WorldWideScience

Sample records for concentration nitrogen content

  1. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS (SIGMODON HISPIDUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  2. Relationship between atmospheric ammonia concentration and nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Strandberg, Morten Tune

    2014-01-01

    From April 2006 to April 2007, the geographical and seasonal variation in nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa) and atmospheric ammonia concentrations were measured at five heathland sites. The seasonal variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was small, even though...... there was a large seasonal variation in the air concentration of ammonia. A sizable local variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was found even at the scale of a few kilometres. The nitrogen content in the lichen showed a high correlation to the yearly mean value of the measured ammonia concentration...... in air at the different locations. This investigation is part of a larger attempt to incorporate effects of nitrogen in the conservation status of terrestrial habitat types....

  3. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  4. Apple wine processing with different nitrogen contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alberti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the nitrogen content in different varieties of apple musts and to study the effect of different nitrogen concentrations in apple wine fermentation. The average total nitrogen content in 51 different apples juices was 155.81 mg/L, with 86.28 % of the values above 100 mg/L. The apple must with 59.0, 122.0 and 163.0 mg/L of total nitrogen content showed the maximum population of 2.05x 10(7; 4.42 x 10(7 and 8.66 x 10(7 cell/mL, respectively. Therefore, the maximum fermentation rates were dependent on the initial nitrogen level, corresponding to 1.4, 5.1 and 9.2 g/L.day, respectively. The nitrogen content in the apple musts was an important factor of growth and fermentation velocity.

  5. The fitness advantage of commercial wine yeasts in relation to the nitrogen concentration, temperature, and ethanol content under microvinification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; Gutiérrez, Alicia; Salvadó, Zoel; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the main environmental factors governing wine fermentation on the fitness of industrial yeast strains has barely received attention. In this study, we used the concept of fitness advantage to measure how increasing nitrogen concentrations (0 to 200 mg N/liter), ethanol (0 to 20%), and temperature (4 to 45°C) affects competition among four commercial wine yeast strains (PDM, ARM, RVA, and TTA). We used a mathematical approach to model the hypothetical time needed for the control strain (PDM) to out-compete the other three strains in a theoretical mixed population. The theoretical values obtained were subsequently verified by competitive mixed fermentations in both synthetic and natural musts, which showed a good fit between the theoretical and experimental data. Specifically, the data show that the increase in nitrogen concentration and temperature values improved the fitness advantage of the PDM strain, whereas the presence of ethanol significantly reduced its competitiveness. However, the RVA strain proved to be the most competitive yeast for the three enological parameters assayed. The study of the fitness of these industrial strains is of paramount interest for the wine industry, which uses them as starters of their fermentations. Here, we propose a very simple method to model the fitness advantage, which allows the prediction of the competitiveness of one strain with respect to different abiotic factors.

  6. The Fitness Advantage of Commercial Wine Yeasts in Relation to the Nitrogen Concentration, Temperature, and Ethanol Content under Microvinification Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; Gutiérrez, Alicia; Salvadó, Zoel; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the main environmental factors governing wine fermentation on the fitness of industrial yeast strains has barely received attention. In this study, we used the concept of fitness advantage to measure how increasing nitrogen concentrations (0 to 200 mg N/liter), ethanol (0 to 20%), and temperature (4 to 45°C) affects competition among four commercial wine yeast strains (PDM, ARM, RVA, and TTA). We used a mathematical approach to model the hypothetical time needed for the control strain (PDM) to out-compete the other three strains in a theoretical mixed population. The theoretical values obtained were subsequently verified by competitive mixed fermentations in both synthetic and natural musts, which showed a good fit between the theoretical and experimental data. Specifically, the data show that the increase in nitrogen concentration and temperature values improved the fitness advantage of the PDM strain, whereas the presence of ethanol significantly reduced its competitiveness. However, the RVA strain proved to be the most competitive yeast for the three enological parameters assayed. The study of the fitness of these industrial strains is of paramount interest for the wine industry, which uses them as starters of their fermentations. Here, we propose a very simple method to model the fitness advantage, which allows the prediction of the competitiveness of one strain with respect to different abiotic factors. PMID:24242239

  7. Estimating rice chlorophyll content and leaf nitrogen concentration with a digital still color camera under natural light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Dejian; Shi, Peihua; Omasa, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    The color of crop leaves is closely correlated with nitrogen (N) status and can be quantified easily with a digital still color camera and image processing software. The establishment of the relationship between image color indices and N status under natural light is important for crop monitoring and N diagnosis in the field. In our study, a digital still color camera was used to take pictures of the canopies of 6 rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars with N treatments ranging from 0 to 315 kg N ha(-1) in the field under sunny and overcast conditions in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between SPAD readings, leaf N concentration (LNC) and 13 image color indices calculated from digital camera images using three color models: RGB, widely used additive color model; HSV, a cylindrical-coordinate similar to the human perception of colors; and the L (*) a (*) b (*) system of the International Commission on Illumination. Among these color indices, the index b (*) , which represents the visual perception of yellow-blue chroma, has the closest linear relationship with SPAD reading and LNC. However, the relationships between LNC and color indices were affected by the developmental phase. Linear regression models were used to predict LNC and SPAD from color indices and phasic development. After that, the models were validated with independent data. Generally, acceptable performance and prediction were found between the color index b (*) , SPAD reading and LNC with different cultivars and sampling dates under different natural light conditions. Our study showed that digital color image analysis could be a simple method of assessing rice N status under natural light conditions for different cultivars and different developmental stages.

  8. Removing organic and nitrogen content from a highly saline municipal wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate by UV/H2O2-BAC treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A

    2015-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate (ROC) streams generated from RO-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes pose potential health and environmental risks on their disposal to confined water bodies such as bays. A UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process followed by a biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment was evaluated at lab-scale for the removal of organic and nutrient content from a highly saline ROC (TDS 16 g L(-1), EC 23.5 mS cm(-1)) for its safe disposal to the receiving environment. Over the 230-day operation of the UV/H2O2-BAC process, the colour and UV absorbance (254 nm) of the ROC were reduced to well below those of the influent to the reclamation process. The concentrations of DOC and total nitrogen (TN) were reduced by approximately 60% at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 60 min. The reduction in ammonia nitrogen by the BAC remained high under all conditions tested (>90%). Further investigation confirmed that the presence of residual peroxide in the UV/H2O2 treated ROC was beneficial for DOC removal, but markedly inhibited the activities of the nitrifying bacteria (i.e., nitrite oxidising bacteria) in the BAC system and hence compromised total nitrogen removal. This work demonstrated that the BAC treatment could be acclimated to the very high salinity environment, and could be used as a robust method for the removal of organic matter and nitrogen from the pre-oxidised ROC under optimised conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating rice chlorophyll content and leaf nitrogen concentration with a digital still color camera under natural light

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Dejian; Shi, Peihua; OMASA, KENJI

    2014-01-01

    Background The color of crop leaves is closely correlated with nitrogen (N) status and can be quantified easily with a digital still color camera and image processing software. The establishment of the relationship between image color indices and N status under natural light is important for crop monitoring and N diagnosis in the field. In our study, a digital still color camera was used to take pictures of the canopies of 6 rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars with N treatments ranging from 0 to...

  10. High nitrogen availability reduces polyphenol content in Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazza, Luca; Freeman, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Peat mosses of the genus Sphagnum constitute the bulk of living and dead biomass in bogs. These plants contain peculiar polyphenols which hamper litter peat decomposition through their inhibitory activity on microbial breakdown. In the light of the increasing availability of biologically active nitrogen in natural ecosystems, litter derived from Sphagnum mosses is an ideal substrate to test the potential effects of increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition on polyphenol content in litter peat. To this aim, we measured total nitrogen and soluble polyphenol concentration in Sphagnum litter peat collected in 11 European bogs under a chronic gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results demonstrate that increasing nitrogen concentration in Sphagnum litter, as a consequence of increased exogenous nitrogen availability, is accompanied by a decreasing concentration of polyphenols. This inverse relationship is consistent with reports that in Sphagnum mosses, polyphenol and protein biosynthesis compete for the same precursor. Our observation of modified Sphagnum litter chemistry under chronic nitrogen eutrophication has implications in the context of the global carbon balance, because a lower content of decay-inhibiting polyphenols would accelerate litter peat decomposition.

  11. Rumen ammonia concentrations, and non-ammonia nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sheeps' burnet (Sanguisorba minor). Digesta flow was measured with reference to Yb-acetate and Cr-EDTA as particulate and fluid markers, respectively. Rumen ammonia concentrations were exponentially associated with the nitrogen (N) content of the forage, with concentrations increasing progressively above 2.5% N in ...

  12. Microbial Biofertilizer Decreases Nicotine Content by Improving Soil Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Cui; Chen, Anwei; Chen, Guiqiu; Li, Huanke; Guan, Song; He, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Biofertilizers have been widely used in many countries for their benefit to soil biological and physicochemical properties. A new microbial biofertilizer containing Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Bacillus thuringiensis was prepared to decrease nicotine content in tobacco leaves by regulating soil nitrogen supply. Soil NO 3 - -N, NH 4 + -N, nitrogen supply-related enzyme activities, and nitrogen accumulation in plant leaves throughout the growing period were investigated to explore the mechanism of nicotine reduction. The experimental results indicated that biofertilizer can reduce the nicotine content in tobacco leaves, with a maximum decrement of 16-18 % in mature upper leaves. In the meantime, the total nitrogen in mature lower and middle leaves increased with the application of biofertilizer, while an opposite result was observed in upper leaves. Protein concentration in leaves had similar fluctuation to that of total nitrogen in response to biofertilizer. NO 3 - -N content and nitrate reductase activity in biofertilizer-amended soil increased by 92.3 and 42.2 %, respectively, compared to those in the control, whereas the NH 4 + -N and urease activity decreased by 37.8 and 29.3 %, respectively. Nitrogen uptake was improved in the early growing stage, but this phenomenon was not observed during the late growth period. Nicotine decrease is attributing to the adjustment of biofertilizer in soil nitrogen supply and its uptake in tobacco, which result in changes of nitrogen content as well as its distribution in tobacco leaves. The application of biofertilizer containing P. chrysosporium and B. thuringiensis can reduce the nicotine content and improve tobacco quality, which may provide some useful information for tobacco cultivation.

  13. The Vegetation Nitrogen Content and its Latitudinal Patterns in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; He, Nianpeng; Yu, Guirui; Wang, Qiufeng

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient element in biological life activities, and plays an important role in plant production and growth. Vegetation nitrogen content can be used as an important component in estimating ecosystem nitrogen storage. In the present study, we used a large amount of data from the database of north-south transects of eastern China and published literatures. We explored the nitrogen content of different components of China terrestrial ecosystems and its latitude pattern at the scales of the plots and of 8 eco-regions. The average nitrogen content of the forest ecosystem was 1.797% in the tree leaves, 0.663% in the tree branch, 0.586% in the tree stem, 0.755% in the tree root. In the shrub layer, the average leaf nitrogen content is 1.845%, the average branch content is 0.968% and the average root nitrogen content is 0.995%. In the herb layer, the average nitrogen content of aboveground is 2.463% and 1.279% for underground. The average nitrogen content of aboveground in grassland ecosystem is 2.006% and 0.994% for underground. The average aboveground nitrogen content in desert ecosystem is 1.911%. The average nitrogen contents of the leaves, stems and roots in wetland ecosystem were 1.669%, 0.741% and 0.659%. There were significant differences in nitrogen content among different organs, and it showed that the nitrogen content of leaves > roots > branches > trunks and aboveground component > underground component. The nitrogen content of different components in China terrestrial ecosystems increased with increasing latitude, especially in leaf. These results demonstrated latitudinal patterns of nitrogen content in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems, based on field-measured data, and provided a reference or standard for regional vegetation nitrogen allocation and storage estimations.

  14. Influence of nitrate concentration on pigment content in Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krywalska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the qualitative and quantitative composition of pigments in the alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured on mineral media with different nitrate content may give results serving to establish the optimal concentration of the nitrogen source in the medium. It was demonstrated that the interrelations between the particular pigments in 5 kinds of media containing 0, 0.128, 0.192, 0.256 and 0.384 g N/1, respectively, are most favourable in the medium threefold enriched in nitrates. This fact may be explained on the basis of the value of the coefficients: chlorophyll a chlorophyll a + b ----------------- = 3.28\tand ----------------------- = 3.13 chlorophyll b carotenoids The lack of a nitrogen source in the medium causes significant changes in the total pigment content and in the particular fractions. It was also found that under conditions of nitrogen deficit the astaxanthin content increases.

  15. Biohydrogen production from lactose: influence of substrate and nitrogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Fierro, J; Fernández, C; Cuetos, M J; Gómez, X

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from renewable sources may be considered the energy vector of the future. However, reducing process costs is imperative in order to achieve this goal. In the present research, the effect of nitrogen (N), initial pH and substrate content for starting up the dark fermentative process was studied using the response surface methodology. Anaerobic digested dried sludge (biosolid pellets) was used as the inoculum. Synthetic wastewater was used as the substrate in batch reactors. A decrease in H2 production was observed with the increase in N and lactose concentrations. This drop was considerably greater when the concentration of lactose was at its lower level. Although the increase in lactose concentration results in a lower H2 production, the effect of N on the response is attenuated at higher levels of lactose. On the other hand, the effect of initial pH on the fermentation system was not significant. The evaluation on the process under semi-continuous conditions was performed using anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs). The process was evaluated at different C/N ratios using synthetic wastewater. Results showed higher hydrogen yields with the gradual decrease in nitrogen content. The addition of cheese whey to the ASBR resulted in a H2 production rate of 0.18 L H2 L(-1) d(-1).

  16. The effect of elevated cadmium content in soil on the uptake of nitrogen by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciecko, Z.; Kalembasa, S.; Wyszkowski, M.; Rolka, E. [University of Warmia & Mazury Olsztyn, Olsztyn (Poland). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cadmium (10, 20, 30 and 40 mg Cd/kg of soil) contamination in soil with the application of different substances (compost, brown coal, lime and bentonite) on the intake of nitrogen by some plants. The correlations between the nitrogen content in the plants and the cadmium concentration in the soil, as well as the plant yield and the content of micro- and macroelements in the plants were determined. Plant species and cadmium dose determined the effects of soil contamination with cadmium on the content of nitrogen. Large doses of cadmium caused an increase in nitrogen content in the Avena sativa straw and roots and in the Zea mays roots. Soil contamination with cadmium resulted in a decrease of nitrogen content in the Avena sativa grain, in above-ground parts and roots of the Lupinus luteus, in the above-ground parts of the Zea mays and in the above-ground parts and roots of Phacelia tanacaetifolia. Among the experimental different substances, the application of bentonite had the strongest and a usually negative effect on the nitrogen content in plants. The greatest effect of bentonite was on Avena sativa grain, above-ground parts Zea mays and Lupinus luteus and Phacelia tanacaetifolia. The content of nitrogen in the plants was generally positively correlated with the content of the macroelements and some of the microelements, regardless of the substances added to the soil.

  17. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmens, H., E-mail: hh@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A., E-mail: danor@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cooper, D.M., E-mail: cooper@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Mills, G., E-mail: gmi@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Steinnes, E., E-mail: Eiliv.Steinnes@chem.ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kubin, E., E-mail: Eero.Kubin@metla.fi [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kirkkosaarentie 7, 91500 Muhos (Finland); Thoeni, L., E-mail: lotti.thoeni@fub-ag.ch [FUB-Research Group for Environmental Monitoring, Alte Jonastrasse 83, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alber, R., E-mail: Renate.Alber@provinz.bz.it [Environmental Agency of Bolzano, 39055 Laives (Italy); Carballeira, A., E-mail: alejo.carballeira@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Coskun, M., E-mail: coskunafm@yahoo.com [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey); De Temmerman, L., E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.be [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Tervuren (Belgium); Frolova, M., E-mail: marina.frolova@lvgma.gov.lv [Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Agency, Riga (Latvia); Gonzalez-Miqueo, L., E-mail: lgonzale2@alumni.unav.es [Univ. of Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations ({>=}1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km x 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r{sup 2} = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. - Highlights: > Nitrogen concentrations in mosses were determined at ca. 3000 sites across Europe. > Moss concentrations were compared with EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition. > The asymptotic relationship for Europe showed saturation at ca. 15 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. > Linear relationships were found with measured nitrogen deposition in some countries. > Moss concentrations complement deposition measurements at high spatial resolution. - Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

  18. Chlorophyll meter reading and total nitrogen content applied as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was aimed to assess the relationship between the reading of the chlorophyll meter and the total nitrogen (N) content in the leaf in different parts of the crambe plant, depending on the doses of nitrogen applied to the canopy. Randomized block design in a split plot experimental design was used. The plots ...

  19. Chlorophyll meter reading and total nitrogen content applied as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ana Mascarello

    The present study was aimed to assess the relationship between the reading of the chlorophyll meter and the total nitrogen (N) content in the leaf in different parts of the crambe plant, depending on the doses of nitrogen applied to the canopy. Randomized block design in a split-plot experimental design was used. The plots ...

  20. The influence of nitrogen and defoliation on the nitrogen content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of the nitrogen content in ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar) to a variation in applied nitrogen (0kg N ha-1, 150kg N ha-1, 300kg N ha-1 and 450kg N ha-1) and defoliation intervals (every 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks, as well as twice a season) was determined. In a field trial, the four nitrogen levels were ...

  1. [Progress in inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wen; Wei, Ya-Xing

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen is the necessary element in life activity of vegetation, which takes important function in biosynthesis of protein, nucleic acid, chlorophyll, and enzyme etc, and plays a key role in vegetation photosynthesis. The technology about inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing has been the research hotspot since the 70s of last century. With the development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology in recent years, the advantage of spectral bands subdivision in a certain spectral region provides the powerful technology measure for correlative spectral characteristic research on vegetation nitrogen. In the present paper, combined with the newest research production about monitoring vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing published in main geography science literature in recent several years, the principle and correlated problem about monitoring vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing were introduced. From four aspects including vegetation nitrogen spectral index, vegetation nitrogen content inversion based on chlorophyll index, regression model, and eliminating influence factors to inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration, main technology methods about inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing were detailedly introduced. Correlative research conclusions were summarized and analyzed, and research development trend was discussed.

  2. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  3. Effect of Nitrogen and Sulphur Fertilization on Chlorophyll Content in Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skudra Ilze

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen management strategy in plant growth period based on chlorophyll content evaluation in plant can improve nitrogen usage efficiency and reduce environmental contamination. This study is aimed to determine the impact of different nitrogen and sulphur fertilizer rates on dynamics of chlorophyll content in winter wheat during vegetative growth and to determine the relationship between nitrogen and chlorophyll content and grain yield of winter wheat. Field trial involving a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. variety ‘Kranich’ was conducted at the LUA Research and Study Farm Vecauce during a three-year period (2012-2015. The treatments were 0, 85, 153, 175+S21, 175 (in 2015, 187 N kg ha−1 and different nitrogen norms according to chlorophyll meter Yara N-tester (Konica Minolta Ltd. data: 180, 150, 205 N kg ha−1 depending on the year. The results of the trial show that the maximum chlorophyll content in different plant parts was observed at the end of flowering stage. The chlorophyll content depended on the level of mineral fertilisation. The highest chlorophyll content in leaves, stems and ears was obtained by using additional sulphur in two trial years. Usage of chlorophyll meter Yara N-tester obtained the highest chlorophyll content in all analyzed plant parts in one trial year. Chlorophyll content was significantly dependant on plant growth stage in stems in all trial years, in leaves in two trial years, and in ears in one year. Nitrogen fertilization significantly affected chlorophyll content in leaves and stems in one trial year. Close positive correlation was observed between grain yield and wheat plant chlorophyll content and average nitrogen concentration at the end of flowering stage in all three trial years.

  4. Background nitrogen concentrations in fresh waters in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windolf, Jørgen; Bøgestrand, Jens; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Kronvang, Brian

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative information on the background loading of nitrogen is important when establishing the pressure-impact pathway for Danish springs, streams, lakes and estuaries The background nitrogen loading thus determines present day lowest nitrogen loadings without influence from point sources and agriculture but includes present day atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. We have mapped the background concentration of nitrogen in Danish soil water, springs and streams based on monitoring in one soil water station (1990-2010), 11 springs, 7 small streams draining undisturbed catchments (1990-2010) and 19 streams draining small undisturbed catchments (2004-11). The concentration of ammonium-N (NH4+) and organic N was found to be nearly constant within six major landscape types in Denmark, respectively, 0.05 mg ± 0.06 mg N L-1 and 0.53 mg ± 0.29 mg N L-1. On contrary, the concentration of nitrate-nitrite-N (NO3- + NO2-) was found to vary between 0.06-0.83 mg N L-1 within the six landscape types. We have also time series of background total nitrogen concentrations from 7 small undisturbed catchments covering the period 1990-2010. No significant trends have been observed for total nitrogen concentrations from these streams during the period 1990-2010. The measured average nitrate-N concentrations in streams has been modelled against dominant landscape geology and a 5x5 km grid map of Denmark showing background concentrations of nitrate-N and total N has been produced. This map has been used during the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive as a baseline for estimating background nitrogen losses to surface waters in Denmark. Thus, the average annual background loss of total nitrogen amounts to 13,000 tonnes N or 20% of the total loading of nitrogen from the Danish land to sea during the period 2005-2009.

  5. Nitrogen concentration estimation with hyperspectral LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nevalainen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural lands have strong impact on global carbon dynamics and nitrogen availability. Monitoring changes in agricultural lands require more efficient and accurate methods. The first prototype of a full waveform hyperspectral Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR instrument has been developed at the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI. The instrument efficiently combines the benefits of passive and active remote sensing sensors. It is able to produce 3D point clouds with spectral information included for every point which offers great potential in the field of remote sensing of environment. This study investigates the performance of the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument in nitrogen estimation. The investigation was conducted by finding vegetation indices sensitive to nitrogen concentration using hyperspectral LiDAR data and validating their performance in nitrogen estimation. The nitrogen estimation was performed by calculating 28 published vegetation indices to ten oat samples grown in different fertilization conditions. Reference data was acquired by laboratory nitrogen concentration analysis. The performance of the indices in nitrogen estimation was determined by linear regression and leave-one-out cross-validation. The results indicate that the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument holds a good capability to estimate plant biochemical parameters such as nitrogen concentration. The instrument holds much potential in various environmental applications and provides a significant improvement to the remote sensing of environment.

  6. Quantification of Fluorine Content in AFFF Concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    for MilSpec compliance. Fluorocarbon surfactants are the most active components in these concentrates, and analysis of the fluorine content in the...situation as warming or cooling the sample does not affect the spectrum. The next most affected resonance is the one originating from the -CF2...Mabury, Environ. Chem. 2013, 10, 486-493. 9. T.J. Martin, “Fire-Fighting Foam Technology,” in Foam Engineering : Fundamentals and Applications; P

  7. Nodulation, chlorophyll content and nitrogen yield of two woody ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field studies were conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria between 2000 and 2002 to compare the growth, nodulation, chlorophyll content and nitrogen accumulation of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam) de Wit cv. 28 and Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp cv. ILG50 at the ...

  8. The relationship between the nitrogen and nitrate content and nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interrelationships between the nitrate-N and nitrogen content and dry matter yield of Midmar ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar) were investigated. Data were collected from N fertility trials, from two seasons (1985 and 1987) on four soil sites (Metz, Griffin, Clovelly and Katspruit) with N fertilizer rates ranging from 0 ...

  9. Effects of nitrogen enrichment on heavy metals content of cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was carried out at John Ker Nigeria Organo-Mineral Company site at Ikot Ekpene, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, to investigate the effect of nitrogen enrichment on contents of heavy metals in cattle dung/poultry manure compost and the growth of maize. Cattle dung was mixed with poultry manure in the ratio of 3:1 ...

  10. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  11. Effects of substrate type on plant growth and nitrogen and nitrate concentration in spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of three commercial substrates (a mixture of forest residues, composted grape husks, and white peat; black peat; and coir) on plant growth and nitrogen (N) and nitrate (NO3) concentration and content were evaluated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Tapir). Spinach seedlings were trans...

  12. Effect of nitrogen concentration of urea ammonium nitrate, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liquid urea ammonium nitrate (UAN) was applied to dryland Pennisetum clandestinum (Kikuyu (Chiov)) and Cynodon hybrid (Coastcross II (L.) (Pers.)) pastures at two levels (207 and 414 kg N/ha/season) and at three concentrations (10, 5; 21 and 42% N) of nitrogen. The degree of leaf scorch increased as both the amount ...

  13. Carbon and nitrogen content of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in relation to their Alcian Blue adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Anja; Passow, Uta

    2001-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen content of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) was determined and related to the concentration of TEP as quantified by a colorimetrical method. TEP were produced in the laboratory from dissolved precursors by laminar or turbulent shear. Dissolved precursors were obtained by 0.2 µm filtration from diatom cultures, with or without nutrient reduction, and from natural diatom populations. The relationship between carbon and TEP was significant, linear and species-specif...

  14. Nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone concentrations in residential environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyoung; Xue, Jianping; Geyh, Alison S; Ozkaynak, Halûk; Leaderer, Brian P; Weschler, Charles J; Spengler, John D

    2002-02-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) may be generated by heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide and direct emission from combustion sources. Interactions among nitrogen oxides and ozone are important for outdoor photochemical reactions. However, little is known of indoor HONO levels or the relationship between residential HONO, NO(2), and O(3) concentrations in occupied houses. Six-day integrated indoor and outdoor concentrations of the three pollutants were simultaneously measured in two communities in Southern California using passive samplers. The average indoor HONO concentration was 4.6 ppb, compared to 0.9 ppb for outdoor HONO. Average indoor and outdoor NO(2)concentrations were 28 and 20.1 ppb, respectively. Indoor O(3) concentrations were low (average 14.9 ppb) in comparison to the outdoor levels (average 56.5 ppb). Housing characteristics, including community and presence of a gas range, were significantly associated with indoor NO(2) and HONO concentrations. Indoor HONO levels were closely correlated with indoor NO(2) levels and were about 17% of indoor NO(2) concentrations. Indoor HONO levels were inversely correlated with indoor O(3) levels. The measurements demonstrated the occurrence of substantial residential indoor HONO concentrations and associations among the three indoor air pollutants.

  15. Nitrogen removal from concentrated latex wastewater by land treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikanda Thongnuekhang

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the concentrated latex factories in the South of Thailand discharge treated wastewater that contains high level of nitrogen to a nearby river or canals leading to a water pollution problem. A study of land treatment system was conducted to treat and utilize nitrogen in treated wastewater from the concentrated latex factory. The experimental pilot-scale land treatment system was constructed at the Faculty of Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai Campus. It consisted of water convolvulus (Ipomea aquatica, I. Reptans, tropical carpet grass (Axonopus compresus (Swartz Beav. and control unit (no plantation. The treated wastewater from the stabilization pond system of the selected concentrated latex factoryin Songkhla was used to irrigate each experimental unit. Influent and effluent from the experimental units were analyzed for TKN, NH3-N, Org-N, NO3 --N, NO2 --N, BOD5, sulfate, pH and EC. The land treatment system resulted a high removal efficiency for nitrogen. Tropical carpet grass provided higher removal efficiency than other units for all parameters. The removal efficiency of water convolvulus and control unit were not significantly different. The average removal efficiency of TKN, NH3-N, Org-N, BOD5 and sulfate for tropical carpet grass unit were 92, 97, 61, 88 and 52%, for water convolvulus unit were 75, 80, 43, 41 and 30%, and for control unit were 74, 80, 41, 31 and 28%, respectively. Mass balance of nitrogen transformation was conducted. It revealed that plant uptake was the major mechanism for nitrogen removal in land treatment.

  16. Nitrogen content and nitrogen reserves in annual leaves and offshoots of apple trees undergoing foliar nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Brunetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Foliar applications of nitrogen (N, when needed, have been used to supplement the fertilization of fruit trees through the soil. However, information on frequency effects, N amount to be applied, and the importance of increasing N content and N reserves in the leaves and offshoots are few. This paper aimed at evaluating the effect of foliar N applications on the N content and reserves in annual leaves and offshoots of apple trees. The study was carried out in an apple trees orchard (Eva cultivar, crop 2007/2008, in the experimental area of the Polytechnic College of Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, in the town of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, on a hydromorphic planosol. The treatments consisted of 1 and 2 foliar applications of 0; 1.11; 2.23; 3.31; 4.41; and 5.51g of N plant-1. The results showed that foliar N applications resulted in increased N contents in the whole leaves, especially up to the 8th day after application, but they do not affect N content in the annual offshoots. Nitrogen fertilization via the leaves did not increase the total content of amino acids and proteins in the annual whole leaves and offshoots

  17. Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen δ-doping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen δ-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen δ-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MANGOSTEEN LEAF NITROGEN CONTENTS AND LEAF SPAD VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Setiawan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nitrogen contents on mangosteen leaf and related on leaf SPAD value. The experiment was conducted using mangosteen trees grown in commercial orchard in Bogor, Indonesia during May to October 2010. Mangosteen trees of 3 different ages, young (20-year-old, middle-aged (35-year-old, and old (50-year-old trees, each of five trees, were selected for study, and the canopy of each tree was divided into 9 sectors based on height (bottom, middle, top and width (inner, center, outer. SPAD values had a negative correlation with leaf N content in all ages and could be explained by regressionl equations N level (% DW = -0.0099 × SPAD + 2.2366; R² = 0.91; N level (% DW = -0.0177 × SPAD + 2.8001; R² = 0.67; and N level (% DW = -0.0187 × SPAD + 2.7785; R² = 0.45 in young, middle-aged and old trees, respectively. It is suggested that the SPAD value determined by a portable chlorophyll meter can be used to obtain a quick estimation of mangosteen leaf N status. Keywords: age, fruiting position, Garcinia mangostana L., nitrogen, SPAD

  19. Calibration of Soil Available Nitrogen and Water Content with Grain Yield of Dry land Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Feiziasl

    2017-01-01

    measurement in the soil KCl extracts was down by spectrophotometry method and colorimetric reaction at 655 nm. Also, Absorption spectrophotometry method was used for determination of nitrate in soil extract based on its UV absorbance at 210 nm. In this method two measurements were carried out; one before (by Zn coated by Cu and second after reduction of nitrate. Using the difference between these two measurements, concentration of nitrate in the extracts was determined. Soil water content was also measured with Diviner 2000 after calibration in 0-20, 20-40, 40-60 and 60-80 cm soil profile in sub-sub plots. After wheat harvest, the most suitable regression model between soil mineral nitrogen (Nm and soil moisture (θ was fitted with wheat grain yield by DataFit version 9.0 software. Results and Discussion: The best model between soil N forms (nitrate, ammonium and mineral nitrogen was calibrated between mineral nitrogen (Nm and soil moisture (θ with crop response (Y=a+bN_m+c ln⁡〖(θ〗+dN_m^2+eln⁡〖(θ〗^2+fN_m ln⁡〖(θ〗 that explained 80% of dryland wheat yield variations. In this model, the contributions of mineral nitrogen (NO3− +NH4+ were 26%, soil moisture 50% and their interactions 24%. According to this model, the effect of soil moisture on production of grain yield was 2.3 folds greater than the mineral N. These results are most suitable for sampling and calibration of mineral nitrogen in 0-40 cm in dryland wheat stem elongation (ZGS32. Critical value of soil mineral N was 41 kg/ha, equal to 18.0 mg Nm/kg in this layer for obtaining higher grain yield (over 2500 kg/ha. According to regression model, application of 50 kg N/ha in autumn was able to provide Nm critical level in 0-40 cm layer for dryland wheat genotypes under experimental conditions. Also simulation model showed that nitrogen fertilizer increased grain yield and it is more than the soil mineral nitrogen. If the soil mineral nitrogen is 20 kg/ha or less in 0-40 cm soil layer, there may be

  20. Effects of simultaneous ozone exposure and nitrogen loads on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, growth, and nutrient concentrations of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.F.D. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)]. E-mail: vera.thomas@iap.ch; Braun, S. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland); Flueckiger, W. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Beech seedlings were grown under different nitrogen fertilisation regimes (0, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) for three years and were fumigated with either charcoal-filtered (F) or ambient air (O{sub 3}). Nitrogen fertilisation increased leaf necroses, aphid infestations, and nutrient ratios in the leaves (N:P and N:K), as a result of decreased phosphorus and potassium concentrations. For plant growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, a positive nitrogen effect was found, but only for fertilisations of up to 40 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The highest nitrogen load, however, reduced leaf area, leaf water content, growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations were enhanced. The ozone fumigation resulted in reduced leaf area, leaf water content, shoot growth, root biomass accumulation, and decreased starch, phosphorus, and potassium concentrations, increasing the N:P and N:K ratios. A combined effect of the two pollutants was detected for the leaf area and the shoot elongation, where ozone fumigation amplified the nitrogen effects. - The effects of nitrogen and ozone on growth, carbohydrate concentrations, and nutrients are mainly additive.

  1. [Research on fast detecting tomato seedlings nitrogen content based on NIR characteristic spectrum selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-zhu; Wang, Feng-zhu; Wang, Li-li; Zhang, Xiao-chao; Mao, Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and robustness of detecting tomato seedlings nitrogen content based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), 4 kinds of characteristic spectrum selecting methods were studied in the present paper, i. e. competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), Monte Carlo uninformative variables elimination (MCUVE), backward interval partial least squares (BiPLS) and synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLS). There were totally 60 tomato seedlings cultivated at 10 different nitrogen-treatment levels (urea concentration from 0 to 120 mg . L-1), with 6 samples at each nitrogen-treatment level. They are in different degrees of over nitrogen, moderate nitrogen, lack of nitrogen and no nitrogen status. Each sample leaves were collected to scan near-infrared spectroscopy from 12 500 to 3 600 cm-1. The quantitative models based on the above 4 methods were established. According to the experimental result, the calibration model based on CARS and MCUVE selecting methods show better performance than those based on BiPLS and SiPLS selecting methods, but their prediction ability is much lower than that of the latter. Among them, the model built by BiPLS has the best prediction performance. The correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance to standard derivate (RPD) is 0. 952 7, 0. 118 3 and 3. 291, respectively. Therefore, NIR technology combined with characteristic spectrum selecting methods can improve the model performance. But the characteristic spectrum selecting methods are not universal. For the built model based or single wavelength variables selection is more sensitive, it is more suitable for the uniform object. While the anti-interference ability of the model built based on wavelength interval selection is much stronger, it is more suitable for the uneven and poor reproducibility object. Therefore, the characteristic spectrum selection will only play a better role in building model

  2. Visible injury and nitrogen metabolism of rice leaves under ozone stress, and effect on sugar and protein contents in grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. Z.; Sui, L. H.; Wang, W.; Geng, C. M.; Yin, B. H.

    2012-12-01

    Effect of ozone on the visible injury, nitrogen metabolism of rice leaves, and sugar and protein contents in rice grain was carried out by the open-top chamber. The results indicated that ozone stress caused obvious injury in rice leaves. The increase in ozone concentration had significant influence on the nitrate reductase activity in rice leaves. At the ozone concentration of 40, 80 and 120 nL L-1, the nitrate reductase activities in rice leaves in the tillering stage, the jointing stage, the heading stage and milk stage were separately reduced by 25.3-86.3%, 57.4-97.8%, 91.0-99.3% and 89.5-96.7% compared with those in the control treatment. As ozone concentration increased, the contents of ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen in rice leaves were obviously reduced. Ozone stress also had an influence on the contents of sugar and protein in rice grain. The stress of high ozone concentration (120 nL L-1) caused the starch content in grain to reduce by 15.8% than that in the control treatment, but total soluble sugars in grain was actually enhanced by 47.5% compared to that in the control treatment. The contents of albumin and glutenin in rice grain increased with increasing the ozone concentration, and prolamin and crude protein contents in rice grain increased only at the higher ozone concentration. Under ozone concentration of 120 nL L-1, the contents of albumin, glutenin and crude protein in rice grain were increased respectively by 23.1%, 21.0% and 21.1% compared with those in the control treatment. The result suggested that ozone tress has an influence on nitrogen metabolism of rice leaves and grain quality.

  3. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, L M; Diette, G B; Scott, M; McCormack, M C; Matsui, E C; Curtin-Brosnan, J; Williams, D L; Kidd-Taylor, A; Shea, M; Breysse, P N; Hansel, N N

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and higher NO2 concentrations, are associated with worse respiratory morbidity in people with obstructive lung disease. A handful of studies have modified the indoor environment by replacing unvented gas heaters; this study, to our knowledge, is the first randomized study to target unvented gas stoves. The results of this study show that simple home interventions, including replacement of an unvented gas stove with an electric stove or placement of HEPA air purifiers with carbon filters, can significantly decrease indoor NO2 concentrations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Determinations of nonprotein nitrogen content of cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, S S; Josephson, R V

    1975-10-01

    Nonprotein nitrogen in pooled sweet (Cheddar and Dagano) and acid (cottage) wheys was estimated by currently proposed dialysis and chemical precipitation methods. Kjeldahl nitrogen analyses of (a) membrane retentates after water dialysis, and (b) 12% trichloroacetic acid plus .2% phosphotungstic acid filtrates indicated that nonprotein nitrogen values vary significantly with the method of sample preparation. Membrane porosity influence nonprotein nitrogen values for molecular weight cut-offs of 3500, 6000 to 8000 and 12,000 to 14,000. Dialyzable nitrogen values with all membranes were lower than 12% trichloroacetic acid soluble nitrogen for both wheys and higher than the 12% trichloroacetic acid + .2% phosphotungstic acid soluble nitrogen for all but the 3500 molecular weight cut-off membrane. The dialyzable nonprotein nitrogen fraction was heterogeneous but more that 80% was less than 3500 in molecular weight.

  5. Nitrogen fertilization of Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines: yield, total nitrogen content in the leaves and must composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Lorensini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Grapevines grown on sandy soils are subjected to the application of supplemental nitrogen (N; however, there is little information available regarding the impact of these applications on yield, plant nutritional state and must composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield, nutritional state and must composition of grapevines subjected to N fertilization. Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines were subjected to annual applications of 0, 10, 15, 20, 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha-1 in 2008, 2009 and 2010. During the 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11 harvest seasons, leaves were collected during full flowering and when the berries changed color, and the total N content was analyzed. The grape yield and the enological characteristics of the must were evaluated. The response to applied N was low, and the highest Cabernet Sauvignon grape yield was obtained in response to an application of 20 kg N ha-1 year-1. The application of N increased the nutrient content in the leaf collected at full flowering, but it had little effect on the total nutrient content in the must, and it did not affect the enological characteristics of the must, such as soluble solids, pH, total acidity, malic acid and tartaric acid.

  6. Body fat content, distribution and blood glucose concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body fat content has been associated with increase of blood glucose concentration. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between body fat content, its distribution and blood glucose concentration among adult population. A cross sectional survey was carried among 270 randomly selected adults, aged ...

  7. Responses of leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf area of Populus sibirica seedlings to nitrogen fertilization in a semi-arid area, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.; Han, S. H.; Son, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effects of three rates of nitrogen fertilization on Populus sibirica seedlings in a semi-arid area, Elsentasarkhai, Mongolia. In May 2015, 2-year-old P. sibirica seedlings were planted in the control and three fertilized plots. Urea was applied to each seedling with 5 g (N1), 15 g (N2) and 30 g (N3) in May 2015 and 2016. Leaf nitrogen concentration, total chlorophyll content, leaf area and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured in July 2016 and the differences were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (P<0.05). Leaf nitrogen concentration was significantly higher in the N2 (2.47±0.01%) and N3 (2.99±0.04%) plots than in the control (1.17±0.04%). Nitrogen fertilization also significantly increased total chlorophyll content (Control: 1.01±0.01 mg g-1, N1: 2.16±0.03 mg g-1, N2: 3.22±0.01 mg g-1, N3: 3.12±0.02 mg g-1) and seedlings in the N1 plot showed the lowest total chlorophyll content among the fertilized plots. There was no significant difference in SLA, however, leaf area in the N2 plot (3109.9 cm2) was significantly higher than that in the control (494.0 cm2). The N3 treatment significantly increased leaf nitrogen concentration and total chlorophyll content, however, it did not change leaf area. The N2 treatment seems to be suitable for leaf growth of P. sibirica seedlings in the study site. To determine the optimal rate of nitrogen fertilization, the growth and biomass of seedlings after treatments also need to be examined. * This study was supported by Korea Forest Service (S211216L030120).

