely factor involved, and a review of the topic of diet, body mass index, and gain in adult body mass, supports a relationship between these factors and breast-cancer risk in post-menopausal, but not pre-menopausal, women. A direct link between nutritional factors and secretion of the hormones prolactin and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate is proposed. An estrogen 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol is formed peripherally from the latter steroid, and in Western women attains a blood concentration at which it is biologically active. Thus diet/fat provides factors, viz., fatty acids, prolactin and estrogen, which in concerted fashion provide a milieu conducive to mammary tumorigenesis.

  14. Concerted in vitro trimming of viral HLA-B27-restricted ligands by human ERAP1 and ERAP2 aminopeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Johnstone, Carolina; Mir, Carmen; Jiménez, Mercedes; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen processing and presentation pathway, the antigenic peptides are generated from viral proteins by multiple proteolytic cleavages of the proteasome (and in some cases other cytosolic proteases) and transported to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen where they are exposed to aminopeptidase activity. In human cells, two different ER-resident enzymes, ERAP1 and ERAP2, can trim the N-terminally extended residues of peptide precursors. In this study, the possible cooperative effect of generating five naturally processed HLA-B27 ligands by both proteases was analyzed. We identified differences in the products obtained with increased detection of natural HLA-B27 ligands by comparing double versus single enzyme digestions by mass spectrometry analysis. These in vitro data suggest that each enzyme can use the degradation products of the other as a substrate for new N-terminal trimming, indicating concerted aminoproteolytic activity of ERAP 1 and ERAP2.

  15. COMMUNICATIONAL THINKING IN THE STATE ORCHESTRA OF MATO GROSSO AND THE FIELD OF CONCERT MUSIC IN CUIABÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Gushiken

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Na perspectiva da “comunicação como cultura”, este artigo tem como questão central a relação entre pensamento comunicacional e a formação da música de concerto como campo artístico-cultural, num estudo de caso da Orquestra do Estado de Mato Grosso (OEMT. Criada em 2005, a OEMT instituiu um novo momento para a música de concerto em Cuiabá, capital de Mato Grosso, estado do Centro-Oeste com parte de seu território na Amazônia Legal. O funcionamento da OEMT na primeira década de atividade (2005-2015 atualiza-se com o desenvolvimento paralelo de estratégias de comunicação organizacional que redimensionam as relações da orquestra junto a seus diversos públicos. A interface entre distintos campos profissionais evidencia a dimensão comunicacional das práticas artísticas e culturais na contemporaneidade.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Comunicação; Música de concerto; Orquestra do Estado de Mato Grosso; Cuiabá.     ABSTRACT In the perspective of “communication as culture”, this article has as its central question the relationship between communicational thinking and the formation of concert music as an artistic-cultural field, in a case study of the State Orchestra of Mato Grosso (OEMT. Created in 2005, OEMT instituted a new moment for concert music in Cuiabá, capital of Mato Grosso, state of the Midwest with part of its territory in the Legal Amazon. The operation of OEMT in the first decade of activity (2005-2015 is updated with the parallel development of organizational communication strategies that reshape the relations of the orchestra with its different audiences. The interface between different professional fields evidences the communicational dimension of the artistic and cultural practices in the contemporaneity.   KEYWORDS: Communication; Concert music; State Orchestra of  Mato Grosso; Cuiabá.     RESUMEN Desde la perspectiva de la “comunicación como cultura”, este artículo tiene como cuestión central la

  16. An European concerted action investigating the validity of perinatal mortality as an outcome indicator for the quality of antenatal and perinatal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardus, J.H.; Graafmans, W.C.; Pal-de Bruin, K.M. van der; Amelink-Verburg, M.P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Mackenbach, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the concepts, objectives, design, and data analysis procedures of the EuroNatal study are described. This sutdy started in 1996 and is a concerted action including 14 countries in Europe. The EuroNatal study aims at determining the validity of national perinatal mortality rates as an

  17. Pilot study: Exposure and materiality of the secondary room and its impact in the impulse response of coupled-volume concert halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Michael; Johnson, Marty E.

    2002-05-01

    What does one room sound like when it is partially exposed to another (acoustically coupled)? More specifically, this research aims to quantify how operational and design decisions impact aural impressions in the design of concert halls with acoustical coupling. By adding a second room to a concert hall, and designing doors to control the sonic transparency between the two rooms, designers can create a new, coupled acoustic. Concert halls use coupling to achieve a variable, longer, and distinct reverberant quality for their musicians and listeners. For this study, a coupled-volume shoebox concert hall was conceived with a fixed geometric volume, form, and primary-room sound absorption. Aperture size and secondary-room sound-absorption levels were established as variables. Statistical analysis of sound decay in this simulated hall suggests a highly sensitive relationship between the double-sloped condition and (1) Architectural composition, as defined by the aperture size exposing the chamber and (2) Materiality, as defined by the sound absorbance in the coupled volume. Preliminary calculations indicate that the double-sloped sound decay condition only appears when the total aperture area is less than 1.5% of the total shoebox surface area and the average absorption coefficient of the coupled volume is less than 0.07.

  18. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  19. European concerted action on offshore wind energy deployment: inventory and analysis of power transmission barriers in eight member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woyte, Achim; Gardner, Paul; Snodin, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The European Concerted Action for Offshore Wind Energy Deployment (COD) was carried out by eight sea-bordering European Union member states, with the objective to remove not explicitly technical barriers to offshore wind energy. Within the COD, an inventory of relevant aspects affecting the grid integration of offshore wind energy on a large scale in the eight countries has been made. Collected data items for this inventory are national plans and prospects for offshore wind energy, information about the transmission system, possibilities for grid connection, aspects of the grid codes, balancing, connection and energy pricing. The comprehensive COD reports were published and presented in October 2005 during the Copenhagen Offshore wind conference. This paper provides a short description of the situation for each country. Thereafter, country-specific information is grouped based on geography and membership in a synchronous zone. Additionally, a view is developed on the desirable facilities for the trans-European exchange of power from large wind farms. Finally, we elaborate overall conclusions in order to arrive at generalized observations, recommendations for policy makers and issues that will emerge in the near future. As a general conclusion, many things need to be done on a technical level in order to integrate large amounts of offshore wind power into our power systems. However, none of these measures is technically unknown. Therefore, the feasibility of integrating large amounts of offshore wind power is mainly a question of finance and hence based on political decisions. (Author)

  20. Offshore Wind Energy Ready to Power a Sustainable Europe. Final Report. Concerted Action on Offshore Wind Energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The objective of the project Concerted Action on Offshore Wind Energy in Europe [CA-OWEE] is to define the current state of the art of offshore wind energy in Europe through gathering and evaluation of information from across Europe and to disseminate the resulting knowledge to all interested, in order to help stimulate the development of the industry. The project is being funded by the European Commission and will be completed at the end of 2001. The knowledge gathered will be freely available through an internet site, a workshop and a printed report. This project divides offshore wind energy into five clusters of subjects and reviews the recent history and summarise the current state of affairs, relating to: Cluster 1 offshore technology, of the wind turbines and the support structures, Cluster 2 grid integration, energy supply and financing, Cluster 3 resources and economics, Cluster 4 activities and prospects, Cluster 5 social acceptance, environmental impact and politics. The conclusions from these surveys are then used to define recommendations for the future RTD strategy for Europe. The project's 17 partners come from 13 countries, thus covering the majority of the European Community's coastline. The partners cover a wide range of expertise and include developers, utilities, consultants, research institutes and universities

  1. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  2. Concerted in vitro trimming of viral HLA-B27-restricted ligands by human ERAP1 and ERAP2 aminopeptidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lorente

    Full Text Available In the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I antigen processing and presentation pathway, the antigenic peptides are generated from viral proteins by multiple proteolytic cleavages of the proteasome (and in some cases other cytosolic proteases and transported to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen where they are exposed to aminopeptidase activity. In human cells, two different ER-resident enzymes, ERAP1 and ERAP2, can trim the N-terminally extended residues of peptide precursors. In this study, the possible cooperative effect of generating five naturally processed HLA-B27 ligands by both proteases was analyzed. We identified differences in the products obtained with increased detection of natural HLA-B27 ligands by comparing double versus single enzyme digestions by mass spectrometry analysis. These in vitro data suggest that each enzyme can use the degradation products of the other as a substrate for new N-terminal trimming, indicating concerted aminoproteolytic activity of ERAP 1 and ERAP2.

  3. Paul Wittgenstein's right arm and his phantom: the saga of a famous concert pianist and his amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, François; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Reports of postamputation pain and problems linked to phantom limbs have increased in recent years, particularly in relation to war-related amputations. These problems are still poorly understood and are considered rather mysterious, and they are difficult to treat. In addition, they may shed light on brain physiology and neuropsychology. Functional neuroimaging techniques now enable us to better understand their pathophysiology and to consider new rehabilitation techniques. Several artists have suffered from postamputation complications and this has influenced not only their personal life but also their artistic work. Paul Wittgenstein (1887-1961), a pianist whose right arm was amputated during the First World War, became a famous left-handed concert performer. His case provides insight into Post-World War I musical and political history. More specifically, the impact on the artistic life of this pianist illustrates various postamputation complications, such as phantom limb, stump pain, and especially moving phantom. The phantom movements of his right hand helped him develop the dexterity of his left hand. Wittgenstein played piano works that were written especially for him (the most famous being Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand) and composed some of his own. Additionally, several famous composers had previously written for the left hand. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The evolution of increased competitive ability, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons act in concert for a tropical invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Long; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M; Barclay, Gregor F; Pereyra, Carlos Silva; Feng, Yu-Long

    2013-02-01

    There are many non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic invasions but few studies have concurrently tested more than one hypothesis for the same species. Here, we tested the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis in two common garden experiments in which Chromolaena odorata plants originating from native and nonnative ranges were grown in competition with natives from each range, and the novel weapons hypothesis in laboratory experiments with leachates from C. odorata. Compared with conspecifics originating from the native range, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were stronger competitors at high nutrient concentrations in the nonnative range in China and experienced far more herbivore damage in the native range in Mexico. In both China and Mexico, C. odorata was more suppressed by species native to Mexico than by species native to China. Species native to China were much more inhibited by leaf extracts from C. odorata than species from Mexico, and this difference in allelopathic effects may provide a possible explanation for the biogeographic differences in competitive ability. Our results indicate that EICA, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons may act in concert to promote invasion by C. odorata, and emphasize the importance of exploring multiple, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for invasions. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Protein crystal growth on board Shenzhou 3: a concerted effort improves crystal diffraction quality and facilitates structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Y.; Cang, H.-X.; Zhou, J.-X.; Wang, Y.-P.; Bi, R.-C.; Colelesage, J.; Delbaere, L.T.J.; Nahoum, V.; Shi, R.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, D.-W.; Lin, S.-X.

    2004-01-01

    The crystallization of 16 proteins was carried out using 60 wells on board Shenzhou 3 in 2002. Although the mission was only 7 days, careful and concerted planning at all stages made it possible to obtain crystals of improved quality compared to their ground controls for some of the proteins. Significantly improved resolutions were obtained from diffracted crystals of 4 proteins. A complete data set from a space crystal of the PEP carboxykinase yielded significantly higher resolution (1.46 A vs. 1.87 A), I/sigma (22.4 vs. 15.5), and a lower average temperature factor (29.2 A 2 vs. 42.9 A 2 ) than the best ground-based control crystal. The 3-D structure of the enzyme is well improved with significant ligand density. It has been postulated that the reduced convection and absence of macromolecule sedimentation under microgravity have advantages/benefits for protein crystal growth. Improvements in experimental design for protein crystal growth in microgravity are ongoing

  6. Acetic acid can catalyze succinimide formation from aspartic acid residues by a concerted bond reorganization mechanism: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-12

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  7. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Main points examined at the meeting of 24 June 2009 Results of the 2009 MARS exercise The Committee took note of the results of the 2009 MARS exercise presented by the Head of the HR Department, expressing satisfaction for the early availability of the statistics and for the fact that the analysis of the results covered the last three years. Status report on the work on the five-yearly review The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Gildemyn on the data collection procedure for the 2010 five-yearly review (staff, fellows, associate members of the personnel, CHIS) and of the proposed work schedule. Implications for employment conditions of the discussions at the Finance Committee and Council on 17 and 18 June 2009 The Chairman briefly reported on the discussions at the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in June 2009, on the 2010-2014 medium-term plan and the 2010 preliminary draft budget, as well as on the modified strategy and goals for 2009. The Committee ...

  8. Towards a Concerted Effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette-Louise; Mouritsen, Tina; Montgomery, Edith

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a method model for the prevention of youth crime in Danish municipalities. The method model consists of instructions for conducting processual network meetings between traumatized refugee parents and the professional specialists working with their children on an intermunicipal...

  9. Thinking-in-Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I examine the concept of thinking in Hannah Arendt's writings. Arendt's interest in the experience of thinking allowed her to develop a concept of thinking that is distinct from other forms of mental activity such as cognition and problem solving. For her, thinking is an unending, unpredictable and destructive activity without fixed…

  10. The heterothallic sugarbeet pathogen Cercospora beticola contains exon fragments of both MAT genes that are homogenized by concerted evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Melvin D; de Jonge, Ronnie; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Liu, Zhaohui; Birla, Keshav; Van de Peer, Yves; Subbarao, Krishna V; Thomma, Bart P H J; Secor, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Dothideomycetes is one of the most ecologically diverse and economically important classes of fungi. Sexual reproduction in this group is governed by mating type (MAT) genes at the MAT1 locus. Self-sterile (heterothallic) species contain one of two genes at MAT1 (MAT1-1-1 or MAT1-2-1) and only isolates of opposite mating type are sexually compatible. In contrast, self-fertile (homothallic) species contain both MAT genes at MAT1. Knowledge of the reproductive capacities of plant pathogens are of particular interest because recombining populations tend to be more difficult to manage in agricultural settings. In this study, we sequenced MAT1 in the heterothallic Dothideomycete fungus Cercospora beticola to gain insight into the reproductive capabilities of this important plant pathogen. In addition to the expected MAT gene at MAT1, each isolate contained fragments of both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 at ostensibly random loci across the genome. When MAT fragments from each locus were manually assembled, they reconstituted MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 exons with high identity, suggesting a retroposition event occurred in a homothallic ancestor in which both MAT genes were fused. The genome sequences of related taxa revealed that MAT gene fragment pattern of Cercospora zeae-maydis was analogous to C. beticola. In contrast, the genome of more distantly related Mycosphaerella graminicola did not contain MAT fragments. Although fragments occurred in syntenic regions of the C. beticola and C. zeae-maydis genomes, each MAT fragment was more closely related to the intact MAT gene of the same species. Taken together, these data suggest MAT genes fragmented after divergence of M. graminicola from the remaining taxa, and concerted evolution functioned to homogenize MAT fragments and MAT genes in each species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Stakeholder Analysis for Sharing Agro-environment Issues Towards Concerted Action: A Case Study on Diffuse Nitrate Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Roggero

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing need for participatory approaches to support the development of sustainable farming systems, based on the active involvement of stakeholders in the definition of research objectives and priorities. This paper reports the experience of a team of agronomy researchers involved in the SLIM project (http://slim.open.ac.uk, around a case study of nitrate pollution. The agro-ecosystem analysis included biophysical processes at microcatchment scale and the stakeholders’ perceptions, interests and practices related to the nitrate issue (stakeholders analysis. The conceptual SLIM framework model supported new interactions among stakeholders, that were facilitated by researchers, using dialogical tools to enable them to use scientific data and to integrate their own knowledge on the farming system. The agro-environment policies, based on compulsory prescriptions, revealed weak assumptions and insufficient integration of scientific knowledge. The stakeholder analysis contributed to the identification of priorities both for scientific research and agro-environment policies. Researchers provided the site-specific scientific knowledge, in a way that enabled stakeholders to identify the relationships between agricultural practices, landscape values and the nitrate pollution issue and to elaborate shared strategies to develop concerted actions. New spaces for interaction between researchers and stakeholders should be created to face complex agro-environment issues at catchment scale, such as the nitrate pollution of groundwater. The implication for agronomy research is that the experiments should be designed to produce suitable results to facilitate participatory sessions and that it is worthwhile to invest in specific skills of communication science and group dynamics management within the agronomy researchers’ community, in order to integrate agronomy knowledge into high quality participatory processes.

  12. Stakeholder Analysis for Sharing Agro-environment Issues Towards Concerted Action: A Case Study on Diffuse Nitrate Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toderi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing need for participatory approaches to support the development of sustainable farming systems, based on the active involvement of stakeholders in the definition of research objectives and priorities. This paper reports the experience of a team of agronomy researchers involved in the SLIM project (http://slim.open.ac.uk, around a case study of nitrate pollution. The agro-ecosystem analysis included biophysical processes at microcatchment scale and the stakeholders’ perceptions, interests and practices related to the nitrate issue (stakeholders analysis. The conceptual SLIM framework model supported new interactions among stakeholders, that were facilitated by researchers, using dialogical tools to enable them to use scientific data and to integrate their own knowledge on the farming system. The agro-environment policies, based on compulsory prescriptions, revealed weak assumptions and insufficient integration of scientific knowledge. The stakeholder analysis contributed to the identification of priorities both for scientific research and agro-environment policies. Researchers provided the site-specific scientific knowledge, in a way that enabled stakeholders to identify the relationships between agricultural practices, landscape values and the nitrate pollution issue and to elaborate shared strategies to develop concerted actions. New spaces for interaction between researchers and stakeholders should be created to face complex agro-environment issues at catchment scale, such as the nitrate pollution of groundwater. The implication for agronomy research is that the experiments should be designed to produce suitable results to facilitate participatory sessions and that it is worthwhile to invest in specific skills of communication science and group dynamics management within the agronomy researchers’ community, in order to integrate agronomy knowledge into high quality participatory processes.

