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Sample records for concerns spanish-speaking hispanics

  1. The Supervision Experiences of Non-Hispanic Bilingual Therapists Who Worked with Spanish-Speaking Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzate, Nancy Ascencio

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative approach to explore the supervision experiences of nine participants (seven females and two males) or non-Hispanic bilingual therapists who worked with Spanish-speaking clients and were under the supervision of a monolingual English-speaking supervisor. Their interviews data were audio recorded, transcribed and…

  2. Neurocognitive performance and symptom profiles of Spanish-speaking Hispanic athletes on the ImPACT test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Summer; Schatz, Philip; Solomon, Gary; Ryan, Joseph J

    2014-03-01

    This study documented baseline neurocognitive performance of 23,815 athletes on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test. Specifically, 9,733 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the ImPACT test in English and 2,087 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the test in Spanish were compared with 11,955 English-speaking athletes who completed the test in English. Athletes were assigned to age groups (13-15, 16-18). Results revealed a significant effect of language group (p speaking athletes completing the test in Spanish scored more poorly than Spanish-speaking and English-speaking athletes completing the test in English, on all Composite scores and Total Symptom scores. Spanish-speaking athletes completing the test in English also performed more poorly than English-speaking athletes completing the test in English on three Composite scores. These differences in performance and reported symptoms highlight the need for caution in interpreting ImPACT test data for Hispanic Americans.

  3. Vida Calma: CBT for Anxiety with a Spanish-Speaking Hispanic Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Katherine; Cortes, Jose; Wilson, Nancy; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2017-01-01

    Hispanic adults aged 55 years and older are the fastest growing ethnic minority group in the United States facing significant mental health disparities. Barriers in accessing care have been attributed to low income, poor education, language barriers, and stigma. Cultural adaptations to existing evidence-based treatments have been encouraged to improve access. However, little is known about mental health treatments translated from English to Spanish targeting anxiety among this Hispanic age group. Objctive: This case study offers an example of how an established, manualized, cognitive-behavioral treatment for adults 55 years and older with generalized anxiety disorder (known as "Calmer Life") was translated to Spanish ("Vida Calma") and delivered to a monolingual, Hispanic 55-year-old woman. Pre- and post-treatment measures showed improvements in symptoms of anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction. Findings suggest Vida Calma is a feasible treatment to use with a 55-year-old Spanish-speaking adult woman. Vida Calma, a Spanish language version of Calmer Life, was acceptable and feasible to deliver with a 55-year-old participant with GAD. Treatment outcomes demonstrate that Vida Calma improved the participant's anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction.

  4. Construct validity of the short inventory of problems among Spanish speaking Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, L B; Field, C A; Caetano, R; von Sternberg, K

    2014-01-01

    Research on ethnic health disparities requires the use of psychometrically sound instruments that are appropriate when applied to ethnically diverse populations. The Short Inventory of Problems (SIP) assesses alcohol-related consequences and is often used as a measure to evaluate intervention effectiveness in alcohol research; however, whether the psychometric properties of this instrument are comparable across language and ethnicity remains unclear. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) was used to test for the invariance of the measurement structure of the SIP across White Non-Hispanic English speaking (N=642), Hispanic English speaking (N=275), and Hispanic Spanish speaking (N=220) groups. The MGCFA model in which factor loadings, measurement intercepts, and item residuals were constrained to be equal between English speakers and Spanish speakers exhibited a reasonable fit to the data, χ(2)(221)=1089.612 p<.001, TLI=.926; CFI=.922, RMSEA=.059 (90% CI=.055-.062). The ΔCFI supported strict factorial invariance, ΔCFI=.01, across groups; no significant group differences were found between factor loadings, measurement intercepts, or item residuals between English speakers and Spanish speakers. This study extends the existing confirmatory factor analysis results of the SIP by providing additional data to inform the utility of the SIP among Hispanics. Strict factorial invariance between Spanish and English speakers is necessary to: conclude that the underlying constructs have the same meaning across groups; test for group differences in the latent variables across groups; and presume that group differences are attributable only to true differences between groups. Thus, the SIP is strongly supported for evaluating the effectiveness of alcohol treatment among Hispanics. © 2013.

  5. Enhancing Hispanic participation in mental health clinical research: development of a Spanish-speaking depression research site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Rivera, Vivianne; Dunlop, Boadie W; Ramirez, Cynthia; Kelley, Mary E; Schneider, Rebecca; Blastos, Beatriz; Larson, Jacqueline; Mercado, Flavia; Mayberg, Helen; Craighead, W Edward

    2014-03-01

    Hispanics, particularly those with limited English proficiency, are underrepresented in psychiatric clinical research studies. We developed a bilingual and bicultural research clinic dedicated to the recruitment and treatment of Spanish-speaking subjects in the Predictors of Remission in Depression to Individual and Combined Treatments (PReDICT) study, a large clinical trial of treatment-naïve subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Demographic and clinical data derived from screening evaluations of the first 1,174 subjects presenting for participation were compared between the Spanish-speaking site (N = 275) and the primary English-speaking site (N = 899). Reasons for ineligibility (N = 888) for the PReDICT study were tallied for each site. Compared to English speakers, Spanish speakers had a lower level of education and were more likely to be female, uninsured, and have uncontrolled medical conditions. Clinically, Spanish speakers demonstrated greater depression severity, with higher mean symptom severity scores, and a greater number of previous suicide attempts. Among the subjects who were not randomized into the PReDICT study, Spanish-speaking subjects were more likely to have an uncontrolled medical condition or refuse participation, whereas English-speaking subjects were more likely to have bipolar disorder or a non-MDD depressive disorder. Recruitment of Hispanic subjects with MDD is feasible and may enhance efforts at signal detection, given the higher severity of depression among Spanish-speaking participants presenting for clinical trials. Specific approaches for the recruitment and retention of Spanish-speaking participants are required. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Psychometric characteristics of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in English speaking non-Hispanic whites and English and Spanish speaking Hispanics of Mexican descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomfohr, Lianne M; Schweizer, C Amanda; Dimsdale, Joel E; Loredo, José S

    2013-01-15

    The current study investigated the factor structure of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) among English speaking non-Hispanic whites (NHW) and English and Spanish speaking Hispanics of Mexican descent (HMD). The PSQI was administered during a telephone interview. In order to test the factor structure of the PSQI structure across ethnic/language groups, multiple group confirmatory analysis with covariates (MIMIC) was employed. The 1- and 3-factor versions of the PSQI previously reported in the literature were examined. San Diego County. Community-dwelling English speaking, NHW (n = 1,698) and English (n = 654) and Spanish (n = 792) speaking HMD. A single-factor scoring model fit across language/ethnic groups; however, a 3-factor model provided a better than the 1-factor model in all language/ethnic groups. The subscale sleep medications loaded poorly and was removed from all models. Across groups, a 3-factor model of the PSQI more reliably assessed sleep quality than a single-factor global score. Results indicate that the 3-factor structure of the PSQI was uniform across English speaking NHW and English and Spanish speaking HMD.

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Self-management Among Spanish-Speaking Hispanic Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Berry, Diane C; DeWalt, Darren; Miller, Cass T

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the quantitative findings of a mixed-methods study that examined the relationship among knowledge, self-efficacy, health promoting behaviors, and type 2 diabetes self-management among recent Spanish-speaking, limited English proficient immigrants to the US. This population is at risk for both a higher incidence of disease and increased barriers to successful disease management compared to the general US population. Distinguishing aspects of this study compared to the available literature are the comprehensive nature of the data collected, the theoretical component, and the analysis and modeling approach. Social cognitive theory provides the framework for the study design and analysis. An innovative community-based recruiting strategy was used, a broad range of physiological measures related to health were observed, and instruments related to knowledge, self-efficacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors were administered orally in Spanish to 30 participants. A broad range of statistical analysis methods was applied to the data, including a set of three structural equation models. The study results are consistent with the importance of education, health knowledge, and healthy lifestyle practices for type 2 diabetes self-management. With the usual cautions associated with applying structural equation modeling to modest sample sizes, multiple elements of the posited theoretical model were consistent with the data collected. The results of the investigation of this under-studied population indicate that, on average, participants were not effectively managing their disease. The results suggest that clinical interventions focused on improving knowledge, nutrition, and physical activity, reducing stress, and leveraging the importance of interpersonal relations could be effective intervention strategies to improve self-management among this population.

  8. Promoting folic acid to Spanish-speaking Hispanic women: evaluating existing campaigns to guide new development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Kahlor, Leeann; Silva, Kristi; Padilla, Yolanda

    2010-06-01

    Hispanic women are 1.5-3 times as likely as non-Hispanic white women to have a child affected by neural tube defects. This disparity exists in spite of varied interventions designed to address the problem. The purpose of this research was to investigate Hispanic women's knowledge of folic acid, perceptions of existing education campaigns, and provide guidance for future promotion efforts. Three focus groups with Hispanic mothers (N = 18) were conducted to garner insights on these issues. Results suggested that these women understood the benefits of folic acid, did not see major cultural barriers to consuming folic acid-rich foods, and did not perceive insurmountable challenges to consuming a multivitamin with folic acid. For many women, an initial pregnancy served as their initial cue to action, suggesting a need for the continued development of education strategies that communicate the benefits of folic acid supplementation prior to pregnancy. Such strategies may necessitate targeting younger audiences, including teenagers.

  9. Internalized HIV Stigma and Disclosure Concerns: Development and Validation of Two Scales in Spanish-Speaking Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernansaiz-Garrido, Helena; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Internalized stigma and disclosure concerns are key elements for the study of mental health in people living with HIV. Since no measures of these constructs were available for Spanish population, this study sought to develop such instruments, to analyze their reliability and validity and to provide a short version. A heterogeneous sample of 458 adults from different Spanish-speaking countries completed the HIV-Internalized Stigma Scale and the HIV-Disclosure Concerns Scale, along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale and other socio-demographic variables. Reliability and correlation analyses, exploratory factor analyses, path analyses with latent variables, and ANOVAs were conducted to test the scales' psychometric properties. The scales showed good reliability in terms of internal consistency and temporal stability, as well as good sensitivity and factorial and criterion validity. The HIV-Internalized Stigma Scale and the HIV-Disclosure Concerns Scale are reliable and valid means to assess these variables in several contexts.

  10. Hispanic Latin America, Spain and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean: A rich source of reference material for public health, epidemiology and tropical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Basáñez María-Gloria; Bórquez Annick; Williams John R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a multiplicity of journals originating in Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (SSLAC) in the health sciences of relevance to the fields of epidemiology and public health. While the subject matter of epidemiology in Spain shares many features with its neighbours in Western Europe, many aspects of epidemiology in Latin America are particular to that region. There are also distinctive theoretical and philosophical approaches to the study ...

  11. Hispanic Latin America, Spain and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean: a rich source of reference material for public health, epidemiology and tropical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John R; Bórquez, Annick; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2008-09-30

    There is a multiplicity of journals originating in Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (SSLAC) in the health sciences of relevance to the fields of epidemiology and public health. While the subject matter of epidemiology in Spain shares many features with its neighbours in Western Europe, many aspects of epidemiology in Latin America are particular to that region. There are also distinctive theoretical and philosophical approaches to the study of epidemiology and public health arising from traditions such as the Latin American social medicine movement, of which there may be limited awareness. A number of online bibliographic databases are available which focus primarily on health sciences literature arising in Spain and Latin America, the most prominent being Literatura Latinoamericana en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS) and LATINDEX. Some such as LILACS also extensively index grey literature. As well as in Spanish, interfaces are provided in English and Portuguese. Abstracts of articles may also be provided in English with an increasing number of journals beginning to publish entire articles written in English. Free full text articles are becoming accessible, one of the most comprehensive sources being the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). There is thus an extensive range of literature originating in Spain and SSLAC freely identifiable and often accessible online, and with the potential to provide useful inputs to the study of epidemiology and public health provided that any reluctance to explore these resources can be overcome. In this article we provide an introduction to such resources.

  12. The convergence of personality disorder diagnoses across different methods among monolingual (Spanish-speaking only) Hispanic patients in substance use treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Douglas B; Añez, Luis M; Paris, Manuel; Grilo, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    Methods for diagnosing personality disorders (PDs) within clinical settings typically diverge from those used in treatment research. Treatment groups in research studies are routinely diagnosed using semistructured interviews or self-report questionnaires, yet these methods show poor agreement with clinical diagnoses recorded in medical charts or assigned by treating clinicians, reducing the potential for evidence-based practice. Furthermore, existing research has been limited by focusing on primarily White and English-speaking participants. Our study extended prior research by comparing 4 independent methods of PD diagnosis, including self-report questionnaire, semistructured interview, chart diagnoses, and ratings by treating clinicians, within a clinical series of 130 monolingual (Spanish only) Hispanic persons (69% male; M age 37.4), in treatment for substance use. The authors examined the convergence of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) PD diagnoses across these methods. PD diagnoses appeared infrequently within medical charts but were diagnosed at higher levels by independent treating clinicians, self-report questionnaires, and semistructured interviews. Nonetheless, diagnostic concordance between clinical diagnoses and the other methods were poor (κ Hispanic persons are comparable to other groups allaying concerns about cross-cultural application of PD diagnoses. Additionally, the results of this study echo previous research in suggesting that clinicians' PD diagnoses overlap little with self-report questionnaires or semistructured diagnostic interviews and suggest that PDs are underdiagnosed using standard diagnostic approaches. Implications for the clinical application of empirically supported research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Hispanic Latin America, Spain and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean: A rich source of reference material for public health, epidemiology and tropical medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John R; Bórquez, Annick; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2008-01-01

    There is a multiplicity of journals originating in Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (SSLAC) in the health sciences of relevance to the fields of epidemiology and public health. While the subject matter of epidemiology in Spain shares many features with its neighbours in Western Europe, many aspects of epidemiology in Latin America are particular to that region. There are also distinctive theoretical and philosophical approaches to the study of epidemiology and public health arising from traditions such as the Latin American social medicine movement, of which there may be limited awareness. A number of online bibliographic databases are available which focus primarily on health sciences literature arising in Spain and Latin America, the most prominent being Literatura Latinoamericana en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS) and LATINDEX. Some such as LILACS also extensively index grey literature. As well as in Spanish, interfaces are provided in English and Portuguese. Abstracts of articles may also be provided in English with an increasing number of journals beginning to publish entire articles written in English. Free full text articles are becoming accessible, one of the most comprehensive sources being the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). There is thus an extensive range of literature originating in Spain and SSLAC freely identifiable and often accessible online, and with the potential to provide useful inputs to the study of epidemiology and public health provided that any reluctance to explore these resources can be overcome. In this article we provide an introduction to such resources. PMID:19243576

  14. Hispanic Latin America, Spain and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean: A rich source of reference material for public health, epidemiology and tropical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basáñez María-Gloria

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a multiplicity of journals originating in Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (SSLAC in the health sciences of relevance to the fields of epidemiology and public health. While the subject matter of epidemiology in Spain shares many features with its neighbours in Western Europe, many aspects of epidemiology in Latin America are particular to that region. There are also distinctive theoretical and philosophical approaches to the study of epidemiology and public health arising from traditions such as the Latin American social medicine movement, of which there may be limited awareness. A number of online bibliographic databases are available which focus primarily on health sciences literature arising in Spain and Latin America, the most prominent being Literatura Latinoamericana en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS and LATINDEX. Some such as LILACS also extensively index grey literature. As well as in Spanish, interfaces are provided in English and Portuguese. Abstracts of articles may also be provided in English with an increasing number of journals beginning to publish entire articles written in English. Free full text articles are becoming accessible, one of the most comprehensive sources being the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO. There is thus an extensive range of literature originating in Spain and SSLAC freely identifiable and often accessible online, and with the potential to provide useful inputs to the study of epidemiology and public health provided that any reluctance to explore these resources can be overcome. In this article we provide an introduction to such resources.

  15. Perceptions of Spanish-speaking clientele of patient care services in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenik, Nicole L; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D; Snyder, Margie E; Nash, Christy L; Smith, Cory T

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of studies exists that have assessed community pharmacy preferences of Spanish-speaking patients living in areas of the U.S. with rapidly growing Hispanic populations. The qualitative approach to this research affords a unique opportunity to further explore perceptions of the Spanish-speaking population. To identify perceptions of Spanish-speaking patients living in the U.S. with a focus on the care provided in community pharmacies, as well as to determine their satisfaction with community pharmacies. Participants were recruited after weekly Spanish-speaking church services for approximately one month. Qualitative, semi-structured individual interviews to identify perceived unmet patient care needs were conducted in Spanish and transcribed/translated verbatim. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to summarize findings. A written questionnaire was administered to collect patient satisfaction and demographic information, summarized using descriptive statistics. Twelve interviews were conducted by the principal investigator. Primary themes included lack of insurance coupled with high medical care costs serving as a barrier for acquisition of health care, difficulty accessing timely and convenient primary care, perceived negative attitudes from pharmacy personnel, lack of Spanish-speaking health care providers, and the provision of verbal and written medication information in English. The results of this study suggest a great need for health care providers, including pharmacists, to expand outreach services to the Spanish-speaking community. Some examples derived from the interview process include increasing marketing efforts of available services in the Spanish language, hiring Spanish-speaking personnel, and offering medical terminology education classes to Spanish-speaking patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Language Usage and Culture Maintenance: A Study of Spanish-Speaking Immigrant Mothers in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the usage of the Spanish language by Hispanic mothers with their children, their views on language maintenance and culture within their bilingual families and their opinions on the benefits of bilingualism in a globalised world. Drawing upon detailed case studies of 16 native Spanish-speaking mothers married to…

  17. Mental Health in Spanish-Speaking Mentally Retarded People: The State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristan, Jaime Rodriguez

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes diagnostic methods, treatment approaches, cultural factors, service delivery systems, and governmental roles important in the consideration of the status of mentally retarded people with mental health problems in four Spanish-speaking populations: Chile, Mexico, Spain, and Hispanic groups in the U.S. (JDD)

  18. Diversity among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Profiles of Early Literacy Skills in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen L.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Konold, Timothy R.; Invernizzi, Marcia; Gartland, Lauren B.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored heterogeneity in literacy development among 2,300 Hispanic children receiving English as a Second Language (ESL) services at the start of kindergarten. Two research questions guided this work: (1) Do Spanish-speaking English language learners receiving ESL services in the fall of kindergarten demonstrate homogeneous early…

  19. The Spanish Speaking and Library Services: A Systematic Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Roberto P.; Cabello-Argandona, Roberto

    Traditional models of library service and their applicability to the Spanish-speaking community, a rapidly growing group not generally considered by policy makers, planners, and decision makers of the library profession, are examined. Topics include: discussion of terms describing Hispanic-origin people; size of Spanish-origin population;…

  20. Child Vocabulary, Maternal Behavior, and Inhibitory Control Development among Spanish-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Tatiana Nogueira; Owen, Margaret Tresch; Rojas, Raúl; Caughy, Margaret O'Brien

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The roles of child lexical diversity and maternal sensitivity in the development of young children's inhibitory control were examined in 100 low-income Hispanic Spanish-speaking children. Child communication utterances at age 2½ years were transcribed from 10-min mother-child interactions to quantify lexical diversity. Maternal…

  1. Spanish-speaking patients perceive high quality care in resident continuity practices: a CORNET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D; Parra-Roide, Lilia; Hobson, Wendy L; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Serwint, Janet R

    2009-04-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that limited English proficiency in Hispanic patients is associated with adverse health outcomes. The authors sought to compare the perception of primary care in resident practices between Spanish-speaking and English-speaking parents using a previously validated tool, the Parents' Perception of Primary Care. Using survey results from 19 CORNET sites nationwide, they compared mean scores for each primary care domain and the full scale between the groups using Student's t test. Multiple linear regression models compared outcomes controlling for demographic variables. Of the 2122 analyzable surveys, 490 (23%) were completed in Spanish and 1632 (77%) in English. The mean scores for each domain and the total scale were not statistically different between the 2 groups. After adjustment, Spanish-speaking parents rated communication significantly higher. Resident clinics may use systems to provide high quality care to Spanish-speaking patients, which may help other sites improve care.

  2. Measuring Disparities: Bias in the SF-36v2 among Spanish-speaking Medical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudano, Joseph J.; Perzynski, Adam; Love, Thomas E.; Lewis, Steven A.; Murray, Patrick M.; Huber, Gail; Ruo, Bernice; Baker, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Many national surveys have found substantial differences in self-reported overall health (SROH) between Spanish-speaking Hispanics and other racial/ethnic groups. However, because cultural and language differences may create measurement bias, it is unclear whether observed differences in SROH reflect true differences in health. Objectives This study uses a cross-sectional survey to investigate psychometric properties of the SF-36v2 for subjects across four racial/ethnic and language groups. Multi-group latent variable modeling was used to test increasingly stringent criteria for measurement equivalence. Subjects Our sample (N = 1281) included 383 non-Hispanic whites, 368 non-Hispanic blacks, 206 Hispanics interviewed in English and 324 Hispanics interviewed in Spanish recruited from outpatient medical clinics in two large urban areas. Results We found weak factorial invariance across the four groups. However, there was no strong factorial invariance. The overall fit of the model was substantially worse (change in CFI > .02, RMSEA change > .003) after requiring equal intercepts across all groups. Further comparisons established that the equality constraints on the intercepts for Spanish-speaking Hispanics were responsible for the decrement to model fit. Conclusions Observed differences between SF-36v2 scores for Spanish speaking Hispanics are systematically biased relative to the other three groups. The lack of strong invariance suggests the need for caution when comparing SF-36v2 mean scores of Spanish-speaking Hispanics with those of other groups. However, measurement equivalence testing for this study supports correlational or multivariate latent variable analyses of SF-36v2 responses across all four subgroups, since these analyses require only weak factorial invariance. PMID:21430580

  3. Prevention of adolescent depression in the Spanish-speaking world

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting programs targeted at the prevention of adolescent depression applied with Spanish-speaking populations that have been developed in Spanish-speaking countries and are mostly published in Spanish. These programs have been developed under different cultural contexts in Spain and Latin-America. The main goal of this paper is to make the studies and movements of the Spanish-speaking literature in this field accessible to the non-Spanish-speaking part of the research c...

  4. Prevention of Adolescent Depression in the Spanish-Speaking World

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting programs targeted at the prevention of adolescent depression applied with Spanish-speaking populations that have been developed in Spanish-speaking countries and are mostly published in Spanish. These programs have been developed under different cultural contexts in Spain and Latin-America. The main goal of this paper is to make the studies and movements of the Spanish-speaking literature in this field accessible to the non-Spanish-speaking part of the research c...

  5. Phonological Production in Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brian A.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    Approximately 10 percent of Latino preschoolers are at risk for developing communication problems unrelated to second language acquisition. Many of these children are Spanish-speaking and have difficulties in producing speech sounds in their native language. One of the services afforded Latino preschoolers by speech-language pathologists is the…

  6. Adapting a tertiary-care pediatric weight management clinic to better reach Spanish-speaking families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Angelica; Irby, Megan B; Pulgar, Camila; Skelton, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Pediatric obesity continues to be an epidemic, affecting Hispanic children disproportionately. Recent recommendations outline a step-wise approach to the treatment of overweight and obese children, culminating in tertiary-care, multidisciplinary programs. We detail here how our tertiary-care, family-based, pediatric weight management clinic addressed the problem of few Spanish-speaking families enrolling in treatment after referral by adding a Bilingual Case Manager. Utilizing a family-centered, high-contact, personal approach, our program increased the number of Hispanic families enrolling over ten-fold. Further, outcomes in Hispanic families were equal to or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Lessons learned from this experience may benefit other obesity treatment programs trying to improve care of Spanish-speaking families.

  7. Satisfaction with provider communication among Spanish-speaking Medicaid enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosen, David M; Carlson, Matthew J; Morales, Leo S; Hanes, Pamela P

    2004-01-01

    To determine if differences between English- and Spanish-speaking parents in ratings of their children's health care can be explained by need for interpretive services. Using the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey-Child-Survey (CAHPS), reports about provider communication were compared among 3 groups of parents enrolled in a Medicaid managed care health plan: 1) English speakers, 2) Spanish speakers with no self-reported need for interpretive services, and 3) Spanish speakers with self-reported need for interpretive services. Parents were asked to report how well their providers 1) listened carefully to what was being said, 2) explained things in a way that could be understood, 3) respected their comments and concerns, and 4) spent enough time during medical encounters. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare the ratings of each of the 3 groups while controlling for child's gender, parent's gender, parent's educational attainment, child's health status, and survey year. Spanish-speaking parents in need of interpretive services were less likely to report that providers spent enough time with their children (odds ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval = 0.17-0.68) compared to English-speaking parents. There was no statistically significant difference found between Spanish-speaking parents with no need of interpretive services and English-speaking parents. Among Spanish- versus English-speaking parents, differences in ratings of whether providers spent enough time with children during medical encounters appear to be explained, in part, by need for interpretive services. No other differences in ratings of provider communication were found.

  8. Pharmacists’ communication with Spanish-speaking patients: a review of the literature to establish an agenda for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Thomas; Mott, Dave; Young, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Background Spanish-speaking people represent more than 12% of the total population in the United States and are poised to become the largest minority group in the U.S. by 2015. Although researchers have studied pharmacist-patient communication for approximately 30 years, little emphasis has been placed on the interactions between pharmacists and Spanish-speaking patients. Objective The objectives of this review are 1) to describe empirical studies on Spanish-speaking patient/pharmacist communication examined relative to patient factors, pharmacist factors, and environmental factors that may influence Spanish-speaking patient/pharmacist communication and 2) to integrate medical and nursing literature to generate a research agenda for future study in this area. Methods We compiled articles from a systematic review of (1) CINAHL, International Pharmacy Abstracts, Pub Med, and Web of Knowledge databases using “Hispanic limited English proficiency”, “Latino limited English proficiency”, “language-assistance services”, “Spanish-speaking patients”, “Latino patients”, “Spanish-speaking health literacy”, “pharmacy health literacy”, “patient-provider communication”, “pharmacy language barriers”, (2) bibliographies of selected articles. Results This search generated 1,174 articles, 7 of which met the inclusion criteria. We categorized the results into four topic areas: “Spanish-speaking patient literacy,” “pharmacists knowledge of/proficiency in the Spanish language,” “pharmacy resources to overcome language barriers,” and “pharmacists’ attitudes towards communicating with Spanish-speaking patients.” Conclusions These studies provide a macroscopic look at the linguistic services offered in pharmacies, gaps in services, and their subsequent impact on pharmacists and patients. Future research should investigate Spanish-speaking patients’ literacy issues, pharmacy staff language skills, factors that influence pharmacists

  9. El asesino silencioso: a methodology for alerting the Spanish-speaking community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A G; Herrick, K L; Weaver, F J

    1981-06-01

    Information describing the health status of the Spanish-speaking population, the nation's second largest minority, is extremely scarce. In particular, few studies have attempted to document the prevalence or ascertain the extent of treatment or the level of public awareness of hypertension or other cardiovascular diseases in this minority population. However, before any large scale effort to determine the prevalence or to determine the treatment and awareness needs related to hypertension is initiated, preliminary questions concerning how to reach and motivate the Spanish-speaking population to adopt cardiovascular health risk-reducing behaviors must be answered.

  10. Maryland environmental public health tracking outreach with Spanish-speaking persons living in Baltimore city or county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braggio, John T; Mitchell, Clifford S; Fierro-Luperini, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The 2000 Pew reports became the impetus for the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program, but there was no mention that Spanish-speaking persons are at increased risk of exposure to environmental hazards. To undertake successful EPHT outreach on Spanish-speaking persons (Hispanics), it is necessary to better understand their environmental health profile and barriers to health care access. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey questions were administered orally in Spanish to Spanish-speaking study participants. Volunteers were tested at a non-for-profit social service and referral agency in Baltimore. To control for acculturation, only Spanish-speaking persons who had lived in the United States for less than 10 years were selected. Responses to 40 BRFSS survey questions asked during the assessment and completion of 3 intervention activities. This study provides new information about Spanish-speaking persons, most of whom (85.3%) would not have been included in the landline administration of the BRFSS survey. Although 29.9% of the participants reported indoor pesticide use and another 9.2% reported outdoor pesticide use, lifetime (3.5%) and current (1.2%) asthma prevalence was significantly lower than asthma prevalence reported by Maryland Hispanics and all Maryland residents. There were significantly lower cholesterol screening (21.5%) and a significantly higher prevalence of diabetes (12.5%) in Spanish-speaking participants than in Maryland Hispanics and all Maryland residents. Among study participants, only 7.8% had health insurance and 39.9% reported that they could not see a doctor. Of the 3 outreach efforts completed, the most promising one involved asking Spanish-English-speaking health care professionals to distribute Spanish comic books about pesticides exposures and health outcomes in community settings where Spanish-only speakers and children were found. The effectiveness of passive and community-based EPHT

  11. Collaborative care for the treatment of depression in primary care with a low-income, spanish-speaking population: outcomes from a community-based program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katherine; Watt, Toni Terling

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative care model with a predominantly Hispanic, low-income population in a primary care setting and (2) examine depression outcomes with a subpopulation of preferentially Spanish-speaking patients compared with non-Hispanic white participants. The data were collected from September 2006 through September 2009 at the study site, the People's Community Clinic, Austin, Texas. Data collection was part of an evaluation of the Integrated Behavioral Health program, a collaborative care model of identifying and treating mild-to-moderate mental disorders in adults in a primary care setting. A bilingual care manager provided supportive counseling and patient education and systematically tracked patient progress in a patient registry. A consulting psychiatrist evaluated patients with diagnostic or treatment concerns. The study retrospectively examined changes in depression scores among 269 subjects as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the primary outcome measure. The PHQ-9 is a self-report of frequency of symptoms for each of the 9 DSM-IV criteria for depression. Logistic regression models compared race/ethnicity and language group combinations on their odds of achieving clinically meaningful depression improvement when background characteristics were controlled for. Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients had significantly greater odds of achieving a clinically meaningful improvement in depression at 3-month follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 2.45, P = .013) compared to non-Hispanic whites. The finding for greater improvement in the Spanish-speaking population remained after controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, prior treatment, and baseline depression scores. The results suggest a model of care that is effective for a population at great risk for marginal mental health care, non-English-speaking Hispanics. Attention to patient preferences in primary care is essential to improve quality of

  12. Child Vocabulary, Maternal Behavior, and Inhibitory Control Development Among Spanish-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Tatiana Nogueira; Owen, Margaret Tresch; Rojas, Raúl; Caughy, Margaret O’Brien

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings The roles of child lexical diversity and maternal sensitivity in the development of young children’s inhibitory control were examined in 100 low-income Hispanic Spanish-speaking children. Child communication utterances at age 2½ years were transcribed from 10-min mother–child interactions to quantify lexical diversity. Maternal behavior was rated independently from the interactions. Inhibitory control was measured with a battery of tasks at ages 2½ and 3½. Greater maternal sensitivity was correlated with higher vocabulary at 2½. Greater vocabulary predicted positive growth in child inhibitory control skills from ages 2½ to 3½ in multivariable regression models that controlled for maternal education, family income, the home environment, and mothering quality. Practice or Policy These findings suggest that supporting vocabulary development in low-income Spanish-speaking children is important for the development of inhibitory control skills, an important foundation for school readiness and academic success. PMID:26306074

  13. Assessing morphosyntax in Spanish-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedore, L M

    2001-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the morpho-syntactic skills of Spanish-speaking children depends on the clinician's understanding of the morpho-syntactic system and on the development of tasks that obligate the use of structures of interest. In this article, the nature and acquisition of the Spanish morpho-syntactic system is outlined. The aspects of the system that are likely to be difficult for children with language impairments and those that are critical to communicative competence are emphasized, as the clinician must take these into account when planning assessment tasks. The analysis of spontaneous language samples and the use of structured probes are discussed as alternatives for assessment. The naturalness and linguistic demands of assessment tasks are also considered because they are critical to understanding children's performance on morpho-syntactic tasks.

  14. Patient-physician language concordance and primary care screening among spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamranond, Pracha Peter; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S; Wee, Christina C

    2011-07-01

    Language discordance between patient and physician is associated with worse patient self-reported healthcare quality. As Hispanic patients have low rates of cardiovascular and cancer screening, we sought to determine whether patient-physician language concordance was associated with differences in rates of screening. We performed a retrospective medical record review of 101 Spanish-speaking patients cared for by 6 Spanish-speaking PCPs (language-concordant group) and 205 Spanish-speaking patients cared for by 44 non-Spanish-speaking PCPs (language-discordant group). Patients were included in the study if they were of age 35 to 75 years and had used interpreter services 2001 to 2006 in 2 Boston-based primary care clinics. Our outcomes included screening for hyperlipidemia, diabetes, cervical cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer with age-appropriate and sex-appropriate subgroups. Our main predictor of interest was patient-physician language concordance. In multivariable modeling, we adjusted for age, sex, insurance status, number of primary care visits, and comorbidities. We adjusted for clustering of patients within individual physicians and clinic sites using generalized estimating equations. Patients in the language-discordant group tended to be female compared with patients in the language-concordant group. There were no significant differences in age, insurance status, number of primary care visits, or Charlson comorbidity index between the 2 groups. Rates of screening for hyperlipidemia, diabetes, cervical cancer, and breast cancer were similar for both language-concordant and language-discordant groups. However, patients in the language-concordant group were less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer compared with the language-discordant group risk ratio 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.99) after multivariable adjustment. This study finds that Spanish-speaking patients cared for by language-concordant PCPs were not more likely to receive

  15. Assessment of alcohol use patterns among spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Shahram; Cisneros, Victor; Anderson, Craig L; Roumani, Samer; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Weiss, Jie; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Dykzeul, Brad; Vaca, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess drinking patterns of Spanish-speaking patients using a bilingual computerized alcohol screening and brief intervention (CASI) tablet computer equipped with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary university hospital emergency department (ED) between 2006 and 2010. Data from 1816 Spanish-speaking ED patients were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the chi-square test for independence, and the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test for comparisons using quantitative variables. Overall, 15% of Spanish-speaking patients were at-risk drinkers, and 5% had an AUDIT score consistent with alcohol dependency (≥20). A higher percentage of Spanish-speaking males than females were at-risk drinkers or likely dependent. Spanish-speaking males exhibited higher frequency of drinking days per week and higher number of drinks per day compared with females. Among older patients, nondrinking behavior increased and at-risk drinkers decreased. The majority of males and females were ready to change their behavior after the CASI intervention; 61% and 69%, respectively, scored 8-10. This study indicated that CASI was an effective tool for detecting at-risk and likely dependent drinking behavior in Spanish-speaking ED patients. The majority of patients were ready to change their drinking behavior. More alcohol screening and brief intervention tools should be tested and become readily accessible for Spanish-speaking patients.

  16. Patient satisfaction among Spanish-speaking patients in a public health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Elisabeth; Yeager, Valerie A; Ouimet, Claude; Menachemi, Nir

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing literature on health care quality, few patient satisfaction studies have focused upon the public health setting; where many Hispanic patients receive care. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in satisfaction between English and Spanish-speaking patients in a local health department clinical setting. We conducted a paper-based satisfaction survey of patients that visited any of the seven Jefferson County Department of Health primary care centers from March 19 to April 19, 2008. Using Chi-squared analyses we found 25% of the Spanish-speaking patients reported regularly having problems getting an appointment compared to 16.8% among English-speakers (p < .001). Results of logistic regression analyses indicated that, despite the availability of interpreters at all JCDH primary care centers, differences in satisfaction existed between Spanish and English speaking patients controlling for center location, purpose of visit, and time spent waiting. Specifically, Spanish speaking patients were more likely to report problems getting an appointment and less likely to report having their medical problems resolved when leaving their visit as compared to those who spoke English. Findings presented herein may provide insight regarding the quality of care received, specifically regarding patient satisfaction in the public health setting. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  17. Stroke knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Spanish is the second most-spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose here some future directions for research. We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and by looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers were analyzed. Key Messages: Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is lacking even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. 'Ictus', the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and the availability of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be better ways of improving the present situation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Physician language ability and cultural competence. An exploratory study of communication with Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Schillinger, Dean; Grumbach, Kevin; Rosenthal, Anne; Stewart, Anita L; Wang, Frances; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2004-02-01

    We studied physician-patient dyads to determine how physician self-rated Spanish-language ability and cultural competence affect Spanish-speaking patients' reports of interpersonal processes of care. Questionnaire study of 116 Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes and 48 primary care physicians (PCPs) at a public hospital with interpreter services. Primary care physicians rated their Spanish ability on a 5-point scale and cultural competence by rating: 1) their understanding of the health-related cultural beliefs of their Spanish-speaking patients; and 2) their effectiveness with Latino patients, each on a 4-point scale. We assessed patients' experiences using the interpersonal processes of care (IPC) in diverse populations instrument. Primary care physician responses were dichotomized, as were IPC scale scores (optimal vs nonoptimal). We analyzed the relationship between language and two cultural competence items and IPC, and a summary scale and IPC, using multivariate models to adjust for known confounders of communication. Greater language fluency was strongly associated with optimal IPC scores in the domain of elicitation of and responsiveness to patients, problems and concerns [Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR], 5.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59 to 17.27]. Higher score on a language-culture summary scale was associated with three IPC domains - elicitation/responsiveness (AOR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.1 to 19.3), explanation of condition (AOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 7.34), and patient empowerment (AOR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.19)-and not associated with two more-technical communication domains. Physician self-rated language ability and cultural competence are independently associated with patients' reports of interpersonal process of care in patient-centered domains. Our study provides empiric support for the importance of language and cultural competence in the primary care of Spanish-speaking patients.

  19. Prevention of adolescent depression in the Spanish-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Andrea B; Cañizares, Catalina; Gómez, Yvonne

    2014-05-27

    This paper aims at presenting programs targeted at the prevention of adolescent depression applied with Spanish-speaking populations that have been developed in Spanish-speaking countries and are mostly published in Spanish. These programs have been developed under different cultural contexts in Spain and Latin-America. The main goal of this paper is to make the studies and movements of the Spanish-speaking literature in this field accessible to the non-Spanish-speaking part of the research community. Therefore, after an introduction referring to possible cultural differences regarding depression in general and epidemiological basics, several programs are introduced. In total 11 programs will be shortly presented and discussed. After revising the programs it can be concluded that in the Spanish-speaking world many programs have been developed and conducted following current state of the art-approaches for adolescent depression prevention. Further research is needed especially targeting possible cultural and contextual aspects of prevention measures and their efficacy and efficiency.

  20. Parent involvement in school: English speaking versus Spanish speaking families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Thorn, Antoinette; Bloomdahl, Susana Contreras; Ha, Jung Hee; Nam, Suk Kyung; Lee, Jayoung

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationships between three predictor variables (attitude toward school, parent-child communication, and school commitment action) and the criterion variable (parent involvement) in a representative sample and to examine if these relationships were consistent across three groups (English speaking Caucasian family, English speaking Latino family, and Spanish speaking Latino families). Using a national database (N = 9.841), multi-group SEM analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between three predictor variables and the criterion variable in three family groups. While all three predictor variables significantly predicted parent involvement in English speaking Caucasian and Latino families, only two variables (parent-child communication and school commitment actions), significantly predicted parent involvement in Spanish speaking Latino families. The results of this study suggest that when administrators, teachers and counselors in school strive to share specific school-related information with Latino families, Spanish speaking families are more likely to become involved with schools.

  1. Noninitiation and Noncompletion of HPV Vaccine Among English- and Spanish-Speaking Parents of Adolescent Girls: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Karen; Barnard, Juliana; O'Leary, Sean T; Lockhart, Steven; Jimenez-Zambrano, Andrea; Stokley, Shannon; Dempsey, Amanda; Kempe, Allison

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for female adolescents aged 11 to 12 years, yet vaccination rates remain low. We conducted a qualitative study to understand English- and Spanish-speaking parents' reasons for noninitiation or noncompletion of the HPV vaccine series for their daughters. Parents of female adolescents aged 12 to 15 years who had not initiated or not completed the HPV vaccine series were identified through administrative data in 2 large urban safety net health care systems in Colorado. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with English-speaking parents and in-depth interviews were conducted with Spanish-speaking parents. All data were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content by experienced analysts using established qualitative content analysis techniques. Forty-one parents participated in the study. Thirty parents participated in individual interviews and 11 parents participated in 1 of 2 focus groups. The most common reasons for noninitiation and noncompletion among English-speaking parents included a low perceived risk of HPV infection, vaccine safety concerns, and distrust of government and/or medicine. In contrast, Spanish-speaking parents most often reported that providers had either not encouraged initiation of the HPV vaccine series or had not explained the necessity of completing the series. Some noninitiating parents, particularly Spanish-speaking ones, also cited concerns that vaccination would encourage sexual activity. The reasons for noninitiation and noncompletion of the HPV vaccine series differed substantially between English- and Spanish-speaking parents. To maximize uptake of HPV vaccine, varying approaches might be needed to effectively target specific populations. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation of self-reported health literacy questions among diverse English and Spanish-speaking populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Urmimala; Schillinger, Dean; López, Andrea; Sudore, Rebecca

    2011-03-01

    Limited health literacy (HL) contributes to poor health outcomes and disparities, and direct measurement is often time-intensive. Self-reported HL questions have not been validated among Spanish-speaking and diverse English-speaking populations. To evaluate three self-reported questions: 1 "How confident are you filling out medical forms?"; 2 "How often do you have problems learning about your medical condition because of difficulty understanding written information?"; and 3 "How often do you have someone help you read hospital materials?" Answers were based on a 5-point Likert scale. This was a validation study nested within a trial of diabetes self-management support in the San Francisco Department of Public Health. English and Spanish-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes receiving primary care. Using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (s-TOFHLA) in English and Spanish as the reference, we classified HL as inadequate, marginal, or adequate. We calculated the C-index and test characteristics of the three questions and summative scale compared to the s-TOFHLA and assessed variations in performance by language, race/ethnicity, age, and education. Of 296 participants, 48% were Spanish-speaking; 9% were White, non-Hispanic; 47% had inadequate HL and 12% had marginal HL. Overall, 57% reported being confident with forms "somewhat" or less. The "confident with forms" question performed best for detecting inadequate (C-index = 0.82, (0.77-0.87)) and inadequate plus marginal HL (C index = 0.81, (0.76-0.86); pconfident with forms" question and scale also performed best across language, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and age. A single self-reported HL question about confidence with forms and a summative scale of three questions discriminated between Spanish and English speakers with adequate HL and those with inadequate and/or inadequate plus marginal HL. The "confident with forms" question or the summative scale may be useful for estimating HL in

  3. Information and Referral Services for Spanish-Speaking People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Rachael Naismith

    This overview of information and referral services for Spanish speaking people surveys the problems and successes of bicultural-bilingual programs as they have evolved in the past decade, emphasizing the need for innovative and nontraditional approaches to these services for minority ethnic groups. Brief descriptions of information and referral…

  4. Narrative Development in Monolingual Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Earls, Anny; Petersen, Douglas; Spencer, Trina; Hammer, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to describe differences in the narratives produced by 3-, 4-, and 5- year old Spanish-speaking (SS) children. Narrative productions of 104 typically developing children were collected using a story-retelling task and coded using the Index of Narrative Complexity. The results of this study indicate…

  5. Periodicals of Interest to a Spanish-Speaking Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucson Public Library, AZ.