  8. Impacts of limestone and nitrogen top dressing application on the potassium content in the soil profile and marandu-grass leaf concentration Impactos da aplicação de calcário e nitrogênio em cobertura no teor de potássio no perfil do solo e na concentração foliar do capim-marandu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Balieiro Neto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of nitrogen doses (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 kg ha-1 year-1, with or without dolomitic lime covering application, on the potassium (K soil content at depths varying form 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 20 cm, and the potassium concentration in the plant. The experiment was carried out in a rhodic ferralsol with a slightly rolling relief, in a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement, in a complete randomized block design, with four replications. Nitrogenated fertilization caused a linear increase in the potassium concentration in the plant and also in the mineral content in the 0-5 cm soil layer. An effect of competitive inhibition occurred between the potassium and calcium absorption, and potassium and magnesium absorption. Although a significant fraction of potassium returned to the soil surface layer through the forage residue due to the increase in dry matter production caused by nitrogenated fertilization, the increase in the potassium concentration in the plant due to the doses of nitrogen demonstrated the importance of considering the potassium supply to the plant, when the forage mass is intensified through nitrogenated fertilization.Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos de nitrogênio (0, 100, 200, 300 e 400 kg/ha.ano, com ou sem aplicação de calcário dolomítico em cobertura, sobre o teor de potássio (K do solo nas profundidades de 0 a 5; 5 a 10; e 10 a 20 cm e a concentração de potássio na planta. O experimento foi realizado em Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico de relevo suavemente ondulado, disposto em esquema fatorial 5 × 2, em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. A adubação nitrogenada promoveu aumento linear na concentração de potássio na planta e no teor desse mineral na camada de 0 a 5 cm do solo. Ocorreu efeito de inibição competitiva entre a absorção de potássio e cálcio e entre potássio e magnésio. Embora uma fração significativa de potássio retorne

  9. Soil temperature, nitrogen concentration, and residence time affect nitrogen uptake efficiency in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholberg, J M S; Parsons, L R; Wheaton, T A; McNeal, B L; Morgan, K T

    2002-01-01

    We try to elucidate which environmental and soil factors control nitrogen uptake efficiency in citrus. Effects of residence time and nitrogen (N) concentration (three 500-mL applications of 7 mg N L(-1), representative of reclaimed water used for citrus irrigation in central Florida, or one 150-mL application of 70 mg N L(-1)) on nitrogen uptake efficiency (NUE) of young citrus seedlings were studied. Increasing residence times from 2 to 8 h increased NUE from 36 to 82% and from 17 to 34% for high and low application frequencies, respectively. We developed a model to predict N uptake based on root density, N concentration, and soil temperature (Ts). Assuming a base temperature (Tb) of 10 degrees C, N uptake temperature sum (UTS) = sigma(Ts - Tb)/24 (degrees CdN, degree day units of N uptake). To eliminate the risk of N leaching for young seedlings, minimum uptake periods of 5 and 16 degrees CdN were required at initial soil N concentrations of 0.9 and 2.5 mg N L(-1), respectively. After correcting for differences in root length, this information was then used to predict the effect of irrigation practices on N uptake from reclaimed water for mature trees. Applying 2500 mm yr(-1) vs. 400 mm yr(-1) reclaimed water reduced the NUE of N in this water from 100 to 63% during the summer and from 100 to 28% during the winter. Reductions in NUE at higher irrigation rates appeared to be related to N displacement below the root zone prior to complete N uptake.

  10. Novel porous carbon materials with ultrahigh nitrogen contents for selective CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials were prepared by a nanocasting route using tri-continuous mesoporous silica IBN-9 as a hard template. Rationally choosing carbon precursors and carefully controlling activation conditions result in an optimized material denoted as IBN9-NC1-A, which possesses a very high nitrogen doping concentration (∼13 wt%) and a large surface area of 890 m 2 g -1 arising from micropores (<1 nm). It exhibits an excellent performance for CO 2 adsorption over a wide range of CO 2 pressures. Specifically, its equilibrium CO 2 adsorption capacity at 25 °C reaches up to 4.50 mmol g -1 at 1 bar and 10.53 mmol g -1 at 8 bar. In particular, it shows a much higher CO 2 uptake at low pressure (e.g. 1.75 mmol g -1 at 25 °C and 0.2 bar) than any reported carbon-based materials, owing to its unprecedented nitrogen doping level. The high nitrogen contents also give rise to significantly enhanced CO 2/N 2 selectivities (up to 42), which combined with the high adsorption capacities, make these new carbon materials promising sorbents for selective CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas and other relevant applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Improved anaerobic digestion performance and biogas production from poultry litter after lowering its nitrogen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Giorgos

    2015-11-01

    Poultry litter (PL) was pre-treated in order to reduce its nitrogen content and to increase the C/N ratio. The pre-treatment consisted of a first anaerobiosis phase of about 60days in order to accumulate ammonia nitrogen, followed by an ammonia stripping phase by heating the substrate at 80°C for 24h. The digestion was performed with PL and pre-treated PL (TPL) after ammonia stripping as mono-substrate under four total solids loads, i.e. 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The TPL after ammonia stripping displayed lower ammonia (62-73%) and VFA (41-65%) concentrations compared to digesters with raw PL, while bio-methane yield increased about 8-124%. Bio-methane yields in the series with TPL after ammonia stripping were about 193, 196, 215 and 147 [Formula: see text] /kgCOD, based on the COD added, for 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% TS load, respectively. The results indicate that lowering nitrogen content using the suggested process improves bio-methane yields significantly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrating species composition and leaf nitrogen content to indicate effects of nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enzai

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has been increasing globally and has arisen concerns of its impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Ecological indicators play an important role in ecosystem monitoring, assessment and management in the context of an anthropogenic transformation of the global N cycle. By integrating species composition and leaf N stoichiometry, a new community N indicator was defined and validated in the understory plots of an N enrichment (as NH4NO3) experiment in an old-growth boreal forest in Northeast China. Three-year N additions showed no significant effect on the understory species richness, but an obvious shift in species composition occurred. The response of leaf N content to N additions was generally positive but varied by species. Overall, the community N indicator increased significantly with higher N addition level and soil available N content, being in the shape of a non-linear saturation response curve. The results suggest that the community N indicator could be an effective tool to indicate changes in ecosystem N availability. Critical values of the community N indicator for specific vegetation type could potentially provide useful information for nature conservation managers and policy makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term trends in nitrogen isotope composition and nitrogen concentration in brazilian rainforest trees suggest changes in nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietz, Peter; Dünisch, Oliver; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2010-02-15

    Direct or indirect anthropogenic effects on ecosystem nitrogen cycles are important components of global change. Recent research has shown that N isotopes in tree rings reflect changes in ecosystem nitrogen sources or cycles and can be used to study past changes. We analyzed trends in two tree species from a remote and pristine tropical rainforest in Brazil, using trees of different ages to distinguish between the effect of tree age and long-term trends. Because sapwood differed from heartwood in delta(15)N and N concentration and N can be translocated between living sapwood cells, long-term trends are best seen in dead heartwood. Heartwood delta(15)N in Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata) and big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) increased with tree age, and N concentrations increased with age in Cedrela. Controlling for tree age, delta(15)N increased significantly during the past century even when analyzing only heartwood and after removing labile N compounds. In contrast to northern temperate and boreal forests where wood delta(15)N often decreased, the delta(15)N increase in a remote rainforest is unlikely to be a direct signal of changed N deposition. More plausibly, the change in N isotopic composition indicates a more open N cycle, i.e., higher N losses relative to internal N cycling in the forest, which could be the result of changed forest dynamics.

  14. Contents of trichothecenes in oats during official variety, organic cultivation and nitrogen fertilization trials in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. HIETANIEMI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural toxins, such as mycotoxins, have emerged as a significant factor affecting the safety image of cereal grains as a raw material for the food and feed industry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contents of trichothecenes in representative samples of oats during official variety, nitrogen fertilization and organic farming trials in Finland, 1997–1999. Further objectives were to promote industry and commerce by selection of high-quality oat varieties for various applications. The official variety trials conducted at 8–10 locations were managed following standard protocol. There were 2 types of agronomy trial, the first included comparison of oat cultivars grown in conventional and organic farming systems at 6 locations, and the second used 5 nitrogen rates (0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 kg N ha-1 at 2 locations. Regardless of wet cold summer occurring in Finland during 1998, the concentrations of Fusarium toxins were lowest during this 3 year monitoring period. More mycotoxins were produced during the warm, dry summers of 1997 and 1999 than in 1998. In all, 55% of the oat samples in the official variety trials contained deoxynivalenol (DON within the range of 50– 896 µ g kg-1. The differences in DON concentrations between organic and conventional cultivation were small. The results showed also that the use of various nitrogen fertilization levels only slightly affected the trichothecene concentrations. The contents of trichothecenes in Finnish grains appeared to be similar to or lower than those reported earlier in the Northern Hemisphere.;

  15. Predicting soil nitrogen content using narrow-band indices from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 0.77; p < 0.05; PRESS = 0.07). The results indicate a potential for forest managers to monitor the status of soil nitrogen in commercial forestry compartments and determine how much fertiliser is required to optimise tree growth. Keywords: hyperspectral remote sensing, leaf spectral indices, soil nitrogen, statistical analysis ...

  16. Seasonal variations in nitrate content, total nitrogen, and nitrate reductase activities of macrophytes from a chalk stream in Upper Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, A; Kaiser, R

    1986-07-01

    11 macrophytic species from a groundwater influenced chalk stream in Upper Bavaria were investigated during a period of one year in order to determine differences in the endogenous nitrate content, in total nitrogen content and in nitrate reductase activity (NRA). Nitrate concentrations of different plants taken from the same site of the river varied by a factor of approximately 103. A maximum of 1,958 μmol NO 3- g-1 dry w. could be measured in the petioles of Nasturtium officinale, which accounts for 12% of plant dry w. Very high values were also found in Callitriche obtusangula and Veronica angallis-aquatica. In comparison to the ambient water, mean accumulation rates of up to 131 could be found. In Fontinalis antipyretica, the plant poorest in nitrate, the ratio was only 1.24:1. Elodea canadensis belonged to a group of plants having very low nitrate concentrations. Since NRA was very low too, it is assumed that nitrogen nutrition of this species depends rather on ammonia than on nitrate. With a few exceptions nitrate content of different plant organs varied markedly. In general they were lowest in leaves and highest in shoot axes. Appreciable amounts of nitrate were also found in the roots of plants. No correlation could be found between endogenous nitrate content and NRA. In contrast to endogenous nitrate content and NRA, total nitrogen concentrations of the plants did not differ significantly.

  17. Short communication. Nitrogen content of residual alfalfa taproots under irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. residues can provide significant amounts of N to subsequent crops, but most of the data on this subject has been obtained from 1-2 year old alfalfa stands. The objective of this study was to determine the biomass of alfalfa taproots and their N content in irrigated alfalfa stands that are more than 2 years old. Twenty-two commercial irrigated alfalfa fields were evaluated in the Ebro Valley (Northeast Spain from 2006 to 2010. The taproot biomass in the arable layer (0 to 30 cm depth ranged from 1.8 to 10.1 Mg ha-1 and averaged 4.8 Mg ha-1. In contrast, the N concentration in alfalfa taproots was constant among fields and averaged 24.6 g N kg-1. The total amount of N contained in alfalfa taproots (0-30 cm depth ranged from 47 to 96 kg N ha-1 in 55% of the fields, ranged from 97 to 200 kg N ha-1 in 22% of the fields, and exceeded 200 kg N ha-1 in 23% of the fields. The N content of the irrigated alfalfa taproots studied here is in the upper range previously reported in other areas, mainly with younger alfalfa stands. Based on the current finding, a classification of the quality of irrigated alfalfa stands is proposed to improve the estimates of the residual-N effects of alfalfa on subsequent crops.

  18. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet-Massin, Claire; Giuliano, Simon; Alletto, Lionel; Daydé, Jean; Berger, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys). The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N) supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions), in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions) and in field conditions (FC) on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC) and location (FC) had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC) N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization. PMID:26192921

  20. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Barbet-Massin

    Full Text Available The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions, in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions and in field conditions (FC on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC and location (FC had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization.

  1. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizers on the Growth and Nitrate Content of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is an essential element for plant growth and development; however, due to environmental pollution, high nitrate concentrations accumulate in the edible parts of these leafy vegetables, particularly if excessive nitrogen fertilizer has been applied. Consuming these crops can harm human health; thus, developing a suitable strategy for the agricultural application of nitrogen fertilizer is important. Organic, inorganic, and liquid fertilizers were utilized in this study to investigate their effect on nitrate concentrations and lettuce growth. The results of this pot experiment show that the total nitrogen concentration in soil and the nitrate concentration in lettuce increased as the amount of nitrogen fertilizer increased. If the recommended amount of inorganic fertilizer (200 kg·N·ha−1 is used as a standard of comparison, lettuce augmented with organic fertilizers (200 kg·N·ha−1 have significantly longer and wider leaves, higher shoot, and lower concentrations of nitrate.

  2. Monitoring total nitrogen content in soil of cultivated land based on hyperspectral technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaohe; Wang, Lizhi; Zhang, Liyan; Wang, Guijun

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring total nitrogen content (TNC) in soil of cultivated land quantitively is significant for fertility adjustment, yield improvement and sustainable development of agriculture. Analyzing the hyperspectrum response on soil TNC is the basis of remote sensing monitoring in a wide range. The study aimed to develop a universal method to monitor total nitrogen content in soil of cultivated land by hyperspectrum data. The correlations between soil TNC and the hyperspectrum reflectivity and its mathematical transformations were analyzed. Then the feature bands and its transformations were screened to develop the optimizing model of monitoring soil TNC based on the method of multiple linear regression. Results showed that the bands with good correlation of soil TNC were concentrated in visible bands and near infrared bands. Differential transformation was helpful for reducing the noise interference to the diagnosis ability of the target spectrum. The determination coefficient of the first order differential of logarithmic reciprocal transformation was biggest (0.56), which was confirmed as the optimal inversion model for soil TNC. The determination coefficient (R2) of testing samples was 0.45, while the RMSE was 0.097 mg/kg. It indicated that the inversion model of soil TNC in the cultivated land with the one differentiation of logarithmic reciprocal transformation of hyperspectral data could reach high accuracy with good stability.

  3. Nitrogen-doped graphene: effect of graphite oxide precursors and nitrogen content on the electrochemical sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Monica; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdenek; Klímová, Kateřina; Pumera, Martin

    2017-06-21

    Graphene, produced via chemical methods, has been widely applied for electrochemical sensing due to its structural and electrochemical properties as well as its ease of production in large quantity. While nitrogen-doped graphenes are widely studied materials, the literature showing an effect of graphene oxide preparation methods on nitrogen quantity and chemical states as well as on defects and, in turn, on electrochemical sensing is non-existent. In this study, the properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials, prepared via hydrothermal synthesis using graphite oxide produced by various classical methods using permanganate or chlorate oxidants Staudenmaier, Hummers, Hofmann and Brodie oxidation methods, were studied; the resulting nitrogen-doped graphene oxides were labeled as ST-GO, HU-GO, HO-GO and BR-GO, respectively. The electrochemical oxidation of biomolecules, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine, nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and DNA free bases, was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The nitrogen content in doped graphene oxides increased in the order ST-GO graphene followed this trend, as shown in the cyclic voltammograms. This is a very important finding that provides insight into the electrocatalytic effect of N-doped graphene. The nitrogen-doped graphene materials exhibited improved sensitivity over bare glassy carbon for ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine detection. These studies will enhance our understanding of the effects of graphite oxide precursors on the electrochemical sensing properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

  4. The effects of nitrogen deficiencies on the lipid and protein contents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrogen deficiencies were studied in Spirulina platensis (Cyanophyceae) with the aim of determining the effects of the 50 and 100% deficient nitrogen on the lipid and protein contents of the cell under laboratory conditions. S. platensis cultures were grown in Spirulina medium and kept at the constant room temperature of ...

  5. Estimation of leaf nitrogen concentration on winter wheat by multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, Vincent; Marlier, Guillaume; Destain, Marie-France; Dumont, Benjamin; Mercatoris, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Precision agriculture can be considered as one of the solutions to optimize agricultural practice such as nitrogen fertilization. Nitrogen deficiency is a major limitation to crop production worldwide whereas excess leads to environmental pollution. In this context, some devices were developed as reflectance spot sensors for on-the-go applications to detect leaves nitrogen concentration deduced from chlorophyll concentration. However, such measurements suffer from interferences with the crop growth stage and the water content of plants. The aim of this contribution is to evaluate the nitrogen status in winter wheat by using multispectral imaging. The proposed system is composed of a CMOS camera and a set of filters ranged from 450 nm to 950 nm and mounted on a wheel which moves due to a stepper motor. To avoid the natural irradiance variability, a white reference is used to adjust the integration time. The segmentation of Photosynthetically Active Leaves is performed by using Bayes theorem to extract their mean reflectance. In order to introduce information related to the canopy architecture, i.e. the crop growth stage, textural attributes are also extracted from raw images at different wavelength ranges. Nc was estimated by partial least squares regression (R² = 0.94). The best attribute was homogeneity extracted from the gray level co-occurrence matrix (R² = 0.91). In order to select in limited number of filters, best subset selection was performed. Nc could be estimated by four filters (450 +/- 40 nm, 500 +/- 20 nm, 650 +/- 40 nm, 800 +/- 50 nm) (R² = 0.91).

  6. Influence of various sources of nitrogen on the growth of Scots pine seedlings and the IAA content in needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kieliszewska-Rokicka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One year old pine seedlings transferred from the nursery and potted in a greenhouse were watered with nitrogen solutions of different form and concentration (urea 0.36 mM and 0.90 mM, ammonium tartrate 0.36 mM and 1.79 mM, calcium nitrate 0.36 mM, 1.79 mM and 3.58 mM. After 10 months the growth and IAA content in needles were compared. Nitrogen fertilization affected shoot growth considerably, but its effects on root growth were less pronounced. The highest shoot weight was obtained after application of ammonium tartrate in 1.79 mM concentration. The lowest concentration of urea (0.36 mM caused the same effect, as did the most concentrated calcium nitrate solution (3.58 mM. Auxine content increased in the needles after nitrogen fertilization as compared with control. The highest accumulation of IAA was found in seedlings treated with low concentrations of urea.

  7. Study on Hyperspectral Estimation Model of Total Nitrogen Content in Soil of Shaanxi Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbao; Dong, Zhenyu; Chen, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology has been widely used in soil nutrient prediction. The soil is the representative soil type in Shaanxi Province. In this study, the soil total nitrogen content in Shaanxi soil was used as the research target, and the soil samples were measured by reflectance spectroscopy using ASD method. Pre-treatment, the first order differential, second order differential and reflectance logarithmic transformation of the reflected spectrum after pre-treatment, and the hyperspectral estimation model is established by using the least squares regression method and the principal component regression method. The results show that the correlation between the reflectance spectrum and the total nitrogen content of the soil is significantly improved. The correlation coefficient between the original reflectance and soil total nitrogen content is in the range of 350 ~ 2500nm. The correlation coefficient of soil total nitrogen content and first deviation of reflectance is more than 0.5 at 142nm, 1963nm, 2204nm and 2307nm, the second deviation has a significant positive correlation at 1114nm, 1470nm, 1967nm, 2372nm and 2402nm, respectively. After the reciprocal logarithmic transformation of the reflectance with the total nitrogen content of the correlation analysis found that the effect is not obvious. Rc2 = 0.7102, RMSEC = 0.0788; Rv2 = 0.8480, RMSEP = 0.0663, which can achieve the rapid prediction of the total nitrogen content in the region. The results show that the principal component regression model is the best.

  8. Dynamics of nitrogenous substances content in the diet of the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Čepelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The representation of nitrogenous substances in the stomach content of Apodemus sylvaticus was determined using the NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy method. Out of the total of 247 examined stomachs, 66 were male and 181 female. Sampling of study material was conducted in 2003–2010 at three isolated forest sites in South Moravia with different habitat conditions and different type of management (old semi-natural forest with dominance of English Oak (Quercus robur; production forest with dominant Sessile Oak (Quercus petraea and Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia; pheasantry with variable mixture of forest plots. The determined nitrogenous substances content ranged from 9.5–64.4% of dry matter. With respect to nitrogenous substances content, the habitat, site and sex factors were assessed as statistically insignificant. On the other hand, the factor of a given year (χ2 = 31.14; p < 0.000 and that of sexual activity (χ2 = 7.86; p = 0.005 showed significant differences. In relation to season, both the average nitrogenous substances content in diet and the standard deviation oscillated. The highest average nitrogenous substances content was determined in winter months, when the most significant dispersion in values was determined as well. In years following mast years (2004 and 2007 high values of standard deviations in dietary nitrogenous compounds content were determined.

  9. Simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles in low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented, which simulates nitrogen concentration-depth profiles as obtained with low temperature gaseous nitriding of stainless steel. The evolution of the calculated nitrogen concentration-depth profiles is compared with experimental nitriding kinetics. It is shown...

  10. 40 CFR 52.277 - Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. 52.277 Section 52.277 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. (a) The following rules are being retained...

  11. Accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen contents in banana 'Williams' (Musa AAA plants in Uraba, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Torres B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Banana production for export in the Uraba region of Colombia represents economic and social benefits for the country and demands improved agronomic management practices, especially for fertilization. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of different doses of nitrogen on crop development during two production cycles in order to adjust fertilizer recommendations to values consistent with plant requirements. Sixth-generation banana Williams plants were subjected to five treatments of nitrogen doses at five stages of development and during two production cycles. Two linear models, according to the phenological stage and vegetative structures, were used, assessing the variables of dry weight and nitrogen content. The statistical differences found for the effect of the nitrogen dose on the dry matter accumulation per plant organ and nitrogen content in the plants for the development stages per production cycle and between the cycles allowed for the selection of the 321.8 and 483 kg ha-1 ha of nitrogen doses as the better ones. In this research, the nitrogen dose of 483 kg ha-1 was the most successful at obtaining the highest nitrogen content in the plants. This research confirmed the practical utility of nutrient extraction curves because they allowed for the selection of the fertilizer dose with the best response.

  12. Chromium-manganese stainless steels with nitrogen content up to 2.10 wt%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, C.; Rashev, Ts. [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Metaloznanie i Tekhnologiya na Metalite

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the possibilities of existent in the Institute of metal science (Sofia) plants for nitrogen alloying of corrosion resistant steels type CrMnMo21 18 3 with nitrogen content up to 2.10 wt%. The method of producing is with only one melting of the charge without an additional electroslag remelting under pressure (ESRP). It is used the combination method for nitrogen alloying of the melt by solid nitrogen carrier and nitrogen gaseous blowing under high pressure up to 8 MPa. It has been obtained the compact and homogeneous ingots (10 kg of each). It is proved the possibilities for producing of industrial 0.5 and 1.8 t ingots of these grades steels with nitrogen content up to 1.20 wt percentage. All ingots of both nitrogen content levels were plastic deformed by forging and rolling. The industrial ingots were forged on radial forging machine CFM-SH 500 and laboratory ingots were deformed on laboratory rolling mill quarto in IMS. After high temperature quenching (1473-1523 K; water) the high nitrogen steels have shown a very good complex of mechanical properties: yield strength (R{sub 0.2}): 750-1000 MPa, tensile strength (R{sub m}):1250-1500 MPa, relative reduction of area (Z):60-50%, Rockwell hardness : 30-50. (orig.)

  13. Determining the Content of Nitrogen in Rubber Trees by the Method of NIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, R.; Chen, K.; Jiang, C.; Li, Ch.

    2017-09-01

    Foliar nitrogen (N) is an important index to evaluate the content of nitrogen in rubber trees. Hence, a fast way utilizing the spectroscopy to estimate the nitrogen content level of the rubber tree under natural environment has been preliminarily investigated in this paper. The combined features strategy is adopted in this study. The evaluation model is developed by back propagation (BP) algorithm and Adaboost algorithm. The results of simulation experiment show that satisfactory classification performance has been achieved using the proposed model and the percentage of samples correctly classified by the proposed model in the validation set is 92.98%.

  14. Evaluation of Six Algorithms to Monitor Wheat Leaf Nitrogen Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and non-destructive monitoring of the canopy leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC in crops is important for precise nitrogen (N management. Nowadays, there is an urgent need to identify next-generation bio-physical variable retrieval algorithms that can be incorporated into an operational processing chain for hyperspectral satellite missions. We assessed six retrieval algorithms for estimating LNC from canopy reflectance of winter wheat in eight field experiments. These experiments represented variations in the N application rates, planting densities, ecological sites and cultivars and yielded a total of 821 samples from various places in Jiangsu, China over nine consecutive years. Based on the reflectance spectra and their first derivatives, six methods using different numbers of wavelengths were applied to construct predictive models for estimating wheat LNC, including continuum removal (CR, vegetation indices (VIs, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR, partial least squares regression (PLSR, artificial neural networks (ANNs, and support vector machines (SVMs. To assess the performance of these six methods, we provided a systematic evaluation of the estimation accuracies using the six metrics that were the coefficients of determination for the calibration (R2C and validation (R2V sets, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP for the calibration and validation sets, the ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD, the computational efficiency (CE and the complexity level (CL. The following results were obtained: (1 For the VIs method, SAVI(R1200, R705 produced a more accurate estimation of the LNC than other indices, with R²C, R²V, RMSEP, RPD and CE values of 0.844, 0.795, 0.384, 2.005 and 0.10 min, respectively; (2 For the SMLR, PLSR, ANNs and SVMs methods, the SVMs using the first derivative canopy spectra (SVM-FDS offered the best accuracy in terms of R²C, R²V, RMSEP, RPD, and CE, at 0.96, 0.78, 0.37, 2.02, and 21

  15. Soil water and mineral nitrogen content as influenced by crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and wheat–medic rotation (McWMcW) and tillage, conventional-till (CT), minimum-till (MT), no-till (NT) and zero-till (ZT) were studied. Crop rotation did not influence soil moisture content. Soil water content in CT tended to be lower compared ...

  16. The effects of nitrogen on protein, oil and trypsin inhibitor content of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization have influence on protein, oil and trypsin inhibitor content of different soybean genotypes. Seed protein content was increased over control by 60 kg ha-1 nitrogen while trypsin inhibitor was reduced by all treatmens (30, 60,90 N kg ha-1 as compared to controls. Significant genetic variation in TI was found both within the genotype class with the Kunitz inhibitor present as well as within the class lacking this inhibitor. Genotypes containing the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor protein (KTI exhibit a higher TI than genotypes lacking this protein, however, in both groups of genotypes TI was similary affected by nitrogen application. Oil content was reduced following nitrogen fertilisation.

  17. Mineral, protein and nitrate contents in leaves of Pereskia aculeata subjected to nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina de Miranda Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering that nitrogen is directly related to leaf protein content, the nitrogen fertilization in Pereskia aculeata plants may affect the protein content and increase its nutritional potential. This study aimed at assessing the effect of nitrogen fertilization on mineral, protein and nitrate contents, as well as the yield of P. aculeata leaves. A randomized blocks design was used, with three replications and five treatments, consisting of increasing topdressing nitrogen doses (0-400 kg ha-1, in soil with organic matter content of 4.0 dag kg-1. Three harvests were performed for leaf analysis. No significant effect was observed for mineral and protein content or leaf fresh mass yield. The mean values for mineral composition were: 3.52 dag kg-1 of N, 0.47 dag kg-1 of P, 4.65 dag kg-1 of Ca, 0.71 dag kg-1 of Mg, 0.25 dag kg-1 of S, 36.64 mg kg-1 of Zn and 174.13 mg kg-1 of Fe. The mean content for protein was 21.86 % and the leaf fresh mass yield was 0.971 kg plant-1. K levels decreased from 50 kg ha-1 of N. Nitrate increased linearly with the nitrogen fertilization, reaching a maximum value of 78.2 mg kg-1 of fresh mass, well below the health risk threshold. It was concluded that a soil with high organic matter content does not require nitrogen fertilization. However, doses up to 400 kg ha-1 of nitrogen ensure adequate leaf yield and protein and mineral contents within the desired range for the species, being a food rich in proteins, iron and calcium.

  18. Photopyroelectric measurement of dry matter content in tomato puree concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neamtu, C.; Dadarlat, D.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    The photopyroelectric (PPE) method, in both front and back configuration, was used to measure the thermal effusivity and diffusivity of several tomato puree concentrates. These results were used to construct a calibration curve which was used at a later stage to determine dry matter content of

  19. Effect of nitrogen sources on in vitro fermentation profiles and microbial yield using equine caecal contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, A.S.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Martin-Rosset, W.; Cone, J.W.; Bessa, R.J.B.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different nitrogen and carbohydrate sources on in vitro fermentation profile and microbial yield of equine caecal contents was assessed. For this purpose, caecal contents were collected from 3 geldings, fed at maintenance level twice a day, and diluted with a buffer mineral solution

  20. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  1. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  2. Rumen ammonia concentrations, and non-ammonia nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-ammonia nitrogen (NAN) passage to the small intestine and disappearance of NAN in that organ have been studied in multi-cannulated sheep on pasture or fed indoors. Forages under investigation included a number of subtropical grasses, foggages and hay, temperate grasses, lucerne (Medicago sativa), triticale ...

  3. Effects of nitrogen source and concentration on biomass and oil production of a Scenedesmus rubescens like microalga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Lin, Junda

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of nitrogen source and concentration on the ash free dry biomass (AFDB) and oil accumulation and productivity of a Scenedesmusrubescens like alga cultivated in indoor photo-bioreactors and outdoor raceway ponds. Among the nitrogen sources ((NH4)2CO3, urea, NaNO3, urea and NaNO3 mixture), the algae fed with the mixture of urea-N and NaNO3-N had the highest AFDB productivity of 0.539±0.040 g/L/d and the content of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) (%) fed with (NH4)2CO3-N increased continuously for 17 days and reached 42.94±2.05% in the indoor photo-bioreactors. The content of C18 series (as % of total FAME) was high in all the treatments of nitrogen sources. The algae fed with (NH4)2CO3-N had the highest FAME productivity of 0.133 g/L/d (P<0.001). The effect of ammonia concentration on the AFDB and FAME productivity was also studied during the 20-day cultivation in the outdoor raceway cultivation system. The mean FAME of the algae cultivated in the ammonia concentration of 1.0-1.5 mg/L were the highest (0.556±0.112 g/m2/d) (P<0.001). The total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) in the algae and cultivation water decreased but the FAME content (%) of the algae increased during the nitrogen starvation phase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amino acid content in red wines obtained from grapevine nitrogen foliar treatments: consumption during the alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Portu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is an important element for grapevine and winemaking which affects the development of the plant and yeast, and therefore it is important for wine quality. The aim of this work was to study the influence of foliar application to vineyard of proline, phenylalanine and urea and two commercial nitrogen fertilizers, without and with amino acids in their formulation, on the wine amino acid content and their consumption during the alcoholic fermentation. The results showed that these treatments did not affect the amino acid composition in wines. The differences observed for certain amino acids were so small that the concentration of total amino acids was not significantly different among wines. Moreover, it was observed that the higher the content of amino acids in the medium, the greater their consumption during the alcoholic fermentation.

  5. Relative chlorophyll contents in the evaluation of the nutritional status of nitrogen from xaraes palisade grass and determination of critical nitrogen sufficiency index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Paulo Ramos Costa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status of xaraes palisade grass with SPAD chlorophyll meter and the critical nitrogen sufficiency index (cNSI in the dry and rainy seasons were assessed. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with four treatments (50, 100, 200 and 400 kg N ha-1, three replicates and two seasons: dry and rainy. All variables had a high nonlinear relationship with their predictors (p < 0.001. Total nitrogen (TN reached a plateau at doses 262.0 and 514.8 kg of N ha-1 and the concentration of TN in the plant was 1.88 and 1.93% respectively during the rainy and dry season. Relative chlorophyll content (RCC reached a plateau at 46.05 and 53.65 SPAD units in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. The production of dry matter (DM showed maximum response to nitrogen fertilization at 209.5 and 229.1 kg N ha-1 during the rainy and dry season respectively. The nitrogen sufficiency index (NSI reached the plateau at 0.85 and 0.99 in the rainy and dry season respectively. All variables showed high linear correlation (r = 0.71 to 0.99. The xaraés palisade grass’s cNSI is 0.85 and the chlorophyll meter may be used as a nutritional N management tool for the grass.

  6. Changes in the content of total nitrogen and mineral nitrogen in the basil herb depending on the cultivar and nitrogen nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dzida

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Among fundamental nutrients, nitrogen fertilization is considered one of the most effective factors affecting both the yield and the quality of plant material. Nitrogen form used for fertilizing is also of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of nitrogen nutrition (calcium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, and urea as well as (green, purple, and‘Fino Verde’ on the chemical composition and yielding of basil (Ocimum basilicumL.. After drying the plant material at a temperature of 60°C and milling, total nitrogen was determined by means of Kjeldahl method, while mineral nitrogen content (N-NH 4, N-NO 3 was analyzed in 2% acetic acid extract. Yield of fresh basil matter depended significantly on the variety grown. The highest yields were obtained from a cultivar of ‘Fino Verde’ fertilized with ammonium nitrate. The purple variety plants fertilized with urea were characterized by a largest amount of total nitrogen. The‘Fino Verde’cultivar fertilized with urea accumulated the least quantities of nitrates in the basil herb.

  7. Global patterns of foliar nitrogen isotopes and their relationships with climate, mycorrhizal fungi, foliar nutrient concentrations, and nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph M. Craine; Andrew J. Elmore; Marcos P. M. Aidar; Mercedes Bustamante; Todd E. Dawson; Erik A. Hobbie; Ansgar Kahmen; Michelle C. Mack; Kendra K. McLauchlan; Anders Michelsen; Gabriela . Nardoto; Linda H. Pardo; Josep Penuelas; Peter B. Reich; Edward A.G. Schuur; William D. Stock; Pamela H. Templer; Ross A. Virginia; Jeffrey M. Welker; Ian J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    Ratios of nitrogen (N) isotopes in leaves could elucidate underlying patterns of N cycling across ecological gradients. To better understand global-scale patterns of N cycling, we compiled data on foliar N isotope ratios, foliar N concentrations, mycorrhizal type and climate for over 11 000 plants worldwide. Global-scale comparisons of other components of the N cycle...

  8. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Trends in stream nitrogen concentrations for forested reference catchments across the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Argerich; S.L. Johnson; S.D. Sebestyen; C.C. Rhoades; E. Greathouse; J.D. Knoepp; M.B. Adams; G.E. Likens; J.L. Campbell; W.H. McDowell; F.N. Scatena; G.G. Ice

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether stream nitrogen concentrations in forested reference catchments have changed over time and if patterns were consistent across the USA, we synthesized up to 44 yr of data collected from 22 catchments at seven USDA Forest Service Experimental Forests. Trends in stream nitrogen presented high spatial variability both among catchments at a site and among...

  10. Growth response of four freshwater algal species to dissolved organic nitrogen of different concentration and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Graeber, Daniel; Badrian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    (DCAA), natural organic matter (NOM)) or with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Monocultures of Chlamydomonas spp., Cyclotella meneghiniana, Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena flos-aquae were incubated with dissolved nitrogen compounds at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mg N L−1, which...

  11. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  12. Auxiliary units for refining of high nitrogen content oils: Premium II refinery case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Paolo Contim; Pinotti, Rafael [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    PETROBRAS is constantly investing on its refining park in order to increase the production of clean and stable fuels and to be capable to process heavier oils with high contaminants content. Sulfur and nitrogen are the main heteroatoms present in petroleum. They are responsible for some undesirable fuels properties like corrosivity and instability, and also emit pollutants when burnt. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are designed to remove these contaminants and adjust other fuel properties, generating, as byproduct, sour gases and sour water streams rich in H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}, which are usually sent to Sour Water Treatment Units and Sulfur Recovery Units. The regeneration of the amine used for the light streams treatment, as fuel gas and LPG, also generates sour gas streams that must be also sent to Sulfur Recovery Units. As the ammonia content in the sour streams increases, some design parameters must be adjusted to avoid increasing the Refinery emissions. Sulfur Recovery Units must provide proper NH3 destruction. Sour Water Treatment must have a proper segregation between H{sub 2}S and ammonia streams, whenever desirable. Amine Regeneration Systems must have an efficient procedure to avoid the ammonia concentration in the amine solution. This paper presents some solutions usually applied to the Petroleum Industry and analyses some aspects related to Premium II Refinery Project and how its design will help the Brazilian refining park to meet future environmental regulation and market demands. (author)

  13. Concentrations and deposition of nitrogenous air pollutants in a ponderosa/Jeffrey pine canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Mark E. Fenn; Michael J. Arbaugh

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogenous (N) air pollutant concentrations and surface deposition of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) to branches of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws.) seedlings were measured on a vertical transect in a mature ponderosa/Jeffrey (...

  14. Water content and glycosaminoglycan disaccharide concentration of the canine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, J S; McLaughlin, R M; Griffith, G

    1998-02-01

    To determine the regional composition of water and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) disaccharides of the canine meniscus. 52 menisci from the stifle of dogs. Regional sections of each meniscus were weighed, dried, and reweighed to determine water content. Dried tissue specimens were subjected to enzymatic digestion. Analysis and quantification of disaccharide degradation products were performed, using high-performance liquid chromatography. Water content was approximately 65% in polar and central regions of the canine meniscus. Water content of the central region of the lateral meniscus was significantly higher than that of the medial meniscus (P = 0.0090). Chondroitinase digestion of canine meniscal tissue yielded detectable delta Di-HA, delta Di-4S, and delta Di-6S GAG disaccharides. Disaccharides specific to dermatan sulfate and chondroitin D or E sulfate were not detected. Concentrations of delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S were significantly greater in the lateral central region, compared with the medial central region (P = 0.0005 and 0.0002, respectively). Water content and delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S concentrations were significantly lower in the central region of the medial meniscus, compared with the central region of the lateral meniscus. Reduced tissue hydration of the medial central region may have been a direct result of its overall decrease in total GAG content. The ability to evaluate subtle differences in tissue GAG composition by analytical measurement of their constituent disaccharides may aid in the understanding of the complex material properties of the normal and diseased meniscus, which may be applied to the study of meniscal healing and biomechanics.