  13. Epigenetic silencing of BTB and CNC homology 2 and concerted promoter CpG methylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Keeok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mirang; Kim, Seon-Young; Noh, Seung-Moo; Song, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Yong Sung

    2014-09-01

    BTB and CNC homology 2 (BACH2) is a lymphoid-specific transcription factor with a prominent role in B-cell development. Genetic polymorphisms within a single locus encoding BACH2 are associated with various autoimmune diseases and allergies. In this study, restriction landmark genomic scanning revealed methylation at a NotI site in a CpG island covering the BACH2 promoter in gastric cancer cell lines and primary gastric tumors. Increased methylation of the BACH2 promoter was observed in 52% (43/83) of primary gastric tumors, and BACH2 hypermethylation was significantly associated with decreased gene expression. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or trichostatin. A restored BACH2 expression in BACH2-silenced gastric cancer cell lines, and knockdown of BACH2 using short hairpin RNA (i.e. RNA interference) increased cell proliferation in gastric cancer cells. Clinicopathologic data showed that decreased BACH2 expression occurred significantly more frequently in intestinal-type (27/44, 61%) compared with diffuse-type (13/50, 26%) gastric cancers (P<0.001). Furthermore, BACH2 promoter methylation paralleled that of previously identified targets, such as LRRC3B, LIMS2, PRKD1 and POPDC3, in a given set of gastric tumors. We propose that concerted methylation in many promoters plays a role in accelerating gastric tumor formation and that methylated promoter loci may be targets for therapeutic treatment, such as the recently introduced technique of epigenetic editing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The concerted impact of galaxies and QSOs on the ionization and thermal state of the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiichi, Koki; Graziani, Luca; Ciardi, Benedetta; Meiksin, Avery; Compostella, Michele; Eide, Marius B.; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2017-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the ionization and thermal structure of the intergalactic medium (IGM) around a high-redshift (z = 10) QSO, using a large suite of cosmological, multifrequency radiative transfer simulations, exploring the contribution from galaxies as well as the QSO, and the effect of X-rays and secondary ionization. We show that in high-z QSO environments both the central QSO and the surrounding galaxies concertedly control the reionization morphology of hydrogen and helium and have a non-linear impact on the thermal structure of the IGM. A QSO imprints a distinctive morphology on H II regions if its total ionizing photon budget exceeds that of the surrounding galaxies since the onset of hydrogen reionization; otherwise, the morphology shows little difference from that of H II regions produced only by galaxies. In addition, the spectral shape of the collective radiation field from galaxies and QSOs controls the thickness of the I-fronts. While a UV-obscured QSO can broaden the I-front, the contribution from other UV sources, either galaxies or unobscured QSOs, is sufficient to maintain a sharp I-front. X-ray photons from the QSO are responsible for a prominent extended tail of partial ionization ahead of the I-front. QSOs leave a unique imprint on the morphology of He II/He III regions. We suggest that, while the physical state of the IGM is modified by QSOs, the most direct test to understand the role of galaxies and QSOs during reionization is to perform galaxy surveys in a region of sky imaged by 21 cm tomography.

  15. Concerted evolution rapidly eliminates sequence variation in rDNA coding regions but not in intergenic spacers in Nicotiana tabacum allotetraploid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunerová Bedřichová, Jana; Renny-Byfield, S.; Matyášek, Roman; Leitch, A.; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 8 (2017), s. 1043-1060 ISSN 0378-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-11642S; GA ČR(CZ) GC16-02149J Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Concerted evolution * Immunomodulation * Neutrophils Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 1.239, year: 2016

  16. Evolutionary and polymorphism analyses reveal the central role of BTN3A2 in the concerted evolution of the BTN3 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrache, Hassnae; Pontarotti, Pierre; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Olive, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    The butyrophilin 3 (BTN3) receptors are implicated in the T lymphocytes regulation and present a wide plasticity in mammals. In order to understand how these genes have been diversified, we studied their evolution and show that the three human BTN3 are the result of two successive duplications in Primates and that the three genes are present in Hominoids and the Old World Monkey groups. A thorough phylogenetic analysis reveals a concerted evolution of BTN3 characterized by a strong and recurrent homogenization of the region encoding the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain in Hominoids, where the sequences of BTN3A1 or BTN3A3 are replaced by BTN3A2 sequence. In human, the analysis of the diversity of these genes in 1683 individuals representing 26 worldwide populations shows that the three genes are polymorphic, with more than 46 alleles for each gene, and marked by extreme homogenization of the IgV sequences. The same analysis performed for the BTN2 genes shows also a concerted evolution; however, it is not as strong and recurrent as for BTN3. This study shows that BTN3 receptors are marked by extreme concerted evolution at the IgV domain and that BTN3A2 plays a central role in this evolution.

  17. Computational Investigation of the Competition between the Concerted Diels-Alder Reaction and Formation of Diradicals in Reactions of Acrylonitrile with Non-Polar Dienes

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Natalie C.; Um, Joann M.; Padias, Anne B.; Hall, H. K.; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    The energetics of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dienes with acrylonitrile, and the energetics of formation of diradicals, were investigated with density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and compared to experimental data. For the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene with acrylonitrile, the concerted reaction is favored over the diradical pathway by 2.5 kcal/mol using B3LYP/6-31G(d); experimentally this reaction gives both cycloadduct and copolymer. The concerted cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene with acrylonitrile is preferred computationally over the stepwise pathway by 5.9 kcal/mol; experimentally, only the Diels-Alder adduct is formed. For the reactions of (E)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, both cycloaddition and copolymerization were observed experimentally; these trends were mimicked by the computational results, which showed only a 1.2 kcal/mol preference for the concerted pathway. For the reactions of (Z)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, the stepwise pathway is preferred by 3.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with previous experimental findings that only polymerization occurs. M06-2X is known to give more accurate activation and reaction energetics but the energies of diradicals are too high. PMID:23758325

  18. Aperture size, materiality of the secondary room and listener location: Impact on the simulated impulse response of a coupled-volume concert hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Michael; Johnson, Marty E.; Harrison, Byron W.

    2003-04-01

    By adding a second room to a concert hall, and designing doors to control the sonic transparency between the two rooms, designers can create a new, coupled acoustic. Concert halls use coupling to achieve a variable, longer and distinct reverberant quality for their musicians and listeners. For this study, a coupled-volume concert hall based on an existing performing arts center is conceived and computer-modeled. It has a fixed geometric volume, form and primary-room sound absorption. Ray-tracing software simulates impulse responses, varying both aperture size and secondary-room sound absorption level, across a grid of receiver (listener) locations. The results are compared with statistical analysis that suggests a highly sensitive relationship between the double-sloped condition and the architecture of the space. This line of study aims to quantitatively and spatially correlate the double-sloped condition with (1) aperture size exposing the chamber, (2) sound absorptance in the coupled volume, and (3) listener location.

  19. The Concert of Europe and Great Power Governance Today: What Can the Order of 19th-Century Europe Teach Policymakers About International Order in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    13 These differences became alarmingly clear once liberal revolutions broke out across multiple European polities in 1820.61 The eastern powers ...dealings with that eastern power that they had so often worked with in concert. For in that treat- ment, the western powers ultimately “ broke the first...KYLE LASCURETTES The Concert of Europe and Great- Power Governance Today What Can the Order of 19th-Century Europe Teach Policymakers About

  20. Mapping sound intensities by seating position in a university concert band: A risk of hearing loss, temporary threshold shifts, and comparisons with standards of OSHA and NIOSH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nicholas Vedder, III

    Exposure to loud sounds is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in the United States. The purpose of the current research was to measure the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and determine if those levels exceeded permissible sound limits for exposure according to criteria set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Time-weighted averages (TWA) were obtained via a dosimeter during six rehearsals for nine members of the ensemble (plus the conductor), who were seated in frontal proximity to "instruments of power" (trumpets, trombones, and percussion; (Backus, 1977). Subjects received audiometer tests prior to and after each rehearsal to determine any temporary threshold shifts (TTS). Single sample t tests were calculated to compare TWA means and the maximum sound intensity exposures set by OSHA and NIOSH. Correlations were calculated between TWAs and TTSs, as well as TTSs and the number of semesters subjects reported being seated in proximity to instruments of power. The TWA-OSHA mean of 90.2 dBA was not significantly greater than the specified OSHA maximum standard of 90.0 dBA (p > .05). The TWA-NIOSH mean of 93.1 dBA was, however, significantly greater than the NIOSH specified maximum standard of 85.0 dBA (p OSHA, r = .20 for NIOSH); the correlation between TTSs and semesters of proximity to instruments of power was also considered weak (r = .13). TWAs cumulatively exceeded both association's sound exposure limits at 11 specified locations (nine subjects and both ears of the conductor) throughout the concert band's rehearsals. In addition, hearing acuity, as determined by TTSs, was substantially affected negatively by the intensities produced in the concert band. The researcher concluded that conductors, as well as their performers, must be aware of possible damaging sound intensities in rehearsals or performances.

  1. The 5S rDNA family evolves through concerted and birth-and-death evolution in fish genomes: an example from freshwater stingrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Ribosomal 5S genes are well known for the critical role they play in ribosome folding and functionality. These genes are thought to evolve in a concerted fashion, with high rates of homogenization of gene copies. However, the majority of previous analyses regarding the evolutionary process of rDNA repeats were conducted in invertebrates and plants. Studies have also been conducted on vertebrates, but these analyses were usually restricted to the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. The recent identification of divergent 5S rRNA gene paralogs in the genomes of elasmobranches and teleost fishes indicate that the eukaryotic 5S rRNA gene family has a more complex genomic organization than previously thought. The availability of new sequence data from lower vertebrates such as teleosts and elasmobranches enables an enhanced evolutionary characterization of 5S rDNA among vertebrates. Results We identified two variant classes of 5S rDNA sequences in the genomes of Potamotrygonidae stingrays, similar to the genomes of other vertebrates. One class of 5S rRNA genes was shared only by elasmobranches. A broad comparative survey among 100 vertebrate species suggests that the 5S rRNA gene variants in fishes originated from rounds of genome duplication. These variants were then maintained or eliminated by birth-and-death mechanisms, under intense purifying selection. Clustered multiple copies of 5S rDNA variants could have arisen due to unequal crossing over mechanisms. Simultaneously, the distinct genome clusters were independently homogenized, resulting in the maintenance of clusters of highly similar repeats through concerted evolution. Conclusions We believe that 5S rDNA molecular evolution in fish genomes is driven by a mixed mechanism that integrates birth-and-death and concerted evolution. PMID:21627815

  2. Electronic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su

    2010-07-01

    This book is composed of five chapters, which introduces electronic technology about understanding of electronic, electronic component, radio, electronic application, communication technology, semiconductor on its basic, free electron and hole, intrinsic semiconductor and semiconductor element, Diode such as PN junction diode, characteristic of junction diode, rectifier circuit and smoothing circuit, transistor on structure of transistor, characteristic of transistor and common emitter circuit, electronic application about electronic equipment, communication technology and education, robot technology and high electronic technology.

  3. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  4. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  6. Concerted Practice-Based Actions in Intimate Partner and Family Violence: When the Children’s Well-Being Is the Central Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Lessard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, the exposure of children to intimate partner violence is, along with negligence, one of the most frequent forms of maltreatment. Intimate partner violence raises important issues with regard to child custody and to the exercising of parental roles. The aid provided for children exposed to intimate partner violence covers a range of programs, in particular community services specializing in intimate partner violence, frontline social and health services, and child protection. However, these resource services do not share the same missions, or the same understanding of the problems and possible solutions, since they often operate in parallel networks. The complex situations of families confronted with intimate partner violence present considerable challenges in terms of collaboration between the different organizations. Action research was employed to develop an innovative concertation strategy that fostered collaboration between practitioners from different family resource services. The strategy, which was implemented in the Québec City region between 2011 and 2013, was then evaluated. This article presents the results of this evaluation as well as the positive outcomes that the concertation strategy had for the practitioners’ practice and for the improvement of family services.

  7. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  8. Concerted effects in the reaction of ·OH radicals with aromatics: radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albarran, G.; Schuler, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic and capillary electrophoretic studies have been used to resolve the products produced in the radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution. These studies have shown that, as in the case of phenol, · OH radicals preferentially add to the positions ortho and para to the OH substituent. However, in contrast to its reaction with phenol, addition at the ortho position is favored over addition at the para position. Because · OH radical is a strong electrophile this difference suggests that the electron population at the ortho position in the salicylate anion is enhanced as a result of the hydrogen bonding in salicylic acid

  9. Electron-cloud build-up in hadron machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The first observations of electron-proton coupling effect for coasting beams and for long-bunch beams were made at the earliest proton storage rings at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in the mid-60's [1]. The effect was mainly a form of the two-stream instability. This phenomenon reappeared at the CERN ISR in the early 70's, where it was accompanied by an intense vacuum pressure rise. When the ISR was operated in bunched-beam mode while testing aluminum vacuum chambers, a resonant effect was observed in which the electron traversal time across the chamber was comparable to the bunch spacing [2]. This effect (''beam-induced multipacting''), being resonant in nature, is a dramatic manifestation of an electron cloud sharing the vacuum chamber with a positively-charged beam. An electron-cloud-induced instability has been observed since the mid-80's at the PSR (LANL) [3]; in this case, there is a strong transverse instability accompanied by fast beam losses when the beam current exceeds a certain threshold. The effect was observed for the first time for a positron beam in the early 90's at the Photon Factory (PF) at KEK, where the most prominent manifestation was a coupled-bunch instability that was absent when the machine was operated with an electron beam under otherwise identical conditions [4]. Since then, with the advent of ever more intense positron and hadron beams, and the development and deployment of specialized electron detectors [5-9], the effect has been observed directly or indirectly, and sometimes studied systematically, at most lepton and hadron machines when operated with sufficiently intense beams. The effect is expected in various forms and to various degrees in accelerators under design or construction. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been the subject of various meetings [10-15]. Two excellent reviews, covering the phenomenology, measurements, simulations and historical development, have been recently given by Frank Zimmermann [16

  10. How Create an Astronomy Outreach Program to Bring Astronomy to Thousands of People at Outdoor Concerts Astronomy Festivals, or Tourist Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    I describe how to create an astronomy program for thousands of people at outdoor concerts based on my $308,000 NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program (60 events 2009 - 2013), and the Astronomy Festival on the National Mall (AFNM, 10,000 people/yr).MAUS reached 50,000 music lovers at local parks and at the Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood Music Festivals with classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts assisted by astronomy clubs. Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Tony Orlando, and Wilco performed at these events. AFNM was started in 2010 with co-sponsorship by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. MAUS and AFMN combine solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; large posters/banners; hands-on activities, imaging with a cell phone mount; citizen science activities; hand-outs; and teacher info packet. Representatives from scientific institutions participated. Tyco Brahe, Johannes Kepler, and Caroline Herschel made guest appearances.MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large crowds. Young kids participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. While < 50% of the participants took part in a science activity in the past year, they found MAUS enjoyable and understandable; learned about astronomy; wanted to learn more; and increased their interest in science (ave. rating 3.6/4). MAUS is effective in promoting science education!Lessons learned: plan early; create partnerships with parks, concert organizers, and astronomy clubs; test equipment; have backup equipment; create professional displays; select the best location to obtain a largest number of participants; use social media/www sites to promote the events; use many telescopes for multiple targets; project a live image or video; select equipment that is easy to

  11. Design and evaluation of a higher-order spherical microphone/ambisonic sound reproduction system for the acoustical assessment of concert halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Samuel W.

    Previous studies of the perception of concert hall acoustics have generally employed two methods for soliciting listeners' judgments. One method is to have listeners rate the sound in a hall while physically present in that hall. The other method is to make recordings of different halls and seat positions, and then recreate the environment for listeners in a laboratory setting via loudspeakers or headphones. In situ evaluations offer a completely faithful rendering of all aspects of the concert hall experience. However, many variables cannot be controlled and the short duration of auditory memory precludes an objective comparison of different spaces. Simulation studies allow for more control over various aspects of the evaluations, as well as A/B comparisons of different halls and seat positions. The drawback is that all simulation methods suffer from limitations in the accuracy of reproduction. If the accuracy of the simulation system is improved, then the advantages of the simulation method can be retained, while mitigating its disadvantages. Spherical microphone array technology has received growing interest in the acoustics community in recent years for many applications including beamforming, source localization, and other forms of three-dimensional sound field analysis. These arrays can decompose a measured sound field into its spherical harmonic components, the spherical harmonics being a set of spatial basis functions on the sphere that are derived from solving the wave equation in spherical coordinates. Ambisonics is a system for two- and three-dimensional spatialized sound that is based on recreating a sound field from its spherical harmonic components. Because of these shared mathematical underpinnings, ambisonics provides a natural way to present fully spatialized renderings of recordings made with a spherical microphone array. Many of the previously studied applications of spherical microphone arrays have used a narrow frequency range where the array

  12. Pseudo-bi-enzyme glucose sensor: ZnS hollow spheres and glucose oxidase concerted catalysis glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Ying; Liu, Changhua; Wang, Jia; Cui, Xiaoyan; Nie, Ling

    2013-06-07

    This work creatively uses peroxidase-like ZnS hollow spheres (ZnS HSs) to cooperate with glucose oxidase (GOx) for glucose determinations. This approach is that the ZnS HSs electrocatalytically oxidate the enzymatically generated H2O2 to O2, and then the O2 circularly participates in the previous glucose oxidation by glucose oxidase. Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as electron transfer and enzyme immobilization matrices, respectively. The biosensor of glucose oxidase-carbon nanotubes-Au nanoparticles-ZnS hollow spheres-gold electrode (GOx-CNT-AuNPs-ZnS HSs-GE) exhibits a rapid response, a low detection limit (10 μM), a wide linear range (20 μM to 7 mM) as well as good anti-interference, long-term longevity and reproducibility.