    The document gives a partial listing of magazines of special interest to the Mexican American and Spanish speaking community in Tucson, Arizona. The journals are grouped in 4 broad categories: there are 8 listings for popular journals (women's magazines, home decoration, and crafts); 12 for news; 8 for Mexican American cultural studies; and 9…

  6. Is Software Available for Early Childhood Spanish Speaking Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona de Divale, Maria Victoria

    A search was conducted on the Internet for software available for bilingual Spanish-speaking children. The only programs found under this heading were 18 programs for learning Spanish. Five of the least expensive were selected for review using a standardized scale for evaluating children's software. Four of the programs were found to be…

  7. Pharmacy language assistance resources and their association with pharmacists' self-efficacy in communicating with Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devraj, Radhika; Young, Henry N

    Spanish-speaking patients experience significant disparities in care and poorer health outcomes in comparison to English-speaking patients, often due to language barriers. Providers should be equipped with resources to effectively communicate with Spanish-speaking patients to provide the best possible care. The purpose of this study is to examine the resources available to support pharmacists' communication with Spanish-speaking patients. A cross-sectional study design was used to examine language-assistance resources in community pharmacies throughout the state of Illinois. A telephone survey contained items to examine the accessibility, frequency of use, ease of use, and helpfulness of language-assistance resources; items were rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale (1 = Never to 5 = Always). The survey also included nine items to assess pharmacists' self-efficacy in communicating with Spanish-speaking patients. Purposeful sampling was utilized to increase the likelihood of obtaining information from pharmacies serving Hispanic populations. The sample was categorized into high and low Spanish-speaking populations based on pharmacists' self-reported data. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine relationships between language-assistance resources and pharmacist self-efficacy. A total of 231 community pharmacists participated in the survey. The most accessible language-assistance resources were computer-based (92%) and telephone help lines (80%). Among various computer-based resources, Spanish labels (M = 2.12, SD = 1.58) and leaflets (M = 2.04, SD = 1.49) were the most frequently used. Computer generated Spanish leaflets and labels, and language-assistance telephone lines were also perceived to be easier to use and more helpful in comparison to paper-based resources and personnel. Respondents also reported that it was easy to use friends and family (M = 3.5, SD = 1.8) and that they were helpful (M = 3.58, SD = 1.26). Access to

  8. Colorado Hispanics: A Report of Selected Social Concerns, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Georgia, Ed.; Guajardo, Maria, Ed.

    This publication offers a compilation of 12 reports on selected social concerns pertaining to the Hispanic community in Colorado and provides a comprehensive overview of demographic information and information on health, education, and social welfare issues. The first report looks at Colorado's multicultural population through a demographic…

  9. The impact of language barriers and immigration status on the care experience for Spanish-speaking caregivers of patients with pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Eduardo R; Kaul, Sapna; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Gwilliam, Vannina; Jimenez, Ornella A; Morreall, Deborah K; Montenegro, Roberto E; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark N

    2016-12-01

    An increasing proportion of pediatric cancer patients in the United States are Latino and many have Spanish-speaking immigrant parents with limited English proficiency (LEP). Little is known about how language or undocumented immigration status impacts their care experience. A cross-sectional survey was administered to English (N = 310) and Spanish-speaking LEP (N = 56) caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. To assess differences in healthcare experiences between the language groups, t-tests and chi-square statistics were used. Multivariable logistic regression evaluated associations between primary language and knowledge of clinical trial status. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to report higher rates of quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child's cancer, and their children were more likely to experience a delay in education. Although Spanish-speaking caregivers reported higher satisfaction with care, 32% reported feeling that their child would have received better care if English was their primary language. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to incorrectly identify whether their child was on a clinical trial compared with English-speaking caregivers. The majority of Spanish-speaking caregivers reported at least one undocumented caregiver in the household and 11% of them avoided or delayed medical care for their child due to concerns over their undocumented immigration status. Language barriers and undocumented immigration status may negatively impact the quality of informed decision-making and the care experience for Spanish-speaking LEP caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. These families may benefit from culturally appropriate Spanish language resources to improve communication and open a dialogue regarding undocumented immigration status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Tobacco cessation services through community health workers for Spanish-speaking populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Bristow, Zuzanne; Sias, Jeri J; Urquidi, Ulysses J; Feng, Chun

    2006-02-01

    Partnerships were established with the University of Arizona's Healthcare Partnership to train promotores--Spanish-speaking community health workers--as tobacco cessation counselors. Tobacco Free El Paso certified promotores to help identify tobacco users and offer tobacco cessation counseling services. The project certified 89 participants, of whom 95% were promotores; 88% were Hispanic/Latino, 67% were females, and 62% indicated Spanish as their primary language. Participants who completed Técnicas Básicas, Treatment Specialist, and Déjate de ese Vicio certifications significantly increased self-confidence levels to deliver brief smoking cessation interventions (P < .05). Satisfaction scores (scale = 1-5) were also relatively high for each certification (Técnicas Básicas, mean = 4.8; Treatment Specialist, mean = 4.7; Déjate de ese Vicio, mean = 4.6). The results suggest that promotores understood the concepts and methodologies presented.

  11. Assessing Cancer Health Literacy among Spanish-Speaking Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Anderson, David; Nápoles, Anna María

    2017-07-24

    Health literacy is a dynamic construct that changes with specific health conditions; thus, new disease-specific health literacy tools are needed. Since cancer is the leading cause of death among Latinos, the largest and fastest-growing minority population in the nation, there is a need to develop tools to assess cancer health literacy (CHL) among the Spanish-speaking population. The Cancer Health Literacy Test, Spanish version (CHLT-30-DKspa) was applied to identify Spanish-speaking individuals with low CHL and ascertain which items in the tool best discriminate between CHL level groups. Cross-sectional field test of the CHLT-30-DKspa among Spanish-speaking Latinos. Latent class analysis (LCA) identified participants with varying CHL levels. Probability of correct answers, odds ratios, and standardized errors were used to identify the items that allow the classification of individuals among the latent classes. LCA resulted in a three-latent-class model predicting 39.4% of participants to be in the HIGH class, 43.3% in the MEDIUM class, and 17.3% in the LOW class. Eleven items (the CHLT-11-DKspa) meet the criteria to clearly separate participants with HIGH and LOW classes of CHL. Although the best model fit was a three-class solution, results showed a clear separation of individuals from HIGH versus LOW levels of CHL, but separation of those in the MEDIUM level was not as clear. The CHLT-11-DKspa is a shorter measure that may be relatively easy to use in a clinical encounter to identify Spanish-speaking patients with the poorest levels of CHL who may require additional support to understand medical instructions and care plans.

  12. Early lexical development in Spanish-speaking infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Maldonado, D; Thal, D; Marchman, V; Bates, E; Gutierrez-Clellen, V

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the early lexical development of a group of 328 normal Spanish-speaking children aged 0;8 to 2;7. First the development and structure of a new parent report instrument, Inventario del Desarollo de Habilidades Communicativas is described. Then five studies carried out with the instrument are presented. In the first study vocabulary development of Spanish-speaking infants and toddlers is compared to that of English-speaking infants and toddlers. The English data were gathered using a comparable parental report, the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories. In the second study the general characteristics of Spanish language acquisition, and the effects of various demographic factors on that process, are examined. Study 3 examines the differential effects of three methods of collecting the data (mail-in, personal interview, and clinic waiting room administration). Studies 4 and 5 document the reliability and validity of the instrument. Results show that the trajectories of development are very similar for Spanish- and English-speaking children in this age range, that children from varying social groups develop similarly, and that mail-in and personal interview administration techniques produce comparable results. Inventories administered in a medical clinic waiting room, on the other hand, produced lower estimates of toddler vocabulary than the other two models.

  13. Effects of Length, Complexity, and Grammatical Correctness on Stuttering in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer B.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Carlo, Edna J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of utterance length, syntactic complexity, and grammatical correctness on stuttering in the spontaneous speech of young, monolingual Spanish-speaking children. Method: Spontaneous speech samples of 11 monolingual Spanish-speaking children who stuttered, ages 35 to 70 months, were examined. Mean number of syllables,…

  14. Effects of Length, Complexity, and Grammatical Correctness on Stuttering in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer B.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Carlo, Edna J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of utterance length, syntactic complexity, and grammatical correctness on stuttering in the spontaneous speech of young, monolingual Spanish-speaking children. Method: Spontaneous speech samples of 11 monolingual Spanish-speaking children who stuttered, ages 35 to 70 months, were examined. Mean number of syllables,…

  15. The Needs of the Spanish Speaking Mujer [Woman] in Woman-Manpower Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Gomez, Anna

    Although the Spanish Speaking woman is usually considered to be outside the labor market, 36 percent of the 52 percent Spanish Speaking women were in the labor force in March 1972. These women suffer economic-sexist discrimination due to ascription of work according to sex and race by a racial-sexual hierarchy existing within the traditional…

  16. System Analysis of Library and Information Services to the Spanish Speaking Community of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Argandona, Roberto; Haro, Roberto Peter

    This study focuses on factors contributing to the low level of effectiveness of library and information services to the Spanish speaking community as reported in the literature. It analyzes, using an open system approach, models developed by public and academic libraries to serve the Spanish speaking population. Problems contributing to the…

  17. Depression and quality of life in Spanish-speaking immigrant persons with epilepsy compared with those in English-speaking US-born persons with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Lancman, Marcelo; Vazquez-Casals, Gonzalo; Bonafina, Marcela; Perrine, Kenneth; Sabri, Jomard

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to examine levels of depression and quality of life in Spanish-speaking (less acculturated) immigrants with epilepsy compared with those in English-speaking US-born persons with epilepsy (PWEs). The study included 85 PWEs - 38 Spanish-speaking immigrants with epilepsy and 47 US-born PWEs. All patients underwent video-EEG monitoring and completed depression and quality-of-life inventories in their dominant language (Spanish/English). Chart review of clinical epilepsy variables was conducted by an epileptologist. Our study revealed that depression scores were significantly higher in Hispanic PWEs (21.65±14.6) than in US-born PWEs (14.50±10.2) (t (64.02)=-2.3, two-sided p=.025). Marital status, medical insurance, antidepressant use, seizure frequency, and number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were tested as covariates in the ANCOVA framework and were not statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. Fewer Hispanics were prescribed antidepressant medications (13.15% for Hispanics and 40.42% for US-born, χ(2) (1,85) 7.71, p=.005) and had access to comprehensive health insurance coverage (χ(2) (1,85)=13.70, p=0.000). Hispanic patients were also found to be receiving significantly less AEDs compared with their US-born peers (t (83, 85)=2.33, p=.02). Although quality of life was diminished in both groups, Seizure Worry was worse for Hispanics after accounting for potential effects of marital status, medical insurance, use of antidepressants, seizure frequency, and number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) ((1, 83), F=7.607, p=0.007). The present study is the first of its kind to examine depression and quality of life in Spanish-speaking US immigrants with epilepsy. Spanish-speaking immigrants with epilepsy have been identified as a group at risk. They demonstrated higher depression scores and more Seizure Worry independent of epilepsy and demographic characteristics compared with their US-born peers. The Hispanic group was receiving less

  18. Determination of normative criteria and validation of the SKT for use in Spanish-speaking populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solís, F; Dávila, G; Ortiz, X; Vega, F; García Ramos, G; de Celis, M; Dávila, L; Gómez, C; Jiménez, S; Juárez, S; Corte, G; Molina, B

    1999-06-01

    Most of the tests, questionnaires, and neuropsychological batteries for the assessment of dementia have been translated and adapted for use in the Hispanic population without having normative data, which results in a high number of false positives when age and educational level are not considered. The Short Cognitive Performance Test (SKT) is a psychometric instrument evaluating memory and attention deficits that has been developed and standardized in Germany (Erzigkeit, 1989a, 1989b). The objective of this study was to adapt the SKT, to establish normative criteria that take into consideration age and educational level, and to establish its concurrent validity in comparison to other neuropsychological tests: Brief Neuropsychological Evaluation for Spanish-Speaking Subjects (Ostrosky-Solis et al., 1994), the Mini-Mental State Examination (Folstein et al., 1975), and the Blessed Functional Scale (Blessed et al., 1968) in 238 neurologically intact subjects and 97 subjects with mild to moderate dementia. The SKT showed adequate sensitivity (80.5%) and specificity (80.3%) in subjects with medium and high educational level; however, the sensitivity and specificity diminished (75% and 56.7%) in subjects with no education or low educational level. The adapted and validated version of the SKT in the Mexican population has been shown to be a psychometric instrument that in subjects with medium educational level can detect cognitive alterations and is able to determine the severity of deterioration; however, in subjects with low educational level and severe dementia, the SKT cannot be usefully administered.

  19. Internet-based developmental screening: a digital divide between English- and Spanish-speaking parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambidge, Simon J; Phibbs, Stephanie; Beck, Arne; Bergman, David Aaron

    2011-10-01

    Internet-based developmental screening is being implemented in pediatric practices across the United States. Little is known about the application of this technology in poor urban populations. We describe here the results of focus groups, surveys, and in-depth interviews during home visits with families served by an urban safety-net organization to address the question of whether it is possible to use Internet or e-mail communication for medical previsit engagement in a population that is majority Hispanic, of low socioeconomic status, and has many non-English-speaking families. This study included families in 4 clinics within a safety-net health care system. The study design included the use of (1) parental surveys (n = 200) of a convenience sample of parents whose children received primary care in the clinics, (2) focus groups (n = 7 groups) with parents, and (3) in-depth interviews during home visits with 4 families. We used χ(2) and multivariate analyses to compare Internet access in English- and Spanish-speaking families. Standard qualitative methods were used to code focus-group texts and identify convergent themes. In multivariate analysis, independent factors associated with computer use were English versus Spanish language (odds ratio: 3.2 [95% confidence interval: 1.4-6.9]) and education through at least high school (odds ratio: 4.7 [95% confidence interval: 2.3-9.7]). In focus groups, the concept of parental previsit work, such as developmental screening tests, was viewed favorably by all groups. However, many parents expressed reservations about doing this work by using the Internet or e-mail and stated a preference for either paper or telephone options. Many Spanish-speaking families discussed lack of access to computers and printers. In this economically disadvantaged population, language and maternal education were associated with access to the Internet. Given the potential power of previsit work to tailor well-child visits to the needs of

  20. The Foreign Language Anxiety in a Medical Office Scale: developing and validating a measurement tool for Spanish-speaking individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntzviller, Lisa M; Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Davis, LaShara A

    2011-09-01

    Communication research has been hindered by a lack of validated measures for Latino populations. To develop and validate a foreign language anxiety in a medical office scale (the Foreign Language Anxiety in a Medical Office Scale [FLAMOS]), the authors conducted a survey of low income, primarily Spanish-speaking Latinos (N=100). The scale factored into a unidimensional construct and showed high reliability (α=.92). The Foreign Language Anxiety in a Medical Office Scale also demonstrated convergent and divergent validity compared with other communication anxiety scales (Personal Report of Communication Apprehension-24, Communication Anxiety Inventory, and Recipient Apprehension Test), and predictive validity for acculturation measures (the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics). The Foreign Language Anxiety in a Medical Office Scale provides a validated measure for researchers and may help to explain Latino health care communication barriers.

  1. "Kinder En Ingles." English for the Spanish-speaking Pre-schooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John S.

    1970-01-01

    Their producer describes a series of instructional programs shown on commercial television in Amarillo, Texas that are designed to help Spanish speaking preschoolers learn enough English to prepare them for public school. (LS)

  2. "Kinder En Ingles." English for the Spanish-speaking Pre-schooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John S.

    1970-01-01

    Their producer describes a series of instructional programs shown on commercial television in Amarillo, Texas that are designed to help Spanish speaking preschoolers learn enough English to prepare them for public school. (LS)

  3. The Effects of Program Models on Language Acquisition by Spanish Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarreta, Dorothy

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the results of a study designed to investigate the effects of five different program models on both acquisition and maintenance of Spanish by native Spanish-speaking kindergarten children. (Author/CFM)

  4. Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Romo, Dawn N; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Rivera, José O; Garza, Aida A; Klein-Bradham, Kristina; Jokerst, Jason R; Janiga, Xan; Brown, Bob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity, while controlling for patients' sociodemographic, clinical, and communication factors, as well as pharmacist factors, and to identify clinical pharmacists' cultural factors that are important to Spanish-speaking patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Central Texas during August 2011 to May 2012. PARTICIPANTS Spanish-speaking patients of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) A Spanish-translated survey assessed Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. RESULTS Spanish-speaking patients (N = 101) reported overall satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patients also indicated that pharmacists' cultural rapport (e.g., ability to speak Spanish, respectfulness) was generally important to Spanish speakers. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that cultural rapport was significantly related to satisfaction with pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. CONCLUSION Overall, patients were satisfied with pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patient satisfaction initiatives that include cultural rapport should be developed for pharmacists who provide care to Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.

  5. Assessment of Reading Precursors in Spanish-Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Anibal; Alvarado, Jesús M; Fernández, Paz; Rosselli, Mónica; Ardila, Alfredo; Jiménez, Amelia

    2016-11-24

    This study's purpose was to analyse basic reading processes in different age groups of Spanish-speaking children using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and regression analysis. Two hundred forty-five children (aged 4 years and 9 months, to 9 years and 7 months; 120 boys, 125 girls), native Spanish-speakers, were selected from schools in Madrid. All participants were in either their last year of preschool or the first three years of elementary school, depending on their age. Nine classic reading tasks were created and administered to measure three reading skills: word recognition, phonological awareness, and reading comprehension. The results of the CFA show that data fit to proposed model with a general reading factor based on these three reading skills χ2(27) = 29.03, p = .36, RMSEA = .02, 90% CIs [.0, .05], CFI = 1.0. The word recognition skills were the best at describing reading performance in preschool children (R 2 = .51 for word identification task); phonological awareness, especially rhyme identification task, discriminated well until second grade (R 2 = .60); and finally, reading comprehension, basically phrase completion task, were the best measure of reading performance in third grade (R 2 = .45).

  6. Patient and provider perspectives on the potential value and use of a bilingual online patient portal in a Spanish-speaking safety-net population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Alejandro; Kitayama, Ken; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Vermillion, Michelle; Eaton, Michael; Carpio, Felix; Serota, Martin; Hochman, Michael E

    2017-04-27

    To assess patient and provider perspectives on the potential value and use of a bilingual patient portal in a large safety-net health system serving predominantly Spanish-speaking patients. We captured patient and provider perspectives through the administration of surveys to assess Internet access, barriers, and facilitators to patient portal adoption, along with portal preferences. We report on these survey results using descriptive and comparative statistics. Four hundred patients (82% response rate) and 59 providers (80% response rate) participated in the study. Although 73% of providers believed that the patient portal would increase patient satisfaction, just 39% planned to recommend portal use to patients, citing concerns related to time and reimbursement. In contrast, 72% of patients believed the patient portal would strengthen the patient-provider relationship and 77% believed it would improve the quality of care. Latino patients in particular believed the patient portal would strengthen the patient-provider relationship. Seventy-five percent of patients reported interest in a mobile version of the portal. Patients from a safety-net health system, most of whom were Spanish-speaking, reported a high level of interest in the patient portal. Providers at the same health system expressed reluctance about the portal due to concerns related to time and reimbursement. Bilingual patient portal implementation has considerable potential to promote health care engagement within Spanish-speaking safety-net populations; however, lack of provider engagement in the process could undermine the effort.

  7. Effects of language concordance and interpreter use on therapeutic alliance in Spanish-speaking integrated behavioral health care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Bianca T; Bridges, Ana J; Anastasia, Elizabeth A; Ojeda, Carlos A; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez; Gomez, Debbie

    2016-02-01

    The discrepancy between the growing number of Spanish speakers in the U.S. and the availability of bilingual providers creates a barrier to accessing quality mental health care. Use of interpreters provides one strategy for overcoming this linguistic barrier; however, concerns about whether sessions with interpreters, versus bilingual providers, impede therapeutic alliance remain. The current study explored associations between the use of interpreters and therapeutic alliance in a sample of 458 Spanish-speaking patients seen for integrated behavioral health visits at primary care clinics. Patients completed a brief (4 item) therapeutic alliance scale at their behavioral health appointment. In addition, to supplement the quantitative study data, a pilot study of 30 qualitative interviews was conducted with a new sample of 10 Spanish-speaking patients, 10 behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and 10 trained interpreters. Quantitative results showed that interpreter use did not relate to therapeutic alliance, even when controlling for relevant demographic variables. However, qualitative interviews suggested major themes regarding the relative benefits and challenges of using interpreters for patients, interpreters, and BHCs. In interviews, patients expressed a strong preference for bilingual providers. Benefits included greater privacy, sense of trust, and accuracy of communication. However, in their absence, interpreters were seen as increasing access to services and facilitating communication with providers, thereby addressing the behavioral health needs of patients with limited English proficiency. BHCs and interpreters emphasized the importance of interpreter training and a good collaborative relationship with interpreters to minimize negative effects on the quality of care.

  8. Managerial Concerns and Hispanic Culture in the American Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Alva V.

    With changing social and economic realities, certain cultural differences in the management of Hispanic workers must be accepted and accommodated in the American workplace, where the scientific approach to management is the general rule. The scientific view of management is hardly accepted by Latin Americans whose management philosophy is more…

  9. Satisfaction With Communication in Primary Care for Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Kori B; Skinner, Asheley C; Yin, H Shonna; Rothman, Russell L; Sanders, Lee M; Delamater, Alan; Perrin, Eliana M

    Effective communication with primary care physicians is important yet incompletely understood for Spanish-speaking parents. We predicted lower satisfaction among Spanish-speaking compared to English-speaking Latino and non-Latino parents. Cross-sectional analysis at 2-month well visits within the Greenlight study at 4 pediatric resident clinics. Parents reported satisfaction with 14 physician communication items using the validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT). High satisfaction was defined as "excellent" on each CAT item. Mean estimations compared satisfaction for communication items among Spanish- and English-speaking Latinos and non-Latinos. We used generalized linear regression modeling, adjusted for parent age, education, income, and clinic site. Among Spanish-speaking parents, we compared visits conducted in Spanish with and without an interpreter, and in English. Compared to English-speaking Latino (n = 127) and non-Latino parents (n = 432), fewer Spanish-speaking parents (n = 303) reported satisfaction with 14 communication items. No significant differences were found between English-speaking Latinos and non-Latinos. Greatest differences were found in the use of a greeting that made the parent comfortable (59.4% of Spanish-speaking Latinos endorsing "excellent" vs 77.5% English-speaking Latinos, P speaking Latinos vs 79.8% English-speaking Latinos, P speaking Latinos were still less likely to report high satisfaction with these communication items. Satisfaction was not different among Spanish-speaking parents when the physician spoke Spanish versus used an interpreter. Satisfaction with physician communication was associated with language but not ethnicity. Spanish-speaking parents less frequently report satisfaction with communication, and innovative solutions to enhance communication quality are needed. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diabetes self-management among low-income Spanish-speaking patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C; Olendzki, Barbara; Reed, George W; Gumieniak, Olga; Scavron, Jeffrey; Ockene, Ira

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related morbidity and mortality is higher among low-income Hispanics when compared to that of Whites. However, little is known about how to effectively promote self-management in this population. The objectives were first to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial of an innovative self-management intervention to improve metabolic control in low-income Spanish-speaking individuals with type 2 diabetes and second to obtain preliminary data of possible intervention effects. Participants for this pilot study were recruited from a community health center, an elder program, and a community-wide database developed by the community health center, in collaboration with other agencies serving the community, by surveying households in the entire community. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 15) or a control (n = 10) condition. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months postrandomization. The intervention consisted of 10 group sessions that targeted diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and self-management skills through culturally specific and literacy-sensitive strategies. The intervention used a cognitive-behavioral theoretical framework. Recruitment rates at the community health center, elder program, and community registry were 48%, 69%, and 8%, respectively. Completion rates for baseline, 3-month, and 6-month assessments were 100%, 92%, and 92%, respectively. Each intervention participant attended an average of 7.8 out of 10 sessions, and as a group the participants showed high adherence to intervention activities (93% turned in daily logs, and 80% self-monitored glucose levels at least daily). There was an overall Group x Time interaction (p = .02) indicating group differences in glycosylated hemoglobin over time. The estimated glycosylated hemoglobin decrease at 3 months for the intervention group was -0.8% (95% confidence intervals = -1.1%, -0

  11. Diagnostic utility of the HIV dementia scale and the international HIV dementia scale in screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders among Spanish-speaking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Enrique; Steiner, Alexander J; Smith, Kimberly; Thaler, Nicholas S; Hardy, David J; Levine, Andrew J; Al-Kharafi, Hussah T; Yamakawa, Cristina; Goodkin, Karl

    2016-08-15

    Given that neurocognitive impairment is a frequent complication of HIV-1 infection in Spanish-speaking adults, the limited number of studies assessing HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in this population raises serious clinical concern. In addition to being appropriately translated, instruments need to be modified, normed, and validated accordingly. The purpose of the current study was to examine the diagnostic utility of the HIV Dementia Scale (HDS) and International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults living with HIV infection. Participants were classified as either HAND (N = 47) or No-HAND (N = 53) after completing a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic analyses found the HDS (AUC = .706) was more sensitive to detecting HAND than the IHDS (AUC = .600). Optimal cutoff scores were 9.5 for the HDS (PPV = 65.2%, NPV = 71.4%) and 9.0 for the IHDS (PPV = 59.4%, NPV = 59.1%). Canonical Correlation Analysis found the HDS converged with attention and executive functioning. Findings suggest that while the IHDS may not be an appropriate screening instrument with this population, the HDS retains sufficient statistical validity and clinical utility to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults as a time-efficient and cost-effective measure in clinical settings with limited resources.

  12. Level of education and category fluency task among Spanish speaking elders: number of words, clustering, and switching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, Monica; Tappen, Ruth; Williams, Christine; Salvatierra, Judy; Zoller, Yaron

    2009-11-01

    It has been well documented that education influences the individual's performance on category fluency tasks but it is still unclear how this effect may differ across the different types of category tasks (i.e., animals, fruits, vegetables and clothing). This study aims (1) to analyze the effect of the level of education on four different types of category fluency tasks among elder Hispanic Americans and (2) to provide normative information on a population with different education levels that was previously screened for neurological and psychiatric conditions. In addition this study examines the semantic strategies used by these individuals to complete the fluency tasks. The sample included 105 healthy Hispanic individuals (age 55-98; 29 males and 76 females) divided into three education groups (11 years of education). Results showed that after controlling for age and gender, education has a main effect and is a strong predictor of performance in verbal fluency for the categories animals and clothing with increasing educational attainment being associated with higher category fluency scores and with more switches between categories. These findings suggest that the category fruit is less influenced by level of education than the other three semantic categories and may be a more appropriate test across different educational groups. Results from this study provide a reference for clinicians assessing verbal fluency in Spanish speaking populations.

  13. A Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 among English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a significant problem for ethnic minorities that remains understudied partly due to a lack of strong measures with established psychometric properties. One screening tool, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), which was developed for use in primary care has also gained popularity in research settings. The reliability and validity of the PHQ-9 has been well established among predominantly Caucasian samples, in addition to many minority groups. However, there is little evidence regarding its utility among Hispanic Americans, a large and growing cultural group in the United States. In this study, we investigated the reliability and structural validity of the PHQ-9 in Hispanic American women. A community sample of 479 Latina women from southern California completed the PHQ-9 in their preferred language of English or Spanish. Cronbach’s alphas suggested that there was good internal consistency for both the English- and Spanish-language versions. Structural validity was investigated using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results support a similar one-factor structure with equivalent response patterns and variances among English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas. These results suggest that the PHQ-9 can be used with confidence in both English and Spanish versions to screen Latinas for depression. PMID:21787063

  14. Mediating Literacy Skills in Spanish-Speaking Children With Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Clellen, Vera F

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to: (a) describe sources of variability in reading and spelling performance of children learning English as a second language, with a specific emphasis on Spanish-speaking children; (b) encourage teachers and clinicians to consider these differences when developing intervention plans; and (c) suggest specific intervention procedures that might facilitate development of reading and spelling skills of Spanish-speaking children with language difficulties and limited English proficiency. An integrated approach to intervention is highlighted that addresses reading and spelling as reciprocal processes. Implementation of this approach is presented using various contexts for learning and strategies specific to developing second-language reading and writing skills.

  15. Examining the Relationship between Emergent Literacy Skills and Invented Spelling in Prekindergarten Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Meghan; Bingham, Gary; Patton-Terry, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine associations among English and Spanish emergent literacy skills of prekindergarten (pre-K) Spanish-speaking dual language learners in relation to their English invented spelling. Study participants included 141 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs in a large…

  16. Emerging Temporality: Past Tense and Temporal/Aspectual Markers in Spanish-Speaking Children's Intra-Conversational Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccelli, Paola

    2009-01-01

    This study describes how young Spanish-speaking children become gradually more adept at encoding temporality using grammar and discourse skills in intra-conversational narratives. The research involved parallel case studies of two Spanish-speaking children followed longitudinally from ages two to three. Type/token frequencies of verb tense,…

  17. Emerging Temporality: Past Tense and Temporal/Aspectual Markers in Spanish-Speaking Children's Intra-Conversational Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccelli, Paola

    2009-01-01

    This study describes how young Spanish-speaking children become gradually more adept at encoding temporality using grammar and discourse skills in intra-conversational narratives. The research involved parallel case studies of two Spanish-speaking children followed longitudinally from ages two to three. Type/token frequencies of verb tense,…

  18. Morphological Awareness in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Within and Cross-Language Effects on Word Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gloria; Chen, Xi; Geva, Esther; Kiefer, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated within and cross-language effects of morphological awareness on word reading among Spanish-speaking children who were English Language Learners. Participants were 97 Spanish-speaking children in grade 4 and grade 7. Morphological awareness in Spanish and in English was evaluated with two measures of derivational morphology.…

  19. Examining the Relationship between Emergent Literacy Skills and Invented Spelling in Prekindergarten Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Meghan; Bingham, Gary; Patton-Terry, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine associations among English and Spanish emergent literacy skills of prekindergarten (pre-K) Spanish-speaking dual language learners in relation to their English invented spelling. Study participants included 141 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs in a large…

  20. Self-Esteem in the Adaptation of Spanish-Speaking Adolescents: The Role of Immigration, Family Conflict, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portes, Pedro R.; Zady, Madelon F.

    2002-01-01

    Self-esteem variations were studied among 2,600 Spanish-speaking adolescents who were immigrants or children of immigrants and attended grade 8 or 9 in 42 Florida and San Diego (California) schools. Five Spanish-speaking subgroups had different acculturation patterns. Depression, parent-child conflict, discrimination, and school achievement and…

  1. Development of Vocabulary in Spanish-Speaking and Cantonese-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko

    2014-01-01

    This study examines vocabulary growth rates in first and second languages for Spanish-speaking and Cantonese-speaking English language learners from kindergarten through second grade. Growth-modeling results show a within-language effect of concepts about print on vocabulary. Language exposure also had an effect on English vocabulary: earlier…

  2. Predictors of Reading Comprehension for Struggling Readers: The Case of Spanish Speaking Language Minority Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Martinez, Jeannette; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the process of English reading comprehension at age 11 years for 173 low-achieving Spanish-speaking children. The influence of growth rates, from early childhood (age 4.5 years) to pre-adolescence (age 11 years), in vocabulary and word reading skills on this complex process were evaluated with structural equation…

  3. Early Indicators of Later English Reading Comprehension Outcomes among Children from Spanish-Speaking Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Martinez, Jeannette; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2017-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between primary grade (K-2) Spanish and English language- and word-based skills and later English reading comprehension (RC) outcomes (Grades 5 and 8) among children (n = 148) from immigrant, Spanish-speaking, low-income homes in English instructional contexts since kindergarten entry. As…

  4. Predicting English Word Reading Skills for Spanish-Speaking Students in First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Mariela; Rinaldi, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the word reading skills in English and Spanish for a sample of 244 Spanish-speaking, English-learning (hence, bilingual) students in first grade and presents a predictive model for English word reading skills. The children in the study were assessed at the end of kindergarten and first grade, respectively. Data were gathered…

  5. Preschool Matters: Predicting Reading Difficulties for Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Students in First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Claudia; Paez, Mariela

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal analysis of factors that predict the word reading skills in English and Spanish for a sample of 234 Spanish-speaking students in first grade. The children were assessed at the end of preschool, kindergarten, and first grade. Data include three subtests of the Woodcock Language Proficiency Battery and a…

  6. English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Domestic Violence Perpetrators: An MMPI-2 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ronald L.; Flowers, John V.; Bulnes, Alejandro; Olmsted, Eileen; Carbajal-Madrid, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The use of assessments to characterize domestic violence perpetrators continues to develop with an emphasis on increasing the effectiveness of domestic violence interventions. The present study examines and compares Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2 responses from 41 English-speaking and 48 Spanish-speaking men who were in…

  7. Relations between Early Reading and Writing Skills among Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. Marc; Farrington, Amber L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature on the development of reading skills of Spanish-speaking language minority children, little research has focused on the development of writing skills in this population. This study evaluated whether children's Spanish early reading skills (i.e., print knowledge, phonological awareness, oral language)…

  8. Relations between Early Reading and Writing Skills among Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. Marc; Farrington, Amber L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature on the development of reading skills of Spanish-speaking language minority children, little research has focused on the development of writing skills in this population. This study evaluated whether children's Spanish early reading skills (i.e., print knowledge, phonological awareness, oral language)…

  9. Development and Transfer of Vocabulary Knowledge in Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. Marc; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Kleuver, Cherie G.; Farver, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the predictive validity of conceptual scoring. Two independent samples of Spanish-speaking language minority preschoolers (Sample 1: N = 96, mean age = 54.51 months, 54.3% male; Sample 2: N = 116, mean age = 60·70 months, 56.0% male) completed measures of receptive, expressive, and definitional vocabulary in their first…

  10. "La CLAve" to Increase Psychosis Literacy of Spanish-Speaking Community Residents and Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven R.; Lara, Ma. Del Carmen; Kopelowicz, Alex; Solano, Susana; Foncerrada, Hector; Aguilera, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed and tested a 35-min psychoeducational program with the goal of increasing Spanish-speaking persons' literacy of psychosis. The program uses popular cultural icons derived from music, art, and videos, as well as a mnemonic device--La CLAve (The Clue)--to increase (a) knowledge of psychosis, (b) efficacy beliefs that one can…

  11. Using Narrative Language Intervention as a Tool To Increase Communicative Competence in Spanish-Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbrodt, Lisa; Kerins, Marie; Gesell, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Twelve Spanish-speaking school-aged children participated in an 8-week pretest/posttest design investigation targeting improvement of their communicative competence through a narrative intervention program. Also examined the efficacy of providing an intervention in the children's native language. Findings revealed that use of a narrative…

  12. A Five Week Alcoholism Ethnography Conducted in Three Spanish Speaking Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M. Jean

    As part of a study of the cultural and societal factors influencing alcohol use and abuse and variations in drinking patterns among California's Spanish speaking population, ethnographic research was conducted in three separate communities. In this paper, the design and methodology (including participant observation), and some of the results of…

  13. Exploring Algebra Based Problem Solving Methods and Strategies of Spanish-Speaking High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes differences found in Spanish-speaking middle school and high school students in algebra-based problem solving. It identifies the accuracy differences between word problems presented in English, Spanish and numerically based problems. The study also explores accuracy differences between each subgroup of Spanish-speaking…

  14. Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' Experiences in High School Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Annette; Smith, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences of Spanish-speaking English language learners in high school chemistry courses, focusing largely on experiences in learning the English language, experiences learning chemistry, and experiences learning chemistry in the English language. The findings illustrate the cognitive processes the students undertake…

  15. Auditory Discrimination and Reading Achievement of Puerto Rican Spanish-Speaking First-Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Judith Ann

    The focus of this study is on the possible effects of phonological interference on the reading achievement of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rican first graders. Specifically, the study explored the relationship between standard English auditory discrimination and first-grade reading achievement. Subjects for the study were 32 female and 20 male students…

  16. Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' Experiences in High School Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Annette; Smith, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences of Spanish-speaking English language learners in high school chemistry courses, focusing largely on experiences in learning the English language, experiences learning chemistry, and experiences learning chemistry in the English language. The findings illustrate the cognitive processes the students undertake…

  17. Morphological Awareness and Reading Difficulties in Adolescent Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Learners and Their Classmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of morphological awareness weaknesses in the reading difficulties encountered by Spanish-speaking language minority learners and their native English-speaking peers in sixth grade. One hundred and thirty-eight students (82 language minority learners; 56 native English speakers) were assessed on English measures of…

  18. Causal Coherence in the Oral Narratives of Spanish-Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Clellen, Vera F.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1992-01-01

    Forty-six Spanish-speaking children ages four, six, or eight years viewed a short silent film and told what happened in the film. The stories of older children included more narrative actions, more mental state/goal causes, more three-clause causal sequences, and a lower proportion of unrelated statements than those of younger children.…

  19. The Development and Treatment of Phonological Processes in Spanish Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brian; Iglesias, Aquiles

    The Assessment of Phonological Disabilities measure was administered to 39 normally developing children and 10 speech-delayed children who were Spanish speaking, of Puerto Rican descent, and ranging in age from 3 to 4. Data were analyzed by comparing phonological processes against the "standard referent" and the "Puerto Rican referent." The…

  20. Phonological Patterns in Puerto Rican Spanish-Speaking Children with Phonological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brian A.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the speech of 54 young Spanish-speaking (Puerto Rican dialect) children with phonological disorders. It described the mean percentage-of-occurrence and standard deviation of phonological processes and the number and type of nontargeted process errors. Specific patterns characterizing the speech of these children were…

  1. Spanish-Speaking Parent-Child Emotional Narratives and Children's Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Diana; Berrocal, Monica; Nolivos, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether parents' content and style when discussing past positive and negative emotional experiences with their children were concurrently and predictively linked to prekindergarteners' social skills. Sixty-five low-income Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads discussed a past positive and negative emotional experience at the beginning of…

  2. Reading Resources and Project LEER. Libraries and the Spanish-Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Marietta Daniels

    1970-01-01

    A discussion of the problems U.S. librarians and educators face in dealing with Spanish-speaking children and adults; and a description of Project LEER, a program to aid school and public libraries in the selection, procurement, and processing of books in Spanish. (JB)

  3. A Core Collection of Print Material for Libraries Serving the Spanish-Speaking of the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    REFORMA, Tucson, AZ.

    This booklist prepared by the Arizona chapter of REFORMA, an organization established to promote better library services and programs for the Spanish speaking population of the southwest, presents a representative sample of printed materials dealing with literature and language, traditions and customs, history and heritage, the arts, and applied…

  4. Survey of Native English Speakers and Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners in Tertiary Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Wagler, Amy E.; Esquinca, Alberto; Valenzuela, M. Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    The framework of linguistic register and case study research on Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) learning statistics informed the construction of a quantitative instrument, the Communication, Language, And Statistics Survey (CLASS). CLASS aims to assess whether ELLs and non-ELLs approach the learning of statistics differently with…

  5. Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' Experiences in High School Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Annette; Smith, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences of Spanish-speaking English language learners in high school chemistry courses, focusing largely on experiences in learning the English language, experiences learning chemistry, and experiences learning chemistry in the English language. The findings illustrate the cognitive processes the students undertake…

  6. Morphological Awareness and Reading Difficulties in Adolescent Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Learners and Their Classmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of morphological awareness weaknesses in the reading difficulties encountered by Spanish-speaking language minority learners and their native English-speaking peers in sixth grade. One hundred and thirty-eight students (82 language minority learners; 56 native English speakers) were assessed on English measures of…

  7. A Core Collection of Print Material for Libraries Serving the Spanish-Speaking of the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    REFORMA, Tucson, AZ.

    This booklist prepared by the Arizona chapter of REFORMA, an organization established to promote better library services and programs for the Spanish speaking population of the southwest, presents a representative sample of printed materials dealing with literature and language, traditions and customs, history and heritage, the arts, and applied…

  8. Classification Accuracy of Nonword Repetition when Used with Preschool-Age Spanish-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark; Rodriguez, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to (a) describe and compare the nonword repetition (NWR) performance of preschool-age Spanish-speaking children (3- to 5-year-olds) with and without language impairment (LI) across 2 scoring approaches and (b) to contrast the classification accuracy of a Spanish NWR task when item-level and percentage…

  9. Validity of a Parent-Report Measure of Vocabulary and Grammar for Spanish-Speaking Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Donna; Jackson-Maldonado, Donna; Acosta, Dora

    2000-01-01

    The validity of the Fundacion MacArthur Inventaria de Habilidades Communicativas: Palabras y Enuciados was examined with twenty 20- and nineteen 28-month-old, typically developing, monolingual, Spanish-speaking children in Mexico. Results indicated validity for assessing expressive vocabulary in 20-month-olds and expressive vocabulary and grammar…

  10. An Exploration of Oral Language Development in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Renee A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multi-case study was to explore the oral language of Spanish-speaking preschool students and their responses to questions, comments and requests made by an English-speaking teacher. Research questions focused on students' responses to questions; comments and requests by the teacher; and whether the response was…

  11. Survey of Native English Speakers and Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners in Tertiary Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Wagler, Amy E.; Esquinca, Alberto; Valenzuela, M. Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    The framework of linguistic register and case study research on Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) learning statistics informed the construction of a quantitative instrument, the Communication, Language, And Statistics Survey (CLASS). CLASS aims to assess whether ELLs and non-ELLs approach the learning of statistics differently with…

  12. Development of a Language Impairment Screener for Spanish Speaking Children--SSLIC: Phase 1--Task Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, M. Adelaida; Gorin, Joanna S.; Gray, Shelley; Morgan, Gareth P.; Barona, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a Spanish language screening measure that (a) is valid and reliable for the purpose of identifying Spanish-speaking (SS) children at risk for Language Impairment (LI), (b) is valid and reliable across different Spanish dialects, different socioeconomic groups, and different ethnicities, (c) uses a…

  13. Teaching Numeric Concepts to Spanish-Speaking Second Graders: English or Spanish Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Elenor Rubin

    Seventeen Spanish-speaking children received mathematics instruction in either Spanish or English. Numeric concepts were chosen as the content area so that the results could be understood non-verbally at the outset, the teachers ranked the children's abilities in English and math, and no significant difference between groups was found. However,…

  14. Development of Vocabulary in Spanish-Speaking and Cantonese-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko

    2014-01-01

    This study examines vocabulary growth rates in first and second languages for Spanish-speaking and Cantonese-speaking English language learners from kindergarten through second grade. Growth-modeling results show a within-language effect of concepts about print on vocabulary. Language exposure also had an effect on English vocabulary: earlier…

  15. An Exploration of Oral Language Development in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Renee A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multi-case study was to explore the oral language of Spanish-speaking preschool students and their responses to questions, comments and requests made by an English-speaking teacher. Research questions focused on students' responses to questions; comments and requests by the teacher; and whether the response was…

  16. Accuracy of Telehealth-Administered Measures to Screen Language in Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark; Rodríguez, Barbara L; Zajacova, Anna

    2015-09-01

    There is a critical need for telehealth language screening measures for use with Spanish-speaking children because of the shortage of bilingual providers and the current lack of psychometrically sound measures that can be administered via telehealth. The purpose of the current study was to describe the classification accuracy of individual telehealth language screening measures as well as the accuracy of combinations of measures used with Spanish-speaking preschoolers from rural and underserved areas of the country. This study applied a hybrid telehealth approach that implemented synchronous videoconferencing, videocasting, and traditional pen and paper measures. Screening measures included a processing efficiency measure (Spanish nonword repetition [NWR]), language sampling, and a developmental language questionnaire. Eighty-two mostly Spanish-speaking preschool-age children and their parents participated. Thirty-four children had language impairment (LI), and 48 had typical language development. Although many of the individual measures were significantly associated with standardized language scores (r=0.27-0.55), not one of the measures had classification values of 0.8 or higher, which is recommended when screening for LI. However, when NWR scores were combined with language sample or parent survey measures, promising classification accuracy values that approached or were higher than 0.8 were obtained. This research provides preliminary evidence showing the effectiveness of a hybrid telehealth model in screening the language development of Spanish-speaking children. A processing efficiency measure, NWR, combined with a parent survey or language sample measure can provide informative and accurate diagnostic information when screening Spanish-speaking preschool-age children for LI.