  15. Biogas production from water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nitrogen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Dilhani, Jayakodi A T; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports the biogas production from water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nitrogen concentrations of 1-fold [28 mg/L of total nitrogen (TN)], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold and plants harvested from a polluted water body. This study was carried out for a period of 4 months at ambient mesophilic temperatures of 30.3-31.3 degrees C using six 3-barreled batch-fed reactors with the innermost barrel (45 L) being used as the digester. There was no marked variation in the C/N ratios of the plants cultured under different nitrogen concentrations. The addition of fresh cow dung having a low C/N of 8 resulted in a significant reduction in the C/N ratios of the water hyacinth substrates. However, gas production commenced 3 days after charging the reactors and gas production rates peaked in 4-7 days. The volatile solids (VS) degradation and gas production patterns manifested that in conventional single-stage batch digesters acidogenesis and methanogenesis of water hyacinth requires a retention time of around 27-30 days and 27-51 days, respectively. Substrates in the f-1 digester (i.e., the digester containing plants grown under 28 TN mg/L) having the lowest VS content of 45.3 g/L with a highest C/N ratio of 16 showed fairly higher gas production rates consistently (10-27 days) with higher gas yields containing around 50-65% of CH4 (27-51 days). Moreover the highest overall VS (81.7%) removal efficiencies were reported from the f-1 digester. Fairly higher gas production rates and gas yields with fairly higher CH4 contents were also noticed from the f-2 digester containing substrates having a C/N of 14 and f-out digester (containing the plants harvested from the polluted water body) having the lowest C/N ratio of 9.7 with a fairly high VS content of 56 g/L. CH4 production was comparatively low in the f-1/8, f-1/4 and f-1/2 digesters having VS rich substrates with varying C/N ratios. We conclude that water hyacinth could be

  16. Nitrogen and sugar content variability in tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Sreten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several nutritive values for tubers of 114 Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus populations were evaluated during 2006. The used material is a part of wild sunflower species collection at the Institute of field and vegetable crops and it is situated in Rimski Šancevi, Novi Sad. The samples were analyzed as fresh tubers on 'Venema' automatic laboratory for alpha amino nitrogen, sodium and potassium content. Total sugar content was determined as the brix value on a refractometer. Total nitrogen was determined by the Kjeldahl method on dried samples. Significant variability was found for all analyzed traits. Total nitrogen varied from 0,695 to 2,179% dry weight (mean 1,23%, alpha amino nitrogen content 0,012 to 0,118% fresh weight (m. 0,07%, potassium 0,231 0,452% fresh weight (m. 0,403% and sodium 0,0003 - 0,0143% fresh weight (m. 0,007%. Total sugar content varied from 13,69 - 22,94% fresh weight (m. 19,14%. Alpha amino nitrogen is an essential nutrient for animals so that it's presence in tubers of Jerusalem artichoke as food is positive. The protein content is similar to the one in potato and as such satisfactory for nutrition. The K/Na ratio is high which is useful, because an increased content of potassium in food can positively affect the reduction of Na/K ratio and lower systolic blood pressure by a significant amount in adults with mild hypertension. Inulin makes up to 80% of the total sugar content in the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke, and as a dietary fiber and a fructose polymer it positively influences digestion and sugar blood levels. The obtained results suggest that selection of cultivars and populations with inappropriate nutritive values is possible. Further research is needed to estimate the share of genetic in total variability and to determine whether the selection for new cultivars is justified.

  17. Low light intensity and nitrogen starvation modulate the chlorophyll content of Scenedesmus dimorphus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V S; Pinto, R F; Sant'Anna, C

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment found in plants and algal organisms and is a bioproduct with human health benefits and a great potential for use in the food industry. The chlorophyll content in microalgae strains varies in response to environmental factors. In this work, we assessed the effect of nitrogen depletion and low light intensity on the chlorophyll content of the Scenedesmus dimorphus microalga. The growth of S. dimorphus under low light intensity led to a reduction in cell growth and volume as well as increased cellular chlorophyll content. Nitrogen starvation led to a reduction in cell growth and the chlorophyll content, changes in the yield and productivity of chlorophylls a and b. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural changes in the S. dimorphus exposed to nitrogen and light deficiency. In contrast to nitrogen depletion, low light availability was an effective mean for increasing the total chlorophyll content of green microalga S. dimorphus. The findings acquired in this work are of great biotechnological importance to extend knowledge of choosing the right culture condition to stimulate the effectiveness of microalgae strains for chlorophyll production purposes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Influence of carbon dioxide content in the biogas to nitrogen oxides emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Marija A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are an alternative solution for the fossil fuel shortage. Usually this kind of fuels is called low calorific value fuels, due to the large proportion of inert components in their composition. The most common is carbon dioxide, and its proportion in biogas can be different, from 10 up to 40%, or even more. The presence of inert component in the composition of biogas causes the problems that are related with flame blow off limits. One of the possibilities for efficient combustion of biogas is the combustion in swirling flow including a pilot burner, aimed to expand the borders of stable combustion. This paper presents an analysis of the influence of the carbon dioxide content to the nitrogen oxides emissions. Laboratory biogas was used with different content of CO2 (10, 20, 30 and 40%. Investigation was carried out for different nominal powers, coefficients of excess air and carbon dioxide content. With increasing content of carbon dioxide, emission of nitrogen oxides was reduced, and this trend was the same throughout the whole range of excess air, carried out through measurements. Still, the influence of carbon dioxide content is significantly less than the influence of excess air. The coefficient of excess air greatly affects the production of radicals which are essential for the formation of nitrogen oxides, O, OH and CH. Also, the results show that the nominal power has no impact on the emission of nitrogen oxides.

  19. Evaluation of radiative transfer models for estimation of foliar nitrogen content at leaf and canopy level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Skidmore, A. K.; Wang, T.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Hearne, J.

    2016-12-01

    Foliar nitrogen is often a limiting factor for plant growth, and is a primary regulator of physiological processes such as photosynthesis, leaf respiration, and transpiration. Foliar nitrogen has been recently proposed as one of the key ecosystem biodiversity variables. Estimation of foliar nitrogen using hyperspectral data will further improve our understanding of the photosynthetic process and net primary productivity and will be beneficial to the assessment of biodiversity, ecosystem services and carbon sequestration. Empirical approaches have dominated the retrieval of nitrogen using hyperspectral data; physically based approaches using radiative transfer models remain elusive. This study aimed to evaluate radiative transfer models for estimating foliar nitrogen at the leaf and canopy level. A leaf-level optical properties model PROSPECT-5 was first recalibrated, and then linked with a canopy reflectance model for canopy level analysis. Our results confirmed the feasibility of retrieving foliar nitrogen from fresh leaf spectra by inversion of the recalibrated PROSPECT-5. Moderate accuracies were obtained for the previously published LOPEX agricultural data set (R2 = 0.47, NRMSE = 0.17) and a Bavarian forest data set (R2 = 0.49, NRMSE = 0.20). At the canopy level, foliar nitrogen content was estimated with a lower accuracy (R2 = 0.38, NRMSE = 0.20) when using canopy spectra extracted from airborne hyperspectral imagery.

  20. Farmer driven national monitoring of nitrogen concentrations in drainage water in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piil, Kristoffer; Lemming, Camilla; Kolind Hvid, Søren; Knudsen, Leif

    2014-05-01

    Field drains are often considered to short circuit the hydrological cycle in agricultural catchments and lead to an increased risk of nitrogen loss to the environment. Because of increased regulation of agricultural practices due to catchment management plans, resulting from the implementation of the water frame directive, Danish farmers pushed for a large scale monitoring of nitrogen loss from field drains. Therefore, the knowledge centre for agriculture, Denmark, organized a three year campaign where farmers and local agricultural advisory centres collected water samples from field drains three to five times during the winter season. Samples were analysed for nitrate and total nitrogen. Combined, more than 600 drains were monitored over the three years. During the first two years of monitoring, average winter concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.1 mg N L-1 to 31.1 mg N L-1, and the fraction of total nitrogen present as nitrate ranged from 0% to 100%. This variation is much larger than what is observed in the Danish national monitoring and assessment programme, which monitors only a few drains in selected catchments. Statistical analysis revealed that drainage water nitrogen concentrations were significantly correlated to the cropping system and the landscape type (high ground/lowlands/raised seabed) in which the monitored fields were situated. The average total nitrogen concentration was more than 2 mg N L-1 lower on raised seabed than on high ground, and the average fraction of total nitrogen present as nitrate was more than 20% lower. This indicates that substantial nitrate reduction occurs at or above the drain depth on raised sea flats, in particular in the north of Denmark. This inherent nitrogen retention on raised seabed is not taken into account in the current environmental regulation, nor in the first generation catchment management plans. The monitoring program demonstrated large variation in nitrogen concentrations in drainage water, in

  1. [Inversion of the lake total nitrogen concentration by multiple regression kriging model based on hyperspectral data of HJ-1A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bang-long; Yi, Wei-ning; Wang, Xian-hua; Qin, Hui-ping; Wang, Jia-cheng; Qiao, Yan-li

    2011-07-01

    The content of total nitrogen in the waters is an important index to measure lake water quality, and the technique of remote sensing plays a large role in quantitatively monitoring the dynamic change and timely grasping the status of lake pollution. Taking Chaohu as an example, quantitative inversion models of total nitrogen were established by multivariable regression Kriging under analyzing of an correlation between total nitrogen and chlorophyll-a or suspended solids by HIS hyperspectral remote sensing data of HJ-1A satellite. The result shows that the correlation of 0.76 was discovered between total nitrogen and the multiple combination with band 72, band 79 and band 97, while the correlation could be increased to 0.83 by applying combined model of multiple linear regression and ordinary Kriging. The optimization of the residuals of the conventional regression model can improve the accuracy of the inversion effectively. These results also provide useful exploration for further establishing a common model of quantitative inversion of lake total nitrogen concentration.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen contents in Desert Plants and Soil in the Yanqi basin of Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are two main elements in plant-soil systems. Here, we present a study of carbon and nitrogen contents in several typical desert plants and underlying soil, which was conducted in Yanqi basin, Xinjiang province of China. Our results show that carbon (C) content is around 30% in both aboveground tissues and belowground roots. Nitrogen (N) content in desert plants has a range of 0.5%-3.5%, and the aboveground tissue has higher nitrogen content (~2%) than the belowground root (~1%). As a result, the belowground root has higher C/N ratio (~35) than the aboveground tissue (~25). Especially, the C/N values in belowground roots are twice as much as their aboveground tissues in Acroption repens, Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb. and Halostachys caspica. In desert soils, the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) with depth 0-50cm are range of 12.5-4.6 and 3.2-1.4 g/kg, respectively, different . As expected, the SOC and TN contents are declined with the depth increase. Meanwhile, our result indicated the soil TN is followed the SOC dynamic, as both elements are bond into the organic compounds. However, unlike the C/N ratios in aboveground tissue and roots, there is no significant difference of C/N ratios (2.95-3.46) in the soils within the 0-50 cm depth. The results inferred that in the desert plant C mainly storage in roots, but the C, N allocation between desert plant and soil has no significantly related.

  3. Nitrogen Fertilizer Factory Effects on the Amino Acid and Nitrogen Content in the Needles of Scots Pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenija Kupsinskiene

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to evaluate the content of amino acids in the needles of Pinus sylvestris growing in the area affected by a nitrogen fertilizer factory and to compare them with other parameters of needles, trees, and sites. Three young-age stands of Scots pine were selected at a distance of 0.5 km, 5 km, and 17 km from the factory. Examination of the current-year needles in winter of the year 2000 revealed significant (p

  4. Cow and herd variation in milk urea nitrogen concentrations in lactating dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Hanigan, M D; Tucker, H A; Jones, B L; Garbade, S K; McGilliard, M L; Stallings, C C; Knowlton, K F; James, R E

    2012-12-01

    Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) is correlated with N balance, N intake, and dietary N content, and thus is a good indicator of proper feeding management with respect to protein. It is commonly used to monitor feeding programs to achieve environmental goals; however, genetic diversity also exists among cows. It was hypothesized that phenotypic diversity among cows could bias feed management decisions when monitoring tools do not consider genetic diversity associated with MUN. The objective of the work was to evaluate the effect of cow and herd variation on MUN. Data from 2 previously published research trials and a field trial were subjected to multivariate regression analyses using a mixed model. Analyses of the research trial data showed that MUN concentrations could be predicted equally well from diet composition, milk yield, and milk components regardless of whether dry matter intake was included in the regression model. This indicated that cow and herd variation could be accurately estimated from field trial data when feed intake was not known. Milk urea N was correlated with dietary protein and neutral detergent fiber content, milk yield, milk protein content, and days in milk for both data sets. Cow was a highly significant determinant of MUN regardless of the data set used, and herd trended to significance for the field trial data. When all other variables were held constant, a percentage unit change in dietary protein concentration resulted in a 1.1mg/dL change in MUN. Least squares means estimates of MUN concentrations across herds ranged from a low of 13.6 mg/dL to a high of 17.3 mg/dL. If the observed MUN for the high herd were caused solely by high crude protein feeding, then the herd would have to reduce dietary protein to a concentration of 12.8% of dry matter to achieve a MUN concentration of 12 mg/dL, likely resulting in lost milk production. If the observed phenotypic variation is due to genetic differences among cows, genetic choices could result in

  5. Biomass, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of leaves of two chili pepper varieties (Capsicum annum in different fertilization treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUTARNO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Suharja, Sutarno. 2009. Biomass, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of leaves of two chili pepper varieties (Capsicum annum in different fertilization treatments. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 9-16. This study aims to determine the influence of various fertilization treatments on biomass, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of leaves from two varieties of chili, Sakti (large chili and Fantastic (curly chili. The study was conducted in the village of Gatak, Karangnongko sub-district, Klaten District, Central Java in September 2006 to March 2007. The study used a complete block design with two factorial of chili varieties and fertilizer treatment. Fertilization treatments includes no fertilizer (control (P1; manure 2 kg/plant (P2, manure (1 kg/plant + chemical fertilizer (ZA, SP-36, KCl = 2: 1: 1 + NPK (P3; and manure (1 kg/plant + chemical fertilizer (SP-36: KCl = 1:1 + liquid organic fertilizer (P4. Chlorophyll content was measured refers to Harborne (1987, whereas leaf nitrogen concentration was measured with Kjeldahl method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by DMRT. The results showed that on the Fantastic chili fertilizer treatment affected the biomass and chlorophyll a, but gave no effect on chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll and leaf nitrogen. On the curly chili fertilizer treatment effected plant fresh weight, chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll, but gave no effect on dry weight, fresh fruit weight, chlorophyll b and leaf nitrogen. It is, therefore, recommended to use the formulation of manure + chemical fertilizer (SP-36: KCl = 1: 1 + liquid organic fertilizer in the cultivation of chili.Key words: biomass, chlorophyll, leaf nitrogen, chili, Capsicum annum, fertilizing.Abstrak. Suharja, Sutarno. 2009. Biomassa, kandungan klorofil dan nitrogen daun dua varietas cabai (Capsicum annum pada berbagai perlakuan pemupukan. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 9-16. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh berbagai perlakuan pemupukan terhadap biomassa

  6. Effects of stepwise nitrogen depletion on carotenoid content, fluorescence parameters and the cellular stoichiometry of Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Li, Zhe; Lu, Lunhui; Xiao, Yan; Liu, Jing; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang

    2017-06-01

    Stressful conditions can stimulate the accumulation of carotenoids in some microalgae. To obtain more knowledge of the stress response, we studied the effects of different N concentrations on unicellular content of carotenoids using Raman spectroscopic technique; cellular stoichiometric changes and the fluorescence parameters of Chlorella vulgaris were concomitantly studied. Initially, we optimized the Raman scattering conditions and demonstrated the feasibility of unicellular carotenoid analysis by Raman spectroscopic technique. The results showed that an integration time of 10 s, laser power at 0.1 mW and an accumulation time of 1 were the optimum conditions, and the peak height at 1523 cm- 1 scaled linearly with the carotenoid content in the range of 0.625-1440 mg/L with a recovery rate of 97% 103%. In the experiment, seven different nitrogen levels ranging from 0 to 2.48 × 105 μg/L were imposed. Samples were taken at the start, exponential phase and end of the experiment. The results showed that nitrogen stress can facilitate the synthesis of carotenoids, while at the same time, excessive nitrogen stress led to lower proliferative and photosynthetic activity. Compared with carotenoids, chlorophylls were more sensitive to nitrogen stress; it declined dramatically as stress processed. There existed no significant differences for Fv/Fm among different nitrogen levels during the exponential phase, while in the end, it declined and a significant difference appeared between cells in 2.48 × 105 μg/L N and other experimental levels. Photosynthetic efficiency, namely the C/N mole ratio in algal cells, didnot significantly change during the exponential phase; however, apparent increases ultimately occurred, except for the stable C/N in BG11 medium. This increase matched well with the carotenoid decline, indicating that an increasing cellular C/N mole ratio can be used as an indicator of excessive stress in carotenoid production. Besides, there also existed an inverse

  7. Simultaneous effect of nitrate (NO3- concentration, carbon dioxide (CO2 supply and nitrogen limitation on biomass, lipids, carbohydrates and proteins accumulation in Nannochloropsis oculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Millán-Oropeza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel from microalgae is a promising technology. Nutrient limitation and the addition of CO2 are two strategies to increase lipid content in microalgae. There are two different types of nitrogen limitation, progressive and abrupt limitation. In this work, the simultaneous effect of initial nitrate concentration, addition of CO2, and nitrogen limitation on biomass, lipid, protein and carbohydrates accumulation were analyzed. An experimental design was established in which initial nitrogen concentration, culture time and CO2 aeration as independent numerical variables with three levels were considered. Nitrogen limitation was taken into account as a categorical independent variable. For the experimental design, all the experiments were performed with progressive nitrogen limitation. The dependent response variables were biomass, lipid production, carbohydrates and proteins. Subsequently, comparison of both types of limitation i.e. progressive and abrupt limitation, was performed. Nitrogen limitation in a progressive mode exerted a greater effect on lipid accumulation. Culture time, nitrogen limitation and the interaction of initial nitrate concentration with nitrogen limitation had higher influences on lipids and biomass production. The highest lipid production and productivity were at 582 mgL-1 (49.7 % lipid, dry weight basis and 41.5 mgL-1d-1, respectively; under the following conditions: 250 mgL-1 of initial nitrate concentration, CO2 supply of 4% (v/v, 12 d of culturing and 2 d in state of nitrogen starvation induced by progressive limitation. This work presents a novel way to perform simultaneous analysis of the effect of the initial concentration of nitrate, nitrogen limitation, and CO2 supply on growth and lipid production of Nannochloropsis oculata, with the aim to produce potential biofuels feedstock.

  8. Characterization of the growth, chlorophyll content and lipid accumulation in a marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta under different nitrogen to phosphorus ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donghui; Xi, Bo; Sun, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Microalgal lipids are regarded as main future feedstock of biofuels for its higher efficiency of accumulation and sustainable production. In order to investigate the effect of various nitrogen to phosphorus ratios on cells growth, chlorophyll content and accumulation of lipids in Dunaliella tertiolecta, experiments were carried out in modified microalgal medium with inorganic nitrogen (nitrate-nitrogen) or organic nitrogen (urea-nitrogen) as the sole nitrogen source at initial N:P ratios ranging from 1:1 to 32:1. The favorable N:P of 16:1 in the nitrate-N or urea-N medium yielded the maximum cell density and specific growth rate. Decrease in chlorophyll content were observed at the N:P of 4:1 in both nitrate-N and urea-N cultures. It was also observed that the maximum lipids concentration was obtained at the N:P of 4:1 in both nitrate and urea nutrient medium. The lipid productivity and lipid content of cultures in the urea-N medium at the N:P of 4:1were markedly higher than those from cultures with other N:P ratios ( p < 0.05). The results of this work illustrate the possibility that higher ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus have enhancing effect on cells growth of D. tertiolecta. Conversely, higher lipid accumulation is associated with a decrease in chlorophyll content under lower ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus. The results confirm the hypothesis of this study that a larger metabolic flux has been channeled to lipid accumulation in D. tertiolecta cells when the ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus drop below a critical level.

  9. role of potassium and nitrogen on sugar concentration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugar is obtained from root of su gar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in addition to other sources. Three important economic parameters are often considered and these are root yield, sugar concentration in root juice and total sugar"yield. All the three are affected by cropping period and use of fertilisers. Existingliterature suggests the ...

  10. Dynamics of the nitrogen content in aboveground phytomass on the turf after fertilization of different forms of fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter HRIC

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to find out dynamics of the nitrogen (N content in aboveground phytomass on the turf after fertilization of different forms of fertilizers under non–irrigated conditions. The experiment was carried out in warm and dry conditions in the area of Nitra (Slovak Republic. There were included 7 treatments: 1. Without fertilization, 2. Saltpetre with dolomite, Superphosphate, Potassium salt, 3. Turf fertilizer 15–3–8 (+ 3MgO + 0.8Fe + 18S, 4. Slow release fertilizer SRF NPK 14–5–14 (+ 4CaO + 4MgO + 7S, 5. Controlled release fertilizer Duslocote NPK (S 13-9-18 (+ 6S, 6. Organic fertilizer Condit (5-1-1 and 7. Organic fertilizer Veget (3-2-1. In the begging of the seasons fertilizing by controlled release fertilizer Duslocote NPK (S 13-9-18 (+ 6S had a slow onset of action. The opposite trend had use of organic fertilizer Condit (5-1-1 on nitrogen content in aboveground turf phytomass. The nitrogen concentration was statistically higher in variants fertilized with inorganic fertilizer and organic fertilizer Condit (5-1-1 (33,727 mg*kg-1 – 36,737 mg*kg-1 as a non-fertilized turf (28,446 mg*kg-1. Higher nitrogen content in aboveground phytomass was after application of organic fertilizer Condit (5-1-1 into the turf in comparison with fertilization inorganic fertilizers.

  11. Fuel-N Evolution during the Pyrolysis of Industrial Biomass Wastes with High Nitrogen Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshikawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, sewage sludge and mycelial waste from antibiotic production were pyrolyzed in a batch scale fixed-bed reactor as examples of two kinds of typical industrial biomass wastes with high nitrogen content. A series of experiments were conducted on the rapid pyrolysis and the slow pyrolysis of these wastes in the temperature range from 500–800 °C to investigate the Fuel-N transformation behavior among pyrolysis products. The results showed that Fuel-N conversion to Char-N intimately depended on the pyrolysis temperature and the yield of Char-N reduced with the increase of the pyrolysis temperature. Under the same pyrolysis conditions, Tar-N production mainly depended on complex properties of the different biomasses, including volatile matter, nitrogen content and biomass functional groups. HCN was the predominant NOx precursor in the rapid pyrolysis of biomass, whereas in the slow pyrolysis of mycelial waste, more NH3 was produced than HCN due to the additional NH3 formation through the hydrogenation reaction of Char-N, HCN and H radicals. At the same time, some part of the char was analyzed by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to get more information on the nitrogen functionality changes and the tar was also characterized by Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GCMS to identify typical nitrogenous tar compounds. Finally, the whole nitrogen distribution in products was discussed.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EUROPEAN CORN BORER FEEDING ACTIVITY AND NITROGEN LEAF CONTENT UNDER DIFFERENT AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Sarajlić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most destructive maize pest in Croatia is European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (ECB. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of irrigation, nitrogen fertilization, different maize genotypes and nitrogen leaf content on ECB feeding activity. The experiment was set up in Osijek, Croatia under field conditions during 2012-2013 vegetation season. Experiment treatments were as follows: three irrigation levels (A1 - control, A2 from 60% to 80% field water capacity - FWC and A3 from 80% to100% FWC, three nitrogen fertilizer levels (B1 - 0, B2 - 100 and B3 - 200 kg N/ha and four different genotypes (C1 - OSSK 596; C2 - OSSK 617; C3 - OSSK 602 and C4 - OSSK 552. Ear weight, number of larvae in stem and shank, tunnel length and nitrogen leaf content were evaluated. Genotype C1 was the most susceptible for following the tested variables of ECB feeding: tunnel length (TL, larvae in stalk (LS and total number of larvae (TNL at P<0.05 probability level. By raising the level of irrigation, European corn borer feeding activity was reduced while by raising the level of nitrogen fertilization feeding activity was increased. These results suggest that good production practices can significantly affect the susceptibility of maize to European corn borer.

  13. A one-step carbonization route towards nitrogen-doped porous carbon hollow spheres with ultrahigh nitrogen content for CO 2 adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nitrogen doped porous carbon hollow spheres (N-PCHSs) with an ultrahigh nitrogen content of 15.9 wt% and a high surface area of 775 m2 g-1 were prepared using Melamine-formaldehyde nanospheres as hard templates and nitrogen sources. The N-PCHSs were completely characterized and were found to exhibit considerable CO2 adsorption performance (4.42 mmol g-1).

  14. Nitrogen Fertilizer Replacement Value of Concentrated Liquid Fraction of Separated Pig Slurry Applied to Grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, Van J.C.; Holshof, G.

    2017-01-01

    Seven grassland experiments on sandy and clay soils were performed during a period of 4 years to estimate the nitrogen (N) fertilizer replacement value (NFRV) of concentrated liquid fractions of separated pig slurry (mineral concentrate: MC). The risk of nitrate leaching when applying MC was

  15. Low-to-moderate nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations accelerate microbially driven litter breakdown rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Kominoski; Amy D. Rosemond; Jonathan P. Benstead; Vladislav Gulis; John C. Maerz; David Manning

    2015-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) processing is an important driver of aquatic ecosystem productivity that is sensitive to nutrient enrichment and drives ecosystem carbon (C) loss. Although studies of single concentrations of nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) have shown effects at relatively low concentrations, responses of litter breakdown rates along gradients of low-to-...

  16. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to different nitrogen concentrations during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Ferreira, A; del Olmo, M; García-Martínez, J; Jiménez-Martí, E; Mendes-Faia, A; Pérez-Ortín, J E; Leão, C

    2007-05-01

    Gene expression profiles of a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC4072 were monitored during alcoholic fermentations with three different nitrogen supplies: (i) control fermentation (with enough nitrogen to complete sugar fermentation), (ii) nitrogen-limiting fermentation, and (iii) the addition of nitrogen to the nitrogen-limiting fermentation (refed fermentation). Approximately 70% of the yeast transcriptome was altered in at least one of the fermentation stages studied, revealing the continuous adjustment of yeast cells to stressful conditions. Nitrogen concentration had a decisive effect on gene expression during fermentation. The largest changes in transcription profiles were observed when the early time points of the N-limiting and control fermentations were compared. Despite the high levels of glucose present in the media, the early responses of yeast cells to low nitrogen were characterized by the induction of genes involved in oxidative glucose metabolism, including a significant number of mitochondrial associated genes resembling the yeast cell response to glucose starvation. As the N-limiting fermentation progressed, a general downregulation of genes associated with catabolism was observed. Surprisingly, genes encoding ribosomal proteins and involved in ribosome biogenesis showed a slight increase during N starvation; besides, genes that comprise the RiBi regulon behaved distinctively under the different experimental conditions. Here, for the first time, the global response of nitrogen-depleted cells to nitrogen addition under enological conditions is described. An important gene expression reprogramming occurred after nitrogen addition; this reprogramming affected genes involved in glycolysis, thiamine metabolism, and energy pathways, which enabled the yeast strain to overcome the previous nitrogen starvation stress and restart alcoholic fermentation.

  17. Aporphine alkaloid contents increase with moderate nitrogen supply in Annona diversifolia Saff. (Annonaceae) seedlings during diurnal periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Castillo, José Agustín; Cruz-Ortega, Rocío; Martinez-Vázquez, Mariano; González-Esquinca, Alma Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Aporphine alkaloids are secondary metabolites that are obtained in low levels from species of the Annonaceae family. Nitrogen addition may increase the alkaloid content in plants. However, previous studies published did not consider that nitrogen could change the alkaloid content throughout the day. We conducted this short-term study to determine the effects of nitrogen applied throughout the diurnal period on the aporphine alkaloids via measurements conducted on the roots, stems and leaves of Annona diversifolia seedlings. The 60-day-old seedlings were cultured with the addition of three levels of nitrogen (0, 30 and 60 mM), and alkaloid extracts were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The highest total alkaloid content was measured in the treatment with moderate nitrogen supply. Further, the levels of aporphine alkaloids changed significantly in the first few hours of the diurnal period. We conclude that aporphine alkaloid content increased with moderate nitrogen supply and exhibited diurnal variation.

  18. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... conclusion is that GERG-water must be used with caution outside its specified working range. For some selected natural gas mixtures the two models also perform very much alike. The water content of the mixtures decreases with increasing amount of heavier components, and it seems that both models slightly...

  19. ASSESS CONCENTRATIONS OF THE FORMS OF NITROGEN IN URBANIZED CATCHMENT FOR EXAMPLE OLIWA STREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Matej-Łukowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the results of nitrogen compounds (NH4, NO2-, NO3- in water samples collected at six locations (sampling points at the Oliwa Stream will be presented. The study was carried out in 2016-2017, analyzing the changes caused by rainfall in the urban catchment. After the spring rain the concentration of ammonia nitrogen is considerably higher than in autumn. The results were compared with the Regulation of the Minister of the Environment, which describes two main classes of water purity. In addition, the article describes the results of the nitrogen compounds after the rainfall of 15th July 2016 will be presented.

  20. Novel Approach for Estimating Nitrogen Content in Paddy Fields Using Low Altitude Remote Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberioon, M. M.; Gholizadeh, A.

    2016-06-01

    Concerns over the use of nitrogen have been increasing due to the high cost of fertilizers and environmental pollutions caused by excess nitrogen application in agricultural fields. Several methods are available to assess the amount of nitrogen in crops, however, they are expensive, time-consuming, inaccurate, and/or require specialists to operate the tools. Researcher recently suggested remote sensing and specifically Low Altitude Remote Sensing (LARS) system of chlorophyll content in crop canopies as a low-cost alternative to estimate plant nitrogen status. The main objective of this study was to develop and test a new Vegetation Index (VI) to determine the status of nitrogen and chlorophyll content in rice leaf by analysing and considering all Visible (Vis) bands. Besides, capability of introduced VI has compared with all known VIs in both Vis and Near Infrared (NIR) bands in canopy scale. To develop the VI, images from 6-pannel leaf colour chart were acquired using Basler Scout scA640-70fc under light-emitting diode lighting, in which principal component analysis was used to retain the lower order principal component to develop a new index called IPCA. A conventional digital camera mounted to an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was also used to acquire images over the rice canopy in Vis bands. Simultaneously, Tetracam agriculture digital camera was employed to acquire rice canopy image in Vis-NIR bands. The results indicated that the proposed index at canopy (r = 0.78) scale could be used as a sensor to determine the status of chlorophyll content consequently for monitoring nitrogen in rice plant through different growth stages. Moreover, results confirmed that a lowcost LARS system would be suited for high spatial and temporal resolution images and data analysis for proper assessment of key nutrients in crop farming in a fast, inexpensive and non-destructive way.

  1. NOVEL APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING NITROGEN CONTENT IN PADDY FIELDS USING LOW ALTITUDE REMOTE SENSING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Saberioon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns over the use of nitrogen have been increasing due to the high cost of fertilizers and environmental pollutions caused by excess nitrogen application in agricultural fields. Several methods are available to assess the amount of nitrogen in crops, however, they are expensive, time-consuming, inaccurate, and/or require specialists to operate the tools. Researcher recently suggested remote sensing and specifically Low Altitude Remote Sensing (LARS system of chlorophyll content in crop canopies as a low-cost alternative to estimate plant nitrogen status. The main objective of this study was to develop and test a new Vegetation Index (VI to determine the status of nitrogen and chlorophyll content in rice leaf by analysing and considering all Visible (Vis bands. Besides, capability of introduced VI has compared with all known VIs in both Vis and Near Infrared (NIR bands in canopy scale. To develop the VI, images from 6-pannel leaf colour chart were acquired using Basler Scout scA640-70fc under light-emitting diode lighting, in which principal component analysis was used to retain the lower order principal component to develop a new index called IPCA. A conventional digital camera mounted to an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV was also used to acquire images over the rice canopy in Vis bands. Simultaneously, Tetracam agriculture digital camera was employed to acquire rice canopy image in Vis-NIR bands. The results indicated that the proposed index at canopy (r = 0.78 scale could be used as a sensor to determine the status of chlorophyll content consequently for monitoring nitrogen in rice plant through different growth stages. Moreover, results confirmed that a lowcost LARS system would be suited for high spatial and temporal resolution images and data analysis for proper assessment of key nutrients in crop farming in a fast, inexpensive and non-destructive way.

  2. Effect of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Sources on Soil Chemical Properties and Elements Concentration in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. i Yadav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil fertility management is a key factor in achieving sustainable agriculture. Use of organic fertilizers is one of the methods that without environmental harmful effects with improvement of chemical and biological conditions increases soil fertility. Nitroxin contains a collection of the best strains of nitrogen fixation bacteria of the genus Azospirillum and Azotobacter. These bacteria through atmospheric nitrogen fixation and the balance of macro and microelements needed for plant uptake, stimulate the growth and development of roots and aerial parts of the plant. Phosphate Barvar2 is another bio-fertilizer which contains set of phosphate solubilizing bacteria of different genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas that can change soil insoluble phosphorus into available forms for plants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate some chemical properties of soil and nutrient concentrations in leaves and seeds of sunflower under the influence of chemical and biological form of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers to reduce the use of chemical inputs and to improve quality traits in sunflower. Material and Methods :The experiment was carried out in a split factorial based on RCBD with three replications in a field in Eivanegharb (Ilam province in summer of 2011. The main plot included four levels of phosphorus and nitrogen chemical fertilizer (0, 33, 66 and 100% of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer requirements and subplot included factorial of Nitroxin bio-fertilizer application with two levels (inoculation and non inoculation and Phosphate Barvare2 bio fertilizer with two levels (inoculation and non inoculation. Each plot consisted of 5 rows at a distance of 60 cm and a length of 6 m and 20 cm plant spacing. At the time of flowering, leaves were harvested for measurement of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, zinc and manganese. After harvesting, the amount of total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and pH of the soil and the concentrations

  3. Effects of Nitrogen Nutrition and Salinity Stress on 1000-Grain Weight, Mucilage Content and Nutrient Uptake in Psyllium (Plantago ovata F.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heidari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of salinity stress and three nitrogen fertilizers on some traits of psyllium (Plantago ovata plants, a factorial experiment, as completely randomized design with three replications, was carried out at University of Zabol, in 2010. Salinity at three levels (0, 100 and 200 mM sodium chloride was the main plot and three forms of nitrogen source (nitrate from calcium nitrate, ammonium from ammonium sulfate, and ammonium + nitrate (50: 50 were the sub-plot. Seeds were sown in pots containing clean sand. After germination, plants nutrition was by application of Hoagland solution, which was prepared according to the nitrogen treatments. Salinity stress was started at 2-leaf stage. Results showed that salinity significantly affected 1000-grain weight, spike length, mucilage content of grains, and swelling index of psyllium grains. By increasing salinity level, the spike length and 1000-grain weight were decreased 21.5% and 27.3%, respectively. Among the four mentioned traits, interaction of salinity and nitrogen treatment significantly affected only the spike length. Maximum spike length was obtained in non-saline treatment and ammonium fertilizer. Salinity stress increased the sodium and chlorine ions and decreased the potassium content in shoots. Nitrogen source and interaction between salinity and nitrogen significantly affected the content of these elements in plants. The highest concentration of sodium and potassium was obtained in 200 mM sodium chloride and non-saline treatments (control, respectively, along with application of ammonium fertilizer.

  4. Reducing the CP content in broiler feeds: impact on animal performance, meat quality and nitrogen utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, P; Méda, B; Lambert, W; Corrent, E; Juin, H; Lessire, M; Tesseraud, S

    2017-11-01

    Reducing the dietary CP content is an efficient way to limit nitrogen excretion in broilers but, as reported in the literature, it often reduces performance, probably because of an inadequate provision in amino acids (AA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decreasing the CP content in the diet on animal performance, meat quality and nitrogen utilization in growing-finishing broilers using an optimized dietary AA profile based on the ideal protein concept. Two experiments (1 and 2) were performed using 1-day-old PM3 Ross male broilers (1520 and 912 for experiments 1 and 2, respectively) using the minimum AA:Lys ratios proposed by Mack et al. with modifications for Thr and Arg. The digestible Thr (dThr): dLys ratio was increased from 63% to 68% and the dArg:dLys ratio was decreased from 112% to 108%. In experiment 1, the reduction of dietary CP from 19% to 15% (five treatments) did not alter feed intake or BW, but the feed conversion ratio was increased for the 16% and 15% CP diets (+2.4% and +3.6%, respectively), while in experiment 2 (three treatments: 19%, 17.5% and 16% CP) there was no effect of dietary CP on performance. In both experiments, dietary CP content did not affect breast meat yield. However, abdominal fat content (expressed as a percentage of BW) was increased by the decrease in CP content (up to +0.5 and +0.2 percentage point, in experiments 1 and 2, respectively). In experiment 2, meat quality traits responded to dietary CP content with a higher ultimate pH and lower lightness and drip loss values for the low CP diets. Nitrogen retention efficiency increased when reducing CP content in both experiments (+3.5 points/CP percentage point). The main consequence of this higher efficiency was a decrease in nitrogen excretion (-2.5 g N/kg BW gain) and volatilization (expressed as a percentage of excretion: -5 points/CP percentage point). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that with an adapted AA profile, it is possible to reduce

  5. [Effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration enhancement and nitrogen application rate on wheat grain yield and quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; Shi, Zu-liang; Cai, Jian; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Wei-xing; Dai, Ting-bo

    2011-04-01

    FACE platform was applied to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on wheat grain yield and quality under two nitrogen (N) application rates. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and applying N increased the grain yield, spike number, grain number per spike, and biomass significantly, but elevated CO2 concentration had no significant effects on harvest index (HI). Under elevated CO2 concentration, there was a significant decrease in the protein, gliadin, gluteinin, and glutein contents of the grain and the sedimentation value of the flour, and a significant increase in the starch and its components contents of the grain; under N application, an inverse was observed. The dough stability time and the dough viscosity characteristics, such as peak viscosity, final viscosity, and setback value, increased significantly under elevated CO2 concentration and high N application rate. The interaction of atmospheric CO2 concentration and N application rate had significantly positive effects on wheat grain yield and biomass, but less effect on grain quality. Therefore, with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in the future, maintaining a higher N application level would benefit wheat grain yield and paste characteristics, and mitigate the decline of grain quality.

  6. NITROGEN UTILIZATION BY DAIRY GOATS OFFERED DIFFERENT NITROGEN SOURCES AS SUPPLEMENTS IN HIGH ISOCALORIC ENERGY CONCENTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R.S. Asih

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twelve growing female goats (Anglo-Nubian were assigned to a multiple latin square designexperiment to evaluate the effectiveness of additions of nitrogen (N supplements to a high isocaloricenergy ration on N utilization. In this experiment, microbial synthesis and N balance were assessed. Thedaily rations were either unsupplemented barley meal (BM, or BM supplemented with one of threenitrogen sources. All rations were isocaloric (3.0 Mcal ME/kg DM and the N supplements weresoybean meal (BSBM, cottonseed meal (BCSM or urea (BU to provide 2.9% N in the concentratecomponent. The unsupplemented BM contained 1.7% N. The addition of N supplements to the rationenhanced N utilization in dairy goats. The organic matter (OM intake, N intake, N balance, andmicrobial N synthesis for BM, BSBM, BCSM and BU were 660.5 g, 721.9 g, 728.1g and 703.5 g; 13.5g, 21.5 g, 20.9 g and 20.7 g; 2.7 g; 7.1 g, 5.4 g, and 5.7 g; and 14.1 g 19.1 g, 19.1 g, and 20.0 g,respectively. It can be concluded that when sufficient dietary energy was available for ruminal microbialactivities, the source of N did not affect N balance, and microbial N synthesis.

  7. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    -freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC......Freezing can affect concentrations and spectroscopic properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water samples. Nevertheless, water samples are regularly frozen for sample preservation. In this study we tested the effect of different freezing methods (standard freezing at −18 °C and fast...... concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax...

  8. Optimization of free ammonia concentration for nitrite accumulation in shortcut biological nitrogen removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Shim, Hojae; Park, Seong-Jun; Kim, Seung-Jin; Bae, Wookeun

    2006-03-01

    A shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) utilizes the concept of a direct conversion of ammonium to nitrite and then to nitrogen gas. A successful SBNR requires accumulation of nitrite in the system and inhibition of the activity of nitrite oxidizers. A high concentration of free ammonia (FA) inhibits nitrite oxidizers, but unfortunately decreases the ammonium removal rate as well. Therefore, the optimal range of FA concentration is necessary not only to stabilize nitrite accumulation but also to achieve maximum ammonium removal. In order to derive such optimal FA concentrations, the specific substrate utilization rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were measured. The optimal FA concentration range appeared to be 5-10 mg/L for the adapted sludge. The simulated results from the modified inhibition model expressed by FA and ammonium/nitrite concentrations were shown very similar to the experimental results.