  13. Electrons, Electronic Publishing, and Electronic Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; Lynch, Clifford A.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a perspective on electronic publishing by distinguishing between "Newtonian" publishing and "quantum-mechanical" publishing. Highlights include media and publishing, works delivered through electronic media, electronic publishing and the printed word, management of intellectual property, and recent copyright-law issues…

  14. Legami curati – Legami curanti "Cliniche della Concertazione" e violenze di quartiere / Liens soignés, liens soignant. « Cliniques de Concertation » et violences de quartiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Lemaire

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahdi is twenty-six years old, he is tall and athletic. He is blind, because he was attacked. This kind of situation puts at work a complex network of professionals of help, care, education and control, beyond everything they can expect. The methodology of the « Clinic of Concertation », as a « Laboratory of applied communicational ethics », recognises that Mahdi and the members of his family are directly part of this network. If the professionals do not resist to this collective construction, they will see laying out different relational systems in balance from which they can exploit the resources in the process of reconstructive links. More than a narrative device, the "Clinic of Concertation" is a creative therapeutic device governed by random rules beyond an absolute mastery. It is, in a collective discussion that does not exclude any member of the collective, but on the contrary, that promotes every extensive step, about differentiating without dissociating, with all interested persons, what will belong to the private sphere and what will belong to the public sphere, while recognizing the legitimacy of the compensatory dynamics of revenge and the protective dynamics of future generations, by identifying their joints, their compatibilities and their incompatibilities, by developing preferentially those reconstructive and preventive.Mahdi a vingt-six ans, il est grand et de stature athlétique. Il est aveugle. Il a été victime d’une agression qui lui a ôté la vue. Une situation comme celle de Mahdi met au travail un réseau complexe associant des professionnels de l’aide, du soin, de l’éducation et du contrôle, au-delà de ce que ces mêmes professionnels peuvent imaginer. La Méthodologie de la « Clinique de Concertation », en tant que « Laboratoire d’éthique communicationelle appliquée», reconnaît que Mahdi et les membres de sa famille font d’emblée partie des architectes de ce réseau. Si les professionnels ne r

  15. Diathesis sotto tensione. La sala per concerti del Centro culturale di Atene di Jan Despo / Diathesis under Tension. Concert Theatre of the Athens Cultural Center by Jan Despo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilemachos Adrianopoulos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nel 1959, l'architetto greco Jan Despo (1903-1992 fu insignito del primo premio nella competizione per il Centro culturale di Atene, rimasto irrealizzato eccezion fatta per il Conservatorio di Atene. La sala circolare per concerti, danza e conferenze era l'edificio nodale di una ambiziosa composizione urbana: la sbalorditiva forma geometrica della sala, la funzione tipicamente composita e l'ingegnosa conformazione strutturale furono integralmente concepite all'interno di una "diathesis spaziale". / In 1959, Greek architect Jan Despo (1903-1992 was awarded First Prize in the competition for the Athens Cultural Centre -that remained unrealized, however, with the exception of the Athens Conservatory. The circular concert, dance and conference theatre was the nodal building of an ambitious urban composition: the theatre’s stunning geometric form, distinctively composite function and ingenious structural conformation were all integrally conceived—within an essentially tense spatial diathesis.

  16. Visiting the cinema, concerts, museums or art exhibitions as determinant of survival: a Swedish fourteen-year cohort follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlaan, B B; Bygren, L O; Johansson, S E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible influence of attending various kinds of cultural events or visiting cultural institutions as a determinant of survival. A cohort of individuals aged 25-74 years from a random sample were interviewed by trained non-medical interviewers in 1982 and 1983. The interviews covered standard-of-living variables. Our independent variables covered visiting cultural institutions and attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and music making. The non-response rate was about 25%. The cohort was followed with respect to survival for 14 years up to 31st December 1996. The background covariates that were used for control purposes were age, sex, cash buffer, educational standard, long-term disease, smoking, and physical exercise. Our setting was the Swedish survey of living conditions among the adult Swedish population aged 25-74 years. About 10,609 individuals were interviewed in 1982 and 1983. The outcome measure was survival until 31st December 1996. In all, 916 men and 600 women died during this period. We found a higher mortality risk for those people who rarely visited the cinema, concerts, museums, or art exhibitions compared with those visiting them most often. The significant relative risks ranging between RR 1.14 (95% CI. 1.01-1.31) of attending art exhibitions, and RR 1.42 (CI. 1.25-1.60) of attending museums, when adjusting for the nine other variables. Visits to the cinema and concerts gave significant RR in between. We could not discern any beneficial effect of attending the theatre, church service or sports event as a spectator or any effect of reading or music making. Our conclusion is that attendance at certain kinds of cultural events may have a beneficial effect on longevity.

  17. Anomalous van der Waals-Casimir interactions on graphene: A concerted effect of temperature, retardation, and non-locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Dispersion forces play a major role in graphene, largely influencing adhesion of adsorbate moieties and stabilization of functional multilayered structures. However, the reliable prediction of dispersion interactions on graphene up to the relevant ˜10 nm scale is an extremely challenging task: in fact, electromagnetic retardation effects and the highly non-local character of π electrons can imply sizeable qualitative variations of the interaction with respect to known pairwise approaches. Here we address both issues, determining the finite-temperature van der Waals (vdW)-Casimir interaction for point-like and extended adsorbates on graphene, explicitly accounting for the non-local dielectric permittivity. We find that temperature, retardation, and non-locality play a crucial role in determining the actual vdW scaling laws and the stability of both atomic and larger molecular adsorbates. Our results highlight the importance of these effects for a proper description of systems of current high interest, such as graphene interacting with biomolecules, and self-assembly of complex nanoscale structures. Due to the generality of our approach and the observed non-locality of other 2D materials, our results suggest non-trivial vdW interactions from hexagonal mono-layered materials from group 14 of the periodic table, to transition metal dichalcogenides.

  18. Electron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Mogami, A.

    1975-01-01

    A device for measuring electron densities at a given energy level in an electron beam or the like having strong background noise, for example, in the detection of Auger electric energy spectrums is described. An electron analyzer passes electrons at the given energy level and at the same time electrons of at least one adjacent energy level. Detecting means associated therewith produce signals indicative of the densities of the electrons at each energy level and combine these signals to produce a signal indicative of the density of the electrons of the given energy level absent background noise

  19. First observation of alkyne radical anions by electron spin resonance spectroscopy: Hexyne/n-hexane mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, K.; Muto, H.

    1991-01-01

    The radical anions of alkynes have been first observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy following alkene anions previously studied. Hexyne radical anions were formed in 1-, 2-, or 3-hexyne/n--hexane mixed crystals irradiated at 4.2 or 77 K. The characters of the anions were as follows; (a) the α-proton hyperfine coupling is very large (∼4.5 mT for the 1-hexyne anion), (b) the β-proton couplings are very small (∼1.0 mT for C--H β proton with the conformational angle of 0 degree), and (c) the radicals show a negative g shift (2.0014). From these observations, it was found that the anions have a nonlinear(bent) molecule structure in the anticonfiguration (trans C--C≡C--C) with the bend angle ∼60 degree, and that the unpaired electron orbital is approximately composed of the anticombination of the sp 2 hybrid orbitals of the C≡C carbon atoms. A discussion based on complete neglect of differential overlap (CNDO) molecular orbital (MO) calculations was given for the observed negative g shift, which was shown to be characteristic of the alkyne anions which have a high-lying unpaired electron orbital and an antibonding 2p--2p π carbon orbital just above it on the upper energy side

  20. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  1. Calculations of secondary electron yield of graphene coated copper for vacuum electronic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. A. Nguyen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The suppression of secondary electron yield (SEY which can possibly lead to multipactor is an important goal for several applications. Though some techniques have focused on geometric modifications to lower the SEY, the use of graphene coatings as thin as a few monolayers is a promising new development that deserves attention either as a standalone technique or in concert with geometric alterations. Here we report on Monte Carlo based numerical studies of SEY on graphene coated copper with comparisons to recent experimental data. Our predicted values are generally in good agreement with reported measurements. Suppression of the secondary electron yield by as much as 50 percent (over copper with graphene coating is predicted at energies below 125 eV, and bodes well for multipactor suppression in radio frequency applications.

  2. Electronic emission and electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the process of electron emission from metal surface. Although electrons move freely in conductors like metals, they normally do not leave the metal without some manipulation. In fact, heating and bombardment are the two primary ways in which electrons are emitted through the use of a heating element behind the cathode (termed thermionic emission) or as a result of bombardment with a beam of electrons, ions, or metastable atoms (termed secondary emission). Another important emission mechanism called Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) is also often used in various High Voltage Pulse Power Systems to generate very high current (few hundreds of kA) pulsed electron beams. The electron gun is the device in that it shoots off a continuous (or pulsed) stream of electrons. A brief idea about the evolution of the electron gun components and their basis of functioning are also discussed. (author)

  3. Sticker electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Diaz Cordero, Marlon Steven

    2017-01-01

    Electronic stickers may be manufactured on flexible substrates (110, 120, 130) as layers and packaged together. The package may then have an adhesive applied to one side to provide capability for sticking the electronic devices to surfaces

  4. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    "[to] promote the understanding and, acceptance of and growth in the number of electronic transactions .... Chapter III of the ECT Act is based on the UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic. Commerce ... Communications Technology Law 146. 22.

  5. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  6. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  7. Electronic Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-01-01

    Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks...

  8. Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    Describes various stages involved in the applications of electronic media to the publishing industry. Highlights include computer typesetting, or photocomposition; machine-readable databases; the distribution of publications in electronic form; computer conferencing and electronic mail; collaborative authorship; hypertext; hypermedia publications;…

  9. Sticker electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-09-08

    Electronic stickers may be manufactured on flexible substrates (110, 120, 130) as layers and packaged together. The package may then have an adhesive applied to one side to provide capability for sticking the electronic devices to surfaces. The stickers can be wrappable, placed on surfaces, glued on walls or mirrors or wood or stone, and have electronics (112, 122, 132) which may or may not be ultrathin. Packaging for the electronic sticker can use polymer on cellulose manufacturing and/or three dimensional (3-D) printing. The electronic stickers may provide lighting capability, sensing capability, and/or recharging capabilities.

  10. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  11. Electronic Commerce and Electronic Business

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    This special issue is motivated by the recent upsurge of research activity in the areas of electronic commerce and electronic business both in India and all over the world. The current ... Monte Carlo methods for pricing financial options are then.

  12. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K; Gascó, M; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I; Milano, M; Panagiotopoulos, P; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P; Sæbø, Ø

    2016-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies.This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  13. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E.; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K.; Gascó, M.; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I.; Milano, M.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P.; Sæbø, O.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies. This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  14. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  15. `Twisted' electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Hugo; Kaminer, Ido; Grillo, Vincenzo; Leuchs, Gerd; Padgett, Miles J.; Boyd, Robert W.; Segev, Mordechai; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2018-04-01

    Electrons have played a significant role in the development of many fields of physics during the last century. The interest surrounding them mostly involved their wave-like features prescribed by the quantum theory. In particular, these features correctly predict the behaviour of electrons in various physical systems including atoms, molecules, solid-state materials, and even in free space. Ten years ago, new breakthroughs were made, arising from the new ability to bestow orbital angular momentum (OAM) to the wave function of electrons. This quantity, in conjunction with the electron's charge, results in an additional magnetic property. Owing to these features, OAM-carrying, or twisted, electrons can effectively interact with magnetic fields in unprecedented ways and have motivated materials scientists to find new methods for generating twisted electrons and measuring their OAM content. Here, we provide an overview of such techniques along with an introduction to the exciting dynamics of twisted electrons.

  16. Two small RNAs, CrcY and CrcZ, act in concert to sequester the Crc global regulator in Pseudomonas putida, modulating catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Renata; Fonseca, Pilar; Rojo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The Crc protein is a translational repressor that recognizes a specific target at some mRNAs, controlling catabolite repression and co-ordinating carbon metabolism in pseudomonads. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the levels of free Crc protein are controlled by CrcZ, a sRNA that sequesters Crc, acting as an antagonist. We show that, in Pseudomonas putida, the levels of free Crc are controlled by CrcZ and by a novel 368 nt sRNA named CrcY. CrcZ and CrcY, which contain six potential targets for Crc, were able to bind Crc specifically in vitro. The levels of CrcZ and CrcY were low under conditions generating a strong catabolite repression, and increased strongly when catabolite repression was absent. Deletion of either crcZ or crcY had no effect on catabolite repression, but the simultaneous absence of both sRNAs led to constitutive catabolite repression that compromised growth on some carbon sources. Overproduction of CrcZ or CrcY significantly reduced repression. We propose that CrcZ and CrcY act in concert, sequestering and modulating the levels of free Crc according to metabolic conditions. The CbrA/CbrB two-component system activated crcZ transcription, but had little effect on crcY. CrcY was detected in P. putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas syringae, but not in P. aeruginosa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzilhav Shem-Ad

    Full Text Available The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  18. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  19. Intercorrência audiológica em músicas após um show de rock Hearing incidents in musicians after a rock concert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pfeiffer

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar mudança temporária do limiar de audição de músicos, após exposição a níveis de pressão sonora elevados de um show de rock. MÉTODOS: foi utilizada uma amostra com seis músicos componentes da banda. Foram feitos: anamnese ocupacional, determinação dos níveis mínimos de audição e reflexos acústicos, antes e após o show de rock. A mensuração do ruído da sala do exame e do palco foi realizada por meio de um dosímetro. Os resultados foram comparados e analisados estatisticamente, utilizando-se o teste t Student, com critério para determinação de significância de p maior do que 0,05. RESULTADOS: para a dosimetria, foi encontrada a exposição ao ruído do show com valor de LAVG igual a 98,5 dB. Dentre os aspectos comportamentais relacionados ao ruído, o zumbido foi a queixa mais presente entre os integrantes. Na audiometria tonal, as maiores diferenças pré e pós-exposição, foram encontradas nas freqüências altas, sendo a orelha direita a que apresentou maiores mudanças temporárias de limiar. Os resultados foram significantes nas freqüências de 2000, 3000, 4000 e 6000 Hz, na orelha direita (p=2,7; p=2,59; p=3,7 e p=2,86 e, na freqüência de 4000 Hz, na orelha esquerda (p=2,87. Na medida do reflexo acústico após o show, a orelha direita obteve o maior índice de ausência de reflexo, com o índice de 40%; entretanto, foram encontradas diferenças estatisticamente significantes, na presença de reflexo acústico na comparação pré e pós-exposição, apenas na orelha esquerda (p=3,64. CONCLUSÃO: músicos expostos a níveis de pressão sonora intensos apresentaram alteração temporária do limiar e alteração do reflexo acústico.PURPOSE: verifying the temporary threshold shift in musicians after a high sound pressure level music exposure in a rock concert. METHODS: the sample has been made up of six band's musicians, who underwent an occupational anamnesis, pure tone audiometry and

  20. To a cultural perspective of mixed reality events: a case study of event overflow in operas and concerts in mixed reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jean-François; Cornish, Tracy; Margolis, Todd

    2012-12-01

    Mixed reality defines the sharing of a space-time between the real and the virtual world. The definition of this concept is further extended when virtual worlds such as Second Life® (SL) are included. Through cultural events such as concerts and operas, we will see that the main goal of these kinds of projects is not simply to offer a video and audio broadcast of these events in the digital dimension. The current challenge is to create interactions between the individuals who are in different shared spaces. By studying the unfolding of these events in its various phases-before, during, and after-we examine the culture of the event. We question how the culture of the event can be transposed in a mixed reality display, and how this kind of event can affect people on both sides of the "membrane" made by the technical configuration. Beyond the alignments and adjustments that we can see between the different individuals involved in these events, we examine more broadly the changes and mutations of the culture of the event in this specific configuration.

  1. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks, including the Internet. Electronic commerce is not limited just to buying and selling, but it also includes all pre-sales and after-sales ongoing activities along the supply chain. Introducing electronic commerce, using the Internet and Web services in business, realizes the way to a completely new type of economy - internet economy.

  3. Advanced Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-21

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0114 TR-2017-0114 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS Ashwani Sharma 21 Jul 2017 Interim Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...NUMBER Advanced Electronics 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4846 Ashwani Sharma 5e. TASK NUMBER...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. (RDMX-17-14919 dtd 20 Mar 2018) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Space Electronics

  4. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  5. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Hsin-Fei, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Polymer semiconductor is the only semiconductor that can be processed in solution. Electronics made by these flexible materials have many advantages such as large-area solution process, low cost, and high performance. Researchers and companies are increasingly dedicating time and money in polymer electronics. This book focuses on the fundamental materials and device physics of polymer electronics. It describes polymer light-emitting diodes, polymer field-effect transistors, organic vertical transistors, polymer solar cells, and many applications based on polymer electronics. The book also disc

  6. Electronics Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Robert; Carroll-Garrison, Martina; Donovan, Daniel; Fisher, John; Guemmer, Paul; Harms, Robert; Kelly, Timothy; Love, Mattie; McReynolds, James; Ward, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    .... Government action to preserve strategic access to semiconductor producers is clearly needed to ensure DoD electronic systems can be built without compromising sensitive technology, though every...

  7. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  8. Electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Tonomura, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Holography was devised for breaking through the resolution limit of electron microscopes The advent of a "coherent" field emission electron beam has enabled the use of Electron Holography in various areas of magnetic domain structures observation, fluxon observation in superconductors, and fundamental experiments in physics which have been inaccessible using other techniques After examining the fundamentals of electron holography and its applications to the afore mentioned fields, a detailed discussion of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the related experiments is presented Many photographs and illustrations are included to elucidate the text

  9. The flux database concerted action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the background to the UIR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved so far by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative and outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation. Particular emphasis is placed on the proforma used for data entry, on the database help file and on the approach adopted to indicate data quality. Refs. 3 (author)

  10. The electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hestenes, David; Weingartshofer, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    The stupendous successes of the Dirac equation and quantum electro-dynamics have established the electron as the best understood of the fundamental constituents of matter. Nevertheless, physicists agree that the electron still has secrets to reveal. Moreover, powerful new theoretical and experimental tools for probing those secrets have been sharpened during the last decade. This workshop was organized to bring theorists and experimentalists together to discuss their common goal of knowing the electron. Present state and future prospects for progress toward that goal are here described. The theoretical papers encompass a wide range of views on the electron. Several argue that the 'Zitter-bewegung' is more than a mathematical peculiarity of the Dirac equation, that it may well be a real physical phenomenon and worthy of serious study, theoretically and experimentally. Besides generating the electron spin and magnetic moment, the 'Zitterbewegung' may be a vital clue to electron structure and self-interaction. Some of the papers employ a radical new formulation of the Dirac theory which reveals a hidden geo-metric structure in the theory that supports a 'Zitterbewegung' inter-pretation. For the last half century the properties of electrons have been probed primarily by scattering experiments at ever higher energies. Recently, however, two powerful new experimental techniques have emerged capable of giving alternative experimental views of the electron. First, techniques for confining single electrons for long term study have led to the most accurate measurements of the electron magnetic moment. Second, the interaction of high intensity laser fields with atoms and electrons have revealed striking new phenomena such as multiphoton ionization. refs.; figs.; tabs

  11. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Crain, John M. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  12. HIGH IMPACT HEAT WAVES OVER THE EURO-MEDITERRANEAN REGION AND TURKEY - IN CONCERT WITH ATMOSPHERIC BLOCKING AND LARGE DYNAMICAL AND PHYSICAL ANOMALIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Demirtaş

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The increase in high impact heat waves in the Euro-Mediterranean region and Turkey is related to a number of concurring factors that include the persistent anticyclonic weather regimes. The present study investigates the June-July-August (JJA of 2000, 2007 and 2010 heat wave events in concert with some meteorological anomalies (the 500 hPa geopotential height, 850 hPa temperature, sea surface temperature and soil wetness and blocking anticyclones, focusing on heat wave occurrences on a grid point base. Detection methods for atmospheric blocking and heat wave are introduced and applied for the mentioned years. During the 2000 JJA very high temperatures were recorded over the Balkan Peninsula and in Turkey where 42 cities had breaking all time highest temperature records for June, but the duration of heat wave was the shortest. The 2007 summer was also abnormally hot for the region and record breaking temperatures were observed in Greece, Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey where 34 cities had highest temperature records for June and July, and the highest total heat wave duration was 60-70 days. The 2010 JJA period was extremely hot over Russia and nearby countries including Turkey where 9 cities had highest temperature records for August. The 2010 case was marked for; large anomalies, the longest heat wave duration and the highest heat wave intensity. In all cases, heat wave occurrences found to be particularly high over the western part of Turkey. The abnormally hot summers of 2000, 2007 and 2010 could reflect summers to come. The results indicate that summer climate might experience a pronounced increase in year-to-year variability. Increase in variability might be able to explain the high impact heat waves, and would strongly affect their incidence in the future. The results may also contribute to a better understanding of heat waves in context of climate variability.