  17. Measuring Early Communication in Spanish Speaking Children: The Communication Complexity Scale in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Erin; Brady, Nancy C.; Esplund, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a great need in the United States to develop presymbolic evaluation tools that are widely available and accurate for individuals that come from a bilingual and/or multicultural setting. The Communication Complexity Scale (CCS) is a measure that evaluates expressive presymbolic communication including gestures, vocalizations and eye gaze. Studying the effectiveness of this tool in a Spanish speaking environment was undertaken to determine the applicability of the CCS with Spanish speaking children. Methods & Procedures: In 2011–2012, researchers from the University of Kansas and Centro Ann Sullivan del Perú (CASP) investigated communication in a cohort of 71 young Spanish speaking children with developmental disabilities and a documented history of self-injurious, stereotyped and aggressive behaviors. Communication was assessed first by parental report with translated versions of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales (CSBS), a well-known assessment of early communication, and then eleven months later with the CCS. Hypothesis We hypothesized that the CCS and the CSBS measures would be significantly correlated in this population of Spanish speaking children. Outcomes & Results The CSBS scores from time 1 with a mean participant age of 41 months were determined to have a strong positive relationship to the CCS scores obtained at time 2 with a mean participant age of 52 months. Conclusions & Implications The CCS is strongly correlated to a widely accepted measure of early communication. These findings support the validity of the Spanish version of the CCS and demonstrate its usefulness for children from another culture and for children in a Spanish speaking environment. PMID:26636094

  18. Impact of Spanish-language information sessions on Spanish-speaking patients seeking bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Allison N; Marino, Miguel; Killerby, Marie; Rosselli-Risal, Liliana; Isom, Kellene A; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2017-06-01

    Bariatric centers frequently provide preoperative educational programs to inform patients about the risks and benefits of weight loss surgery. However, most programs are conducted in English, which may create barriers to effective treatment and access to care for non-English speaking populations. To address this concern, we instituted a comprehensive Spanish-language education program consisting of preoperative information and group nutrition classes conducted entirely in, and supported with Spanish-language materials. The primary aim was to examine the effect of this intervention on Spanish-speaking patients' decision to undergo surgery in a pilot study. University Hospital/Community Health Center, United States. Three cohorts of patients seeking bariatric surgery between January 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012 were identified: 1) primary English speakers attending English-language programs ("English-English"); 2) primary Spanish speakers attending Spanish-language programs ("Spanish-Spanish"); and 3) primary Spanish speakers attending English-speaking programs with the assistance of a Spanish-to-English translator ("Spanish-English"). 26% of the English-English cohort ultimately underwent surgery compared with only 12% of the Spanish-Spanish cohort (P = .009). Compared with the English-English group, time to surgery was 35 days longer for the Spanish-Spanish and 185 days longer for the Spanish-English group (both Pspeaking patients were less likely to undergo bariatric surgery regardless of the language in which educational sessions are provided. For those choosing surgery, providing Spanish-language sessions can shorten time to surgery. A barrier to effective obesity treatment may exist for Spanish speakers, which may be only partially overcome by providing support in Spanish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The effects of language concordant care on patient satisfaction and clinical understanding for Hispanic pediatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Jonathan L; Jaramillo, Joshua D; Koppolu, Raji; Wright, Robert; Mendoza, Fernando; Bruzoni, Matias

    2015-09-01

    Hispanics account for over 60% of the U.S. population growth and 25% speak little-to-no English. This language barrier adversely affects both access to and quality of care. Surgical specialties trail other medical fields in assessing the effects of language barriers to surgical clinical care and patient satisfaction. This study was designed to assess the effects of patient-provider language concordance on a pediatric surgery practice. A surgery-specific, 7-point Likert scale questionnaire was designed with 14 questions modeled after validated patient satisfaction surveys from the literature. Questions concerning provider-patient language concordance, quality of understanding, and general satisfaction were included. Surveys were administered to families of patients in the General Pediatric Surgery Clinic at our institution. Families were categorized into three groups: English-speaking, regardless of race/ethnicity; Spanish-speaking using interpreter services with an English-speaking medical team; and Spanish-speaking communicating directly with a Spanish-speaking medical team (Hispanic Center for Pediatric Surgery, HCPS). One-way analysis of variance was used to test for group differences. We administered 226 surveys; 49 were removed due to lack literacy proficiency. Families in the HCPS group reported a higher level of satisfaction than the interpreter and English groups (ppediatric surgery clinic, language concordant care improves patient satisfaction and understanding for Hispanic families in comparison to language discordant care. Other clinics in other surgery sub-specialties may consider using this model to eliminate language barriers and improve patient satisfaction and understanding of surgical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Latinas: Hispanic Women in the United States. The Hispanic Experience in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Hedda

    The term "Latinas" encompasses many different groups of women. Despite the disparities among the cultures of their countries of origin, Spanish-speaking peoples have been lumped as "Hispanics," and later "Latinos," in the United States. The Latino group is rapidly becoming the largest minority population in the United…

  1. Health Care Disparities Among English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Women With Pelvic Organ Prolapse at Public and Private Hospitals: What Are the Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Alexandriah N; Dunivan, Gena C; Wieslander, Cecelia K; Sevilla, Claudia; Barrera, Biatris; Rashid, Rezoana; Maliski, Sally; Eilber, Karen; Rogers, Rebecca G; Anger, Jennifer Tash

    The objective of this study was to compare perceptions and barriers between Spanish-speaking and English-speaking women in public and private hospitals being treated for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Eight focus groups, 4 in English and 4 in Spanish, were conducted at 3 institutions with care in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. Standardized questions were asked regarding patients' emotions to when they initially noticed the POP, if they sought family support, and their response to the diagnosis and treatment. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory qualitative methods. Thirty-three women were Spanish-speaking and 25 were English-speaking. Spanish speakers were younger (P = 0.0469) and less likely to have a high school diploma (P speaking women had more concerns that the bulge or treatments could lead to cancer, were more resistant to treatment options, and were less likely to be offered surgery. Women in the private hospital desired more information, were less embarrassed, and were more likely to be offered surgery as first-line treatment. The concept emerged that patient care for POP varied based on socioeconomic status and language and suggested the presence of disparities in care for underserved women with POP. The discrepancies in care for Spanish-speaking women and women being treated at public hospitals suggest that there are disparities in care for POP treatment for underserved women. These differences may be secondary to profit-driven pressures from private hospitals or language barriers, low socioeconomic status, low health literacy, and barriers to health care.

  2. Emerging temporality: past tense and temporal/aspectual markers in Spanish-speaking children's intra-conversational narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Uccelli, Paola

    2009-01-01

    This study describes how young Spanish-speaking children become gradually more adept at encoding temporality using grammar and discourse skills in intra-conversational narratives. The research involved parallel case studies of two Spanish-speaking children followed longitudinally from ages two to three. Type/token frequencies of verb tense, temporal/aspectual markers and narrative components were analyzed to explore interrelationships among grammatical and discourse skills. Children progresse...

  3. Language Ideologies and Hegemonic Factors Imposed upon Judeo-Spanish Speaking Communities

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the concept of hemispheric intersection by analyzing language ideologies that have shaped the linguistic construct of the Judeo-Spanish language. Given the abundance of languages that have influenced the overall linguistic strata of Judeo-Spanish over the past five centuries, the primary questions of this study are: (1) what are the hegemonic factors that have been imposed on Judeo-Spanish speaking communities and (2) how are such factors representative of linguistic chang...

  4. 911 (nueve once): Spanish-speaking parents' perspectives on prehospital emergency care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer; Cowden, John D; Cupertino, A Paula; Dowd, M Denise; Kennedy, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Racial, ethnic and language-based disparities occur throughout the US health system. Pediatric prehospital emergency medical services are less likely to be used by Latinos. We identified perceptions of and barriers to prehospital pediatric emergency care (911) access among Spanish-speaking parents. A qualitative study involving six focus groups was conducted. Spanish-speaking parents participated with a bilingual moderator. Topics discussed included experiences, knowledge, beliefs, fears, barriers, and improvement strategies. All groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and reviewed for recurring themes. Forty-nine parents participated. Though parents believed 911 was available to all, many were uncertain how to use it, and what qualified as an emergency. Barriers included language discordance, fear of exposing immigration status, and fear of financial consequences. Parents strongly desired to learn more about 911 through classes, brochures, and media campaigns. Prehospital emergency care should be available to all children. Further quantitative studies may help solidify the identified barriers and uncover areas needing improvement within Emergency Medical Systems. Addressing barriers to 911 use in Spanish-speaking communities could improve the equity of health care delivery, while also decreasing the amount of non-emergency 911 use.

  5. Is there a cognate advantage for typically developing Spanish-speaking English-language learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Alaina; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2012-04-01

    Cross-linguistic cognates are words that share form and meaning in two languages (e.g., helicopter-helicóptero); translation equivalents are words that share meaning but not form (e.g., house-casa). Research consistently demonstrates a performance speed and/or accuracy advantage for processing cognates versus noncognates in bilingual adults; studies with children are limited, with equivocal results. We investigated the potential for a cognate advantage for processing expressive and receptive vocabulary in the spoken (vs. written) modality in typically developing Spanish-speaking English-language learners (ELLs). Thirty 8- to 13-year-old native Spanish-speaking children learning English as their second language completed standardized vocabulary tests in spoken English. Each test item was classified as a cognate or noncognate based on phonological overlap with its Spanish translation. Group and individual analyses were used to examine the effects of cognates. At the group level, children's test scores were higher for items that were classified as cognates as compared to noncognates of comparable difficulty. However, not all children demonstrated this cognate advantage. Age predicted significant amounts of variance in cognate performance on the receptive test. Overall, typically developing Spanish-speaking school-age ELL students demonstrated a cognate advantage. There was also considerable within-group variation in performance. Clinical implications are discussed, and directions for future study are provided.

  6. An Automated Telephone Nutrition Support System for Spanish-Speaking Patients With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Pamela J.; Gonzales, Elizabeth N.; Villagran-Flores, Mariana; Thomson, Joan; Bayard, Paul; Palos Lucio, Ana Gabriela; Schillinger, Dean; Bertozzi, Stefano; Gonzales, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes often receive inadequate dietary counseling. Providing language and culture-concordant dietary counseling on an ongoing basis is critical to diabetes self-care. To determine if automated telephone nutrition support (ATNS) counseling could help patients improve glycemic control by duplicating a successful pilot in Mexico in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland, California. A prospective randomized open-label trial with blinded endpoint assessment (PROBE) was performed. The participants were seventy-five adult patients with diabetes receiving care at a federally qualified health center in Oakland, California. ATNS, a computerized system that dialed patients on their phones, prompted them in Spanish to enter (via keypad) portions consumed in the prior 24 hours of various cultural-specific dietary items, and then provided dietary feedback based on proportion of high versus low glycemic index foods consumed. The control group received the same ATNS phone calls 14 weeks after enrollment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c % (A1c) 12 weeks following enrollment. Participants had no significant improvement in A1c (–0.3% in the control arm, –0.1% in the intervention arm, P = .41 for any difference) or any secondary parameters. In our study, an ATNS system did not improve diabetes control in a Spanish-speaking population in Oakland. PMID:25239122

  7. Neuropsychological test scores, academic performance, and developmental disorders in Spanish-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, M; Ardila, A; Bateman, J R; Guzmán, M

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is currently available about performance of Spanish-speaking children on different neuropsychological tests. This study was designed to (a) analyze the effects of age and sex on different neuropsychological test scores of a randomly selected sample of Spanish-speaking children, (b) analyze the value of neuropsychological test scores for predicting school performance, and (c) describe the neuropsychological profile of Spanish-speaking children with learning disabilities (LD). Two hundred ninety (141 boys, 149 girls) 6- to 11-year-old children were selected from a school in Bogotá, Colombia. Three age groups were distinguished: 6- to 7-, 8- to 9-, and 10- to 11-year-olds. Performance was measured utilizing the following neuropsychological tests: Seashore Rhythm Test, Finger Tapping Test (FTT), Grooved Pegboard Test, Children's Category Test (CCT), California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version (CVLT-C), Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), and Bateria Woodcock Psicoeducativa en Español (Woodcock, 1982). Normative scores were calculated. Age effect was significant for most of the test scores. A significant sex effect was observed for 3 test scores. Intercorrelations were performed between neuropsychological test scores and academic areas (science, mathematics, Spanish, social studies, and music). In a post hoc analysis, children presenting very low scores on the reading, writing, and arithmetic achievement scales of the Woodcock battery were identified in the sample, and their neuropsychological test scores were compared with a matched normal group. Finally, a comparison was made between Colombian and American norms.

  8. Women's Understanding of the Term 'Pap smear': A Comparison of Spanish-Speaking Versus English-Speaking Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David L; Soulli, Beth; Johnson, Nicole; Cooper, Saladin

    2016-11-01

    Objective To compare the understanding of the term 'Pap smear' among Spanish-speaking women, as compared to their English-speaking counterparts. Methods Surveys were distributed to English and Spanish speaking female patients in an urban Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic. Patients were at least 18 years old or they were less than 18 years old and pregnant. Results A majority of participants (77.3 % English-speaking vs. 74.1 % Spanish-speaking, respectively) were able to identify at least one correct descriptor for the term Pap smear. However, Spanish-speaking women were significantly less likely to choose incorrect descriptors. Spanish-speaking women were much less likely to say that a Pap smear was the same as a Pelvic exam (45.7 vs. 78.8 %; p = 0.001), or a test for a sexually transmitted disease (25 vs. 60.6 %; p = 0.001). Conclusions for Practice Compared to English-speaking women, Spanish-speaking women are much less likely to conflate a pelvic exam with a Pap smear. Overall understanding was suboptimal, regardless of primary language, indicating that major efforts are still needed to improve functional health literacy with respect to cervical cancer screening.

  9. Hispanic Children's/Juvenile Literature: A Selection for Spanish Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Funes, Marcela

    A significant number of Hispanic children's books and juvenile short stories and novels produced in the last two decades reveal the social and cultural elements that affect the lives, traditions, and beliefs of young adults from Spanish-speaking countries. These books contain sociocultural realism, yet with a touch of the innocence and freshness…

  10. Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2009-12-01

    To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.

  11. C-C3-02: Developing a Culturally Appropriate Weight-Loss Intervention Program for Spanish-Speaking Mexican-American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Nangel; Stevens, Victor; Calderon, Mariana Rosales; Cervantes, Mayan; Gullion, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Background In the USA, 77% of Hispanic women age 20 and older are classified as overweight or obese. There is evidence that Hispanics tend to be less successful than non-Hispanic whites in standard weight-loss interventions. This study assessed the feasibility of a culturally-tailored behavioral weight-loss intervention specifically designed for Spanish-speaking women of Mexican origin. Methods This 6-month intervention consisting of weekly sessions was based on approaches previously used successfully with English-speaking participants in the PREMIER and Weight Loss Maintenance trials. Cultural adaptations were implemented throughout the program based on information derived from focus groups, available literature, and a multidisciplinary team that included Mexican experts in behavioral interventions and nutritional anthropology. The intervention was conducted entirely in Spanish. Beyond language, specific cultural adaptations included: “Grupos de mujeres” (“women-only” groups) of a wide range of age—covering topics central to the immigration experience (e.g., the loss of social networks, differing body-shape ideals in Mexican and American cultures, and the pressure of maintaining Mexican traditions while adopting “American ways”). Focusing on staple foods in the Mexican diet: returning to a traditional diet, how to make healthy choices. Providing basic instruction on nutrition, and hands-on training on standard food measurement for portion control. Addressing Mexican folk remedies and traditional beliefs regarding food and diet (e.g. “hot” and “cold” foods, “empacho,” etc.). Developing food-intake journals for people of limited literacy. Results The recruitment strategies used resulted in a significantly larger-than-expected response. There were 47 participants in the study. Thirty-one participants completed the intervention and had main outcome data available. Participants did not complete the intervention because they became pregnant (2

  12. Perceptions of general environmental problems, willingness to expend federal funds on these problems, and concerns regarding the Los Alamos National Laboratory: Hispanics are more concerned than Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Myers, O; Boring, C S; Dixon, C; Lord, C; Ramos, R; Shukla, S; Gochfeld, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Perceptions about general environmental problems, governmental spending for these problems, and major concerns about the US Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were examined by interviewing 356 people attending a gun show in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis that there are differences in these three areas as a function of ethnicity was examined. We predicted that if differences existed, they would exist for all three evaluations (general environmental problems, government spending, and environmental concerns about LANL). However, this was not the case; there were fewer ethnic differences concerning LANL. Hispanics rated most general environmental problems higher than Whites and rated their willingness to expend federal funds higher than Whites, although all groups gave a lower score on willingness than on concern. Further, the congruence between these two types of ratings was higher for Hispanics than for others. In general, the concerns expressed by subjects about LANL showed few ethnic differences, and everyone was most concerned about contamination. These data indicate that Hispanics attending a gun show are equally or more concerned than others about environmental problems generally but are not more concerned about LANL. The data can be useful for developing future research and stewardship plans and for understanding general environmental problems and their relationship to concerns about LANL. More generally, they indicate that the attitudes and perceptions of Hispanics deserve increased study in a general population.

  13. Preparedness of small animal veterinary practices to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited proficiency in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the preparedness of small animal veterinary personnel to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited English-language proficiency (LEP). Cross-sectional telephone survey. Data from 383 small animal veterinary practices. Telephone surveys were conducted with veterinarians and office or practice managers from a random sample of US small animal veterinary practices in 10 states to estimate the number of Spanish-speaking pet owners with LEP visiting these practices, proportion of practices that used services to facilitate communication with Spanish-speaking clients with LEP, and degree of veterinarian satisfaction with their communication with those clients. Responses were obtained from 383 of 1,245 (31%) eligible practices, of which 340 (89%) had Spanish-speaking clients with LEP and 200 (52%) had such clients on a weekly basis. Eight percent of practices had veterinary personnel who were conversant or fluent in spoken Spanish. Veterinarians who depended on clients' friends or family to translate were significantly less satisfied with client communication than were those who could converse in Spanish with clients directly. Availability of Spanish-speaking staff and offering of Spanish-language resources were associated with an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking clients with LEP seen on a weekly basis. Industry- and practice-generated Spanish-language materials were offered at 32% (124/383) and 21% (81/383) of practices, respectively; 329 (86%) practices had no Spanish-language marketing. Opportunities were identified for improving communication with pet owners with LEP in the veterinary clinical setting, which could ultimately positively impact patient well-being and client compliance.

  14. Barriers and successful strategies to antiretroviral adherence among HIV-infected monolingual Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D A; Roberts, K Johnston; Hoffman, D; Molina, A; Lu, M C

    2003-04-01

    Focus groups were conducted with HIV-infected, monolingual Spanish-speaking patients (N = 81) taking antiretrovirals in order to: (1) determine what barriers impede medication adherence; (2) determine what strategies facilitate adherence; and (3) investigate the health care provider-patient relationship and whether it impacts adherence. Both quantitative and qualitative information was gathered. Participants were prescribed an average of 11 pills per day (M = 11.4, SD = 7.0, range = 1-30). Only 32% of participants were consistently adherent when self-report of medication taking (yesterday, the day before yesterday, and last Saturday) was compared to prescribed regimen. The most frequently reported strategies were: learning more about the medications (77%), accepting the need to take them (75%) and refilling prescriptions early or on time (70%). Barriers most often reported were: feeling depressed or overwhelmed (21%), simply forgetting (19%) and sleeping through a dose (17%). From the qualitative data, four main issues emerged: patient characteristics, the health care professional-patient relationship, language and cultural barriers within the health care system, and the medication regimen. Among this Latino sample, having someone to live for was extremely important in terms of patient adherence. Language barriers were reported, and the use of translators was not always seen as a sufficient remedy. Differences between monolingual Spanish-speaking patients' and English-speaking patients' strategies and barriers are discussed.

  15. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III: Normative data for Spanish-speaking pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta-Landa, L; Rivera, D; Ibáñez-Alfonso, J A; Albaladejo-Blázquez, N; Martín-Lobo, P; Delgado-Mejía, I D; Lara, L; Rabago Barajas, B V; Rodriguez Salgado, A M; Paredes Quispe, L A; Romero-García, I; Velázquez-Cardoso, J; García de la Cadena, C; Fernandez-Agis, I; Padilla-López, A; Hernández Agurcia, G P; Marín-Morales, A; Corral San José, A; Arango-Lasprilla, J C

    2017-09-16

    To generate normative data for the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III (PPVT-III) in Spanish-speaking pediatric populations. The sample consisted of 4,373 healthy children from nine countries in Latin America (Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Puerto Rico) and Spain. Each participant was administered the PPVT-III as part of a larger neuropsychological battery. PPVT-III scores were normed using multiple linear regressions and standard deviations of residual values. Age, age2, sex, and mean level of parental education (MLPE) were included as predictors in the analyses. The final multiple linear regression models showed main effects for age on all countries, such that scores increased linearly as a function of age. In addition, age2 had a significant effect in all countries, except Guatemala and Paraguay. Models showed that children whose parents had a MLPE >12 years of education obtained higher scores compared to children whose parents had MLPE ≤12 years in all countries, except for Cuba, Peru, and Puerto Rico. Sex affected scores for Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, and Spain. This is the largest Spanish speaking pediatric normative study in the world, and it will allow neuropsychologists from these countries have a more accurate interpretation of the PPVT-III when used in pediatric populations.

  16. Writing Disabilities in Spanish-Speaking Children: Introduction to the Special Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan E

    2016-05-10

    This special issue of the Journal of Learning Disabilities focuses on studies of writing disabilities in Spanish-speaking children. The World Health Organization (2001) included writing difficulties as one of the problems considered to constitute an impediment to school participation, a significant element in the normal developmental process of the child. In this introduction, I describe the background of a larger project promoted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This special series offers recent findings on writing disabilities in Spanish-Speaking children within the UNESCO project. The pilot study was carried out in the Canary Islands, an autonomous Spanish region located between three continents and composed of seven islands in the Atlantic Ocean. Most of the current empirical evidence on writing disabilities comes from English, a language with deep orthography; therefore, it is very relevant to investigate the writing process in Spanish, a language with shallow, fine-grained orthography. Included are a number of articles that form a conspectus on writing disabilities in the Spanish language. Topics center on early grade writing assessment, prevalence of writing disabilities, handwriting and keyboarding, transcription and text generation, graphonomic and handwriting analysis, and instructional practices with an learning disabled population.

  17. Neuropsychological Test Performance in Cognitively Normal Spanish-speaking Nonagenarians with Little Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Berroa, Elizabeth; Schmeidler, James; Raventos, Henriette; Valerio, Daniel; Beeri, Michal Schnaider; Carrión-Baralt, José R; Mora-Villalobos, Lara; Bolaños, Patricia; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    To find associations of age, sex, and education with neuropsychological test performance in cognitively normal Spanish-speaking Costa Rican nonagenarians with little education; to provide norms; and to compare their performance with similar Puerto Ricans. For 95 Costa Ricans (90-102 years old, 0-6 years of education), multiple regression assessed associations with demographics of performance on six neuropsychological tests. Analyses of covariance compared them with 23 Puerto Ricans (90-99 years old). Younger age and being female-but not education-were associated with better performance on some neuropsychological tests, in particular episodic memory. The Puerto Ricans performed better on learning and memory tasks. In cognitively intact Spanish-speaking nonagenarians with little or no education, education did not affect test performance. Additional studies of the effect of education on cognitive performance are warranted in other samples with extremely low education or old age. National differences in performance highlight the importance of group-specific norms.

  18. Misconceptions and miscommunication among Spanish-speaking and English-speaking women with pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieslander, Cecilia K; Alas, Alexandriah; Dunivan, Gena C; Sevilla, Claudia; Cichowski, Sara; Maliski, Sally; Eilber, Karyn; Rogers, Rebecca G; Anger, Jennifer T

    2015-04-01

    Limited data exist on women's experience with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptoms. We aimed to describe factors that prevent disease understanding among Spanish-speaking and English-speaking women. Women with POP were recruited from female urology and urogynecology clinics in Los Angeles, California, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Eight focus groups were conducted, four in Spanish and four in English. Topics addressed patients' emotional responses when noticing their prolapse, how they sought support, what verbal and written information was given, and their overall feelings of the process. Additionally, patients were asked about their experience with their treating physician. All interview transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory qualitative methods. Qualitative analysis yielded two preliminary themes. First, women had misconceptions about what POP is as well as its causes and treatments. Second, there was a great deal of miscommunication between patient and physician which led to decreased understanding about the diagnosis and treatment options. This included the fact that women were often overwhelmed with information which they did not understand. The concept emerged that there is a strong need for better methods to achieve disease and treatment understanding for women with POP. Our findings emphasize that women with POP have considerable misconceptions about their disease. In addition, there is miscommunication during the patient-physician interaction that leads to further confusion among Spanish-speaking and English-speaking women. Spending more time explaining the diagnosis of POP, rather than focusing solely on treatment options, may reduce miscommunication and increase patient understanding.

  19. Beginning English Literacy Development and Achievement among Spanish-Speaking Children in Arizona's English-Only Classrooms: A Four-Year Two-Cohort Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar; Blanchard, Jay; Atwill, Kim; Jiménez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study examined beginning English literacy-skill development and achievement among Spanish-speaking children enrolled in state-mandated English-only classrooms. The children possessed Spanish skill at or above age-appropriate level, yet minimal English skill, and came from a Spanish-speaking community adjacent to the U.S.-Mexico border. Under…

  20. The Impact of a Systematic and Explicit Vocabulary Intervention in Spanish with Spanish-Speaking English Learners in First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Johanna; Baker, Doris Luft; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Baker, Scott K.; Park, Yonghan; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a 15-min daily explicit vocabulary intervention in Spanish on expressive and receptive vocabulary knowledge and oral reading fluency in Spanish, and on language proficiency in English. Fifty Spanish-speaking English learners who received 90 min of Spanish reading instruction in an early transition model were…

  1. The Development of Self-Concept and Language Identity in Spanish-Speaking Children of Migrant Farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, Kathryn Ann

    A discussion of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learning in Spanish-speaking migrant workers' children focuses on the relationship of language identification and achievement. The first chapter briefly tells the story of the education and ESL instruction of one migrant adolescent. Chapter 2 offers a demographic and historical overview of migrant…

  2. Gesture, Play, and Language Development of Spanish-Speaking Toddlers with Developmental Language Disorders: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to (a) examine relationships between the symbolic and language skills of a mixed (developmental language disordered [DLD] and typical language [TL]) Spanish-speaking sample; (b) describe gesture, play, and language skills of DLD and TL groups; (c) compare the development between groups; and (d) explore…

  3. Language of Instruction as a Moderator for Transfer of Reading Comprehension Skills among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, María S.; Barr, Christopher D.; August, Diane; Calderón, Margarita; Artzi, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    This three-year longitudinal study investigated the role of language of instruction in moderating the relationships between initial levels of English oral language proficiency and Spanish reading comprehension and growth in English reading comprehension. The study followed Spanish-speaking English language learners in English-only literacy…

  4. Predicting First Grade Reading Achievement for Spanish-Speaking Kindergartners: Is Early Literacy Screening in English Valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen L.; Invernizzi, Marcia A.; Huang, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the viability of using kindergarten measures of phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge, and orthographic knowledge, administered in English, to predict first grade reading achievement of Spanish-speaking English language learners. The primary research question was: Do kindergarten measures of early literacy skills in…

  5. Impacts of Parent-Implemented Early-Literacy Intervention for Spanish-Speaking Children with Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Amy S.; Justice, Laura M.; Perez, Ashanty; Duran, Lillian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with language impairment (LI) often have lags in development of print knowledge, an important early-literacy skill. This study explores impacts of a print-focused intervention for Spanish-speaking children with LI in Southeastern Mexico. Aims: Aims were twofold. First, we sought to describe the print knowledge (print-concept…

  6. Oral Language Skills of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Impact of High-Quality Native Language Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Perla B.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relation between young English language learners' (ELL) native oral language skills and their language input in transitional bilingual education kindergarten classrooms. Spanish-speaking ELLs' ("n" = 101) Spanish expressive language skills were assessed using the memory for sentences and picture vocabulary…

  7. Development of Reading Skills from K-3 in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners Following Three Programs of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Jonathan; Lindsey, Kim A.; Manis, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    The development of English and Spanish reading and oral language skills from kindergarten to third grade was examined with a sample of 502 Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) enrolled in three instructional programs. The students in the transitional bilingual and dual-language programs had significantly higher scores than the…

  8. Oral Language Skills of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Impact of High-Quality Native Language Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Perla B.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relation between young English language learners' (ELL) native oral language skills and their language input in transitional bilingual education kindergarten classrooms. Spanish-speaking ELLs' ("n" = 101) Spanish expressive language skills were assessed using the memory for sentences and picture vocabulary…

  9. Studying the Impact of Technology-Infused Activities among Low-Income Spanish-Speaking Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Héctor H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an intervention technology program--Community Learning Centers--designed to assist low-income Spanish-speaking parents in learning and using technology for family advancement. The study is based on a sample of 408 participants who completed pre- and post-surveys. Data collection was conducted across 2 years in…

  10. Knowledge and Beliefs about Developmental Dyslexia in Pre-Service and In-Service Spanish-Speaking Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ferrer, Manuel; Echegaray-Bengoa, Joyce; Joshi, R. Malathesa

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated knowledge, misconceptions, and lack of information about dyslexia among pre-service (PST) and in-service (IST) Spanish-speaking teachers in Spain and Peru. Two hundred and forty-six pre-service teachers and 267 in-service teachers completed the Knowledge and Beliefs about Developmental Dyslexia Scale (KBDDS).…

  11. Ethnic Groups: Negroes, Spanish Speaking, American Indians, and Eskimos. Part 4 of a Bibliographic Series on Meeting Special Educational Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Lorraine, Comp.

    This bibliography on ethnic groups cites 117 documents acquired and processed by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education from July 1968 to December 1969. Organization is in three sections: Negroes--58 items; Spanish Speaking People--33 items; and American Indians and Eskimos--26 items. Each section is further broken down by document type:…

  12. Effects of a Literacy Curriculum that Supports Writing Development of Spanish-Speaking English Learners in Head Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, Carola; Gerber, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the results of a preliminary study that applied a randomized posttest-only design to evaluate the effectiveness of a literacy curriculum that incorporated explicit opportunities for Spanish-speaking Head Start preschool children (N = 76) to develop writing abilities in English. The study also addressed English language…

  13. Assessment of English- and Spanish-Speaking Students with the WISC-III and Leiter-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathers-Schiffman, Teresa A.; Thompson, Marilyn S.

    2007-01-01

    The Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) scores of 47 English- and 47 Spanish-speaking students were analyzed, and the effects of English language ability on these scores were examined. Leiter-R validity was supported for both language groups. WISC-III…

  14. Phonological Patterns in Normally Developing Spanish-Speaking 3-and 4-Year Olds of Puerto Rican Descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brian A.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1996-01-01

    This study used quantitative and qualitative methodology to examine the phonological patterns of 24 3-year-old and 30 4-year-old Spanish-speaking preschoolers of Puerto Rican descent. The children acquired the sounds of their language at an early age and did not exhibit high percentages of occurrence on targeted phonological processes. (DB)

  15. Traditional foods and practices of Spanish-speaking latina mothers influence the home food environment: Implications for future interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to obtain in-depth information from low income, Spanish-speaking Latino families with young children to guide the development of culturally appropriate nutrition interventions. Focus groups were used to assess parent’s knowledge about healthful eating, the home food enviro...

  16. The Impact of a Systematic and Explicit Vocabulary Intervention in Spanish with Spanish-Speaking English Learners in First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Johanna; Baker, Doris Luft; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Baker, Scott K.; Park, Yonghan; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a 15-min daily explicit vocabulary intervention in Spanish on expressive and receptive vocabulary knowledge and oral reading fluency in Spanish, and on language proficiency in English. Fifty Spanish-speaking English learners who received 90 min of Spanish reading instruction in an early transition model were…

  17. Language of Instruction as a Moderator for Transfer of Reading Comprehension Skills among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, María S.; Barr, Christopher D.; August, Diane; Calderón, Margarita; Artzi, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    This three-year longitudinal study investigated the role of language of instruction in moderating the relationships between initial levels of English oral language proficiency and Spanish reading comprehension and growth in English reading comprehension. The study followed Spanish-speaking English language learners in English-only literacy…

  18. Self-Regulation Abilities and Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers' Vocabulary and Letter-Word Skills in Spanish and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Francisco; Mikulski, Ariana M.; Conejo, L. Diego

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the heterogeneity in Spanish-speaking children's (N = 117; M age = 53 months; SD = 5 months; 57% boys) vocabulary and letter-word skills in English and Spanish after one year of preschool and the extent to which early self-regulation abilities (i.e., executive function and effortful control) were associated…

  19. Predicting First Grade Reading Achievement for Spanish-Speaking Kindergartners: Is Early Literacy Screening in English Valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen L.; Invernizzi, Marcia A.; Huang, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the viability of using kindergarten measures of phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge, and orthographic knowledge, administered in English, to predict first grade reading achievement of Spanish-speaking English language learners. The primary research question was: Do kindergarten measures of early literacy skills in…

  20. "You Have the Right to Remain Silent." Two Case Studies in Forensic Linguistics Involving Spanish Speaking Suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotto, Giorgio

    Two case studies involving possible violations of the rights of Spanish speaking criminal suspects are presented. In cases where suspects do not understand English, the Miranda warnings regarding the right to remain silent must be delivered in their native language and in a way that is understandable to the suspects. In the two cases involving…

  1. Exploring English and Spanish Rhyme Awareness and Beginning Sound Segmentation Skills in Prekindergarten Spanish-Speaking English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynolds, Laura B.; López-Velásquez, Angela; Olivo Valentín, Laura E.

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five 4- and 5-year-old Spanish-speaking English Learners (ELs) were tested in order to compare their English and Spanish performance in two phonological awareness skills: Rhyme awareness (RA) and beginning sound segmentation (BSS). The children had received formal instruction of phonological awareness, with an emphasis on RA and BSS for…

  2. Self-Regulation Abilities and Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers' Vocabulary and Letter-Word Skills in Spanish and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Francisco; Mikulski, Ariana M.; Conejo, L. Diego

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the heterogeneity in Spanish-speaking children's (N = 117; M age = 53 months; SD = 5 months; 57% boys) vocabulary and letter-word skills in English and Spanish after one year of preschool and the extent to which early self-regulation abilities (i.e., executive function and effortful control) were associated…

  3. Spanish Language Self-Efficacy Beliefs among Spanish-Speaking Social Workers: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Limited research exists about Spanish-speaking social workers that provide bilingual social work services. To date, studies have not exclusively focused on actual language competence of bilingual social workers or even their self-perceived language beliefs. This study reviews the results of a cross-sectional Internet-based survey exploring…

  4. Development of Early English Language and Literacy Skills among Spanish-Speaking Children: Does Preschool Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Myae; Silva, Luisa; Vukelich, Carol; Buell, Martha; Hou, Likun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the early English language and literacy skill development of 179 children from 11 Head Start classrooms who participated in an added focus on language and literacy skill-building supported by Early Reading First programme. Of this sample, 118 children were Spanish-speaking English Language Learners (ELL). All children were…

  5. Cross-Linguistic Transfer of Morphological Awareness in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Facilitating Effect of Cognate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gloria; Chen, Xi; Pasquarella, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cross-language effects of Spanish derivational awareness on English vocabulary and reading comprehension were studied in Spanish-speaking English Language Learners (N = 90) in grades four and seven. The role of cognate vocabulary in cross-language transfer of derivational awareness was also examined. Multivariate path analyses controlling for age,…

  6. Studying the Impact of Technology-Infused Activities among Low-Income Spanish-Speaking Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Héctor H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an intervention technology program--Community Learning Centers--designed to assist low-income Spanish-speaking parents in learning and using technology for family advancement. The study is based on a sample of 408 participants who completed pre- and post-surveys. Data collection was conducted across 2 years in…

  7. Cross-Linguistic Transfer of Morphological Awareness in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: The Facilitating Effect of Cognate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gloria; Chen, Xi; Pasquarella, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cross-language effects of Spanish derivational awareness on English vocabulary and reading comprehension were studied in Spanish-speaking English Language Learners (N = 90) in grades four and seven. The role of cognate vocabulary in cross-language transfer of derivational awareness was also examined. Multivariate path analyses controlling for age,…

  8. Television viewing by young Hispanic children: evidence of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Darcy A; Sibinga, Erica M S; Jennings, Jacky M; Bair-Merritt, Megan H; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2010-02-01

    To determine if hours of daily television viewed by varying age groups of young children with Hispanic mothers differs by maternal language preference and to compare these differences with young children with white mothers. Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2000 from the National Survey of Early Childhood Health. Nationally representative sample. One thousand three hundred forty-seven mothers of children aged 4 to 35 months. Subgroups of self-reported maternal race/ethnicity (white or Hispanic) and within Hispanic race/ethnicity, stratification by maternal language preference (English or Spanish). Hours of daily television the child viewed. Bivariate analyses showed that children of English- vs Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television daily (1.88 vs 1.31 hours, P speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts. However, among children aged 12 to 23 and 24 to 35 months, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television than children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.22; IRR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10-2.51, respectively). Compared with children of white mothers, children of both Hispanic subgroups watched similar amounts among the 4- to 11-month-old group. However, among 12- to 23-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more compared with children of white mothers (IRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.18-2.11). Among 24- to 35-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts compared with children of white mothers, but children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched less (IRR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.95). Television-viewing amounts among young children with Hispanic mothers vary by child age and maternal language preference, supporting the need to explore sociocultural factors that influence viewing in Hispanic children.

  9. Interlocutor differential effects on the expressive language skills of Spanish-speaking English learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Raúl; Iglesias, Aquiles; Bunta, Ferenc; Goldstein, Brian; Goldenberg, Claude; Reese, Leslie

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between language use with different interlocutors, maternal education level and the expressive language skills of US English learners (ELs) in Spanish and English. Two hundred and twenty-four Spanish-speaking ELs in kindergarten provided narrative language samples in Spanish and English. Parents completed a questionnaire of maternal education level and language use with parents, older siblings and peers. Multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated that language used with different interlocutors and maternal education level had unique effects on participants' expressive language skills. ELs' expressive language skills in English were predicted by interactions with older siblings, peers and maternal education level; Spanish expressive language skills were predicted by interactions with older siblings. The findings from this study suggest that the determination of language experience of school-age bilingual children should examine differential language use with multiple interlocutors, particularly interactions with older siblings and peers.

  10. Predictors of Reading Comprehension for Struggling Readers: The Case of Spanish-speaking Language Minority Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Martinez, Jeannette; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the process of English reading comprehension at age 11 for 173 low achieving Spanish-speaking children. The influence of growth rates, from early childhood (age 4.5) to pre-adolescence (age 11), in vocabulary and word reading skills on this complex process were evaluated using structural equation modeling. Standardized measures of word reading accuracy and productive vocabulary were administered annually, in English and Spanish, and English reading comprehension measures were administered at age 11. Latent growth curve analyses revealed that English skills accounted for all unique variance in English reading comprehension outcomes. Further, expected developmental shifts in the influence of word reading and vocabulary skills over time were not shown, likely on account of students’ below grade level reading comprehension achievement. This work underscores the need for theoretical models of comprehension to account for students’ skill profiles and abilities. PMID:20856691

  11. HIV-Related Stigma Among Spanish-speaking Latinos in an Emerging Immigrant Receiving City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolwick Grieb, Suzanne M; Shah, Harita; Flores-Miller, Alejandra; Zelaya, Carla; Page, Kathleen R

    2016-09-27

    HIV-related stigma has been associated with a reluctance to test for HIV among Latinos. This study assessed community HIV-related stigma within an emerging Latino immigrant receiving city. We conducted a brief survey among a convenience sample of 312 Spanish-speaking Latinos in Baltimore, Maryland. HIV-related stigma was assessed through six items. Associations between stigma items, socio-demographic characteristics, and HIV testing history were considered. Gender, education, and religiosity were significantly associated with stigmatizing HIV-related beliefs. For example, men were 3.4 times more likely to hold more than three stigmatizing beliefs than women, and were also twice as likely as women to report feeling hesitant to test for HIV for fear of people's reaction if the test is positive. These findings can help inform future stigma interventions in this community. In particular, we were able to distinguish between drivers of stigma such as fear and moralistic attitudes, highlighting specific actionable items.

  12. Predictors of Reading Comprehension for Struggling Readers: The Case of Spanish-speaking Language Minority Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Martinez, Jeannette; Lesaux, Nonie K

    2010-08-01

    This longitudinal study examined the process of English reading comprehension at age 11 for 173 low achieving Spanish-speaking children. The influence of growth rates, from early childhood (age 4.5) to pre-adolescence (age 11), in vocabulary and word reading skills on this complex process were evaluated using structural equation modeling. Standardized measures of word reading accuracy and productive vocabulary were administered annually, in English and Spanish, and English reading comprehension measures were administered at age 11. Latent growth curve analyses revealed that English skills accounted for all unique variance in English reading comprehension outcomes. Further, expected developmental shifts in the influence of word reading and vocabulary skills over time were not shown, likely on account of students' below grade level reading comprehension achievement. This work underscores the need for theoretical models of comprehension to account for students' skill profiles and abilities.

  13. Validity of a parent-report measure of vocabulary and grammar for Spanish-speaking toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, D; Jackson-Maldonado, D; Acosta, D

    2000-10-01

    The validity of the Fundación MacArthur Inventario del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas: Palabras y Enunciados (IDHC:PE) was examined with twenty 20- and nineteen 28-month-old, typically developing, monolingual, Spanish-speaking children living in Mexico. One measure of vocabulary (number of words) and two measures of grammar (mean of the three longest utterances and grammatical complexity score) from the IDHC:PE were compared to behavioral measures of vocabulary (number of different words from a language sample and number of objects named in a confrontation naming task) and one behavioral measure of grammar (mean length of utterance from a language sample). Only vocabulary measures were assessed in the 20-month-olds because of floor effects on the grammar measures. Results indicated validity for assessing expressive vocabulary in 20-month-olds and expressive vocabulary and grammar in 28-month-olds.