  9. Formation and control of nitrogenous DBPs from Western Australian source waters: Investigating the impacts of high nitrogen and bromide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiana, Ina; Liew, Deborah; Henderson, Rita K; Joll, Cynthia A; Linge, Kathryn L

    2017-08-01

    We studied the formation of four nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) classes (haloacetonitriles, halonitromethanes, haloacetamides, and N-nitrosamines), as well as trihalomethanes and total organic halogen (TOX), after chlorination or chloramination of source waters. We also evaluated the relative and additive toxicity of N-DBPs and water treatment options for minimisation of N-DBPs. The formation of halonitromethanes, haloacetamides, and N-nitrosamines was higher after chloramination and positively correlated with dissolved organic nitrogen or total nitrogen. N-DBPs were major contributors to the toxicity of both chlorinated and chloraminated waters. The strong correlation between bromide concentration and the overall calculated DBP additive toxicity for both chlorinated and chloraminated source waters demonstrated that formation of brominated haloacetonitriles was the main contributor to toxicity. Ozone-biological activated carbon treatment was not effective in removing N-DBP precursors. The occurrence and formation of N-DBPs should be investigated on a case-by-case basis, especially where advanced water treatment processes are being considered to minimise their formation in drinking waters, and where chloramination is used for final disinfection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modification of yield and chlorophyll content in leaf lettuce by HPS radiation and nitrogen treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cary A.; Leakakos, Tina; Ford, Tameria L.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of realizing high photosynthetic photon flux from radiation by high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamp, alone or in combination with metal halide (MH) plus quartz iodide (QI) incandescent lamps, to support lettuce grow, with or without nitrogen supplement, was investigated. It was found that varying exposures to radiation from combined HPS, MH, and QI lamps influenced dry weight gain and photosynthetic pigment content of hydroponically grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings.

  11. Seasonal changes in tannin and nitrogen contents of Casuarina equisetifolia branchlets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-hua; Ye, Gong-fu; Lin, Yi-ming; Zhou, Hai-chao; Zeng, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of total phenolics (TP), extractable condensed tannins (ECT), protein-bound condensed tannins (PBCT), fiber-bound condensed tannins (FBCT), total condensed tannins (TCT), and protein precipitation capacity (PPC) in young, mature and senescent branchlets of Casuarina equisetifolia were studied at Chishan Forestry Center of Dongshan County, Fujian Province, China. In addition, nitrogen contents of branchlets at the different developmental stages were also determined. The contents of TP and ECT, and PPC in young branchlets were significantly higher than those in mature and senescent branchlets through the season. However, PBCT contents were significantly higher in senescent branchlets than those in young and mature branchlets; FBCT fluctuated with season. Young branchlets had the highest N content, which decreased during branch maturity and senescence. The highest contents of TP and the lowest contents of TCT and N in young and mature branchlets were observed in summer. There was a significant negative correlation between TP and N contents. In contrast, TCT contents were positively correlated to N contents. Nutrient resorption during senescence and high TCT:N ratios in senescent branchlets are the important nutrient conservation strategies for C. equisetifolia. PMID:19235268

  12. Estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen content using continuum-removal spectroscopy analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongjun; Li, Minzan; Zheng, Lihua; Sun, Hong

    2012-11-01

    In quantitative analysis of spectral data, noises and background interference always degrades the accuracy of spectral feature extraction. Continuum-removal analysis enables the isolation of absorption features of interest, thus increasing the coefficients of determination and facilitating the identification of more sensible absorption features. The purpose of this study was to test continuum-removal methodology with Visual-NIR spectral data of tomato leaf. Through analyzing the correlation between continuum-removal spectrum and nitrogen content, 15 characteristics parameters reflected changing tendency of nitrogen content were chosen, which is at 335, 405, 500, 520, 540, 550, 560, 580, 620, 640, 683, 704, 720, 736 and 770 nm. Finally, the variance inflation analysis and stepwise regression method was used to develop the prediction model of the nitrogen content of tomato leaf. The result showed that the predicted model, which used the values of continuum-removal spectrum at 335 and 720nm as input variables, had high predictive ability, with R2 of 0.755. The root mean square errors of prediction using a leave-one-out cross validation method were 0.513. These results suggest that the continuum-removal spectroscopy analysis has better potential to diagnose tomato growth in greenhouse.

  13. CONCENTRATION OF UREA NITROGEN IN BUFFALO MILK DURING DIFFERENT SEASONS OF THE YEAR IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANO HENRIQUE DO NASCIMENTO RANGEL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at assessing the influence of different seasons of the year (dry and rainy on urea nitrogen (MUN concentration of buffalo milk in a commercial herd from Rio Grande do Norte state. The region is characterized by a rainy tropical climate with a dry and wet season from August to January and February to July, respectively. Samples were collected monthly from the cooling tank between February 2010 and February 2011, in the morning. Next, they were homogenized and packed in 40-mL plastic flasks, containing the preservative Bronopol® and later sent to the laboratory for urea nitrogen analysis. Although March 2010 exhibited greater ureanitrogen concentration (25.4 ± 4.4 mg/dL and November the lowest mean (12 ± 0.4 mg/ dL, there was no significant variation in milk urea nitrogen in samples collected from cooling tanks during the rainy and dry seasons.

  14. The changes of the polyphenol content and antioxidant activity in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L. due to nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hrabovská

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available 96 Normal 0 false false false CS JA X-NONE Cultivar is one of the most important internal factors affecting polyphenol concentration in the plants. However, influence of the grown locality, climate conditions and way of cultivation belong to important external factors. In our experiment the influence of different nitrogen doses (0 - 40 - 80 - 120 - 160 - 240 kg N.ha-1 applied in the form of Vermikompost on the total polyphenol content and derived total antioxidant activity in cv. Sorento were investigated. While in the 1st - 5th variants the determined polyphenol content in dry mater of potato tubers decreased from 399.2 to 70.40 mg.kg-1, in the 6th variant that was twice higher in comparison to the 5th variants (135.6 mg.kg-1. The statistically significant differences in values of total polyphenol content between variants (polynomial function of 2nd degree were confirmed. The study also confirmed a strong statistical correlation between the content of polyphenols and the content of antioxidant activity has been confirmed (sign. F: 3.24E-10. The highest value of antioxidant activity was observed in the first variant. From the first to the fifth variant (7.62 - 4.84%, the value of antioxidant activity was decreasing and in the sixth variant this value increased to 6.31%.

  15. Effects of combinations of land use history and nitrogen application on nitrate concentration in the groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Bouma, J.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of differences in both land use history and levels of nitrogen (N) application on nitrate concentration in the groundwater were studied for permanent pastures located on a single soil series in the Frisian Woodlands in the north of the Netherlands. The study was carried out for three fields:

  16. Nitrogen requirement to change protein concentration of spring wheat in semiarid Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    On-combine yield monitors and grain protein analyzers enable mapping of grain N removal at time of harvest. Nitrogen removal maps combined with estimates of the fertilizer N equivalent (FNE) for each unit (g kg-1) change in grain protein concentration (GPC) are useful for developing site-specific f...

  17. [Grey analysis of NIR spectra and prediction of nitrogen content in jujube leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Hong; Zheng, Li-Hua; Zhang, Yao; Li, Min-Zan

    2013-11-01

    Jujube was chosen as the object in the present research. Spectra data of jujube leaves were collected during the period of budding, branch leaf, flowering and coloring. The nitrogen contents of jujube leaf samples were determined by Kjeldahl analysis method. Grey relation analysis between spectral reflectance and nitrogen content of jujube leaves was done based on Grey theory. It was found that the gray relation between spectral reflectance and nitrogen content of jujube leaves at 560, 678 and 786 nm was high. Nine kinds of vegetation index based on spectra data of NIR786, R678 and G570 were calculated. The gray relation of nine kinds of vegetation index was NDVI>GRVI>NDGI>GNDVI>CNDVI>RVI>GDVI>DVI>SAVI. NDVI, GRVI, NDGI, GNDVI and CNDVI were chosen to build prediction models of nitrogen content of jujube leaves. Spectra data of 560, 678 and 786 nm were also used to build prediction models of nitrogen content of jujube leaves. LS-SVM and GM(1, N) were used to build prediction module. The prediction R2 and verification R2 of LS-SVM module were 0.805 and 0.704 respectively when five kinds of vegetation index were used as input of prediction module. When when Spectra data of 560, 678 and 786 nm were used as input, the prediction R2 and verification R2 of LS-SVM prediction model were 0.772 and 0.685 respectively. The prediction R2 and verification R2 of GM(1, N) module were 0.927 7 and 0.895 8 respectively when spectra data of 560, 678 and 786 nm were used as input. The results of prediction GM(1, N) module which used five kinds of vegetation index as input were 0.547 6 and 0.489 7. From those results it was observed that grey theory only needed little information to build prediction module with high precision, so that it could be used in precision management of jujube plants.

  18. Global patterns of foliar nitrogen isotopes and their relationships with climate, mycorrhizal fungi, foliar nutrient concentrations, and nitrogen availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craine, J M; Elmore, A J; Aidar, M P M

    2009-01-01

     000 plants worldwide. Arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal, and ericoid mycorrhizal plants were depleted in foliar d15N by 2‰, 3.2‰, 5.9‰, respectively, relative to nonmycorrhizal plants. Foliar d15N increased with decreasing mean annual precipitation and with increasing mean annual temperature (MAT......) across sites with MAT = -0.5°C, but was invariant with MAT across sites with MAT global scale, foliar d15N increased with increasing foliar N concentrations and decreasing......Ratios of nitrogen (N) isotopes in leaves could elucidate underlying patterns of N cycling across ecological gradients. To better understand global-scale patterns of N cycling, we compiled data on foliar N isotope ratios (d15N), foliar N concentrations, mycorrhizal type and climate for over 11...

  19. Effect of nitrification inhibitors on the content of available nitrogen forms in the soil under maize (Zea mays, L. growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana PANAKOVA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of nitrification inhibitors (dicyandiamide and 1,2,4 triazole on the content of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen in the soil and the effectiveness of nitrogen-sulphur nutrition of maize. The research was conducted in field small-plot experiment with maize on Haplic Luvisol with dominance of clay fraction in experimental years 2012 to 2015. The dose of nitrogen in all experimental treatments was 160 kg*ha-1 and was applied at one shot or split in three partial doses. Soil samples from all examined treatments were taken from three soil depths (0.0-0.3 m, 0.3-0.6 m and 0.6-0.9 m, respectively by probe rod in 4-5 week intervals. Achieved results indicate that on the average of four years and three depths of the soil profile, application of nitrification inhibitors contained in fertilizer ENSIN considerably reduced portion of nitrate nitrogen from the content of mineral nitrogen in the soil by 7-32 relative %. The application of fertilizer ENSIN considerably increased content of ammonium nitrogen in the soil by 10-59 relative %. A favourable effect on increase of ammonium nitrogen content and reduction of nitrate nitrogen content was found out in spite of the fact that in this treatment the total dose of fertilizer was applied at one shot.

  20. On-farm measurement of electrical conductivity for the estimation of ammonium nitrogen concentration in pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, M R; Quílez, D

    2012-01-01

    Pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) slurry (PS) is commonly applied as fertilizer to agricultural fields. Knowledge of PS nitrogen content is essential for good management, but PS nitrogen content is highly variable, not only between farms but also within a farm. Laboratory analysis of animal slurries is often expensive and impractical for routine farmer use. Therefore, when slurry is spread on land, its fertilizer value is generally unknown, resulting in the risk of pollution. In this work, two rapid and suitable for field use methods for determining PS ammonium N (NH(4)+-N) concentration (Quantofix and conductimetry) are evaluated. The electrical conductivity of a dilution 1 PS:9 distilled water had better results than Quantofix, did not need reagents, and gave a direct value of NH(4)+-N concentrations (range, 1.0-7.6 kg NH(4)+-N m(-3)). The conductimetry method allows the use of alternative waters with EC <1.9 dS m(-1) for dilution. This method is being introduced to farmers in northeast Spain to improve PS management and has been well received due to its low cost and ease of use. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Historical nitrogen content of bryophyte tissue as an indicator of increased nitrogen deposition in the Cape Metropolitan Area, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D. [Botany Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Stock, W.D. [Botany Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Perth, WA 6027 (Australia)], E-mail: w.stock@ecu.edu.au; Hedderson, T. [Botany Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2009-03-15

    Information on changes in precipitation chemistry in the rapidly expanding Cape Metropolitan Area (CMA) of South Africa is scarce. To obtain a long-term record of N deposition we investigated changes in moss foliar N, C:N ratios and nitrogen isotope values that might reflect precipitation chemistry. Tissue from 9 species was obtained from herbarium specimens collected between 1875 and 2000 while field samples were collected in 2001/2002. There is a strong trend of increasing foliar N content in all mosses collected over the past century (1.32-1.69 %N). Differences exist between ectohydric mosses which have higher foliar N than the mixohydric group. C:N ratios declined while foliar {delta}{sup 15}N values showed no distinct pattern. From relationships between moss tissue N and N deposition rates we estimated an increase of 6-13 kg N ha{sup -1} a{sup -1} since 1950. Enhanced N deposition rates of this magnitude could lead to biodiversity losses in native ecosystems. - This study of bryophyte tissue nutrient contents shows a historical increase in N deposition rates to the low nutrient adapted plant biodiversity hotspot in the Western Cape, South Africa.

  2. Seasonal changes in carbon and nitrogen compound concentrations in a Quercus petraea chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Angélique; Barthes, Laure; Delpierre, Nicolas; Dufrêne, Éric; Fresneau, Chantal; Bazot, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Forest productivity declines with tree age. This decline may be due to changes in metabolic functions, resource availability and/or changes in resource allocation (between growth, reproduction and storage) with tree age. Carbon and nitrogen remobilization/storage processes are key to tree growth and survival. However, studies of the effects of tree age on these processes are scarce and have not yet considered seasonal carbon and nitrogen variations in situ. This study was carried out in a chronosequence of sessile oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.) for 1 year to survey the effects of tree age on the seasonal changes of carbon and nitrogen compounds in several tree compartments, focusing on key phenological stages. Our results highlight a general pattern of carbon and nitrogen function at all tree ages, with carbon reserve remobilization at budburst for growth, followed by carbon reserve formation during the leafy season and carbon reserve use during winter for maintenance. The variation in concentrations of nitrogen compounds shows less amplitude than that of carbon compounds. Storage as proteins occurs later, and mainly depends on leaf nitrogen remobilization and root uptake in autumn. We highlight several differences between tree age groups, in particular the loss of carbon storage function of fine and medium-sized roots with tree ageing. Moreover, the pattern of carbon compound accumulation in branches supports the hypothesis of a preferential allocation of carbon towards growth until the end of wood formation in juvenile trees, at the expense of the replenishment of carbon stores, while mature trees start allocating carbon to storage right after budburst. Our results demonstrate that at key phenological stages, physiological and developmental functions differ with tree age, and together with environmental conditions, influence the carbon and nitrogen concentration variations in sessile oaks. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  3. Use of Potato Nitrogen Concentrate in the Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Thaller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of various nitrogen sources and media supplements on α-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1 formation by Aspergillus oryzae ATCC 1011 was investigated in shake flask experiments and batch fermentations. Both inorganic and organic nitrogen-containing supplements have been applied, while corn starch and ammonium sulphate were used as the major source of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. Shake flask experiments revealed that potato nitrogen concentrate (PNC is almost equivalent to corn steep liquor (CSL in supporting amylase formation. A pretreatment step consisting of clarification of the turbid material did not show any significant effect. The replacement of the inorganic nitrogen source by sodium nitrate led to lower enzyme yields. Other complex supplements may reduce the enzyme level formed, e.g. casein hydrolysate, or increase the amylase titre slightly, e.g. yeast extract or malt extract. Cultivations in instrumented bench top reactors on media supplemented with PNC led to higher cell growth rates and yields of α-amylase in comparison with the medium without any supplement. Replacement of PNC by CSL revealed a slightly increased enzyme level, which is in the range of 9–17 % after 100 h of cultivation. Only minor differences were revealed in the growth kinetics and enzyme formation when PNC was used as the sole nitrogen source, replacing a mixture of soybean meal, yeast extract, malt extract and casein hydrolysate in bioreactor cultivations with lactose as the carbon source. However, metabolic differences as seen from the course of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT, α-amino nitrogen concentration and the amount of acid needed to maintain a constant pH were observed.

  4. Does anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment increase organic nitrogen concentrations in runoff from forested and human-dominated watersheds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, B.A.; Kaushal, S.S.; McDowell, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Although the effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs on the dynamics of inorganic N in watersheds have been studied extensively, "the influence of N enrichment on organic N loss" is not as well understood. We compiled and synthesized data on surface water N concentrations from 348 forested and human-dominated watersheds with a range of N loads (from less than 100 to 7,100 kg N km-2 y-1) to evaluate the effects of N loading via atmospheric deposition, fertilization, and wastewater on dissolved organic N (DON) concentrations. Our results indicate that, on average, DON accounts for half of the total dissolved N (TDN) concentrations from forested watersheds, but it accounts for a smaller fraction of TDN in runoff from urban and agricultural watersheds with higher N loading. A significant but weak correlation (r 2 = 0.06) suggests that N loading has little influence on DON concentrations in forested watersheds. This result contrasts with observations from some plot-scale N fertilization studies and suggests that variability in watershed characteristics and climate among forested watersheds may be a more important control on DON losses than N loading from atmospheric sources. Mean DON concentrations were positively correlated, however, with N load across the entire land-use gradient (r 2 = 0.37, P Media, Inc.

  5. Effect of CO2 enrichment on the glucosinolate contents under different nitrogen levels in bolting stem of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Gui-xiao; Fang, Ping; Teng, Yi-bo; Li, Ya-juan; Lin, Xian-yong

    2009-06-01

    The effects of CO(2) enrichment on the growth and glucosinolate (GS) concentrations in the bolting stem of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.) treated with three nitrogen (N) concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mmol/L) were investigated. Height, stem thickness, and dry weights of the total aerial parts, bolting stems, and roots, as well as the root to shoot ratio, significantly increased as CO(2) concentration was elevated from 350 to 800 microl/L at each N concentration. In the edible part of the bolting stem, 11 individual GSs were identified, including 7 aliphatic and 4 indolyl GSs. GS concentration was affected by the elevated CO(2) concentration, N concentration, and CO(2)xN interaction. At 5 and 10 mmol N/L, the concentrations of aliphatic GSs and total GSs significantly increased, whereas those of indolyl GSs were not affected, by elevated atmospheric CO(2). However, at 20 mmol N/L, elevated CO(2) had no significant effects on the concentrations of total GSs and total indolyl GSs, but the concentrations of total aliphatic GSs significantly increased. Moreover, the bolting stem carbon (C) content increased, whereas the N and sulfur (S) contents decreased under elevated CO(2) concentration in the three N treatments, resulting in changes in the C/N and N/S ratios. Also the C/N ratio is not a reliable predictor of change of GS concentration, while the changes in N and S contents and the N/S ratio at the elevated CO(2) concentration may influence the GS concentration in Chinese kale bolting stems. The results demonstrate that high nitrogen supply is beneficial for the growth of Chinese kale, but not for the GS concentration in bolting stems, under elevated CO(2) condition.

  6. Effect of CO2 enrichment on the glucosinolate contents under different nitrogen levels in bolting stem of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Gui-xiao; Fang, Ping; Teng, Yi-bo; Li, Ya-juan; Lin, Xian-yong

    2009-01-01

    The effects of CO2 enrichment on the growth and glucosinolate (GS) concentrations in the bolting stem of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.) treated with three nitrogen (N) concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mmol/L) were investigated. Height, stem thickness, and dry weights of the total aerial parts, bolting stems, and roots, as well as the root to shoot ratio, significantly increased as CO2 concentration was elevated from 350 to 800 μl/L at each N concentration. In the edible part of the bolting stem, 11 individual GSs were identified, including 7 aliphatic and 4 indolyl GSs. GS concentration was affected by the elevated CO2 concentration, N concentration, and CO2×N interaction. At 5 and 10 mmol N/L, the concentrations of aliphatic GSs and total GSs significantly increased, whereas those of indolyl GSs were not affected, by elevated atmospheric CO2. However, at 20 mmol N/L, elevated CO2 had no significant effects on the concentrations of total GSs and total indolyl GSs, but the concentrations of total aliphatic GSs significantly increased. Moreover, the bolting stem carbon (C) content increased, whereas the N and sulfur (S) contents decreased under elevated CO2 concentration in the three N treatments, resulting in changes in the C/N and N/S ratios. Also the C/N ratio is not a reliable predictor of change of GS concentration, while the changes in N and S contents and the N/S ratio at the elevated CO2 concentration may influence the GS concentration in Chinese kale bolting stems. The results demonstrate that high nitrogen supply is beneficial for the growth of Chinese kale, but not for the GS concentration in bolting stems, under elevated CO2 condition. PMID:19489111

  7. Failure of carnitine in improving hepatic nitrogen content in alcoholic and non-alcoholic malnourished rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana P. Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate the effect of carnitine supplementation on alcoholic malnourished rats' hepatic nitrogen content. METHODS: Malnourished rats, on 50% protein-calorie restriction with free access to water (malnutrition group and malnourished rats under the same conditions with free access to a 20% alcohol/water solution (alcohol group were studied. After the undernourishment period (4 weeks with or without alcohol, both groups were randomly divided into two subgroups, one of them nutritionally recovered for 28 days with free access to a normal diet and water (recovery groups and the other re-fed with free access to diet and water plus carnitine (0.1 g/g body weight/day by gavage (carnitine groups. No alcohol intake was allowed during the recovery period. RESULTS: The results showed: i no difference between the alcohol/no alcohol groups, with or without carnitine, regarding body weight gain, diet consumption, urinary nitrogen excretion, plasma free fatty acids, lysine, methionine, and glycine. ii Liver nitrogen content was highest in the carnitine recovery non-alcoholic group (from 1.7 to 3.3 g/100 g, P.05 was highest in the alcoholic animals. CONCLUSION: Carnitine supplementation did not induce better nutritional recovery.

  8. Phytoplankton growth rate and nitrogen content: Implications for feeding and fecundity in a herbivorous copepod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    at a concentration of 1.5 ppm. Over more than 2 orders of magnitude increase in algal growth rate, the ingested cell volume increased by less than a factor of 2, ingested carbon remained constant whereas ingested nitrogen as well as rate of egg production increased by a factor of ca 6. Variation in ingested cell...... composition of the algae, while the observed feeding response is probably insufficient to account for the variability observed in the sea....

  9. Agaricus subrufescens: substratum nitrogen concentration and mycelial extraction method on antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÍRIA B.D. BERTÉLI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antitumor activity of Agaricus subrufescens has been shown on vegetative mycelium and basidiocarp. However, few studies have assessed the effect of A. subrufescens cultivation conditions and extraction methods on antitumor activity. This study evaluated the effect of nitrogen concentration on the cultivation medium of A. subrufescens and the extraction method of mycelial antineoplastic actives against sarcoma 180 cells implanted in mice. Two nitrogen sources (isolated soybean protein and NaNO3 and 10 nitrogen concentrations (0.25 to 8.0 g/L were used. Dried mycelium extract was obtained by hot water infusion (1:10 mass:volume; 90 °C or by aqueous mixture (1:10 mass:volume, ambient temperature in ultrapure water. The doses were administered daily by gavage to mice implanted with sarcoma 180 cells. Isolated soy protein is more efficient to mycelial biomass production than NaNO3. The mycelial biomass production increases when the cultivation medium is added with high nitrogen concentrations as well as the splenic index and the antitumor activity of the moistened mycelial powder. Hot water extract is more effective than the moistened mycelial powder to reduce tumor. The antitumor activity of hot water mycelial extract is similar to the one of basidiocarps, presenting lower metabolic demand on the spleen, keeping blood parameters normal and promoting animal wellness.

  10. Effects of Nitrogen Content on the HAZ Softening of Ti-Containing High Strength Steels Manufactured by Accelerated Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kook-soo; Jung, Ho-shin; Park, Chan [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The effects of nitrogen content on the HAZ softening of Ti-containing high strength steels manufactured by accelerating cooling were investigated and interpreted in terms of the microstructures in the softening zone. Regardless of their content, all of the steels investigated showed a softened zone 9-10 mm wide. The minimum hardness in the zone, however, was different, with lower hardness in the higher nitrogen content steel. Microstructural observations of the steel showed that the amount of soft ferrite was increased in the zone with an increase of nitrogen content of the steel, suggesting that microstructural evolution in the HAZ is influenced by the nitrogen content. Measurements of TiN particles showed that the degree of particles coarsening in the HAZ was lower in the higher nitrogen content steel. Therefore, it is believed that finer TiN particles in the HAZ inhibit austenite grain growth more effectively, and lead to an accelerated ferrite transformation in higher nitrogen content steel, resulting in a higher amount of soft ferrite microstructure in the softened zone.

  11. A PUBLISHED KINETIC MODEL EXPLAINS THE VARIATION IN NITROGEN CONTENT OF Pichia guilliermondii DURING ITS BATCH CULTIVATION ON DIESEL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORZANI W.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in nitrogen content of Pichia guilliermondii during its batch cultivation on media containing diesel oil as the main carbon source may be explained by means of a kinetic model proposed earlier to interpret the kinetics of nitrogen consumption during the process.

  12. Plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations and follicular dynamics in ewes fed proteins of different degradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bianchi Lazarin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of overfeeding with protein of different degradability on body condition, plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations, ovulation number and follicular dynamics were assessed in Santa Ines ewes. Twelve ewes were assigned to a randomized block design according to body weight and received overfeeding with soybean meal or with corn gluten meal or maintenance diet for 28 days before ovulation and during the next estrous cycle. Blood samples were taken on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the beginning of treatments for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and on days 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 into the estrous cycle for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone. Follicular dynamics was monitored daily by ultrasound during one estrous cycle. Dry matter and crude protein intake, weight gain, plasma urea nitrogen concentration before ovulation, number of ovulations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 1st and of the 2nd waves and the growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave were higher in the ewes that received overfeeding. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave was higher in the ewes fed maintenance diet. The back fat thickness, plasma urea nitrogen before ovulation and progesterone concentrations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 2nd wave and growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave were higher in ewes that received overfeeding with soybean meal. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave was higher in ewes that received overfeeding with corn gluten meal. Overfeeding with protein-rich feeds may increase the ovulation number and with soybean meal, it may be effective in increasing plasma progesterone concentration in ewes.

  13. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  14. The influence of land use on soil organic carbon and nitrogen content and redox potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime

    2010-01-01

    different farming systems (conventional and organic) as well as abandoned lands. We choose the plants of two botanical species (Poaceae and Fabaceae) in organic and conventional farming systems as well as abandoned lands. Experimental results show that the best soil organic matter status according...... to the investigated indexes is in the soils of conventional and orgaic farming systems occupied with mixtures of Poaceae and Fabaceae and the worst - in the soils of abandoned Poaceae meadowa. In the abandoned lands, Fabaceae (galega) had better influence on soil organic matter status than Poaceae.......The aim of the research was to evaluate organic matter status in the soil according to the organic carbon content, total and mineral nitrogen amounts, carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio and redox potential depending on land usage and plant spieces. Soil samples were taken from the fields under...

  15. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, H; Des Marais, D J; Ueda, A; Moore, J G

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges, -6.2 +/- 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 +/- 0.6% relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (delta 13 C = around -24%) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). the delta 34S values average +0.3 +/- 0.5% with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 +/- 1.6%. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt.

  16. The effect of meat and bone meal (MBM on the nitrogen and phosphorus content and pH of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nogalska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in 2011 – 2013 in Poland. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of increasing doses of meat and bone meal (MBM on the mineral nitrogen (Nmin and available phosphorus (P content of soil and the soil pH. Changes in the content of NH4+-N, NO3--N and available P in soil were affected by MBM dose, experiment duration, weather conditions and crop species. Soil amended with MBM was more abundant in mineral N and available P. The lowest concentration of NO3--N and the highest concentration of NH4+-N were noted in the first year of the study, because the nitrification process requires a longer time. MBM had no influence on the accumulation of Nmin in soil, whereas the concentration of available P increased significantly throughout the experiment. The soil pH decreased with increasing MBM doses. After the application of the highest MBM doses soil pH classification was changed from neutral to slightly acidic.

  17. Defect concentration in nitrogen-doped graphene grown on Cu substrate: A thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dhananjay K.; Fateixa, Sara; Hortigüela, María J.; Vidyasagar, Reddithota; Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo; Nogueira, Helena I. S.; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Kholkin, Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Tuning the band-gap of graphene is a current need for real device applications. Copper (Cu) as a substrate plays a crucial role in graphene deposition. Here we report the fabrication of in-situ nitrogen (N) doped graphene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and the effect of Cu substrate thickness on the growth mechanism. The ratio of intensities of G and D peaks was used to evaluate the defect concentration based on local activation model associated with the distortion of the crystal lattice due to incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene lattice. The results suggest that Cu substrate of 20 μm in thickness exhibits higher defect density (1.86×1012 cm-2) as compared to both 10 and 25 μm thick substrates (1.23×1012 cm-2 and 3.09×1011 cm-2, respectively). Furthermore, High Resolution -X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS) precisely affirms 0.4 at% of nitrogen intercalations in graphene. Our results show that the substitutional type of nitrogen doping dominates over the pyridinic configuration. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows all the XRD peaks associated with carbon. However, the peak at 24° is suppressed by the substrate peaks (Cu). These results suggest that nitrogen atoms can be efficiently incorporated into the graphene using thinner copper substrates, rather than the standard 25 μm ones. This is important for tailoring the properties by graphene required for microelectronic applications.

  18. Brachiaria sp yield and nutrient contents after nitrogen and sulphur fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reges Heinrichs

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the production factors, adequate fertilization is an important tool to raise the productivity of pastoral systems and consequently increase the share of Brazil in the supply chain of primary agricultural products at the global level. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization in BRACHIARIA DECUMBENS: Stapf. The experiment in pots with Dystrophic Oxisol was evaluated in a completely randomized design with four replications in a 5 x 3 factorial arrangement, involving five N doses (0, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg dm-3 in the form of ammonium nitrate and three S doses (0, 20 and 80 mg dm-3 in the form of calcium sulfate, with a total of 15 treatments. In the treatments with low S dose, calcium was provided as calcium chloride, to ensure a homogeneous Ca supply in all treatments. The results showed that the tiller production and dry weight of green leaves and of stems + sheaths and total dry weight were favored by the combination of N and S fertilizer, while the proportion of dry leaves was reduced. Nitrogen fertilization raised the N contents in green leaves and stems + sheaths and reduced K contents in fresh and dry leaves. The response to S rates in the N content of green leaves was quadratic.

  19. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serret, María D.; Yousfi, Salima; Vicente, Rubén; Piñero, María C.; Otálora-Alcón, Ginés; del Amor, Francisco M.; Araus, José L.

    2018-01-01

    Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1), three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress) and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N) in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct relationship with N

  20. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Serret

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1, three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct

  1. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Gibberellic Acid and Nitrogen on Some Physiology Parameters and Micronutrients Concentration in Pistachio under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid mozafari

    2017-02-01

    /63, Tissue (Sandy loam, electrical conductivity (ECe (1 dS m-1, Silt (23.1%, Clay (5.5%, Organic matter (0.5%, Olsen phosphorus (P (5.35 mg kg-1, Ammonium acetate-extractable K (100 mg kg-1 were determined. Nitrogen treatments 3 weeks after planting, dissolved in irrigation water was added to pots. Salinity, after the establishment of the plant (5 weeks after planting, divided into two equal parts and one-week interval dissolved with irrigation water was added to the pot. as well acid gibberellic treatments, as spray after salt treatment was applied at three times and at intervals of one week. Results and discussion: The results showed that the salinity content of carotenoid and Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters significantly reduced but with increasing acid gibberellic and nitrogen application, mentioned parameters were significantly increased, compared to controls. The ability of photosynthesis improved and increased productivity. Mozafari et al studied the pistachio, reported that with increasing salinity from zero to 150 and 300 mM NaCl, carotenoids decreased more than 16% and 22% compared to control respectively. Carotenoids play a most important role in light, protecting plants against stress condition. Salinity application increased leaf proline, but with application of 150 mg nitrogen and 500 mg per liter foliar application of acid gibberellics, this parameter increased by 55 and 26 percent, respectively. Also, combined use of these two treatments increased proline content by 79 percent compared to control. The researchers stated that the increasing gibberellin concentration caused leaf proline increased, so spraying 100 and 200 mg per liter gibberellin significantly increased leaf proline compared with the non-application of gibberellin. The results also showed with increasing salinity increased iron, manganese and zinc concentrations shoots and roots and decreased copper concentrations, but using 150 mg of nitrogen and acid gibberellic consumption concentrations

  3. [Nitrogen and protein content analysis of human milk, diurnality vs nocturnality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez López, C L; Hernández, A; Rodríguez, A B; Rivero, M; Barriga, C; Cubero, J

    2011-01-01

    Breast milk is changing with the progression of lactation and during a 24-h period. To determine the effect of diurnality or nocturnality on total nitrogen and protein content of the breast milk. We collected human milk samples from health mothers living throughout Community of Extremadura (Spain) from January 2008 to December 2008 with less than two months of lactation. We divided the samples in three groups: calostral group (1-5 days postpartum), transitional group (6-15 days postpartum) and mature group (> 15 days postpartum). All samples were stored in a freezer at -80 ºC. We considered as day period between 08:00-20:00 h and night period 20:00-08:00 h. Analysis of the human milk samples was based on the Kjeldahl method. Protein contents were calculated from total nitrogen x 6,25. The statistical analysis of the data was descriptive (mean ± standard deviation) and inferential (T-Student test). No differences (P > 0,05) were found to exist among the contents of individual human milk samples. The mean contents of each component were as follows: Total nitrogen of calostral, transitional and mature group was 0,30 ± 0,06 g/dL (night period), 0,29 ± 0,05 g/dL (day period); 0,26 ± 0,04 g/dL (night period), 0,25 ± 0,04 g/dL (day period); 0,22 ± 0,05 g/dL (night period), 0,20 ± 0,04 g/dL (day period) respectively, in this mature group with a statistical variation (P Protein content of calostral, transitional and mature group was 1,88 ± 0,4 g/dL (night period), 1,81 ± 0,3 g/dL (day period); 1,62 ± 0,3 g/dL (night period), 1,59 ± 0,3 g/dL (day period); 1,35 ± 0,3 g/dL (night period), 1,26 ± 0,3 g/dL (day period) respectively, in this mature group with a statistical variation (P protein content during the individual stages of lactation, it is just in the population of mature lactating women, where the components analyzed varied significantly between day and night.

  4. Influence of pH on lead uptake, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of Nasturtium officinale R. Br. and Mentha aquatica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygideger, Saadet; Dogan, Muhittin

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, effects of pH (5.0, 7.0 and 9.0) and lead (1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 microg mL(-1)) were investigated on uptake of lead, content of chlorophyll and nitrogen in Nasturtium officinale and Mentha aquatica. Total chlorophyll and nitrogen contents were adversely affected from Pb2+ concentrations dose dependently at each pH. The macrophytes were adversely affected by pH 5.0 or more than 9.0. After 12-days Pb2+ treatment, results showed that lead accumulation of macrophyte tissues was variable. According to the parts of the macrophytes, Pb2+ amounts were generally found at all tested pH levels and the metal concentrations for M. aquatica in the following order: root > stem > leaf and for N. officinale root > leaf > stem. Pb2+ concentrations in plant tissues (root, stem, leaf) in relation to pH were generally found for both macrophytes in following order: 7.0 > 9.0 > 5.0. Despite of the fact that high Pb2+ accumulation was observed in root tissues of the macrophytes, low metal accumulation was measured in the above-ground parts indicating low root-leaf translocation. The study indicated that uptake rate of Pb2+ and its toxicity on Chlorophyll and nitrogen contents in the macrophytes were dependent upon pH value of solutions.

  5. Leaf litter nitrogen concentration as related to climatic factors in Eurasian forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chunjiang; Berg, Bjørn; Kutsch, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the patterns of nitrogen (N) concentrations in leaf litter of forest trees as functions of climatic factors, annual average temperature (Temp, °C) and annual precipitation (Precip, dm) and of forest type (coniferous vs. broadleaf, deciduous vs. evergreen, Pin....... In the context of global warming, these regression equations are useful for a better understanding and modelling of the effects of geographical and climatic factors on leaf litter N at a regional and continental scale.......The aim of this study is to determine the patterns of nitrogen (N) concentrations in leaf litter of forest trees as functions of climatic factors, annual average temperature (Temp, °C) and annual precipitation (Precip, dm) and of forest type (coniferous vs. broadleaf, deciduous vs. evergreen, Pinus...

  6. Reference material certification of chinese cabbage composition for selenium, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Chupakhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. The reference material of composition with the established metrological characteristics including a certified value and an expanded uncertainty is necessary to ensure an effective accuracy and precision control of results of element composition determination in food ingredients and products. This paper represents the development of a reference material of food crop composition for selenium, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content. Methods. To identify the selenium the hybrid atomic absorption method was used, to identify the nitrogen and phosphorus the photometric method was used, to determine the potassium flame-photometric method was used. When determining the metrological characteristics of the reference material the Russian national instructions and recommendations MI 3174-2009 and P 50.2.058-2007 were applied. Results. Based on the research findings the reference material of Chinese cabbage composition with a certified value and an expanded uncertainty was developed: for selenium 0.044 ± 0.017 mg/kg; for nitrogen 4.09 ± 0.27 %; for phosphorus 0.69 ± 0.14 %; for potassium 2.87 ± 0.22 %.

  7. Three Band Indexes for Leaf Nitrogen Content estimation in Holm oak in a temporal scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Labrador, J.; González, M. R.; Martín, M. P.; Riaño, D.; Salas, J.

    2011-12-01

    Holm oak Leaf Nitrogen Content (LNC) has been estimated in a Mediterranean savanna ecosystem "dehesa" in the Iberian Peninsula using an ASD FieldSpec° FR3 spectroradiometer connected to a Plant Probe with Leaf Clip (www.asdi.com). One of each ten bands between 400nm and 2500nm were selected, and two different Three Bands Indexes (TBI) with all the possible band combinations were built. Linear and logarithmic empirical relations with LNC were analyzed and the most correlated models were independently and inter-annually validated using the bootstrap technique. Data from two complete phenological years were used, the first one for calibration and the second for validation. The consideration of the temporal variation of both, optical responses and LNC resulted critical for the achievement of robust models, which showed high correlations (R2 max =0.81) and low errors (RMSE min = 8.74%). Nitrogen absorption bands were found in the selected indexes where non-correlated bands and usually the red edge region were also involved. Three Band Indexes may be sensible to physical responses of nitrogen bounds in the leaf molecules, though it is still necessary proving the influence of such absorptions in these relations.

  8. Past and future trends in concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hole, Lars R.; Christensen, Jesper H.; Ruoho-Airola, Tuija

    2009-01-01

    Recent trends in nitrogen and sulphur compounds in air and precipitation from a range of Arctic monitoring stations are presented, with seasonal data from the late 70s to 2004 or 2005. Earlier findings of declining sulphur concentrations are confirmed for most stations, while the pattern is less ...... deposition can be expected. This is because South-East Asian emissions have small influence north of the Arctic circle....

  9. Transformation of nitrogen dioxide into ozone and prediction of ozone concentrations using multiple linear regression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Nurul Adyani; Ramli, Nor Azam; Yahaya, Ahmad Shukri; Yusof, Noor Faizah Fitri M D; Sansuddin, Nurulilyana; Al Madhoun, Wesam Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Analysis and forecasting of air quality parameters are important topics of atmospheric and environmental research today due to the health impact caused by air pollution. This study examines transformation of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) into ozone (O(3)) at urban environment using time series plot. Data on the concentration of environmental pollutants and meteorological variables were employed to predict the concentration of O(3) in the atmosphere. Possibility of employing multiple linear regression models as a tool for prediction of O(3) concentration was tested. Results indicated that the presence of NO(2) and sunshine influence the concentration of O(3) in Malaysia. The influence of the previous hour ozone on the next hour concentrations was also demonstrated.