  13. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansong Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections.

  14. Brain scaling in mammalian evolution as a consequence of concerted and mosaic changes in numbers of neurons and average neuronal cell size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana eHerculano-Houzel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Enough species have now been subject to systematic quantitative analysis of the relationship between the morphology and cellular composition of their brain that patterns begin to emerge and shed light on the evolutionary path that led to mammalian brain diversity. Based on an analysis of the shared and clade-specific characteristics of 41 modern mammalian species in 6 clades, and in light of the phylogenetic relationships among them, here we propose that ancestral mammal brains were composed and scaled in their cellular composition like modern afrotherian and glire brains: with an addition of neurons that is accompanied by a decrease in neuronal density and very little modification in glial cell density, implying a significant increase in average neuronal cell size in larger brains, and the allocation of approximately 2 neurons in the cerebral cortex and 8 neurons in the cerebellum for every neuron allocated to the rest of brain. We also propose that in some clades the scaling of different brain structures has diverged away from the common ancestral layout through clade-specific (or clade-defining changes in how average neuronal cell mass relates to numbers of neurons in each structure, and how numbers of neurons are differentially allocated to each structure relative to the number of neurons in the rest of brain. Thus, the evolutionary expansion of mammalian brains has involved both concerted and mosaic patterns of scaling across structures. This is, to our knowledge, the first mechanistic model that explains the generation of brains large and small in mammalian evolution, and it opens up new horizons for seeking the cellular pathways and genes involved in brain evolution.

  15. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN HISPANIC COMMUNITIES: a concerted South American approach could identify the aetiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affifa FARRUKH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research we remain ignorant of the cause of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The dramatic rise in incidence, particularly of Crohn’s disease, points towards environmental factors as playing a significant role. A major purpose of this review is to stimulate a co-ordinated international effort to establish an on-going data base in Central and South America in which new cases are registered and through which investigations into aetiology can be conducted. In both Brazil and Mexico there is evidence that the incidence of ulcerative colitis is increasing, as also is the case for Crohn’s disease in Brazil. The pattern of disease is, therefore, directly comparable to that reported from Europe and the USA during the 1970s and 1980s, but much lower than contemporary data from Spain. Although the incidence is similar to that reported from Portugal, the studies from Almada and Braga were conducted a decade before that from Sao Paulo. The situation in Brazil compares dramatically with Uruguay and Argentina where the reported incidence of inflammatory bowel disease is significantly less. However, with growing industrialisation it is likely that there will be an explosion of inflammatory bowel disease in some areas of Central and South America over the next 20 years. The creation of a network of researchers across South and Central America is a real possibility and through a Concerted Action there is the possibility that major strides could be made towards understanding the cause of inflammatory bowel disease and so develop preventive strategies.

  16. The GDP-switched GAF domain of DcpA modulates the concerted synthesis/hydrolysis of c-di-GMP in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Jie; Li, Na; Luo, Ye; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing; Li, Qiong

    2018-04-09

    The second messenger c-di-GMP [bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate] plays a key role in bacterial growth, survival and pathogenesis, and thus its intracellular homeostasis should be finely maintained. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes a GAF (mammalian c G MP-regulated phosphodiesterases, Anabaena a denylyl cyclases and Escherichia coli transcription activator F hlA) domain containing bifunctional enzyme DcpA ( d iguanylate c yclase and p hosphodiesterase A ) that catalyzes the synthesis and hydrolysis of c-di-GMP . Here, we found that M. smegmatis DcpA catalyzes the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP at a higher velocity, compared with synthetic activity, resulting in a sum reaction from the ultimate substrate GTP to the final product pGpG [5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'-5')-guanosine]. Fusion with the N-terminal GAF domain enables the GGDEF (Gly-Gly-Asp-Glu-Phe) domain of DcpA to dimerize and accordingly gain synthetic activity. Screening of putative metabolites revealed that GDP is the ligand of the GAF domain. Binding of GDP to the GAF domain down-regulates synthetic activity, but up-regulates hydrolytic activity, which, in consequence, might enable a timely response to the transient accumulation of c-di-GMP at the stationary phase or under stresses. Combined with the crystal structure of the EAL (Glu-Ala-Leu) domain and the small-angle X-ray scattering data, we propose a putative regulatory model of the GAF domain finely tuned by the intracellular GTP/GDP ratio. These findings help us to better understand the concerted control of the synthesis and hydrolysis of c-di-GMP in M. smegmatis in various microenvironments. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Genetic studies in Drosophila and humans support a model for the concerted function of CISD2, PPT1 and CLN3 in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A. Jones

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome (WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. WFS1 and WFS2 are caused by recessive mutations in the genes Wolfram Syndrome 1 (WFS1 and CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 (CISD2, respectively. To explore the function of CISD2, we performed genetic studies in flies with altered expression of its Drosophila orthologue, cisd2. Surprisingly, flies with strong ubiquitous RNAi-mediated knockdown of cisd2 had no obvious signs of altered life span, stress resistance, locomotor behavior or several other phenotypes. We subsequently found in a targeted genetic screen, however, that altered function of cisd2 modified the effects of overexpressing the fly orthologues of two lysosomal storage disease genes, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1 in humans, Ppt1 in flies and ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal 3 (CLN3 in humans, cln3 in flies, on eye morphology in flies. We also found that cln3 modified the effects of overexpressing Ppt1 in the eye and that overexpression of cln3 interacted with a loss of function mutation in cisd2 to disrupt locomotor ability in flies. Follow-up multi-species bioinformatic analyses suggested that a gene network centered on CISD2, PPT1 and CLN3 might impact disease through altered carbohydrate metabolism, protein folding and endopeptidase activity. Human genetic studies indicated that copy number variants (duplications and deletions including CLN3, and possibly another gene in the CISD2/PPT1/CLN3 network, are over-represented in individuals with developmental delay. Our studies indicate that cisd2, Ppt1 and cln3 function in concert in flies, suggesting that CISD2, PPT1 and CLN3 might also function coordinately in humans. Further, our studies raise the possibility that WFS2 and some lysosomal storage disorders might be influenced by common mechanisms and that the underlying genes might have previously unappreciated effects on

  18. Initiation and Propagation of Vascular Calcification Is Regulated by a Concert of Platelet- and Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon J. Schurgers

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ageing population continues to suffer from its primary killer, cardiovascular disease (CVD. Despite recent advances in interventional medicinal and surgical therapies towards the end of the 20th century, the epidemic of cardiovascular disease has not been halted. Yet, rather than receding globally, the burden of CVD has risen to become a top cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most CVD arises from thrombotic rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, the pathologic thickening of coronary and carotid artery segments and subsequent distal ischemia in heart or brain. In fact, one-fifth of deaths are directly attributable to thrombotic rupture of a vulnerable plaque. Atherosclerotic lesion formation is caused by a concert of interactions between circulating leukocytes and platelets, interacting with the endothelial barrier, signalling into the arterial wall by the release of cytokines and extracellular vesicles (EVs. Both platelet- and cell-derived EVs represent a novel mechanism of cellular communication, particularly by the transport and transfer of cargo and by reprogramming of the recipient cell. These interactions result in phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs causing migration and proliferation, and subsequent secretion of EVs. Loss of VSMCs attracts perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs from the adventitia, which are a source of VSMCs and contribute to repair after vascular injury. However, continuous stress stimuli eventually switch phenotype of cells into osteochondrogenic VSMCs facilitating vascular calcification. Although Virchow’s triad is over 100 years old, it is a reality that is accurate today. It can be briefly summarised as changes in the composition of blood (platelet EVs, alterations in the vessel wall (VSMC phenotypic switching, MSC infiltration and EV release and disruption of blood flow (atherothrombosis. In this paper, we review the latest relevant advances in the identification of

  19. Duplication and concerted evolution of MiSp-encoding genes underlie the material properties of minor ampullate silks of cobweb weaving spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienneau-Hathaway, Jannelle M; Brassfield, Elizabeth R; Lane, Amanda Kelly; Collin, Matthew A; Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M; Clarke, Thomas H; Schwager, Evelyn E; Garb, Jessica E; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Ayoub, Nadia A

    2017-03-14

    Orb-web weaving spiders and their relatives use multiple types of task-specific silks. The majority of spider silk studies have focused on the ultra-tough dragline silk synthesized in major ampullate glands, but other silk types have impressive material properties. For instance, minor ampullate silks of orb-web weaving spiders are as tough as draglines, due to their higher extensibility despite lower strength. Differences in material properties between silk types result from differences in their component proteins, particularly members of the spidroin (spider fibroin) gene family. However, the extent to which variation in material properties within a single silk type can be explained by variation in spidroin sequences is unknown. Here, we compare the minor ampullate spidroins (MiSp) of orb-weavers and cobweb weavers. Orb-web weavers use minor ampullate silk to form the auxiliary spiral of the orb-web while cobweb weavers use it to wrap prey, suggesting that selection pressures on minor ampullate spidroins (MiSp) may differ between the two groups. We report complete or nearly complete MiSp sequences from five cobweb weaving spider species and measure material properties of minor ampullate silks in a subset of these species. We also compare MiSp sequences and silk properties of our cobweb weavers to published data for orb-web weavers. We demonstrate that all our cobweb weavers possess multiple MiSp loci and that one locus is more highly expressed in at least two species. We also find that the proportion of β-spiral-forming amino acid motifs in MiSp positively correlates with minor ampullate silk extensibility across orb-web and cobweb weavers. MiSp sequences vary dramatically within and among spider species, and have likely been subject to multiple rounds of gene duplication and concerted evolution, which have contributed to the diverse material properties of minor ampullate silks. Our sequences also provide templates for recombinant silk proteins with tailored

  20. Concerted actions of insulin-like growth factor 1, testosterone, and estradiol on peripubertal bone growth: a 7-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leiting; Wang, Qin; Wang, Qingju; Lyytikäinen, Arja; Mikkola, Tuija; Völgyi, Eszter; Cheng, Shumei; Wiklund, Petri; Munukka, Eveliina; Nicholson, Patrick; Alén, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2011-09-01

    A better understanding of how bone growth is regulated during peripuberty is important for optimizing the attainment of peak bone mass and for the prevention of osteoporosis in later life. In this report we used hierarchical models to evaluate the associations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), estradiol (E(2) ), and testosterone (T) with peripubertal bone growth in a 7-year longitudinal study. Two-hundred and fifty-eight healthy girls were assessed at baseline (mean age 11.2 years) and at 1, 2, 3.5, and 7 years. Serum concentrations of IGF-1, E(2) , and T were determined. Musculoskeletal properties in the left lower leg were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Serum levels of IGF-1, E(2) , and T increased dramatically before menarche, whereas they decreased, plateaued, or increased at a lower rate, respectively, after menarche. IGF-1 level was positively associated with periosteal circumference (PC) and total bone mineral content (tBMC) throughout peripuberty but not after adjustment for muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA). On the other hand, IGF-1 was associated with tibial length (TL) independently of mCSA before menarche. T was positively associated with TL, PC, tBMC, and cortical volumetric bone mineral density, independent of mCSA, before menarche but not after. E(2) was associated with TL positively before menarche but negatively after menarche. These findings suggest that during puberty, circulating IGF-1 promotes bone periosteal apposition and mass accrual indirectly, probably through stimulating muscle growth, whereas the effects of sex steroids on bone growth differ before and after menarche, presenting a biphasic pattern. Hence the concerted actions of these hormones are essential for optimal bone development in peripuberty. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. Quantum Calculations of Electron Tunneling in Respiratory Complex III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2015-11-19

    The most detailed and comprehensive to date study of electron transfer reactions in the respiratory complex III of aerobic cells, also known as bc1 complex, is reported. In the framework of the tunneling current theory, electron tunneling rates and atomistic tunneling pathways between different redox centers were investigated for all electron transfer reactions comprising different stages of the proton-motive Q-cycle. The calculations reveal that complex III is a smart nanomachine, which under certain conditions undergoes conformational changes gating electron transfer, or channeling electrons to specific pathways. One-electron tunneling approximation was adopted in the tunneling calculations, which were performed using hybrid Broken-Symmetry (BS) unrestricted DFT/ZINDO levels of theory. The tunneling orbitals were determined using an exact biorthogonalization scheme that uniquely separates pairs of tunneling orbitals with small overlaps out of the remaining Franck-Condon orbitals with significant overlap. Electron transfer rates in different redox pairs show exponential distance dependence, in agreement with the reported experimental data; some reactions involve coupled proton transfer. Proper treatment of a concerted two-electron bifurcated tunneling reaction at the Q(o) site is given.

  2. Salt-bridge Swapping in the EXXERFXYY Motif of Proton Coupled Oligopeptide Transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Ernst, Heidi A

    2015-01-01

    to as E1XXE2R), located on Helix I, in interactions with the proton. In this study we investigated the intracellular substrate accumulation by motif variants with all possible combinations of glutamate residues changed to glutamine and arginine changed to a tyrosine; the latter being a natural variant......-motif salt bridge, i.e. R-E2 to R-E1, which is consistent with previous structural studies. Molecular dynamics simulations of the motif variants E1XXE2R and E1XXQ2R support this mechanism. The simulations showed that upon changing conformation, arginine pushes Helix V, through interactions with the highly...

  3. Structural basis for polyspecificity in the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, Joseph A.; Parker, Joanne L.; Solcan, Nicolae

    2014-01-01

    An enigma in the field of peptide transport is the structural basis for ligand promiscuity, as exemplified by PepT1, the mammalian plasma membrane peptide transporter. Here, we present crystal structures of di‐ and tripeptide‐bound complexes of a bacterial homologue of PepT1, which reveal at least...... two mechanisms for peptide recognition that operate within a single, centrally located binding site. The dipeptide was orientated laterally in the binding site, whereas the tripeptide revealed an alternative vertical binding mode. The co‐crystal structures combined with functional studies reveal...... that biochemically distinct peptide‐binding sites likely operate within the POT/PTR family of proton‐coupled symporters and suggest that transport promiscuity has arisen in part through the ability of the binding site to accommodate peptides in multiple orientations for transport...

  4. Freestanding Artificial Synapses Based on Laterally Proton-Coupled Transistors on Chitosan Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2015-10-07

    Freestanding synaptic transistors are fabricated on solution-processed chitosan membranes. A short-term memory to long-term memory transition is observed due to proton-related electrochemical doping under repeated pulse stimulus. Moreover, freestanding artificial synaptic devices with multiple presynaptic inputs are investigated, and spiking logic operation and logic modulation are realized. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    POT). It has been shown that the gene encoding this transporter is upregulated during infection. NmPOT conformed to the typical chain length preference as observed in prototypical transporters of this family. In contrast to prototypical transporters, it was unable to accommodate a positively charged peptide...

  6. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  7. Biophysical characterization of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne Mørch; Simonsen, Fie C.; Mastali, Amir

    2012-01-01

    significantly different from prototypical POTs such as the human hPepT1. Nonetheless YjdL contains several highly conserved POT residues, which include Glu388 that is located in the putative substrate binding cavity. Here we present biophysical characterization of WT-YjdL and Glu388Gln. Isothermal titration...

  8. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are there differences in the regulation and/or activity of SOS1 in plants differing in their adaptation to salinity?

  9. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-07-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of alcohols is a major focus of energy and chemical conversion efforts, with potential applications ranging from fuel cells to biomass utilization and fine-chemical synthesis. Small-molecule electrocatalysts for processes of this type are promising targets for further development, as demonstrated by recent advances in nickel catalysts for electrochemical production and oxidation of hydrogen. Complexes with tethered amines that resemble the active site of hydrogenases have been shown both to catalyse hydrogen production (from protons and electrons) with rates far exceeding those of such enzymes and to mediate reversible electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation with enzyme-like performance. Progress in electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation has been more modest. Nickel complexes similar to those used for hydrogen oxidation have been shown to mediate efficient electrochemical oxidation of benzyl alcohol, with a turnover frequency of 2.1 per second. These compounds exhibit poor reactivity with ethanol and methanol, however. Organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine N-oxyl), are the most widely studied electrocatalysts for alcohol oxidation. These catalysts exhibit good activity (1-2 turnovers per second) with a wide range of alcohols and have great promise for electro-organic synthesis. Their use in energy-conversion applications, however, is limited by the high electrode potentials required to generate the reactive oxoammonium species. Here we report (2,2‧-bipyridine)Cu/nitroxyl co-catalyst systems for electrochemical alcohol oxidation that proceed with much faster rates, while operating at an electrode potential a half-volt lower than that used for the TEMPO-only process. The (2,2‧-bipyridine)Cu(II) and TEMPO redox partners exhibit cooperative reactivity and exploit the low-potential, proton-coupled TEMPO/TEMPOH redox process rather than the high-potential TEMPO/TEMPO+ process. The results show how

  10. Digital electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, John

    2013-01-01

    An essential companion to John C Morris's 'Analogue Electronics', this clear and accessible text is designed for electronics students, teachers and enthusiasts who already have a basic understanding of electronics, and who wish to develop their knowledge of digital techniques and applications. Employing a discovery-based approach, the author covers fundamental theory before going on to develop an appreciation of logic networks, integrated circuit applications and analogue-digital conversion. A section on digital fault finding and useful ic data sheets completes th

  11. Electronic diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Diagrams is a ready reference and general guide to systems and circuit planning and in the preparation of diagrams for both newcomers and the more experienced. This book presents guidelines and logical procedures that the reader can follow and then be equipped to tackle large complex diagrams by recognition of characteristic 'building blocks' or 'black boxes'. The goal is to break down many of the barriers that often seem to deter students and laymen in learning the art of electronics, especially when they take up electronics as a spare time occupation. This text is comprised of nin

  12. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Polymer electronics is the science behind many important new developments in technology, such as the flexible electronic display (e-ink) and many new developments in transistor technology. Solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and transistors are all areas where plastic electronics is likely to, or is already having, a serious impact on our daily lives. With polymer transistors and light-emitting diodes now being commercialised, there is a clear need for a pedagogic text thatdiscusses the subject in a clear and concise fashion suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate students. The content

  13. Starting electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Starting Electronics is unrivalled as a highly practical introduction for hobbyists, students and technicians. Keith Brindley introduces readers to the functions of the main component types, their uses, and the basic principles of building and designing electronic circuits. Breadboard layouts make this very much a ready-to-run book for the experimenter; and the use of multimeter, but not oscilloscopes, puts this practical exploration of electronics within reach of every home enthusiast's pocket. The third edition has kept the simplicity and clarity of the original. New material

  14. Stretchable electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Someya, Takao

    2012-01-01

    With its comprehensive coverage this handbook and ready reference brings together some of the most outstanding scientists in the field to lay down the undisputed knowledge on how to make electronics stretchable.As such, it focuses on gathering and evaluating the materials, designs, models and technologies that enable the fabrication of fully elastic electronic devices which can sustain high strain. Furthermore, it provides a review of those specific applications that directly benefit from highly compliant electronics, including transistors, photonic devices and sensors. In addition to stre

  15. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris

  16. Electronic identity

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Norberto Nuno Gomes; Argles, David

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing availability of electronic services, security and a reliable means by which identity is verified is essential.Written by Norberto Andrade the first chapter of this book provides an overview of the main legal and regulatory aspects regarding electronic identity in Europe and assesses the importance of electronic identity for administration (public), business (private) and, above all, citizens. It also highlights the role of eID as a key enabler of the economy.In the second chapter Lisha Chen-Wilson, David Argles, Michele Schiano di Zenise and Gary Wills discuss the user-cent

  17. Power Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most...... emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine...... technology from kW to MW, discuss which power electronic solutions are most feasible and used today....