  14. Auditory implicit semantic priming in Spanish-speaking children with and without specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbau, Dolors

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed whether Spanish-speaking children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) showed deficits in lexical-semantic processing/organization, and whether these lexical measures correlated with standardized measures of language abilities. Fourteen children with Typical Language Development (TLD) and 16 age-matched children with SLI (8;0-9;11 years) participated. In a Lexical Decision (LD) task with implicit semantic priming, children judged whether a given speech pair contained two words (semantically related/unrelated) or a word-pseudoword. Children received a comprehensive language and reading test battery. Children with TLD exhibited significant semantic priming; they were faster for semantically related word pairs than for unrelated (p language scores, showed a semantic-lexical deficit and a weakness in lexical-semantic association networks. Their performance on the LD task was significantly slower and poorer than for children with TLD. Increasing a child's vocabulary may benefit lexical access.

  15. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) in State Science Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, Maria O.

    Psychometricians and test developers evaluate standardized tests for potential bias against groups of test-takers by using differential item functioning (DIF). English language learners (ELLs) are a diverse group of students whose native language is not English. While they are still learning the English language, they must take their standardized tests for their school subjects, including science, in English. In this study, linguistic complexity was examined as a possible source of DIF that may result in test scores that confound science knowledge with a lack of English proficiency among ELLs. Two years of fifth-grade state science tests were analyzed for evidence of DIF using two DIF methods, Simultaneous Item Bias Test (SIBTest) and logistic regression. The tests presented a unique challenge in that the test items were grouped together into testlets---groups of items referring to a scientific scenario to measure knowledge of different science content or skills. Very large samples of 10, 256 students in 2006 and 13,571 students in 2007 were examined. Half of each sample was composed of Spanish-speaking ELLs; the balance was comprised of native English speakers. The two DIF methods were in agreement about the items that favored non-ELLs and the items that favored ELLs. Logistic regression effect sizes were all negligible, while SIBTest flagged items with low to high DIF. A decrease in socioeconomic status and Spanish-speaking ELL diversity may have led to inconsistent SIBTest effect sizes for items used in both testing years. The DIF results for the testlets suggested that ELLs lacked sufficient opportunity to learn science content. The DIF results further suggest that those constructed response test items requiring the student to draw a conclusion about a scientific investigation or to plan a new investigation tended to favor ELLs.

  16. Tornado hazard communication disparities among Spanish-speaking individuals in an English-speaking community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Leslie; Franc, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-02-01

    The state of Oklahoma, known for destructive tornados, has a native Spanish-speaking (NSS) population of approximately 180,241, of which 50% report being able to speak English "very well" (US Census Bureau). With almost 50% of these native Spanish-speaking persons being limited English proficient (LEP), their reception of tornado hazard communications may be restricted. This study conducted in northeast Oklahoma (USA) evaluates the association between native language and receiving tornado hazard communications. This study was a cross-sectional survey conducted among a convenience sample of NSS and native English-speaking (NES) adults at Xavier Clinic and St. Francis Trauma Emergency Center in Tulsa, OK, USA from September 2009 through December 2009. Of the 82 surveys administered, 80 were returned, with 40 NES and 40 NSS participants. A scoring system (Severe Weather Information Reception (SWIR)) was developed to quantify reception of hazard information among the study participants (1-3 points=poor reception, 4-5=adequate reception, 6-8=excellent reception). Pearson's chi-squared test was used to calculate differences between groups with Yates' continuity correction applied where appropriate, and SWIR scores were analyzed using ANOVA. P-valuestornado siren. NSS were less likely to have Internet access (Ptornado warning reception between NSS and NES. Poor English proficiency was noted to be 75% among NSS, which is approximately 25% more than estimated by the US Census Bureau. This study demonstrates a need for emergency managers to recognize when appropriate and overcome communication disparities among limited English proficient populations.

  17. Limited English proficient Hmong- and Spanish-speaking patients’ perceptions of the quality of interpreter services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Maichou; Xiong, Phia; Schweia, Rebecca J.; Bowers, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Language barriers are a large and growing problem for patients in the U.S. and around the world. Interpreter services are a standard solution for addressing language barriers and most research has focused on utilization of interpreter services and their effect on health outcomes for patients who do not speak the same language as their healthcare providers including nurses. However, there is limited research on patients’ perceptions of these interpreter services. Objective To examine Hmong- and Spanish-speaking patients’ perceptions of interpreter service quality in the context of receiving cancer preventive services. Methods Twenty limited English proficient Hmong (n=10) and Spanish-speaking participants (N=10) ranging in age from 33 to 75 years were interviewed by two bilingual researchers in a Midwestern state. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim, and translated into English. Analysis was done using conventional content analysis. Results The two groups shared perceptions about the quality of interpreter services as variable along three dimensions. Specifically, both groups evaluated quality of interpreters based on the interpreters’ ability to provide: (a) literal interpretation, (b) cultural interpretation, and (c) emotional interpretation during the health care encounter. The groups differed, however, on how they described the consequences of poor interpretation quality. Hmong participants described how poor quality interpretation could lead to: (a) poor interpersonal relationships among patients, providers, and interpreters, (b) inability of patients to follow through with treatment plans, and (c) emotional distress for patients. Conclusions Our study highlights the fact that patients are discerning consumers of interpreter services; and could be effective partners in efforts to reform and enhance interpreter services. PMID:25865517

  18. Survey of US Veterinary Students on Communicating with Limited English Proficient Spanish-Speaking Pet Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary schools and colleges generally include communication skills training in their professional curriculum, but few programs address challenges resulting from language gaps between pet owners and practitioners. Due to shifting US demographics, small animal veterinary practices must accommodate an increasing number of limited English proficient (LEP) Spanish-speaking pet owners (SSPOs). A national survey was conducted to assess the interest and preparedness of US veterinary students to communicate with LEP SSPOs when they graduate. This online survey, with more than 2,000 first-, second-, and third-year US veterinary students, revealed that over 50% of students had worked at a practice or shelter that had LEP Spanish-speaking clients. Yet fewer than 20% of these students described themselves as prepared to give medical information to an LEP SSPO. Over three-fourths of respondents agreed that communication with LEP SSPOs was important for veterinarians in general, and two-thirds agreed that communication with LEP SSPOs was important for themselves personally. Ninety percent of students who described themselves as conversant in Spanish agreed that they would be able to communicate socially with SSPOs, while only 55% said they would be able to communicate medically with such clients. Overall, two-thirds of students expressed interest in taking Spanish for Veterinary Professionals elective course while in school, with the strongest interest expressed by those with advanced proficiency in spoken Spanish. Bridging language gaps has the potential to improve communication with LEP SSPOs in the veterinary clinical setting and to improve patient care, client satisfaction, and the economic health of the veterinary profession.

  19. Performance of Hispanic inmates on the Spanish Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Orbelin; Guyton, Michelle R

    2014-10-01

    The few psychological assessment measures commercially available for the assessment of Spanish-speaking populations lack strong empirical foundation. This is concerning given the rising numbers of Spanish speakers entering the forensic and correctional systems for whom valid assessment is difficult without linguistically and culturally appropriate measures. In this study, we translated and adapted the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) into Spanish. The general purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric, linguistic, and conceptual equivalence of the English- and Spanish-language versions of the M-FAST in a sample of 102 bilingual Hispanic incarcerated males. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three feigning conditions (honest, uncoached, or coached) and completed the M-FAST in both English and Spanish on two separate occasions. Both language versions were psychometrically, linguistically, and conceptually equivalent.

  20. Hispanic Orientation to Life in America. Project HOLA, 1987-88. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Tomi D.; Mohagdam, Val

    In its fifth year, the Hispanic Orientation to Life in America Project (Project HOLA) served 472 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency. The aim of the program was to help students develop English language skills, enter mainstream classes, and understand Spanish and American culture. The program provided instruction in English as…

  1. Cuentos Hispanos de los Estados Unidos (Hispanic Stories of the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Julian, Ed.

    This anthology of 21 short stories is intended for Spanish-speaking students of Spanish, other students in intermediate and advanced Spanish-language courses, and students commencing study of the Hispanic literature of the United States. Twelve of the 15 authors are, by birth or descent, of Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican origin. Eight were born…

  2. Cuentos Hispanos de los Estados Unidos (Hispanic Stories of the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Julian, Ed.

    This anthology of 21 short stories is intended for Spanish-speaking students of Spanish, other students in intermediate and advanced Spanish-language courses, and students commencing study of the Hispanic literature of the United States. Twelve of the 15 authors are, by birth or descent, of Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican origin. Eight were born…

  3. The Role of Access to Head Start and Quality Ratings for Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners' (DLLs) Participation in Early Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfader, Christa Mulker; Miller, Elizabeth B

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 4,442) were used to test for differences between Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLLs) and monolingual English-speaking children in: (1) Head Start attendance rates when randomly assigned admission; and (2) quality ratings of other early childhood education (ECE) programs attended when not randomly assigned admission to Head Start. Logistic regressions showed that Spanish-speaking DLL children randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely than monolingual-English learners to attend. Further, Spanish-speaking DLLs not randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely to attend higher-quality ECE centers than non-DLL children. Policy implications are discussed, suggesting that, if given access, Spanish-speaking DLL families will take advantage of quality ECE programs.

  4. The Role of Access to Head Start and Quality Ratings for Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners’ (DLLs) Participation in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 4,442) were used to test for differences between Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLLs) and monolingual English-speaking children in: (1) Head Start attendance rates when randomly assigned admission; and (2) quality ratings of other early childhood education (ECE) programs attended when not randomly assigned admission to Head Start. Logistic regressions showed that Spanish-speaking DLL children randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely than monolingual-English learners to attend. Further, Spanish-speaking DLLs not randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely to attend higher-quality ECE centers than non-DLL children. Policy implications are discussed, suggesting that, if given access, Spanish-speaking DLL families will take advantage of quality ECE programs. PMID:25018585

  5. Using Spanish-speaking films for helping learners of Spanish as a foreign language acquire cultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to point out the usefulness of Spanish-speaking films in teaching Spanish as a foreign language. As feature films are not created for the purposes of language teaching, they cannot be considered didactic materials per se. However, their usefulness for teaching a foreign language lies exactly in this feature of theirs, distinguishing them from other resources created solely for educational purposes, because they can be used as didactic materials in a different guise, which make...

  6. Communication between physicians and Spanish-speaking Latin American women with pelvic floor disorders: a cycle of misunderstanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Claudia; Wieslander, Cecilia K; Alas, Alexandriah N; Dunivan, Gena C; Khan, Aqsa A; Maliski, Sally L; Rogers, Rebecca G; Anger, Jennifer Tash

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of the initial visit with a specialist on disease understanding among Spanish-speaking women with pelvic floor disorders. Spanish-speaking women with referrals suggestive of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were recruited from public urogynecology clinics. Patients participated in a health literacy assessment and interview before and after their physician encounter. All interviews were analyzed using Grounded Theory qualitative methods. Twenty-seven women with POP (n = 6), UI (n = 11), and POP/UI (n = 10) were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 55.5 years, and most women had marginal levels of health literacy. From our qualitative analysis, 3 concepts emerged. First, was that patients had poor understanding of their diagnosis before and after the encounter regardless of how extensive the physician's explanation or level of Spanish-proficiency. Second, patients were overwhelmed with the amount of information given to them. Lastly, patients ultimately put their trust in the physician, relying on them for treatment recommendations. Our findings emphasize the difficulty Spanish-speaking women with low health literacy have in understanding information regarding pelvic floor disorders. In this specific population, the physician has a major role in influencing patients' treatment decisions and helping them overcome fears they may have about their condition.

  7. Perception of audio-visual speech synchrony in Spanish-speaking children with and without specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Ferran; Andreu, Llorenç; Sanz-Torrent, Monica; Buil-Legaz, Lucía; Lewkowicz, David J

    2013-06-01

    Speech perception involves the integration of auditory and visual articulatory information, and thus requires the perception of temporal synchrony between this information. There is evidence that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulty with auditory speech perception but it is not known if this is also true for the integration of auditory and visual speech. Twenty Spanish-speaking children with SLI, twenty typically developing age-matched Spanish-speaking children, and twenty Spanish-speaking children matched for MLU-w participated in an eye-tracking study to investigate the perception of audiovisual speech synchrony. Results revealed that children with typical language development perceived an audiovisual asynchrony of 666 ms regardless of whether the auditory or visual speech attribute led the other one. Children with SLI only detected the 666 ms asynchrony when the auditory component preceded [corrected] the visual component. None of the groups perceived an audiovisual asynchrony of 366 ms. These results suggest that the difficulty of speech processing by children with SLI would also involve difficulties in integrating auditory and visual aspects of speech perception.

  8. Specific Language Impairment: Evaluation and detection of differential psycholinguistic markers in phonology and morphosyntax in Spanish-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiza, Juan J; Rodríguez-Parra, María José; González-Sánchez, Mercedes; Adrián, José A

    2016-11-01

    The diagnosis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is very complex, given the variety of clinical pictures described in this disorder. Knowledge about the linguistic markers of SLI can facilitate its differentiation from the normal profile of language development. These markers can also be used as tools that may improve diagnostic. To determine which psycholinguistic markers best discriminate Spanish-speaking children with SLI from children with typical language development. The performance of 31 Spanish-speaking children with SLI was analysed using a battery of 13 psycholinguistic tasks organized into two areas: phonology and morphosyntax. The performance of the SLI group was compared to that of two subgroups of controls: aged matched (CA) and linguistically matched (CL). The data show that the SLI group performed worse than the CA subgroup on all 13 verbal tasks. However, the performance of the SLI group did not significantly differ from that of the CL subgroup on most (11/13) of the tasks. Stepwise discriminant analysis established the canonical function of three tasks (morphologic integration, sentence understanding and diadochokinesis) which significantly discriminated SLI from CA, with sensitivity 84% and specificity 90%. These results contribute to determining the psycholinguistic and clinical characteristics of SLI in Spanish-speaking children and provide some methods for screening assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Posttraumatic growth inventory: factor structure in Spanish-speaking people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hernansaiz, Helena; Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study analyzed the factorial structure of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) in a sample of 304 Spanish-speaking HIV-positive adults. Participants completed the PTGI and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out through structural equations modeling, with a Varimax rotation. Factors with eigenvalues greater than 1 were extracted, and items with loadings higher than .5 on a factor and lower than .4 on the rest were retained. Two confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed to test a hierarchical model and a bifactor model. Reliability analyses were conducted. EFA suggested a three-factor model keeping 11 of the original 21 items. The three factors that emerged were changes in philosophy of life, in the self and in interpersonal relationships. CFAs suggested that only the bifactor model fitted the data. The three factors as well as the global scale showed good reliability. The factor structure of PTGI's scores in our data is consistent with the three dimensions theorized by Tedeschi and Calhoun, which speaks in favor of the construct validity of this measure.

  10. Relationships between vocabulary size, working memory, and phonological awareness in Spanish-speaking English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Brenda K

    2012-05-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the impact of short-term phonological awareness (PA) instruction presented in children's first language (L1; Spanish) on gains in their L1 and second language (L2; English) and to determine whether relationships exist between vocabulary size, verbal working memory, and PA in Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs). Participants included 25 kindergartners who received PA instruction and 10 controls. A 2-way within-subjects repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted to evaluate gains. Relationships between PA gains, Spanish and English vocabulary, and memory, as measured using nonword repetition and experimental working memory tasks, were analyzed using correlation and regression analyses. Results indicated significant and equivalent gains in both languages of children in the experimental group and no gains in the control group. Spanish vocabulary size was significantly related to PA gains in both languages and was more strongly related to English gains than was English vocabulary size. The memory tasks predicted gains in each language in distinct ways. Results support the conclusion that PA instruction and strong vocabulary skills in an individual's L1 benefit PA development in both the L1 and L2. Results also indicate that dynamic relationships exist between vocabulary size, storage and processing components of working memory, and PA development in both languages of ELLs.

  11. Interactions between Bilingual Effects and Language Impairment: Exploring Grammatical Markers in Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Earls, Anny P; Restrepo, María Adelaida; Perez-Leroux, Ana Teresa; Gray, Shelley; Holmes, Paul; Gail, Daniel; Chen, Ziqiang

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the interaction between language impairment and different levels of bilingual proficiency. Specifically, we explore the potential of articles and direct object pronouns as clinical markers of primary language impairment (PLI) in bilingual Spanish-speaking children. The study compared children with PLI and typically developing children (TD) matched on age, English language proficiency, and mother's education level. Two types of bilinguals were targeted: Spanish-dominant children with intermediate English proficiency (asymmetrical bilinguals, AsyB), and near-balanced bilinguals (BIL). We measured children's accuracy in the use of direct object pronouns and articles with an elicited language task. Results from this preliminary study suggest language proficiency affects the patterns of use of direct object pronouns and articles. Across language proficiency groups, we find marked differences between TD and PLI, in the use of both direct object pronouns and articles. However, the magnitude of the difference diminishes in balanced bilinguals. Articles appear more stable in these bilinguals and therefore, seem to have a greater potential to discriminate between TD bilinguals from those with PLI. Future studies using discriminant analyses are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings.

  12. Validity of a parent vocabulary checklist for young Spanish speaking children of Mexican immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of the current investigation was to examine the concurrent and predictive validity of a parent vocabulary checklist with young Spanish speaking children of Mexican immigrants. This study implemented a longitudinal approach. Nineteen families participated when children were 15-16 months of age, and then again at 30-32 months of age. The Spanish version of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory (Inventarios del Desarrollo de Habilidades Communicativas, INV) and spontaneous language samples collected during naturalistic play were used to examine the relationship between observed and reported vocabulary. Vocabulary reported through the INV-II and vocabulary observed at 30-32 months were significantly correlated, suggesting that the INV-II captures a valid representation of vocabulary at this age. Comparatively, vocabulary reported on the INV-I, was not correlated with observed vocabulary at 15-16 months of age or reported or observed vocabulary at 30-32 months of age. These results suggest that the INV-I, when used with 14-16-month-olds, demonstrates limited concurrent and predictive validity. Implications for the clinical use of the INV-I and INV-II are presented.

  13. Morphological awareness and reading difficulties in adolescent Spanish-speaking language minority learners and their classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of morphological awareness weaknesses in the reading difficulties encountered by Spanish-speaking language minority learners and their native English-speaking peers in sixth grade. One hundred and thirty-eight students (82 language minority learners; 56 native English speakers) were assessed on English measures of reading comprehension, silent word reading fluency, and derivational morphological awareness. Students with specific reading comprehension difficulties, specific word reading difficulties, and combined difficulties were identified using categorical cut-scores. Findings indicated that morphological awareness differentiated skilled readers from students with reading difficulties. Substantial proportions of students with reading difficulties (38%-63%, depending on reading difficulty subtype) demonstrated weaknesses in morphological awareness. Language minority learners with reading difficulties were particularly likely to demonstrate weaknesses in morphological awareness (55%-64%), compared to native English speakers with similar reading difficulties (13%-50%). Findings suggest the diagnostic potential of morphological awareness for adolescent learners with reading difficulties, especially those from language minority backgrounds.

  14. Interactions between Bilingual Effects and Language Impairment: Exploring Grammatical Markers in Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Earls, Anny P.; Restrepo, María Adelaida; Perez-Leroux, Ana Teresa; Gray, Shelley; Holmes, Paul; Gail, Daniel; Chen, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the interaction between language impairment and different levels of bilingual proficiency. Specifically, we explore the potential of articles and direct object pronouns as clinical markers of primary language impairment (PLI) in bilingual Spanish-speaking children. The study compared children with PLI and typically developing children (TD) matched on age, English language proficiency, and mother’s education level. Two types of bilinguals were targeted: Spanish-dominant children with intermediate English proficiency (asymmetrical bilinguals, AsyB), and near-balanced bilinguals (BIL). We measured children’s accuracy in the use of direct object pronouns and articles with an elicited language task. Results from this preliminary study suggest language proficiency affects the patterns of use of direct object pronouns and articles. Across language proficiency groups, we find marked differences between TD and PLI, in the use of both direct object pronouns and articles. However, the magnitude of the difference diminishes in balanced bilinguals. Articles appear more stable in these bilinguals and therefore, seem to have a greater potential to discriminate between TD bilinguals from those with PLI. Future studies using discriminant analyses are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings. PMID:27570320

  15. Development and transfer of vocabulary knowledge in Spanish-speaking language minority preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J Marc; Lonigan, Christopher J; Kleuver, Cherie G; Farver, Joann M

    2016-09-01

    In this study we evaluated the predictive validity of conceptual scoring. Two independent samples of Spanish-speaking language minority preschoolers (Sample 1: N = 96, mean age = 54·51 months, 54·3% male; Sample 2: N = 116, mean age = 60·70 months, 56·0% male) completed measures of receptive, expressive, and definitional vocabulary in their first (L1) and second (L2) languages at two time points approximately 9-12 months apart. We examined whether unique L1 and L2 vocabulary at time 1 predicted later L2 and L1 vocabulary, respectively. Results indicated that unique L1 vocabulary did not predict later L2 vocabulary after controlling for initial L2 vocabulary. An identical pattern of results emerged for L1 vocabulary outcomes. We also examined whether children acquired translational equivalents for words known in one language but not the other. Results indicated that children acquired translational equivalents, providing partial support for the transfer of vocabulary knowledge across languages.

  16. Current cariology education in dental schools in Spanish-speaking Latin American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Gomez, Juliana; Tellez, Marisol; Ruiz, Jaime A; Marin, Lina M; Rangel, Maria C

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to provide an overview of current cariology education in Spanish-speaking Latin American dental schools. Data collection was via an eighteen-item survey with questions about curriculum, methods of diagnosis and treatment, and instructors' perceptions about cariology teaching. The response rate was 62.1 percent (n=54), and distribution of participating schools by country was as follows: Bolivia (four), Chile (four), Colombia (twenty-four), Costa Rica (one), Cuba (one), Dominican Republic (two), El Salvador (two), Mexico (six), Panama (two), Peru (four), Puerto Rico (one), Uruguay (two), and Venezuela (one). Forty percent of the responding schools considered cariology the key axis of a course, with a cariology department in 16.7 percent. All schools reported teaching cariology, but with varying hours and at varying times in the curriculum, and 77.8 percent reported having preclinical practices. The majority reported teaching most main teaching topics, except for behavioral sciences, microbiology, saliva and systemic diseases, caries-risk factors, root caries, erosion, and early caries management strategies. The most frequently taught caries detection methods were visual-tactile (96.3 percent), radiographic (92.6 percent), and the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) (61.1 percent). Respondents said their schools' clinics make an operative treatment decision when radiolucency is in the inner half of enamel (42.3 percent) for radiographic criteria and when the lesion is visually non-cavitated (5.8 percent). All respondents reported that their schools teach preventive strategies, but only 43.4 percent said they tie it to risk assessment and 40.7 percent said they implement nonsurgical management regularly.

  17. Reaching Spanish-speaking smokers online: a 10-year worldwide research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ricardo Felipe; Chen, Ken; Bunge, Eduardo Liniers; Bravin, Julia Isabela; Shaughnessy, Elizabeth Annelly; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a 10-year proof-of-concept smoking cessation research program evaluating the reach of online health interventions throughout the Americas. Methods Recruitment occurred from 2002–2011, primarily using Google.com AdWords. Over 6 million smokers from the Americas entered keywords related to smoking cessation; 57 882 smokers (15 912 English speakers and 41 970 Spanish speakers) were recruited into online self-help automated intervention studies. To examine disparities in utilization of methods to quit smoking, cessation aids used by English speakers and Spanish speakers were compared. To determine whether online interventions reduce disparities, abstinence rates were also compared. Finally, the reach of the intervention was illustrated for three large Spanish-speaking countries of the Americas—Argentina, Mexico, and Peru—and the United States of America. Results Few participants had utilized other methods to stop smoking before coming to the Internet site; most reported using no previous smoking cessation aids: 69.2% of Spanish speakers versus 51.8% of English speakers (P < 0.01). The most used method was nicotine gum, 13.9%. Nicotine dependence levels were similar to those reported for in-person smoking cessation trials. Overall observed quit rate for English speakers was 38.1% and for Spanish speakers, 37.0%; quit rates in which participants with missing data were considered to be smoking were 11.1% and 10.6%, respectively. Neither comparison was significantly different. Conclusions The systematic use of evidence-based Internet interventions for health problems could have a broad impact throughout the Americas, at little or no cost to individuals or to ministries of health. PMID:25211569

  18. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M.; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, Jose; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and are often excluded from clinical trials in the United States. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. The authors conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 3…

  19. B.A.I.L.A. - A Latin dance randomized controlled trial for older Spanish-speaking Latinos: Rationale, design, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; Wilbur, JoEllen; Hughes, Susan; Berbaum, Michael L.; Wilson, Robert; Buchner, David M.; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has documented health benefits, but older Latinos are less likely to engage in leisure time PA than older non-Latino whites. Dance holds promise as a culturally appropriate form of PA that challenges individuals physically and cognitively. This paper describes a randomized controlled trial that will test the efficacy of BAILAMOS©, a 4-month Latin dance program followed by a 4-month maintenance program, for improving lifestyle PA and health outcomes. Older adults (n = 332), aged 55+, Latino/Hispanic, Spanish speaking, with low PA levels, and at risk for disability will be randomized to one of two programs, a dance program or health education control group. BAILAMOS© is a 4-month program that meets two times per week for one hour per session. Dance sessions focus on instruction, including four styles of dance, and couples dancing. Bi-monthly “Fiestas de Baile” (dance parties) are also included, in which participants dance and practice what they have learned.. Monthly 1-hour discussion sessions utilize a Social Cognitive framework and focus on knowledge, social support, and self-efficacy to increase lifestyle PA. The health education control group will meet one time per week for two hours per session. Primary outcomes including PA changes and secondary outcomes including self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and disability will be assessed at baseline, 4, and 8 months. It is hypothesized that PA, self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and functional limitations and disability scores will be significantly better in the BAILAMOS© group at 4 and 8 months compared to the control group. PMID:24969395

  20. Prolonged exposure for the treatment of Spanish-speaking Puerto Ricans with posttraumatic stress disorder: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olmo Alicia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the empirical studies that support the efficacy of prolonged exposure (PE for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD have been conducted on white mainstream English-speaking populations. Although high PTSD rates have been reported for Puerto Ricans, the appropriateness of PE for this population remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of providing PE to Spanish speaking Puerto Ricans with PTSD. Particular attention was also focused on identifying challenges faced by clinicians with limited experience in PE. This information is relevant to help inform practice implications for training Spanish-speaking clinicians in PE. Results Fourteen patients with PTSD were randomly assigned to receive PE (n = 7 or usual care (UC (n = 7. PE therapy consisted of 15 weekly sessions focused on gradually confronting and emotionally processing distressing trauma-related memories and reminders. Five patients completed PE treatment; all patients attended the 15 sessions available to them. In UC, patients received mental health services available within the health care setting where they were recruited. They also had the option of self-referring to a mental health provider outside the study setting. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS was administered at baseline, mid-treatment, and post-treatment to assess PTSD symptom severity. Treatment completers in the PE group demonstrated significantly greater reductions in PTSD symptoms than the UC group. Forty percent of the PE patients showed clinically meaningful reductions in PTSD symptoms from pre- to post-treatment. Conclusions PE appears to be viable for treating Puerto Rican Spanish-speaking patients with PTSD. This therapy had good patient acceptability and led to improvements in PTSD symptoms. Attention to the clinicians' training process contributed strongly to helping them overcome the challenges posed by the intervention and increased their

  1. A Voice and a Vote: The Advisory Board Experiences of Spanish-Speaking Latina Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Lisa Ross; Gregory, Emily; Polk, Sarah; Chrismer, Marilyn Camacho; Giusti, Flor; Thompson, Darcy A.; Sibinga, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Latino children experience disparities in health care access and quality. Family advisory groups for clinics and hospitals may be one way to address disparities. We implemented and sustained an advisory board whose parent participants were exclusively limited-English proficient Latina mothers. As part of the board evaluation, we conducted semistructured individual interviews with parent participants during initial participation and after the final board meeting of the year. Members were satisfied with their board participation in both initial and follow-up interviews. They reported that board membership was an important way to improve clinic services and a unique opportunity for Latinos in the community. Experiences of discrimination and marginalization in health care settings were a theme across interviews. Members reported board membership countered these negative experiences. An advisory board including Spanish-speaking parents is an opportunity to engage vulnerable populations, which may result in broader impact on health care disparities. Los niños latinos experimentan disparidad en el acceso y calidad del cuidado de salud. Grupos de familias asesoras para clínicas y hospitales pueden ser una forma de hacer frente a las disparidades. Nosotros implementamos y sostuvimos un consejo asesor cuyos participantes fueron exclusivamente madres latinas con dominio limitado del inglés. Como parte de la evaluación del consejo, condujimos entrevistas semi-estructuradas individuales con las madres participantes durante la participación inicial y después de la última reunión del año del consejo. Los miembros estaban satisfechas con su participación en el consejo en ambas entrevistas, la inicial y la de seguimiento. Ellas reportaron que ser miembros del consejo era una forma importante para mejorar los servicios de la clínica y una oportunidad única para los latinos en la comunidad. Las experiencias de discriminación y marginalización en las instalaciones de

  2. Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, Christopher J; Allan, Darcey M; Goodrich, J Marc; Farrington, Amber L; Phillips, Beth M

    Children's self-regulation, including components of executive function such as inhibitory control, is related concurrently and longitudinally with elementary school children's reading and math abilities. Although several recent studies have examined links between preschool children's self-regulation or executive function and their academic skill development, few included large numbers of Spanish-speaking language-minority children. Among the fastest growing segments of the U.S. school-age population, many of these children are at significant risk of academic difficulties. We examined the relations between inhibitory control and academic skills in a sample containing a large number of Spanish-speaking preschoolers. Overall, the children demonstrated substantial academic risk based on preschool-entry vocabulary scores in the below-average range. Children completed assessments of language, literacy, and math skills in English and Spanish, when appropriate, at the start and end of their preschool year, along with a measure of inhibitory control, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, which was administered at the start of the preschool year in the child's dominant conversational language. Scores on this last measure were lower for children for whom it was administered in Spanish. For both English and Spanish outcomes, those scores were significantly and uniquely associated with higher scores on measures of phonological awareness and math skills but not vocabulary or print knowledge skills.

  3. Listening to middle-school Spanish-speaking English language learners: A qualitative study of their perspectives of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ferrao, Julio E.

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding and explanation of the science achievement gap between Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) and their mainstream peers. The sample of purposefully selected participants (N = 23) included students representing eight Spanish-speaking countries who attended three middle schools (grades 6th-8th), 11 boys and 12 girls, with different years of schooling in the United States, English proficiency levels, and science achievement levels. Data gathering strategies included individual interviews with participants, classroom observations, and analysis of secondary data sources on students' English language proficiency and science achievement. Data interpretation strategies using a critical-interpretive perspective consisted of coding and narrative analysis, including analyses of excerpts and case studies. Two major findings emerge from the study: (1) An inverse relation between participants' number of years of exposure to science learning in an English-only learning environment and their science achievement levels; and (2) specific participant-identified problems, such as learning the science vocabulary, writing in science, the use of mathematics in science, and the lack of sense making in the science classroom. Key recommendations comprise: (1) Acknowledging the value of dual language education; (2) supporting the science-literacy connection; (3) ensuring high-quality science through research-informed instructional strategies; and (4) assessing ELLs' science achievement.

  4. Supplement for Curriculum Guide for Mathematics: Spanish-Speaking Students, Grades 2-3 = Supplemento de la guia didactica de matematicas para los estudiantes de habla hispana, segundo y tercer grados. Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    A contrastive analysis approach is used in this supplementary math curriculum guide for Spanish-speaking second and third grade students in Chicago public schools. Lessons are presented for those objectives for which the instructional strategies used in the United States differ from those used in Spanish-speaking countries. (Objectives for which…

  5. Supplement for Curriculum Guide for Mathematics: Spanish-Speaking Students, Grades 7-8 = Supplemento de la guia didactica de matematicas para los estudiantes de habla hispana, septimo y octavo grados. Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    This supplementary math curriculum guide for use with Spanish-speaking students in Chicago public schools' seventh and eighth grade classes employs a contrastive analysis approach. Lessons are presented for objectives for which the instructional strategies used in the United States differ from those in Spanish-speaking countries. (Objectives for…

  6. Supplement for Curriculum Guide for Mathematics: Spanish-Speaking Students, Grades 4-6 = Supplemento de la guia didactica de matematicas para los estudiantes de habla hispana, cuatro-sexto grados. Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    This supplementary math curriculum guide for use with Spanish-speaking, fouth through sixth grade students in Chicago public schools employs a contrastive analysis approach. Lessons are presented for objectives for which the instructional strategies used in the United States differ from those used in Spanish-speaking countries. (Objectives for…

  7. Beginning English Literacy Development and Achievement among Spanish-Speaking Children in Arizona's English-Only Classrooms: A Four-Year Two-Cohort Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar; Blanchard, Jay; Atwill, Kim; Jiménez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study examined beginning English literacy-skill development and achievement among Spanish-speaking children enrolled in state-mandated English-only classrooms. The children possessed Spanish skill at or above age-appropriate level, yet minimal English skill, and came from a Spanish-speaking community adjacent to the U.S.-Mexico border. Under…

  8. California Conference on High Blood Pressure Control in the Spanish-Speaking Community (Los Angeles, California, April 1-2, 1978). Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    As part of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program effort, the conference explored the implications and impact of the prevalence of hypertension in Spanish-speaking populations in California. Approximately 150 experts in health fields, representing all levels of government, public and private health care providers, consumers, and health…

  9. A Phenomenological Study: Factors that Influence Spanish Speaking English Language Learners' Ability to Complete High School in a Public School District in the State of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, Daniela M.

    2010-01-01

    The researcher is a native Nicaraguan who has similar cultural background and language as the students and parents who participated in this study. The purpose of this study was to identify some of the factors that influence Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' ability to complete high school in a public school district in the State of…

  10. Mathematics Curriculum Guide for Spanish-Speaking Students, Levels A, B, C, D, Field Test. Working Draft = Guia didactica de Matematicas, Niveles A, B, C, D. Edicion Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    The introductory level curriculum guide for bilingual education for Spanish-speaking children in the Chicago public schools is divided into four difficulty levels and is designed to facilitate acquisition of mathematical concepts by presenting them in the children's native language. At each level, the concepts covered include the meaning of…

  11. Las Voces Nuevas del Sudoeste (New Voices of the Southwest). Symposium: "The Spanish-Speaking Child in the Schools of the Southwest" (Tucson, Arizona, October 30, 31, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Elinor, Ed.

    The symposium was held to publicize the positive efforts which were being undertaken to solve the problems of Spanish-speaking children and to provide a catalyst for the further action that was needed. The problems were explored from various points of view with two questions in mind: "What was being done?" and "What more could be…

  12. Enticing Spanish-Speaking Adolescents: Recent Books in Spanish for Every Taste/Cautivar a los Adolescentes Hispanohablantes: Libros Recientes en Espanol Para Todos los Gustos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1999-01-01

    Argues that books in Spanish can engage Spanish-speaking students in the reading process, and that fostering the love of reading is a necessary first step to reading proficiency in any language. Offers brief descriptions of 16 recently published books in Spanish, and describes a large database of recommended books for children and adolescents in…

  13. Predictors of Grade 2 Word Reading and Vocabulary Learning from Grade 1 Variables in Spanish-Speaking Children: Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, Alexandra; Collins, Penny; Baciu, Iuliana; Gebotys, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We examined the components of first (L1) and second language (L2) phonological processing that are related to L2 word reading and vocabulary. Spanish-speaking English learners (EL) were classified as average or low readers in grades 1 and 2. A large number of children who started out as poor readers in first grade became average readers in second…

  14. Advanced Course Enrollment and Performance in Washington State: Comparing Spanish-Speaking Students with Other Language Minority Students and English-Only Speakers. REL 2017-220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Havala; Bisht, Biraj; Motamedi, Jason Greenberg

    2017-01-01

    Students who take advanced courses in high school are more likely to enroll and persist in college. This report describes patterns in advanced coursetaking among three groups of students in Washington state: Spanish-speaking students, other language minority students whose primary or home language is not Spanish, and English-only speakers. This…

  15. Early Comprehension Instruction for Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Teaching Text-Level Reading Skills while Maintaining Effects on Word-Level Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Emily J.; Gerber, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three instructional conditions on precursors to successful reading for Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELL). The study was conducted using a randomized, alternate treatment control group design specifically targeting phonological awareness (PA) listening comprehension (LC), and decoding in a…

  16. ""Una Persona Derechita" (Staying Right in the Mind)": Perceptions of Spanish-Speaking Mexican American Older Adults in South Texas "Colonias"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Joseph R.; Sharf, Barbara F.; St. John, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the perceptions of brain health among older Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans who reside in colonia areas of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Design and Methods: In 2007, 33 Mexican American older adults (9 men and 24 women) were recruited by "promotoras" (community health workers) from clusters of…

  17. Bilingual and Biliteracy Skills in Young Spanish-Speaking Low-SES Children: Impact of Instructional Language and Primary Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm-Leary, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to better understand the bilingual and biliteracy skills of Spanish-speaking low-socio-economic status (low-SES) children who attended an English or a bilingual programme during preschool and kindergarten/first grade, and to determine whether their outcomes varied according to instructional language and primary…

  18. ""Una Persona Derechita" (Staying Right in the Mind)": Perceptions of Spanish-Speaking Mexican American Older Adults in South Texas "Colonias"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Joseph R.; Sharf, Barbara F.; St. John, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the perceptions of brain health among older Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans who reside in colonia areas of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Design and Methods: In 2007, 33 Mexican American older adults (9 men and 24 women) were recruited by "promotoras" (community health workers) from clusters of…

  19. Mathematics Curriculum Guide for Spanish-Speaking Students, Levels A, B, C, D, Field Test. Working Draft = Guia didactica de Matematicas, Niveles A, B, C, D. Edicion Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    The introductory level curriculum guide for bilingual education for Spanish-speaking children in the Chicago public schools is divided into four difficulty levels and is designed to facilitate acquisition of mathematical concepts by presenting them in the children's native language. At each level, the concepts covered include the meaning of…

  20. Spanish-Speaking Children's Spelling Errors with English Vowel Sounds that Are Represented by Different Graphemes in English and Spanish Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Alperin, M. Kendra; Wang, Min

    2008-01-01

    Vowels in Spanish have direct one-to-one letter-sound correspondences, whereas vowels in English usually have multiple spellings. For native Spanish-speaking children learning to spell in English, this transition from a shallow to a deep orthography could potentially cause difficulties. We examined whether the spelling of English vowel sounds was…

  1. Enticing Spanish-Speaking Adolescents: Recent Books in Spanish for Every Taste/Cautivar a los Adolescentes Hispanohablantes: Libros Recientes en Espanol Para Todos los Gustos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1999-01-01

    Argues that books in Spanish can engage Spanish-speaking students in the reading process, and that fostering the love of reading is a necessary first step to reading proficiency in any language. Offers brief descriptions of 16 recently published books in Spanish, and describes a large database of recommended books for children and adolescents in…

  2. Evaluation of the Utility of the "Revised Get Ready to Read!" For Spanish-Speaking English-Language Learners through Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Amber L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Farver, JoAnn M.; McDowell, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Children who are Spanish-speaking English-language learners (ELLs) comprise a rapidly growing percentage of the population in U.S. schools. To determine which of these children have weaker emergent literacy skills and are in need of intervention, it is necessary to assess emergent literacy skills accurately and reliably. In this study, 1,318…

  3. Development and Validation of Extract the Base: An English Derivational Morphology Test for Third through Fifth Grade Monolingual Students and Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Amanda P.; Huggins, A. Corinne; Carlo, Maria; Malabonga, Valerie; Kenyon, Dorry; Louguit, Mohammed; August, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and validation of the Extract the Base test (ETB), which assesses derivational morphological awareness. Scores on this test were validated for 580 monolingual students and 373 Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) in third through fifth grade. As part of the validation of the internal structure,…

  4. Early Oral Language and Later Reading Development in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Evidence from a Nine-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Using nationally-representative, longitudinal data on a cohort of Spanish-speaking English language learners in the U.S., this study investigated the extent to which early oral language proficiency in Spanish and English predicts later levels and rates of growth in English reading. Latent growth models indicated that both Spanish and English…

  5. Misreporting of Dietary Intake Affects Estimated Nutrient Intakes in Low-Income Spanish-Speaking Women

    OpenAIRE

    Banna, JC; Fialkowski, MK; Townsend, MS

    2014-01-01

    © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Misreporting of dietary intake affects the validity of data collected and conclusions drawn in studies exploring diet and health outcomes. One consequence of misreporting is biological implausibility. Little is known regarding how accounting for biological implausibility of reported intake affects nutrient intake estimates in Hispanics, a rapidly growing demographic in the United States. Our study explores the effect of accounting for plausibility on...