  10. MACRONUTRIENT CONCENTRATION AND CONTENT IN PASSION FRUIT LEAVES UNDER SAMPLING METHODS AND N-K FERTILIZATION RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODINEI FACCO PEGORARO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen and potassium fertilization and assessment of adequate nutritional status are essential for increasing fruit production of passion fruit. However, studies related to characterization of the leaf nutrient concentration and content in passion fruit with different production capacities are scarce in the literature in Brazil. The objective of this study was to evaluate macronutrient leaf concentration and content in different parts of the reproductive shoot of yellow passion fruit subjected to different ratios of N and K fertilization. The study was conducted in a randomized block design, with three replications, following a 4 x 6 factorial arrangement consisting of four cultivars of yellow passion fruit (BRS Gigante Amarelo, IAC 275, BRS Ouro Vermelho, and BRS Sol do Cerrado and six application rates of N-K2O fertilizer (0-0, 50-125, 100-250, 150-375, 200-500, and 250-625 kg ha-1 year-1. Two leaf sampling methods were adopted (leaf located at a position adjacent to the fruit, and leaf located at the end of the reproductive branch for nutritional assessment. The leaf located at the adjacent position had lower N, P, K, Mg, and S concentration and higher Ca concentration than the concentrations observed in the standard leaf. However, the higher leaf dry matter in adjacent leaves resulted in increased macronutrient concentration/content. The increase in N-K fertilizations inhibited Ca and Mg content in the leaves adjacent to the fruit of the Gigante Amarelo, IAC, and Ouro Vermelho passion fruit cultivars, but did not affect Ca and Mg content in the standard leaf. The passion fruit cultivars showed different leaf nutrient contents after N-K fertilization, indicating variable nutritional demands and the need for specific diagnostic methods for each cultivar.

  11. Estimation of Protein Content in Rice Crop and Nitrogen Content in Rice Leaves Through Regression Analysis with NDVI Derived from Camera Mounted Radio-Control Helicopter

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Arai; Masanori Sakashita; Osamu Shigetomi; Yuko Miura

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of protein content in rice crop and nitrogen content in rice leaves through regression analysis with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index: NDVI derived from camera mounted radio-control helicopter is proposed. Through experiments at rice paddy fields which is situated at Saga Prefectural Research Institute of Agriculture: SPRIA in Saga city, Japan, it is found that protein content in rice crops is highly correlated with NDVI which is acquired with visible and Near Infrared: NIR c...

  12. Dynamics of nitrogen concentration on intercropped ryegrass - 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i1.12661

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mossate Gabbi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrogen (N in ryegrass intercropped with different forage species with regard to dry matter (DM accumulation within an agroecological transition system was evaluated. Annual ryegrass was intercropped with black oats (RY + BO, white clover (RY + WC and forage peanut (RY + FP. The experimental design was completely randomized, with three replications. The study applied the N dilution model for plant tissue which comparatively uses modifiable factors of the environment at optimal levels. The model shows decline in N concentration due to the DM accumulation of temperate grass pastures. Data were compared to model by the root mean square deviation analysis. Dilution coefficient (β, used in all pasture samples, was lower than -0.60. Highest N concentration decline in plant tissues, due to DM accumulation, occurred in RY + WC pastures (β = -0.94, followed by RY + FP (β = - 0.86 and RY + BO (β = - 0.67, respectively. Ryegrass intercropped with white clover showed the highest N content in plant tissue, with a nitrogen nutrition index close to the proposed model.

  13. Round Robin test for the determination of nitrogen concentration in solid Lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favuzza, P., E-mail: paolo.favuzza@enea.it [ENEA Center, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Antonelli, A. [ENEA Research Center, Brasimone, 40035, Camugnano (Italy); Furukawa, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Groeschel, F. [KIT Research Center, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hedinger, R. [F4E Research Center, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Higashi, T. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Hirakawa, Y.; Iijima, M.; Ito, Y.; Kanemura, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Knaster, J. [IFMIF-EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho (Japan); Kondo, H. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Miccichè, G.; Nitti, F.S. [ENEA Research Center, Brasimone, 40035, Camugnano (Italy); Ohira, S. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Severi, M. [University of Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sugimoto, M. [JAEA Research Center, Rokkasho (Japan); Suzuki, A. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Traversi, R. [University of Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Wakai, E. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen contained in solid Lithium is converted into Ammonium ion. • Ammonium ion is suitably quantified by ionic chromatograph or by Ammonia sensor. • Good agreement of the partner’s results has been achieved. • Maximum operative reproducibility and blank subtraction are necessary. - Abstract: Three different partners, ENEA, JAEA ed University of Tokyo, have been involved during 2014–2015 in the Round Robin experimentation for the assessment of the soundness of the analitycal procedure for the determination of the Nitrogen impurities contained inside a solid Lithium sample. Two different kinds of Lithium samples, differing by about an order of magnitude in Nitrogen concentration (∼230 wppm; ∼20–30 wppm), have been selected for this cross analysis. The agreement of the achieved results appears very good for what concerns the most concentrated Lithium and indicates each partner’s procedure is appropriate and intrinsecally able to lead to meaningful values, characterized by a relative uncertainty of just few %. The smaller agreement in the case of the less concentrated Lithium anyway points out that particular attention must be paid to reduce as much as possible any source of external contamination and highlights the importance of the proper blank subtraction.

  14. Mountain wave-induced variations of ozone and total nitrogen dioxide contents over the Subpolar Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, V. N.; Elansky, N. F.; Moiseenko, K. B.

    2017-08-01

    Wavy spatial variations in the contents of trace gases are identified using plane measurements of O3 concentrations in the medium troposphere and the total content (TC) of NO2 in the atmospheric column from flights above the Subpolar Urals in April 1984. The results of model calculations allow us to relate these variations to mesoscale atmospheric disturbances above the mountains, which are caused by the influence of dynamic relief on the leaked-in flow.

  15. Growth and content of Spirulina platensis biomass chlorophyll cultivated at different values of light intensity and temperature using different nitrogen sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Dalva Godoy Danesi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of light intensity and temperature in S. platensis cultivation with potassium nitrate or urea as nitrogen source were investigated, as well as the biomass chlorophyll contents of this cyanobacteria, through the Response Surface Methodology. Experiments were performed at temperatures from 25 to 34.5ºC and light intensities from 15 to 69 µmol photons m-2 s-1, in mineral medium. In cultivations with both sources of nitrogen, KNO3 and urea, statistic evaluation through multiple regression, no interactions of such independent variables were detected in the results of the dependent variables maximum cell concentration, chlorophyll biomass contents, cell and chlorophyll productivities, as well as in the nitrogen-cell conversion factor. In cultivation performed with both sources of nitrogen, it was possible to obtain satisfactory adjustments to relate the dependent variables to the independent variables. The best results were achieved at temperature of 30ºC, at light intensity of 60 µmol photons m-2s-1, for cell growth, with cell productivity of approximately 95 mg L-1 d-1 in cultivations with urea. For the chlorophyll biomass content, the most adequate light intensity was 24 µmol photons m-2 s-1.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  17. Body Fat Content, Distribution and Blood Glucose Concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body fat content has been associated with development of non-communicable diseases due to its influence on metabolic risk factors (Levitan et al., 2004). Globally, the leading metabolic risk factors are high blood pressure (13%), tobacco use (9%), raised blood glucose levels (6%), physical inactivity (6%) and overweight ...

  18. Synergistic effects and optimization of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on the growth and nutrient uptake of a freshwater Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alketife, Ahmed M; Judd, Simon; Znad, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The synergistic effects and optimization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris (CCAP 211/11B, CS-42) and nutrient removal have been investigated under different concentrations of N (0-56 mg/L) and P (0-19 mg/L). The study showed that N/P ratio has a crucial effect on the biomass growth and nutrient removal. When N/P=10, a complete P and N removal was achieved at the end of cultivation with specific growth rate (SGR) of 1 d-1 and biomass concentration of 1.58 g/L. It was also observed that when the N content <2.5 mg/L, the SGR significantly reduced from 1.04 to 0.23 d-1 and the maximum biomass produced was decreased more than three-fold to 0.5 g/L. The Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface method were used to study the effects of the initial concentrations (P, N and C) on P and N removal efficiencies. The optimized P, N and C concentrations supporting 100% removal of both P and N at an SGR of 0.95 were 7, 55 and 10 mg/L respectively, with desirability value of 0.94. The results and analysis obtained could be very useful when applying the microalgae for efficient wastewater treatment and nutrient removal.

  19. On-farm measurement of electrical conductivity for the estimation of ammonium nitrogen concentration in pig slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Yagüe Carrasco, María Rosa; Quílez Sáez de Viteri, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) slurry (PS) is commonly applied as fertilizer to agricultural fields. Knowledge of PS nitrogen content is essential for good management, but PS nitrogen content is highly variable not only between farms but also within a farm. Laboratory analysis of animal slurries is often expensive and impractical for routine farmer use. Therefore, when slurry is spread on land its fertilizer value is generally unknown resulting in risk of pollution. In this work, ...

  20. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization on wheat leaf photosynthesis under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xian-feng; Zhang, Xu-cheng; Guo, Tian-wen; Yu, Jia

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization on the wheat leaf photosynthesis under long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (760 micromol x mol(-1)) was studied, based on the measurements of photosynthetic gas exchange parameters and light intensity-photosynthetic rate response curves at jointing stage. Under the long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, applying sufficient N could increase the wheat leaf photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr), and instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi). Comparing with those under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration, the Po and WUEi under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration increased, while the stomatal conductance (Gs) and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) decreased. With the increase of light flux intensity, the Pn and WUEi under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were higher those under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration, Gs was in adverse, while Ci and Tr had less change. At high fertilization rate of N, the Gs was linearly positively correlated with Pn, Tr, and WUEi, and the Gs and Ci had no correlation with each other under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration but negatively correlated under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration. At low fertilization rate of N, the Gs had no correlations with Pn and WUEi but linearly positively correlated with Ci and Tr. It was suggested that under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the wheat leaf Pn at low N fertilization rate was limited by non-stomatal factor.

  1. A Nitrogen-concentrated Phase in IA Iron Meteorite Acid Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, K.; Sugiura, N.

    1993-07-01

    portion of nitrogen is released at 500 degrees C and 600 degrees C temperature fractions. Total nitrogen amounts and average delta^l5N values of the two acid residues are described in Table 1. Discussion and Summary: Sample "Can-1bn" is 3-4 times concentrated in nitrogen than "Call-2b," although its delta^15N value is within terrestrial range (0 < delta^15N < +20 per mil). Presently, we cannot deny the possibility that nitrogen in "Can-1bn" is dominated by terrestrial nitrogen, which may have been acquired during the acid treatment. Nevertheless, nitrogen isotope data of "Can-2b" suggests that indigenous nitrogen is indeed concentrated in the acid residue of Canyon Diablo. Bulk nitrogen isotope data of Canyon Diablo is reported to be delta^15N= -61.8 +- 10.4 per mil, N= 38.0 +- 155 ppm [2]. Therefore, delta^15N values of "Can-2b" can be resulted by a mixing of indigenous nitrogen and contaminating nitrogen. However, distinct delta^15N values of these two samples may indicate, in turn, that nitrogen isotopes in inclusions of Canyon Diablo are truly heterogeneous because carbon isotopes of graphite inclusions in IA iron meteorites seem to be heterogeneous [7]. Acknowledgments: We thank Dr. J.-I. Matsuda of Osaka University for providing samples and information on these samples. References: [1] Scott E. R. D. and Wasson J. T. (1975) Rev. Geophys. Space Sci., 13, 527-546. [2] Prombo C. A. and Clayton R. N. (1983) Meteoritics, 18, 377-379. [3] Franchi I. A. et al. (1988) Meteoritics, 22, 379-380. [4] Hashizume K. (1993) Doctor Thesis. [5] Murty S. V. S. et al. (1983) GCA, 47, 1061-1068. [6] Ogata Y. et al. (1990) In Abstract of the 1990 Annual Meeting of the Geochemical Society of Japan, 57. [7] Deines P. and Wickman F. E. (1973) GCA, 37, 1295-1319. Table 1 appears here in the hard copy.

  2. Prediction of Fecal Nitrogen and Fecal Phosphorus Content for Lactating Dairy Cows in Large-scale Dairy Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QU Qing-bo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate efficient and sustainable manure management and reduce potential pollution, it's necessary for precise prediction of fecal nutrient content. The aim of this study is to build prediction models of fecal nitrogen and phosphorus content by the factors of dietary nutrient composition, days in milk, milk yield and body weight of Chinese Holstein lactating dairy cows. 20 kinds of dietary nutrient composition and 60 feces samples were collected from lactating dairy cows from 7 large-scale dairy farms in Tianjin City; The fecal nitrogen and phosphorus content were analyzed. The whole data set was divided into training data set and testing data set. The training data set, including 14 kinds of dietary nutrient composition and 48 feces samples, was used to develop prediction models. The relationship between fecal nitrogen or phosphorus content and dietary nutrient composition was illustrated by means of correlation and regression analysis using SAS software. The results showed that fecal nitrogen(FN content was highly positively correlated with organic matter intake(OMI and crude fat intake(CFi, and correlation coefficients were 0. 836 and 0. 705, respectively. Negative correlation coefficient was found between fecal phosphorus(FP content and body weight(BW, and the correlation coefficient was -0.525. Among different approaches to develop prediction models, the results indicated that determination coefficients of multiple linear regression equations were higher than those of simple linear regression equations. Specially, fecal nitrogen content was excellently predicted by milk yield(MY, days in milk(DIM, organic matter intake(OMI and nitrogen intake(NI, and the model was as follows:y=0.43+0.29×MY+0.02×DIM+0.92×OMI-13.01×NI (R2=0.96. Accordingly, the highest determination coefficient of prediction equation of FP content was 0.62, when body weight(BW, phosphorus intake(PI and nitrogen intake(NI were combined as predictors. The prediction

  3. Effect of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on micronutrient content in grain maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Maňásek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-year small-plot field experiment with the grain maize hybrid KWS 2376 was conducted on heavy soil with a low supply of available nutrients incl. potassium (K at Otrokovice, Czech Republic, during 2010–2011. The experiment included 4 treatments: unfertilized control; nitrogen (N fertilisation with urea (120 kg N/ha alone or combined with two forms of K fertiliser (potassium chloride (KCl or potassium sulphate (K2SO4; 125 kg K2O/ha. Biomass samples for determination of Zn, Mn, Cu and Fe were taken as the whole aboveground biomass in the DC 32 (first node stage, the ear-leaf in the DC 61 (flowering stage and grain during the harvest.Between the two years the content of micronutrients in the individual treatments varied irregularly. In DC 32 and DC 61 the order of the content of micronutrients was as follows: Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu. The Fe content was significantly the highest in the unfertilised control and the Mn content after the application of N + K2SO4 in both samplings. In the grain the order was as follows: Zn > Fe > Mn > Cu (mg/kg DM: at the following contents: Zn: 19.20–23.19; Fe: 15.12–19.87; Mn: 0.85–3.60; Cu: 0.19–1.34. We can recommend fertilisation of maize with urea and with both potassium mineral fertilisers without any negative effects on the content of the micronutrients in the maize biomass.

  4. The effect of carbohydrate accumulation and nitrogen deficiency on feedback regulation of photosynthesis in beech (Fagus sylvatica) under elevated CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, K.; Urban, O.; Holub, P.; Rajsnerova, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main manifestations of global change is an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Elevated concentration of CO2 has stimulating effect on plant photosynthesis and consequently also on the productivity. Long-term studies, however, show that this effect is progressively reduced due to feedback regulation of photosynthesis. The main causes of this phenomenon are considered as two factors: i) increased biomass production consumes a larger amount of nitrogen from the soil and this leads to progressive nitrogen limitation of photosynthesis, particularly at the level of the enzyme Rubisco, ii) the sink capacity is genetically limited and elevated CO2 concentration leads to increased accumulation of carbohydtrates (mainly sucrose, which is the main transport form of assimilates) in leaves. Increased concentrations of carbohydrates leads to a feedback regulation of photosynthesis by both, long-term feedback regulation of synthesis of the enzyme Rubisco, and also due to reduced capacity to produce ATP in the chloroplasts. However, mechanisms for interactive effects of nitrogen and accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates are still not well understood. Using 3-year-old Fagus sylvatica seedlings we have explored the interactive effects of nitrogen nutrition and sink capacity manipulation (sucrose feeding) on the dynamics of accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and changes in photosynthetic parameters under ambient (385 μmol (CO2) mol-1) and elevated (700 μmol(CO2) mol-1) CO2 concentration. Sink manipulation by sucrose feeding led to a continuous increase of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, which was higher in nitrogen fertilized seedlings. The accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates was also slightly stimulated by elevated CO2 concentration. Exponential decay (p carbohydrates increased. However, this relationship was modified by the nitrogen content. Accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates had relatively smaller effect on actual

  5. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Libault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2. In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  6. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  7. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency. PMID:24987690

  8. progesterone concentration and content in the post-partum ewe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    concentrations and the absence of estrus. Furthermore. estrus activitv was probably inhibited by lactation, but the latter hacl no inf'luence on ovulatron. During spring. ovulation and oestrus ..... The breeding season and artificial light. 4. Studies on the reproduction of the ewe.5. Mating behaviour and pregnancv diagnosis.

  9. Changes in polyphenol content during production of grape juice concentrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capanoglu, E.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Boyacioglu, D.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The production of grape juice concentrate on an industrial scale was evaluated and samples from the main steps of processing have been collected and analyzed. The sampling steps included the selection and washing of grapes (Nevsehir Patlak variety), pressing in order to obtain the juice separate

  10. Defect concentration in nitrogen-doped graphene grown on Cu substrate: A thickness effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Dhananjay K., E-mail: dhananjay@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Fateixa, Sara [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Hortigüela, María J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vidyasagar, Reddithota [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Nogueira, Helena I.S. [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Singh, Manoj Kumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kholkin, Andrei, E-mail: kholkin@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Tuning the band-gap of graphene is a current need for real device applications. Copper (Cu) as a substrate plays a crucial role in graphene deposition. Here we report the fabrication of in-situ nitrogen (N) doped graphene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and the effect of Cu substrate thickness on the growth mechanism. The ratio of intensities of G and D peaks was used to evaluate the defect concentration based on local activation model associated with the distortion of the crystal lattice due to incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene lattice. The results suggest that Cu substrate of 20 µm in thickness exhibits higher defect density (1.86×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) as compared to both 10 and 25 µm thick substrates (1.23×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and 3.09×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively). Furthermore, High Resolution -X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS) precisely affirms ~0.4 at% of nitrogen intercalations in graphene. Our results show that the substitutional type of nitrogen doping dominates over the pyridinic configuration. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows all the XRD peaks associated with carbon. However, the peak at ~24° is suppressed by the substrate peaks (Cu). These results suggest that nitrogen atoms can be efficiently incorporated into the graphene using thinner copper substrates, rather than the standard 25 µm ones. This is important for tailoring the properties by graphene required for microelectronic applications.

  11. Nitrogen Concentration Estimation in Tomato Leaves by VIS-NIR Non-Destructive Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Menesatti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen concentration in plants is normally determined by expensive and time consuming chemical analyses. As an alternative, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration determination in petiole sap were proposed, but these assays are not always satisfactory. Spectral reflectance values of tomato leaves obtained by visible-near infrared spectrophotometry are reported to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plant nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility and the accuracy of the estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen concentration performed through a rapid, portable and non-destructive system, in comparison with chemical standard analyses, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration in petiole sap. Mean reflectance leaf values were compared to each reference chemical value by partial least squares chemometric multivariate methods. The correlation between predicted values from spectral reflectance analysis and the observed chemical values showed in the independent test highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.94. The utilization of the proposed system, increasing efficiency, allows better knowledge of nutritional status of tomato plants, with more detailed and sharp information and on wider areas. More detailed information both in space and time is an essential tool to increase and stabilize crop quality levels and to optimize the nutrient use efficiency.

  12. A Programmable Aerial Multispectral Camera System for In-Season Crop Biomass and Nitrogen Content Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Geipel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study introduces a prototype multispectral camera system for aerial estimation of above-ground biomass and nitrogen (N content in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. The system is fully programmable and designed as a lightweight payload for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS. It is based on an industrial multi-sensor camera and a customizable image processing routine. The system was tested in a split fertilized N field trial at different growth stages in between the end of stem elongation and the end of anthesis. The acquired multispectral images were processed to normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and red-edge inflection point (REIP orthoimages for an analysis with simple linear regression models. The best results for the estimation of above-ground biomass were achieved with the NDVI (R 2 = 0.72–0.85, RMSE = 12.3%–17.6%, whereas N content was estimated best with the REIP (R 2 = 0.58–0.89, RMSE = 7.6%–11.7%. Moreover, NDVI and REIP predicted grain yield at a high level of accuracy (R 2 = 0.89–0.94, RMSE = 9.0%–12.1%. Grain protein content could be predicted best with the REIP (R 2 = 0.76–0.86, RMSE = 3.6%–4.7%, with the limitation of prediction inaccuracies for N-deficient canopies.

  13. Effect of nitrification inhibitors on the content of available nitrogen forms in the soil under maize (Zea mays, L.) growing

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana PANAKOVA; Slamka, Pavol; LOŽEK, Otto

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of nitrification inhibitors (dicyandiamide and 1,2,4 triazole) on the content of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen in the soil and the effectiveness of nitrogen-sulphur nutrition of maize. The research was conducted in field small-plot experiment with maize on Haplic Luvisol with dominance of clay fraction in experimental years 2012 to 2015. The dose of nitrogen in all experimental treatments was 160 kg*ha-1 and was applied at one shot ...

  14. Trends in concentrations and export of nitrogen in boreal forest streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkkola, S.; Nieminen, M. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland); Koivusalo, H. [Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo (Finland), Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [and others

    2012-11-01

    Temporal trends in inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) export in the stream water between 1979 and 2006 were studied in eight forested headwater catchments in eastern Finland, where an increasing air-temperature trend and a decreasing N-deposition trend has been observed since the 1980s. The Seasonal Kendall test was conducted to study if the stream water N concentrations have changed concurrently and a mixed model regression analysis was used to study which catchment characteristics and hydrometeorological variables were related to the variation in stream water N. The annual concentrations of total organic N (TON) increased at two catchments and the concentrations of nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}-N) decreased at three and four catchments, respectively. The main factor explaining variation in concentrations and export of N was percentage of peatlands in a catchment. The NH{sub 4}-N concentrations were also related to the N deposition, and the exports of NO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}, and TON to precipitation. Quantitative changes in both the N concentrations and exports were small. The results suggested relatively small changes in the N concentrations and exports between 1979 and 2006, most probably because the effects of increased air and stream water temperatures largely have been concealed behind the concurrent decrease in N deposition. (orig.)

  15. The effect of light and nitrogen availability on the caffeine, theophylline and allantoin contents in the leaves of Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F. Pompelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most abundant and important purine alkaloid derived from several important crop, such as coffee, tea, cocoa, guarana, and other plants. In tea and coffee plants, caffeine is predominantly produced in the young buds of leaves and in immature fruits. The effect of light-stimulating caffeine biosynthesis is uncertain, but our results clearly show that light, independent of N-availability, increases caffeine (26%, allantoin (47%, and theophylline (8% content in plants compared with those grown in a shaded (50% solar irradiation environment. Caffeine is the major low-molecular-weight nitrogenous compound in coffee plants, and at times, it functions as a chemical defense for new bud leaves. Therefore, the primary question that remains is whether caffeine can serve as a nitrogen source for other metabolic pathways. If so, plants grown under a low nitrogen concentration should promote caffeine degradation, with the consequent use of nitrogen atoms (e.g., in NH3 for the construction of other nitrogen compounds that are used for the plant’s metabolism. Our results provide strong evidence that caffeine is degraded into allantoin at low rates in N-deficient plants but not in N-enriched ones. By contrast, this degradation may represent a significant N-source in N-deficient plants.

  16. Combined effect of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium fertilizers on the contents of glucosinolates in rocket salad (Eruca sativa Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Silbia; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Chung, Doug Young; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) are the most limiting factors in crop production. N often affects the amino acid composition of protein and in turn its nutritional quality. In Brassica plants, abundant supply of N fertilizer decreases the relative proportion of glucosinolates (GSLs), thus reducing the biological and medical values of the vegetables. Hence effort was made to evaluate the influence of different proportions of nutrient solutions containing N-P-K on the GSL profiles of rocket salad (Eruca sativa Mill.). Fifteen desulpho-(DS) GSLs were isolated and identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis. Rocket salad plants supplied with lesser amount of N, P or higher concentrations of K showed a typical improvement in total GSL contents. In contrast, total GSL levels were less at higher N supply. Furthermore, with N concentrations above 5 mM and K concentrations less than 2.5 mM, the GSL amounts were on average 13.51 and 13.75 μmol/g dry weight (DW), respectively. Aliphatic GSLs predominated in all concentrations of NPK while indolyl GSLs made up marginally less amount of the total compositions. Five and 2 mM N and P possessed much higher levels of several types of aliphatic GSLs than other concentrations, including glucoerucin, glucoraphanin and dimeric 4-mercaptobutyl GSL. From this perspective, it is contended that supply of less N results in enhancing the metabolic pathway for the synthesis of GSLs in rocket salad.

  17. Combined effect of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium fertilizers on the contents of glucosinolates in rocket salad (Eruca sativa Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyuk Chun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N, phosphorous (P and potassium (K are the most limiting factors in crop production. N often affects the amino acid composition of protein and in turn its nutritional quality. In Brassica plants, abundant supply of N fertilizer decreases the relative proportion of glucosinolates (GSLs, thus reducing the biological and medical values of the vegetables. Hence effort was made to evaluate the influence of different proportions of nutrient solutions containing N–P–K on the GSL profiles of rocket salad (Eruca sativa Mill.. Fifteen desulpho-(DS GSLs were isolated and identified using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis. Rocket salad plants supplied with lesser amount of N, P or higher concentrations of K showed a typical improvement in total GSL contents. In contrast, total GSL levels were less at higher N supply. Furthermore, with N concentrations above 5 mM and K concentrations less than 2.5 mM, the GSL amounts were on average 13.51 and 13.75 μmol/g dry weight (DW, respectively. Aliphatic GSLs predominated in all concentrations of NPK while indolyl GSLs made up marginally less amount of the total compositions. Five and 2 mM N and P possessed much higher levels of several types of aliphatic GSLs than other concentrations, including glucoerucin, glucoraphanin and dimeric 4-mercaptobutyl GSL. From this perspective, it is contended that supply of less N results in enhancing the metabolic pathway for the synthesis of GSLs in rocket salad.

  18. Nitrogen concentrations and nitrogen isotopic compositions in leaves of Cinnamomum Camphora and Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) for indicating atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Guiyang (SW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Xiao, Huayun; Qu, Linglu

    2017-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) concentrations and δ15N signatures in soil and camphor (Cinnamomum Camphora) and Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) leaves collected along an urban-rural gradient in Guiyang (SW China) were investigated systematically. N concentrations in camphor (1.01-2.37%) and Masson pine (0.99-2.42%) leaves showed a significant decrease from central Guiyang (0-6 km) to suburban areas (18-24 km), while slightly increased leaf N concentrations reemerged at areas more than 24 km from the city center. The δ15N values in camphor and Masson pine leaves also decreased from central Guiyang to the rural area, with more positive leaf δ15N in the urban area and 15N-depleted leaf δ15N in the rural area. No significant differences were observed for soil N concentrations and soil δ15N in these areas, which suggested that the decrease in leaf N concentrations was due to decreased atmospheric N deposition along the urban-rural gradient and that there were two isotopically different atmospheric N sources in Guiyang city: foliar δ15N values in urban areas were mainly influenced by 15N-enriched atmospheric NOx-N from traffic emissions, while those in rural areas were primarily affected by 15N-depleted atmospheric NHx-N from agricultural activities. However, the pattern of moss (collected ten years prior, with lower traffic density and wastewater treatment rate in the urban area) δ15N variation in the urban area (0-12 km) was contrary to that of the camphor and Masson pine leaves, indicating that the δ15N values in previously collected urban mosses were mainly controlled by isotopically light NHx-N from untreated wastes and sewage, but were much less affected by traffic. For the trees in the urban area, N concentrations in camphor and Masson pine leaves varied in parallel with their δ15N values (P deposition in the urban area. This indicated that the greater δ15N in urban camphor and Masson pine leaves reflected a higher contribution of NOx-N to N deposition. This study

  19. Effect of temperature and nitrogen concentration on biomass composition of Heterochlorella luteoviridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania MENEGOL

    Full Text Available Abstract The interest in microalga as a food supplement has grown due their high contents of carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and proteins. This study evaluated the effect of different temperatures (22, 27 or 32 °C and sodium nitrate concentrations (12, 24, 36, 48 or 60 mg L-1 of N-NO3 in culture medium on Heterochlorella luteoviridis biomass production and composition. The highest biomass concentration (3.35 g L-1 was observed at the highest N-NO3 concentration. The N-NO3 concentration positively affected protein, carbohydrate and carotenoids contents of biomass. On the other hand, cells cultured at the lowest N-NO3 concentration showed a slight increment in lipid content. The major carotenoid was lutein (30.7 ± 1.4% of total carotenoids, and the polyunsaturated fatty acids were 37 ± 2% of total fatty acids. Low temperature improved the biosynthesis of ω3 type fatty acids by lowering the ω6:ω3 ratio. Overall, our results indicate H. luteoviridis can yield high biomass concentration under autotrophic growth, resulting in a biomass rich in carotenoids, mainly lutein, and ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  20. THE EFFECT OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION OF MAIZE ON PROTEIN CONCENTRATION AND IN VITRO FEMENTABILITY OF GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D BABNIK

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrogen fertilization of maize on fermentability of maize grain in the rumen was studied by means of in vitro method based on the measurement of gas produced during the incubation of samples with rumen liquor. Gas production was recorded continuously up to 72 h incubation time and cumulative gas production was described by the Gompertz equation Y=A*exp(-exp(-d*(t-tm. Seven treatments, one of them unfertilized and others fertilized with 100 to 250 kg N ha–1, were compared. Grain yield and concentration of crude protein (CP in grain increased linearly with nitrogen fertilization. Grain yield increased for 25 kg dry matter (DM ha–1 and CP concentration for 0.13 g kg–1 DM per each additional kg of N. Concentration of CP in grain, which varied from 83 to 115 g kg–1 DM, was closely related to the dynamics of gas production. The maximal gas production rate (MPR was negatively related to CP concentration in the grain (R2 = 0.53; p < 0.10 and the time of MPR (tm was positively related to the amount of added N (R2 = 0.74; p < 0.05 and concentration of CP in the grain (R2 = 0.88; p < 0.01. It is likely that intensive N fertilization of maize limits ruminal digestion of maize starch. Due to the shift of starch digestion from the rumen to lower gastrointestinal tract better utilization of energy can be expected in maize grain of extensively fertilized maize than in the grain of maize, in which supply of N is sub-optimal.

  1. sp sup 2 and sp sup 3 bonding configurations in low nitrogen content a-CN sub x thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzasalma, A M; Neri, F; Trusso, S

    2003-01-01

    The results of an electron spectroscopy study carried out on a set of pulsed laser deposited CN sub x films are reported. A progressive degree of graphitization, deduced from the continuous increase in the sp sup 2 bond fraction, has been found for x values up to 25%. The mass density values, deduced by a proper treating of both the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy data, are consistent with a material made up by two phases, namely a sp sup 2 threefold (graphite-like) and a sp sup 3 fourfold (diamond-like) coordinated one. The behaviour of the density of the samples as a function of the N content does not show any abrupt change in going from lower to higher nitrogen concentrations as found by other authors, this certainly being due to differences in the starting sp sup 3 /sp sup 2 ratio of the films at zero N concentration and to their different preparation parameters.

  2. A facile approach towards increasing the nitrogen-content in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via halogenated catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ombaka, L.M. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Ndungu, P.G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Department of Applied Chemistry, Doornfontein Campus, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 17011, Johannesburg 2028 (South Africa); Omondi, B. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); McGettrick, J.D.; Davies, M.L. [SPECIFIC, Swansea University, Baglan Bay Innovation Centre, Baglan, Port Talbot SA12 7AX (United Kingdom); Nyamori, V.O., E-mail: nyamori@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2016-03-15

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been synthesized at 850 °C via a CVD deposition technique by use of three ferrocenyl derivative catalysts, i.e. para-CN, -CF{sub 3} and -Cl substituted-phenyl rings. The synthesized catalysts have been characterized by NMR, IR, HR-MS and XRD. The XRD analysis of the para-CF{sub 3} catalyst indicates that steric factors influence the X-ray structure of 1,1′-ferrocenylphenyldiacrylonitriles. Acetonitrile or pyridine was used as carbon and nitrogen sources to yield mixtures of N-CNTs and carbon spheres (CS). The N-CNTs obtained from the para-CF{sub 3} catalysts, in pyridine, have the highest nitrogen-doping level, show a helical morphology and are less thermally stable compared with those synthesized by use of the para-CN and -Cl as catalyst. This suggests that fluorine heteroatoms enhance nitrogen-doping in N-CNTs and formation of helical-N-CNTs (H-N-CNTs). The para-CF{sub 3} and para-Cl catalysts in acetonitrile yielded iron-filled N-CNTs, indicating that halogens promote encapsulation of iron into the cavity of N-CNT. The use of acetonitrile, as carbon and nitrogen source, with the para-CN and -Cl as catalysts also yielded a mixture of N-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), with less abundance of CNFs in the products obtained using para-Cl catalysts. However, para-CF{sub 3} catalyst in acetonitrile gave N-CNTs as the only shaped carbon nanomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Graphical abstract showing the synthesis of N-CNTs using halogenated-ferrocenyl derivatives as catalyst with pyridine or acetonitrile as nitrogen and carbon sources via the chemical vapour deposition technique. - Highlights: • N-CNTs were synthesized from halogenated ferrocenyl catalysts. • Halogenated catalysts promote nitrogen-doping and pyridinic nitrogen in N-CNTs. • Halogenated catalysts facilitate iron filling of N-CNTs.

  3. Long-term multifactorial climate change impacts on mesofaunal biomass and nitrogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Mette; Dyrnum, Kristine; Michelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration accompanied by temperature increases and altered precipitation patterns calls for assessment of long-term effects of these climatic changes on soil organisms that are essential for ecosystem functioning. In a long-term, full-factorial climate change...... field experiment, with factors elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, warming and prolonged summer drought, we assessed the responses of Collembola, oribatid and mesostigmatic mites and enchytraeid worms after 8 years of treatment. Both the biomasses and N content of oribatid and mesostigmatic mites...... microbial N content and enchytraeid biomass. The biomass of all mesofaunal groups was reduced by spring drought, especially when combined with warming. Enchytraeid and especially collembolan biomass suffered greater drought declines than mite biomasses. We conclude that under long-term elevated CO2 exposure...

  4. Nitrogen concentrations and losses from agricultural streams in the Nordic and Baltic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålnacke, Per; Bechmann, Marianne; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Iital, Arvo; Kyllmar, Katarina; Koskiaho, Jari; Lagzdins, Ainis; Povilaitis, Arvydas

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of long-term trends is one of the key objectives in most national water quality monitoring programmes. It is for example essential that we know how long it can take to detect the response in agricultural streams to changes in agriculture and implemented measures, because such information is needed to allow environmental authorities and decision and policy makers to establish realistic goals. Thus, long-term monitoring data is the key to cover future management needs and demands such as implementation of various EU-Directives (e.g., WFD, the Nitrates Directive). This paper in a uniform fashion examines the levels and temporal trends of nitrogen concentrations and losses in streams draining agricultural catchment areas in the Nordic and Baltic countries. 35 catchments (range 0.1-33km2) in Norway (9), Denmark (5), Sweden (8), Finland (4), Estonia (3), Latvia (3) and Lithuania (3) were selected for the study. Most of these catchments are part of national water quality monitoring programmes and initially selected to represent the major crops, soil types and climatic conditions in each country. The longest time series where 23 years (1988-2010) while the shortest one was 10 years (2002-2011). The reasons for these identified trends and no-trends will be discussed during the oral presentation in relation to land use, agricultural management and implementation of mitigation measures. Furthermore, the difference in mean level concentrations and losses will be discussed in relation to differences in climate, land use and agricultural management Overall the results show that agricultural catchments in the Nordic and Baltic countries exhibit different levels of nitrogen concentrations and losses, with a large interannual variability in all catchments. For example, the overall range in annual long-term mean TN losses was 6-102 kg N ha-1. Nearly one third of the investigated agricultural catchments showed statistically significant downward trends in nitrogen losses or

  5. Effect of Charcoal Volatile Matter Content and Feedstock on Soil Microbe-Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, T.; Deenik, J. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Campbell, S.; Antal, M. J., Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Charcoal has important biogeochemical implications in soil—first as a means to sequester carbon, and second as a soil conditioner to potentially enhance soil quality and fertility. Volatile matter (VM) content is a property of charcoal which describes its degree of thermal alteration, or carbonization. Results from greenhouse experiments have shown that plant growth can be negatively affected by charcoals with high VM content (20-35%), with and without fertilizer supplements, whereas low VM charcoal (6-9%) increased plant growth when combined with fertilizer. We conducted two laboratory studies to characterize the VM content of charcoals derived from two feedstocks (corncob and kiawe) and relate observed differences to key aspects of soil fertility. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), total phenol content (using a Prussian blue colorimetric assay), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we found that the VM content of charcoal primarily consisted of alkanes, oxygen-substituted alkanes, and phenolic compounds. However, the GC-MS data indicated that charcoals can differ vastly in their extractable fraction, depending upon both VM content and feedstock. In a second set of experiments, we examined the effect of VM content and feedstock on soil microbial activity, available nitrogen (N), and soluble carbon (C). High VM corncob charcoals significantly enhanced microbial activity, coupled with net reduction in available N and soluble C. For a given feedstock, the extent of this effect was dependent upon VM content. However, the overall effect of VM content on microbial dynamics was apparently related to the composition of the acetone-extractable fraction, which was particularly important when comparing two charcoals derived from different feedstocks but with the equivalent VM contents. Removing the acetone-extractable fraction from the 23% VM corncob charcoal significantly reduced the enhancement of

  6. [Interpretation of spatial distribution pattern for dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentration in coastal estuary using hyperspectral data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Huan

    2010-06-01

    Choosing dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) as one of the representative nutritional salt monitoring indexes, a hyperspectral remotely sensed inversion model was built and applied to quantitatively retrieve water quality parameters with its spatial distribution patterns in coastal estuary with high suspended sediment concentration (SSC). It was found that when SSC was larger than 0.1 kg/m3, DIN concentration had a notable inverse correlation with SSC and the correlation coefficient R2 reached 0.617. Based on this conclusion, firstly the in-situ observed water surface remote sensing reflectance was resampled according to the spectral response characters of Hyperion sensor. And then, statistical correlation analysis between reflectance and DIN concentration was carried out. The results showed that band reflectance of R804 and R630 representing the second and first reflectance peak of water spectrum curve were sensitive to the variation of DIN concentration. And then, a pseudo remotely sensed sand parameter index R804 x R630/(R804 - R630) was calculated for the construction of the nonlinear DIN quantitative reversion model. Correlation coefficient R2 between observed and simulated DIN concentrations for 29 calibrating samples and 10 validating samples were 0.746 and 0.67, while their mean absolute errors reached 109.07 and 147.58 microg/L, respectively. The model was then applied on Hyperion hyperspectral image to get the spatial distribution character of DIN concentration in Sheyanghe river estuary and the DIN concentration was between 52 to 513 microg/L. Results indicated that in coastal estuary which was dominated by suspended sediments, the diffusive trends of DIN concentration reversed by remote sensing techniques had an intimate relationship with motions of tidal current and transportation attributes of SSC. As the hydrodynamic conditions were unclear, hyperspectral remote sensing technique was an effective technical way for dynamic survey of DIN concentration.