  18. Paper electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Electron Microprobe

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The JEOL JXA-8600 is a conventional hairpin filament thermal emission electron microprobe that is more than 20 years old. It is capable of performing qualitative and...

  20. Electronic Aggression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Aggression is no longer limited to the school yard. New forms of electronic media, such as blogs, instant messaging, chat rooms, email, text messaging, and the internet are providing new arenas for youth violence to occur.

  1. Electron Emitters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2002-01-01

    When two carbon-nanotube coated electrodes are placed at a small distance from each other, electron emission from carbon nanotubes allows a DC or AC electrical current to flow between these two electrodes...

  2. Electronic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T.; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  3. Electronic Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Electronic voting technology is a two edged sword. It comes with many risks but brings also many benefits. Instead of flat out rejecting the technology as uncontrollably dangerous, we advocate in this paper a different technological angle that renders electronic elections trustworthy beyond...... the usual levels of doubt. We exploit the trust that voters currently have into the democratic process and model our techniques around that observation accordingly. In particular, we propose a technique of trace emitting computations to record the individual steps of an electronic voting machine...... for a posteriori validation on an acceptably small trusted computing base. Our technology enables us to prove that an electronic elections preserves the voter’s intent, assuming that the voting machine and the trace verifier are independent....

  4. Electronic commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Zvolánková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    The thesis deals with a description of electronic commerce from its beginning up to present situation in this area. It explains basic terms connected with electronic commerce and it summarizes the relevant legislation. Moreover it describes e-contracts and rights and duties of both contractual parties. The main view is the view of Internet retailer, which is reflected in the practical part focused on concrete problems of retailers.

  5. e-Biologics: Fabrication of Sustainable Electronics with "Green" Biological Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2017-06-27

    The growing ubiquity of electronic devices is increasingly consuming substantial energy and rare resources for materials fabrication, as well as creating expansive volumes of toxic waste. This is not sustainable. Electronic biological materials (e-biologics) that are produced with microbes, or designed with microbial components as the guide for synthesis, are a potential green solution. Some e-biologics can be fabricated from renewable feedstocks with relatively low energy inputs, often while avoiding the harsh chemicals used for synthesizing more traditional electronic materials. Several are completely free of toxic components, can be readily recycled, and offer unique features not found in traditional electronic materials in terms of size, performance, and opportunities for diverse functionalization. An appropriate investment in the concerted multidisciplinary collaborative research required to identify and characterize e-biologics and to engineer materials and devices based on e-biologics could be rewarded with a new "green age" of sustainable electronic materials and devices. Copyright © 2017 Lovley.

  6. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jessica; Hollis, Joseph Razzell; Wood, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    The combination of printing technology with manufacturing electronic devices enables a new paradigm of printable electronics, where 'smart' functionality can be readily incorporated into almost any product at low cost. Over recent decades, rapid progress has been made in this field, which is now emerging into the industrial andcommercial realm. However, successful development and commercialisation on a large scale presents some significant technical challenges. For fully-printable electronic systems, all the component parts must be deposited from solutions (inks), requiring the development of new inorganic, organic and hybrid materials.A variety of traditional printing techniques are being explored and adapted forprinting these new materials in ways that result in the best performing electronicdevices. Whilst printed electronics research has initially focused on traditional typesof electronic device such as light-emitting diodes, transistors, and photovoltaics, it is increasingly apparent that a much wider range of applications can be realised. The soft and stretchable nature of printable materials makes them perfect candidates forbioelectronics, resulting in a wealth of research looking at biocompatible printable inks and biosensors. Regardless of application, the properties of printed electronicmaterials depend on the chemical structures, processing conditions, device architecture,and operational conditions, the complex inter-relationships of which aredriving ongoing research. We focus on three particular 'hot topics', where attention is currently focused: novel materials, characterisation techniques, and device stability. With progress advancing very rapidly, printed electronics is expected to grow over the next decade into a key technology with an enormous economic and social impact.

  7. The Concerted Action of Type 2 and Type 3 Deiodinases Regulates the Cell Cycle and Survival of Basal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Caterina; Ambrosio, Raffaele; De Stefano, Maria Angela; Di Girolamo, Daniela; Di Cicco, Emery; Cicatiello, Annunziata Gaetana; Mancino, Giuseppina; Porcelli, Tommaso; Raia, Maddalena; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Salvatore, Domenico; Dentice, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) mediate pleiotropic cellular processes involved in metabolism, cellular proliferation, and differentiation. The intracellular hormonal environment can be tailored by the type 1 and 2 deiodinase enzymes D2 and D3, which catalyze TH activation and inactivation respectively. In many cellular systems, THs exert well-documented stimulatory or inhibitory effects on cell proliferation; however, the molecular mechanisms by which they control rates of cell cycle progression have not yet been entirely clarified. We previously showed that D3 depletion or TH treatment influences the proliferation and survival of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. Surprisingly, we also found that BCC cells express not only sustained levels of D3 but also robust levels of D2. The aim of the present study was to dissect the contribution of D2 to TH metabolism in the BCC context, and to identify the molecular changes associated with cell proliferation and survival induced by TH and mediated by D2 and D3. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to genetically deplete D2 and D3 in BCC cells and studied the consequences of depletion on cell cycle progression and on cell death. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of synchronized cells, and the apoptosis rate by annexin V incorporation. Mechanistic investigations revealed that D2 inactivation accelerates cell cycle progression thereby enhancing the proportion of S-phase cells and cyclin D1 expression. Conversely, D3 mutagenesis drastically suppressed cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis of BCC cells. Furthermore, the basal apoptotic rate was oppositely regulated in D2- and D3-depleted cells. Our results indicate that BCC cells constitute an example in which the TH signal is finely tuned by the concerted expression of opposite-acting deiodinases. The dual regulation of D2 and D3 expression plays a critical role in cell cycle progression and cell death by influencing cyclin D1-mediated

  8. Scharoun versus Gehry : dos opciones metodológicas personales explícitas a partir del análisis de la Filarmónica de Berlín y el Walt Disney Concert Hall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneko Besa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Resumen

    Estudio de la Filarmónica de Berlín como ejemplo de las  diferentes aproximaciones y contradicciones que la arquitectura “traba” a través del argumento que la constituye. Acuerdo tenso entre interior‐exterior, lugar‐programa, simetría‐asimetría,  unidad sintética ‐ complejidad múltiple, continuidad orgánica ‐ discontinuidad fragmentada.
    Comparativa con el edificio Walt Disney Concert Hall, en el que  se utiliza la misma tipología de sala de conciertos. Sin embargo y al contrario que Scharoun, Gehry evita cualquier acuerdo sintético de unidad, constituyendo el edificio a partir de la pura  fragmentación y diversidad per se. Pues en su caso, la unidad necesaria para constituir la autonomía y ser de la obra, se buscará a través de la imagen y expresión del concepto de  belleza que el edificio alcanza.

    Palabras clave

    sala de conciertos, lugar, unidad, exterior, fragmento

    Abstract

    This article is a study of the Berlin Philharmonic Concert Hall as an example of the different approximations and contradictions that Architecture ties together as a result of the reasoning that makes it up. A tense agreement between interior and exterior, place and program, symmetry and asymmetry, synthetic unity and multiple complexity, organic continuity and fragmented discontinuity.
    A comparison to Walt Disney Concert Hall is made, where the same concert hall typology is used. Nevertheless, in contrast to Scharoun, Gehry avoids any kind of synthetic agreement of unity, conceiving the building out of pure fragmentation and  diversity per se. In Gehry’s case, the unity necessary to constitute the autonomy and essence of the building is sought  through the image and expression of the concept of beauty that it reaches.

    Key words

    concert hall, place, unity, exterior, fragment

  9. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  10. Electron tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  11. Spin electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Buhrman, Robert; Daughton, James; Molnár, Stephan; Roukes, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This report is a comparative review of spin electronics ("spintronics") research and development activities in the United States, Japan, and Western Europe conducted by a panel of leading U.S. experts in the field. It covers materials, fabrication and characterization of magnetic nanostructures, magnetism and spin control in magnetic nanostructures, magneto-optical properties of semiconductors, and magnetoelectronics and devices. The panel's conclusions are based on a literature review and a series of site visits to leading spin electronics research centers in Japan and Western Europe. The panel found that Japan is clearly the world leader in new material synthesis and characterization; it is also a leader in magneto-optical properties of semiconductor devices. Europe is strong in theory pertaining to spin electronics, including injection device structures such as tunneling devices, and band structure predictions of materials properties, and in development of magnetic semiconductors and semiconductor heterost...

  12. Electronic Commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, N. [NRG Information Services Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1995-11-01

    The concept of electronic commerce in the gas industry was discussed. It was defined as the integration of communication technology, advanced information processing capability and business standards, to improve effectiveness of the business process. Examples of electronic data interchange from the automotive, airline, and banking industry were given. The objective of using this technology in the gas industry was described as the provision of one electronic facility to make seamless contractual and operational arrangements for moving natural gas across participating pipelines. The benefit of seamless integration - one readily available standard system used by several companies - was highlighted. A list of value-added services such as the free movement of bulletins, directories, nominations,and other documents was provided.

  13. Electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyan.

    1981-01-01

    The USSR produces an electron accelerator family of a simple design powered straight from the mains. The specifications are given of accelerators ELITA-400, ELITA-3, ELT-2, TEUS-3 and RIUS-5 with maximum electron energies of 0.3 to 5 MeV, a mean power of 10 to 70 kW operating in both the pulsed and the continuous (TEUS-3) modes. Pulsed accelerators ELITA-400 and ELITA-3 and RIUS-5 in which TESLA resonance transformers are used are characterized by their compact size. (Ha)

  14. Electronic cigarette

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    As we know E-cigarette is becoming increasingly popular all over the world. It is a new product that the most of smoking people would like to buy and use. However, we are not realizing advantages and disadvantages of e-cigarette clearly. My objective was to research the development of electronic cigarette whether it is under control or a good way of marketing. The thesis has two main parts. They include answers to questions what is electronic cigarette and how to manage the whole industry...

  15. Electronic School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Executive Educator, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "The Electronic School" features a special forum on computer networking. Articles specifically focus on network operating systems, cabling requirements, and network architecture. Tom Wall argues that virtual reality is not yet ready for classroom use. B.J. Novitsky profiles two high schools experimenting with CD-ROM…

  16. Electronic Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmer, Maria A.; Traunmüller, Roland; Grönlund, Åke

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Electronic Government, EGOV 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005. The 30 revised papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions, and assess the state-of-the-art in e-government/e-governance...

  17. Electronics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities in 1978 of some of the groups within the Electronics Department. The work covered includes plant protection and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  18. Power electronics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kishore Chatterjee

    This special issue of Sadhana is a compilation of papers selected from those presented at the 7th National Power. Electronics Conference (NPEC), held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, on 21–23 December 2015. From among the papers presented in NPEC-2017, selected papers were peer-reviewed for ...

  19. Electron linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, G A; Schriber, S O [ed.

    1976-11-01

    A study was made of the present status of the thousand or so electron linacs in the world, and future trends in the field. These machines were classified according to their use: medical, industrial, and nuclear physics. In the medical category, two types of electron linacs are discussed: the conventional ones which are used for x-ray and electron therapy, and those which may in the future be used for negative pion therapy. Industrial machines discussed include linacs for radiographic and other specialized applications. In the nuclear physics category, the status of conventional low- and medium-energy as well as high duty cycle linacs is reviewed. The question of how one might obtain a c-w, 1 GeV, 100..mu..A electron linac is raised, and various options using recirculation and stretchers are examined. In this connection, the status of rf superconductivity is summarized. A review is given of linacs for injectors into synchrotrons and e/sup +-/ storage rings, and recent work done to upgrade the only multi-GeV linac, namely SLAC, is described.

  20. Greening Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Søes Kokborg, Morten; Thomsen, Marianne

    Based on a literature review with focus on hazardous substances in waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) and numbers from a Danish treatment facility a flow analysis for specific substances has been conducted. Further, the accessible knowledge on human and environmental effects due...

  1. Electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musyck, E.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic seal is presented for a volume such as container for fissile materials. The seal encloses a lock for barring the space as well as a device for the detection and the recording of the intervention of the lock. (AF)

  2. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  3. Electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    To study the present status of the thousand or so electron linacs in the world, and future trends in the field, we have classified these machines according to their use: medical, industrial, and nuclear physics. In the medical category, two types of electron linacs are discussed: the conventional ones which are used for X-ray and electron therapy, and those which may in the future be used for negative pion therapy. The section on industrial machines includes linacs for radiographic and other specialized applications. In the nuclear physics category, the status of conventional low- and medium-energy as well as high duty cycle linacs is reviewed. The question of how one might obtain a C.W., 1 GeV, 100 μA electron linac is raised and various options using recirculation and stretchers are examined. In this connection, the status of RF superconductivity is summarized. Following, there is a review of linacs for injectors into synchrotrons and e +- storage rings. The paper ends with a description of recent work done to upgrade the only multi-GeV linac, namely SLAC. (author)

  4. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  5. High-resolution compact Johann crystal spectrometer with the Livermore electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.L.; Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; May, M.J.; Dunn, J.; Smith, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    A compact high-resolution (λ/Δλ≅10 000) spherically bent crystal spectrometer in the Johann geometry was recently installed and tested on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The curvature of the mica (002) crystal grating allows for higher collection efficiency compared to the flat and cylindrically bent crystal spectrometers commonly used on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The spectrometer's Johann configuration enables orientation of its dispersion plane to be parallel to the electron beam propagation. Used in concert with a crystal spectrometer, whose dispersion plane is perpendicular to the electron beam propagation, the polarization of x-ray emission lines can be measured

  6. Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyay, Rajib

    Human beings have five senses, namely, vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste. The sensors for vision, hearing and touch have been developed for several years. The need for sensors capable of mimicking the senses of smell and taste have been felt only recently in food industry, environmental monitoring and several industrial applications. In the ever-widening horizon of frontier research in the field of electronics and advanced computing, emergence of electronic nose (E-Nose) and electronic tongue (E-Tongue) have been drawing attention of scientists and technologists for more than a decade. By intelligent integration of multitudes of technologies like chemometrics, microelectronics and advanced soft computing, human olfaction has been successfully mimicked by such new techniques called machine olfaction (Pearce et al. 2002). But the very essence of such research and development efforts has centered on development of customized electronic nose and electronic tongue solutions specific to individual applications. In fact, research trends as of date clearly points to the fact that a machine olfaction system as versatile, universal and broadband as human nose and human tongue may not be feasible in the decades to come. But application specific solutions may definitely be demonstrated and commercialized by modulation in sensor design and fine-tuning the soft computing solutions. This chapter deals with theory, developments of E-Nose and E-Tongue technology and their applications. Also a succinct account of future trends of R&D efforts in this field with an objective of establishing co-relation between machine olfaction and human perception has been included.

  7. Electronics Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    countries in developing market nations in Asia (such as Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia , China and Vietnam). The competition for the knowledge, economic...Intel, Infineon Technologies, STMicroelectronics, Samsung Electronics, Texas Instruments, AMD Spansion, Philips Semiconductor, Freescale... Samsung ($19.7B), #5 Toshiba ($9.8B), #6 TSMC ($9.7B), #7 Hynix ($8.0B) and #8 Renesas ($7.9B) (McGrath, 2007, p. 3). Samsung , headquartered in

  8. Electronic banking

    OpenAIRE

    Gradišnik, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The development of information and communication technology is one of the most important reasons for the incredibly fast changes in business. Electronic commerce is spreading unstoppably in the operations of companies. The creation of new models, such as online banking, online shopping and the like, has sped up the development of the World Wide Web. Owing to the rapid progress of the World Wide Web and technologies for secure business operations, we can barely imagine life today without e...

  9. Electronic Aggression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Aggression is no longer limited to the school yard. New forms of electronic media, such as blogs, instant messaging, chat rooms, email, text messaging, and the internet are providing new arenas for youth violence to occur.  Created: 11/20/2007 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention.   Date Released: 11/28/2007.