  6. Executive function of Spanish-speaking language-minority preschoolers: Structure and relations with early literacy skills and behavioral outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, Christopher J; Lerner, Matthew D; Goodrich, J Marc; Farrington, Amber L; Allan, Darcey M

    2016-04-01

    Young children's executive function (EF) is increasingly recognized as an important construct associated with development in cognitive and socioemotional domains. To date, however, few studies have examined EF in populations of language-minority children. In this study, 241 Spanish-speaking language-minority preschoolers who ranged in age from 38 to 69 months (M=54.23 months, SD=6.17) completed three tasks designed to measure inhibitory control (IC) and four tasks designed to measure working memory (WM). Children completed assessments of their vocabulary skills, early literacy skills, and behavioral self-regulation in both English and Spanish, and their classroom teachers completed three behavior rating measures. Children were classified as more proficient in English or Spanish based on their scores on the vocabulary measures, and all IC and WM measures were administered in the children's more proficient language. Results of confirmatory factor analyses supported a two-factor model of EF for both groups of children as well as strong measurement and structural invariance across groups. Children's EF was substantially related to the language, early literacy, and behavioral self-regulation measures as well as teacher ratings of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. For children with more proficient English, EF was associated with skills in both English and Spanish; however, for children with more proficient Spanish, EF was associated primarily with skills in Spanish. These results provide evidence of strong correspondence for EF measured in Spanish-speaking language-minority preschoolers and monolingual preschoolers, and they identify a potential key factor that can enhance understanding of development in this population of children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Validity and reliability of two brief physical activity questionnaires among Spanish-speaking individuals of Mexican descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mexican Americans are the largest minority group in the US and suffer disproportionate rates of diseases related to the lack of physical activity (PA). Since many of these Mexican Americans are Spanish-speaking, it is important to validate a Spanish language physical activity assessment tool that can be used in epidemiology as well as clinical practice. This study explored the utility of two Spanish translated physical activity questionnaires, the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) and the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity (RAPA), for use among Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans. Methods Thirty-four participants (13 M, 21 F; 37.6 ± 9.5 y) completed each of the two PA surveys twice, one week apart. During that week 31 participants also wore an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer for 7 days to objectively measure PA. Minutes of moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA) were determined from the accelerometer data using Freedson and Matthews cut points. Results Validity, determined by Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and minutes of ActiGraph measured MVPA were 0.38 and 0.45 for the SBAS and RAPA, respectively. Test-retest reliability was 0.61 for the SBAS and 0.65 for the RAPA. Sensitivity and specificity were 0.60 and 0.47 for the SBAS, and 0.73 and 0.75 for the RAPA. Participants who were classified as meeting the 2008 National Physical Activity Guidelines by the RAPA engaged in significantly (p questionnaires had comparable reliability, the RAPA was better able to distinguish between those who met and did not meet National PA Guidelines. PMID:24410978

  8. Spontaneous speech: Quantifying daily communication in Spanish-speaking individuals with aphasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martínez-Ferreiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Observable disruptions in spontaneous speech are among the most prominent characteristics of aphasia. The potential of language production analyses in discourse contexts to reveal subtle language deficits has been progressively exploited, becoming essential for diagnosing language disorders (Vermeulen et al., 1989; Goodglass et al., 2000; Prins and Bastiaanse, 2004; Jaecks et al., 2012. Based on previous studies, short and/or fragmentary utterances, and consequently a shorter MLU, are expected in the speech of individuals with aphasia, together with a large proportions of incomplete sentences and a limited use of embeddings. Fewer verbs with a lower diversity (lower type/token ratio and fewer internal arguments are also predicted, as well as a low proportion of inflected verbs (Bastiaanse and Jonkers, 1998. However, this profile comes mainly from the study of individuals with prototypical aphasia types, mainly Broca’s aphasia, raising the question of how accurate spontaneous speech is to pinpoint deficits in individuals with less clear diagnoses. To address this question, we present the results of a spontaneous speech analysis of 25 Spanish-speaking subjects: 10 individuals with aphasia (IWAs, 7 male and 3 female (mean age: 64.2 in neural stable condition (> 1 year post-onset who suffered from a single CVA in the left hemisphere (Rosell, 2005, and 15 non-brain-damaged matched speakers (NBDs. In the aphasia group, 7 of the participants were diagnosed as non-fluent (1 motor aphasia, 4 transcortical motor aphasia or motor aphasia with signs of transcorticality, 2 mixed aphasia with motor predominance, and 3 of them as fluent (mixed aphasia with anomic predominance. The protocol for data collection included semi-standardized interviews, in which participants were asked 3 questions evoking past, present, and future events (last job, holidays, and hobbies. 300 words per participant were analyzed. The MLU over the total 300 words revealed a decreased

  9. Lay experiences and concerns with asthma in an urban Hispanic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene; Zayas, Luis E

    2006-06-01

    National asthma guidelines are often not translated into practice. Barriers to translation impactboth provider and patient adherence. This qualitative study describes how perceptions and experiences of patients with asthma or their caregivers affect disease management in a Puerto Rican community in Buffalo, NY. Two community-based asthma workshops following a focus group format were conducted with 22 Puerto Rican adults with asthma or who cared for asthmatic children. A bilingual-bicultural community moderator used a semistructured interview guide to foster discussion on asthma definitions, triggers, management, coping and concerns. Four analysts interpreted data transcripts following the grounded theory approach, identifying salient thematic categories. Multiple analysts and a postsearch for conflicting evidence support analytical trustworthiness. Perceptions of illness revealed concerns about the deceiving character and burden of asthma. Recognition of indoor household triggers underscored concerns about the impact on quality of life, emergency department use, and the ineffectiveness or side effects of some prescribed therapies. Misconceptions about asthma and self-management strategies were identified. Learning about lay perceptions and management approaches regarding asthma may afford healthcare professionals insight to better understand, educate and care for ethnic minority patients, and help to improve their asthma outcomes.

  10. 76 FR 37820 - Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... communications to meet the need for adapted risk communications based on literacy, Spanish language, culture... public health information to millions of Spanish-speaking consumers within the targeted populations... . For financial and administrative questions or concerns: Gladys M. Melendez, Office of Acquisition...

  11. Physical activity maintenance among Spanish-speaking Latinas in a randomized controlled trial of an Internet-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sheri J; Dunsiger, Shira I; Bock, Beth C; Larsen, Britta A; Linke, Sarah; Pekmezi, Dori; Marquez, Becky; Gans, Kim M; Mendoza-Vasconez, Andrea S; Marcus, Bess H

    2017-06-01

    Spanish-speaking Latinas have some of the lowest rates of meeting physical activity guidelines in the U.S. and are at high risk for many related chronic diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the maintenance of a culturally and individually-tailored Internet-based physical activity intervention for Spanish-speaking Latinas. Inactive Latinas (N  =  205) were randomly assigned to a 6-month Tailored Physical Activity Internet Intervention or a Wellness Contact Control Internet Group, with a 6-month follow-up. Maintenance was measured by assessing group differences in minutes per week of self-reported and accelerometer measured moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at 12 months after baseline and changes in MVPA between the end of the active intervention (month 6) and the end of the study (month 12). Potential moderators of the intervention were also examined. Data were collected between 2011 and 2014, and were analyzed in 2015 at the University of California, San Diego. The Intervention Group engaged in significantly more minutes of MVPA per week than the Control Group at the end of the maintenance period for both self-reported (mean diff. = 30.68, SE = 11.27, p = .007) and accelerometer measured (mean diff. = 11.47, SE = 3.19, p = .01) MVPA. There were no significant between- or within-group changes in MVPA from month 6 to 12. Greater intervention effects were seen for those with lower BMI (BMI × intervention = -6.67, SE = 2.88, p = .02) and lower perceived places to walk to in their neighborhood (access × intervention = -43.25, SE = 19.07, p = .02), with a trend for less family support (social support × intervention = -3.49, SE = 2.05, p = .08). Acculturation, health literacy, and physical activity related psychosocial variables were not significant moderators of the intervention effect during the maintenance period. Findings from the current study support the efficacy of an Internet

  12. “‘Sólo Soy Un Guitarrista’: Bob Dylan in the Spanish-Speaking World—Influences, Parallels, Reception, and Translation”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Rollason

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines key aspects of the relationship between the work of Bob Dylan and the cultures of Spain and Spanish-speaking Latin America, including the Spanish/Latin American presence in Dylan’s songs and prose texts; the reception of Dylan’s work by Spanish-speaking critics and intellectuals; influences and parallels between Dylan and Spanish/Latin American musicians and writers, notably Federico García Lorca; and the translation of Dylan into Spanish. Dylan’s work is seen as a hybrid cultural phenomenon, generating connections between high-cultural and popular elements. Its two-way relationship with Hispanophone culture is seen as an interesting case of bridge-building between cultural systems.

  13. Assessment of health literacy and numeracy among Spanish-Speaking parents of young children: validation of the Spanish Parental Health Literacy Activities Test (PHLAT Spanish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Sanders, Lee M; Rothman, Russell L; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; White, Richard O; Finkle, Joanne P; Prendes, Stefania; Perrin, Eliana M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the health literacy and numeracy skills of Spanish-speaking parents of young children and to validate a new Spanish language health literacy assessment for parents, the Spanish Parental Health Literacy Activities Test (PHLAT Spanish). Cross-sectional study of Spanish-speaking caregivers of young children (education (r = 0.49), S-TOFHLA (r = 0.53), and WRAT-3 (r = 0.55) scores (P parents have difficulty performing health-related literacy and numeracy tasks. The Spanish PHLAT demonstrates good psychometric characteristics and may be useful for identifying parents who would benefit from receiving low-literacy child health information. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vida Sana: a lifestyle intervention for uninsured, predominantly Spanish-speaking immigrants improves metabolic syndrome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jacob; Yekta, Shahla; Joseph, Valerie; Johnson, Heather; Oliverio, Susan; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasingly common condition that can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. 35 % of adults living in the United States meet the criteria for having metabolic syndrome, with that number being even higher in populations with health disparities. We describe a 'healthy lifestyles' program implemented at a free clinic serving a predominantly Hispanic cohort of low-income, uninsured individuals living in Providence, Rhode Island. The "Vida Sana/Healthy Life" (Vida Sana) program uses low literacy, language-appropriate materials and trained peers to educate participants about healthy lifestyles in a setting that also provided opportunities for social engagement. 192 of 126 (65.6 %) participants in Vida Sana completed 6 out of 8 sessions of the Vida Sana program over a 12-month period. At the completion of the program, nearly 90 % of Vida Sana participants showed an increase in their health literacy, and at least 60 % of participants decreased each of the risk factors (blood sugar, cholesterol, body mass index or waist circumference) associated with metabolic syndrome.

  15. Perceptions of Patient-Provider Communication in Breast and Cervical Cancer-Related Care: A Qualitative Study of Low-Income English- and Spanish-Speaking Women

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa A. Simon; Ragas, Daiva M.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Dong, XinQi

    2013-01-01

    To explore patient perceptions of patient-provider communication in breast and cervical cancer-related care among low-income English- and Spanish- speaking women, we examined communication barriers and facilitators reported by patients receiving care at safety net clinics. Participants were interviewed in English or Spanish after receiving an abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening test or cancer diagnosis. Following an inductive approach, interviews were coded and analyzed by the langua...

  16. Using an iPad for Basic Communication Between Spanish-Speaking Families and Nurses in Pediatric Acute Care: A Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kylie H; Mixer, Sandra J

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of Spanish speakers in the United States poses communication challenges for healthcare providers. Language barriers in pediatric acute care have been associated with an increased risk for adverse events, longer hospital stays, and decreased quality of care. In addition, clinicians' usage of interpreter services is inconsistent. In fact, nurses often lack interpreter support during daily bedside care. Nursing staff at a pediatric children's hospital in the southeastern United States identified bedside communication with Spanish-speaking patients and families as a clinical challenge. To address this challenge, a basic communication interface, UTalk version 1.0 (the author is the owner and proprietor), supported by an Apple iPad, was developed by the researcher with input from nursing staff, a certified medical interpreter, and Spanish-speaking community members. A feasibility pilot study of the interface's usability and engagement was conducted on the hospital's pediatric medical-surgical unit through qualitative interviews with nurse-family dyads. Three themes emerged from the data: UTalk-facilitated communication, UTalk needs improvement, and interpreter miscommunication. These findings indicate that a mobile digital device interface is a feasible method for augmenting bedside communication with Spanish-speaking patients and families. These results also may serve as a reference for the development of similar mobile device interfaces. Further research with a larger sample size is needed.

  17. The Latino Physician Shortage: How the Affordable Care Act Increases the Value of Latino Spanish-Speaking Physicians and What Efforts Can Increase Their Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, David A; Alvarez-Estrada, Miguel; Alpert, Abigail E

    2017-03-31

    The United States Latino population is growing at a rapid pace and is set to reach nearly 30% by 2050. The demand for culturally and linguistically competent health care is increasing in lockstep with this growth; however, the supply of doctors with skills and experience suited for this care is lagging. In particular, there is a major shortage of Latino Spanish-speaking physicians, and the gap between demand and supply is widening. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has increased the capacity of the US healthcare system to care for the growing Latino Spanish-speaking population, through health insurance exchanges, increased funding for safety net institutions, and efforts to improve efficiency and coordination of care, particularly with Accountable Care Organizations and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. With these policies in mind, the authors discuss how the value of Latino Spanish-speaking physicians to the healthcare system has increased under the environment of the ACA. In addition, the authors highlight key efforts to increase the supply of this physician population, including the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act, premedical pipeline programs, and academic medicine and medical school education initiatives to increase Latino representation among physicians.

  18. Interactive nutrition education via a touchscreen: is this technology well received by low-income Spanish-speaking parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Darcy A; Joshi, Ashish; Hernandez, Raquel G; Jennings, Jacky M; Arora, Mohit; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the usability of touchscreen mediated nutrition and feeding educational modules among low-income Latino immigrant parents. A cross-sectional study was performed March-August, 2010 in an outpatient pediatric setting among low-income Spanish-speaking parents of children educational modules focused on infant/toddler nutrition and feeding were delivered via touchscreen to participants in Spanish using a multimedia format including text, audio and pictures. Viewing of all modules lasted 25 minutes. Demographic and computer use data was collected. The outcomes assessed were perceived ease of use of the touchsreen and usefulness of the educational modules. The majority of the eighty participants reported rarely/never using a computer (64%; n=51) and 46% reported ≤ 8th grade education. 92% of participants found the touchscreen 'easy'/'very easy' to use. Nearly all users found the modules 'useful' (95%) and 'easy' to understand (96%). Higher educated individuals were more likely to find the touchscreen 'very easy' versus 'easy' to use (Odds Ratio=3.67, 95% CI:1.18-11.43) and the modules 'very easy' to understand (OR=3.99, 95% CI:1.37-11.62). Despite low computer experience levels, participants perceived touchscreens and the content presented as highly usable. Ongoing evaluation of providing targeted health education via touchscreens in this population is indicated.

  19. Evaluating the Linguistic Appropriateness and Cultural Sensitivity of a Self-Report System for Spanish-Speaking Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Tofthagen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spanish speakers in the United States encounter numerous communication barriers during cancer treatment. Communication-focused interventions may help Spanish speakers communicate better with healthcare providers and manage symptoms and quality of life issues (SQOL. For this study, we developed a Spanish version of the electronic self-report assessment for cancer (ESRA-C, a web-based program that helps people with cancer report, track, and manage cancer-related SQOL. Four methods were used to evaluate the Spanish version. Focus groups and cognitive interviews were conducted with 51 Spanish-speaking individuals to elicit feedback. Readability was assessed using the Fry readability formula. The cultural sensitivity assessment tool was applied by three bilingual, bicultural reviewers. Revisions were made to personalize the introduction using a patient story and photos and to simplify language. Focus group participants endorsed changes to the program in a second round of focus groups. Cultural sensitivity of the program was scored unacceptable (x¯=3.0 for audiovisual material and acceptable (x¯=3.0 for written material. Fry reading levels ranged from 4th to 10th grade. Findings from this study provide several next steps to refine ESRA-C for Spanish speakers with cancer.

  20. El Asesino Silencioso: A Methodology for Alerting the Spanish Speaking Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G.

    As a result of a survey of 2,322 Houston adults, a nine-phase methodology was used to design a program of public education about cardiovascular disease (CVD). Survey results indicated that Mexican Americans were significantly less knowledgeable than Anglos concerning the impact, nature, and control of CVD. Many Mexican Americans could not…

  1. Monolingual Ideologies and Multilingual Practices in Small Claims Court: The Case of Spanish-Speaking Arbitrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeyer, Philipp Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the institutional policies and practices concerning multilingualism in small claims courts in New York City. Building on prior work that has investigated the language use of court interpreters and of the litigants for whom they translate, this study focuses on the analysis of institutional interactions in which all…

  2. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M

    2011-06-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project-a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided.

  3. Traditional foods and practices of Spanish-speaking Latina mothers influence the home food environment: implications for future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alexandra; Chow, Sherman; Jennings, Rose; Dave, Jayna; Scoblick, Kathryn; Sterba, Katherine Regan; Loyo, Jennifer

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to obtain in-depth information from low-income, Spanish-speaking Latino families with young children to guide the development of culturally appropriate nutrition interventions. Focus groups were used to assess parent's knowledge about healthful eating, the home food environment, perceived influences on children's eating habits, food purchasing practices, and commonly used strategies to promote healthful eating among their children. Thirty-four Latino parents (33 women; 27 born in Mexico; 21 food-insecure) of preschool-aged children participated in four focus group discussions conducted in Spanish by a trained moderator. The focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, and coded by independent raters. Results suggest that in general, parents were very knowledgeable about healthful eating and cited both parents and school as significant factors influencing children's eating habits; at home, most families had more traditional Mexican foods available than American foods; cost and familiarity with foods were the most influential factors affecting food purchasing; many parents had rules regarding sugar intake; and parents cited role modeling, reinforcement, and creative food preparation as ways to encourage children's healthful eating habits. Finally, parents generated ideas on how to best assist Latino families through interventions. Parents indicated that future interventions should be community based and teach skills to purchase and prepare meals that include low-cost and traditional Mexican ingredients, using hands-on activities. In addition, interventions could encourage and reinforce healthy food-related practices that Latino families bring from their native countries. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perceptions of patient-provider communication in breast and cervical cancer-related care: a qualitative study of low-income English- and Spanish-speaking women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melissa A; Ragas, Daiva M; Nonzee, Narissa J; Phisuthikul, Ava M; Luu, Thanh Ha; Dong, XinQi

    2013-08-01

    To explore patient perceptions of patient-provider communication in breast and cervical cancer-related care among low-income English- and Spanish-speaking women, we examined communication barriers and facilitators reported by patients receiving care at safety net clinics. Participants were interviewed in English or Spanish after receiving an abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening test or cancer diagnosis. Following an inductive approach, interviews were coded and analyzed by the language spoken with providers and patient-provider language concordance status. Of 78 participants, 53 % (n = 41) were English-speakers and 47 % (n = 37) were Spanish-speakers. All English-speakers were language-concordant with providers. Of Spanish-speakers, 27 % (n = 10) were Spanish-concordant; 38 % (n = 14) were Spanish-discordant, requiring an interpreter; and 35 % (n = 13) were Spanish mixed-concordant, experiencing both types of communication throughout the care continuum. English-speakers focused on communication barriers, and difficulty understanding jargon arose as a theme. Spanish-speakers emphasized communication facilitators related to Spanish language use. Themes among all Spanish-speaking sub-groups included appreciation for language support resources and preference for Spanish-speaking providers. Mixed-concordant participants accounted for the majority of Spanish-speakers who reported communication barriers. Our data suggest that, although perception of patient-provider communication may depend on the language spoken throughout the care continuum, jargon is lost when health information is communicated in Spanish. Further, the respective consistency of language concordance or interpretation may play a role in patient perception of patient-provider communication.

  5. Measurement Invariance of Torrance Test of Creative Thinking Figural Scores across Age: A study in Spanish-Speaking Children and Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela L. Krumm

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a previous study carried out with Spanish-speaking children which indicates that the Creativity construct, operationalized by means of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT-Figural, consists of two factors –Innovation and Adaptation– (Krumm, Lemos & Arán Filippetti, in press, the objective of the present work was to prove whether this structure is invariant across age. A sample of 652 Spanish-speaking children and adolescents aged 9-17 years of both sexes was tested. It was in turn divided into three age groups: (a 9-10, (b 11-13 and (c 16 -17 years. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA showed that in each group of the sample, the structure of the TTCT is composed of two correlated factors, namely Innovation and Adaptation. In addition, Multigroup CFA demonstrated that the two-factor solution was actually invariant (configural and metric across age, meaning that children and adolescents equally conceptualize the Creativity construct. Finally, MANOVA showed a significant age effect on every subscale. These data suggest the relevance of considering the age factor when assessing the creative potential through the TTCT-Figural.

  6. Use of the MoCA in Detecting Early Alzheimer's Disease in a Spanish-Speaking Population with Varied Levels of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA has been demonstrated to be dependent on the educational level. The purpose of this study was to identify how to best adjust MoCA scores and to identify MoCA items most sensitive to cognitive decline in incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD in a Spanish-speaking population with varied levels of education. Methods: We analyzed data from 50 Spanish-speaking participants. We examined the pattern of diagnosis-adjusted MoCA residuals in relation to education and compared four alternative score adjustments using bootstrap sampling. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were performed for the raw and each adjusted score. The interval reliability of the MoCA as well as item discrimination and item validity were examined. Results: We found that with progressive compensation added for those with lower education, unexplained residuals decreased and education-residual association moved to zero, suggesting that more compensation was necessary to better adjust MoCA scores in those with a lower educational level. Cube copying, sentence repetition, delayed recall, and orientation were most sensitive to cognitive impairment due to AD. Conclusion: A compensation of 3-4 points was needed for <6 years of education. Overall, the Spanish version of the MoCA maintained adequate psychometric properties in this population.

  7. Tailored, interactive soap operas for breast cancer education of high-risk Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibaja, M L; Kingery, P; Neff, N E; Smith, Q; Bowman, J; Holcomb, J D

    2000-01-01

    While Hispanic women have lower rates of breast cancer than do women of other ethnic groups, they are the least likely to undergo screening examinations. This study evaluated a culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate, tailored, computer-based, educational program for early detection of breast cancer aimed at high-risk Hispanic women. Spanish-speaking Hispanic women from an inner-city community health clinic were recruited and randomly assigned either to a computer intervention with an interactive soap-opera format (n = 118) or to a comparison group (n = 60). Pre- and posttests were used to identify any change in breast-cancer-related knowledge and beliefs. Both younger (18-40 years old) and older (41-65 years old) women in the intervention group demonstrated significant increases in their breast cancer screening knowledge and beliefs as compared with the younger and older women in the comparison group (n soap operas that are linguistically and culturally appropriate are effective in increasing breast cancer screening knowledge and beliefs among underserved Spanish-speaking Hispanic women.

  8. [The use of bibliographic databases by Spanish-speaking Latin American biomedical researchers: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Edgar Guillermo; Reveiz Herault, Ludovic; Cardona, Andrés Felipe

    2005-04-01

    To describe how Spanish-speaking biomedical professionals in Latin America access and utilize bibliographic databases. Based on a MEDLINE search, 2 515 articles published between August 2002 and August 2003 were identified that dealt with and/or had authors from 16 countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The search was limited to references to basic science, clinical science, or social medicine. A survey was sent by e-mail to researchers who lived in 15 of the 16 countries (the exception being Nicaragua). The survey asked about the researcher's area of work (basic science, clinical science, or public health), the level of skill in using databases, the frequency and type of access to the databases most utilized, the impact from not having access to the full text of articles when preparing a manuscript, and how the respondent usually obtained the full-text version of articles. A total of 586 e-mail messages with the survey were sent out, and 185 responses were received (32%). The databases most utilized to obtain biomedical information were MEDLINE (34.1%), general search engines (Google, Yahoo!, and AltaVista) (15.9%), on-line journals (9.8%), BIREME-LILACS (6.0%), BioMedNet (5.4%), the databases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States of America (5.2%), and the Cochrane Library (4.9%). Of the respondents, 64% said they had average or advanced abilities in using MEDLINE. However, 71% of the respondents did not use or were not aware of the MEDLINE Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), a controlled vocabulary established by the National Library of Medicine of the United States of America for indexing articles. The frequency of accessing the databases was similar in all the countries studied, without significant differences in terms of the type of access (authorized access to commercial databases, unauthorized access to

  9. Use of Visuals for Food Safety Education of Spanish-Speaking Foodservice Workers: A Case Study in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2012-01-01

    Providing food safety training to an audience whose native language is not English is always a challenge. In the study reported here, minimal-text visuals in Spanish were used to train Hispanic foodservice workers about proper handwashing technique and glove use based on the 2005 Food Code requirements. Overall, results indicated that visuals…

  10. Use of Visuals for Food Safety Education of Spanish-Speaking Foodservice Workers: A Case Study in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2012-01-01

    Providing food safety training to an audience whose native language is not English is always a challenge. In the study reported here, minimal-text visuals in Spanish were used to train Hispanic foodservice workers about proper handwashing technique and glove use based on the 2005 Food Code requirements. Overall, results indicated that visuals…

  11. Examining Student Cognitive and Affective Engagement and Reading Instructional Activities: Spanish-Speaking English Learners' Reading Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Ana Taboada; Gallagher, Melissa; Smith, Peet; Buehl, Michelle M.; Beck, Jori S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has emphasized the key role of engagement in helping students succeed in school and beyond. Given the academic struggles that many English learners (ELs) face as they transition to middle school, exploring the facets of engagement in middle school ELs is needed. We established reader profiles for eight sixth grade Hispanic ELs and…

  12. Validation of the Spanish SIRS with monolingual Hispanic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Amor A; Rogers, Richard; Hoersting, Raquel

    2010-09-01

    Psychologists are faced with formidable challenges in making their assessment methods relevant to growing numbers of Hispanic clients for whom English is not the primary or preferred language. Among other clinical issues, the determination of malingering has profound consequences for clients. In this investigation, we evaluated a Spanish translation of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS; Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1992) with 80 Spanish-speaking Hispanic American outpatients. Using a between-subjects simulation design, the Spanish SIRS was found to produce reliable results with small standard errors of measurement. Regarding validity, very large effect sizes (mean Cohen's d= 2.00) were observed between feigners and honest responders for the SIRS primary scales. We consider the potential role of the Spanish SIRS with reference to Spanish translations for other assessment instruments.

  13. Statement of Henry M. Ramirez, Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for Spanish Speaking People, Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, July 23, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Henry M.

    On July 23, 1973, Dr. Henry M. Ramirez, Chariman of the Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for Spanish Speaking People, spoke before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations. Dr. Ramirez outlined why the Cabinet Committee is needed, gave examples of the Committee's accomplishments, and discussed future plans to assure that…

  14. [image omitted] Verbal fluency in Spanish-speaking children: analysis model according to task type, clustering, and switching strategies and performance over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetti, Vanessa Aran; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2011-04-01

    Verbal fluency (VF) tasks are extensively used to measure strategic retrieval and executive functioning. Results for total production of words, clustering and switching strategies, and performance over time for Spanish-speaking children are provided. A total of 120 children, ranging in age from 8 to 11, were divided by age into two groups and evaluated. A higher total score for words produced in the semantic compared with the phonological task, a correlation between clustering and switching strategies and total score, and decreased task performance over time were evidenced. These scores were higher in the older group. Moreover, an association was found between verbal fluency tasks, strategies employed, and cognitive executive functions. This indicates that clustering and switching strategies provide indicators of strategic retrieval and executive processes. Together the results suggest that these fluency scores are valuable to measure underlying cognitive processes and retrieval strategies and therefore could be useful to assess executive function deficits in children.

  15. Spanish-speaking Mexican-American Families' Involvement in School-based Activities and their Children's Literacy: The Implications of Having Teachers who Speak Spanish and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sandra; Dearing, Eric; Weiss, Heather B

    2012-06-01

    For a sample of low-income, Spanish-speaking Mexican-American families (n = 72), we investigated associations between family involvement in school-based activities and children's literacy in their preferred language (English or Spanish) during early elementary school. We gave special attention to the potential moderating role of teacher fluency in Spanish. Between kindergarten and third grade, family involvement in school-based activities increased for children who displayed early literacy problems. The rate of increase was greater for children who consistently had bilingual teachers than for children who did not. In turn, increased family involvement predicted better literacy skills at third grade, particularly for children who struggled early. We discuss these results in light of recent recommendations to increase the number of elementary school teachers who are fluent in Spanish and English.

  16. Brief Report: Attitudes about Responding to Survey Questions Concerning Childhood Sexual Abuse by Hispanic Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Frederick A.; Salinas, Nancy I.; Perez, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    In no studies have research participants been asked how they feel about answering questions concerning childhood sexual abuse. We have performed searches from two different search engines again and have found nothing published which specifically addresses this question in the way we have. A questionnaire about childhood sexual abuse was…

  17. Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Carmody, Tom; Akhtar, Maleeha; Stebbins, Mary B; Walters, Scott T; Warden, Diane

    2015-12-01

    This study explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome.

  18. Broadcasting behavior change: a comparison of the effectiveness of paid and unpaid media to increase folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption among Hispanic women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alina L; Prue, Christine E; Daniel, Katherine Lyon

    2007-04-01

    Awareness about folic acid's effectiveness in reducing the risk of certain birth defects has increased among women in the United States; however, few Hispanic women are consuming enough folic acid daily. A 1998 survey conducted by the Gallup Organization for the National March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation found that English-speaking Hispanic women had lower folic acid awareness (53% vs. 72%) and lower daily consumption (29% vs. 33%) than non-Hispanic White women. In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted baseline surveys with Spanish-speaking Hispanic women in selected U.S. markets to measure folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption. A Spanish-language public service announcement (PSA) volunteer campaign and a paid Spanish-language media and community education campaign were conducted in 2000 and 2002, respectively. Comparisons of postcampaign surveys indicate that the paid media campaign was significantly more effective than the PSA campaign in increasing folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption among Spanish-speaking Hispanic women.

  19. Health Literacy and Patient-Reported Outcomes: A Cross-Sectional Study of Underserved English- and Spanish-Speaking Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Burns, James L; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Rutsohn, Joshua P; Baker, David W

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between patient characteristics, health behaviors, and health outcomes and explored the role of health literacy as a potential mediator of outcomes. English- and Spanish-speaking adults with Type 2 diabetes used a bilingual multimedia touchscreen to complete questionnaires. The behavioral model for vulnerable populations guided multivariable regression and mediation testing. Dependent variables were diabetes self-care, health status, and satisfaction with communication. Independent variables included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, health literacy, health beliefs, and self-efficacy. Spanish speakers had lower health literacy and poorer physical, mental, and overall health compared to English speakers. Higher health literacy was associated with less social support for diet, fewer diet and medication barriers, younger age, higher diabetes knowledge, and talking with health care professionals to get diabetes information. In contrast to expectations, health literacy was not associated with diabetes self-care, health status, or satisfaction with communication, and it did not mediate the effects of other factors on these outcomes. Diabetes self-efficacy was significantly associated with health behaviors and outcomes. The association between Spanish language preference and poorer health was not mediated by this group's lower health literacy. Increasing health-related self-efficacy might be an important clinical strategy for improving outcomes in underserved patients with Type 2 diabetes.

  20. Attitudes toward science: measurement and psychometric properties of the Test of Science-Related Attitudes for its use in Spanish-speaking classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Marianela; Förster, Carla; González, Caterina; González-Pose, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    Understanding attitudes toward science and measuring them remain two major challenges for science teaching. This article reviews the concept of attitudes toward science and their measurement. It subsequently analyzes the psychometric properties of the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA), such as its construct validity, its discriminant and concurrent validity, and its reliability. The evidence presented suggests that TOSRA, in its Spanish-adapted version, has adequate construct validity regarding its theoretical referents, as well as good indexes of reliability. In addition, it determines the attitudes toward science of secondary school students in Santiago de Chile (n = 664) and analyzes the sex variable as a differentiating factor in such attitudes. The analysis by sex revealed low-relevance gender difference. The results are contrasted with those obtained in English-speaking countries. This TOSRA sample showed good psychometric parameters for measuring and evaluating attitudes toward science, which can be used in classrooms of Spanish-speaking countries or with immigrant populations with limited English proficiency.

  1. Identifying consumer's needs of health information technology through an innovative participatory design approach among English- and Spanish-speaking urban older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, R; Sheehan, B; Yen, P; Velez, O; Nobile-Hernandez, D; Tiase, V

    2014-01-01

    We describe an innovative community-centered participatory design approach, Consumer-centered Participatory Design (C2PD), and the results of applying C2PD to design and develop a web-based fall prevention system. We conducted focus groups and design sessions with English- and Spanish-speaking community-dwelling older adults. Focus group data were summarized and used to inform the context of the design sessions. Descriptive content analysis methods were used to develop categorical descriptions of design session informant's needs related to information technology. The C2PD approach enabled the assessment and identification of informant's needs of health information technology (HIT) that informed the development of a falls prevention system. We learned that our informants needed a system that provides variation in functions/content; differentiates between actionable/non-actionable information/structures; and contains sensory cues that support wide-ranging and complex tasks in a varied, simple, and clear interface to facilitate self-management. The C2PD approach provides community-based organizations, academic researchers, and commercial entities with a systematic theoretically informed approach to develop HIT innovations. Our community-centered participatory design approach focuses on consumer's technology needs while taking into account core public health functions.

  2. Identifying Consumer’s Needs of Health Information Technology through an Innovative Participatory Design Approach among English- and Spanish-speaking Urban Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, B.; Yen, P.; Velez, O.; Nobile-Hernandez, D.; Tiase, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives We describe an innovative community-centered participatory design approach, Consumer-centered Participatory Design (C2PD), and the results of applying C2PD to design and develop a web-based fall prevention system. Methods We conducted focus groups and design sessions with English- and Spanish-speaking community-dwelling older adults. Focus group data were summarized and used to inform the context of the design sessions. Descriptive content analysis methods were used to develop categorical descriptions of design session informant’s needs related to information technology. Results The C2PD approach enabled the assessment and identification of informant’s needs of health information technology (HIT) that informed the development of a falls prevention system. We learned that our informants needed a system that provides variation in functions/content; differentiates between actionable/non-actionable information/structures; and contains sensory cues that support wide-ranging and complex tasks in a varied, simple, and clear interface to facilitate self-management. Conclusions The C2PD approach provides community-based organizations, academic researchers, and commercial entities with a systematic theoretically informed approach to develop HIT innovations. Our community-centered participatory design approach focuses on consumer’s technology needs while taking into account core public health functions. PMID:25589909

  3. Spanish-Speaking Patients’ Engagement in Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Chronic Disease Self-Management Support Calls: Analyses of Data from Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D.; Marinec, Nicolle; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C.; Gutierrez-Valverde, Juana Mercedes; Rodriguez-Saldaña, Joel; Mendoz-Alevares, Milton; Silveira, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    We used data from Interactive Voice Response (IVR) self-management support studies in Honduras, Mexico, and the United States (US) to determine whether IVR calls to Spanish-speaking patients with chronic illnesses is a feasible strategy for improving monitoring and education between face-to-face visits. 268 patients with diabetes or hypertension participated in 6–12 weeks of weekly IVR follow-up. IVR calls emanated from US servers with connections via Voice over IP. More than half (54%) of patients enrolled with an informal caregiver who received automated feedback based on the patient’s assessments, and clinical staff received urgent alerts. Participants had on average 6.1 years of education, and 73% were women. After 2,443 person weeks of follow-up, patients completed 1,494 IVR assessments. Call completion rates were higher in the US (75%) than in Honduras (59%) or Mexico (61%; pVoice over IP can be used to deliver IVR disease management services internationally; involving informal caregivers may increase patient engagement. PMID:23532005

  4. "Una persona derechita (staying right in the mind)": perceptions of Spanish-speaking Mexican American older adults in South Texas colonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Sharf, Barbara F; St John, Julie A

    2009-06-01

    This study describes the perceptions of brain health among older Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans who reside in colonia areas of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. In 2007, 33 Mexican American older adults (9 men and 24 women) were recruited by promotoras (community health workers) from clusters of colonias in Hidalgo County to participate in focus group discussions conducted in Spanish. After participants completed a 19-item questionnaire (in Spanish), a bilingual and bicultural researcher from the community, trained as a moderator, conducted 4 focus groups using a semistructured interview guide, culturally modified with the assistance of promotoras. All discussions were audio recorded; audio recordings were transcribed verbatim in Spanish and then translated into English. Analyses were conducted in English. Almost 85% had less than a high school education and 100% reported a household income less than $20,000/year. Groups attached cultural meaning to aging well. The idea of "staying straight in the mind" resonated as a depiction of brain health. Participants also mentioned the types of activities they could do to stay "right in the mind." Particular attention must be focused on development of programs that provide satisfying culturally appropriate activities for older participants and the delivery of health messages that take into consideration culture and language.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5, Part I (YAM-5-I) in a community sample of Spanish-speaking adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis-Joaquin; Saez-Castillo, Antonio J; Fuentes-Rodriguez, Gema

    2017-01-15

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental disorders in adolescence. There is a need for brief screening tools to identify adolescents at risk for anxiety disorders. The Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5 has been recently developed to assess youths' anxiety symptoms in terms of the current classification system. The goal of this study is to provide a first test of its psychometric properties in a community sample of adolescents in Spain. The sample consisted of 505 13- to 17-year-old adolescents who completed Part I of the YAM-5 (YAM-5-I), which measures symptoms of the major anxiety disorders. Data indicated that the YAM-5-I displays appropriate internal consistency reliability. In addition, support was also found for the construct validity of the measure: most items loaded on a factor that represented the hypothesized anxiety syndromes, although it should also be noted that some items exhibited issues and therefore had to be discarded. Cross-cultural and trans-national studies are needed to determine psychometric properties of scale across languages and cultures. Our findings suggest that the YAM-5-I has satisfactory psychometric properties, which indicates that it can be used as a screening tool in Spanish-speaking adolescents from the general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcoholism and the Hispanic: A Mutual Concern = El Alcoholismo y Los Hispanos Una Preocupacion Nacional. Proceedings of the National Hispanic Conference on Alcoholism (San Antonio, Texas, September 7-10, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AVANTE International Systems Corp., San Antonio, TX.

    Written in Spanish and English, the proceedings include 6 papers and the recommendations presented at the conference on alcoholism and alcohol-related problems among Hispanics attended by approximately 400 participants, representing 29 states, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. "The Challenge of the 1980's: Action Through Unity" discusses the need for unity…

  7. Influences on preschool children's oral health-related quality of life as reported by English and Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Catherine D; Divaris, Kimon; Zeldin, Leslie P; Rozier, R Gary

    2016-09-01

    This study examined young, preschool children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among a community-based cohort of English and Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads in North Carolina, and sought to quantify the association of parent/caregiver characteristics, including spoken language, with OHRQoL impacts. Data from structured interviews with 1,111 parents of children aged 6-23 months enrolled in the Zero-Out Early Childhood Caries study in 2010-2012 were used. OHRQoL was measured using the overall score (range: 0-52) of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). We examined associations with parents' sociodemographic characteristics, spoken language, self-reported oral and general health, oral health knowledge, children's dental attendance, and dental care needs. Analyses included descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate methods based upon zero-inflated negative binomial regression. To determine differences between English and Spanish speakers, language-stratified model estimates were contrasted using homogeneity χ(2) tests. The mean overall ECOHIS score was 3.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.6-4.2]; 4.7 among English-speakers and 1.5 among Spanish speakers. In multivariate analyses, caregivers' education showed a positive association with OHRQoL impacts among Spanish speakers [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.12 (95% CI = 1.03-1.22), for every added year of schooling], whereas caregivers' fair/poor oral health showed a positive association among English speakers (PR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.02-1.41). The overall severity of ECOHIS impacts was low among this population-based sample of young, preschool children, and substantially lower among Spanish versus English speakers. Further studies are warranted to identify sources of these differences in - actual or reported - OHRQoL impacts. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  8. Exploring problem solving strategies on multiple-choice science items: Comparing native Spanish-speaking English Language Learners and mainstream monolinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachchaf, Rachel Rae

    The purpose of this study was to compare how English language learners (ELLs) and monolingual English speakers solved multiple-choice items administered with and without a new form of testing accommodation---vignette illustration (VI). By incorporating theories from second language acquisition, bilingualism, and sociolinguistics, this study was able to gain more accurate and comprehensive input into the ways students interacted with items. This mixed methods study used verbal protocols to elicit the thinking processes of thirty-six native Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs), and 36 native-English speaking non-ELLs when solving multiple-choice science items. Results from both qualitative and quantitative analyses show that ELLs used a wider variety of actions oriented to making sense of the items than non-ELLs. In contrast, non-ELLs used more problem solving strategies than ELLs. There were no statistically significant differences in student performance based on the interaction of presence of illustration and linguistic status or the main effect of presence of illustration. However, there were significant differences based on the main effect of linguistic status. An interaction between the characteristics of the students, the items, and the illustrations indicates considerable heterogeneity in the ways in which students from both linguistic groups think about and respond to science test items. The results of this study speak to the need for more research involving ELLs in the process of test development to create test items that do not require ELLs to carry out significantly more actions to make sense of the item than monolingual students.

  9. Contributors to self-reported health in a racially and ethnically diverse population: focus on Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jessica V V; Miyasato, Gavin S; Gates, Margaret A; Curto, Teresa M; Hall, Susan A; McKinlay, John B

    2013-01-01

    To understand if Hispanics report health differently than other racial and ethnic groups after controlling for demographics and risk factors for poor health. The sample (N = 5502) included 3201 women, 1767 black, 1859 white, and 1876 Hispanic subjects from the Boston Area Community Health Survey, a population-based survey of English- and Spanish-speaking residents of Boston, Massachusetts, United States, aged 30-79 years in 2002-2005. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity (including interview language for Hispanics) and fair/poor self-reported health (F/P SRH) adjusting for gender, age, socioeconomic status, depression, nativity, and comorbidities. Compared with whites, Hispanics interviewed in Spanish were seven times as likely to report F/P SRH (odds ratio, 7.7; 95% confidence interval, 4.9-12.2) after adjusting for potential confounders and those interviewed in English were twice as likely. In analyses stratified by depression and nativity, we observed stronger associations with Hispanic ethnicity in immigrants and nondepressed individuals interviewed in Spanish. Increased odds of F/P SRH persisted in the Hispanic group even when accounting for interview language and controlling for socioeconomic status, age, depression, and nativity, with interview language mitigating the association. These findings have methodological implications for epidemiologists using SRH across diverse populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Promotora de salud: promoting folic acid use among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRosset, Leslie; Mullenix, Amy; Flores, Alina; Mattia-Dewey, Daniel; Mai, Cara T

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Public Health Service recommends that all women in the United States capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 μg of folic acid daily to reduce their risk of having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect (NTD). However, disparities exist in the consumption of folic acid, with Hispanic women having lower rates of folic acid consumption than non-Hispanic white women. A community-based feasibility study was designed to assess the utility of the promotora de salud model to promote consumption of multivitamins containing folic acid for the prevention of NTDs among Spanish-speaking Hispanic women in North Carolina. The study consisted of an educational intervention given by a promotora (a lay, community health worker), with data collection occurring at baseline and four months post-intervention to measure changes in knowledge and behavior. Overall, 52% (n=303) of participants completed all components of the study. Self-reported daily multivitamin consumption increased from 24% at baseline to 71% four months post-intervention. During the same time frame, awareness of folic acid increased from 78% to 98% and knowledge of the role of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects increased from 82% to 92%. The results of this study indicate that the promotora de salud model may be effective in reaching a subpopulation of women with the folic acid message. Additional studies with larger population sizes are warranted to validate these findings.

  11. Actitudes lingüísticas de hispanohablantes de Santiago de Chile: creencias sobre la corrección idiomática (Linguistic attitudes of Spanish-speaking subjects from Santiago de Chile: beliefs about linguistic correctness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Rojas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos resultados parciales del proyecto "Linguistic Identity and Attitudes in Spanish-speaking Latin America", que revelan las creencias de hispanohablantes de Santiago de Chile acerca de la corrección idiomática ("¿Qué es hablar correctamente?", así como acerca de su relación y su importancia relativa en comparación con la comprensibilidad. Para recoger los datos aplicamos una encuesta directa a 400 sujetos de esta capital estratificados de acuerdo con sexo, edad y grupo socioeconómico. Nuestros hallazgos revelan que el español correcto, según los encuestados, se configura principalmente sobre el modelo de la norma peninsular y se encuentra estrechamente asociado a la comprensibilidad y la efectividad de la comunicación. En general, las creencias sobre la corrección idiomática observadas son congruentes con la cultura lingüística monoglósica que caracteriza al mundo hispanohablante. (We show partial results of the project "Linguistic Identity and Attitudes in Spanish-speaking Latin America", that reveal the beliefs about linguistic correctness and its relation with comprehensibility expressed by Spanishspeaking subjects from Santiago de Chile. In order to collect the data we have applied a direct survey to 400 subjects from this city, grouped according to sex, age and socio-economic status. Our findings reveal that correct Spanish, according to these subjects, matches mainly with Castilian Spanish and is strongly related to comprehensibility and effectiveness in communication. In general terms, beliefs about linguistic correctness are coherent with the monoglossic linguistic culture current in the Spanish-speaking world.