  7. Nitrogen Concentrations and Exports in Baseflow and Stormflow from Three Small Urban Catchments in Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J.; Hochmuth, G.; Clark, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Export of nitrogen from different watersheds across the United States is receiving increasing attention due to the impairment of water quality in receiving water bodies. Researchers have indicated that different land uses exerted a substantial influence on the water quality. Nitrogen loadings on the watershed scale are being studied in many large ecosystems, such as the Baltimore Ecosystem and Arizona Ecosystem, but only a few focuses in a smaller scale such as catchment scale. Characterization of the land use in catchment scale can better explain the observed environmental phenomena under the watershed scale and enrich the related watershed studies. Nitrogen fluxes have been studied at Lake Alice watershed in Gainesville, Florida with a focus on the rarely studied catchments such as sports fields with intensive fertilization management (SFC), urban area with reclaimed water irrigation (RWC) and urban area without irrigation (CC). The entire study started from May 2013. Discharge was monitored in the three catchments by transducers every 5 minutes. Regular biweekly grab samples in the three catchments were used to estimate the baseflow N loads, composite samples in 13 storms were collected to estimate the stormflow N loads. The results showed that in the baseflow, the average NO3-N concentration in SFC was 12.19 mg/l, which was significantly different from the urban catchments. Also there was a significant difference between the NO3-N concentrations in RWC (1.17 mg/l on average) and CC (0.60 mg/l on average). A separate log-log relationship was developed between discharge and N loads to estimate the baseflow N loads and stormflow N loads. It showed that baseflow contributed more N loads than stormflow in the three catchments in the annual N load. In conclusion, the recreational catchment received the greatest N load compared to the other catchments, so it should be the priority catchment when it comes to adopting nutrient management practices in the Lake Alice

  8. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) uptake by vegetation controlled by atmospheric concentrations and plant stomatal aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exchange between the atmosphere and five European tree species was investigated in the laboratory using a dynamic branch enclosure system (consisting of two cuvettes) and a highly specific NO2 analyzer. NO2 measurements were performed with a sensitive gas phase chemiluminescence NO detector combined with a NO2 specific (photolytic) converter, both from Eco-Physics (Switzerland). This highly specific detection system excluded bias from other nitrogen compounds. Investigations were performed at two light intensities (Photosynthetic Active Radiation, PAR, 450 and 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and NO2 concentrations between 0 and 5 ppb. Ambient parameters (air temperature and relative humidity) were held constant. The data showed dominant NO2 uptake by the respective tree species under all conditions. The results did not confirm the existence of a compensation point within a 95% confidence level, though we cannot completely exclude emission of NO2 under very low atmospheric concentrations. Induced stomatal stricture, or total closure, by changing light conditions, as well as by application of the plant hormone ABA (Abscisic Acid) caused a corresponding decrease of NO2 uptake. No loss of NO2 to plant surfaces was observed under stomatal closure and species dependent differences in uptake rates could be clearly related to stomatal behavior.

  9. Determination of type and concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases by Raman spectroscopy using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptinskiy, Kirill A.; Burikov, Sergey A.; Sarmanova, Olga E.; Dolenko, Sergey A.; Dolenko, Tatiana A.

    2016-04-01

    In this article the results of solution of two-parametrical inverse problems of laser Raman spectroscopy of identification and determination of concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases in two-component solutions are presented. Elaboration of methods of control of reactions with DNA strands in remote real-time mode is necessary for solution of one of the basic problems of creation of biocomputers - increase of reliability of molecular DNA-computations. The comparative analysis of two used methods of solution of stated problems has demonstrated convincing advantages of technique of artificial neural networks. Use of artificial neural networks allowed to reach the accuracy of determination of concentration of each base in two-component solutions 0.2-0.3 g/l.

  10. Development of FT-NIR Models for the Simultaneous Estimation of Chlorophyll and Nitrogen Content in Fresh Apple (Malus Domestica Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural practices determine the level of food production and, to great extent, the state of the global environment. During the last decades, the indiscriminate recourse to fertilizers as well as the nitrogen losses from land application have been recognized as serious issues of modern agriculture, globally contributing to nitrate pollution. The development of a reliable Near-Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS-based method, for the simultaneous monitoring of nitrogen and chlorophyll in fresh apple (Malus domestica leaves, was investigated on a set of 133 samples, with the aim of estimating the nutritional and physiological status of trees, in real time, cheaply and non-destructively. By means of a FT (Fourier Transform-NIR instrument, Partial Least Squares (PLS regression models were developed, spanning a concentration range of 0.577%–0.817% for the total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN content (R2 = 0.983; SEC = 0.012; SEP = 0.028, and of 1.534–2.372 mg/g for the total chlorophyll content (R2 = 0.941; SEC = 0.132; SEP = 0.162. Chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b contents were also evaluated (R2 = 0.913; SEC = 0.076; SEP = 0.101 and R2 = 0.899; SEC = 0.059; SEP = 0.101, respectively. All calibration models were validated by means of 47 independent samples. The NIR approach allows a rapid evaluation of the nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, and may represent a useful tool for determining nutritional and physiological status of plants, in order to allow a correction of nutrition programs during the season.

  11. Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center]|[Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Ball, J.T. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center; Walker, R.F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    1998-03-01

    This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.

  12. Nitrogen concentration in dry matter of the fifth leaf during growth of greenhouse tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattin Jorge E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen concentration in dry matter of the fifth leaf during growth of a greenhouse tomato crop was determined. Plants of hybrid Monte Carlo were grown in 4.5 L bags, using a commercial substrate, in a plant density of 3.3 plants m-2. A nutrient solution containing, in mmol L-1: KNO3, 4.0; K2SO4, 0.9; Ca(NO32, 3.75; KH2PO4, 1.5; MgSO4, 1.0; iron chelate 19. 10³, was used as reference. Microelements were added by a commercial mixture. The T3 treatment was equal to the reference nutrient solution, whereas in treatments T1, T2, T4 and T5 quantities of all nutrients from T3 were multiplied by 0.25, 0.50, 1.25 and 1.50, respectively. In each treatment, the volume of 1 L of nutrient solution was supplied to each plant once a week by fertigation. Periodically destructive measurements were made from anthesis to ripening of the first truss, to determine dry matter and N concentration in shoot and in fifth leaf tissues, counted from the apex to the bottom of the plant. Five dilution curves were fitted from data of N concentration in the fifth leaf and shoot dry matter accumulation during growth of plants. A general relationship was adjusted between actual N concentration in shoot (Nt and in the fifth leaf (Nf: Nt = 1.287 Nf (R² = 0.80. This relationship could be used to estimate the N status of plants by means of a nitrogen nutrition index (NNI, from analysis of the fifth leaf sap.

  13. Effects of Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Levels and Native Soil Properties on Rice Grain Fe, Zn and Protein Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. CHANDEL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of protein and metal ions (Fe, Zn in rice grains is a complex polygenic trait showing considerable environmental effect. To analyze the effect of nitrogen application levels and native soil properties on rice grain protein, iron (Fe and zinc (Zn contents, 32 rice genotypes were grown at three different locations each under 80 and 120 kg/hm2 nitrogen fertilizer applications. In treatments with nitrogen fertilizer application, the brown rice grain protein content (GPC increased significantly (1.1% to 7.0% under higher nitrogen fertilizer application (120 kg/hm2 whereas grain Fe/Zn contents showed non-significant effect of nitrogen application level, thus suggesting that the rate of uptake and translocation of macro-elements does not influence the uptake and translocation of micro-elements. The pH, organic matter content and inherent Fe/Zn levels of native soil showed significant effects on grain Fe and Zn contents of all the rice genotypes. Grain Zn content of almost all the tested rice genotypes was found to increase at Location III having loamy soil texture, neutral pH value (pH 6.83 and higher organic matter content than the other two locations (Locations I and II, indicating significant influence of native soil properties on brown rice grain Zn content while grain Fe content showed significant genotype × environment interaction effect. Genotypic difference was found to be the most significant factor to affect grain Fe/Zn contents in all the tested rice genotypes, indicating that although native soil properties influence phyto-availability of micronutrients and consequently influencing absorption, translocation and grain deposition of Fe/Zn ions, yet genetic makeup of a plant determines its response to varied soil conditions and other external factors. Two indica rice genotypes R-RF-31 (27.62 μg/g grain Zn content and 7.80% GPC and R1033-968-2-1 (30.05 μg/g grain Zn content and 8.47% GPC were identified as high grain Zn and

  14. Effects of the addition of different nitrogen sources in the tequila fermentation process at high sugar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizon, J; Gschaedler, A

    2007-04-01

    To study the effect of the addition of different nitrogen sources at high sugar concentration in the tequila fermentation process. Fermentations were performed at high sugar concentration (170 g l(-1)) using Agave tequilana Weber blue variety with and without added nitrogen from different sources (ammonium sulfate; glutamic acid; a mixture of ammonium sulfate and amino acids) during the exponential phase of growth. All the additions increased the fermentation rate and alcohol efficiency. The level of synthesis of volatile compounds depended on the source added. The concentration of amyl alcohols and isobutanol were decreased while propanol and acetaldehyde concentration increased. The most efficient nitrogen sources for fermentation rate were ammonium sulfate and the mixture of ammonium sulfate and amino acids. The level of volatile compounds produced depended upon types of nitrogen. The synthesis of some volatile compounds increased while others decreased with nitrogen addition. The addition of nitrogen could be a strategy for improving the fermentation rate and efficiency in the tequila fermentation process at high sugar Agave tequilana concentration. Furthermore, the sensory quality of the final product may change because the synthesis of the volatile compounds is modified.

  15. Using a Chlorophyll Meter to Evaluate the Nitrogen Leaf Content in Flue-Cured Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Contillo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In flue-cured tobacco N fertilizer is commonly applied during pre-planting, and very often applied again later as a growth-starter. It is generally held that the efficiency of N-fertilizer use can be improved by evaluating the leaf Nstatus after transplanting and until flowering stage. N use efficiency in this context does not refer merely to the yield but also to the quality, in the meanwhile minimizing the negative effects on the environment. To investigate these aspects, we evaluated the capacity of a Minolta model SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter to estimate the N-status in flue-cured tobacco. The aims was to verify if a relationship exists between SPAD readings and leaf N content, and if a single leaf, in a well defined stalk position, could represent the nitrogen content of the whole plant. During the years 1995 and 1996, a pot experiment was conducted using two flue-cured tobacco varieties. SPAD values, total chlorophyll, total N contents and leaf area were measured throughout the growing season, on each odd leaf stalk position. SPAD values were well-correlated with both total chlorophyll and total N leaf concentration, and the regression coefficients were higher when relationships were calculated on a leaf-area basis. For both relationships, SPAD-total chlorophyll and SPAD-total N, the best fittings were obtained with quadratic equations. One leaf stalk position alone is able to monitor the N-status of the whole plant during the first six weeks after transplanting, without distinction of year and variety effects. The SPAD measurement of one leaf per plant, throughout the vegetative growing season, is therefore a valid tool to test the N-status of the crop in a period when a required N supply is still effective.

  16. Responses in growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition of four oleaginous microalgae to different nitrogen sources and concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wan, Linglin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen deficiency is an effective strategy for enhancing lipid production in microalgae. Close relationships exist among lipid production, microalgal species, and nitrogen sources. We report growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition in four microalgae ( Chlorococcum ellipsoideum UTEX972, Chlorococcum nivale LB2225, Chlorococcum tatrense UTEX2227, and Scenedesmus deserticola JNU19) under nitrate- and urea-nitrogen deficiencies. We found three patterns of response to nitrogen deficiency: Type-A (decrease in biomass and increase in lipid content), Type-B (reduction in both biomass and lipid content), and Type-C (enhancement of both biomass and lipid content). Type-C microalgae are potential candidates for large-scale oil production. Chlorococcum ellipsoideum, for example, exhibited a neutral lipid production of up to 239.6 mg/(L·d) under urea-nitrogen deficiency. In addition, nitrogen deficiency showed only a slight influence on lipid fractions and fatty acid composition. Our study provides useful information for further screening hyper-lipid microalgal strains for biofuel production.

  17. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to different nitrogen concentrations during alcoholic fermentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes Ferreira, A.; Olmo Muñoz, Marcel·lí del; García Martínez, José; Jiménez Martí, Elena; Mendes Faia, A.; Pérez Ortín, José Enrique; Leão, C.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC4072 were monitored during alcoholic fermentations with three different nitrogen supplies: (i) control fermentation (with enough nitrogen to complete sugar fermentation), (ii) nitrogen-limiting fermentation, and (iii) the addition of nitrogen to the nitrogen-limiting fermentation (refed fermentation). Approximately 70% of the yeast transcriptome was altered in at least one of the fermentation stages studied, revealing t...

  18. Effects of Cycocel on Morphological Traits, Nitrogen and Potassium Content of Basil Plants under Water Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaei Estakhroeih

    2016-10-01

    -plots. Cultivation was carried out in March and harvested in late June. In this study the plant height, fresh and dry weight of root and shoot, root to shoot dry weight ratio, percentage of nitrogen and potassium, leaf relative water content and leaf area index were measured. For its statistical calculation, SAS (v. 9.1 software and for the comparison of the averages the Duncan’s test was used. The level of possibility used in the analysis was five percent. Results and Discussion The result of the analysis of variance of measured traits has shown in Table 1. Data analysis of variance (Table 1 shows different levels of irrigation, Cycocel and irrigation with Cycocel interaction were significant at the level of one percent on plant height. Effects of different irrigation treatments and Cycocel concentration on fresh and dry weight of shoot were significant at one and five percent, respectively. However, the effect of irrigation and Cycocel interaction on shoot dry weight was not significant. Root fresh and dry weight were influenced by irrigation levels (Table 1. The effect of irrigation and Cycocel interaction on root dry weight, percent of nitrogen and dry weight of root to shoot ratio was significantat one percent. The effect of irrigation on root to shoot dry weight ratio was not significant. Moreover, the effects of Cycocel treatments on root to shoot dry weight ratio were significant at the five percent level. The effect of irrigation, Cycocel on percent of nitrogen and potassium was significant and potassium decreased with the increasing of water stress. The highest percentage of potassium (2.26% belonged to the full irrigation and the concentration of 2000 milligrams per litre Cycocel and the lowest belonged to the interaction of severe stress and zero, 500 and 1000 milligrams per litre Cycocel. Irrigation and Cycocel had a significant influence on leaf relative water content at the level of one percent. Conclusions According to the results which obtained through this study

  19. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the perched ground water under seepage-irrigated potato cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Arboleda, F; Mylavarapu, R; Hutchinson, C; Portier, K

    2008-01-01

    Excessive nitrogen rates for potato production in northeast Florida have been declared as a potential source of nitrate pollution in the St. Johns River watershed. This 3-yr study examined the effect of N rates (0, 168, and 280 kg ha(-1)) split between planting and 40 d after planting on the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Atlantic) in rotation with sorghum sudan grass hybrid (Sorghum vulgare x Sorghum vulgare var. sudanese, cv. SX17), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cv. Iron Clay), and greenbean (Phaseolus vulgare cv. Espada). Soil solution from the root zone and water from the perched ground water under potato were sampled periodically using lysimeters and wells, respectively. Fertilization at planting increased the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water, but no effect of the legumes in rotation with potatoes on nitrate leaching was detected. Fertilization of green bean increased NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato planted in the following season. The NO(3)-N concentration in the soil solution within the potato root zone followed a similar pattern to that of the perched ground water but with higher initial values. The NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water was proportional to the rainfall magnitude after potato planting. A significant increase in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under cowpea planted in summer after potato was detected for the side-dressing of 168 kg ha(-1) N applied to potato 40 d after planting but not at the 56 kg ha(-1) N side-dress. Elevation in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under sorghum was not significant, supporting its use as an effective N catch crop.

  20. Effect of dietary crude protein and forage contents on enteric methane emissions and nitrogen excretion from dairy cows simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study aimed to examine, simultaneously, the effects of changing dietary forage and crude protein (CP) contents on methane (CH4) emissions and nitrogen (N) excretion from lactating dairy cows. Twelve post-peak lactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 4 treatments from a 2×2 factorial arr...

  1. Productivity, Oil Content, and Oil Composition of Sweet Basil as a Function of Nitrogen and Sulfur Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) were believed to be important nutrient management tools for the production of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. 'German') with desirable oil content and composition and also acceptable herbage yields. A multi-location research study was initiated to evaluate the effect of...

  2. Determination by near infrared microscopy of the nitrogen and carbon content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaf powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequeue, Gauthier; Draye, Xavier; Baeten, Vincent

    2016-09-16

    Near infrared microscopy (NIRM) has been developed as a rapid technique to predict the chemical composition of foods, reduce analytical costs and time and ease sample preparation. In this study, NIRM has been evaluated as an alternative to classical chemical analysis to determine the nitrogen and carbon content of small samples of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaf powder. Near infrared spectra were obtained by NIRM for independent leaf samples collected on 216 plants grown under six different levels of nitrogen. From these, 30 calibration and 30 validation samples covering the spectral range of the whole set were selected and their nitrogen and carbon contents were determined by a reference method. The calibration model obtained for nitrogen content proved to be excellent, with a coefficient of determination in calibration (R(2)c) higher than 0.9 and a ratio of performance to deviation (RPDc) higher than 3. Statistical indicators of prediction using the validation set were also very high (R(2)p values > 0.90). However, the calibration model obtained for carbon content was much less satisfactory (R(2)c tomato leaf powder.

  3. Atmospheric NH3 and NO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition in an agricultural catchment of Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Hayashi, Kentaro; Zhu, Bin; Li, Feiyue; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2010-09-15

    To assess the atmospheric environmental impacts of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen in the fast-developing Eastern China region, we measured atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ammonia (NH(3)) as well as the wet deposition of inorganic nitrogen (NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+)) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) levels in a typical agricultural catchment in Jiangsu Province, China, from October 2007 to September 2008(.) The annual average gaseous concentrations of NO(2) and NH(3) were 42.2 microg m(-3) and 4.5 microg m(-3) (0 degree C, 760 mm Hg), respectively, whereas those of NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+), and DON in the rainwater within the study catchment were 1.3, 1.3, and 0.5 mg N L(-1), respectively. No clear difference in gaseous NO(2) concentrations and nitrogen concentrations in collected rainwater was found between the crop field and residential sites, but the average NH(3) concentration of 5.4 microg m(-3) in residential sites was significantly higher than that in field sites (4.1 microg m(-3)). Total depositions were 40 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for crop field sites and 30 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for residential sites, in which dry depositions (NO(2) and NH(3)) were 7.6 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for crop field sites and 1.9 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for residential sites. The DON in the rainwater accounted for 16% of the total wet nitrogen deposition. Oxidized N (NO(3)(-) in the precipitation and gaseous NO(2)) was the dominant form of nitrogen deposition in the studied region, indicating that reactive forms of nitrogen created from urban areas contribute greatly to N deposition in the rural area evaluated in this study. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation of dissolved organic nitrogen concentration during the ultrasonic pretreatment to Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Cao, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Bi, Hongkai

    2016-03-01

    Algae cells were the main sources of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in raw water with plenty of algae, and ultrasonic pretreatment was one of the algae-controlling methods through the damage of algae cells. However, the variation of DON concentration during the ultrasonic treatment process was not confirmed. Variation of DON concentration during the processes of low frequency ultrasound treatment of Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated. In addition, the effect of sonication on the metabolite concentration, algae cellar activity and the subsequent coagulation performance were discussed. The results showed that after a long duration of ultrasonic (60 s), nearly 90% of the algal cells were damaged and the maximum concentration of DON attained more than 3 mg/L. In order to control the leakage extent of DON, the sonication time should be less than 30 s with power intensity of more than 1.0 W/cm(3). In the mean time, ultrasonic treatment could inhibit the reactivation and the proliferation of algal, keep the algae cell wall integrity and enhance coagulation effectively under the same condition. However, ultrasound frequency had little effect on DON at the frequency range used in this study (20-150 kHz). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Land Use and Stream Nitrogen Concentrations in Agricultural Watersheds Along the Central Coast of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Los Huertos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In coastal California nitrogen (N in runoff from urban and agricultural land is suspected to impair surface water quality of creeks and rivers that discharge into the Monterey Bay Sanctuary. However, quantitative data on the impacts of land use activities on water quality are largely limited to unpublished reports and do not estimate N loading. We report on spatial and temporal patterns of N concentrations for several coastal creeks and rivers in central California. During the 2001 water year, we estimated that the Pajaro River at Chittenden exported 302.4 Mg of total N. Nitrate-N concentrations were typically <1 mg N l–1 in grazing lands, oak woodlands, and forests, but increased to a range of 1 to 20 mg N l–1 as surface waters passed through agricultural lands. Very high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 80 mg N l–1 were found in selected agricultural ditches that received drainage from tiles (buried perforated pipes. Nitrate concentrations in these ditches remained high throughout the winter and spring, indicating nitrate was not being flushed out of the soil profile. We believe unused N fertilizer has accumulated in the shallow groundwater through many cropping cycles. Results are being used to organize landowners, resource managers, and growers to develop voluntary monitoring and water quality protection plans.

  6. Bubble growth as a means to measure dissolved nitrogen concentration in aerated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Keita; Yamashita, Tatsuya

    2017-11-01

    Controlling the amount of dissolved gases in water is important, for example, to food processing; it is essential to quantitatively evaluate dissolved gas concentration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) can be measured by commercial DO meters, but that of dissolved nitrogen (DN) cannot be obtained easily. Here, we propose a means to measure DN concentration based on Epstein-Plesset-type analysis of bubble growth under dissolved gas supersaturation. DO supersaturation in water is produced by oxygen microbubble aeration. The diffusion-driven growth of bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water is first observed. The observed growth is then compared to the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that considers Fick's mass transfer of both DO and DN across bubble interfaces; in this comparison, the unknown DN concentration is treated as a fitting parameter. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest, as expected, that DN can be effectively purged by oxygen microbubble aeration. This study was supported in part by the Mizuho Foundation for the Promotion of Science and by a MEXT Grant-in-Aid for the Program for Leading Graduate Schools.

  7. Determination of Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N Content in Beef by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shanmei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive determination of TVB-N content in beef using hyperspectral imaging (HSI technique was evaluated. In order to create a robust model to predict the TVB-N content in beef, partition of sample set, spectral pretreatment, and the optimum wavelength selection were discussed. After the beef sample set was parted by concentration gradient (CG algortithm, and the spectra of beef samples were preprocessed by standard normalized variate (SNV combined with auto scale(AS, the partial least square regression (PLSR model was established using the full spectral range, which had the best prediction abilities with Rcv2 of 0.9124, Rp2 of 0.8816, RMSECV of 1.5889, and RMSEP of 1.7719, respectively. After the optimum wavelengths which is closely related to the TVB-N content of beef samples was obtained using the competitive adaptive re-weighted (CARS algorithm, a new PLSR model was established using the optimum wavelengths, which had outstanding prediction abilities with Rcv2 of 0.9235, Rp2 of 0.9241, RMSECV of 1.4881, and RMSEP of 1.4882, respectively.The study showed that HSI is a powerful technique to predict the TVB-N content in beef by a nondestructive way.

  8. Struvite Crystallization of Anaerobic Digestive Fluid of Swine Manure Containing Highly Concentrated Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Young Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optimal operation factors for struvite crystallization for removing and recovering nitrogen and phosphorus from anaerobic digestive fluid of swine manure containing highly concentrated nitrogen was determined. Every experiment for the struvite crystallization reaction was conducted by placing 1,000 mL of digestion fluid in a 2,000 mL Erlenmeyer flask at various temperatures, pH, and mixing speed. Except for special circumstances, the digestion fluid was centrifuged (10,000 rpm, 10 min and then the supernatant was used for the experiment at room temperature and 100 rpm. The optimal mole ratio of PO43−:Mg2+ was 1:1.5, and the pH effect ranging from 9 to 11 was similar, when mixed for 1 hour. Under this condition, the removal efficiency of NH4+-N and PO43−-P was 40% and 88.6%, respectively. X-shaped crystal was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, struvite crystal structure was confirmed through X-ray diffraction analysis.

  9. RESEARCH INTO THE USE OF DIETARY NITROGEN BY GROWING AND FATTENING STEERS IN RELATION TO DIET FORMULATION AND ENERGY CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. VOICU

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were done on the use of the dietary nitrogen by fattening steers between 300-450 kg using the method of in vivo nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance. Alfalfa and corn-based diets were used, in different forms of preservation and with different ratio of the bulk forage to the concentrate feeds; diet digestibility expressed as organic matter and protein varied between 72-76% and between 66- 75% respectively; the best performance produced by the corn silage diets were observed in diet 2 (with ammonia, while the best results produced by the alfalfa diets was noticed in diet 5 (haylage; nitrogen balance showed the highest values of the retained nitrogen in the alfalfa half-hay diet, the alfalfa hay diet having lower values.

  10. The Genetic Control of Grain Protein Content under Variable Nitrogen Supply in an Australian Wheat Mapping Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Mahjourimajd

    Full Text Available Genetic variation has been observed in both protein concentration in wheat grain and total protein content (protein yield. Here we describe the genetic analysis of variation for grain protein in response to nitrogen (N supply and locate significant genomic regions controlling grain protein components in a spring wheat population. In total, six N use efficiency (NUE field trials were carried out for the target traits in a sub-population of doubled haploid lines derived from a cross between two Australian varieties, RAC875 and Kukri, in Southern and Western Australia from 2011 to 2013. Twenty-four putative Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL for protein-related traits were identified at high and low N supply and ten QTL were identified for the response to N for the traits studied. These loci accounted for a significant proportion of the overall effect of N supply. Several of the regions were co-localised with grain yield QTL and are promising targets for further investigation and selection in breeding programs.

  11. Proximate composition of marine invertebrates from tropical coastal waters, with emphasis on the relationship between nitrogen and protein contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela S Diniz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical profiles of Desmapsamma anchorata, Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera, Bunodosoma caissarum, Renilla muelleri (Cnidaria, Aplysia brasiliana, Eledone massyae, Isognomon bicolor (Mollusca, Echinaster brasiliensis, Echinometra lucunter, Holothuria grisea, Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata, and Phallusia nigra (Chordata were determined. Hydrosoluble protein was the most abundant class of substances for all species, except for the ascidian Phallusia nigra, in which the carbohydrate content was higher. The percentages of hydrosoluble protein (dry weight, dw varied widely among the invertebrates, ranging from 5.88% (R. muelleri to 47.6% (Eledone massyae of the dw .The carbohydrate content fluctuated from 1.3% (R. muelleri to 18.4% (Aplysia brasiliana of the dw. For most of the species, lipid was the second most abundant class of substances, varying from 2.8% (R. muelleri to 25.3% (Echinaster brasiliensis of the dw. Wide variations were also found for the invertebrates nitrogen content, with the lowest value recorded in the cnidarian R. muelleri (2.02% of the dw and the highest in the molluscan E. massyae (12.7% of the dw. The phosphorus content of the dw varyed from 0.24% (R. muelleri to 1.16% (E. massyae. The amino acid composition varied largely among the species, but for most of the species glycine, arginine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were the most abundant amino acids, with histidine and tyrosine among the less abundant amino acids. The actual content of total protein in the samples was calculated by the sum of amino acid residues, establishing dw values that fluctuated from 11.1% (R. muelleri to 66.7% (E. massyae. The proteinaceous nitrogen content was high in all species, with an average value of 97.3% of the total nitrogen. From data of total amino acid residues and total nitrogen, specific nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors were calculated for each species. The nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors ranged from 5.10 to

  12. Theoretical study of electric properties of zig-zag carbon nanotubes at low nitrogen concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa G. Ordoñez Casanova

    Full Text Available We have performed a comparative study of electrical properties between pristine and nitrogen doped (at low concentration single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, for three zig-zag cases: (6,0, (8,0 and (9,0. The results were obtained through the Density Functional Theory (DFT with the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA in the relaxed CC bond length for the long-wavelength limit. The stability of the structures was determined by calculating total energies for the pristine and the N-doped structures. From the calculations of the energy loss function, we probed plasmon peak positions for the proposed quiralities. Keywords: DFT, Carbon nanotubes, Electrical properties

  13. Influence of Nitrogen Application Rate and Meteorological Conditions on β-Glucan Content in Naked and Husked Oat Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunava Linda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of applied nitrogen fertilizer rate on β-glucan content in oat (Avena sativa L. grains. The study was carried out at the State Stende Cereal Breeding Institute from 2011 to 2014. Three nitrogen surface fertiliser treatments (80, 120 and 160 kg·ha-1 were applied on one husked oat (variety 'Lizete' and two naked oat genotypes (breeding lines 'S-156' and '33793'. The content of β-glucan in naked oat genotypes was significantly (p 0.05. Significant (p < 0.05 differences in β-glucan content were observed between nitrogen treatments only for husked oat genotype 'Lizete'. Effect of growing season on β-glucan content was significant (p < 0.05 for both (naked and husked oat genotypes. β-glucan content of naked oat breeding lines ('S-156' and '33793' was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 2011 comparing with 2012 and 2013, due to differences in precipitation during the grain filling period.

  14. Determination of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) content in pork meat using hyperspectral imaging technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Oh, Mirae; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) content is one of the important factors to measure the quality of meat. However, conventional chemical analysis methods for measuring TVB-N contents are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and are destructive procedures. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of fluorescence hyperspectral imaging techniques for determination of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in beef meat. High intensity LED lights at 365 nm and 405 nm were used as the excitation for acquiring fluorescence images. Prediction algorithms based on simple band-ratio, partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) have been developed. This study shows that fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system has a good potential for rapid measurement of TVB-N content in meat.

  15. Effect of dietary crude protein and energy content on nitrogen utilisation, water intake and urinary output in growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. VALAJA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A digestibility and balance trial was carried out with four intact castrated male pigs (live weight 33-82 kg to study the effects of dietary crude protein and energy content on nutrient digestibility, nitrogen metabolism, water intake and urinary output. In a 4 ´ 4 Latin square design, four barley-oats-soya bean meal based diets were arranged 2 ´ 2 factorially. The corresponding factors were dietary crude protein (CP content: high (180 g/kg CP or low protein diet (140 g/kg CP supplemented with free lysine, methionine and threonineLowering dietary CP content (mean values of 189 to 152 g/kg dry matter, respectively by supplementation of free amino acids decreased urinary nitrogen (N excretion by 6.9 g/day (32% (P

  16. Fecal nitrogen concentration as a nutritional quality indicator for European rabbit ecological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gil-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Measuring the quality of the nutritional resources available to wild herbivores is critical to understanding trophic regulation processes. However, the direct assessment of dietary nutritional characteristics is usually difficult, which hampers monitoring nutritional constraints in natural populations. The feeding ecology of ruminant herbivores has been often assessed by analyzing fecal nitrogen (FN concentrations, although this method has been less evaluated in other taxa. This study analyzed the suitability of FN as an indicator of ingesta quality in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus, which is a keystone lagomorph species in Mediterranean ecosystems and of great conservation interest. Firstly, domestic O. cuniculus were used to evaluate under experimental conditions the accuracy of total FN and the metabolic FN as diet quality indicators of forages with characteristics similar to those available under natural conditions. Secondly, the accuracy of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS to calculate FN was tested using partial least squares regression. Thirdly, a pilot field study was conducted to monitor FN dynamics from wild O. cuniculus in three different habitats during wet and drought periods. A strong association was found between diet type and total FN and metabolic FN (Pseudo-R(2 ≥ 0.89. It was also found that NIRS calibrations were accurate for depicting nitrogen concentrations (R(2 > 0.98 between NIRS and chemical results. Finally, the seasonal FN dynamics measured in the field were consistent with current knowledge on vegetation dynamics and forage limitations in the three habitats. The results support the use of NIRS methods and FN indices as a reliable and affordable approach to monitoring the nutritional quality of rabbit habitats. Potential applications include the assessment of the mechanistic relationships between resource limitations and population abundance, e.g., in relation to natural drought cycles and to habitat

  17. Split nitrogen application improves wheat baking quality by influencing protein composition rather than concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eXue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of late nitrogen (N fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g. booting, heading or anthesis to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS, which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems.

  18. Impact of available nitrogen and sugar concentration in musts on alcoholic fermentation and subsequent wine spoilage by Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Bradford C; Bohlscheid, Jeffri C; Edwards, Charles G

    2015-04-01

    The level of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) supplementation required for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to complete fermentation of high sugar musts in addition to the impact of non-metabolized nitrogen on post-alcoholic spoilage by Brettanomyces bruxellensis was studied. A 2 × 3 factorial design was employed using a synthetic grape juice medium with YAN (150 or 250 mg N/L) and equal proportions of glucose/fructose (230, 250, or 270 g/L) as variables. S. cerevisiae ECA5 (low nitrogen requirement) or Uvaferm 228 (high nitrogen requirement) were inoculated at 10(5) cfu/mL while B. bruxellensis E1 or B2 were added once alcoholic fermentation ceased. Regardless of YAN concentration, musts that contained 230 or 250 g/L glucose/fructose at either nitrogen level attained dryness (mean = 0.32 g/L fructose) while those containing 270 g/L generally did not (mean = 2.5 g/L fructose). Higher concentrations of YAN present in musts yielded wines with higher amounts of α-amino acids and ammonium but very little (≤ 6 mg N/L) was needed by B. bruxellensis to attain populations ≥ 10(7) cfu/mL. While adding nitrogen to high sugar musts does not necessarily ensure completion of alcoholic fermentation, residual YAN did not affect B. bruxellensis growth as much as ethanol concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of HCO3- concentration on anammox nitrogen removal rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Vabamäe, Priit; Kroon, Kristel; Loorits, Liis; Saluste, Alar; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-01-01

    Anammox biomass enriched in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) fed by actual sewage sludge reject water and synthetically added NO2- was used to study the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of the anammox process depending on bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration. MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1100 g N m(-3) d(-1) when the optimum HCO3- concentration (910 mg L(-1)) was used. The average reaction ratio of NO2- removal, NO3- production and NH4+ removal were 1.18/0.20/1. When the HCO3- concentration was increased to 1760mg L(-1) the TN removal rate diminished to 270 g N m(-3) d(-1). The process recovered from bicarbonate inhibition within 1 week. The batch tests performed with biomass taken from the MBBR showed that for the HCO3- concentration of 615 mg L(-1) the TN removal rate was 3.3 mg N L(-1) h(-1), whereas for both lower (120 mg L(-1)) and higher (5750 mg L(-1)) HCO3- concentrations the TN removal rates were 2.3 (+/- 0.15) and 1.6 (+/- 0.12) mg N L(-1) d(-1), respectively. PCR and DGGE analyses resulted in the detection of uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 and, surprisingly, low-oxygen-tolerant aerobic ammonia oxidizers. The ability of anammox bacteria for mixotrophy was established by diminished amounts of nitrate produced when comparing the experiments with an organic carbon source and an inorganic carbon source.

  20. Effect of irradiation on the patulin content and chemical composition of apple juice concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zegota, H.; Zegota, A.; Bachmann, S.

    1988-09-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on the patulin content of apple juice concentrate was investigated. The results indicated that patulin, at an initial concentration of about 2 mg/kg, disappeared after irradiation of the concentrate with doses as low as 2.5 kGy. For lower doses, the extent of patulin degradation was proportional to the absorbed dose. Irradiation of the concentrate with doses sufficient for patulin disappearance did not change the titratable acidity, the content of reducing sugars and carbonyl compounds or the amino acid composition. The content of ascorbic acid slightly decreased and the colour of the concentrate brightened. The intensity of the patulin absorption spectra after irradiation of mycotoxin in aqueous solutions decreased.

  1. Estimation of the Effect of Soil Texture on Nitrate-Nitrogen Content in Groundwater Using Optical Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taravudh Tipdecho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical fertilizers in Thailand increased exponentially by more than 100-fold from 1961 to 2004. Intensification of agricultural production causes several potential risks to water supplies, especially nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N pollution. Nitrate is considered a potential pollutant because its excess application can move into streams by runoff and into groundwater by leaching. The nitrate concentration in groundwater increases more than 3-fold times after fertilization and it contaminates groundwater as a result of the application of excess fertilizers for a long time. Soil texture refers to the relative proportion of particles of various sizes in a given soil and it affects the water permeability or percolation rate of a soil. Coarser soils have less retention than finer soils, which in the case of NO3−-N allows it to leach into groundwater faster, so there is positive relationship between the percentage of sands and NO3−-N concentration in groundwater wells. This study aimed to estimate the effect of soil texture on NO3−-N content in groundwater. Optical reflectance data obtained by remote sensing was used in this study. Our hypothesis was that the quantity of nitrogen leached into groundwater through loam was higher than through clay. Nakhon Pathom province, Thailand, was selected as a study area where the terrain is mostly represented by a flat topography. It was found that classified LANDSAT images delineated paddy fields as covering 29.4% of the study area, while sugarcane covered 10.4%, and 60.2% was represented by “others”. The reason for this classified landuse was to determine additional factors, such as vegetation, which might directly affect the quantity of NO3−-N in soil. Ideally, bare soil would be used as a test site, but in fact, no such places were available in Thailand. This led to an indirect method to estimate NO3−-N on various soil textures. Through experimentation, it was found that NO3

  2. Carbon and nitrogen in Danish forest soils - Contents and distribution determined by soil order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejre, Henrik; Callesen, Ingeborg; Vesterdal, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and widespread deposition of N to terrestrial ecosystems has increased the focus on soil C and N pools. The aim of this study was to estimate the size and distribution of organic C and N pools in well-drained Danish forest soils. We examined 140 forest s...... correlated to N content. Soil order and horizon designations may be useful in predicting the total C and N content of Danish forest soils, and may also predict potential for C sequestration following afforestation of arable land.......Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and widespread deposition of N to terrestrial ecosystems has increased the focus on soil C and N pools. The aim of this study was to estimate the size and distribution of organic C and N pools in well-drained Danish forest soils. We examined 140 forest...... soil profiles from pedological surveys of Danish forest soils. We calculated total C and N pools in organic layers and mineral soils to a depth of 1 m. The profiles represent variations in texture (sandy to loamy), and soil order (USDA soil taxonomy Spodosols, Alfisols, Entisols,,and Inceptisols...

  3. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes Using Injection-Vertical Chemical Vapor Deposition: Effects of Synthesis Parameters on the Nitrogen Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdouelilah Hachimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped CNTs (N-CNTs were synthesized using an injection-vertical chemical vapor deposition (IV-CVD reactor. This type of reactor is quite useful for the continuous mass production of CNTs. In this work, the optimum deposition conditions for maximizing the incorporation of nitrogen were identified. Ferrocene served as the source of the Fe catalyst and was dissolved in acetonitrile, which served as both the hydrocarbon and nitrogen sources. Different concentrations of ferrocene in acetonitrile were introduced into the top of a vertically aligned reactor at a constant flow rate with hydrogen serving as the carrier. The effects of hydrogen flow rate, growth temperature, and catalyst loading (Fe from the ferrocene on the microstructure, elemental composition, and yield of N-CNTs were investigated. The N-CNTs possessed a bamboo-like microstructure with a nitrogen doping level as high as 14 at.% when using 2.5 to 5 mg/mL of the ferrocene/acetonitrile mixture at 800°C under a 1000 sccm flow of hydrogen. A production rate of 100 mg/h was achieved under the optimized synthesis conditions.