  10. ELECTRON GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1960-04-01

    A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

  11. Electronic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic sputtering covers a range of phenomena from electron and photon stimulated desorption from multilayers to fast heavy ion-induced desorption (sputtering) of biomolecules. In this talk the author attempted. Therefore, to connect the detailed studies of argon ejection from solid argon by MeV ions and keV electrons to the sputtering of low temperatures molecular ices by MeV ions then to biomolecule ejection from organic solids. These are related via changing (dE/dx) e , molecular size, and transport processes occurring in materials. In this regard three distinct regions of (dE/dx) e have been identified. Since the talk this picture has been made explicit using a simple spike model for individual impulsive events in which spike interactions are combined linearly. Since that time also the molecular dynamics programs (at Virginia and Uppsala) have quantified both single atom and dimer processes in solid Ar and the momentum transport in large biomolecule sputtering. 5 refs

  12. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-04-09

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a significant role. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-12-20

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a signficant role. The theoretical development portion of this Review was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-10-57875. The biological portion of this Review was funded by NIH Grant No. GM056207. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  14. Characterization of NiFe oxyhydroxide electrocatalysts by integrated electronic structure calculations and spectroelectrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Zachary K.; Harshan, Aparna K.; Gerken, James B.; Vörös, Márton; Galli, Giulia; Stahl, Shannon S.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-03-06

    NiFe oxyhydroxide materials are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), an important process for carbon-neutral energy storage. Recent spectroscopic and computational studies increasingly support iron as the site of catalytic activity but differ with respect to the relevant iron redox state. A combination of hybrid periodic density functional theory calculations and spectroelectrochemical experiments elucidate the electronic structure and redox thermodynamics of Ni-only and mixed NiFe oxyhydroxide thin-film electrocatalysts. The UV/visible light absorbance of the Ni-only catalyst depends on the applied potential as metal ions in the film are oxidized before the onset of OER activity. In contrast, absorbance changes are negligible in a 25% Fe-doped catalyst up to the onset of OER activity. First-principles calculations of proton-coupled redox potentials and magnetizations reveal that the Ni-only system features oxidation of Ni2+ to Ni3+, followed by oxidation to a mixed Ni3+/4+ state at a potential coincident with the onset of OER activity. Calculations on the 25% Fedoped system show the catalyst is redox inert before the onset of catalysis, which coincides with the formation of Fe4+ and mixed Ni oxidation states. The calculations indicate that introduction of Fe dopants changes the character of the conduction band minimum from Ni-oxide in the Ni-only to predominantly Fe-oxide in the NiFe electrocatalyst. These findings provide a unified experimental and theoretical description of the electrochemical and optical properties of Ni and NiFe oxyhydroxide electrocatalysts and serve as an important benchmark for computational characterization of mixedmetal oxidation states in heterogeneous catalysts.

  15. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  16. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  17. Electronic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    E-waste amount is growing at about 4% annually, and has become the fastest growing waste stream in the industrialized world. Over 50 million tons of e-waste are produced globally each year, and some of them end up in landfills causing danger of toxic chemicals leakage over time. E-waste is also sent to developing countries where informal processing of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) causes serious health and pollution problems. A huge interest in recovery of valuable metals from WEEE is clearly visible in a great number of scientific, popular scientific publications or government and industrial reports.

  18. Electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.-Y.; Hughes, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to cathode ray tubes, and particularly to color picture tubes of the type useful in home television receivers and therefore to electron guns. The invention is especially applicable to self-converging tube-yoke combinations with shadow mask tubes of the type having plural-beam in-line guns disposed in a horizontal plane, an apertured mask with vertically oriented slit-shaped apertures, and a screen with vertically oriented phosphor stripes. The invention is not, however, limited to use in such tubes and may in fact be used, e.g., in dot-type shadow mask tubes and index-type tubes. (Auth.)

  19. Bolometer electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenig, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    High quality is required to the electronic which works with bolometer made of metal for measuring the radiation power in plasmaphysical experiments. If the bandwidth is to be 1 kHz, and the time constant of the bolometer is about 160 ms by high overall gain the critical parameters are the noise of the amplifier, pick up to the system, stability and decoupling of common mode signals. The high overall gain is necessary to be able to measure lowest radiation power. The design made is a good approach to the desired property. (orig.) [de

  20. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  1. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero B, E.

    1989-01-01

    The rapid technical development of Colombia over the past years, resulted among others, a considerable increase in the number of measuring instrumentation and testing laboratories, scientific research and metrology centers, in industry, agriculture, public health, education on the nuclear field, etc. IAN is a well organized institution with qualified management, trained staff and reasonably equipped laboratories to carry out tasks as: Metrology, standardization, quality control and maintenance and repair of nuclear instruments. The government of Colombia has adopted a policy to establish and operate through the country maintenance and repair facilities for nuclear instrumentation. This policy is reflected in the organization of electronic laboratories in Bogota-IAN

  2. Practical electronics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Ian R

    2013-01-01

    Practical Electronics Handbook, Third Edition provides the frequently used and highly applicable principles of electronics and electronic circuits.The book contains relevant information in electronics. The topics discussed in the text include passive and active discrete components; linear and digital I.C.s; microprocessors and microprocessor systems; digital-analogue conversions; computer aids in electronics design; and electronic hardware components.Electronic circuit constructors, service engineers, electronic design engineers, and anyone with an interest in electronics will find the book ve

  3. Electron foreshock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimas, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    ISEE particle and wave data are noted to furnish substantial support for the basic features of the velocity dispersed model at the foreshock boundary that was proposed by Filbert and Kellogg (1979). Among many remaining discrepancies between this model and observation, it is noted that unstable reduced velocity distributions have been discovered behind the thin boundary proposed by the model, and that these are at suprathermal energies lying far below those explainable in terms of an oscillating, two-stream instability. Although the long-theorized unstable beam of electrons has been found in the foreshock, there is still no ready explanation of the means by which it could have gotten there. 16 references

  4. Sustainable Management of Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information on EPAs strategy for electronics stewardship, certified electronics recyclers and the Challenge; as well as where to donate unwanted electronics, how to calculate benefits, and what's going on with electronics mgmt in their states.

  5. Advanced electron beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    After 100 years from the time of discovery of electron, we now have many applications of electron beam in science and technology. In this report, we review two important applications of electron beam: electron microscopy and pulsed-electron beam. Advanced electron microscopy techniques to investigate atomic and electronic structures, and pulsed-electron beam for investigating time-resolved structural change are described. (author)

  6. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  7. On Yi Concert "China' s memory, A Torch in the cloud"%浅谈《中国记忆·云中火把》彝族音乐会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虎

    2012-01-01

    《中国记忆·云中火把》在上海音乐厅的成功演出,标志着楚雄彝族音乐走向世界的开始,音乐会的演出成功是楚雄、上海两地艺术家们交流、合作、共同努力的结果。以此为契机,努力打造更加优秀的音乐作品,来赢得人们对彝族音乐的认可。%The successful performance of "China' s memory, a torch in the cloud" in Shanghai concert hall marks the beginning of Yi music going global, to which the artists contribute through their communication, cooperation and joint effort. Taking this opportunity, we should create more good music works to win the world' s recognition.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  9. Water network-mediated, electron-induced proton transfer in [C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup −} clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, P.O. Box 208107, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Weddle, Gary H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, P.O. Box 208107, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Fairfield University, 1073 North Benson Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 06824 (United States); Archer, Kaye A.; Jordan, Kenneth D., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 219 Parkman Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Kelly, John T.; Tschumper, Gregory S.; Hammer, Nathan I., E-mail: jordan@pitt.edu, E-mail: nhammer@olemiss.edu, E-mail: mark.johnson@yale.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    The role of proton-assisted charge accommodation in electron capture by a heterocyclic electron scavenger is investigated through theoretical analysis of the vibrational spectra of cold, gas phase [Py ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub n=3−5}]{sup −} clusters. These radical anions are formed when an excess electron is attached to water clusters containing a single pyridine (Py) molecule in a supersonic jet ion source. Under these conditions, the cluster ion distribution starts promptly at n = 3, and the photoelectron spectra, combined with vibrational predissociation spectra of the Ar-tagged anions, establish that for n > 3, these species are best described as hydrated hydroxide ions with the neutral pyridinium radical, PyH{sup (0)}, occupying one of the primary solvation sites of the OH{sup −}. The n = 3 cluster appears to be a special case where charge localization on Py and hydroxide is nearly isoenergetic, and the nature of this species is explored with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of the trajectories that start from metastable arrangements of the anion based on a diffuse, essentially dipole-bound electron. These calculations indicate that the reaction proceeds via a relatively slow rearrangement of the water network to create a favorable hydration configuration around the water molecule that eventually donates a proton to the Py nitrogen atom to yield the product hydroxide ion. The correlation between the degree of excess charge localization and the evolving shape of the water network revealed by this approach thus provides a microscopic picture of the “solvent coordinate” at the heart of a prototypical proton-coupled electron transfer reaction.

  10. Electron-electron Bremsstrahlung for bound target electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, E.

    2008-01-01

    For the process of electron-electron (e-e) Bremsstrahlung the momentum and energy distributions of the recoiling electrons are calculated in the laboratory frame. In order to get the differential cross section and the photon spectrum for target electrons which are bound to an atom, these formulae are multiplied by the incoherent scattering function and numerically integrated over the recoil energy. The effect of atomic binding is most pronounced at low energies of the incident electrons and for target atoms of high atomic numbers. The results are compared to those of previous calculations. (authors)

  11. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  12. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  13. Electronic pay and leave statements (e-Payslips)

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of measures to simplify and rationalise administrative procedures, the FI and IT Departments proposed a project to introduce electronic pay and leave statements. The project was launched at the beginning of 2004 after it had been approved by the Director of the Finance and Human Resources Departments. The project was presented to the GTPA (Groupe de Travail sur les Procédures Administratives) and discussed at the meeting of the SCC (Standing Concertation Committee) on 8 July 2004. The system designed and developed by the IT Department is now operational. What will change? Members of the personnel who currently receive a paper copy of their pay and/or leave statement will, in future, receive monthly e-mail notification of their electronic pay and leave statement, instead of the paper document. The current project does not affect retired members of the personnel. Each person receiving the e-mail notification will be invited to consult these electronic statements by clicking on a link p...

  14. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy

  15. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  16. Interplay between electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, O.; Gunnarsson, O.; Han, J.E.; Crespi, V.H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the interplay between electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions for alkali-doped fullerides and high temperature superconductors. Due to the similarity of the electron and phonon energy scales, retardation effects are small for fullerides. This raises questions about the origin of superconductivity, since retardation effects are believed to be crucial for reducing effects of the Coulomb repulsion in conventional superconductors. We demonstrate that by treating the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions on an equal footing, superconductivity can be understood in terms of a local pairing. The Jahn-Teller character of the important phonons in fullerides plays a crucial role for this result. To describe effects of phonons in cuprates, we derive a t-J model with phonons from the three-band model. Using exact diagonalization for small clusters, we find that the anomalous softening of the half-breathing phonon as well as its doping dependence can be explained. By comparing the solution of the t-J model with the Hartree-Fock approximation for the three-band model, we address results obtained in the local-density approximation for cuprates. We find that genuine many-body results, due to the interplay between the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, play an important role for the the results in the t-J model. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  18. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  19. Electronics and Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Previously founded as CCPITMachinery and Electronics Sub-council and CCOIC Machinery and Electronics Chamber of Corn-merce in June, 1988, CCPIT Electronics Sub-Council and CCOIC Electronics Chamber of Commerce were established in May, 1993, and then renamed as CCPIT Electronics and Information Industry Sub-council and CCOIC Electronics and Infor-mation Industry Chamber of Commerce (CCPITECC) in September 1999.

  20. Electron-electron coincidence spectroscopies at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, G.; Iacobucci, S.; Ruocco, A.; Gotter, R.

    2002-01-01

    In the past 20 years, a steadily increasing number of electron-electron coincidence experiments on atoms and molecules have contributed to a deeper understanding of electron-electron correlation effects. In more recent years this technique has been extended to the study of solid surfaces. This class of one photon IN two electrons OUT experiments will be discussed with an emphasis on grazing incidence geometry, that is expected to be particularly suited for studying surfaces. The crucial question of which is the dominant mechanism that leads to ejection of pairs of electron from the surface will be addressed. It will be shown that, depending on the kinematics chosen, the correlated behaviour of the pairs of electrons detected might be singled out from independent particle one

  1. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  2. Plasmaspheric electron content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, G.K.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the plasmaspheric electron content are reviewed with particular reference to the ATS-6 radio beacon experiment. From the review, it appears likely that measurement of the plasmaspheric electron content is the only one capable of monitoring electron fluxes continuously between L 1 and L 2. Some recent important results deduced from plasmaspheric electron content measurements are discussed

  3. Introduction to electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Electronics in HEP experiments: specificities and evolution The Art of Electronics: is there something beyond Ohm's law? Basic building blocks of Analog electronics: quickly understanding a schematic Charge preamps, current preamps and future preamps, shaping and the rest Electronics noise: fundamental and practical Evolution of technology: ASICs, FPGAs...

  4. Introduction to Electronics course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    Electronics in HEP experiments: specificities and evolution The Art of Electronics: is there something beyond Ohm's law? Basic building blocks of Analog electronics: quickly understanding a schematic Charge preamps, current preamps and future preamps, shaping and the rest Electronics noise: fundamental and practical Evolution of technology: ASICs, FPGAs...

  5. Electronics engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Mazda, F F

    1989-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, Sixth Edition is a five-part book that begins with a synopsis of mathematical and electrical techniques used in the analysis of electronic systems. Part II covers physical phenomena, such as electricity, light, and radiation, often met with in electronic systems. Part III contains chapters on basic electronic components and materials, the building blocks of any electronic design. Part IV highlights electronic circuit design and instrumentation. The last part shows the application areas of electronics such as radar and computers.

  6. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  7. Electron-electron interactions in artificial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanen, Esa

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in the creation and modulation of graphenelike systems are introducing a science of ``designer Dirac materials.'' In its original definition, artificial graphene is a man-made nanostructure that consists of identical potential wells (quantum dots) arranged in an adjustable honeycomb lattice in the two-dimensional electron gas. As our ability to control the quality of artificial graphene samples improves, so grows the need for an accurate theory of its electronic properties, including the effects of electron-electron interactions. Here we determine those effects on the band structure and on the emergence of Dirac points, and discuss future investigations and challenges in this field.

  8. Electronic payment systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mláka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis analysis issue of electronic payment systems. It discusses their use for payments on the internet and sending funds via e-mail. The first part is devoted to the theoretical definition and legislation of the issuance of electronic money and activities of electronic money institutions. The main part of the work clearly focuses on the use of e-wallets, which is an integral part of electronic payment systems. E-wallet of electronic payment system Moneybookers is considered as...

  9. Electronics engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, L W

    1976-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, 4th Edition is a reference book for electronic engineers that reviews the knowledge and techniques in electronics engineering and covers topics ranging from basics to materials and components, devices, circuits, measurements, and applications. This edition is comprised of 27 chapters; the first of which presents general information on electronics engineering, including terminology, mathematical equations, mathematical signs and symbols, and Greek alphabet and symbols. Attention then turns to the history of electronics; electromagnetic and nuclear radiatio

  10. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  11. Neutrinos in the Electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.

    2007-01-01

    I will show that one half of the rest mass of the electron consists of electron neutrinos and that the other half of the rest mass of the electron consists of the mass in the energy of electric oscillations. With this composition we can explain the rest mass of the electron, its charge, its spin and its magnetic moment We have also determined the rest masses of the muon neutrino and the electron neutrino

  12. Human proton coupled folic acid transporter is a monodisperse oligomer in the lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol solubilized state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aduri, Nanda G.; Ernst, Heidi A.; Prabhala, Bala K.

    2018-01-01

    and purification of recombinant PCFT. Following detergent screening n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) were chosen for further work as they exhibited the most optimal solubilization. We found that purified detergent solubilized PCFT was able to bind folic acid, thus indicating...

  13. Transport of amino acids and GABA analogues via the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie; Larsen, Birger Brodin; Frølund, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate transepithelial amino acid transport as a function of Caco-2 cell culture time. Furthermore, the objective was to investigate apical uptake characteristics of hPAT1-mediated transport under various experimental conditions. Apical amino acid uptake......, which has been shown to function as a carboxylic acid bioisostere for substrates of the GABA receptor and transport systems....

  14. How the shape of an H-bonded network controls proton-coupled water activation in HONO formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, Rachael A; Guasco, Timothy L; Elliott, Ben M; Kamrath, Michael Z; McCoy, Anne B; Steele, Ryan P; Schofield, Daniel P; Jordan, Kenneth D; Viggiano, Albert A; Ferguson, Eldon E; Johnson, Mark A

    2010-01-15

    Many chemical reactions in atmospheric aerosols and bulk aqueous environments are influenced by the surrounding solvation shell, but the precise molecular interactions underlying such effects have rarely been elucidated. We exploited recent advances in isomer-specific cluster vibrational spectroscopy to explore the fundamental relation between the hydrogen (H)-bonding arrangement of a set of ion-solvating water molecules and the chemical activity of this ensemble. We find that the extent to which the nitrosonium ion (NO+)and water form nitrous acid (HONO) and a hydrated proton cluster in the critical trihydrate depends sensitively on the geometrical arrangement of the water molecules in the network. Theoretical analysis of these data details the role of the water network in promoting charge delocalization.

  15. Functional investigation of conserved membrane-embedded glutamate residues in the proton-coupled peptide transporter YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne M; Ernst, Heidi A; Wang, Xiaole

    2012-01-01

    -Ala-Lys, respectively, suggesting that Glu388, and not Glu20, is able to sense the position of the N-terminus and important for the interaction.Furthermore, uptake as a function of pH showed that the optimum at around pH 6.5 for wild type YjdL shifted to 7.0-7.5 for the Glu388Asp/Gln mutants while the Glu20Asp retained...

  16. Electron-electron interactions in disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Efros, AL

    1985-01-01

    ``Electron-Electron Interactions in Disordered Systems'' deals with the interplay of disorder and the Coulomb interaction. Prominent experts give state-of-the-art reviews of the theoretical and experimental work in this field and make it clear that the interplay of the two effects is essential, especially in low-dimensional systems.

  17. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M., E-mail: champ@neu.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems,Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  18. VIRTUAL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS OF THE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lazarevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is present new idea of the creation, developments and improvements of the electronic equipment of complex systems by means of the virtual electronic components. The idea of the virtual electronic components is a presentation and perception of the creation and developments of the equipment on two forming: real – in the manner of standard marketed block of the intellectual property and image – in the manner of virtual component. The real component in most cases slows the development of the electronic equipment. The imaginary component is the «locomotive» of development of the electronic equipment. The Imaginary component contains the scientific has brushed against developer. The scientific has brushed against developer reveals of itself in the manner of virtual component on the modern level of the design rates of microelectronics.