  12. Social media in public health: an analysis of national health authorities and leading causes of death in Spanish-speaking Latin American and Caribbean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novillo-Ortiz, David; Hernández-Pérez, Tony

    2017-02-03

    Information and communications technologies, like social media, have the potential to reduce some barriers in disease prevention and control in the Americas. National health authorities can use these technologies to provide access to reliable and quality health information. A study was conducted to analyze availability of information about the leading causes of death on social media channels of national health authorities in 18 Spanish-speaking Latin American and Caribbean countries. We gathered data of national health authorities's institutional presence in social media. Exploratory-descriptive research was useful for analysis and interpretation of the data collected. An analysis was carried out for 6 months, from April 1 to September 30, 2015. Sixteen of the 18 countries studied have institutional presences on social media. National health authorities have a presence in an average of almost three platforms (2.8%). An average of 1% of the populations with Internet access across the 18 countries in this study follows national health authorities on social media (approximately, an average of 0.3% of the total population of the countries under study). On average, information on 3.2 of the 10 leading causes of death was posted on the national health authorities' Facebook pages, and information on 2.9 of the 10 leading causes of death was posted on their Twitter profiles. Additionally, regarding public health expenditures and the possibility of retrieving information on the leading causes of death, an apparent negative correlation exists in the case of Facebook, r(13) = -.54, P = .03 and a weak negative correlation in the case of Twitter, r(14) = -.26, P = .31, for the countries with presences in those networks. National health authorities can improve their role in participating in conversations on social media regarding the leading causes of death affecting their countries. Taking into account Internet accessibility levels in the countries under study

  13. Hispanic Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the suicide rate for all Hispanic Americans was 5.24 per ... males and females • Hispanic adolescents may also experience stress with ... help because they feel that suicide should be dealt with by the family or ...

  14. Responses of a vulnerable Hispanic population in New Jersey to Hurricane Sandy: Access to care, medical needs, concerns, and ecological ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Pittfield, Taryn; Jeitner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recent increases in hurricanes led to a need to evaluate access to medical care, medical needs, and personal and community impact on vulnerable populations, particularly elderly, low income, and minority communities. This investigation examined (1) access to care, (2) interruptions in medical services, (3) personal impact from Hurricane Sandy, and (4) agreement with ecological statements related to storms, flooding, and damages in Hispanic/Latino patients receiving health care at Federally Qualified Health Centers in New Jersey. Only 10% of 335 Hispanic interviewees were US born. Self-identified personal impact was a better indicator of effects from Sandy, health center use, and medical issues, than community impact rating. Respondents who provided a high personal impact rating were more likely to have evacuated, had longer power outage, were more likely to need medical care, displayed more trouble getting to centers, and exhibited more medical interruptions during Sandy. A higher % respondents who evacuated, needed the center, had trouble getting there, and had more "medical need" than those who did not evacuate. The greatest impacts were on respondents who were told to evacuate before the storm, but did not (46% had "medical need"). The respondents had high agreement ratings for "storms are due to climate change," followed by "frequent and stronger storms will come more often," "flooding is due to sea level rise," and "changing climate is due mainly to human activity and not natural causes". These ratings may aid public policymakers and planners in developing resiliency strategies for vulnerable coastal communities.

  15. Hispanic AIDS education in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J

    1988-04-01

    The Hispanic AIDS Committee for Education and Resources (HACER) was established in 1987 as an AIDS education program targeted at the Mexicano population of South Texas. The word "Mexicano" is used because "Hispanic" refers to a larger, more diversified group. "Mexicano" refers specifically to people of South Texas who are either Mexican-Americans (people of Mexican descent, born and educated in the US) or Mexicans (people born and educated in Mexico). Mexicanos constitute 56% of the population of South Texas and 54% of the population of San Antonio. Mexican-Americans, in general, speak and read English and listen to English-language television and radio. Mexicans are poorer and less educated, Spanish-speaking, and often illiterate. The Mexicanos do not constitute a high risk group for AIDS; at present there are only 64 Mexicano AIDS patients in San Antonio. AIDS education campaigns on television which are directed at the whole Hispanic community may be counter-productive when directed at the Mexicano population because they know that AIDS is not yet a serious problem among them, and scare tactics only cause hysteria. AIDS education is essential, but it must be specifically geared to the Mexicano community, which, in general, is a very conservative community, in which subjects like sex, homosexuality, condoms, or anal intercourse are not discussed in public. But it is also a community of young (median age 23) sexually active people. An AIDS education program directed at them must use simple, elementary language in standard Mexican Spanish for the Mexicans and in English for the young Mexican-Americans. The single most effective way to reach the Mexicano population would be public service announcements aired on television during the time when the telenovelas (soap operas) are on. Not only are the telenovelas widely watched, but their actors are popular heros, who will be listened to by their audience. The use of radio for public service announcements would be useful

  16. El Desafio a la Realidad (A Challenge to Reality). Annual Report to the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare and the Commissioner of Education from the Advisory Committee for the Education of the Spanish-Speaking and Mexican Americans, May 1, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Facundo R.; And Others

    Purpose of the Advisory Committee was to: advise the Assistant Secretary/Commissioner of Education on the problems central to the education of the Spanish speaking children and adults, particularly those of bilingual bicultural families; recommend, where appropriate, shifts in emphasis of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW),…

  17. El Desafio a la Realidad (A Challenge to Reality). Annual Report to the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare and the Commissioner of Education from the Advisory Committee for the Education of the Spanish-Speaking and Mexican Americans, May 1, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Facundo R.; And Others

    Purpose of the Advisory Committee was to: advise the Assistant Secretary/Commissioner of Education on the problems central to the education of the Spanish speaking children and adults, particularly those of bilingual bicultural families; recommend, where appropriate, shifts in emphasis of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW),…

  18. Appealing Features of Vocational Support Services for Hispanic and non-Hispanic Transition Age Youth and Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Rosalie A Torres; Delman, Jonathan; McKay, Colleen E; Smith, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Transition age youth and young adults (TAYYAs) diagnosed with serious mental health conditions (SMHCs) are at greater risk of being unemployed compared to their peers without SMHCs. Job counseling and job placement services are the greatest predictor of competitive employment, yet we have limited knowledge about what TAYYAs believe they need to obtain gainful employment. In person, qualitative interviews were conducted with 57 non-Hispanic and Hispanic TAYYAs with SMHCs enrolled in three vocational support programs in MA (Vocational Rehabilitation, Individual Placement and Support; the Clubhouse Model as described by the International Center for Clubhouse Development). Six themes emerged from the data: three themes were identified as social capital (supportive relationships, readily available workplace supports, and vocational preparation), two themes related to human capital (effective educational supports and work experience), and one theme related to cultural capital (social skills training). Unique features (Spanish-speaking staff and/or familiar in Latino culture, familial-like staff support) were frequently noted by Hispanic TAYYAs.

  19. A health protection model for Hispanic adults with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Christine L; Calvillo, Evelyn

    2007-07-01

    The Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) was designed to assist practitioners' systematic assessment of Hispanic people to establish baselines and evaluate the success of early diabetes treatment. This article provides the research basis of the HHPM and related assessment tools. The treatment of diabetes incorporates lifestyle change, and this adjustment is particularly important to follow with vulnerable groups. One such group is the Hispanic population, since the impact of diabetes is greatest on economically disadvantaged segments of this population, who suffer disproportionately higher Type 2 diabetes prevalence and higher levels of morbidity and mortality as compared with other populations. Traditional Hispanic health beliefs are often in conflict with Western medicine, so the adjustments to the lifestyle demands of this disease need to be evaluated. To understand this discrepancy fully in patient outcomes, a culturally sensitive assessment framework was developed based on health protection theories and research with Hispanic people with diabetes and, based on this framework, assessment tools were translated for use during interviews with low literacy, Spanish-speaking patients. The HHPM translated measures of premorbid lifestyle, health beliefs, support, self-efficacy, quality of life, knowledge of diabetes, and physiological parameters can be used during consecutive clinic visits during the first six months of therapy to map the success of patients' understanding of and psychological adjustment to diabetes. The HHPM is a culturally-relevant, systematic, and holistic approach to assessing adjustment of Hispanic people to a new diagnosis of diabetes, including their psychological, cognitive, and physiological outcomes. Using this type of systematic approach will allow practitioners to target barriers to therapy, such as a lack of self-efficacy or incomplete knowledge of the disease and its treatment in a strategic manner to improve patient success in

  20. Primary Spoken Language and Neuraxial Labor Analgesia Use Among Hispanic Medicaid Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Paloma; Eosakul, Stanley T; Grobman, William A; Feinglass, Joe; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic women are less likely than non-Hispanic Caucasian women to use neuraxial labor analgesia. It is unknown whether there is a disparity in anticipated or actual use of neuraxial labor analgesia among Hispanic women based on primary language (English versus Spanish). In this 3-year retrospective, single-institution, cross-sectional study, we extracted electronic medical record data on Hispanic nulliparous with vaginal deliveries who were insured by Medicaid. On admission, patients self-identified their primary language and anticipated analgesic use for labor. Extracted data included age, marital status, labor type, delivery provider (obstetrician or midwife), and anticipated and actual analgesic use. Household income was estimated from census data geocoded by zip code. Multivariable logistic regression models were estimated for anticipated and actual neuraxial analgesia use. Among 932 Hispanic women, 182 were self-identified as primary Spanish speakers. Spanish-speaking Hispanic women were less likely to anticipate and use neuraxial anesthesia than English-speaking women. After controlling for confounders, there was an association between primary language and anticipated neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women, 0.70; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.53-0.92). Similarly, there was an association between language and neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women 0.88; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.78-0.99). The use of a midwife compared with an obstetrician also decreased the likelihood of both anticipating and using neuraxial analgesia. A language-based disparity was found in neuraxial labor analgesia use. It is possible that there are communication barriers in knowledge or understanding of analgesic options. Further research is necessary to determine the cause of this association.

  1. Pitfalls in communication with Hispanic and African-American patients: do translators help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, T R

    1992-11-01

    The Martin Luther King County General Hospital, Los Angeles, California, provides services for an equal number of Hispanics (most are recent immigrants from Mexico) and African Americans who have lived in the community since before the Watts riot in 1965. The hospital is staffed by a large percentage of foreign-trained doctors and other personnel who speak some English, but suffer from a lack of understanding of the Hispanic as well as the African-American patients. Very few trained interpreters are provided for the Spanish-speaking population, and no interpreters are provided for African Americans. A 100-question survey on common African-American expressions was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine, as well as an opinion poll to determine if adequate understanding existed between patients and providers. The data revealed that native African-American providers understood significantly more African-American expressions than foreign, white, and Hispanic providers. The opinion poll also revealed inadequate translation of medical complaints from patients through interpreters. In addition, the poll found that diagnoses and instructions were not adequately related to the patients. Furthermore, it was felt that trained interpreters should be provided for all patients who presented communication problems.

  2. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  3. A cross-cultural comparison of tonal synchrony and pitch imitation in the vocal dialogs of Belgian Flemish-speaking and Mexican Spanish-speaking mother-infant dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Martine; Loots, Gerrit; Gillisjans, Lobcke; Pattyn, Nathalie; Quintana, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    This study reports a cross-cultural comparison of the vocal pitch patterns of 15 Mexican Spanish-speaking and 15 Belgian Flemish-speaking dyads, recorded during 5min of free-play in a laboratory setting. Both cultures have a tradition of dyadic face-to-face interaction but differ in language origins (i.e., Romanic versus Germanic). In total, 374 Mexican and 558 Flemish vocal exchanges were identified, analyzed and compared for their incidence of tonal synchrony (harmonic/pentatonic series), non-tonal synchrony (with/without imitations) and pitch and/or interval imitations. The main findings revealed that dyads in both cultures rely on tonal synchrony using similar pitch ratios and timing patterns. However, there were significant differences in the infants' vocal pitch imitation behavior. Additional video-analyzes on the contingency patterns involved in pitch imitation showed a cross-cultural difference in the maternal selective reinforcement of pitch imitation. The results are interpreted with regard to linguistic, developmental and cultural aspects and the 'musilanguage' model.

  4. Oral English Development among Non-English Speaking, Spanish-Speaking American Adults Based on Thirty Innovative Video Programs and Related Paper/Pencil Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Atilano A.

    The 1970-1971 field testing of the Adult Basic Education Empleen Ingles video programs and paper and pencil lessons was undertaken to provide answers to several questions. These questions concerned: (1) the instructional effectiveness of the 30 video programs and pen and pencil lessons; (2) the two programs as single or dual instructional media;…

  5. Situation that presents the spelling in Cuba and in other Spanish-speaking countries at the end of the first decade of XXI century. Situación que presenta la ortografía en Cuba y en otros países hispanohablantes al final de la primera década del siglo XXI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Yanes Seijo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish language is the social communication link from a large number of people distributed in different regions of the world and deserve protection and preservation. The correct spelling of the texts is a way to defend and preserve our language, because the written word is the one permanently fixed language. Speaking of the correct spelling of words we are talking about spelling, this item is diffucult today. The aim of this paper is to analyze how the situation presents spelling of Spanish-speaking countries in the late first decade of the twenty-first century, through a literature review to update readers and constitutes a starting point for further work. A literature search was conducted in different countries, among which are: Spain, Mexico, San Salvador, Nicaragua, Chile, Peru, Colombia, Argentina and Cuba, where it was observed that the spelling is deficient in all matters, covers all levels of education, even professionals, as well as widespread concern about their treatment.El idioma español es el vínculo de comunicación social de una gran cantidad de pueblos distribuidos en diferentes regiones del planeta y merece defensa y preservación. La correcta escritura de los textos es una vía para defender y preservar nuestro idioma, ya que la palabra escrita es la que de manera permanente fija el idioma. Al hablar de la correcta escritura de las palabras nos estamos refiriendo a la ortografía, tema este que está presentando serias dificultades en la actualidad. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar cómo se presenta la situación ortográfica en países de habla española en los finales de la primera década del siglo XXI, a través de una revisión bibliográfica que actualice a los lectores y constituya un punto de partida para trabajos posteriores. Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en diferentes países entre los que se encuentran: España, México, San Salvador, Nicaragua, Chile, Perú, Colombia, Argentina y Cuba, donde

  6. Hispanic Student Experiences at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: Strong Voices, Key Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christina A.; Posadas, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    A symposium at New Mexico State University, a Hispanic-Serving Institution, revealed Hispanic students' attitudes about their experiences at the university. Discussions concerned the campus climate, mentors, the experiences of first-time students, cultural challenges, retention, and accountability. Discussion of the resulting data yields policy…

  7. Outreach to Hispanic/Latino Communities With a Spanish-Language Version of the Earthscope Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Delaughter, J.

    2005-12-01

    Spanish is estimated to be the fourth language in the world based on number of speakers, the second as a vehicle of international communication and the third as an international language of politics, economics and culture. Its importance in the U.S. is illustrated by the fact that the Hispanic/Latino population is becoming the largest minority group because it has the fastest growth rate of all ethnic groups in the U.S. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2004 there were ~41 million people in the U.S. (~14% of the total population) of Hispanic or Latino origin. Although the Spanish-speaking population is growing rapidly, the same cannot be said about the number of Hispanic/Latino high school and college graduates. Studies by the National Center for Education Statistics show that Hispanic/Latino students are as likely to drop out are to complete high school. Similarly, although more Hispanic/Latino students enroll in college and/or universities than a decade ago, few complete degrees. For example, in the geosciences only 3% of bachelor's degrees were granted to people identifying themselves as Hispanic or Latino. Over the last 28 years, only 263 of the 20,000 geoscience Ph.D.s awarded in the U.S. went to Hispanic Americans. Bilingual educational offerings are one technique for addressing this discrepancy. For example, scientists and research programs such as EarthScope, NASA, NOAA, and ODP frequently reach out to students and the general public using the internet. Many well-made and useful websites with scientific themes in the U.S. are available to millions of users worldwide, providing a resource that is limited or non-existent in other countries. Unfortunately, few geoscience education sites are available in languages other than English. To address this need, Earthscope is developing a Spanish version of its website describing its goals, techniques, and educational opportunities. Currently, approximately 90% of the educational content on this site (http

  8. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  9. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  10. Hispanic Victims. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Lisa D.

    This report provides detailed information about crimes committed against Hispanics from 1979 to 1986 based on the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Survey (NCS). The rate of violent crime committed against Hispanics each year surveyed is examined and compared to that for non-Hispanics. The demographic characteristics of the…

  11. Nonjudging facet of mindfulness predicts enhanced smoking cessation in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Claire Adams; Houchins, Sean C; Stewart, Diana W; Chen, Minxing; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Heppner, Whitney L; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Wetter, David W

    2015-12-01

    Although most smokers express interest in quitting, actual quit rates are low. Identifying strategies to enhance smoking cessation is critical, particularly among underserved populations, including Hispanics, for whom many of the leading causes of death are related to smoking. Mindfulness (purposeful, nonjudgmental attention to the present moment) has been linked to increased likelihood of cessation. Given that mindfulness is multifaceted, determining which aspects of mindfulness predict cessation could help to inform interventions. This study examined whether facets of mindfulness predict cessation in 199 Spanish-speaking smokers of Mexican heritage (63.3% male, mean age of 39 years, 77.9% with a high school education or less) receiving smoking cessation treatment. Primary outcomes were 7-day abstinence at weeks 3 and 26 postquit (biochemically confirmed and determined using an intent-to-treat approach). Logistic random coefficient regression models were utilized to examine the relationship between mindfulness facets and abstinence over time. Independent variables were subscales of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (Observing, Describing, Acting With Awareness, Nonjudging, and Nonreactivity). The Nonjudging subscale (i.e., accepting thoughts and feelings without evaluating them) uniquely predicted better odds of abstinence up to 26 weeks postquit. This is the first known study to examine whether specific facets of mindfulness predict smoking cessation. The ability to experience thoughts, emotions, and withdrawal symptoms without judging them may be critical in the process of quitting smoking. Results indicate potential benefits of mindfulness among smokers of Mexican heritage and suggest that smoking cessation interventions might be enhanced by central focus on the Nonjudging aspect of mindfulness.

  12. Adaptation, Implementation Plan, and Evaluation of an Online Tobacco Cessation Training Program for Health Care Professionals in Three Spanish-Speaking Latin American Countries: Protocol of the Fruitful Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Company, Assumpta; Guillen, Olga; Margalef, Mercè; Arrien, Martha Alicia; Sánchez, Claudia; Cáceres de León, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Background Tobacco cessation training programs to treat tobacco dependence have measureable effects on patients’ smoking. Tobacco consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is high and slowly decreasing, but these countries usually lack measures to face the epidemic, including tobacco cessation training programs for health professionals and organizations. Based on a previous online smoking cessation training program for hospital workers in Spain, the Fruitful Study aims to increase smoking cessation knowledge, attitudes, self-confidence, and performance interventions among health care professionals of three Spanish-speaking low- and middle-income Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. Objective The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology and evaluation strategy of the Fruitful Study intended to adapt, implement, and test the effectiveness of an online, evidence-based tobacco cessation training program addressed to health professionals from Bolivia, Guatemala, and Paraguay. Methods This study will use a mixed-methods design with a pre-post evaluation (quantitative approach) and in-depth interviews and focus groups (qualitative approach). The main outcomes will be (1) participants’ attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors before and after the training; and (2) the level of implementation of tobacco control policies within the hospitals before and after the training. Results To date, adaptation of the materials, study enrollment, and training activities have been completed. During the adaptation, the main mismatches were language background and content adaptation. Several aids were developed to enable students’ training enrollment, including access to computers, support from technicians, and reminders to correctly complete the course. Follow-up data collection is in progress. We have enrolled 281 hospital workers. Results are expected at the beginning of 2017 and will be reported in two follow-up papers: one about the formative

  13. Adaptation, Implementation Plan, and Evaluation of an Online Tobacco Cessation Training Program for Health Care Professionals in Three Spanish-Speaking Latin American Countries: Protocol of the Fruitful Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Cristina; Company, Assumpta; Guillen, Olga; Margalef, Mercè; Arrien, Martha Alicia; Sánchez, Claudia; Cáceres de León, Paula; Fernández, Esteve

    2017-01-27

    Tobacco cessation training programs to treat tobacco dependence have measureable effects on patients' smoking. Tobacco consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is high and slowly decreasing, but these countries usually lack measures to face the epidemic, including tobacco cessation training programs for health professionals and organizations. Based on a previous online smoking cessation training program for hospital workers in Spain, the Fruitful Study aims to increase smoking cessation knowledge, attitudes, self-confidence, and performance interventions among health care professionals of three Spanish-speaking low- and middle-income Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology and evaluation strategy of the Fruitful Study intended to adapt, implement, and test the effectiveness of an online, evidence-based tobacco cessation training program addressed to health professionals from Bolivia, Guatemala, and Paraguay. This study will use a mixed-methods design with a pre-post evaluation (quantitative approach) and in-depth interviews and focus groups (qualitative approach). The main outcomes will be (1) participants' attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors before and after the training; and (2) the level of implementation of tobacco control policies within the hospitals before and after the training. To date, adaptation of the materials, study enrollment, and training activities have been completed. During the adaptation, the main mismatches were language background and content adaptation. Several aids were developed to enable students' training enrollment, including access to computers, support from technicians, and reminders to correctly complete the course. Follow-up data collection is in progress. We have enrolled 281 hospital workers. Results are expected at the beginning of 2017 and will be reported in two follow-up papers: one about the formative evaluation and the other about the summative

  14. The Hispanic Clinic for Pediatric Surgery: A model to improve parent-provider communication for Hispanic pediatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Joshua; Snyder, Elizabeth; Dunlap, Jonathan L; Wright, Robert; Mendoza, Fernando; Bruzoni, Matias

    2016-04-01

    26 million Americans have limited English proficiency (LEP). It is well established that language barriers adversely affect health and health care. Despite growing awareness of language barriers, there is essentially a void in the medical literature regarding the influence of language disparity on pediatric surgery patients. This study was designed to assess the impact of patient-provider language concordance on question-asking behavior and patient satisfaction for pediatric surgery patients. Participants included families of patients in a General Pediatric Surgery Clinic categorized into 3 groups by patient-provider language concordance: concordant English-speaking, LEP concordant Spanish-speaking, and LEP discordant Spanish-speaking using an interpreter. Clinical visits were audio recorded and the number of patient-initiated questions and the length of clinical encounter were measured. Families were administered a surgery-specific, 5-point Likert scale questionnaire modeled after validated surveys concerning communication, trust, perceived discrimination and patient-provider language concordance. Regression models were performed to analyze associations between language concordance and patient's question-asking behavior and between language concordance and survey results. A total of 156 participants were enrolled including 57 concordant-English, 52 LEP concordant-Spanish and 47 LEP-discordant-Spanish. There was significant variation in the mean number of patient-initiated questions among the groups (p=0.002). Both the English and Spanish concordant groups asked a similar number of questions (p=0.9), and they both asked more questions compared to the Spanish-discordant participants (p=0.002 and p=0.001). Language discordance was associated with fewer questions asked after adjustment for socioeconomic status. Language concordant participants rated higher scores of communication. Both Spanish-concordant and Spanish-discordant patients reported significantly increased

  15. A Culturally Appropriate Self-Management Program for Hispanic Adults With Type 2 Diabetes and Low Health Literacy Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunk, Debra R; Taylor, Ann Gill; Clark, Myra L; Williams, Ishan C; Cox, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of adapting a patient-centered educational intervention for type 2 diabetes (T2D) self-management for a Hispanic population with low health literacy skills. A descriptive qualitative study design and phenomenological analyses were used. Nine Hispanic adults with T2D recruited from a rural community health center participated in an educational program that instructed on low glycemic food choices, meaningful glucose self-monitoring, and physical activity to decrease blood glucose spikes. Participants' feedback was recorded during four 2-hour focus group sessions. Findings/Results: Participants' feedback clustered around four themes: information and knowledge, motivation and barriers to change, experiences with new behaviors, and personal responsibility. Data support the feasibility of adapting an established health-enhancing approach for promoting self-management of T2D to a low health literacy Spanish-speaking population. The findings may help in further development of tools and strategies for improved T2D self-management in the study population.

  16. Physician Knowledge of Chagas Disease in Hispanic Immigrants Living in Appalachian Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz-Szalay, Shelley

    2017-06-01

    Studies have indicated that US physicians may not consider Chagas disease when diagnosing immigrant patients from Chagas-endemic areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physician knowledge of Chagas disease in six Appalachian Ohio counties. Physician knowledge was assessed by self-administrated survey (n = 105). Over 80 % of physicians reported that their current knowledge of Chagas disease was limited or very limited, and 50 % reported never considering Chagas disease diagnosis for their at-risk patients. Nearly 70 % of physicians were unaware of the percentage of chronic Chagas patients that develop clinical disease, and 36 % could not correctly identify the disease course. In addition, over 30 % of physicians reported that no services were available within their practice to assist Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. A lack of physician awareness of Chagas disease, coupled with a lack of translation services, may create a barrier to care by decreasing the likelihood of identification of patients at risk for Chagas disease. The results of this study support the need for interventions to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease in Hispanic immigrants in rural Appalachian Ohio.

  17. Improving access to shared decision-making for Hispanics/Latinos with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson JA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jaime A Davidson,1 Aracely Rosales,2 Alicia C Shillington,3 Robert A Bailey,4 Chris Kabir,3 Guillermo E Umpierrez51Touchstone Diabetes Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Rosales Communications, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3EPI-Q, Inc., Oakbrook, IL, USA; 4Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA; 5Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, GA, USAPurpose: To describe the cultural and linguistic adaptation and Spanish translation of an English-language patient decision aid (PDA for use in supporting shared decision-making in Hispanics/Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, a group at a high risk for complications.Patients and methods: A steering committee of endocrinologists, a primary care physician, a certified diabetes educator, and a dietician, each with extensive experience in providing care to Hispanics/Latinos was convened to assess a PDA developed for English-speaking patients with T2DM. English content was reviewed for cultural sensitivity and appropriateness for a Hispanic/Latino population. A consensus-building process and iterative version edits incorporated clinician perspectives. The content was adapted to be consistent with traditional Hispanic/Latino cultural communication precepts (eg, avoidance of hostile confrontation; value for warm interaction; respect for authority; value of family support for decisions. The PDA was translated by native-speaking individuals with diabetes expertise.Results: The PDA underwent testing during cognitive interviews with ten Spanish-speaking Hispanics/Latinos with T2DM to ensure that the content is reflective of the experience, understanding, and language Hispanic/Latino patients use to describe diabetes and treatment. Content edits were made to assure a literacy level appropriate to the audience, and the PDA was produced for online video dissemination.Conclusion: High

  18. Hispanics of a San Diego Barrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    individuals though some are native born. Young men who adopt this lifestyle dress in distinct and uniform ways, speak a dialect that isa blend of...future generations of Spanish- speaking people" (Camarillo 1979, p. 78). Camarillo’s work deals primarily with the city of Santa Barbara, but he also...There, according to a former Mexicano resident of the area, they were confined to a segregated barrio in "the midst of the cruelest kind of poverty

  19. Hispanic Higher Education and HSIs. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents facts about Hispanic higher education. Facts on the following topics are presented: (1) Hispanic demographics; (2) Hispanic academic attainment; (3) Hispanic higher education; and (4) Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

  20. Hispanic Business Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Cola USA, Atlanta, GA.

    This is a corporate policy statement of the Hispanic business agenda of Coca Cola USA, and the results of a community survey conducted to inform that agenda. The statement outlines several areas of company policy as they relate to Hispanic Americans. These areas include regional marketing, promotion, and community relations strategies, a…

  1. Understanding the Hispanic Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes cultural differences of Hispanic students in family structure, language, motivation, mysticism, machismo, touching, and time concepts which may lead to problems in the classroom. Suggests strategies teachers may employ to increase opportunities for positive school experiences for Hispanic students through recognition and acknowledgement…

  2. Analyzing cognitive and spelling skills in Spanish-speaking English-language learners and English-speaking Canadian learners Analizando procesos cognitivos y de escritura en niños hispano-parlantes que aprenden inglés como segunda lengua y niños canadienses de habla inglesa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel O’Shanahan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The principal purpose of this study has been to analyze the cognitive processes and spelling skills in Spanish-speaking English-language learners. A sample of English-speaking Canadian learners and Spanish-speaking English-language learners was selected from different Canadian schools in the Vancouver District within British Columbia's province. We examined cognitive and spelling skills of English-speaking students and Spanish-speaking English language learners in the primary grades. We hypothesized that there would be a positive transfer from cognitive and linguistic processes from L1 to L2 spelling skills development, if no significant differences were observed among native English speakers and Spanish-language learners on these measures. There were no significant differences between the English –language learners and the native English speakers on measures of phonological awareness and spelling skills. However, English-speaking Canadian learners performed better than Spanish-speaking English-language learners on vocabulary and syntactic awareness. El objetivo principal de este estudio ha sido analizar los procesos cognitivos y de escritura de niños hispano-parlantes que aprenden el inglés como segunda lengua. Para ello se seleccionó a una muestra de niños canadienses de habla inglesa y otra de hispano-parlantes que reciben instrucción en inglés como segunda lengua en escuelas canadienses del distrito de Vancouver en la provincia canadiense de Columbia Británica (British Columbia. Se tomaron medidas de competencia lingu?ística (vocabulario y conciencia sintáctica, memoria de trabajo, conciencia fonológica y escritura de palabras y pseudopalabras en inglés para el grupo de monolingu?es, y las mismas medidas en los idiomas inglés y español para el grupo de hispano-parlantes. Nuestra predicción es que si existe un efecto de transferencia de L1 sobre L2 entonces existiría relación entre los procesos cognitivos y de escritura que

  3. Long-term Diet and Biomarker Changes after a Short-term Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors: The ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Ogden Gaffney, Ann; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Shi, Zaixing; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Santella, Regina M; Blaner, William S; Clugston, Robin D; Cremers, Serge; Pollak, Susan; Sirosh, Iryna; Crew, Katherine D; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    Among Hispanic breast cancer survivors, we examined the long-term effects of a short-term culturally based dietary intervention on increasing fruits/vegetables (F/V), decreasing fat, and changing biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. Spanish-speaking women (n = 70) with a history of stage 0-III breast cancer who completed treatment were randomized to ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! (n = 34), a culturally based 9-session program (24 hours over 12 weeks, including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips), or a control group (n = 36, written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors). Diet recalls, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. We report changes between groups at 12 months in dietary intake and biomarkers using 2-sample Wilcoxon t tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. At 12 months, the intervention group compared with the control group reported higher increases in mean daily F/V servings (total: +2.0 vs. -0.4; P Salud! program was effective at increasing long-term F/V intake in Hispanic breast cancer survivors and changed biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. It is possible for short-term behavioral interventions to have long-term effects on behaviors and biomarkers in minority cancer patient populations. Results can inform future study designs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1491-502. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Jüri Talveti filoloogiline teekond: hispaaniakeelsest maailmast Eestisse ja tagasi / Jüri Talvet’s Philological Journey: from the Spanish-speaking World to Estonia and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rein Veidemann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Teesid: Artikkel esitab bio-bibliograafilise ülevaate luuletaja, esseisti, kirjandusteadlase, tõlkija ning õppejõu Jüri Talveti (s 1945 loomingulisest teest. Talveti kui erakordselt laiahaardelise loomingulise isiksuse panus hispaaniakeelse kirjandusruumi vahendamisel ja uurimisel Eestis on jätnud püsiva jälje. Tema viljeldava komparativismi keskmeks olev võrdlus ei piirdu üksnes võrreldavate objektidega, vaid viib põimumiste ja mõjutuste väljaselgitamisele ning uue sünteesini. Niisugune lähenemine võimaldab Talvetil esitada mitmeid eesti kirjanduskultuuri keskseid autoreid ja teoseid maailmakirjanduslikus kontekstis. Luuletajana esindab Talvet hingestatud intellektuaalsust, milles intertekstuaalsed osutused toimivad kultuuridevahelise sillana.   The article presents a bio- and bibliographical overview of the creative work of Jüri Talvet (born in 1945 – a poet, essayist, literary scholar, translator and university professor. The creative scope of Talvet is exceptionally wide and his decades-long contribution to the mediation and exploration of the Spanish-speaking literary space in Estonia has left permanent traces. The comparative method cultivated by Talvet does not border merely on the literary texts considered but lead to the establishment of reciprocal impact and a new level of synthesis. Terms such as “symbiosis”, “symbiotic unity” and “synthesis” play an important role in Talvet’s contemplations of life, literature and culture; they are not only part of his epistemological ’toolkit’ but also represent a relation of value. In the semiotic approach such discourse may be viewed as the replacement of binary structure with a ternal one, a change elaborated already by Talvet’s most famous colleague Juri Lotman in 1992 when his intellectual testament Culture and Explosion was published: “Ternal structures retain certain values of the previous period by shifting them from the periphery into the centre

  5. Enhancement of a locally developed HIV prevention intervention for Hispanic/Latino MSM: A partnership of community-based organizations, a university, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Freeman, Arin; Sun, Christina J.; Garcia, Manuel; Painter, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic/Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); however, no efficacious behavioral interventions are currently available for use with this vulnerable population. We describe the development and enhancement of HOLA en Grupos, a community-based behavioral HIV/STD prevention intervention for Spanish-speaking Hispanic/Latino MSM that is currently being implemented and evaluated. Our enhancement process included incorporating local data on risks and context; identifying community priorities; defining intervention core elements and key characteristics; developing a logic model; developing an intervention logo; enhancing intervention activities and materials; scripting intervention delivery; expanding the comparison intervention; and establishing a materials review committee. If efficacious, HOLA en Grupos will be the first behavioral intervention to be identified for potential use with Hispanic/Latino MSM, thereby contributing to the body of evidence-based resources that may be used for preventing HIV/STD infection among these MSM and their sex partners. PMID:26241382

  6. Enhancement of a Locally Developed HIV Prevention Intervention for Hispanic/Latino MSM: A Partnership of Community-Based Organizations, a University, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Freeman, Arin; Sun, Christina J; Garcia, Manuel; Painter, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    Hispanic/Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); however, no efficacious behavioral HIV/STD prevention interventions are currently available for use with this vulnerable population. We describe the enhancement of HOLA en Grupos, a community-based behavioral HIV/STD prevention intervention for Spanish-speaking Hispanic/Latino MSM that is currently being implemented and evaluated in North Carolina with support from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Our intervention enhancement process included incorporating local data on risks and context; identifying community needs and priorities; defining intervention core elements and key characteristics; developing a logic model; developing an intervention logo; enhancing intervention activities and materials; scripting intervention delivery; expanding the comparison intervention; and establishing a materials review committee. If the CDC-sponsored evaluation determines that HOLA en Grupos is efficacious, it will be the first such behavioral HIV/STD prevention intervention to be identified for potential use with Hispanic/Latino MSM, thereby contributing to the body of evidence-based resources that may be used for preventing HIV/STD infection among these MSM and their sex partners.

  7. Role Perceptions of Hispanic and Mainstream Navy Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    eye-views of life in an urban barrio. In J. Helm (Ed.), Spanish speaking people in the United States. Seattle: Uni- versity of Washington Press, 1968...la mujer Mexicana? Mexico City: Instituto Mexicano de Estudios Sociales, 1969. Linton, R. The study of man. New York: Appleton-Century, 1936

  8. Predictors of English Health Literacy among U.S. Hispanic Immigrants: The importance of language, bilingualism and sociolinguistic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E. Jacobson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, data confirm that Spanish-speaking immigrants are particularly affected by the negative health outcomes associated with low health literacy. Although the literature points to variables such as age, educational background and language, only a few studies have investigated the factors that may influence health literacy in this group. Similarly, the role that bilingualism and/or multilingualism play in health literacy assessment continues to be an issue in need of further research. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of English health literacy among adult Hispanic immigrants whose self-reported primary language is Spanish, but who live and function in a bilingual community. It also explored issues related to the language of the instrument. An analysis of data collected through a randomized controlled study was conducted. Results identified English proficiency as the strongest predictor of health literacy (p < 0.001. The results further point to the importance of primary and secondary language in the assessment of heath literacy level. This study raises many questions in need of further investigation to clarify how language proficiency and sociolinguistic environment affect health literacy in language minority adults; proposes language approaches that may be more appropriate for measuring health literacy in these populations; and recommends further place-based research to determine whether the connection between language proficiency and health is generalizable to border communities.

  9. Predictors of English Health Literacy among U.S. Hispanic Immigrants: The importance of language, bilingualism and sociolinguistic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Holly E; Hund, Lauren; Soto Mas, Francisco

    In the United States, data confirm that Spanish-speaking immigrants are particularly affected by the negative health outcomes associated with low health literacy. Although the literature points to variables such as age, educational background and language, only a few studies have investigated the factors that may influence health literacy in this group. Similarly, the role that bilingualism and/or multilingualism play in health literacy assessment continues to be an issue in need of further research. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of English health literacy among adult Hispanic immigrants whose self-reported primary language is Spanish, but who live and function in a bilingual community. It also explored issues related to the language of the instrument. An analysis of data collected through a randomized controlled study was conducted. Results identified English proficiency as the strongest predictor of health literacy (p sociolinguistic environment affect health literacy in language minority adults; proposes language approaches that may be more appropriate for measuring health literacy in these populations; and recommends further place-based research to determine whether the connection between language proficiency and health is generalizable to border communities.

  10. The relationship between obesity, hyperglycemia symptoms, and health-related quality of life among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohrer James E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study was conducted to evaluate the effects of overweight, hyperglycemia symptoms, Hispanic ethnicity, and language barriers on health-related quality of life (HRQoL among children and adolescents. Methods Parents'/guardians of a population based sample of 5530 children between ages 3 and 18 were administered the parents' version of the KINDL® survey instrument to assess HRQoL in children and adolescents. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess relationships between HRQoL, body mass index, and hyperglycemia symptoms categories. Results The mean age of children was 10.6 (SD = 4.3. The mean KINDL® total score was 79.7 (SD = 11.6 and the mean physical functioning score was 81.9 (SD = 20.3. Male children exhibited better physical health as compared to the female children (p p = 0.008. However, the association was not significant for the four of the six subscales including the physical health domain. Children with hyperglycemia symptoms and a family history of diabetes also had significantly lower overall and physical health HRQoL (p p p = 0.001. Conclusion Results suggest that overweight may reduce overall quality of life among children, though it does not directly influence physical functioning. However, hyperglycemia symptoms may affect both overall health and physical functioning. Findings also suggest the need for developing programs directed at overcoming language barriers that may face Spanish-speaking children or their parents. Furthermore, targeting children who have hyperglycemia symptoms with public information campaigns may be more appropriate than targeting overweight children.

  11. A New Chapter. The Fresh Voices of Hispanic Fiction Writers Are Being Heard by a Growing Mainstream Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase-Blunt, Martha

    1992-01-01

    Highlights numerous Hispanic fiction writers who are beginning to experience popularity. Describes Hispanic genre such as "magic realism" in which real action is tinged with dreamlike surrealism. Discusses Hispanic writers' experiences with small independent presses as well as major publishers. Expresses such concerns as patronization and the lack…

  12. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  13. Hispanic Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  14. Hispanics in Fast Food Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined the employment of Hispanics in the fast-food industry. Data were obtained from a national survey of employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies in which 194 (4.2 percent) of the 4,660 respondents reported being Hispanic. Compared with the total sample, Hispanic fast-food employees were slightly less likely to be…

  15. Do Hispanics Fail to Assimilate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the content of an article by Samuel P. Huntington entitled "The Hispanic Challenge," which ignited a protest from the Hispanic community. Huntington posits in his article that the persistent flow of Hispanic immigrants threatens to divide the US into two peoples, two cultures, and two languages. He explains…

  16. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  17. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  18. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  19. Hispanic Alcoholic Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Raymond M.

    1987-01-01

    A path analytic model for Hispanic alcoholics relating socioclinical prognostic variables to outcome following treatment in a therapeutic community differs markedly from that fitted to Anglo alcoholics. The differential relationship of education to alcoholism severity and outcome was noted specifically as reflecting different racial-ethnic paths…

  20. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  1. VARIATIONS IN RECRUITMENT YIELD, COSTS, SPEED AND PARTICIPANT DIVERSITY ACROSS INTERNET PLATFORMS IN A GLOBAL STUDY EXAMINING THE EFFICACY OF AN HIV/AIDS AND HIV TESTING ANIMATED AND LIVE-ACTION VIDEO AMONG ENGLISH- OR SPANISH-SPEAKING INTERNET OR SOCIAL MEDIA USERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Winnie; Guan, Wentao; Clark, Melissa A; Liu, Tao; Santelices, Claudia; Cortés, Dharma E; Merchant, Roland C

    For a world-wide, Internet-based study on HIV/AIDS and HIV testing knowledge, we compared the yields, speed and costs of recruitment and participant diversity across free postings on 13 Internet or social media platforms, paid advertising or postings on 3 platforms, and separate free postings and paid advertisements on Facebook. Platforms were compared by study completions (yield), time to completion, completion to enrollment ratios (CERs), and costs/ completion; and by participants' demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and health literacy levels. Of the 482 English-speaking participants, Amazon Mechanical Turk yielded the most participants, recruited participants at the fastest rate and had the highest CER (0.78) and lowest costs / completion. Of the 335 Spanish-speaking participants, Facebook yielded the most participants and recruited participants at the fastest rate, although Amazon Mechanical Turk had the highest CER (0.72) and lowest costs/completion. Across platforms participants differed substantially according to their demographic characteristics, HIV testing history and health literay skills. The study results highlight the need for researchers to strongly consider choice of Internet or social media plaforms when conducting Internet-based research. Because of the sample specifications and cost restraints of studies, specific Internet/ social media or participant selection plaforms will be much more effective or appropriate than others.

  2. Variations in recruitment yield, costs, speed and participant diversity across Internet platforms in a global study examining the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS and HIV testing animated and live-action video among English- or Spanish-speaking Internet or social media users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Shao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a world-wide, Internet-based study on HIV/AIDS and HIV testing knowledge, we compared the yields, speed and costs of recruitment and participant diversity across free postings on 13 Internet or social media platforms, paid advertising or postings on 3 platforms, and separate free postings and paid advertisements on Facebook. Platforms were compared by study completions (yield, time to completion, completion to enrollment ratios (CERs, and costs/completion; and by participants’ demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and health literacy levels. Of the 482 English-speaking participants, Amazon Mechanical Turk yielded the most participants, recruited participants at the fastest rate and had the highest CER (0.78 and lowest costs/completion. Of the 335 Spanish-speaking participants, Facebook yielded the most participants and recruited participants at the fastest rate, although Amazon Mechanical Turk had the highest CER (0.72 and lowest costs/completion. Across platforms participants differed substantially according to their demographic characteristics, HIV testing history and health literacy skills. The study results highlight the need for researchers to strongly consider choice of Internet or social media platforms when conducting Internet-based research. Because of the sample specifications and cost restraints of studies, specific Internet/social media or participant selection platforms will be much more effective or appropriate than others.