  4. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  5. Influence of three different concentration techniques on evaporation rate, color and phenolics content of blueberry juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elik, Aysel; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Maskan, Medeni; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2016-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of three different concentration processes open-pan, rotary vacuum evaporator and microwave heating on evaporation rate, the color and phenolics content of blueberry juice. Kinetics model study for changes in soluble solids content (°Brix), color parameters and phenolics content during evaporation was also performed. The final juice concentration of 65° Brix was achieved in 12, 15, 45 and 77 min, for microwave at 250 and 200 W, rotary vacuum and open-pan evaporation processes, respectively. Color changes associated with heat treatment were monitored using Hunter colorimeter (L*, a* and b*). All Hunter color parameters decreased with time and dependently studied concentration techniques caused color degradation. It was observed that the severity of color loss was higher in open-pan technique than the others. Evaporation also affected total phenolics content in blueberry juice. Total phenolics loss during concentration was highest in open-pan technique (36.54 %) and lowest in microwave heating at 200 W (34.20 %). So, the use of microwave technique could be advantageous in food industry because of production of blueberry juice concentrate with a better quality and short time of operation. A first-order kinetics model was applied to modeling changes in soluble solids content. A zero-order kinetics model was used to modeling changes in color parameters and phenolics content.

  6. The effect of drying the herbage on soluble nitrogen content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amount of soluble nitrogen and the effective degradation of fresh and dry herbage of Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar was determined by the nylon bag technique. In another experiment the digestion and disappearance of organic matter and nitrogen were measured on fresh and dry ryegrass herbage fed to sheep either ...

  7. Modelling of in-stream nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations using different sampling strategies for calibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Jiang, Sanyuan; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that a good evaluation and prediction of surface water pollution is mainly limited by the monitoring strategy and the capability of the hydrological water quality model to reproduce the internal processes. To this end, a compromise sampling frequency, which can reflect the dynamical behaviour of leached nutrient fluxes responding to changes in land use, agriculture practices and point sources, and appropriate process-based water quality model are required. The objective of this study was to test the identification of hydrological water quality model parameters (nitrogen and phosphorus) under two different monitoring strategies: (1) regular grab-sampling approach and (2) regular grab-sampling with additional monitoring during the hydrological events using automatic samplers. First, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was successfully calibrated (1994-1998) for discharge (NSE = 0.86), nitrate-N (lowest NSE for nitrate-N load = 0.69), particulate phosphorus and soluble phosphorus in the Selke catchment (463 km2, central Germany) for the period 1994-1998 using regular grab-sampling approach (biweekly to monthly for nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations). Second, the model was successfully validated during the period 1999-2010 for discharge, nitrate-N, particulate-phosphorus and soluble-phosphorus (lowest NSE for soluble phosphorus load = 0.54). Results, showed that when additional sampling during the events with random grab-sampling approach was used (period 2011-2013), the hydrological model could reproduce only the nitrate-N and soluble phosphorus concentrations reasonably well. However, when additional sampling during the hydrological events was considered, the HYPE model could not represent the measured particulate phosphorus. This reflects the importance of suspended sediment during the hydrological events increasing the concentrations of particulate phosphorus. The HYPE model could

  8. Temporal variations and scaling of streamflow and baseflow and their nitrate-nitrogen concentrations and loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.-K.; Schilling, K.

    2005-01-01

    The patterns of temporal variations of precipitation (P), streamflow (SF) and baseflow (BF) as well as their nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations (C) and loads (L) from a long-term record (28 years) in the Raccoon River, Iowa, were analyzed using variogram and spectral analyses. The daily P is random but scaling may exist in the daily SF and BF with a possible break point in the scaling at about 18 days and 45 days, respectively. The nitrate concentrations and loads are shown to have a half-year cycle while daily P, SF, and BF have a one-year cycle. Furthermore, there may be a low-frequency cycle of 6-8 years in C. The power spectra of C and L in both SF and BF exhibit fractal 1/f scaling with two characteristic frequencies of half-year and one-year, and are fitted well with the spectrum of the gamma distribution. The nitrate input to SF and BF at the Raccoon watershed seems likely to be a white noise process superimposed on another process with a half-year and one-year cycle. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Precipitation of aluminum nitride in a high strength maraging steel with low nitrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmaire, G., E-mail: guillaume.jeanmaire@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Aubert and Duval, BP1, 63770 Les Ancizes (France); Dehmas, M.; Redjaïmia, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Puech, S. [Aubert and Duval, BP1, 63770 Les Ancizes (France); Fribourg, G. [Snecma Gennevilliers, 171 Boulevard de Valmy-BP 31, 92702 Colombes (France)

    2014-12-15

    In the present work, aluminum nitride (AlN) precipitation was investigated in a X23NiCoCrMoAl13-6-3 maraging steel with low nitrogen content (wt.% N = 5.5 ppm). A reliable and robust automatic method by scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was developed for the quantification of AlN precipitates. The first stage was to identify the solvus temperature and to develop a heat treatment able to dissolve the AlN precipitates. The experimental determination of equilibrium conditions and solvus temperature show good agreement with ThermoCalc® simulation. Then, from this AlN-free state, the cooling rate, isothermal holding time and temperature were the subject of an intensive investigation in the austenite region of this maraging steel. In spite of the high temperatures used during heat treatments, the growth kinetic of the largest AlN precipitates (> 1 μm) is slow. The cooling rate has a major effect on the size and the number density of AlN due to a higher driving force for nucleation at low temperatures. At last, quenching prior to isothermal annealing at high temperatures leads to fine and dense AlN precipitation, resulting from the martensite to austenite transformation. Experimental results will be discussed and compared with kinetic data obtained with the mobility database MobFe2 implemented in Dictra® software. - Highlights: • Slow dissolution kinetic of AlN precipitates due to both their large size and small chemical driving force • Significant effects of cooling rate prior isothermal heat treatment, holding time and temperature on AlN precipitation • Size of AlN precipitates can be reduced by quenching prior isothermal holding. • Fine precipitation of AlN related to the α → γ transformation.

  10. Functional differences in the allometry of the water, carbon and nitrogen content of gelatinous organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Molina-Ramírez, Axayacatl

    2015-05-19

    We have supplemented available, concurrent measurements of fresh weight (W, g) and body carbon (C, g) (46 individuals, 14 species) and nitrogen (N, g) (11 individuals, 9 species) of marine gelatinous animals with data obtained during the global ocean MALASPINA 2010 Expedition (totalling 267 individuals and 33 species for the W versus C data; totalling 232 individuals and 31 species for the N versus C data). We then used those data to test the allometric properties of the W versus C and N versus C relationships. Overall, gelatinous organisms contain 1.13 ± 1.57% of C (by weight, mean ± SD) in their bodies and show a C:N of 4.56 ± 2.46, respectively, although estimations can be improved by using separate conversion coefficients for the carnivores and the filter feeders. Reduced major axis regression indicates that W increases isometrically with C in the carnivores (cnidarians and ctenophores), implying that their water content can be described by a single conversion coefficient of 173.78 gW(g C)-1, or a C content of 1.17 ± 1.90% by weight, although there is much variability due to the existence of carbon-dense species. In contrast, W increases more rapidly than C in the filter feeders (salps and doliolids), according to a power relationship W = 446.68C1.54. This exponent is not significantly different from 1.2, which is consistent with the idea that the watery bodies of gelatinous animals represent an evolutionary response towards increasing food capture surfaces, i.e. a bottom-up rather than a top-down mechanism. Thus, the available evidence negates a bottom-up mechanism in the carnivores, but supports it in the filter feeders. Last, N increases isometrically with C in both carnivores and filter feeders with C:N ratios of 3.89 ± 1.34 and 4.38 ± 1.21, respectively. These values are similar to those of compact, non-gelatinous organisms and reflect a predominantly herbivorous diet in the filter feeders, which is confirmed by a difference of one trophic level

  11. Life cycle assessment of microalgae-based aviation fuel: Influence of lipid content with specific productivity and nitrogen nutrient effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Jing; A, Lusi; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the life cycle assessments of low-N and normal culture conditions for a balance between the lipid content and specific productivity. In order to achieve the potential contribution of lipid content to the life cycle assessment, this study established relationships between lipid content (nitrogen effect) and specific productivity based on three microalgae strains including Chlorella, Isochrysis and Nannochloropsis. For microalgae-based aviation fuel, the effects of the lipid content on fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are similar. The fossil fuel consumption (0.32-0.68MJ·MJ-1MBAF) and GHG emissions (17.23-51.04gCO2e·MJ-1MBAF) increase (59.70-192.22%) with the increased lipid content. The total energy input decreases (2.13-3.08MJ·MJ-1MBAF, 14.91-27.95%) with the increased lipid content. The LCA indicators increased (0-47.10%) with the decreased nitrogen recovery efficiency (75-50%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer and harvesting stage on photosynthetic pigments and phytol contents of Italian ryegrass silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Renlong; El-Sabagh, Mabrouk; Obitsu, Taketo; Sugino, Toshihisa; Kurokawa, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kensuke

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilizer application and harvesting stage on the contents of chlorophyll, phytol and carotenoids (β-carotene and lutein) in Italian ryegrass herbage before and after ensiling, and the extent of phytol preservation after ensiling. Three rates of N fertilizer (0, 60 and 120 kg N/ha) were applied by top-dressing as an additional fertilizer. The herbage harvested at booting stage (27 weeks of age) or heading stage (29 weeks of age) were wilted for 1 day, then ensiled for 60 days using a small-scale pouch system. In the pre-ensiled herbages, increasing N fertilizer application increased the contents of crude protein and photosynthetic pigments, and these contents were also higher at the booting stage compared with the heading stage. In the silage, increasing N fertilizer application also increased the contents of crude protein, the photosynthetic pigments and their derivatives (pheophytin and pheophorbide), while harvesting stage did not affect the contents of β-carotene, chlorophylls or pheophorbide. Nitrogen fertilizer application and early harvesting of herbage increased lutein and phytol contents in Italian ryegrass silage. Lutein and phytol in Italian ryegrass herbage are indicated to be well preserved during ensiling. © 2017 The Authors. Animal Science Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Estimating Canopy Nitrogen Content in a Heterogeneous Grassland with Varying Fire and Grazing Treatments: Konza Prairie, Kansas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Ling

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative, spatially explicit estimates of canopy nitrogen are essential for understanding the structure and function of natural and managed ecosystems. Methods for extracting nitrogen estimates via hyperspectral remote sensing have been an active area of research. Much of this research has been conducted either in the laboratory, or in relatively uniform canopies such as crops. Efforts to assess the feasibility of the use of hyperspectral analysis in heterogeneous canopies with diverse plant species and canopy structures have been less extensive. In this study, we use in situ and aircraft hyperspectral data to assess several empirical methods for extracting canopy nitrogen from a tallgrass prairie with varying fire and grazing treatments. The remote sensing data were collected four times between May and September in 2011, and were then coupled with the field-measured leaf nitrogen levels for empirical modeling of canopy nitrogen content based on first derivatives, continuum-removed reflectance and ratio-based indices in the 562–600 nm range. Results indicated that the best-performing model type varied between in situ and aircraft data in different months. However, models from the pooled samples over the growing season with acceptable accuracy suggested that these methods are robust with respect to canopy heterogeneity across spatial and temporal scales.

  14. The creation of pollution mapping and measurement of ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide with passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Andaç

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of nitrogen and sulfur dioxide using passive sampler over 12 months in Samsun, Turkey, are compared with SO2 and NO2 concentrations obtained from a co-located chemiluminescence analyzer. The concentrations of Sulfur and nitrogen dioxide in the ambient air during the period from November 2009 to September 2010 are analyzed. The highest value for annual NO2 and SO2 averages of passive sampler was 29.65 μg/m(3) and 21.01 μg/m(3) for exposures of 2-weeks at an industrial site. The maximum monthly concentration for SO2 was observed at the 10(th) measurement station with 44.19 μg/m(3) for August. The maximum monthly concentration for NO2 was observed on the 3(rd) measurement station with 42.83 μg/m(3) for November. A negative correlation between nitrogen dioxide concentrations and temperature (R(2) = -0.5489) was estimated. A positive correlation between nitrogen dioxide measurement with passive sampler and continuous measurement (R(2) = 0.6571) was estimated.

  15. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in neighborhoods adjacent to a commercial airport: a land use regression modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkiewicz, Gary; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Vallarino, Jose; Melly, Steven J; Spengler, John D; Levy, Jonathan I

    2010-11-17

    There is growing concern in communities surrounding airports regarding the contribution of various emission sources (such as aircraft and ground support equipment) to nearby ambient concentrations. We used extensive monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in neighborhoods surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, and land-use regression (LUR) modeling techniques to determine the impact of proximity to the airport and local traffic on these concentrations. Palmes diffusion tube samplers were deployed along the airport's fence line and within surrounding neighborhoods for one to two weeks. In total, 644 measurements were collected over three sampling campaigns (October 2007, March 2008 and June 2008) and each sampling location was geocoded. GIS-based variables were created as proxies for local traffic and airport activity. A forward stepwise regression methodology was employed to create general linear models (GLMs) of NO2 variability near the airport. The effect of local meteorology on associations with GIS-based variables was also explored. Higher concentrations of NO2 were seen near the airport terminal, entrance roads to the terminal, and near major roads, with qualitatively consistent spatial patterns between seasons. In our final multivariate model (R2 = 0.32), the local influences of highways and arterial/collector roads were statistically significant, as were local traffic density and distance to the airport terminal (all p GIS variables, and the regression model structure was robust to various model-building approaches. Our study has shown that there are clear local variations in NO2 in the neighborhoods that surround an urban airport, which are spatially consistent across seasons. LUR modeling demonstrated a strong influence of local traffic, except the smallest roads that predominate in residential areas, as well as proximity to the airport terminal.

  16. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in neighborhoods adjacent to a commercial airport: a land use regression modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spengler John D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing concern in communities surrounding airports regarding the contribution of various emission sources (such as aircraft and ground support equipment to nearby ambient concentrations. We used extensive monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 in neighborhoods surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, and land-use regression (LUR modeling techniques to determine the impact of proximity to the airport and local traffic on these concentrations. Methods Palmes diffusion tube samplers were deployed along the airport's fence line and within surrounding neighborhoods for one to two weeks. In total, 644 measurements were collected over three sampling campaigns (October 2007, March 2008 and June 2008 and each sampling location was geocoded. GIS-based variables were created as proxies for local traffic and airport activity. A forward stepwise regression methodology was employed to create general linear models (GLMs of NO2 variability near the airport. The effect of local meteorology on associations with GIS-based variables was also explored. Results Higher concentrations of NO2 were seen near the airport terminal, entrance roads to the terminal, and near major roads, with qualitatively consistent spatial patterns between seasons. In our final multivariate model (R2 = 0.32, the local influences of highways and arterial/collector roads were statistically significant, as were local traffic density and distance to the airport terminal (all p Conclusion Our study has shown that there are clear local variations in NO2 in the neighborhoods that surround an urban airport, which are spatially consistent across seasons. LUR modeling demonstrated a strong influence of local traffic, except the smallest roads that predominate in residential areas, as well as proximity to the airport terminal.

  17. Seasonal fluctuation in concentrations and content of sugar, starch and nutrient in nordmanns fir (Abies nordmannia) Christmas tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Bo; Christensen, Claus Jerram

    Seasonal fluctuation in concentrations and content of sugar, starch and nutrient in nordmanns fir (Abies nordmannia) Christmas tree......Seasonal fluctuation in concentrations and content of sugar, starch and nutrient in nordmanns fir (Abies nordmannia) Christmas tree...

  18. Comparison of Surti goat milk with cow and buffalo milk for gross composition, nitrogen distribution, and selected minerals content

    OpenAIRE

    Kapadiya, Dhartiben B.; Darshna B. Prajapati; Amit Kumar Jain; Mehta, Bhavbhuti M.; Darji, Vijaykumar B.; Kishorkumar D. Aparnathi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to find out the gross composition, nitrogen distribution, and selected mineral content in Surti goat milk, and its comparison was made between cow and buffalo milk. Materials and Methods: Goat milk samples of Surti breed and buffalo milk samples were collected during the period from July to January 2014 at Reproductive Biology Research Unit, Anand Agricultural University (AAU), Anand. Cow milk samples of Kankrej breed were collected from Livestock Research Statio...

  19. Technical Note: Comparison between a direct and the standard, indirect method for dissolved organic nitrogen determination in freshwater environments with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Graeber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on dissolved organic nitrogen (DON in aquatic systems with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, the sum of NO3, NO2 and NH4+ concentrations is often hampered by high uncertainties regarding the determined DON concentration. The reason is that DON is determined indirectly as the difference between total dissolved nitrogen (TDN and DIN. In this standard approach to determine DON concentrations, even small relative measurement errors of the DIN and TDN concentrations propagate into high absolute errors of DON concentrations at high DIN : TDN ratios. To improve the DON measurement accuracy at high DIN : TDN ratios, we investigated the DON measurement accuracy of this standard approach according to the DIN : TDN ratio and compared it to the direct measurement of DON by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC for freshwater systems. For this, we used standard compounds and natural samples with and without DIN enrichment. We show that for the standard approach, large errors of the determined DON concentrations at DIN : TDN ratios >0.6 occur for both standard compounds and natural samples. In contrast, measurements of DON by SEC always gave low errors at high DIN : TDN ratios due to the successful separation of DON from DIN. For SEC, DON recovery rates were 91–108% for five pure standard compounds and 89–103% for two standard compounds, enriched with DIN. Moreover, SEC resulted in 93–108% recovery rates for DON concentrations of natural samples at a DIN : TDN ratio of 0.8 and the technique was successfully applied to a range of samples from waste water treatment plants to forest and agricultural streams. With 2.5 h of measurement time per sample, SEC is slower, but more accurate than the standard approach for determination of DON concentrations in freshwaters with DIN : TDN ratios >0.6. To sum up, the direct DON measurement by SEC enables better understanding of the

  20. Nitrogen, potassium and plant growth retardant effects on oil content and quality of cotton seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkassas, A. R.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this field experiment was to investigate the effect of nitrogen, potassium and a plant growth retardant (PGR on seed yield and protein and oil content of an Egyptian cotton cultivar (Gossypium barbadense Giza 86. Treatments consisted of: soil application of N (95 and 143 kg N ha-1 in the form ammonium nitrate, foliar application of potassium (0, 319, 638 or 957 g K ha-1 as potassium sulfate and foliar application of mepiquat chloride (MC (0 and 48 + 24 g active ingredient ha-1 on seed, protein and oil yields and oil properties of Egyptian cotton cultivar “Giza 86” (Gossypium barbadense. After applying the higher N-rate, foliar application of potassium and plant growth retardant MC significantly increased seed yield and the content of seed protein and oil, seed oil refractive index, unsaponifiable matter and total unsaturated fatty acids (oleic and linoleic. In contrast, oil acid and saponification value as well as total saturated fatty acids were decreased by foliar application of potassium and MC. The seed oil content was decreased with soil application of N.El objetivo de los experimentos de campo fue investigar el efecto del nitrogeno, potasio y retardantes del crecimiento de plantas sobre el contenido en proteínas y aceite de una semilla de algodón cultivada en Egipto (Gossypium barbadense Giza 86. Los tratamientos consistieron en la aplicación en suelo de N (95 and 143 kg N ha-1 en forma de nitrato amónico, aplicación foliar de K (0, 319, 638 or 957 g K ha-1 como sulfato potásico y aplicación foliar de cloruro de m mepiquat (MC (0 and 48 + 24 g de ingrediente activo ha-1 sobre un cultivar de algodón «Giza 86» (Gossypium barbadense. La aplicación de la cantidad más elevada de N, unida a la aplicación de potasio y del retardador MC, aumentó significativamente el rendimiento en semilla, así como el contenido en proteinas y en aceite. Respecto al aceite, aumentó el índice de refracción, la fracci

  1. [Variation of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in water-sediment system and influence of overlying water on the algae growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shao-yong; Jin, Xiang-can; Guo, Jian-ning; Sheng, Li

    2007-10-01

    The effect of biosidal treatment of initial sediment, addition of inhibitor and addition of phosphorus on the transform of nitrogen and phosphorus in the sediment-water simulative system were studied. S. quadricaudain was cultured in overlying waters took from the above experiment sets when the above experiment completed. The result indicated that, biosidal treatment enhanced the concentration of TP while there was no obvious effect on N. The TP, DTP and TN concentrations were closely between inhibitor addition set and the control set in the sediment-water simulative system but the content of NO3(-)-N of the set with inhibitor addition reached 19.2 mg x L(-1), which was much higher than that of the control set. The sediment significantly adsorbed the P added to the system, and the content of TP decreased when the system reached balance. Algae biomass of the biosidal treatment set was higher than that of the control set, and the main cause was sterilizer leaded to higher concentration of TP of the biosidal treatment set. The highest Algae biomass of the group with inhibitor (224.5 x 10(4) unit x L(-1)) was much higher than that of the control set (26 x 10(4) unit x L(-1)), and that was 5-10 times than that of other sets (sterilized set 22.5 x 10(4) unit x L(-1), set with P added 38.5 x 10(4) uni x L(-1)). Inhibitor restrained the microorganism from using some nutrition which was important to alga's growth. At the beginning, the addition of P had no remarkable effect on the alga growth, but along with the experiment, the alga of the P addition set adapted to the environment and algae biomass exceed that of the control set. The increase of biological bioavailable phosphorus of sediment in biosidal treatment set and addition of inhibitor sets were caused by the increase of algae biomass and thus the increase of liable organic phosphorus.

  2. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  3. [Prediction of total nitrogen and alkali hydrolysable nitrogen content in loess using hyperspectral data based on correlation analysis and partial least squares regression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-ying; Wang, Li; Chang, Qing-rui; Wang, Xiao-xing; Shang, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Wuqi County of Shaanxi Province, where the vegetation recovering measures have been carried out for years, was taken as the study area. A total of 100 loess samples from 24 different profiles were collected. Total nitrogen (TN) and alkali hydrolysable nitrogen (AHN) contents of the soil samples were analyzed, and the soil samples were scanned in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) region of 350-2500 nm in the laboratory. The calibration models were developed between TN and AHN contents and VNIR values based on correlation analysis (CA) and partial least squares regression (PLS). Independent samples validated the calibration models. The results indicated that the optimum model for predicting TN of loess was established by using first derivative of reflectance. The best model for predicting AHN of loess was established by using normal derivative spectra. The optimum TN model could effectively predict TN in loess from 0 to 40 cm, but the optimum AHN model could only roughly predict AHN at the same depth. This study provided a good method for rapidly predicting TN of loess where vegetation recovering measures have been adopted, but prediction of AHN needs to be further studied.

  4. Association of triacylglyceride content and transcript abundance of genes involving in lipid synthesis of nitrogen deficient Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Han, Jichang; Yang, Guanpin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou

    2014-03-01

    Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a diatom that is rich in lipids. Recently, it has received much attention as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Nitrogen deficiency is widely known to increase the content of neutral lipids (mainly triacylglycerides, or TAGs) of microalgae, including P. tricornutum, but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we deciphered the correlations between TAG content and nine key enzymatic genes involved in lipid synthesis in P. tricornutum. After being cultured under nitrogen-free conditions for 0, 4, 24, 48, 72, 120, and 168 h, the TAG contents of P. tricornutum cells were assayed and the transcript abundances of the target genes were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that the abundances of four target gene transcripts ( LACS3, G3PDH2, G3PDH3, and G3PDH5) were positively correlated with TAG content, indicating that these genes may be involved in TAG synthesis in P. tricornutum. The findings improve our understanding of the metabolic network and regulation of lipid synthesis and will guide the future genetic improvement of the TAG content of P. tricornutum.

  5. Concentrations, loads, and yields of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment and bacteria concentrations in the Wister Lake Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas, 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stephanie D.

    2014-01-01

    The Poteau Valley Improvement Authority uses Wister Lake in southeastern Oklahoma as a public water supply. Total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediments from agricultural runoff and discharges from wastewater treatment plants and other sources have degraded water quality in the lake. As lake-water quality has degraded, water-treatment cost, chemical usage, and sludge production have increased for the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority, investigated and summarized concentrations of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, suspended sediment, and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus sp.) in surface water flowing to Wister Lake. Estimates of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment loads, yields, and flow-weighted mean concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations were made for the Wister Lake Basin for a 3-year period from October 2010 through September 2013. Data from water samples collected at fixed time increments during base-flow conditions and during runoff conditions at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla. (USGS station 07247015), the Poteau River near Heavener, Okla. (USGS station 07247350), and the Fourche Maline near Leflore, Okla. (USGS station 07247650), water-quality stations were used to evaluate water quality over the range of streamflows in the basin. These data also were collected to estimate annual constituent loads and yields by using regression models. At the Poteau River stations, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment concentrations in surface-water samples were significantly larger in samples collected during runoff conditions than in samples collected during base-flow conditions. At the Fourche Maline station, in contrast, concentrations of these constituents in water samples collected during runoff conditions were not significantly larger than concentrations during base

  6. Assessing the extent of nitrogen saturation in northern West Virginia forested watersheds: a survey of stream nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl W. J. Williard; David R. DeWalle; Pamela J. Edwards

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-seven forested watersheds in northern West Virginia were sampled for stream nitrate concentrations during summer 1997 and fall 1998 baseflow periods to determine if Fernow watershed 4, an often-cited and studied nitrogen saturated basin, was anomalous or regionally representative in terms of stream nitrate levels. Baseflow stream NO3-N...

  7. Modelling and mapping heavy metal and nitrogen concentrations in moss in 2010 throughout Europe by applying Random Forests models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickel, S.; Schröder, W.; Wosniok, W.; Harmens, H.; Frontasyeva, M.V.; Alber, R.; Aleksiayenak, J.; Barandovski, L.; Blum, O.; Danielsson, H.; Temmermann, L. de; Dunaev, A.M.; Fagerli, H.; Godzik, B.; Ilyin, I.; Jonkers, S.; Jeran, Z.; Pihl Karlsson, G.; Lazo, P.; Leblond, S.; Liiv, S.; Magnússon, S.H.; Mankovska, B.; Martínez-Abaigar, J.; Piispanen, J.; Poikolainen, J.; Popescu, I.V.; Qarri, F.; Radnovic, D.; Santamaria, J.M.; Schaap, M.; Skudnik, M.; Špirić, Z.; Stafilov, T.; Steinnes, E.; Stihi, C.; Suchara, I.; Thöni, L.; Uggerud, H.T.; Zechmeister, H.G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study explores the statistical relations between the concentration of nine heavy metals (HM) (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), vanadium (V), zinc (Zn)), and nitrogen (N) in moss and potential explanatory variables

  8. The Effect of Global Change on Surface Ozone and Reactive Nitrogen Concentrations: Implications for the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. G.; Murazaki, K.; Emmons, L.; Lamarque, J.

    2005-12-01

    We simulated two ten year periods using the global chemical transport model MOZART-2 (Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers version 2): 1990-2000 and 2090-2100. In each case MOZART-2 is driven by meteorology from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) coupled Climate Systems Model (CSM) 1.0 forced with the (SRES) A1 scenario. Profound future changes in the summertime climate over the U.S. are found including changes in temperature, water vapor and clouds and the frequency of synoptic venting of the boundary layer. Even allowing for no changes in emissions in the future, the changes in climate alone drive a significant increase in the ozone concentration over the eastern U.S. (up to 5 ppbv on average) and an increase in the persistence of pollution events. Implications of these changes on the biosphere are assessed with and without allowing for the impact of climate on biogenic emissions. Furthermore the changes in climate alone cause large changes in the partitioning of NOy, decreasing PAN by over 20% over the U.S. Coupled with changes in precipitation; this induces significant changes in the deposition of nitrogen species to the biosphere in a future climate.

  9. Acclimation of nitrogen uptake capacity of rice to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Hiroyuki; Bunce, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen (N) is a major factor affecting yield gain of crops under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations [CO2]. It is well established that elevated [CO2] increases root mass, but there are inconsistent reports on the effects on N uptake capacity per root mass. In the present study, it was hypothesized that the responses of N uptake capacity would change with the duration of exposure to elevated [CO2]. Methods The hypothesis was tested by measuring N uptake capacity in rice plants exposed to long-term and short-term [CO2] treatments at different growth stages in plants grown under non-limiting N conditions in hydroponic culture. Seasonal changes in photosynthesis rate and transpiration rate were also measured. Key Results In the long-term [CO2] study, leaf photosynthetic responses to intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) were not affected by elevated [CO2] before the heading stage, but the initial slope in this response was decreased by elevated [CO2] at the grain-filling stage. Nitrate and ammonium uptake capacities per root dry weight were not affected by elevated [CO2] at panicle initiation, but thereafter they were reduced by elevated [CO2] by 31–41 % at the full heading and mid-ripening growth stages. In the short-term study (24 h exposures), elevated [CO2] enhanced nitrate and ammonium uptake capacities at the early vegetative growth stage, but elevated [CO2] decreased the uptake capacities at the mid-reproductive stage. Conclusions This study showed that N uptake capacity was downregulated under long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] and its response to elevated [CO2] varied greatly with growth stage. PMID:18952623

  10. Estrone, 17β-estradiol and progesterone concentrations in processed milk with different fat contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoj Tomaž

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to determine estrone (E1, 17β-estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4 concentrations in processed milk with different fat contents and to compare the concentrations of these hormones in commercial ultrahigh temperature (UHT processed milk and commercial pasteurized milk. Materials and Methods. Commercial milks with different fat contents (UHT 0.5 %, UHT 1.5 %, UHT 3.5 % and pasteurized 3.5 % (10 samples of each type of milk were purchased in local stores. E1, E2 and P4 concentrations were determined by commercial ELISA kits. Results and Conclusions. E1 concentrations were below the limit of detection (15 pg mL-1 in all milks except in two UHT 3.5 % (out of 10 and two pasteurized 3.5 % (out of 10 milk samples. Mean E2 and P4 concentrations in UHT 3.5 % milk (25.37 ± 1.15 pg mL-1 and 10.76 ± 0.43 ng mL-1, respectively were significantly higher than in UHT 0.5 % milk (19.38 ± 0.79 pg mL-1 and 7.06 ± 0.26 ng mL-1, respectively. Significant positive correlations were determined between hormone concentrations and milk fat contents. Relatively high E2 and P4 concentrations indicate that the bulk of milk in the commercial milks examined originated from pregnant cows.

  11. Evaluating stream water quality through land use analysis in two grassland catchments: impact of wetlands on stream nitrogen concentration.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, A; Shimizu, M.; Woli, K. P.; Kuramochi, K.; HATANO, R

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the impacts of natural wetlands and various land uses on stream nitrogen concentration in two grassland-dominated catchments in eastern Hokkaido, Japan. Analyzing land use types in drainage basins, measuring denitrification potential of its soil, and water sampling in all seasons of 2003 were performed. Results showed a highly significant positive correlation between the concentration of stream NO3–N and the proportion of upland area in drainage basins in both catchments. The reg...

  12. Influence of dietary methionine concentration on growth and nitrogen balance in weanling Quarter Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsco, K N; Coverdale, J A; Wickersham, T A; Shelton, J L

    2011-07-01

    Twenty-four Quarter Horse weanlings (120 ± 10 d) were blocked by age into 4 groups (n=6) for a 56-d trial to evaluate the influence of dietary Met concentration on growth and N balance. Weanling horses were housed by block and individually fed concentrates twice daily at 1.75% BW (as-fed basis). Weanling horses were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 concentrate treatments: basal (0.20 Met), basal + 0.03% Met (0.23 Met), basal + 0.07% Met (0.27 Met), and basal + 0.11% Met (0.31 Met). Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and contained equal amounts of Lys and Thr. Coastal bermudagrass hay (Cynodon dactylon) was individually fed at 0.75% BW (as-fed basis). Growth measurements, BW, rump fat, and plasma were obtained every 7 d. The final 4 d consisted of total collection of urine and feces. Feed, fecal, and urine samples were analyzed for N content, and N balance was calculated. Urine was analyzed for urea and ammonia concentrations. Plasma was analyzed for urea concentration. Grain, hay, and fecal samples were analyzed for nutrient composition. Data were analyzed using the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. Linear, quadratic, and cubic effects were tested in the form of contrasts. There was no influence (P>0.25) of treatment on growth measurements, N balance, or urinary urea or ammonia. Intake of Lys and Thr did not differ (P>0.08) among treatments. Methionine intake increased as expected with increasing Met inclusion in the diet (Pdietary variable are necessary to better explain the Met requirements of weanling horses. © 2011 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen fertilization affects silicon concentration, cell wall composition and biofuel potential of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Lindedam, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential input factor required for plant growth and biomass production. However, very limited information is available on how nitrogen fertilization affects the quality of crop residues to be used as lignocellulosic feedstock. In the present study, straw of winter wheat plants gro...

  14. Linking nitrogen deposition to nitrate concentrations in groundwater below nature areas : modelling approach and data requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, L.T.C.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Wieggers, H.J.J.; Vries, de W.; Pul, van W.A.J.; Hoek, van den K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the most suitable model and required model improvements to link atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other elements in the Netherlands to measurements of nitrogen and other elements in the upper groundwater. The deterministic model SMARTml was found to be the most suitable

  15. The responses of shoot growth of Eucalyptus species to concentration and frequency of exposure to nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.; Monk, R.; Walker, C.D. (Environmental Science, Murdoch Univ. (Australia))

    1994-03-01

    To manage forests in areas with high concentrations of nitrogen oxides in the air, it is important to know the concentrations and frequencies of exposure which produce responses in trees. Four Eucalyptus species (E. microcorys F. Muell., E. globulus Labill., E. pilularis Smith and E. marginata Don ex Smith) were exposed to a range of nitrogen oxides concentrations (<5, 25, 50, 91 and 187 nl l[sup -1]) at fixed frequency (2 h day[sup -1], three times per week), and to fixed concentration (about 100 nl l[sup -1]), but variable frequency (never, once only, once per month, once per week and three times per week) for 169 days. The responses of growth to these treatments were determined using open-top chambers with plants grown directly in the soil. Generally, increasing frequency or concentration of nitrogen oxide fumigations had effects of similar magnitude. The effects of nitrogen oxides on growth were consistent with bivariant response models having constants which varied between species. Eucalyptus microcorys grew taller and heavier with increasing exposure, with a significant response in the ascending and plateau regions of the curve. Eucalyptus globulus and E. pilularis grew taller and heavier at low exposures but this effect reversed at higher exposures. The response encompassed the ascending, plateau and descending regions of the curve. The height and weight of E. marginata were not statistically significantly affected by nitrogen oxides fumigation, although the response curve suggested a similar response, but with smaller ascending and narrower plateau regions of the curve than the other species

  16. [Response of Algae to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Concentration and Quantity of Pumping Water in Pumped Storage Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You-peng; Yin, Kui-hao; Peng, Sheng-hua

    2015-06-01

    Taking a pumped storage reservoir located in southern China as the research object, the paper established a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and eutrophication model of the reservoir employing EFDC (environmental fluid dynamics code) model, calibrated and verified the model using long-term hydraulic and water quality data. Based on the model results, the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on the algae growth were analyzed, and the response of algae to nitrogen and phosphorus concentration and quantity of pumping water was also calculated. The results showed that the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations had little limit on algae growth rate in the reservoir. In the nutrients reduction scenarios, reducing phosphorus would gain greater algae biomass reduction than reducing nitrogen. When reducing 60 percent of nitrogen, the algae biomass did not decrease, while 12.4 percent of algae biomass reduction could be gained with the same reduction ratio of phosphorus. When the reduction ratio went to 90 percent, the algae biomass decreased by 17.9 percent and 35.1 percent for nitrogen and phosphorus reduction, respectively. In the pumping water quantity regulation scenarios, the algae biomass decreased with the increasing pumping water quantity when the pumping water quantity was greater than 20 percent of the current value; when it was less than 20 percent, the algae biomass increased with the increasing pumping water quantity. The algae biomass decreased by 25.7 percent when the pumping water quantity was doubled, and increased by 38.8 percent when it decreased to 20 percent. The study could play an important role in supporting eutrophication controlling in water source area.

  17. Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Martin, R. V.; van Donkelaar, A.; Steinbacher, M.; Celarier, E. A.; Bucsela, E.; Dunlea, E. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2008-08-01

    We present an approach to infer ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations by applying local scaling factors from a global three-dimensional model (GEOS-Chem) to tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura satellite. Seasonal mean OMI surface NO2 derived from the standard tropospheric NO2 data product (Version 1.0.5, Collection 3) varies by more than two orders of magnitude (10 ppbv) over North America. Two ground-based data sets are used to validate the surface NO2 estimate and indirectly validate the OMI tropospheric NO2 retrieval: photochemical steady-state (PSS) calculations of NO2 based on in situ NO and O3 measurements, and measurements from a commercial chemiluminescent NO2 analyzer equipped with a molybdenum converter. An interference correction algorithm for the latter is developed using laboratory and field measurements and applied using modeled concentrations of the interfering species. The OMI-derived surface NO2 mixing ratios are compared with an in situ surface NO2 data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Air Quality System (AQS) and Environment Canada's National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) network for 2005 after correcting for the interference in the in situ data. The overall agreement of the OMI-derived surface NO2 with the corrected in situ measurements and PSS-NO2 is -11-36%. A larger difference in winter/spring than in summer/fall implies a seasonal bias in the OMI NO2 retrieval. The correlation between the OMI-derived surface NO2 and the ground-based measurements is significant (correlation coefficient up to 0.86) with a tendency for higher correlations in polluted areas. The satellite-derived data base of ground level NO2 concentrations could be valuable for assessing exposures of humans and vegetation to NO2, supplementing the capabilities of the ground-based networks, and evaluating air quality models and the effectiveness of air quality control strategies.

  18. Leaf traits and photosynthetic responses of Betula pendula saplings to a range of ground-level ozone concentrations at a range of nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmens, Harry; Hayes, Felicity; Sharps, Katrina; Mills, Gina; Calatayud, Vicent

    2017-04-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition rates have increased strongly since the 1950s. Rising ground-level O3 concentrations and atmospheric N deposition both affect plant physiology and growth, however, impacts have often been studied in isolation rather than in combination. In addition, studies are often limited to a control treatment and one or two elevated levels of ozone and/or nitrogen supply. In the current study, three-year old Betula pendula saplings were exposed to seven different O3 profiles (24h mean O3 concentration of 36-68ppb in 2013, with peaks up to an average of 105ppb) in precision-controlled hemispherical glasshouses (solardomes) and four different N loads (10, 30, 50 or 70kgNha-1y-1) in 2012 and 2013. Here we report on the effects of enhanced O3 concentrations and N load on leaf traits and gas exchange in leaves of varying age and developmental stage in 2013. The response of leaf traits to O3 (but not N) vary with leaf developmental stage. For example, elevated O3 did not affect the chlorophyll content of the youngest fully expanded leaf, but it reduced the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic parameters in aging leaves, relatively more so later than earlier in the growing season. Elevated O3 enhanced the N content of senesced leaves prior to leaf fall, potentially affecting subsequent N cycling in the soil. Enhanced N generally stimulated the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic capacity. Whilst elevated O3 reduced the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis (Asat) in aging leaves, it did not affect stomatal conductance (gs). This suggests that photosynthesis and gs are not closely coupled at elevated O3 under-light saturating conditions. We did not observe any interactions between O3 and N regarding photosynthetic parameters (Vc,max, Jmax, Asat), chlorophyll content, gs, N content in senesced leaves and leaf number. Hence, the sensitivity of these leaf traits to O3 in young silver birch trees is

  19. The Relationship between Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations in the Atmosphere Measured by the Sodium Arsenite Method and the Chemiluminescence Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivapan Choo-in

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the nitrogen dioxide concentration measured by the Sodium Arsenite method and the Chemiluminescence method, aimed at developing a device for measuring nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere by means of the Sodium Arsenite method and studying the correlation between the concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere which was measured by Sodium Arsenite method and the Chemiluminescense method done by the Pollution Control Department, Thailand. In this research sampling collection of nitrogen dioxide concentration in various conditions by the Sodium Arsenite method was compared with that by the Chemiluminescence method done by the pollution control Department at the Air Quality Measurement Station at the Din Dang district, Bangkok. It was done by one-hour average value totaling of thirty data. The research result found that the sampling collection with the flowing rate of 160 ml/min and the absorption reagent with mixture of 0.2 M sodium hydroxide and 0.015 M sodium arsenite had the highest relationship to the measurement result done by the Pollution Control Department at a statistical significance level of 0.05 with the value of correlation coefficient at 0.658 which had a high relation.