  19. Practical XHV electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Cho, Boklae; Oshima, Chuhei

    2008-01-01

    We have developed practical XHV chambers of a electron gun, of which the operating pressures are 1x10 -9 Pa in a stainless-steel one and 4x10 -9 Pa in a permalloy one. By mounting a noble single-atom electron source with high brightness and high spatial coherence on the electron gun including electron optics, we demonstrated highly collimated electron-beam emission: ∼80% of the total emission current entered the electron optics. This ratio was two or three orders of magnitude higher than those of the conventional electron sources. In XHV, in addition, we confirmed stable electron emission up to 20 nA, which results in the specimen current high enough for scanning electron microscopes. (author)

  20. The Solvay Council - Concerted voices on strings

    CERN Multimedia

    Greene, Brian

    2005-01-01

    "Quantum mechanics describes the world of the infinitely small, explaining the very special interactions at particle levl. Einstein's theory of general relativity applies to the infinitely big, combining space and time within a single entity (space-time) whose deformation explains the universal gravitational attraction between the large galactic and stellar objects in the universe (2.5 pages)

  1. A tale of two concerts / Paul Goble

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goble, Paul Alan, 1949-

    2008-01-01

    Lõuna-Osseetias Tskhinvalis 20. augustil 2008 toimunud Peterburi Marinski teatri orkestri kontserdist ja Tallinna lauluväljakul ööl vastu 20. augustit 2008 toimunud öölaulupeost. Tallinna kontserdil esines kõnega president Toomas Hendrik Ilves ja avaldati toetust Gruusiale

  2. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE OCTOBER 1999 ORDINARY MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    Original: FrenchThe meeting was mainly devoted to the examination of the items below, to which the Committee had allocated two meetings:Preparation for the meeting of TREF on 19 November 1999The SCC took note of the agenda for that meeting which includes additional information on the long-term care insurance project, a second report on staff recruitment and retention, a status report on the voluntary programmes (especially an assessment of the Progressive Retirement Programme), a proposal for the application of the cost-of-living index for 2000, an addendum to the technical amendments to be made to the Staff Rules and Regulations, a balance sheet of CERN's apprenticeship programmes and a status report with regard to guarantees for the pensions of members of the personnel in the event of the dissolution of the Organization.Long-term care: TREF would be given further information following the comments made when the Management's initial proposals were presented to the Forum at its September meeting. The informat...

  3. Comité de concertation permanent

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    (The English version will be available next week)Principaux points examinés lors de la réunion du 24 juin 2009 Résultats de l’exercice MARS 2009 Le Comité a pris note des résultats de l’exercice MARS 2008, présentés par le chef du département HR, en exprimant sa satisfaction tant pour la disponibilité précoce des statistiques, que pour le caractère pluriannuel de l’analyse effectuée. Rapport d’avancement des travaux concernant l’examen quinquennal Le Comité a pris note d’une présentation de P. Gildemyn portant sur la procédure de collecte des données pour l’examen quinquennal 2010 (titulaires, boursiers, membres du personnel associés, CHIS), ainsi que du calendrier proposé. Incidence sur les conditions d’emploi des réunions du Comité des finances et du Conseil des 17 et 18 juin 2009 Le Président a rendu brièvement compte des discussions tenues, lors des réunions du Comité des finances et du Conseil de juin 2009, sur le plan à moyen te...

  4. Healtheatre: Drama and Medicine in Concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ian K; Murphy, Paul

    2017-07-28

    Introduction: Clinical practice includes expressing empathy and understanding key features of humanity, such as mortality and illness. The Stanislavski "System" of actor training negotiates a journey from the unconscious via feeling, will and intellect to a proposed supertask. This study explored these areas during collaborative learning amongst undergraduate medical and drama students. Materials and Methods: Each of two interactive sessions involved teams of final year medical students rotating through challenging simulated clinical scenarios, enacted by undergraduate drama students, deploying key techniques from the Stanslavski system of actor training. Team assessment of performance was via a ratified global scoring system and dynamic debriefing techniques. Results: Medical students reported an enhanced immersive experience within simulated clinical scenarios. Drama students reported increased challenge and immersion within their roles. Medical faculty and standardised patients reported positive utility and value for the approach. Clinical team assessment scores increased by 47% ( p merit and utility of such interdisciplinary learning. All students and faculty appreciated the value of the activity and described enhanced learning. Collaborative dynamic debriefing allowed for a continuation of the immersive experience and allowed for an exploration of arenas such as empathy. Conclusions: The deployment of drama students trained in the Stanislavski system significantly enriched medical and drama student experience and performance. Team assessment scores further demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach. Feedback from students, faculty and standardised patients was uniformly positive. The approach facilitated exploration of empathy.

  5. In Concert: artistic approach to teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Levi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La enseñanza es un arte, y los profesores son artistas. Al examinar las fases esenciales en el crecimiento y la formación de un artista -práctica, técnica y teoría, inspiración- podemos descubrir cómo estructurar mejor la formación del profesor. Este artículo recorre la experiencia de su autora, enfatizando el aprendizaje experiencial y estructuras como la que plantean las funciones del aprendiz y el mentor. Explora así la filosofía del programa de orquestas El Sistema en Venezuela, y propugna por una definición multifacética tanto de artistas como de profesores.

  6. A superconducting electron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Huebel, H.; Grumbkow, A. von

    1983-03-01

    The set-up and tests of an electron spectrometer for in-beam conversion electron measurements are described. A superconducting solenoid is used to transport the electrons from the target to cooled Si(Li) detectors. The solenoid is designed to produce either a homogeneous axially symmetric field of up to 2 Tesla or a variety of field profiles by powering the inner and outer set of coils of the solenoid separately. The electron trajectories resulting for various field profiles are discussed. In-beam electron spectra taken in coincidence with electrons, gammas and alpha-particles are shown. (Auth.)

  7. Electronics for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Shamieh

    2015-01-01

    Explore the basic concepts of electronics, build your electronics workbench, and begin creating fun electronics projects right away! Electronics For Dummies, 3rd Edition is your guide to the world of electronics. Spanning circuitry, wiring, robotics, transmitters, amplifiers, and more, this book demystifies electricity basics and beyond. The third edition offers new content revised to reflect the latest advancements in the electronics field, and it offers full color project examples to spark your creativity and inspire you to put your new skills to use! Packed with projects that can be comple

  8. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Altinbas, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Binello, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Costanzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Miller, T. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Pikin, A. I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Samms, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Shrey, T. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tan, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  9. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an electron emitting device for use in an electron discharge system. It comprises: a filament having a pair of terminal ends, electrical supply means for supplying electrical power to the terminal ends of the filament for directly heating the filament by the passage of an electrical current along the filament between the terminal ends, the filament being substantially tapered in cross section continuously in one direction from one of its pair of terminal ends to another of its pair of terminal ends to achieve uniform heating of the filament along the length thereof by compensating for the nonuniform current along the filament due to the emission of electrons therefrom

  10. Narrow electron injector for ballistic electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, M.; Pacher, C.; Strasser, G.; Gornik, E.

    2001-01-01

    A three-terminal hot electron transistor is used to measure the normal energy distribution of ballistic electrons generated by an electron injector utilizing an improved injector design. A triple barrier resonant tunneling diode with a rectangular transmission function acts as a narrow (1 meV) energy filter. An asymmetric energy distribution with its maximum on the high-energy side with a full width at half maximum of ΔE inj =10 meV is derived. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  11. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  12. Electron scattering from pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, Rafael; Fuss, Martina C; García, Gustavo; Oller, Juan C; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; Almeida, Diogo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Electron scattering from pyrimidine (C 4 H 4 N 2 ) was investigated over a wide range of energies. Following different experimental and theoretical approaches, total, elastic and ionization cross sections as well as electron energy loss distributions were obtained.

  13. THE ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voiculescu Madalina Irena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Article refers to significance and the digital signature in electronic commerce. Internet and electronic commerce open up many new opportunities for the consumer, yet, the security (or perceived lack of security of exchanging personal and financial data

  14. Laboratory Handbook Electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    Laboratory manual 1966 format A3 with the list of equipment cables, electronic tubes, chassis, diodes transistors etc. One of CERN's first material catalogue for construction components for mechanical and electronic chassis.

  15. Presidential Electronic Records Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — PERL (Presidential Electronic Records Library) used to ingest and provide internal access to the Presidential electronic Records of the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton...

  16. Chapter 9: Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-01-01

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques

  17. Certified Electronics Recyclers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how EPA encourages all electronics recyclers become certified by demonstrating to an accredited, independent third-party auditor and that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics.

  18. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent

  19. Electronic Signature Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishes the United States Environmental Protection Agency's approach to adopting electronic signature technology and best practices to ensure electronic signatures applied to official Agency documents are legally valid and enforceable

  20. Electronics Industry Study Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belt, David; Fellows, John R; Kameru, Philip; Nazaroff, Boris-Frank A; Pauroso, Anthony; Schulz, Frederick; Ballew, Bob; Bond, Thomas; Demers, Stephy; Kirkpatrick, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a national strategy for the US electronics industry. Electronics is one of the largest industries in the US and plays a critical role in almost every aspect of national security...

  1. Electron microscopy for Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I P

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of (mainly) Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in an engineering context. The first two sections are TEM and chemical in nature; the final three sections are more general and include aspects of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  2. ELSA electron stretcher devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The use of an electron stretcher ring at the Bonn electron synchrotron is discussed. The construction of the proposed ring is described, and the costs are estimated. Possible experiments using this ring are discussed. (HSI)

  3. Electron shuttles in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Manefield, Mike; Lee, Matthew; Kouzuma, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Electron-shuttling compounds (electron shuttles [ESs], or redox mediators) are essential components in intracellular electron transfer, while microbes also utilize self-produced and naturally present ESs for extracellular electron transfer. These compounds assist in microbial energy metabolism by facilitating electron transfer between microbes, from electron-donating substances to microbes, and/or from microbes to electron-accepting substances. Artificially supplemented ESs can create new routes of electron flow in the microbial energy metabolism, thereby opening up new possibilities for the application of microbes to biotechnology processes. Typical examples of such processes include halogenated-organics bioremediation, azo-dye decolorization, and microbial fuel cells. Herein we suggest that ESs can be applied widely to create new microbial biotechnology processes.

  4. Electronic Science Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geidarov P.Sh.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of electronic scientific seminar, which provides a high level of quality of the objectivity in the evaluation of scientific papers, including dissertations, is described. Conditions for the implementation of electronic scientific seminar are also considered.

  5. Copyright of Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Elaine; Wang, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of copyright, considers the main causes of copyright infringement in electronic publishing, discusses fair use of a copyrighted work, and suggests methods to safeguard copyrighted electronic publishing, including legislation, contracts, and technology. (Author/LRW)

  6. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  7. Electronic Effects on Room-Temperature, Gas-Phase C-H Bond Activations by Cluster Oxides and Metal Carbides: The Methane Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Helmut; Shaik, Sason; Li, Jilai

    2017-12-06

    This Perspective discusses a story of one molecule (methane), a few metal-oxide cationic clusters (MOCCs), dopants, metal-carbide cations, oriented-electric fields (OEFs), and a dizzying mechanistic landscape of methane activation! One mechanism is hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which occurs whenever the MOCC possesses a localized oxyl radical (M-O • ). Whenever the radical is delocalized, e.g., in [MgO] n •+ the HAT barrier increases due to the penalty of radical localization. Adding a dopant (Ga 2 O 3 ) to [MgO] 2 •+ localizes the radical and HAT transpires. Whenever the radical is located on the metal centers as in [Al 2 O 2 ] •+ the mechanism crosses over to proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), wherein the positive Al center acts as a Lewis acid that coordinates the methane molecule, while one of the bridging oxygen atoms abstracts a proton, and the negatively charged CH 3 moiety relocates to the metal fragment. We provide a diagnostic plot of barriers vs reactants' distortion energies, which allows the chemist to distinguish HAT from PCET. Thus, doping of [MgO] 2 •+ by Al 2 O 3 enables HAT and PCET to compete. Similarly, [ZnO] •+ activates methane by PCET generating many products. Adding a CH 3 CN ligand to form [(CH 3 CN)ZnO] •+ leads to a single HAT product. The CH 3 CN dipole acts as an OEF that switches off PCET. [MC] + cations (M = Au, Cu) act by different mechanisms, dictated by the M + -C bond covalence. For example, Cu + , which bonds the carbon atom mostly electrostatically, performs coupling of C to methane to yield ethylene, in a single almost barrier-free step, with an unprecedented atomic choreography catalyzed by the OEF of Cu + .

  8. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  9. Electronic theodolite intersection systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bingley, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of electronic surveying instruments, such as electronic theodolites, and concurrent advances in computer technology, has revolutionised engineering surveying; one of the more recent examples being the introduction of Electronic Theodolite Intersection Systems (ETISs). An ETIS consists of two or more electronic theodolites and a computer, with peripheral hardware and suitable software. The theoretical principles on which they are based have been known for a long time, but ...

  10. Electron-attachment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christodoulides, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) modes of production of negative ions, (2) techniques for the study of electron attachment processes, (3) dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules, (4) dissociative electron attachment to hot molecules (effects of temperature on dissociative electron attachment), (5) molecular parent negative ions, and (6) negative ions formed by ion-pair processes and by collisions of molecules with ground state and Rydberg atoms

  11. Handbook on electronic commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology; Blanning, R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Owen Graduate School of Management; Strader, T. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Management Information Systems; Whinston, A. [eds.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Management Science and Information Systems

    2000-07-01

    The world is undergoing a revolution to a digital economy, with pronounced implications for corporate strategy, marketing, operations, information systems, customer services, global supply-chain management, and product distribution. This handbook examines the aspects of electronic commerce, including electronic storefront, on-line business, consumer interface, business-to-business networking, digital payment, legal issues, information product development, and electronic business models. Indispensable for academics, students and professionals who are interested in Electronic Commerce and Internet Business. (orig.)

  12. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code 'POSINST' was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ∼(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed

  13. Syringe injectable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  14. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  15. Electrons in Condensed Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    three freely moving electrons. The value at room temperature is 3.1 k B; the electronic specific heat is missing! The next stage in the electronic theory of solids clears up ..... a big dog? We do not know the reasons yet. As it turns out for many fundamentally interesting phenomena, colossal magneto- resistance may also find ...

  16. Arduino electronics blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcher, Don

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who want to learn about electronics and coding by building amazing devices and gadgets with Arduino. If you are an experienced developer who understands the basics of electronics, then you can quickly learn how to build smart devices using Arduino. The only experience needed is a desire to learn about electronics, circuit breadboarding, and coding.

  17. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  18. Embracing Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Electronic publishing is the grandest revolution in the capture and dissemination of academic and professional knowledge since Caxton developed the printing press. This article examines electronic publishing, describes different electronic publishing scenarios (authors' cooperative, consolidator/retailer/agent oligopsony, publisher oligopoly), and…

  19. SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri L Lewis

    Full Text Available Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

  20. Exploring unimolecular dissociation kinetics of ethyl dibromide through electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulvi, Nitin R.; Patel, Priyanka; Badani, Purav M.

    2018-04-01

    Pathway for dissociation of multihalogenated alkyls is observed to be competitive between molecular and atomic elimination products. Factors such as molecular structure, temperature and pressure are known to influence the same. Hence present work is focussed to explore mechanism and kinetics of atomic (Br) and molecular (HBr and Br2) elimination upon pyrolysis of 1,1- and 1,2-ethyl dibromide (EDB). For this purpose, electronic structure calculations were performed at DFT and CCSD(T) level of theory. In addition to concerted mechanism, an alternate energetically efficient isomerisation pathway has been exploited for molecular elimination. Energy calculations are further complimented by detailed kinetic investigation, over wide range of temperature and pressure, using suitable models like Canonical Transition State Theory, Statistical Adiabatic Channel Model and Troe's formalism. Our calculations suggest high branching ratio for dehydrohalogentation reaction, from both isomers of EDB. Fall off curve depicts good agreement between theoretically estimated and experimentally reported values.

  1. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  2. Quantitative secondary electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Joy, David C.; Nayak, Subuhadarshi

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative Secondary Electron Detection (QSED) using the array of solid state devices (SSD) based electron-counters enable critical dimension metrology measurements in materials such as semiconductors, nanomaterials, and biological samples (FIG. 3). Methods and devices effect a quantitative detection of secondary electrons with the array of solid state detectors comprising a number of solid state detectors. An array senses the number of secondary electrons with a plurality of solid state detectors, counting the number of secondary electrons with a time to digital converter circuit in counter mode.

  3. Electron distribution function in electron-beam-excited plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    In monatomic plasmas excited by high-intensity relativistic electron beams, the electron secondary distribution function is dominated by elastic electron-electron collisions at low electron energies and by inelastic electron-atom collisions at high electron energies (above the excitation threshold). Under these conditions, the total rate of excitation by inelastic collisions is limited by the rate at which electron-electron collisions relax the distribution function in the neighborhood of the excitation threshold. To describe this effect quantitatively, an approximate analytic solution of the electron Boltzmann equation is obtained, including both electron-electron and inelastic collisions. The result provides a simple formula for the total rate of excitation

  4. JUVENIS CONCERT ДЛЯ ФОРТЕПИАНО С ОРКЕСТРОМ ВЛАДИМИРА ЧОЛАКА: ЧЕРТЫ ЖАНРА И ФОРМЫ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COCEAROVA GALINA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Th e article concerns the problem of implementation of genre features and forms of the piano concerto in the work Juvenis concert by Vladimir Cholak. Devoted to the son of the composer, it sounded in its second edition at the Festival Days of New Music (June 10, 2015, soloist - Natalia Botnariuc, Symphony Orchestra of Teleradio Moldova conducted by Denis Chausov, recording posted on the Internet July 31, 2015

  5. Molecular electron affinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, E.K.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular electron affinities have historically been difficult quantities to measure accurately. These difficulties arise from differences in structure between the ion and neutral as well as the existence of excited negative ion states. To circumvent these problems, relative electron affinities were determined in this dissertation by studying equilibrium electron transfer reactions using a pulsed ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer. Direct measurement of ion and neutral concentrations for reactions of the general type, A - + B = B - + A, allow calculation of the equilibrium constant and, therefore, the free energy change. The free energy difference is related to the difference in electron affinities between A and B. A relative electron affinity scale covering a range of about 45 kcal/mol was constructed with various substituted p-benzoquinones, nitrobenzenes, anhydrides, and benzophenones. To assign absolute electron affinities, various species with accurately known electron affinities are tied to the scale via ion-cyclotron double resonance bracketing techniques. After the relative scale is anchored to these species with well-known electron affinities, the scale is then used as a check on other electron affinity values as well as generating new electron affinity values. Many discrepancies were found between the electron affinities measured using the ICR technique and previous literature determinations

  6. Nonambipolar electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmier, B.; Baalrud, S.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2006-01-01

    A radio frequency (rf) plasma-based electron source that does not rely on electron emission at a cathode surface has been constructed. All of the random electron flux incident on an exit aperture is extracted through an electron sheath resulting in total nonambipolar flow within the device when the ratio of the ion loss area to the electron loss area is approximately equal to the square root of the ratio of the ion mass to the electron mass, and the ion sheath potential drop at the chamber walls is much larger than T e /e. The nonambipolar electron source (NES) has an axisymmetric magnetic field of 100 G at the extraction aperture that results in a uniform plasma potential across the aperture, allowing the extraction of all the incident electron flux without the use of grids. A prototype NES has produced 15 A of continuous electron current, using 15 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) Ar, 1200 W rf power at 13.56 MHz, and 6 times gas utilization. Alternatively 8 A of electron current can be produced, using 3 SCCM Ar at 1200 W rf and 20 times gas utilization. NES could replace hollow cathode electron sources in a wide variety of applications

  7. High brightness electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of accelerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity. 5 figs

  8. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  9. Automotive electronics design fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zaman, Najamuz

    2015-01-01

    This book explains the topology behind automotive electronics architectures and examines how they can be profoundly augmented with embedded controllers. These controllers serve as the core building blocks of today’s vehicle electronics. Rather than simply teaching electrical basics, this unique resource focuses on the fundamental concepts of vehicle electronics architecture, and details the wide variety of Electronic Control Modules (ECMs) that enable the increasingly sophisticated "bells & whistles" of modern designs.  A must-have for automotive design engineers, technicians working in automotive electronics repair centers and students taking automotive electronics courses, this guide bridges the gap between academic instruction and industry practice with clear, concise advice on how to design and optimize automotive electronics with embedded controllers.