  3. Health status of Hispanic elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassford, T L

    1995-02-01

    Hispanic elders living in the United States compose a rapidly increasing population. They are underinsured and more likely to be living in poverty. Health care is hindered in this population by lower access to health services and less use of preventive services. Barriers to access are primarily socioeconomic. Acculturation exerts an effect, primarily through its association with language skills, employment, and education. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for Hispanics, who have a higher prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Although neoplasia is the second most frequent cause of death among Hispanics, as it is in whites who are not Hispanic, Hispanics have an overall lower cancer rate. Cancer rates are increasing, however. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the Hispanic population, affecting nearly a quarter of adult Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans. Although higher prevalence of obesity in the Hispanic population accounts for some of this difference, some data suggest the possibility of a genetic component as well. Assessment of psychological health in Hispanic elders is impeded by the lack of instruments designed for this population. Distress is often expressed as somatic symptoms. Values traditional to Hispanic culture, such as respeto, allocentrism, and familialism, are important to US Hispanic elders, many of whom were born in rural Mexico. Our knowledge of determinants of healthy aging in this population is still preliminary, but rapidly expanding, in part, because of increased attention to ethnicity in health reporting.

  4. Comparisons Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Informal Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Karlin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on understanding similarities and differences between non-Hispanic White and Hispanic informal caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s disease. Comparisons take place between caregivers reporting high levels of burden as indicated by the Zarit Burden Inventory. Data suggest similarities and differences between Hispanic (n = 17 and non-Hispanic White (n = 17 caregivers in this study in several areas. Hispanic caregivers indicated fewer sources of income, had less investment money for family member’s treatment, reported caregiving as a greater interference with life’s accomplishments, and indicated a lesser percentage of the total care cost provided by the family member. Non-Hispanic White caregivers reported having completed a higher level of formal education and that organized religion’s importance prior to becoming a caregiver was not quite as important as compared with the Hispanic care provider. With current trends, of demographic and cultural changes, it is crucial to fully understand the changing role and needs of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic White caregivers.

  5. Against the Grain: Confronting Hispanic Service Organizations in Times of Increasing Inequalities, 1930 and 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Linda

    2006-01-01

    In the late 20th century, many college campuses experienced the emergence and flourishing of Hispanic Greek letter societies. Concerned with the concurrent decline in student activism, the author asks, "What is the political significance of Hispanic Greek letter societies on our campuses?" and "Should we, as Latina/o faculty, be…

  6. Hispanic Mental Health, Drugs and Alcohol Policy Issues: Views from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, Jose, Ed.

    This work contains three papers presented at a conference held in 1976 for the purpose of examining, from a national perspective, the status of health and human services among Hispanic Americans. The first chapter, by A. Anthony Arce, concerns mental health policy in relation to the Hispanic American community. The author delineates some of the…

  7. Using Qualitative Methods for Revising Items in the Hispanic Stress Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Goldbach, Jeremy T.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite progress in the development of measures to assess psychosocial stress experiences in the general population, a lack of culturally informed assessment instruments exist to enable clinicians and researchers to detect and accurately diagnosis mental health concerns among Hispanics. The Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI) was developed…

  8. The Prevalence and Comorbidity between Delinquency, Drug Abuse, Suicide Attempts, Physical and Sexual Abuse, and Self-Mutilation among Delinquent Hispanic Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Jeanette; Curry, Theodore R.

    2007-01-01

    Representative data show that drug abuse, delinquency, and suicide attempts are major concerns among adolescent Hispanic females. Although comorbidity research indicates that such problems tend to be related to each other, this research largely neglects Hispanic females. Using data from presentence investigations on 141 Hispanic girls sentenced to…

  9. Aguas!: An Introduction to Hispanic Plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Johnny

    1996-01-01

    Notes that the number of Hispanic children in schools is growing. Presents an annotated bibliography of 46 Hispanic plays, sources of information, and organizations dealing with Hispanic themes and ideas. (PA)

  10. Dental morphology and ancestry in Albuquerque, New Mexico Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermet, C M; Edgar, H J H

    2009-01-01

    The term "Hispanic" groups people from Central and South America and the Caribbean, combining disparate cultures, languages, and ancestry, and masking biological differences. Historical and current admixture patterns within these populations and with indigenous and European-, African-, and/or Asian- derived populations complicate the biological picture. Although "Hispanic" has little biological meaning, it is used widely in epidemiology, disease management, and forensics as a biologically significant group. An interdisciplinary approach combining historical, cultural, and biological data can characterize regional and temporal differences between Hispanic populations. We examined biological distances with a population of central New Mexico Hispanics, as a case study of the local specificity of population history. We collected dental morphological trait frequencies from samples of recent Albuquerque-area Hispanic Americans and several ancestral and contemporary groups. To explore regional admixture patterns we calculated biological distances using the modified Mahalanobis D(2) statistic. Our results indicate that Albuquerque Hispanics are more similar to their European and African ancestral groups than to Native Americans in New Mexico. Additionally, their affinity to Native Americans is greater with prehistoric rather than contemporary samples. We argue that these results reflect a local rather than pan-Hispanic admixture pattern; they underscore that populations are better understood at the local and regional levels. It is undesirable to make sweeping biological generalizations for groups known to be geographically and genetically disparate. This research is part of a growing trend in biological research concerning Hispanics and other groups-an emphasis on local samples, informed by historical, cultural, and biological factors.

  11. Hispanic College Students Library Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Risa; Newman, Eric; Brown, Haakon T.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at undergraduate Hispanic students' interpretations and current perceptions of the academic library's purpose, usefulness and value. What are the reasons to use the library? What are the barriers to use? This study will examine academic libraries' move toward electronic library materials and what it means for Hispanic students.…

  12. Psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders in Hispanic females of diverse ethnic background and non-Hispanic females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Valerie A; Erb, Allison F; Harris, Cristen L; Casazza, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated differences in psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders among university females (n=406) of diverse Hispanic background (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central American/Mexican, Dominican, Venezuelan) and among White non-Hispanic (n=102) female students. Risk factors were assessed using the Psychosocial Risk Factor Questionnaire (PRFQ) which includes four subscales: Social Pressure for Thinness, Media Pressure for Thinness, Concern for Physical Appearance, and Perception of Physical Appearance. There were significant differences among the groups in total PRFQ score, F(7,499)=2.76, Peating disorders in this population.

  13. Cultural Considerations: Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Means for Improving Blood Pressure Control among Hispanic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neela K. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its prevention and treatment remain a priority for the medical community. Ethnic variations account for some differences in the prevalence of hypertension and blood pressure (BP control rates among Hispanics, indicating the need for culturally appropriate management models. Aggressive treatment strategies are key to achieving optimal BP control in high-risk Hispanic patients. Hypertension in this ethnic group continues to be a major health concern. Of note, when provided access to comprehensive care, Hispanics demonstrate similar response rates to treatment as the majority of non-Hispanic whites. This highlights the importance of effective, culturally responsive hypertension management among high-risk Hispanic patients for achieving observable, positive health outcomes.

  14. Percepción y valoración de variedades geográficas del español de Chile entre hispanohablantes santiaguinos PERCEPTION AND VALUATION OF GEOGRAPHICAL VARIETIES OF CHILEAN SPANISH AMONGST SPANISH-SPEAKING SUBJECTS FROM SANTIAGO DE CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo describimos la percepción que tienen los hispanohablantes santiaguinos de la variación geográfica del español de Chile en términos de tres dimensiones valorativas: la similitud que observan respecto del habla propia en el habla de distintos lugares, la calidad que atribuyen a las variedades percibidas y el agrado que sienten por ellas. Estas percepciones revelan las actitudes de los sujetos hacia las variedades geográficas que identifican en el español chileno. Concluimos que, desde la perspectiva intranacional, los santiaguinos poseen un alto grado de autoestima lingüística, pues su actitud hacia el habla de la capital y la zona central, en general, es más positiva que la que muestran hacia las zonas norte y sur. Sin embargo, en el dominio afectivo (agrado y entre los segmentos medios y bajos de la escala socioeconómica, el habla de la zona sur de Chile incrementa su valoración positiva, aunque sin superar la de la zona central del país.In this paper we describe the perception which Spanish-speaking subjects from Santiago de Chile have of the geographical variation of Chilean Spanish in terms of three dimensions: the similarity observed in the speech of various regions in relation to their own speech, the quality attached to regional varieties, and the pleasantness perceived in them. These perceptions reveal the attitudes that the subjects have towards the regional varieties of Chilean Spanish identified by themselves. We conclude that people from Santiago de Chile have a high degree of linguistic self-esteem as they show a more favourable attitude towards the variety of Spanish spoken in the capital city and in the central region of Chile, in general, than towards the varieties spoken in the northern and southern regions. Nevertheless, in the affective dimension (pleasantness and specially amongst people from the middle and lower classes, the southern variety increases its positive valuation, although

  15. Analysis of the Spanish-speaking mailing list RADIOLOGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Recio, Francisco Javier; Sendra-Portero, Francisco

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the mailing list RADIOLOGIA during its first 5 years of operation (from 1998 to 2003). A survey questionnaire was sent to evaluate the characteristics of subscribers and to score (from 0 to 9) the functionality, usefulness and quality of the mailing list. All messages sent to the list during the evaluated period were classified and quantified. A social network analysis was performed from all messages replied to during 2001 and 2002 with the option "reply to" included in the subject. One hundred and forty (36.8%) responses were collected from 380 subscribers, mainly radiologists (90.0%). 80% of responders were located in Spain, 16% in Latin America, and 4% in other places. The obtained scores (mean+/-standard deviation) were: functionality 7.4+/-1.3; usefulness 7.0+/-1.4; and quality of e-mail contents 6.0+/-1.4. During the evaluated period 2700 e-mail messages were sent to the list, with a monthly distribution of 44.3+/-26.0. The list functioning has been based on an active minority of subscribers that provided information and responses to the rest of the subscribers, a ring of active members that participated in discussions, and about 50% of passive members.

  16. The language growth of spanish-speaking English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Raúl; Iglesias, Aquiles

    2013-01-01

    Although the research literature regarding language growth trajectories is burgeoning, the shape and direction of English Language Learners' (ELLs) language growth trajectories are largely not known. This study used growth curve modeling to determine the shape of ELLs' language growth trajectories across 12,248 oral narrative language samples (6,516 Spanish; 5,732 English) produced by 1,723 ELLs during the first 3 years of formal schooling (M age at first observation = 5 years 7 months). Results indicated distinct trajectories of language growth over time for each language differentially impacted by summer vacation and gender, significant intra- and interindividual differences in initial status and growth rates across both languages, and language-specific relations between language growth and initial status. Implications of ELLs' language growth are discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Formal Features of Headlines: notes on ten spanish speaking newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Nadal Palazón

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As a reaction to the few existing descriptions of headlines, descriptions which in some respects often fail the empirical proof of comparing them to the observable newspapers reality, it is proposed an updated set of the most distinctive formal features of headlines, according to their distribution within a large corpus of current newspapers in Spanish. The set is summarized in four constant and four variable features. The constant features —relatively homogeneous throughout the corpus (although some of its variants have certain conditions— are: expressive bimembration, ellipsis, nominal structures and historical present. On the other hand, the variable traits —which show a not so regular distribution— are: impersonal third person, verb in starting position, quoting conditional and anthroponyms abbreviated by initializations. The analysis is based on a corpus of 3 689 recent headlines published in Spanish in the printed editions of the following newspapers: El País, from Madrid (Spain; La Opinión, from Los Angeles (United States; El Universal, from Mexico City (Mexico; La Nación, from San Jose (Costa Rica; Hoy, from Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic; El Tiempo, from Bogota (Colombia; El Nacional, from Caracas (Venezuela; El Comercio, from Lima (Peru; El Mercurio, from Santiago (Chile, and Clarín, from Buenos Aires (Argentina. Where appropriate, the diatopic factor is considered, and the inaccuracy of some frequent approaches is also demonstrated.

  18. Tense Shifting in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swasey Washington, Patricia; Iglesias, Aquiles

    2015-01-01

    Young monolingual children typically demonstrate frequent tense shifting during narrative development, whereas older children maintain a consistent narration tense. Therefore, inconsistent tense usage in older children could be an indication of overall limited language skills. However, information regarding tense use in bilinguals has been…

  19. The Language Growth of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Raul; Iglesias, Aquiles

    2013-01-01

    Although the research literature regarding language growth trajectories is burgeoning, the shape and direction of English Language Learners' (ELLs) language growth trajectories are largely not known. This study used growth curve modeling to determine the shape of ELLs' language growth trajectories across 12,248 oral narrative language samples…

  20. Dialect Contact among Spanish-Speaking Children in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Belen MacGregor

    2014-01-01

    As an immigration hub for a diverse group of Spanish speakers, Los Angeles lends itself to research on dialect contact and leveling. Studies regarding the Spanish spoken by natives of Los Angeles reveal considerable homogeneity with respect to pronunciation, vocabulary and terms of address. This uniformity is notable because two different dialect…

  1. Early Lexical Development in Spanish-Speaking Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Maldonado, Donna; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new parent report instrument, Inventario del Desarollo de Habilidades Communicativas, is reported and 5 studies carried out with the instrument for 328 children aged 8 months to 2 years/7 months are presented. Among the findings are similar trajectories of development for Spanish- and English-speaking children and for children…

  2. Early Lexical Development in Spanish-Speaking Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Maldonado, Donna; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new parent report instrument, Inventario del Desarollo de Habilidades Communicativas, is reported and 5 studies carried out with the instrument for 328 children aged 8 months to 2 years/7 months are presented. Among the findings are similar trajectories of development for Spanish- and English-speaking children and for children…

  3. Hispanic Transfer in 2-Year Hispanic-Serving Institutions. A White Paper for HACU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges offer Hispanic students a critical gateway to bachelor's degrees, but these institutions also have low transfer rates to four-year institutions. Some research suggests that Hispanic-Serving community colleges have higher Hispanic transfer rates. This paper examines transfer patterns of a national sample of Hispanic community…

  4. Magical realism: a cultural intervention for traumatized Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rios, M D

    1997-01-01

    A case study is presented of two Spanish-speaking immigrant children who were run over in an automobile accident and hospitalized, to describe a culturally congruent play-therapy technique. Drawing on the work of Pynoos and Nader, the author argues for an anthropological approach in play therapy to create hyperaroused states for the traumatized child and to use cultural super heroes-what is termed "magical realism." Such an approach can be used with Latin American traumatized children as well as with children from other Third World countries to provide a culturally appropriate intervention to treat the psychological sequelae of trauma.

  5. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  6. Alcohol Related Problems and the Hispanic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Louis S.

    1977-01-01

    Although Hispanic women report high rates of abstinence, more Hispanic men report alcohol related problems than Anglos, Blacks, or Asians and report more heavy drinking. Yet little has been done to develop or fund culturally specific alcoholism prevention, treatment and rehabilitation programs for the Hispanics. (NQ)

  7. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  8. Education Level of Catholic Hispanic Deacons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed self-reported religiosity, spirituality, faith-related behaviors, leadership styles, and personality dimensions of 156 Hispanic Catholic deacons, based on varied educational degrees assisting in Hispanic (n = 91) or non-Hispanic (n = 65) parishes. Results found no significant differences on any self-reported variables…

  9. Economic Strain and Community Concerns in Three Meatpacking Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, Rochelle L.; Cramer, Sheran; Stanek, Kaye

    2002-01-01

    In three rural Nebraska communities experiencing rising inmigration of Hispanic families, newcomers and long-term residents were interviewed concerning personal financial strain; concerns with community issues such as language barriers and interethnic conflict; nutritional habits; and access to health care, education and training, and social…

  10. Hispanic Women Small Business Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarason, Yolanda; Koberg, Christine

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 22 Hispanic women who owned small businesses in a western state found that most were located in metropolitan areas, were new to business ownership, had started the business themselves, engaged in "miscellaneous services," and generated lower than average revenues. Respondents were similar to nonminority owners in educational…

  11. Hispanics in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Annabel Kirschner

    Sources of diversity in the Pacific Northwest's Spanish origin population, up 79.7% since 1970, was the subject of research based on 1980 Census data. Census information for Whites and Hispanics from metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties with 400 or more persons of Spanish origin was compared on the basis of age, family/household structure,…

  12. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And that catering largely has to do with food. For Hispanic and Latina women, cooking for family is an act of love that can involve unhealthy pork products and lard. And the more they assimilate to American traditions, the quality of their diets really deteriorate. Turn ...

  13. Hispanics' Awareness of Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Alberto; Ostrander, Noam

    2009-01-01

    This study compared Hispanics' awareness of services available to acquire assistive technology and whether they actually sought help to the findings from a national sample. The study assists the field by providing information on a group largely ignored in the literature. The authors sought to answer the following research questions: Are there…

  14. Profile: Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States: 2011 [PDF | 1.1MB] Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010 [PDF | 1.9MB] Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2015 [PDF | 1.6MB] Income and Poverty in the United States: 2015 [PDF | 3.1MB] ...

  15. Bridgman's concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. A.

    1993-07-01

    In 1956 P.W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  16. Política linguística do Estado brasileiro para a divulgação do português em países de língua oficial espanhola Brazilian state language policy for promoting Portuguese in Spanish-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rodrigo Alves Diniz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo objetiva traçar um panorama da política linguística exterior do Estado brasileiro em países de língua oficial espanhola. Após analisarmos o funcionamento institucional da Divisão de Promoção da Língua Portuguesa (DPLP, subordinada ao Ministério das Relações Exteriores, reunimos alguns dados relativos à história e distribuição dos Centros Culturais Brasileiros, Institutos Culturais Bilaterais e leitorados brasileiros no chamado "mundo hispânico". Mostramos, então, que, na esteira de recentes mudanças na política externa brasileira, têm se fortalecido as iniciativas para a promoção do português na América Latina. Ademais, argumentamos que, enquanto instrumento de política linguística, o Certificado de Proficiência em Língua Portuguesa para Estrangeiros (Celpe-Bras tem particular potencial nessa região. Concluímos nosso texto destacando alguns pontos essenciais para o planejamento da política para a divulgação internacional do português.This paper aims to provide an overview of the Brazilian State language-spread policy in countries where Spanish is an official language. After analyzing the institutional functioning of the Division of Portuguese Language Promotion (DPLP, subordinated to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, we gather some data concerning the history and distribution of the Brazilian Cultural Centers, Bilateral Cultural Institutes and lectureships over the so-called "Hispanic world". We then show that the initiatives to promote Portuguese in Latin America have strengthened in the wake of recent changes in Brazilian foreign policy. In addition to this, we argue that, as an instrument of language policy, the Certificate of Proficiency in Portuguese as a Foreign Language (Celpe-Bras has particular potential in this region. To conclude, we highlight essential points for the planning of the policy for promoting Portuguese abroad.

  17. Resiliency in the face of disadvantage: do Hispanic cultural characteristics protect health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C; Penedo, Frank J; Espinosa de los Monteros, Karla; Arguelles, William

    2009-12-01

    Hispanics living in the United States may face substantial adversity, given stresses of immigration and acculturation, low incomes, poor educational and occupational opportunities, inadequate access to health care, and exposure to discrimination. Despite these disadvantages, the Hispanic population often shows equal or better health outcomes when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, a trend that has puzzled researchers and has been referred to as the "Hispanic Paradox." Hispanics with non-U.S. nativity also tend to show better health than those born in the United States, although this advantage dissipates with increasing time spent in the United States. The current article discusses the Reserve Capacity Model (L.C. Gallo & K. A. Matthews, 2003) as a potential framework for understanding how psychosocial risk and resilient factors may contribute to health disparities associated with broad sociocultural factors, such as low socioeconomic status or minority ethnicity. In addition, we examine theory concerning features of the Hispanic culture that may enhance resilience (e.g., social resources, familism, religiousness; G. Marin & B. V. Marin, 1991) in the face of adverse circumstances. We summarize some of our recent work that has empirically tested effects of risk and resilient factors in Hispanic health in the contexts of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. We conclude by discussing future directions and opportunities for researchers interested in culture-specific resiliency factors in relation to health outcomes.

  18. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities.

  19. Assessing Early Literacy with Hispanic Preschoolers: The Factor Structure of the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening--Español

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaden, David B., Jr.; Marx, Ronald W.; Cimetta, Adriana D.; Alkhadim, Ghadah S.; Cutshaw, Christina

    2017-01-01

    For two decades, it has been recommended that assessment of literacy for preschool children be conducted in a child's primary language. However, only a few literacy assessments have been validated with a preschool, Spanish-speaking population. The purpose of the present study was to test the latent structure of the Phonological Awareness Literacy…

  20. The Development and Validation of an Auditory Perception Test in Spanish for Hispanic Children Receiving Reading Instruction in Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James A.; Michael, William B.

    1982-01-01

    A Spanish auditory perception test, La Prueba de Analisis Auditivo, was developed and administered to 158 Spanish-speaking Latino children, kindergarten through grade 3. Psychometric data for the test are presented, including its relationship to SOBER, a criterion-referenced Spanish reading measure. (Author/BW)

  1. Environmental Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alma, Peter

    1995-04-01

    This series of A-level social biology topic books responds to the changing demands of social biology syllabuses, with each text dealing with a particular area of interest. Although the series is primarily intended for students of A-level social biology, the books will appeal to students studying a wide range of biological subjects at A-level. Environmental Concerns covers topics common to several A-level human and social biology syllabuses. It is particularly relevant to the human ecology and conservation options. The text focuses on the social and economic implications of current ecological issues as well as the basic biological concepts involved. It deals with the causes, effects and prevention of atmospheric and water pollution as well as with the disruption of ecosystems by changes in land use. The conflict of interests between conservation and exploitation is discussed, along with management techniques including the controversial method of culling to maintain diversity. The moral and aesthetic aspects of conservation and management are emphasised throughout, in addition to the scientific background of these techniques.

  2. Hospice Use by Hispanic and Non‐Hispanic White Cancer Decedents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lackan, Nuha A; Ostir, Glenn V; Freeman, Jean L; Kuo, Yong‐Fang; Zhang, Dong D; Goodwin, James S

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To investigate rates of hospice use between Hispanic and non‐Hispanic white Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with cancer using data from a large, population‐based study. Data Sources...

  3. Franchisees boost growth of Hispanic PPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J

    1991-10-07

    What began as a local marketing effort by two Chicago hospitals to reach the city's fast-growing Hispanic population has turned into a national program with franchises in San Diego and San Antonio, Texas. Formed in 1989, Hispanocare, a preferred provider organization catering to Hispanics, began attracting attention in other cities with large Hispanic populations, prompting the Chicago hospitals to begin a marketing push.

  4. Older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadule-Rios, Nohemi; Tappen, Ruth; Williams, Christine L; Rosselli, Monica

    2014-08-01

    Cultural variations in the perception of depression make it difficult to recognize the disorder resulting in older Hispanics not being diagnosed and not receiving appropriate treatment. This study used a mixed-method design to explore older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression. Depression was recognized as the result of life stressors and personal weaknesses. Terms used for depressed people included "crazy, worry, bored, and nerves." These culturally coded terms may confound diagnosis among many Hispanics who find depression a shameful condition. Findings can be used to inform the adaptation of culturally relevant approaches to better serve the Hispanic community in this country.

  5. Hepatitis C Infection Among Hispanics in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Catherine A; Erlyana, Erlyana; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace L

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics in California are more likely to be infected with hepatitis C, and those infected have had their infection detected later. A total of 1,567 Hispanic and Caucasian individuals were tested for antibodies to hepatitis C from 2000 through 2013. Interviewers administered the Risk Behavior Assessment. Hepatitis C-infected Hispanics were incarcerated longer than hepatitis C-infected Caucasians, and they used marijuana less and illicit methadone more. They were more likely to use crack, heroin, speedballs, and to have been in methadone treatment. Hispanics need hepatitis C testing linked to methadone treatment and written information in Spanish and English.

  6. Demographic Changes of Hispanic Populations and Hispanic Student Enrollment in Texas Community Colleges: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this literature review, Hispanic demographic changes in the United States and in Texas are examined. Hispanics have accounted for large changes in population, population change, and proportion of population. Accordingly, the literature was reviewed regarding Hispanic immigrants, both authorized and non-authorized immigrants. The issue of…

  7. Expressions of machismo in colorectal cancer screening among New Mexico Hispanic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getrich, Christina M; Sussman, Andrew L; Helitzer, Deborah L; Hoffman, Richard M; Warner, Teddy D; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing, and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men's health-seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations, and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as "strictly medical," and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. Findings from the study highlight the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings.

  8. Cardiovascular Disease in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Pelbreton C.; Ruiz, John M.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality in the United States and Western world for all groups with one exception: CVDs are the number 2 cause of death for Hispanics/Latinos behind cancer with overall cancer rates lower for Latinos relative to non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). Despite a significantly worse risk factor profile marked by higher rates of traditional and non-traditional determinants, some CVD prevalence and mortality rates are significantly lower among Latinos relative NHWs. These findings support a need for greater understanding of CVDs specifically among Latinos in order to better document prevalence, appropriately model risk and resilience, and improve targeting of intervention efforts. The current aim is to provide a state-of-the-science review of CVDs amongst Latinos including a review of the epidemiological evidence, risk factor prevalence, and evaluation of the breadth and quality of the data. Questions concerning the generalizability of current risk models, the Hispanic paradox as it relates to CVDs, contributing psychosocial and sociocultural factors, and future directions are discussed. PMID:27429866

  9. Evaluation of hospice care by family members of Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, Abbie; Holland, Jason M; Keene, Jennifer R; Luna, Nora

    2015-05-01

    The Hispanic older adult population is increasing rapidly and past research suggests that this demographic group underutilizes hospice services, highlighting the need to improve our understanding of their needs in end of life. This study relied upon information from the family evaluation of hospice care survey provided by 2980 caregivers, 152 of whom cared for a Hispanic patient and 2828 who cared for a non-Hispanic patient. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were more likely to report that hospice was inconsistent with the patient's wishes, and that they received more attention than desired for emotional issues. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were also more likely to express that emotional/spiritual forms of support were insufficient. Similar levels of satisfaction were reported for caregivers of Hispanics and non-Hispanics regarding dignity/respect, information received, care coordination, and overall satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  11. Hispanic Literature: A Fiesta for Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Bess A.; Casteel, Carolyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how literature can facilitate students' appreciation of the multifaceted Hispanic culture. Offers advice on merging Hispanic literature and literacy instruction, organizing children's books by category to help structure classroom activities, exploring themes and cultural concepts, and integrating literacy/thinking strategies with…

  12. Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centro De La Comunidad, Inc., New London, CT.

    During its second year, the Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project recruited eighth and ninth grade Hispanic youth for a four-week cycle, after-school, career exploratory program at Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical School, Groton, Connecticut. A series of career education workshops was the other major project activity. Supportive…

  13. Making Mathematics and Science Work for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Laura I.; Triana, Estrella M.

    This document discusses barriers that impede the progress and participation of Hispanic American students in mathematics and science education, and recommends extensive educational reforms. Following an introduction, the first of two main sections reviews the current Hispanic American underrepresentation in mathematics and science and describes…

  14. Hispanics Find Jobs that Shift Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Economic opportunity, the force that has driven population shifts for years, is changing the face of migration as Hispanics move into parts of the nation beyond border states and traditional ports of entry. North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Indiana are experiencing a steady growth in Hispanic population. In addition, West Virginia, Ohio, and…

  15. 25 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15th through October 15th, is a great opportunity to kick off a whole year of cultural discovery. This article presents 25 great ideas for Hispanic heritage. These 25 fresh ideas--from Aztec math to Carnaval masks--are easy to put together, and they offer students the chance to celebrate their own…

  16. The Impact of Technology on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Mata-Claflin, Guadalupe; Holland, Glenda; Castillo, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if elementary teachers use technology as a tool to enhance classroom strategies for improving student achievement among Hispanic students. The following research questions were utilized: a) Are computers available for classroom teachers and Hispanic students? b) Has the available technology contributed to…

  17. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  18. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  19. Outpatient drug abuse treatment for Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Lopez, Barbara; Prado, Guillermo; Schwartz, Seth J; Pantin, Hilda

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review the state of the science in evidence-based drug abuse treatments for Hispanic adolescents, highlight scientific opportunities, and offer recommendations to further the field of drug abuse treatment for this population. The article is divided into seven sections: boundaries for this review, drug abuse and associated problems, behavioral treatment, cultural issues in hispanic adolescent behavioral drug abuse treatment, pharmacological treatment, gender differences in treatment, and scientific opportunities/recommendations. Although only one treatment approach, Brief Strategic Family Therapy, has been empirically shown to be efficacious in treating Hispanic adolescent drug abusers, with some modifications other treatments may also have the potential to be efficacious with Hispanic adolescents. Family-based approaches, which typically appear to be most efficacious with adolescents in general, may also have the greatest potential to treat drug abuse in Hispanic adolescents.

  20. Listening to Hispanic mothers: guidelines for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A H; Robledo, L

    1999-01-01

    Teaching Hispanic mothers in a culturally sensitive way to care for their children is a challenge to pediatric nurses. Pediatric nurses must be familiar with customs and the folk medicine practiced by Hispanic mothers. It is very important that the pediatric nurse listens to the voices of Hispanic mothers to determine their health practices, and those that may have been used in their children. Familiarity with folk medicine and health practices will facilitate an appropriate treatment plan and will help to determine whether the mothers' practices are dangerous or beneficial for the child. Pediatric nurses should assess for concurrent use of home remedies and conventional medications to determine if there are any known interactive effects. Finally, increasing the number of pediatric nurses who are fluent in Spanish will enable the voices of Hispanic mothers to be better heard, which in turn, will improve the health status of Hispanic children.

  1. DataTrack 6: Blacks and Hispanics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council of Life Insurance, Washington, DC.

    Sixth in a series of reports which compile and interpret statistical information of direct concern to life insurance executives, this report deals with Blacks and Hispanics in the United States. It can be used in the design of new products and services to meet changing consumer needs, the selection of new markets and marketing strategies, the…

  2. Hispanics in the Labor Force: A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjas, George, Ed.; Tienda, Marta, Ed.

    Hispanics in the U.S. labor force are the subject of the studies in this volume. After an introduction by George J. Borjas and Marta Tienda, the first three papers focus on the same issue: the determination of wage rates for Hispanics and comparison of Hispanic and non-Hispanic wage rates. Cordelia Reimers compares the situation for Black, White,…

  3. The Use of Inpatient Mental Health Services by Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nancy Felipe; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides a profile of Hispanic women's use of inpatient mental health facilities. Presents gender differences for Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatient admissions regarding age, marital status, and diagnosis. Women, particularly Hispanics, used service less than men; admission rates were higher for men with schizophrenia and alcohol-related…

  4. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months.

  5. Hispanic children and overweight: causes and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella-Nigro, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of overweight is increasing to alarming rates in children and adolescents in the United States. Hispanic children are one of the highest risk groups for overweight. Many different factors are positively correlated with childhood overweight in Hispanics: lower socioeconomic status, lacking health insurance or being under-insured, poor diet, decreased physical activity, overweight status of parents, mother's perception of overweight, and degree of acculturation. Pediatric nurses are in a pivotal position to assist in curtailing the epidemic. Various evidence-based practices to prevent and treat pediatric overweight are discussed with recommendations to intervene, particularly with Hispanic youth.

  6. The Effects of Contact on the Prejudice between Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles N.

    2007-01-01

    The growing Hispanic population has come into increasing contact with the larger population of non-Hispanic Whites. It is important to understand the effects of this contact on prejudice. The effects of six kinds of contact were examined for their effects on prejudice between Hispanics (n = 156) and non-Hispanic Whites (n = 1,479) who were…

  7. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and psychological distress among Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Buelna, Christina; Giacinto, Rebeca Espinoza; Gallo, Linda C; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gonzalez, Patricia; Fortmann, Addie L; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Gellman, Marc D; Giachello, Aida L; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    Studies show that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are correlated with psychological distress, yet research examining these relationships among Hispanic/Latinos is lacking. The population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (N=16,415) 18-74years of age at the time of recruitment, from four US metropolitan areas, between March 2008 and June 2011. Psychological distress (i.e., 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, 10 item Spielberger Trait Anxiety Scale, and a combined depression/anxiety score), socio-demographics (i.e., age, education, income, insurance, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background), acculturation (i.e., country of birth and language preference), and traditional CVD risk factors (i.e., dyslipidemia, obesity, current cigarette smoking, diabetes, and hypertension) were assessed at baseline. Associations between CVD risk factors and psychological distress measures by sex were examined using multiple linear regression models, accounting for complex survey design and sampling weights and controlling for socio-demographic and acculturation covariates. In adjusted analyses, all three psychological distress measures were significantly related to smoking. For females, greater psychological distress was significantly related to obesity and current smoking. For males, diabetes and current smoking were associated with psychological distress. For males and females, dyslipidemia and hypertension were not associated with psychological distress after adjusting for other factors. Elevated depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with CVD risk factors for Hispanic/Latino men and women. However, these results were not consistent across Hispanic/Latino groups. As promoted by the integrative care model, psychosocial concerns should be considered in research on CVD risk and chronic disease prevention.

  8. Factors Motivating HPV Vaccine Uptake Among Vaccinated and Nonvaccinated Hispanic Young Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dionne P; Tamir, Hod; Thomas, Tami L

    2016-12-01

    To identify factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination up taking decision making among vaccinated and nonvaccinated Hispanic college women. Hispanic young women between the ages of 18 and 24 years (N = 49). In total, 26 had not received the HPV vaccine, and 23 had started/completed the vaccine series. Participants registered for the study via a psychology research pool at a large public university in the southeast United States after institutional review board approval. After completing a demographic information and HPV knowledge Web-based survey, participants were individually interviewed. Differences in HPV vaccine knowledge emerged between vaccinated and nonvaccinated women. Fear of side effects, perceptions of risk, and sources of encouragement influenced willingness to be vaccinated against HPV. Health care providers played a central role in addressing concerns and promoting vaccination. Health care providers must address and integrate unique decision-making processes influencing Hispanic young adult women's perceptions of HPV vaccination. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Importance of the Hispanic heritage regarding diagnosis and management of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Candales, Angel

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a very prevalent and growing clinical problem that is not always promptly diagnosed and ∼6% of U.S. adults remain undiagnosed. Though numerous risk factors have been linked to the development of HTN, ethnicity has traditionally been simply considered as a significant risk among non-Hispanic Blacks. However, emerging data seems to suggest that Hispanics, the largest and fastest-growing minority in the U.S.A., might have rates of uncontrolled HTN that significantly exceeds the rates observed for non-Hispanic whites. Unfortunately, paucity of a significant Hispanic representation in major clinical trials has raised significant healthcare concerns regarding our true understanding of the meaning of HTN and associated cardiovascular consequences among this ethnic group. Consequently, there is urgency not only in having a better understanding of HTN among Hispanics, but also to examine the potential factors that may play a role in regulating the expression of HTN and its associated cardiovascular manifestations in this ethnic group.

  10. Colonoscopy Screening Information Preferences Among Urban Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Jennie; Jandorf, Lina; DuHamel, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Existing disparities are evident in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We sought to assess preferred sources of colonoscopy screening information among Hispanics in East Harlem, NY. Face-to-face interviews were conducted among average-risk for CRC, non-symptomatic Hispanics in community-based sites and health clinics. SPSS 16 analysis explored the relationships between sociodemographic and health care variables and preferred sources of colonoscopy information for 395 participants. The top fou...

  11. Spanish-Hispanic Culture from A to V (Actualidades to Venezuela): 72 Spanish-Language Interdisciplinary Cultural Themes with Suggested Resource Materials and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Merriam M.

    This guidebook is intended for use by teachers of Spanish (FLES through college level) and by teachers in Spanish bilingual programs. It lists all of the Spanish-speaking countries and 72 Spanish-language cultural themes, such as "Actualidades" (Current Events), "Carreras y espanol comercial" (Careers and Commercial Spanish), "Deportes" (Sports),…

  12. Cultura, communicacion e interaccion: hacia el contexto total del lenguaje y el hombre hispanicos (Culture, Communication and Interaction: Toward the Total Context of Hispanic Man and his Language)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos, Fernando

    1975-01-01

    This fourth and final of a series of papers on communication in the Spanish-speaking world deals with body language and other nonverbal communication. The use of nonverbal sounds, the visual and olfactory senses, and behavior patterns are noted. (Text is in Spanish.) (CK)

  13. Cultura, communicacion e interaccion: hacia el contexto total del lenguaje y el hombre hispanicos (Culture, Communication and Interaction: Toward the Total Context of Hispanic Man and his Language)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos, Fernando

    1975-01-01

    This fourth and final of a series of papers on communication in the Spanish-speaking world deals with body language and other nonverbal communication. The use of nonverbal sounds, the visual and olfactory senses, and behavior patterns are noted. (Text is in Spanish.) (CK)

  14. Spanish-Hispanic Culture from A to V (Actualidades to Venezuela): 72 Spanish-Language Interdisciplinary Cultural Themes with Suggested Resource Materials and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Merriam M.

    This guidebook is intended for use by teachers of Spanish (FLES through college level) and by teachers in Spanish bilingual programs. It lists all of the Spanish-speaking countries and 72 Spanish-language cultural themes, such as "Actualidades" (Current Events), "Carreras y espanol comercial" (Careers and Commercial Spanish), "Deportes" (Sports),…

  15. The Effects of Institutional Culture on Study Strategies of Hispanic Students as Measured by the "Inventario de Comportamiento de Estudio": The Spanish Version of the "Study Behavior Inventory."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Leonard B.; Sandiford, Janice R.

    The study behaviors of Spanish-speaking students at a large two-year public college in the United States were studied using the Inventario de Comportamiento de Estudio (ECI) (L. Bliss, D. Vinay, and F. Koenigner), the Spanish version of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (C. Weinstein, 1987). Behaviors of these students were compared with…

  16. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  17. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  18. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study examines the perceptions of 22 national Hispanic American leaders about poverty among Hispanics. Eleven of the leaders were Mexican American; five were Puerto Rican; four were Cuban American; one was Central American; and one was South American. Twelve of the leaders were heads of public interest organizations; six were members of…

  19. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  20. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  1. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study examines the perceptions of 22 national Hispanic American leaders about poverty among Hispanics. Eleven of the leaders were Mexican American; five were Puerto Rican; four were Cuban American; one was Central American; and one was South American. Twelve of the leaders were heads of public interest organizations; six were members of…

  2. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  3. Perceptions and Needs of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Parents of Children Receiving Learning Disabilities Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Burgo, Nydia I.; Reyes-Wasson, Pamela; Brusca-Vega, Rita

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 50 Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of children with learning disabilities examined treatment of the two groups of parents in the special education process, parents' involvement in the process, and how parental treatment compared to the mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Strategies are suggested to maximize…

  4. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  5. Perceptions and Needs of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Parents of Children Receiving Learning Disabilities Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Burgo, Nydia I.; Reyes-Wasson, Pamela; Brusca-Vega, Rita

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 50 Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of children with learning disabilities examined treatment of the two groups of parents in the special education process, parents' involvement in the process, and how parental treatment compared to the mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Strategies are suggested to maximize…

  6. A pre-Hispanic head.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Bianucci

    Full Text Available This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418-1491 AD, 95.4% probability. Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS. This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies.

  7. Culture-bound syndromes in Hispanic primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayles, Bryan P; Katerndahl, David A

    2009-01-01

    We sought to document Hispanic primary care patients' knowledge and experience of five culture-bound syndromes (CBS), as well as the basic socio-cultural correlates of these disorders. A convenience sample of 100 adult Hispanic patients presenting in an urban South Texas primary care clinic was recruited to complete a brief cross-sectional survey, presented in an oral format. Interviews sought information concerning five culture-bound syndromes--susto, empacho, nervios, mal de ojo, and ataques de nervios. Additional demographic, socio-economic, and acculturation data was collected. Descriptive and bivariate statistics (chi square, Fisher's) were used to assess relationships among variables and experience with each CBS. A multivariate logistic analysis was conducted to determine the possible contributions of age, gender, acculturation, and education to the personal experience of a culture-bound syndrome. Results indicate that 77% of respondents had knowledge of all five syndromes, with 42% reporting having personally experienced at least one CBS. Nervios was the most commonly suffered disorder, being reported by 30 respondents. This was followed, in declining order ofprevalence, by susto, mal de ojo, empacho, and ataques de nervios. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that higher education beyond high school was associated with a slightly decreased likelihood of reporting having suffered from any culture-bound syndrome. While co-occurrence among these disorders occurred, the patterns of predictors suggest that the co-occurrence is not a reflection of mislabeling of one common syndrome. Knowledge of and experience with culture-bound syndromes is common among Hispanic primary care patients in South Texas. Healthcare providers ought to consider discussing these illnesses in a non-judgmental manner with patients who present with symptoms that are consistent with these syndromes. Future studies, with larger sample sizes, are warranted to elucidate the nature

  8. Incidence rates of the major leukemia subtypes among US Hispanics, Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasar, Matthew J; Ritchie, Ellen K; Consedine, Nathan; Magai, Carol; Neugut, Alfred I

    2006-11-01

    While leukemia rates are thought to be lower in South and Central America, no study has systematically investigated incidence rates of the leukemia subtypes among Hispanics in the U.S. This was a retrospective cohort study, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, 1992 - 2001, to compare leukemia incidence rates as a function of race and ethnicity. It was found that in adults, Hispanics had lower incidence rates for each of the major types of leukemia as compared to non-Hispanic Whites: For AML, elderly Whites had an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.61 in comparison to Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.27 in comparison to Blacks (p < 0.001); for CML, the IRR among the elderly was 1.42 that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.22 that of Blacks (p = 0.003); and for CLL, the IRR was 2.31 times that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.48 times that of Blacks (p < 0.001). In ALL, however, Hispanics aged 0 - 19 had a significantly higher incidence rate than Whites and Blacks, with an IRR of 1.32 compared to Whites (p < 0.001), and 2.62 compared to Blacks (p < 0.001). In AML, CML, and CLL, among people age 65 or older, white non-Hispanics have higher incidence rates than Blacks, and Blacks have higher incidence rates than Hispanics. Childhood ALL incidence rates are highest among Hispanics, and lowest among Blacks.

  9. Promoting Multivitamins to Hispanic Adolescents and Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mackert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs can be reduced by 50% to 70% with sufficient periconceptional intake of folic acid. Hispanic women are up to 3 times more likely than non-Hispanics to have a child affected by NTDs. This disparity is complicated by health literacy, as women impacted by this disparity are also at-risk for low health literacy. The purpose of this project was to pilot advertisements to promote multivitamins, increasing folic acid consumption, among Hispanic adolescents. The advertisements for Hispanic adolescents and their mothers focused on broad benefits of a multivitamin, downplaying folic acid’s role in prenatal health. Participants were Hispanic mothers (n = 25 and adolescents (n = 25 at a clinic in the Southwestern United States. Likert-type survey items and an open-ended question were used to assess attitudes toward multivitamins and advertisements. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS was used to assess participants’ health literacy. Participants’ impressions of the ads were positive. Both groups expressed the intent to start taking a daily multivitamin after viewing the ads—adolescents for themselves and mothers to start their daughters on a daily multivitamin. There was no relationship between participants’ health literacy and perceptions of the advertisements or intentions to begin a multivitamin habit. This research illustrates the potential of messages that rely on peripheral health benefits to overcome communication barriers posed by health literacy and address serious health problems such as NTDs.