  10. Ion plasma electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakalopulos, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the disclosed electron gun positive ions generated by a hollow cathode plasma discharge in a first chamber are accelerated through control and shield grids into a second chamber containing a high voltage cold cathode. These positive ions bombard a surface of the cathode causing the cathode to emit secondary electrons which form an electron beam having a distribution adjacent to the cathode emissive surface substantially the same as the distribution of the ion beam impinging upon the cathode. After passing through the grids and the plasma discharge chamber, the electron beam exits from the electron gun via a foil window. Control of the generated electron beam is achieved by applying a relatively low control voltage between the control grid and the electron gun housing (which resides at ground potential) to control the density of the positive ions bombarding the cathode

  11. Seeing with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, P.

    2006-01-01

    Commercially available lens correctors are extending the reach of electron microscopes to unprecedented atomic scales, as Peter Nellist describes. The electron microscope was invented in 1933 and is based on the principle that electrons have a wavelength that is inversely proportional to their momentum. There are two basic types: transmission electron microscopes and scanning electron microscopes, plus a hybrid of the two. The lenses in an electron microscope are provided by electromagnetic fields, but they suffer from spherical aberration. The addition of octupole and quadrupole corrector fields has improved the resolution of the electron microscope to better than 0.1 nm in the last decade. The next step is to correct for chromatic aberration, after which the resolution of the microscope will probably be limited by the size of the atom itself. (U.K.)

  12. (4+2) Cycloaddition reactions with inverse electron demand of nitrogen bearing, heteroaromatic cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzberger-Baumgartner, W.

    1996-06-01

    Three cationic, heteroaromatic diene-systems (1, 2, 3, 4-tetramethoxycarbonyl-quinolizinium-tetrafluoroborate (M), 8, 9, 10, 11-tetrarnethoxycarbonylpyrido[2,1-a]-isoquinolinium-TFB and triazolo[1,5-b]isoquinolinium-TFBs) and a cationic, non-aromatic diene (2,5,5-trimethyl-3-oxo-1, 2, 4-triazolium-TFB) were synthesized. The dienes were employed successfully in cycloaddition reactions with a number ofconjugated dienophiles (including norbornene). The mechanism underlying these cycloaddition reactions was discussed in the theoretical section. At first quantumchemical calculations of the frontier orbital energies provided the proof, that the reactions followed the pattern of reactions with inverse electron demand. Calculation of the charge distribution and of the orbital coefficients led to the conclusion, that these reactions are mainly orbital controlled. Two mechanistic variants were in discussion. Either the reactions proceed in a concerted manner resembling the Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand or in two distinct steps with the formation of a cationic intermediate following the attack of the heterodienes acting as weak electrophiles at the dienophiles being weak nucleophiles. Calculations of a possible transition state of these cycloaddition reactions revealed a pronounced preference for the formation of the bond between the logical reaction centers in the first step of a two-step reaction. However, experimental and theoretical findings led to the conviction, that cationic polar cycloaddition reactions proceed exactly along the crossroad between a concerted and a two-step mechanism and depending on the electrophilic strength of the diene and the nucleophilic strength of the dienophile these reactions show more characteristics of one of the two mechanistic possibilities. The high regioselectivity as well as the high stereoselectivity could be explained satisfactory with the help of the calculated orbital coefficients. (author)

  13. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Decal electronics for printed high performance cmos electronic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Sevilla, Galo Torres; Cordero, Marlon Diaz; Kutbee, Arwa T.

    2017-01-01

    High performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are critical for any full-fledged electronic system. However, state-of-the-art CMOS electronics are rigid and bulky making them unusable for flexible electronic applications

  15. Electronic Publishing or Electronic Information Handling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    The current dramatic evolution in information technology is bringing major modifications in the way scientists communicate. The concept of 'electronic publishing' is too restrictive and has often different, sometimes conflicting, interpretations. It is thus giving way to the broader notion of 'electronic information handling' encompassing the diverse types of information, the different media, as well as the various communication methodologies and technologies. New problems and challenges result also from this new information culture, especially on legal, ethical, and educational grounds. The procedures for validating 'published material' and for evaluating scientific activities will have to be adjusted too. 'Fluid' information is becoming a common concept. Electronic publishing cannot be conceived without link to knowledge bases nor without intelligent information retrieval tools.

  16. Electronic Information Access and Utilization by Makerere University Students in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisam Magara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objectives of this study were to establish the level of computer utilization skills of Makerere University (Uganda Library and Information Science (LIS students; to determine the use of electronic information resources by LIS students; to determine the attitudes of LIS students towards electronic information resources; and to establish the problems faced by LIS students in accessing electronic information resources.Methods – A questionnaire survey was used for data collection.Results – The majority of Library and Information Science students at Makerere University depend on university computers for their work, and very few of them access the library’s e-resources. The few who access e-resources are self-taught. The majority of students surveyed were unaware of Emerald and EBSCO databases relevant to Library and Information Science students, and they found accessing eresources time-consuming. Conclusion – The study concluded that a concerted effort is needed by both LIS lecturers and university librarians in promoting use of the library’s electronic resources.

  17. RETROCK Project. Treatment of geosphere retention phenomena in safety assessments. Scientific basis of retention processes and their implementation in safety assessment models (WP2). Work Package 2 report of the RETROCK Concerted Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nykyri, M.

    2004-10-01

    This report considers the present-day understanding and approaches to take into account retention and transport processes in the performance assessment (PA) models used in the evaluation of the long-term safety of deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. It is a product of Work Package 2 in the RETROCK Concerted Action, a part of EURATOM's research and training programme. The processes emphasised in RETROCK are the influences of the flow field, matrix diffusion, and sorption on radionuclide transport characteristics. These processes, and radioactive decay, provide the key terms to the transport equations of the PA models. The following processes are handled more cursorily: colloid-facilitated transport, microbial activity, gas-mediated transport, precipitation/coprecipitation, and off diagonal Onsager processes. The environment in question is saturated sparsely fractured rock in the repository far field. The fracture network offers flow paths for the groundwater transporting radionuclides away from a repository. The radionuclides in various chemical forms interact physically and chemically with other matter in groundwater, fracture surfaces, fracture infills and the rock matrix adjacent to the fractures. These interactions typically result in significant retardation, and decay, of radionuclides compared to the velocity of the groundwater. The PA models usually take into account retention phenomena using simplified concepts that are justified by their conservatism. They are complemented by a large variety of more detailed and realistic process-specific models that can be used to support the choice of data for PA models, as well as specific arguments made in safety cases. While the fundamental understanding, the conceptualisations of the phenomena, the models and the computing resources develop, the extensive data requirements often become a most restrictive factor to the use of a model. The difficulties in obtaining data tend to hinder the utilisation of

  18. RETROCK Project. Treatment of geosphere retention phenomena in safety assessments. Scientific basis of retention processes and their implementation in safety assessment models (WP2). Work Package 2 report of the RETROCK Concerted Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nykyri, M. [Safram Oy, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    2004-10-01

    This report considers the present-day understanding and approaches to take into account retention and transport processes in the performance assessment (PA) models used in the evaluation of the long-term safety of deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. It is a product of Work Package 2 in the RETROCK Concerted Action, a part of EURATOM's research and training programme. The processes emphasised in RETROCK are the influences of the flow field, matrix diffusion, and sorption on radionuclide transport characteristics. These processes, and radioactive decay, provide the key terms to the transport equations of the PA models. The following processes are handled more cursorily: colloid-facilitated transport, microbial activity, gas-mediated transport, precipitation/coprecipitation, and off diagonal Onsager processes. The environment in question is saturated sparsely fractured rock in the repository far field. The fracture network offers flow paths for the groundwater transporting radionuclides away from a repository. The radionuclides in various chemical forms interact physically and chemically with other matter in groundwater, fracture surfaces, fracture infills and the rock matrix adjacent to the fractures. These interactions typically result in significant retardation, and decay, of radionuclides compared to the velocity of the groundwater. The PA models usually take into account retention phenomena using simplified concepts that are justified by their conservatism. They are complemented by a large variety of more detailed and realistic process-specific models that can be used to support the choice of data for PA models, as well as specific arguments made in safety cases. While the fundamental understanding, the conceptualisations of the phenomena, the models and the computing resources develop, the extensive data requirements often become a most restrictive factor to the use of a model. The difficulties in obtaining data tend to hinder the

  19. RETROCK Project. Treatment of geosphere retention phenomena in safety assessments. Scientific basis of retention processes and their implementation in safety assessment models (WP2). Work Package 2 report of the RETROCK Concerted Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nykyri, M [Safram Oy, Espoo (Finland); and others

    2004-10-01

    This report considers the present-day understanding and approaches to take into account retention and transport processes in the performance assessment (PA) models used in the evaluation of the long-term safety of deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. It is a product of Work Package 2 in the RETROCK Concerted Action, a part of EURATOM's research and training programme. The processes emphasised in RETROCK are the influences of the flow field, matrix diffusion, and sorption on radionuclide transport characteristics. These processes, and radioactive decay, provide the key terms to the transport equations of the PA models. The following processes are handled more cursorily: colloid-facilitated transport, microbial activity, gas-mediated transport, precipitation/coprecipitation, and off diagonal Onsager processes. The environment in question is saturated sparsely fractured rock in the repository far field. The fracture network offers flow paths for the groundwater transporting radionuclides away from a repository. The radionuclides in various chemical forms interact physically and chemically with other matter in groundwater, fracture surfaces, fracture infills and the rock matrix adjacent to the fractures. These interactions typically result in significant retardation, and decay, of radionuclides compared to the velocity of the groundwater. The PA models usually take into account retention phenomena using simplified concepts that are justified by their conservatism. They are complemented by a large variety of more detailed and realistic process-specific models that can be used to support the choice of data for PA models, as well as specific arguments made in safety cases. While the fundamental understanding, the conceptualisations of the phenomena, the models and the computing resources develop, the extensive data requirements often become a most restrictive factor to the use of a model. The difficulties in obtaining data tend to hinder the utilisation of

  20. Kinetic isotope effect studies on aspartate aminotransferase: Evidence for a concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism for the cytoplasmic isozyme and L-aspartate and dichotomy in mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julin, D.A.; Kirsch, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The C alpha primary hydrogen kinetic isotope effects (C alpha-KIEs) for the reaction of the cytoplasmic isozyme of aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) with [alpha-2H]-L-aspartate are small and only slightly affected by deuterium oxide solvent (DV = 1.43 +/- 0.03 and DV/KAsp = 1.36 +/- 0.04 in H 2 O; DV = 1.44 +/- 0.01 and DV/KAsp = 1.61 +/- 0.06 in D 2 O). The D 2 O solvent KIEs (SKIEs) are somewhat larger and are essentially independent of deuterium at C alpha (D 2 OV = 2.21 +/- 0.07 and D 2 OV/KAsp = 1.70 +/- 0.03 with [α-1H]-L-aspartate; D 2 OV = 2.34 +/- 0.12 and D 2 OV/KAsp = 1.82 +/- 0.06 with [α-2H]-L- aspartate). The C alpha-KIEs on V and on V/KAsp are independent of pH from pH 5.0 to pH 10.0. These results support a rate-determining concerted 1,3 prototropic shift mechanism by the multiple KIE criteria. The large C alpha-KIEs for the reaction of mitochondrial AATase (mAATase) with L-glutamate (DV = 1.88 +/- 0.13 and DV/KGlu = 3.80 +/- 0.43 in H 2 O; DV = 1.57 +/- 0.05 and DV/KGlu = 4.21 +/- 0.19 in D 2 O) coupled with the relatively small SKIEs (D 2 OV = 1.58 +/- 0.04 and D 2 OV/KGlu = 1.25 +/- 0.05 with [α-1H]-L-glutamate; D 2 OV = 1.46 +/- 0.06 and D 2 OV/KGlu = 1.16 +/- 0.05 with [alpha-2H]-L-glutamate) are most consistent with a two-step mechanism for the 1,3 prototropic shift for this isozyme-substrate pair

  1. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  2. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    in the possibilities o®ered by the quantum mechanical behavior of electrons when it comes to informa- tion processing. This branch of research is also concerned with fundamental questions in physics. Besides an introduction to the above-mentioned subjects, the thesis con- tains a number of contributions to the ¯elds...... of coherent electron manip- ulation and the statistical description of electron transport through nano- devices. The physics of the electrons are described with a combination of numerical methods, developed and applied in the thesis, and more analytical approaches, which are also discussed. The thesis......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method...

  3. Transition to electronic publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowning, Sam

    Previous communications have described some of the many changes that will occur in the next few months as AGU makes the transition to fully electronic publishing. With the advent of the new AGU electronic publishing system, manuscripts will be submitted, edited, reviewed, and published in electronic formats. This piece discusses how the electronic journals will differ from the print journals. Electronic publishing will require some adjustments to the ways we currently think about journals from our perspective of standard print versions. Visiting the Web site of AGU's Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G-Cubed) is a great way to get familiar with the look and feel of electronic publishing. However, protocols, especially for citations of articles, are still evolving. Some of the biggest changes for users of AGU publications may be the lack of page numbers, the use of a unique identifier (DOI),and changes in citation style.

  4. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  5. New electronics stuff chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, Su Il

    2003-04-01

    The first part of this book is about equilibrium electrochemistry on electric thermo dynamic equilibrium state of electrochemistry, crystal defect of solid, thermodynamics on defect electron and election in semiconductor, Gawani potential, volta potential and equilibrium potential and thermodynamics application in Gawani battery. The second part deals with dynamic electrochemistry electrode reaction kinetics and corrosion potential in normal state, diffusion and transport of ion and electron and current impedance spectroscopy. It also mentions industrial electrochemistry and laboratory works in electronics chemistry course.

  6. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  7. Organizing the Electronic Century

    OpenAIRE

    Richard N. Langlois

    2007-01-01

    This paper's title is an echo of Alfred Chandler's (2001) chronicle of the electronics industry, Inventing the Electronic Century. The paper attempts (A) a general reinterpretation of the pattern of technological advance in (American) electronics over the twentieth century and (B) a somewhat revisionist account of the role of organization and institution in that advance. The paper stresses the complex effects of product architecture and intellectual property regime on industrial organization ...

  8. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  9. Interoperability for electronic ID

    OpenAIRE

    Zygadlo, Zuzanna

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Business, including eBanking, eCommerce and eGovernmental services, is today based on a large variety of security solutions, comprising electronic IDs provided by a broad community of Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) vendors. Significant differences in implementations of those solutions introduce a problem of lack of interoperability in electronic business, which have not yet been resolved by standardization and interoperability initiatives based on existing PKI trust models. It i...

  10. TRANSIENT ELECTRONICS CATEGORIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0169 TRANSIENT ELECTRONICS CATEGORIZATION Dr. Burhan Bayraktaroglu Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace Components & Subsystems...SUBTITLE TRANSIENT ELECTRONICS CATEGORIZATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Burhan...88ABW-2017-3747, Clearance Date 31 July 2017. Paper contains color. 14. ABSTRACT Transient electronics is an emerging technology area that lacks proper

  11. Introduction to electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Korneff, Theodore

    1966-01-01

    Introduction to Electronics focuses on the study of electronics and electronic devices. Composed of 14 chapters, the book starts with discussions on dc circuits, including resistance, voltmeter, ammeter, galvanometer, internal resistance, and positive and negative currents. This topic is followed by discussions on ac circuits, particularly addressing voltage and current, average power, resistive load, complex plane, and parallel circuits. Discussions also focus on filters and tuned circuits, diodes, and power supplies. Particularly given attention are the processes, diagrams, and analyses

  12. Modern electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, John B

    2013-01-01

    Modern Electronic Materials focuses on the development of electronic components. The book first discusses the history of electronic components, including early developments up to 1900, developments up to World War II, post-war developments, and a comparison of present microelectric techniques. The text takes a look at resistive materials. Topics include resistor requirements, basic properties, evaporated film resistors, thick film resistors, and special resistors. The text examines dielectric materials. Considerations include basic properties, evaporated dielectric materials, ceramic dielectri

  13. Electron-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. (UK)

  14. Electron beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. 5 figs

  15. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  16. The Electronic Notebook Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Chalk, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Science is rapidly being brought into the electronic realm and electronic laboratory notebooks (ELN) are a big part of this activity. The representation of the scientific process in the context of an ELN is an important component to making the data recorded in ELNs semantically integrated. This presentation will outline initial developments of an Electronic Notebook Ontology (ENO) that will help tie together the ExptML ontology, HCLS Community Profile data descriptions, and the VIVO-ISF ontol...

  17. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  18. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2007-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Each chapter ends with a set

  19. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  20. The auroral electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Hall, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A model of the auroral electron acceleration process is presented in which the electrons are accelerated resonantly by lower-hybrid waves. The essentially stochastic acceleration process is approximated for the purposes of computation by a deterministic model involving an empirically derived energy transfer function. The empirical function, which is consistent with all that is known of electron energization by lower-hybrid waves, allows many, possibly all, observed features of the electron distribution to be reproduced. It is suggested that the process occurs widely in both space and laboratory plasmas. (author)