  10. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  11. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  12. 77 FR 58291 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Proclamation Our Nation's story would not be possible without generations of Hispanics who have shaped and... reach for all who seek it. From promoting job creation and ensuring Hispanics are represented in the...

  13. Health Snapshot: Hispanic Adolescents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updates March 2013 March 2013 Health Snapshot - Hispanic Adolescents in the United States Our nation’s adolescents are ... care and more positive health outcomes. 5 Hispanic adolescents in the U.S... Increasingly have health care coverage. ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  15. The Supply and Demand of High-Achieving Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurantz, Oded; Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States, increasing almost six-fold from 1970 to 2014. Although Hispanics youth in the U.S. have traditionally had lower college attendance rates, some sources suggest a narrowing of the White-Hispanic postsecondary attendance gap over the last fifteen years. A key question is whether altering…

  16. Military Enlistment of Hispanic Youth: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth J.; Buck, Christopher; Klerman, Jacob Alex; Kleykamp, Meredith; Loughran, David S.

    2009-01-01

    An implicit goal of Congress, the Department of Defense, and the armed services is that diversity in the armed services should approximate diversity in the general population. A key aspect of that diversity is the representation of Hispanics. Although polls of Hispanic youth show a strong propensity to serve in the military, Hispanics are…

  17. 75 FR 57369 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Hispanic Heritage Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation From the... and strengthened our country. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we pause to celebrate the..., Hispanics have preserved the rich heritage of generations past while contributing mightily to the promise...

  18. 76 FR 59499 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8718 of September 21, 2011 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011... National Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) Week, we renew our commitment to strengthening and expanding... country are helping Hispanic students gain access to a quality higher education. These institutions...

  19. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  20. Tools for Success in Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about strategies for success in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. One strategy suggested by Raul Lorenzo, account director for Bauza & Associates, a Hispanic marketing agency that helps colleges and universities recruit and retain Hispanic students, is that institutions need to speak to the heart as well…

  1. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  2. Hispanic Mosaic: A Public Health Service Perspective. Proceedings of the Annual Forum on the Status of Hispanic Health (1st, Rockville, Maryland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Marta, Ed.

    Five agencies of the Public Health Service (PHS) joined with PHS Hispanic employees and other Hispanic health specialists to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Week by critically examining health issues of particular relevance to Hispanics. The first day the forum sought to define, from an Hispanic perspective, issues relating to health statistics,…

  3. Is self-rated health comparable between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics? Evidence from the health and retirement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dejun; Wen, Ming; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2013-07-01

    Using subsequent all-cause mortality as a yardstick for retrospective health, this study assessed the comparability of self-rated health (SRH) between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics. Based on longitudinal data from 6,870 white and 886 Hispanic respondents aged between 51 and 61 in the 1992 Health and Retirement Study, we related SRH in 1992 to risk of mortality in the 1992-2008 period. Logit models were used to predict white-Hispanic differences in reporting fair or poor SRH. Survival curves and cox proportional hazard models were estimated to assess whether and the extent to which the SRH-mortality association differs between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics. Hispanic respondents reported worse SRH than whites at the baseline, yet they had similar risk of mortality as whites in the 1992-2008 period. Overall, Hispanics rated their health more pessimistically than whites. This was especially the case for Hispanics who rated their health fair or poor at the baseline, whereas their presumed health conditions, as reflected by subsequent risk of mortality, should be considerably better than their white counterparts. Health disparities between whites and Hispanics aged between 51 and 61 will be overestimated if the assessment has been solely based on differences in SRH between the two groups. Findings from this study call for caution in relying on SRH to quantify and explain health disparities between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics in the United States.

  4. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Xuan, Lei; Lee, Simon J. Craddock

    2016-01-01

    To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes—i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile—and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995–2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts) adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics) had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born) Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed. PMID:27983668

  5. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi L. Pruitt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes—i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile—and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995–2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed.

  6. Antisocial Behavior and Psychoactive Substance Involvement among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adolescents in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David G.; Brown, Sandra A.; Myers, Mark G.

    1997-01-01

    Compared conduct disorder behaviors and substance involvement of Hispanic (n=34) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (n=34) adolescents so as to determine pre-treatment problem behavior. Results indicate that non-Hispanic Caucasian youth were three times as likely to be diagnosed with conduct disorder prior to substance involvement than were their Hispanic…

  7. Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions of Self-Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogren, Karrie

    2012-01-01

    Limited research has explored the perceptions of self-determination held by diverse families. In this study, seven mothers of transition-age youth with severe disabilities who were Hispanic were interviewed. Each mother was actively engaged in advocacy related to diverse children with disabilities in their local schools and communities. Mothers…

  8. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  9. Hispanic Parents' Perceptions of Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This study examined 32 Hispanic parents' perceptions of education, especially, (a) parent's motivation for their children's career choice, (b) their perceptions of education, and (c) informal means of education at home. The data were collected using openended questions and were analyzed using content analysis. Findings in this study provide…

  10. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  11. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  12. Hispanic Parents' Perceptions of Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This study examined 32 Hispanic parents' perceptions of education, especially, (a) parent's motivation for their children's career choice, (b) their perceptions of education, and (c) informal means of education at home. The data were collected using openended questions and were analyzed using content analysis. Findings in this study provide…

  13. Hispanic Literature: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayman, Valerie, Comp.

    Intended for use by those conducting research in Hispanic literature, this guide contains annotations of more than 100 reference works. Types of materials included in the guide are (1) encyclopedias; (2) guides to literature and to periodicals; (3) literary dictionaries, handbooks, and biographical sources; (4) book reviews; (5) theses and…

  14. A Language Challenge to the Hispanic American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Miguel A.

    The Hispanic-American, because he or she is bilingual and bicultural, could play an important role in the future economic development of the United States. Declines in steel, automotive, and electronics industries due to foreign competition and market saturation have caused industrial displacement and unemployment. The Maquiladora or Twin Plant…

  15. Birth Rates Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics and their Representation in Contemporary Obstetric Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Maike K; De La Torre, Rosa; Racusin, Diana A; Suter, Melissa A; Mastrobattista, Joan M; Ramin, Susan M; Clark, Steven L; Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-10-01

    Objective Our study aims were to establish whether subjects enrolled in current obstetric clinical trials proportionately reflects the contemporary representation of Hispanic ethnicities and their birth rates in the United States. Methods Using comprehensive source data over a defined interval (January 2011-September 2015) on birth rates by ethnicity from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we evaluated the proportional rate by ethnicity, then analyzed the observed to expected relative ratio of enrolled subjects. Results Hispanic women comprise a significant contribution to births in the United States (23% of all births). Systematic analysis of 90 published obstetric clinical trials showed a correlation between inclusion of Hispanic gravidae and the corresponding state's birth rates (r = 0.501, p < 0.001). While the mean was strongly correlated, individual clinical trials may have relatively over-enrolled (n = 31, or 34%) or under-enrolled (n = 33, or 37%) relative to their regional population. In 48% of obstetric clinical trials the Hispanic proportion of the study population was not reported. Conclusion Hispanic gravidae represent a significant number of contemporary U.S. births, and are generally adequately represented as obstetric subjects in clinical trials. However, this is trial-dependent, with significant trial-specific under- and over-enrollment of Hispanic subjects relative to the regional birth population.

  16. Recruiting Hispanics to dietetics: WIC educators' perceptions of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Cynthia J; Henley, Samantha M; Daniluk, Patricia; Rengers, Bruce; Fajardo-Lira, Claudia; Gillette, Cynthia Dormer; Bizeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although Hispanics comprise approximately 12% of the population, only 3% of registered dietitians (RDs) are Hispanic. This pilot study explored non-RD Hispanic Women, Infant and Children (WIC) educators' perceptions of dietetics and identified recruitment strategies to increase Hispanic representation. Hispanic WIC educators (n = 48) completed a questionnaire to determine reasons for not pursuing RD status, reasons Hispanics are underrepresented in dietetics, and recruitment strategies. Thirty-eight percent of respondents planned on becoming an RD; 56% had considered becoming an RD. Eighty-two percent postponed pursing the RD due to expense and 65% due to life circumstances. Reasons cited for underrepresentation of Hispanics in the field included lack of knowledge about dietetics, lack of Hispanic role models, and length and expense of training. Suggested recruitment strategies included scholarships, mentoring programs, and awareness campaigns with schools and community-based organizations serving Hispanics. Many WIC educators are interested in becoming RDs, but barriers prevent them from pursing the necessary education and training. To support WIC educators in becoming RDs, the length and expense of the education/ training should be addressed. Increasing awareness of the profession in the Hispanic community and providing financial support would help recruit more Hispanics to the dietetics major.

  17. Negotiating Religiosity and Sexual Identity Among Hispanic Lesbian Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Zelma

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic lesbian mothers face bicultural tensions that stigmatize their roles as mothers. Religion could produce heightened conflict given their potential incompatibility with the role of a "good mother." In particular, there is a potential for conflict between the definition of a "good mother" set forth in Catholicism and the sexual orientation of Hispanic lesbians. I conducted semistructured in-depth interviews to examine how Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate their Catholic religious identity with aspects of their sexual identity. More specifically, I examined the strategies that Hispanic lesbian mothers use to reconcile or navigate perceived conflict between their roles as a Catholic and as a lesbian. The research questions to be answered were: How do Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate a Catholic religious and a sexual identity? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers create and maintain a religious narrative? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers redefine religion and spirituality?

  18. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally.

  19. Reliability and validity of the DCP among hispanic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Victoria; Mohler, M Jane; Wendel, Christopher S; Hoffman, Richard M; Murata, Glen H; Shah, Jayendra H; Duckworth, William C

    2005-12-01

    The Diabetes Care Profile (DCP) was designed to measure psychosocial factors related to diabetes and its treatment. This study sought to determine the reliability and validity of the DCP in Hispanic veterans with Type 2 diabetes. Hispanic (n=81) and non-Hispanic White (n=238) patients were recruited at three southwestern VA hospitals. Scale reliabilities calculated by Cronbach's coefficient alpha revealed reliabilities ranging from .54 to .97 in Hispanics and .63 to .95 in non-Hispanic Whites. Only one scale, Monitoring Barriers, differed significantly between the two patient groups. Mean values on the DCP scales were consistent within and across ethnicities lending support for construct validity of the DCP in Hispanics. Convergent validity was also supported for DCP scales within the Hispanic patients as evidenced by correlations in expected directions with external measures.

  20. Diverse Hispanic population to become largest U.S. minority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    High immigration rates and relatively high birth rates have made Hispanics the second fastest growing minority population in the US. Only the Asian population is growing faster. In 1996, 11% of the US's population was Hispanic. However, Hispanic Americans are projected to outnumber African Americans by 2005, and by 2050, the Hispanic population in the US is projected to total approximately 100 million, 25% of the US population and the largest of the country's ethnic minorities. Latinos have the lowest rates of high school and college graduation of any major population group in the US. Since relevant data first became available in 1972 and until 1994, the median income of Latino families has remained below that of White families, but above that of African American families. The Hispanics' median family income of $24,000 in 1995 was below that of African American families. Puerto Rican and Mexican families are most likely to be poor, while Cubans are least likely. There is considerable diversity within the US's Hispanic population. For example, some Hispanics speak only Spanish, while others speak no Spanish at all. Hispanic Americans come from many countries and cultures, making the differences between and within the Hispanic ethnic groups sometimes as great as their similarities. Most Americans do not understand that Hispanics are an ethnic group, not a racial group.

  1. Living kidney donation among Hispanics: a qualitative examination of barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Eusebio M; Siegel, Jason T; Turcotte, Dana; Lisha, Nadra; Crano, William D; Dominick, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Despite their increasing need for kidneys and low nonliving donation rates, minimal research has been conducted to ascertain the perceptions of Hispanic Americans about living organ donation and the process of asking for such a donation. To examine perceptions of Hispanics regarding barriers to and benefits of living donation as well as the process of asking someone to be a living donor. A qualitative study consisting of 10 focus groups conducted in 2 series. Adult Spanish-language-dominant Hispanic members of the general population of Tucson, Arizona. The main barriers to living organ donation were a lack of knowledge or information and fear of the donation process. Knowing that one has helped save or improve another's life was the central benefit. Most participants reported being willing to ask a relative to be a living donor if they were ever in need. Two main responses typified these individuals: no concern about asking because of a strong desire to fight for one's health and for one's family, or asking despite difficulties and concerns about the process. A significant minority of participants indicated they would not ask for a donation, because of either a desire to avoid harming others or the expectation that a relative would initiate an offer.

  2. Radio Nutricion: A Program for Nutrition Education with the Hispanic Community. Service Provider's Guide = Radio Nutricion: Un Programa de Educacion para la Nutricion para la Comunidad Hispana. Guia del Proveeidor de Servicios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Farmworker Opportunity Program, Arlington, VA.

    The set of materials was designed to provide nutrition instruction to Spanish-speaking farm workers using radio broadcasts. It includes audiocassette tapes of four novellas (mini-dramas) on nutrition-related topics (diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure, pregnancy, smart shopping), talk shows on the same topics, a public service…

  3. Radio Nutricion: A Program for Nutrition Education with the Hispanic Community. Service Provider's Guide = Radio Nutricion: Un Programa de Educacion para la Nutricion para la Comunidad Hispana. Guia del Proveeidor de Servicios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Farmworker Opportunity Program, Arlington, VA.

    The set of materials was designed to provide nutrition instruction to Spanish-speaking farm workers using radio broadcasts. It includes audiocassette tapes of four novellas (mini-dramas) on nutrition-related topics (diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure, pregnancy, smart shopping), talk shows on the same topics, a public service…

  4. Hispanic caregiver perceptions of preventive service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael H; Paumgarten, Annie C

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study uses grounded theory to examine 38 Hispanic caregivers' perceptions of preventive service at six urban community-based Agencies. The findings show caregivers seek an open personal relationship with workers, value a worker's ability to speak Spanish, respond well to group treatment, place a strong value on family, have deficits in the area of social supports, and struggle to meet the goals of preventive service treatment due to socioeconomic pressures. The article discusses implications for treatment.

  5. Food Insecurity Increases the Odds of Obesity Among Young Hispanic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Mia A; Trabulsi, Jillian C; Dahl, Alicia; Dominick, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a growing public health concern and is more prevalent among low-income and minority populations. Food insecurity may increase the odds of obesity in children. We investigated the association between food insecurity and obesity among low-income, Hispanic, mother-child dyads (n = 74). The United States Department of Agriculture 18-item Household Food Security Survey was used to determine food security status. The majority of households were food insecure (74 %) and one-third (30 %) of children were obese. Food insecurity increased the odds of childhood obesity (OR 10.2; 95 % CI 1.2, 85.5) with stronger associations found within households where mothers were also overweight/obese compared to normal weight (p-for interaction food insecurity and childhood obesity were high among this low-income Hispanic sample. Future studies should elucidate the mechanisms through which food insecurity impacts childhood obesity.

  6. Communicating terminal diagnoses to Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Iraida V

    2010-06-01

    This study addressed factors physicians employ in their communication of a terminal diagnosis and a hospice referral to Hispanic patients. The research method used was an exploratory qualitative in-depth semi-structured interview with thematic analysis. The interviews were with ten physicians in Central Florida. The interviews were conducted in Spanish and/or English with physicians who serve terminally ill Hispanic patients. The findings provide vital information on factors that impact communication of diagnosis and hospice referral. Themes emerged relating to role of family members and end-of-life decision-making. Language barriers and limited knowledge of cultural factors and beliefs impacted communication related to end-of-life decisions. Gaps in training and education for physicians were also identified. These results suggest that discussing end-of-life issues with the diverse category of Hispanic patients and families will be enhanced by eliminating language barriers, increased understanding of the role of family members, and knowledge of cultural factors and beliefs related to end-of-life decisions.

  7. An assessment of hospice bereavement programs for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Martin, Shadi S; Csikai, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, numbering over 42 million and comprising 15% of the total population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 ). Hispanics are a heterogeneous group that experience disparities in accessing health care, including at the end of life. Specific gaps can be identified in the care of bereaved Hispanic individuals and families. This exploratory study examined bereavement services available and perceived needs for Hispanics in Florida. Hospice bereavement coordinators indicated that limited services were available specifically for Spanish-speakers and that language and cultural barriers were challenges when communicating, offering, and delivering bereavement services to Hispanics. Implications for social workers include the need to increase access to and evaluate the effectiveness of bereavement services for Hispanics.

  8. The Hispanic paradox in cardiovascular disease and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Inojosa, Jose; Jean, Nathalie; Cortes-Bergoderi, Mery; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Health statistics and epidemiologic studies have shown that Hispanics live longer than Non Hispanic Whites, despite a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and an average low socioeconomic status, both strong predictors of CVD and mortality. This phenomenon has been dubbed "The Hispanic paradox" and has been demonstrated in old and contemporary cohorts. To date, no factor has been identified that could explain this phenomenon, but socio demographic factors, dietary intake and genetic predisposition have been proposed as possible explanations for the Hispanic paradox. As with the French paradox, where French were found to have a lower rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), helped to identify the role of the Mediterranean diet and wine consumption in the prevention of CHD, the Hispanic paradox could help identify protective factors against CHD. This article describes the current evidence supporting the existence of the Hispanic paradox and provides a brief review on the possible explanations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Utilizing dissemination findings to help understand and bridge the research and practice gap in the treatment of substance abuse disorders in Hispanic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Daniel; Vega, Rodolfo R; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes

    2006-09-01

    This article focuses on the gap between research and practice in substance abuse treatment, identifies some of the key findings in the technology transfer literature, and discusses their relevance to the adoption of new technology among Hispanic serving agencies and counselors. In organizing the material we present information within the categories of: (1) evidence, (2) context, and (3) facilitation. When considering the "evidence" for empirically supported substance abuse treatments for Hispanics, there is great concern about the shortage of treatments that have been adequately tested with Hispanics. In this article, we analyze the strengths and weaknesses of strategies recommended to address this problem. In terms of the "context" in which evidence-based practices will be implemented, we consider counselor characteristics and organizational structures that may facilitate or hinder the adoption of these practices and discuss how these may impact Hispanic-serving agencies. Finally, the mechanisms necessary for "facilitation" of evidence-based practices in Hispanic-serving agencies are described. Given the dearth of dissemination research with Hispanics, as well as other minorities, each area described in this article presents unique challenges that can benefit from a field-wide discussion.

  10. Treatment outcomes in undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kenneth K; Dang, Bich N; Davila, Jessica A; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the treatment outcomes of undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection. We sought to compare the treatment outcomes of undocumented and documented patients 12-months after entering HIV care. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naive patients 18 years and older attending their first visit at Thomas Street Health Center in Houston, Texas, between 1/1/2003 and 6/30/2008. The study population of 1,620 HIV-infected adults included 186 undocumented Hispanic, 278 documented Hispanic, 986 Black, and 170 White patients. The main outcome measures were retention in care (quarter years with at least one completed HIV primary care provider visit) and HIV suppression (HIV RNA Undocumented Hispanic patients had lower median initial CD4 cell count (132 cells/mm(3)) than documented Hispanic patients (166 cells/mm(3); P = 0.186), Black patients (226 cells/mm(3); Pundocumented Hispanic patients did as well or better than their documented counterparts. One year after entering HIV care, undocumented Hispanics achieved similar rates of retention in care and HIV suppression as documented Hispanic and White patients. Of note, black patients were significantly less likely to have optimal retention in care (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65, CI = 0.45-0.94) or achieve HIV suppression (aOR 0.32, CI = 0.17-0.61) than undocumented Hispanics. Undocumented Hispanic persons with HIV infection enter care with more advanced disease than documented persons, suggesting testing and/or linkage to care efforts for this difficult-to-reach population need intensification. Once diagnosed, however, undocumented Hispanics have outcomes as good as or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Safety net providers for undocumented immigrants are vital for maintaining individual and public health.

  11. Features of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hispanics differ from African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venepalli, Neeta K; Modayil, Mary V; Berg, Stephanie A; Nair, Tad D; Parepally, Mayur; Rajaram, Priyanka; Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Huang, Yue; Cotler, Scott J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Hispanics to those of African Americans and Whites. METHODS Patients treated for HCC at an urban tertiary medical center from 2005 to 2011 were identified from a tumor registry. Data were collected retrospectively, including demographics, comorbidities, liver disease characteristics, tumor parameters, treatment, and survival (OS) outcomes. OS analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS One hundred and ninety-five patients with HCC were identified: 80.5% were male, and 22% were age 65 or older. Mean age at HCC diagnosis was 59.7 ± 9.8 years. Sixty-one point five percent of patients had Medicare or Medicaid; 4.1% were uninsured. Compared to African American (31.2%) and White (46.2%) patients, Hispanic patients (22.6%) were more likely to have diabetes (P = 0.0019), hyperlipidemia (P = 0.0001), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (P = 0.0021), end stage renal disease (P = 0.0057), and less likely to have hepatitis C virus (P encephalopathy (P = 0.0087). Hispanic patients with HCC had shorter OS than the other racial groups (P = 0.020), despite similarities in HCC parameters and treatment. CONCLUSION In conclusion, Hispanic patients with HCC have higher incidence of modifiable metabolic risk factors including NASH, and shorter OS than African American and White patients.

  12. Developing a Leadership Identity as a Hispanic Woman at a Hispanic- Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Suzanne; Musoba, Glenda Droogsma

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are uniquely positioned to educate tomorrow's leaders and initiate change in the number and ethnic diversity of women in leadership roles. The purpose of our study was to understand the essence of Hispanic college women's leadership identity development with participants and researchers co-constructing meaning. We…

  13. The Coming Black/Hispanic Coalition. A Black View and An Hispanic View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Lillian; Arias, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Two journalists discuss political, economic, and social issues which unite Blacks and Hispanics and consider the problems which impede the formation of a formal political coalition between the two groups. Among the common issues identified are police brutality, voter registration, unemployment, health, housing, and the media. (GC)

  14. Physical activity of pregnant Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kristine E; Landsbaugh, Jill R; Whitcomb, Brian W; Pekow, Penny; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2012-10-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that physical activity during pregnancy can reduce risk of pregnancy complications. However, factors influencing activity in pregnant Hispanic women, who have high rates of sedentary activity as compared to non-Hispanic whites, are not well characterized. To assess patterns and correlates of physical activity among 1355 participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort of pregnant Hispanic women in Massachusetts from 2006 to 2011. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Pre-, early-, mid-, and late-pregnancy physical activity were assessed using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Women reported the frequency and duration of household/caregiving, occupational, sports/exercise, and transportation activities and were classified according to compliance with American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines for physical activity. Household/caregiving activity was the primary mode of pregnancy activity ranging from 56% to 60% of total activity while sports/exercise contributed the least (<10%). Compared to nulliparous women, women with two or more children were 85% less likely to become inactive at any time during pregnancy (OR=0.15, 95% CI=0.04, 0.56, p-trend <0.01). Women with one or more children increased their total physical activity on average 9.73±2.04 MET-hours/week and 12.04±2.39 MET-hours/week, respectively, with the onset of pregnancy (p<0.01). Those with the highest levels of total physical activity prior to pregnancy were 87% less likely to become inactive with the onset of pregnancy than those who were inactive prior to pregnancy (OR=0.13, 95% CI= 0.05, 0.29). Findings can inform culturally appropriate interventions designed to reduce pregnancy complications through the promotion of physical activity during pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retirement Planning Among Hispanics: In God's Hands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Luisa R; Aguila, Emma; Gongora, Arturo; Duru, O Kenrik

    2016-12-15

    We conducted a qualitative study on retirement preparedness among middle-aged and older low-income Hispanics in Los Angeles. Data were derived from four focus groups conducted in the greater Los Angeles area. Findings demonstrate how behavioral and cultural factors-family experiences, religiosity, and denial of retirement-explain the lack of savings and preparedness for retirement. Findings also indicate that the majority of participants want to be economically independent and to keep working until they are unable to do so. Participants helped their parents financially but did not feel comfortable asking their own children for help. Instead, participants placed their survival in retirement "in God's hands."

  16. Moyamoya in Hispanics: not only in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad Said

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease was first described in 1957 as hypoplasia of the bilateral internal carotid arteries, the characteristic appearance of the associated network of abnormally dilated collateral vessels on angiography was later likened to something hazy, like a puff of cigarette smoke, which, in Japanese, is moyamoya. This paper describes two cases of moyamoya presentations, including moyamoya disease and moyamoya syndrome. Moyamoya may rarely occur in North American Hispanic patients. The presentation can vary significantly and ranges bwtween fulminant outcome and prolonged survival. Awareness about moyamoya and its different presentations may be beneficial for the patients and can improve the outcome.

  17. Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

    2013-01-01

    Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance.

  18. Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study: meal and snack intakes of Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Paula; Hanson, Charlotte; Ponza, Michael; Novak, Timothy; Hendricks, Kristy

    2006-01-01

    To describe meal and snack patterns of Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers. A cross-sectional telephone survey in which mothers or other primary caregivers reported their infants' and toddlers' food and beverage intake for a 24-hour period. Subjects were a subset of the national random sample of children aged 4-24 months who participated in the 2002 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study. The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study includes a stratified random sample of 3,022 infants and toddlers aged 4-24 months. Three hundred seventy-one Hispanic and 2,637 non-Hispanic children who had 24-hour dietary recalls are included in the subset. Means+/-standard errors of daily intakes of energy, nutrients, and nutrient densities were calculated, as were percentages of children consuming foods at each eating occasion. Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers, on average, were fed seven times per day. Overall, the percentages of children who ate snacks increased with age, and more than 80% of toddlers aged 12-24 months consumed afternoon snacks, with more than 90% of Hispanic children consuming an afternoon snack. In each age group, there were significant differences between ethnic groups in nutrient intakes by eating occasion. No significant difference was seen for energy across all meal occasions. At age 6-11 months, Hispanic children had a significantly lower intake of carbohydrate at dinner and lower intake of saturated fat at afternoon snacks compared with non-Hispanic children (Pfiber intake contributed 2 g/meal for both ethnic groups. Snacks contributed, on average, less than 1 g fiber, except Hispanic toddlers had significantly higher fiber intake at afternoon snacks (1.5 g) than non-Hispanic toddlers. Foods frequently consumed at meals and snacks were lacking in whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Most nutrients were not significantly different between Hispanics and non-Hispanics for meals and snacks. Considering the sizeable contribution that snacks

  19. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  20. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  1. Dropping Out: Hispanic Students, Attrition, and the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Hispanic American students leaving college found significant differences between dropouts and those dismissed for academic performance. Familial values and demands and other extra-academic variables exerted considerable pressure on individual students. Institutional assumptions in Hispanic student retention need to be challenged and…

  2. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  3. The Impact of Acculturation on Hispanic Students' Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Nathan E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acculturation on the learning styles of 151 Hispanic students enrolled in a Hispanic Serving Institution in South Texas, controlling for age, gender, and country of origin. Acculturation did not significantly predict learning style when controlling for these three variables. These results may be because…

  4. A Comparison of Acculturation Measures among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B.; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Wagner, Karla; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Acculturation has been associated with numerous health and social outcomes among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Various self-report scales have been used to measure acculturation, making comparisons of results across studies difficult. This study administered several commonly-used acculturation scales to 221 Hispanic/Latino 9th grade students in Los…

  5. Bridging the Gap: The Struggle of One Hispanic Father

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Parent involvement has been shown to be one of the keys to student educational success, their ability to perform at a high level and persevere. The latest government statistics reveal that 53 million Hispanics now reside in the United States and 75 % of this population speaks Spanish at home [Cooper, M. (2014). "Hispanics in America and in…

  6. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  7. Sexual Initiation, Parent Practices, and Acculturation in Hispanic Seventh Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Campos, Daisy Y.; Markham, Christine; Peskin, Melissa Fleschler; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hispanic youths have high rates of sexually transmitted infections and pregnancies, yet little research has targeted multiple protective/risk factors for early sexual initiation in this group. This study examined two main factors--parenting practices and acculturation--on early sexual initiation among Hispanic middle school students in…

  8. Programa Shortstop: A Culturally Focused Juvenile Intervention for Hispanic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Ruan, Karen; Duenas, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Culturally sensitive juvenile delinquency and substance abuse interventions are relatively limited and unavailable to many first-time Hispanic juvenile offenders. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a culturally focused juvenile and substance abuse intervention program for first time Hispanic youth offenders. The intent of…

  9. Hispanic Women: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Sasscer, Ruth

    This paper addresses the status of Hispanic women in the United States and the challenges facing Hispanic women in society. The paper is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) "From a Melting Pot to a Salad Bowl"; (3) "Adobe Walls and Glass Ceilings"; (4) "Signs of Improvement"; (5) "Diversity is 'In'"; (6) "The Need to Manage…

  10. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  11. Risks, Assets, and Negative Health Behaviors among Arkansas' Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kevin M.; Choudary, Wendie; Kearney, Anne; Piko, Bettina F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between risk, assets, and negative health behaviors among a large sample of Hispanic adolescents. Data were collected from over 1,000 Hispanic youth in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 attending school in a moderate size school district in Northwest Arkansas. Logistic regression models examined the variation in the odds…

  12. The Impact of Acculturation on Hispanic Students' Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Nathan E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acculturation on the learning styles of 151 Hispanic students enrolled in a Hispanic Serving Institution in South Texas, controlling for age, gender, and country of origin. Acculturation did not significantly predict learning style when controlling for these three variables. These results may be because…

  13. 78 FR 57465 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9018 of September 13, 2013 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2013... pathways to success. Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) impart essential knowledge while broadening...-Serving Institutions Week, we celebrate these institutions, renew our support for their mission,...

  14. The Hispanic-Asian Achievement Gap in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Lina Maria

    2012-01-01

    There is little research of Hispanic and Asian children's educational outcomes; in particular, the achievement gap between these two racial/ethnic groups has not been fully explored. The objective of this investigation is to analyze the Hispanic-Asian achievement gap in elementary school using the ECLS-K, a longitudinal nationally representative…

  15. Hispanics in the Criminal Justice System--the "Nonexistent" Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jerry

    1979-01-01

    Though hidden from view by being considered "non-existent", the meager evidence indicates that Hispanics have an unusually high arrest and incarceration rate. Hispanic background is rarely asked on the six major sources of criminal justice statistics--statistics of arrests, courts, prisoners, juvenile delinquency, crime victimization, and public…

  16. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  17. 77 FR 37077 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... No: 2012-14952] OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling of Council meeting. SUMMARY: The Hispanic Council on... of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving the recruitment, hiring, and...

  18. 78 FR 57459 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... vibrant cultures, each of which enriches communities in valuable ways. Just as America embraces a rich... boundless opportunity, many Hispanics have marched for social justice and helped advance America's journey... States of America A Proclamation From the earliest days of our Republic, Hispanic Americans have written...

  19. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  20. Hydrologic Areas of Concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of New Hampshire — A Hydrologic Area of Concern (HAC) is a land area surrounding a water source, which is intended to include the portion of the watershed in which land uses are likely...

  1. LGBT Caregiver Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    LGBT CAREGIVER CONCERNS IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR LGBT CAREGIVERS LGBT CAREGIVER CONSIDERATIONS As a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, you will face various challenges. Some are common among all ...

  2. Geoengineering: A humanitarian concern

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suarez, Pablo; van Aalst, Maarten K

    2017-01-01

    .... Geoengineering is a humanitarian concern: the potential for deliberate large‐scale intervention in the Earth's climate system has major implications in terms of impacts on the most vulnerable...

  3. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Hispanic women's experience with "el cambio de vida".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longworth, Judith C

    2003-06-01

    To examine the factors that influence Hispanic women's decisions to initiate or not initiate hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during menopause to manage symptoms or to prevent longer-term conditions. A descriptive study of 51 Hispanic women who completed the Spanish version of the Menopausal Decision-Making Questionnaire (S-MDMQ) to describe their experience with and perceptions about menopause. Most of the low-income Hispanic women in this study would elect not to take HRT; however, they do use exercise, diet, vitamins, and other self-care activities to manage symptoms of menopause. Hispanic women were eager to discuss how to manage their health care during perimenopause and menopause with one another and their health care providers. Nurse practitioners need to understand factors that might influence Hispanic women's decisions regarding management of menopausal symptoms, including the use of HRT, and to be able to assist women in making an individualized personal treatment choice that is culturally acceptable.

  5. School co-ethnicity and Hispanic parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Joshua; Lee, Jennifer C; Nelson, Shelley L

    2012-09-01

    Scholars of immigration disagree about the role ethnic communities play in immigrant families' engagement in educational institutions. While some researchers argue that the concentration of disadvantaged ethnic groups may prevent meaningful engagement with schools, others argue that ethnic communities can possess resources that help immigrant families be involved in their children's schooling. In this study we use a nationally representative dataset of Hispanic children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) to determine if the relative size of the Hispanic population in the school affects levels of their parents' involvement in their education, as well as parents' perceptions of barriers to their involvement. Our results suggest that a large Hispanic presence in a child's school can help increase immigrant Hispanic parents' involvement in their children's schooling, but there are no benefits for US-born Hispanic parents, indicating that ethnic communities help immigrant families acculturate to American institutions.

  6. Physical activity perceptions, context, barriers, and facilitators from a Hispanic child's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sharon E. Taverno; Francis, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to develop effective physical activity interventions and to address the burden of obesity in Hispanic children, qualitative studies are needed to build descriptive theory and expand the state of the science. The purpose of this study is to describe physical activity perceptions, context, facilitators, and barriers from the perspective of Hispanic immigrant-origin children. Method This in-depth, ethnographic study included 14, 6- to 11-year old, first- and second- generation Hispanic children recruited from an afterschool program in Southeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Methods included child observation, field notes, semi-structured interviews, and a PhotoVoice activity. Transcripts and field notes were coded and analyzed using the constant comparison method to identify overarching themes and patterns in the data. Results Data analysis yielded four overarching themes regarding children's perspectives on physical activity. Children engaged in a variety of physical activities and sedentary behaviors, which differed by physical (e.g., park, outside home, and afterschool programs) and social (e.g., parents, siblings, and friends) contexts. Children discussed specific benefits of physical activity. Children's negative attitudes toward physical activity were related to physical discomfort, low athletic competence, and safety concerns. Children perceived physical activity and play to be one in the same, and “fun” was identified as a primary driver of physical activity preferences. The facilitators and barriers to physical activity were related to specific parent/home, school, and neighborhood factors. Conclusion Findings from this study suggest that an emphasis on fun and active play, while taking into account family and neighborhood context, may be a desirable intervention approach in Hispanic immigrant-origin children. This study lays the groundwork for future studies to further explore some of the themes identified here to better understand children

  7. Physical activity perceptions, context, barriers, and facilitators from a Hispanic child's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E. Taverno Ross

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to develop effective physical activity interventions and to address the burden of obesity in Hispanic children, qualitative studies are needed to build descriptive theory and expand the state of the science. The purpose of this study is to describe physical activity perceptions, context, facilitators, and barriers from the perspective of Hispanic immigrant-origin children. Method: This in-depth, ethnographic study included 14, 6- to 11-year old, first- and second- generation Hispanic children recruited from an afterschool program in Southeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Methods included child observation, field notes, semi-structured interviews, and a PhotoVoice activity. Transcripts and field notes were coded and analyzed using the constant comparison method to identify overarching themes and patterns in the data. Results: Data analysis yielded four overarching themes regarding children's perspectives on physical activity. Children engaged in a variety of physical activities and sedentary behaviors, which differed by physical (e.g., park, outside home, and afterschool programs and social (e.g., parents, siblings, and friends contexts. Children discussed specific benefits of physical activity. Children's negative attitudes toward physical activity were related to physical discomfort, low athletic competence, and safety concerns. Children perceived physical activity and play to be one in the same, and “fun” was identified as a primary driver of physical activity preferences. The facilitators and barriers to physical activity were related to specific parent/home, school, and neighborhood factors. Conclusion: Findings from this study suggest that an emphasis on fun and active play, while taking into account family and neighborhood context, may be a desirable intervention approach in Hispanic immigrant-origin children. This study lays the groundwork for future studies to further explore some of the themes identified here to better

  8. Baptism in the Hispanic-Mozarabic Liturgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Roszak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Celebration of the sacrament of baptism in the Hispanic-Mozarabic Rite, as in other liturgical families, was preceded by a period of the catechumenate to which the candidates were introduced by the special rite celebrated on Sunday in vicesima. This article analyzes the course of the celebration of the sacraments of initiation according to the norms from a revised rite and with reference to the earlier tradition reflected in the Liber Ordinum and Antiphonary of Leon. It explains the Visigoths’ practice of single immersion in water during the administration of the sacrament and various other rites, post-baptismal Triduum and acclamations typical for the Hispanic liturgy. Extensive euchology of this rite provides valuable information on sacramental theology, which betrays the African influences (in particular the reference to St. Augustine and has been transmitted by St. Gregory of Elvira, St. Ildefonsus of Toledo and St. Isidore of Seville. It is worth emphasizing the pastoral dimension of the process of initiation visible in complex formulas and the variety of blessings received by catechumens and rituals celebrated in post-baptismal mystagogy.

  9. The Challenges of Change. A Report from the Aspen Institute Seminar on Hispanic Americans and the Business Community (Aspen, Colorado, July 27-30, 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Georgianna; Nicolau, Siobhan

    This report from the 1997 Aspen Institute seminar concerns how demographic changes in American will affect Hispanic Americans' role in the business community. Section 1, "Lashes: Back, Front, and Sideways" (Harold Hodgkinson), describes pervasive national pessimism over demographic change and documents universal backlash to that change among all…

  10. Evaluation of a Coordinated School-Based Obesity Prevention Program in a Hispanic Community: Choosing Healthy and Active Lifestyles for Kids/healthy Schools Healthy Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Jenkins, Evelyn; Rausch, John; Okah, Ebiere; Tsao, Daisy; Nieto, Andres; Lyda, Elizabeth; Meyer, Dodi; McCord, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a public health concern that disproportionately affects underserved and minority communities. Purpose: To evaluate whether a comprehensive obesity prevention program that targets children and school staff in an underserved Hispanic community affects obesity related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among both students and…

  11. Evaluation of a Coordinated School-Based Obesity Prevention Program in a Hispanic Community: Choosing Healthy and Active Lifestyles for Kids/healthy Schools Healthy Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Jenkins, Evelyn; Rausch, John; Okah, Ebiere; Tsao, Daisy; Nieto, Andres; Lyda, Elizabeth; Meyer, Dodi; McCord, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a public health concern that disproportionately affects underserved and minority communities. Purpose: To evaluate whether a comprehensive obesity prevention program that targets children and school staff in an underserved Hispanic community affects obesity related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among both students and…

  12. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED,…

  13. A Comparison of Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses among Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic Workers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Dene T.; Lebbon, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the trends and changes in patterns of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among Hispanic workers versus non-Hispanic minority workers in the United States between 1992 and 2009. Injuries and illnesses are also examined by the severity of cases and across industry sectors. The differences in the mean share of…

  14. Rural Community-Dwelling Elders' Reports of Access to Care: Are There Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic White Disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Tyrone F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer reports can provide useful information about the dimensions of access in need of improvement for particular population subgroups. To determine if there are Hispanic versus non- Hispanic white disparities in rural elders' reports of their health care access. A telephone survey was conducted among 2,097 rural community-dwelling elders in…

  15. Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Nursing Students: Through the Lens of Associate Degree Nursing Program Administrators and Hispanic Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos DeVoe, Debra Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is changing and will constitute 30% of the population in 2050; however, the Hispanic registered nurse population is less than 3%. Cultural differences between patients and nurses may cause harm and a mistrust that can affect patient outcomes. A mixed methods convergent research study was done by an…

  16. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  17. Fairness and nanotechnology concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Katherine A; Besley, John C

    2011-11-01

    Research suggests that fairness perceptions matter to people who are asked to evaluate the acceptability of risks or risk management. Two separate national random surveys (n = 305 and n = 529) addressed Americans' concerns about and acceptance of nanotechnology risk management in the context of the degree to which they view scientists and risk managers as fair. The first survey investigated general views about scientists across four proposed dimensions of fairness (distributional, procedural, interpersonal, and informational). The results show that respondents who believe that the outcomes of scientific research tend to result in unequal benefits (distributional fairness) and that the procedures meant to protect the public from scientific research are biased (procedural fairness) were more concerned about nanotechnology. Believing scientists would treat them with respect (interpersonal fairness) and ensure access to information (informational fairness) were not significant predictors of concern. The second study also looked at these four dimensions of fairness but focused on perceptions of risk managers working for government, universities, and major companies. In addition to concern, it also examined acceptance of nanotechnology risk management. Study 2 results were similar to those of study 1 for concern; however, only perceived informational fairness consistently predicted acceptance of nanotechnology risk management. Overall, the study points to the value of considering fairness perceptions in the study of public perceptions of nanotechnology. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. A systematic review of interventions for Hispanic women with or at risk of Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan-Olah, Mary; Duarte-Gardea, Maria; Lechuga, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a serious health concern for pregnant women, with Hispanic women at particular risk for developing the condition. The aim of this review was to critically examine GDM intervention programs for Hispanic women, in the United States of America (US). English and Spanish electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between 1995 and 2015. Eligible study designs included randomized controlled trial, pre/post-test and quasi experimental methods. Findings indicated that there was a dearth of literature reporting on GDM interventions for Hispanic women and just seven papers met inclusion criteria. These seven studies were included in the review and they reported on interventions for: (1) pregnant women at high risk of developing GDM; (2) pregnant women with GDM. Results suggest that a combination of intensive counselling over a prolonged period of time, together with a low calorie, possibly low glycemic index diet, produces best results. The review found that intensive nutritional counselling approaches which promote low calorie/low GI diets appear to be most effective in BGL management in this population. Interventions that are delivered in Spanish and culturally tailored may be more acceptable to participants. More research is needed to develop suitable interventions to improve GDM management among Hispanic women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Markets for Collective Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Ossandón, José; Pallesen, Trine

    tools already available - such as 'matters of public concern' (Marres 2007) and 'hybrid forums' (Callon et al. 2001; Callon 2009)- that help in framing the particularity of these arrangements. On the other hand, previous STS-market research notions developed mostly in the field of finance studies cannot...... simply be transposed to study markets for collective concerns. We will suggest three main translations: (i) from studying techno-scientific descriptions produced by financial economists inscribed in 'market devices' to studying markets as 'policy devices' enacted with the help of economists turned market......Despite the recent fall-out of finance, confidence in the market does not seem to be diminishing, but, on the contrary, market mechanisms are becoming key instruments to deal with core contemporary collective concerns, including global warming, education, environmental pollution, supply of energy...

  20. Positional Concerns and Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    their implications for economics, positional concerns imply important normative dimensions. There have been presumed to be a symptom of envy, reduce people’s happiness, and create problems of social interaction or economic inefficiencies. Individuals are, for instance, prone to pick states of the world that improve...... that invoking envy or subjective well-being is not fully satisfying for regulating positional concerns. More compelling reasons seem, in complement with efficiency, to be related to considerations for equality. In other words, if institutions could have strong reasons to pay attention to and regulate positional...