  20. Exceptionally high organic nitrogen concentrations in a semi-arid South Texas estuary susceptible to brown tide blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetz, Michael S.; Cira, Emily K.; Sterba-Boatwright, Blair; Montagna, Paul A.; Palmer, Terence A.; Hayes, Kenneth C.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of estuarine eutrophication have tended to focus on systems with continually flowing rivers, while little is known about estuaries from semi-arid/arid regions. Here we report results from an assessment of water quality conditions in Baffin Bay, Texas, a shallow (2 fold higher than in three other Texas estuaries. In contrast, inorganic nitrogen (ammonium, nitrate) and phosphate concentrations were relatively low. Statistically significant long-term annual increases in chlorophyll a and salinity were observed in Baffin Bay, while long-term seasonal increases were observed for water temperature and TKN. Overall, Baffin Bay is displaying multiple symptoms of eutrophication, namely very high organic carbon, organic nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations, as well as symptoms not quantified here such as fish kills and episodic hypoxia. Much of the increase in chlorophyll in Baffin Bay, at least since ∼1990, have coincided with blooms of the mixotrophic phytoplankton species, Aureoumbra lagunensis, which is thought to be favored under high proportions of organic to inorganic nitrogen. Thus the high and possibly increasing organic nitrogen concentrations, coupled with a long-term annual increase in salinity and a long-term seasonal increase in water temperature are likely to promote additional brown tide blooms in this system in the future.

  1. The Influence of Biopolym FTZ on the Content of Nitrogen Compounds in Rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Petrášková

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the effect of Biopolym FZT on the crude protein in the ruminal content. The experiment was conducted in laboratory conditions. Rumen content was removed from the Holstein breed cow fitted with ruminal fistula. The hydrolyzed brown seaweed was added to the samples of the ruminal content. After incubation of the samples the crude protein content was determined. In experiments with solid ruminal contents positive effects of Biopolym on the crude protein content was shown. The best results were achieved at the dilution of 1:2000.

  2. The Interaction Between Groundwater Fluctuations and Nitrate Nitrogen Concentrations: case study in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinbergs, A.; Vircavs, V.; Abramenko, K.; Lauva, D.; Dimanta, Z.; VÄ«tola, I.; Gailuma, A.

    2012-04-01

    Surface water hydrology and hydro-chemical conditions are deeply connected with processes in soil under natural and artificial affections. Combinations of environmental and human impact factors lead to the different effects of aquatic environment. In Latvia, soil particles and chemical substances are particularly affected by shallow groundwater fluctuations and runoff from soil to open streams because of typically humid climate conditions. Latvia is a country in Baltic Sea region where the pollution with plant nutrients is actual problem. As a negative effect of plant nutrient leaching from soil provoke eutrophication in open streams and water reservoirs and cause increased expenses for farmers to establish nutrient balance within the farm. Decrease of shallow groundwater quality endangers drinking water resources in Latvia. To identify reasons of nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching it's necessary to understand the interactions of natural hydrological processes and NO3-N mobility, as well as artificial influences as leaching with runoff formed by drainage systems and doses of used fertilisers. Most of the agricultural lands is drained because of humid climate conditions. It's significant to estimate the runoff from surface water objects and subsurface drainage, groundwater fluctuations as well as the quality of all the mentioned kind of water source. For the better understanding it's important to get knowledge's of principles of runoff formation and water quality fluctuations and interactions between both of them. For identifying interactions significant data are monitored runoff and water quality measurements in different scale: small catchment, drainage field, groundwater wells as well as trial plots. Research field is based on observed data (2006-2010 year period): measured groundwater level, NO3-N concentration and drainage runoff. Study area is monitoring object Mellupīte (monitored by Latvia University of Agriculture) small catchment with groundwater well MG-1

  3. Effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and nitrogen utilization in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A; Smith, M L; Saini, M; Katole, Shrikant; Kullu, S S; Gupta, B K; Sharma, A K; Swarup, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and utilization of nitrogen in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), two feeding trials were conducted on three juveniles, four sub-adults, and three adults. During trial I, the conventional zoo diets of juveniles, sub-adults, and adult contained 22, 17, and 16% of concentrates on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. During trial II, the amount of concentrate was reduced by 50%. A digestion trial of five days collection period was conducted during each period. The animals ate more roughages when concentrates were restricted. Intake of DM (g/kg BW(0.75) /day) was highest in sub-adults, followed by juveniles and adults. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent soluble (NDS), and supply of digestible energy (DE) was highest in juveniles, followed by sub-adults and adults. Based upon the estimated metabolic fecal nitrogen (MFN) and calculated endogenous urinary nitrogen (EUN) and dermal losses, minimum dietary CP required to meet maintenance requirement was estimated to be 6.12, 6.05, and 5.97% in juveniles, sub-adults, and adults, respectively. Restriction of concentrates resulted in decreased (P elephants should be fed in a restricted way so as to reduce the intake of excessive calories and the potential risk of obesity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cross-site comparison of herbivore impact on nitrogen availability in grasslands : the role of plant nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E. S.; Knops, J. M. H.; Milchunas, D. G.; Ritchie, M. E.; Olff, H.; Boutin, Stan

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether there is a relationship between plant N concentration and herbivore impact on soil N availability (measured with resin bags) with a study of replicate 6-8 year old exclosures (with an unfenced control) of vertebrate herbivores (> 1 kg) established at each of seven grassland sites

  5. The Dose-Response Association between Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Serum Interleukin-6 Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bowatte, Gayan; Lodge, Caroline J; Knibbs, Luke D; Gurrin, Lyle C; Kandane-Rathnayake, Rangi; Johns, David P; Lowe, Adrian J; Burgess, John A; Thompson, Bruce R; Thomas, Paul S; Wood-Baker, Richard; Morrison, Stephen; Giles, Graham G; Marks, Guy; Markos, James; Tang, Mimi L K; Abramson, Michael J; Walters, E Haydn; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2017-05-08

    Systemic inflammation is an integral part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and air pollution is associated with cardiorespiratory mortality, yet the interrelationships are not fully defined. We examined associations between nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) exposure (as a marker of traffic-related air pollution) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and investigated effect modification and mediation by post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (post-BD-AO) and cardiovascular risk. Data from middle-aged participants in the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS, n = 1389) were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression, using serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as the outcome. Mean annual NO₂ exposure was estimated at residential addresses using a validated satellite-based land-use regression model. Post-BD-AO was defined by post-BD forced expiratory ratio (FEV₁/FVC) < lower limit of normal, and cardiovascular risk by a history of either cerebrovascular or ischaemic heart disease. We found a positive association with increasing serum IL-6 concentration (geometric mean 1.20 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.3, p = 0.001) per quartile increase in NO₂). This was predominantly a direct relationship, with little evidence for either effect modification or mediation via post-BD-AO, or for the small subgroup who reported cardiovascular events. However, there was some evidence consistent with serum IL-6 being on the causal pathway between NO₂ and cardiovascular risk. These findings raise the possibility that the interplay between air pollution and systemic inflammation may differ between post-BD airflow obstruction and cardiovascular diseases.

  6. The Dose–Response Association between Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Serum Interleukin-6 Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Jennifer L.; Bowatte, Gayan; Lodge, Caroline J.; Knibbs, Luke D.; Gurrin, Lyle C.; Kandane-Rathnayake, Rangi; Johns, David P.; Lowe, Adrian J.; Burgess, John A.; Thompson, Bruce R.; Thomas, Paul S.; Wood-Baker, Richard; Morrison, Stephen; Giles, Graham G.; Marks, Guy; Markos, James; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Abramson, Michael J.; Walters, E. Haydn; Matheson, Melanie C.; Dharmage, Shyamali C.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is an integral part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and air pollution is associated with cardiorespiratory mortality, yet the interrelationships are not fully defined. We examined associations between nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure (as a marker of traffic-related air pollution) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and investigated effect modification and mediation by post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (post-BD-AO) and cardiovascular risk. Data from middle-aged participants in the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS, n = 1389) were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression, using serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as the outcome. Mean annual NO2 exposure was estimated at residential addresses using a validated satellite-based land-use regression model. Post-BD-AO was defined by post-BD forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC) < lower limit of normal, and cardiovascular risk by a history of either cerebrovascular or ischaemic heart disease. We found a positive association with increasing serum IL-6 concentration (geometric mean 1.20 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.3, p = 0.001) per quartile increase in NO2). This was predominantly a direct relationship, with little evidence for either effect modification or mediation via post-BD-AO, or for the small subgroup who reported cardiovascular events. However, there was some evidence consistent with serum IL-6 being on the causal pathway between NO2 and cardiovascular risk. These findings raise the possibility that the interplay between air pollution and systemic inflammation may differ between post-BD airflow obstruction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28481326

  7. The Dose–Response Association between Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Serum Interleukin-6 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Perret

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is an integral part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and air pollution is associated with cardiorespiratory mortality, yet the interrelationships are not fully defined. We examined associations between nitrogen dioxide (NO2 exposure (as a marker of traffic-related air pollution and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and investigated effect modification and mediation by post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (post-BD-AO and cardiovascular risk. Data from middle-aged participants in the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS, n = 1389 were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression, using serum interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α as the outcome. Mean annual NO2 exposure was estimated at residential addresses using a validated satellite-based land-use regression model. Post-BD-AO was defined by post-BD forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC < lower limit of normal, and cardiovascular risk by a history of either cerebrovascular or ischaemic heart disease. We found a positive association with increasing serum IL-6 concentration (geometric mean 1.20 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.3, p = 0.001 per quartile increase in NO2. This was predominantly a direct relationship, with little evidence for either effect modification or mediation via post-BD-AO, or for the small subgroup who reported cardiovascular events. However, there was some evidence consistent with serum IL-6 being on the causal pathway between NO2 and cardiovascular risk. These findings raise the possibility that the interplay between air pollution and systemic inflammation may differ between post-BD airflow obstruction and cardiovascular diseases.

  8. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-04

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  9. Higher milk fat content is associated with higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhout, Shelley M; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Lebovic, Gerald; Chen, Yang; O'Connor, Deborah L; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2016-05-01

    Current guidelines for cow's milk consumption in children older than age 2 years suggest 1% or 2% milk to reduce the risk of obesity. Given that milk is the main dietary source of vitamin D for North American children and that vitamin D is fat soluble, we hypothesized 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration to be positively associated with the fat content of milk. The objective was to determine the relationship between the fat content of milk consumed and the serum 25(OH)D concentration; our secondary objective was to explore the role that the volume of milk consumed played in this relationship. We completed a cross-sectional study of children aged 12-72 months in the TARGetKids! research network. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between milk fat content and child 25(OH)D, adjusted for clinically relevant covariates. The interaction between volume of milk and fat content was examined. Two thousand eight hundred fifty-seven children were included in the analysis. The fat content of milk was positively associated with 25(OH)D (p = 0.03), and the interaction between the volume of milk consumed and the milk fat content was statistically significant (p = 0.005). Children who drank 1% milk needed 2.46 cups (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.38-2.54) of milk to have a 25(OH)D concentration similar to that of children who drank 1 cup of homogenized milk (3.25% fat). Children who consumed 1% milk had 2.05 (95% CI 1.73-2.42) times higher odds of having a 25(OH)D concentration <50 nmol/L compared with children who consumed homogenized milk. In conclusion, recommendations for children to drink lower-fat milk (1% or 2%) may compromise serum 25(OH)D levels and may require study to ensure optimal childhood health.

  10. County-based estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus content of animal manure in the United States for 1982, 1987, and 1992.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains county estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus content of animal wastes produced annually for the years 1982, 1987, and 1992. The estimates are...

  11. Green manures in continuous wheat systems affect grain yield and nitrogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell.) is the foundation for most U.S. southern Great Plains (SGP) agriculture. Inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizers are important to wheat production, but increasing N prices have caused farmers to reconsider growing legumes during summer fallow for ‘...

  12. Influence of denitrification in aquatic sediments on the nitrogen content of natural waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of microbiological processes, particularly denitrification, leading to the elimination of nitrogen from natural waters. As denitrification is an anaerobic process and natural waters mostly contain dissolved oxygen, this process was suggested to proceed in the anaerobic

  13. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen supply on biomass and active carbon of freshwater marsh after two growing seasons in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangying; Liu, Jingshuang; Wang, Yang; Dou, Jingxin; Dong, Xiaoyong

    2009-01-01

    An experiments were carried out with treatments differing in nitrogen supply (0, 5 and 15 g N/m2) and CO2 levels (350 and 700 micromol/mol) using OTC (open top chamber) equipment to investigate the biomass of Calamagrostis angustifolia and soil active carbon contents after two years. The results showed that elevated CO2 concentration increased the biomass of C. angustifolia and the magnitude of response varied with each growth period. Elevated CO2 concentration has increased aboveground biomass by 16.7% and 17.6% during the jointing and heading periods and only 3.5% and 9.4% during dough and maturity periods. The increases in belowground biomass due to CO2 elevation was 26.5%, 34.0% and 28.7% during the heading, dough and maturity periods, respectively. The responses of biomass to enhanced CO2 concentrations are differed in N levels. Both the increase of aboveground biomass and belowground biomass were greater under high level of N supply (15 g N/m2). Elevated CO2 concentration also increased the allocation of biomass and carbon in root. Under elevated CO2 concentration, the average values of active carbon tended to increase. The increases of soil active soil contents followed the sequence of microbial biomass carbon (10.6%) > dissolved organic carbon (7.5%) > labile oxidable carbon (6.6%) > carbohydrate carbon (4.1%). Stepwise regressions indicated there were significant correlations between the soil active carbon contents and plant biomass. Particularly, microbial biomass carbon, labile oxidable carbon and carbohydrate carbon were found to be correlated with belowground biomass, while dissolved organic carbon has correlation with aboveground biomass. Therefore, increased biomass was regarded as the main driving force for the increase in soil active organic carbon under elevated CO2 concentration.

  14. The effect of nitrogen and sulphur fertilization on the yield and content of sulforaphane and nitrates in cauliflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Čekey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field experiment with cauliflower, we investigated the effect of four different variants of nitrogen and suplhur fertilization on quantity and quality of cauliflower in the term of sulforaphane content and nitrate accumulation. The influence of fertilization was statistically significant between control variant and fertilization variants and in both experimental years within all parameters of cauliflower yield. The highest yield of cauliflower was reached at the variant 4 when it was fertilized on the level of nutrients N:S = 250:60 kg.ha−1. The increase of yield against control variant represented value 26.6%. The applied fertilization positively affected on the accumulation sulforaphane in the cauliflower. Its highest content was determined at the variant 4 (N:S = 250:60 kg.ha−1. In comparison with control variant, the sulforaphane content was increased about 18.4%. On the other side, applied nutrition resulted in increased accumulation of nitrates in the cauliflower. The most increase of nitrate content, compared to the control variant, was also ascertained at the variant 4 (about 31.4%.The gathered data point towards to the possibility and way how we could effect on the increased accumulation of sulforaphane in cauliflower florets. This sphere of fertilization effect on the sulforaphane content is not sufficiently explored well. Our aim is to continue in this research subject and to find way how to cultivate vegetables with higher content of health-promoting compounds.

  15. Fed-batch cultivation of baker's yeast followed by nitrogen or carbon starvation: effects on fermentative capacity and content of trehalose and glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    2002-01-01

    , trehalose and glycogen. Nitrogen starvation triggered the accumulation of trehalose and glycogen. After 8 h of starvation, the content of trehalose and glycogen was increased 4-fold and 2-fold, respectively. Carbon starvation resulted in a partial conversion of glycogen into trehalose. The trehalose content...... increased from 45 to 64 mg (g dry-weight)(-1), whereas the glycogen content in the same period was reduced from 55 to 5 mg (g dry-weight)(-1). Glycogen was consumed faster than trehalose during storage of the starved yeast for 1 month. Nitrogen starvation resulted in a decrease in the protein content...

  16. [Change characteristics of rice yield and soil organic matter and nitrogen contents under various long-term fertilization regimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Gao, Ju-Sheng; Zhang, Yang-Zhu; Qin, Dao-Zhu; Xu, Ming-Gang

    2013-07-01

    A long-term (1982-2010) field experiment was conducted in the Red Soil Experiment Station of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Qiyang County of Hunan Province, South-central China to investigate the dynamic changes of rice yield and soil organic matter (OM) and nitrogen contents under different fertilization treatments. The treatments included NPK, NPKM (M: manure), NPM, NKM, PKM, M, and CK. Fertilization increased the soil OM, total N, and alkaline-hydrolysable N contents and the rice yield. In treatment NPKM, the rice yield across the 28 years maintained at the highest level; while in treatment NPK, the yield showed a decreasing trend, being lower than that in other fertilization treatments. In the treatments applied with manure only or in combining with chemical fertilizers, the soil OM content increased rapidly in the first 16 years, and then fluctuated around a constant level (29.42-39.32 g x kg(-1)). In the treatments of chemical fertilization, the soil OM content only had a quicker increase in the first 8 years, and then fluctuated within a relatively stable range. Fertilization with manure increased the soil OM significantly, as compared to fertilization with chemical fertilizers only. The soil total N content in all fertilization treatments showed a rapid increase in the first 8 years, and the increment was the highest in treatment NPKM. The soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content in all fertilization treatments had a slower increase in the first 12 years, with an average annual increment of 0.66-2.25 mg x kg(-1) x a(-1). In 1994-1998, the soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content in fertilization treatments had a quicker increase, with an average annual increment of 6.45-32.45 mg x kg(-1) x a(-1); but after 1998, the soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content had a slight decrease. It was concluded that organic fertilization was the key measure to stably improve the physical and chemical properties and the productivity of red paddy soils by increasing their

  17. Dynamics of the nitrogen content in aboveground phytomass on the turf after fertilization of different forms of fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    HRIC, Peter; Ján JANČOVIČ; KOVÁR, Peter; Ľuboš VOZÁR

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to find out dynamics of the nitrogen (N) content in aboveground phytomass on the turf after fertilization of different forms of fertilizers under non–irrigated conditions. The experiment was carried out in warm and dry conditions in the area of Nitra (Slovak Republic). There were included 7 treatments: 1. Without fertilization, 2. Saltpetre with dolomite, Superphosphate, Potassium salt, 3. Turf fertilizer 15–3–8 (+ 3MgO + 0.8Fe + 18S), 4. Slow release fertilizer...

  18. Using nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichens to spatially assess the relative contribution of atmospheric nitrogen sources in complex landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, P; Barros, C; Augusto, S; Pereira, M J; Máguas, C; Branquinho, C

    2017-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is an important driver of global change, causing alterations in ecosystem biodiversity and functionality. Environmental assessments require monitoring the emission and deposition of both the amount and types of Nr. This is especially important in heterogeneous landscapes, as different land-cover types emit particular forms of Nr to the atmosphere, which can impact ecosystems distinctively. Such assessments require high spatial resolution maps that also integrate temporal variations, and can only be feasibly achieved by using ecological indicators. Our aim was to rank land-cover types according to the amount and form of emitted atmospheric Nr in a complex landscape with multiple sources of N. To do so, we measured and mapped nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichen thalli, which we then related to land-cover data. Results suggested that, at the landscape scale, intensive agriculture and urban areas were the most important sources of Nr to the atmosphere. Additionally, the ocean greatly influences Nr in land, by providing air with low Nr concentration and a unique isotopic composition. These results have important consequences for managing air pollution at the regional level, as they provide critical information for modeling Nr emission and deposition across regional as well as continental scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrogen source tracking with δ15N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory L. Bruland; Richard A.. Mackenzie

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared δ15N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of δ15N with...

  20. Nitrogen content of lichens as an indicator of inversion-based deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Brianne

    2014-01-01

    Inversions have plagued the valleys in Utah resulting in built up pollution carpeting the cities and spreading into surrounding ecosystems. The ecological impact of these inversions is unknown. Inversion-based pollution events deposit nutrients and pollutants in the ecosystems. The purpose of this study is to determine if lichens, due to their unique physiology, preserve a record of inversion-based nitrogen deposition in order to assess the ecological impact of the inversions. In June and Jul...

  1. Redistribution of metabolic fluxes in Chlorella protothecoides by variation of media nitrogen concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saratram Gopalakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU algorithm was employed to calculate intracellular fluxes for Chlorella protothecoides using previously generated growth and mass spec data. While the flux through glycolysis remained relatively constant, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux increased from 3% to 20% of the glucose uptake during nitrogen-limited growth. The TCA cycle flux decreased from 94% to 38% during nitrogen-limited growth while the flux of acetyl-CoA into lipids increased from 58% to 109% of the glucose uptake, increasing total lipid accumulation. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase activity was higher during nitrogen-sufficient growth. The glyoxylate shunt was found to be partially active in both cases, indicating the nutrient nature has an impact on flux distribution. It was found that the total NADPH supply within the cell remained almost constant under both conditions. In summary, algal cells substantially reorganize their metabolism during the switch from carbon-limited (nitrogen-sufficient to nitrogen-limited (carbon-sufficient growth.

  2. Effect of sulfur and nitrogen fertilization on the content of nutritionally relevant carotenoids in spinach ( Spinacia oleracea ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Constance; Arrigoni, Eva; Neuweiler, Reto; Baumgartner, Daniel; Nyström, Laura; Hurrell, Richard F

    2012-06-13

    Spinach is an important dietary source of lutein and β-carotene. Their synthesis is closely linked to chlorophyll synthesis and dependent upon an adequate supply of sulfur and nitrogen. Soils may become sulfur-deficient during winter because microorganisms convert atmospheric SO2 less efficiently to sulfate. The influence of sulfur and nitrogen fertilization on the carotenoid and chlorophyll contents of spinach grown in summer or winter was investigated. Carotenoid and chlorophyll levels were positively correlated. Lutein and β-carotene were 25% higher in summer than in winter. Winter levels were increased by 35-40% by sulfur fertilization in one location but not in the other, with the impact depending upon soil type, growing location, and atmospheric conditions. Carotenoids were little or not affected by nitrogen addition in winter or sulfur addition in summer. It is concluded that sulfur fertilization of spinach in winter may modestly increase carotenoids but high carotenoid levels are best assured with carotenoid-rich cultivars grown in summer.

  3. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli gains a competitive advantage by using ethanolamine as a nitrogen source in the bovine intestinal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Yolande; Girardeau, J P; Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Lyan, Bernard; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Harel, Josée; Martin, Christine

    2011-02-01

    The bovine gastrointestinal tract is the main reservoir for enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) responsible for food-borne infections. Characterization of nutrients that promote the carriage of these pathogens by the ruminant would help to develop ecological strategies to reduce their survival in the bovine gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we show for the first time that free ethanolamine (EA) constitutes a nitrogen source for the O157:H7 EHEC strain EDL933 in the bovine intestinal content because of induction of the eut (ethanolamine utilization) gene cluster. In contrast, the eut gene cluster is absent in the genome of most species constituting the mammalian gut microbiota. Furthermore, the eutB gene (encoding a subunit of the enzyme that catalyses the release of ammonia from EA) is poorly expressed in non-pathogenic E. coli. Accordingly, EA is consumed by EHEC but is poorly metabolized by endogenous microbiota of the bovine small intestine, including commensal E. coli. Interestingly, the capacity to utilize EA as a nitrogen source confers a growth advantage to E. coli O157:H7 when the bacteria enter the stationary growth phase. These data demonstrate that EHEC strains take advantage of a nitrogen source that is not consumed by the resident microbiota, and suggest that EA represents an ecological niche favouring EHEC persistence in the bovine intestine.

  4. Numerical model simulations of nitrate concentrations in groundwater using various nitrogen input scenarios, mid-Snake region, south-central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Kenneth D.; Rupert, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program nitrate transport in groundwater was modeled in the mid-Snake River region in south-central Idaho to project future concentrations of nitrate. Model simulation results indicated that nitrate concentrations would continue to increase over time, eventually exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for drinking water of 10 milligrams per liter in some areas. A subregional groundwater model simulated the change of nitrate concentrations in groundwater over time in response to three nitrogen input scenarios: (1) nitrogen input fixed at 2008 levels; (2) nitrogen input increased from 2008 to 2028 using the same rate of increase as the average rate of increase during the previous 10 years (1998 through 2008); after 2028, nitrogen input is fixed at 2028 levels; and (3) nitrogen input related to agriculture completely halted, with only nitrogen input from precipitation remaining. Scenarios 1 and 2 project that nitrate concentrations in groundwater continue to increase from 10 to 50 years beyond the year nitrogen input is fixed, depending on the location in the model area. Projected nitrate concentrations in groundwater increase by as much as 2–4 milligrams per liter in many areas, with nitrate concentrations in some areas reaching 10 milligrams per liter. Scenario 3, although unrealistic, estimates how long (20–50 years) it would take nitrate in groundwater to return to background concentrations—the “flushing time” of the system. The amount of nitrate concentration increase cannot be explained solely by differences in nitrogen input; in fact, some areas with the highest amount of nitrogen input have the lowest increase in nitrate concentration. The geometry of the aquifer and the pattern of regional groundwater flow through the aquifer greatly influence nitrate concentrations. The aquifer thins toward discharge areas along the Snake River

  5. Relationship of arsenic concentration with ammonium-nitrogen concentration, oxidation reduction potential and pH of groundwater in arsenic-contaminated areas in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Egashira, Kazuhiko; Tani, Masakazu

    This study examines how arsenic (As) concentration is related to ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) concentration, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and pH in groundwater to determine if they have common characteristics in groundwater with high As concentrations in the As-contaminated areas of Bangladesh, Nepal, Cambodia and Vietnam. For the groundwater samples having the three highest As concentrations (top three groundwaters) selected as representatives at each location, As and NH4-N concentrations varied, but ORP and pH did not vary by locations. The ORP value of 30-110 mV, indicating the reducing condition, and the neutral to slightly alkaline pH (pH 7.0-7.6) were presumed to be the key conditions for high As concentrations in groundwater of the study areas. According to the ORP (Eh)-pH diagram, the dominant As species in the top three groundwaters from each location was hydrogen arsenate (HAsO42-). Out of the correlations between the four elements for the top three groundwaters in the areas, only the correlation between As and NH4-N concentrations was positive and significant. Thus, it was identified that NH4-N had an effect on increasing As concentration in groundwater.

  6. A New Route for Unburned Carbon Concentration Measurements Eliminating Mineral Content and Coal Rank Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Liu; Yuan-Yuan Duan; Zhen Yang; Hai-Tong Yu

    2014-01-01

    500 million tons of coal fly ash are produced worldwide every year with only 16% of the total amount utilized. Therefore, potential applications using fly ash have both environmental and industrial interests. Unburned carbon concentration measurements are fundamental to effective fly ash applications. Current on-line measurement accuracies are strongly affected by the mineral content and coal rank. This paper describes a char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance method for unburned carbon ...

  7. Estimation of canopy nitrogen concentration across C3 and C4 grasslands using WorldView-2 multispectral data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adjorlolo, C

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available production of plant functional types, litter decomposition, and rates of photosynthesis [1, 2]. The net primary production of quality biomass is one of the outcomes of complex interaction between vegetation and environment, which is one of the key factors...-band combination, have been used to improve the ability to predict the concentration per unit area of biochemicals at leaf or canopy scales [21-23]. The NDVI Estimation of canopy nitrogen concentration across C3 and C4 grasslands using WorldView-2 multispectral...

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Nitrogen Content and Its Role on the Carbon Dioxide Adsorption Capacity of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhi, Kripal S; Park, Dae-Hwan; Joseph, Stalin; Talapaneni, Siddulu N; Ravon, Ugo; Al-Bahily, Khalid; Vinu, Ajayan

    2017-03-02

    Mesoporous carbon nitrides (MCNs) with rod-shaped morphology and tunable nitrogen contents have been synthesized through a calcination-free method by using ethanol-washed mesoporous SBA-15 as templates at different carbonization temperatures. Carbon tetrachloride and ethylenediamine were used as the sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The resulting MCN materials were characterized with low- and high-angle powder XRD, nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution (HR) SEM, HR-TEM, elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure techniques. The carbonization temperature plays a critical role in controlling not only the crystallinity, but also the nitrogen content and textural parameters of the samples, including specific surface area and specific pore volume. The nitrogen content of MCN decreases with a concomitant increase in specific surface area and specific pore volume, as well as the crystallinity of the samples, as the carbonization temperature is increased. The results also reveal that the structural order of the materials is retained, even after heat treatment at temperatures up to 900 °C with a significant reduction of the nitrogen content, but the structure is partially damaged at 1000 °C. The carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of these materials is not only dependent on the textural parameters, but also on the nitrogen content. The MCN prepared at 900 °C, which has an optimum BET surface area and nitrogen content, registers a carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of 20.1 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 30 bar, which is much higher than that of mesoporous silica, MCN-1, activated carbon, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. [Effects of grape seed addition in swine manure-wheat straw composting on the compost microbial community and carbon and nitrogen contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Mei; Liu, Xue-Ling; Jiang, Ji-Shao; Huang, Hua; Liu, Dong

    2012-08-01

    Taking substrates swine manure and wheat straw (fresh mass ratio 10.5:1) as the control (PMW), a composting experiment was conducted in a self-made aerated static composting bin to study the effects of adding 8% grape seed (treatment PMW + G) on the succession of microbial community and the transformation of carbon and nitrogen in the substrates during the composting. Seven samples were collected from each treatment, according to the temperature of the compost during the 30 d composting period. The microbial population and physiological groups were determined, and the NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, organic N, and organic C concentrations in the compost were measured. Grape seed addition induced a slight increase of bacterial count and a significant increase of actinomycetes count, but decreased the fungal count significantly. Grape seed addition also decreased the ratio of bacteria to actinomycetes and the counts of ammonifiers and denitrifiers, but increased the counts of nitrifiers, N-fixing bacteria, and cellulose-decomposing microorganisms. The contents of NH4(+)-N and organic C decreased, while that of NO3(-)-N increased obviously. The NO3(-)-N content in the compost was positively correlated with the actinomycetes count. During composting, the compost temperature in treatment PMW + G increased more rapidly, and remained steady in thermophilic phase, while the water content changed little, which provided a stable and higher population of actinomycetes and nitrifiers in thermophilic phase, being beneficial to the increase of compost nitrate N.

  10. Serum Sialic Acid Concentration and Content in ApoB-Containing Lipoproteins in Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Monika; Gruszewska, Ewa; Cylwik, Bogdan; Panasiuk, Anatol; Filisiak, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Chrostek, Lech

    2016-01-01

    The great significance for the metabolism of lipoproteins is the composition of carbohydrate chain of apolipoproteins, where sialic acid (SA) is located. In VILDL and LDL sialic acid is attached to apolipoprotein B. The sialylation of serum proteins including apolipoprotein B can be affected in the course of liver diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of liver diseases on the concentration and content of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins. The tested group consisted of 165 patients (118 males, 47 females) with liver diseases: alcoholic cirrhosis, non-alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, toxic hepatitis, chronic viral hepatitis, and liver cancer. ApoB-containing lipoproteins were isolated by a turbidimetric procedure and SA concentration was measured according to an enzymatic method. There was a significant increase in the serum concentration of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins in viral hepatitis. Although the serum concentration of ApoB was not significantly different between specific liver diseases, the serum levels of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins appeared to be different. There is an association between SA concentration and triglycerides in alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. Also, in viral hepatitis SA concentration correlated negatively with HDL-cholesterol. The content of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins in alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis was significantly higher than that in the control group, but did not differ between diseases. This study may explain the variations in serum lipids and lipoproteins in liver diseases. It seems that the reason for these abnormalities is the changes in the concentration of sialic acid in ApoB-containing lipoproteins.

  11. Water-removed spectra increase the retrieval accuracy when estimating savanna grass nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramoelo, A.; Skidmore, A.K.; Schlerf, M.; Mathieu, R.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the distribution of grass foliar nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) is important for understanding rangeland vitality and for facilitating the effective management of wildlife and livestock. Water absorption effects in the near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) regions pose

  12. Carbon dioxide concentration and nitrogen input affect the C and N storage pools in Amanita muscaria-Picea abies mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnau, K; Berger, A; Loewe, A; Einig, W; Hampp, R; Chalot, M; Dizengremel, P; Kottke, I

    2001-02-01

    We studied the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) on the vacuolar storage pool of nitrogen-containing compounds and on the glycogen pool in the hyphal sheath of Amanita muscaria (L. ex Fr.) Hooker-Picea abies L. Karst. mycorrhizae grown with two concentrations of ammonium in the substrate. Mycorrhizal seedlings were grown in petri dishes on agar containing 5.3 or 53 mg N l(-1) and exposed to 350 or 700 microl CO2 l(-1) for 5 or 7 weeks, respectively. Numbers and area of nitrogen-containing bodies in the vacuoles of the mycorrhizal fungus were determined by light microscopy linked to an image analysis system. The relative concentration of nitrogen in the vacuolar bodies was measured by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Glycogen stored in the cytosol was determined at the ultrastructural level by image analysis after staining the sections (PATAg test). Shoot dry weight, net photosynthesis and relative amounts of N in vacuolar bodies were greater at the higher N and CO2 concentrations. The numbers and areas of vacuolar N-containing bodies were significantly greater at the higher N concentration only at ambient [CO2]. In the same treatment the percentage of hyphae containing glycogen declined to nearly zero. We conclude that, in the high N/low [CO2] treatment, the mycorrhizal fungus had an insufficient carbohydrate supply, partly because of increased amino acid synthesis by the non-mycorrhizal rootlets. When [CO2] was increased, the equilibrium between storage of glycogen and N-containing compounds was reestablished.

  13. Nitrogen starvation strategies and photobioreactor design for enhancing lipid content and lipid production of a newly isolated microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31: implications for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2011-11-01

    Microalgae are recognized for serving as a sustainable source for biodiesel production. This study investigated the effect of nitrogen starvation strategies and photobioreactor design on the performance of lipid production and of CO(2) fixation of an indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31. Comparison of single-stage and two-stage nitrogen starvation strategies shows that single-stage cultivation on basal medium with low initial nitrogen source concentration (i.e., 0.313 g/L KNO(3)) was the most effective approach to enhance microalgal lipid production, attaining a lipid productivity of 78 mg/L/d and a lipid content of 55.9%. The lipid productivity of C. vulgaris ESP-31 was further upgraded to 132.4 mg/L/d when it was grown in a vertical tubular photobioreactor with a high surface to volume ratio of 109.3 m(2)/m(3) . The high lipid productivity was also accompanied by fixation of 6.36 g CO(2) during the 10-day photoautotrophic growth with a CO(2) fixation rate of 430 mg/L/d. Analysis of fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipid indicates that over 65% of fatty acids in the microalgal lipid are saturated [i.e., palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0)] and monounsaturated [i.e., oleic acid (C18:1)]. This lipid quality is suitable for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Seasonal variations and cycling of nitrous oxide using nitrogen isotopes and concentrations from an unsaturated zone of a floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Kolding, S.; Williams, K. H.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and isotope ratios of 15N to 14N of N2O in the vadose zone mainly depend on atmospheric deposition, symbiotic or non-symbiotic N2 fixation, and nitrification/denitrification processes in underlying groundwater. In an effort to quantify N2O seasonal variations, cycling and N budgets in an alluvial aquifer in western Colorado (Rifle, CO), the concentrations and nitrogen stable isotopes of N2O within the pore space of partially saturated sediments have been monitored over the 2013-2014 years. Vertically resolved profiles spanning from 0m to 3m depth were sampled at 0.5m increments at a periodicity of one month. At each of the profile locations, N2O concentrations decreased from 3m depth to the surface. The maximum concentrations were observed at the interface between the unsaturated zone and groundwater, with minimum values observed in the near surface samples. The d15N values tend to increase from the unsaturated zone/groundwater interface to the surface. Both variation of N2O concentrations and d15N values suggest that denitrification is the main contribution to N2O production and both parameters exhibited a strong seasonal variation. The maximum concentrations (~10ppmv) were observed at the beginning of summer, during the annual maximum in water table elevation. The minimum N2O concentrations were observed in the period from January to May and coincided with low water table elevations. Additionally, nitrogen concentrations and d15N values of the shallowest sediments within the vertical profiles do not show variation, suggesting that the main source of N2O is associated with groundwater denitrification, with the shallower, partially saturated sediments acting as a sink for N2O.

  15. Technical Note: Comparison between a direct and the standard, indirect method for dissolved organic nitrogen determination in freshwater environments with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Kronvang, Brian

    2012-01-01

    was successfully applied to a range of samples from waste water treatment plants to forest and agricultural streams. With 2.5 h of measurement time per sample, SEC is slower, but more accurate than the standard approach for determination of DON concentrations in freshwaters with DIN : TDN ratios >0.6. To sum up...... accuracy at high DIN : TDN ratios, we investigated the DON measurement accuracy of this standard approach according to the DIN : TDN ratio and compared it to the direct measurement of DON by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) for freshwater systems. For this, we used standard compounds and natural samples......, the direct DON measurement by SEC enables better understanding of the nitrogen cycle of urban and agricultural freshwater systems....

  16. Influence of nitrogen and sulfur on biomass production and carotenoid and glucosinolate concentrations in watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsell, Dean A; Barickman, T Casey; Sams, Carl E; McElroy, J Scott

    2007-12-26

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a perennial herb rich in the secondary metabolites of glucosinolates and carotenoids. 2-phenethyl isothiocyanate, the predominate isothiocyanate hydrolysis product in watercress, can reduce carcinogen activation through inhibition of phase I enzymes and induction of phase II enzymes. Sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) have been shown to influence concentrations of both glucosinolates and carotenoids in a variety of vegetable crops. Our research objectives were to determine how several levels of N and S fertility interact to affect watercress plant tissue biomass production, tissue C/N ratios, concentrations of plant pigments, and glucosinolate concentrations. Watercress was grown using nutrient solution culture under a three by three factorial arrangement, with three S (8, 16, and 32 mg/L) and three N (6, 56, and 106 mg/L) fertility concentrations. Watercress shoot tissue biomass, tissue %N, and tissue C/N ratios were influenced by N but were unaffected by changes in S concentrations or by the interaction of NxS. Tissue pigment concentrations of beta-carotene, lutein, 5,6-epoxylutein, neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and the chlorophyll pigments responded to changes in N treatment concentrations but were unaffected by S concentrations or through N x S interactions. Watercress tissue concentrations of aromatic, indole, and total glucosinolate concentrations responded to changes in N treatments; whereas aliphatic, aromatic, and total glucosinolates responded to changes in S treatment concentrations. Individual glucosinolates of glucobrassicin, 4-methoxyglucobrassicin, and gluconasturriin responded to N fertility treatments, while gluconapin, glucobrassicin, and gluconasturiin responded to changes in S fertility concentrations. Increases in carotenoid and glucosinolate concentrations through fertility management would be expected to influence the nutritional value of watercress in human diets.

  17. Plant family identity distinguishes patterns of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance and nitrogen concentration in mycoheterotrophic plants associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynson, Nicole A.; Schiebold, Julienne M.-I.; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Mycoheterotrophy entails plants meeting all or a portion of their carbon (C) demands via symbiotic interactions with root-inhabiting mycorrhizal fungi. Ecophysiological traits of mycoheterotrophs, such as their C stable isotope abundances, strongly correlate with the degree of species’ dependency on fungal C gains relative to C gains via photosynthesis. Less explored is the relationship between plant evolutionary history and mycoheterotrophic plant ecophysiology. We hypothesized that the C and nitrogen (N) stable isotope compositions, and N concentrations of fully and partially mycoheterotrophic species differentiate them from autotrophs, and that plant family identity would be an additional and significant explanatory factor for differences in these traits among species. We focused on mycoheterotrophic species that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi from plant families Ericaceae and Orchidaceae. Methods Published and unpublished data were compiled on the N concentrations, C and N stable isotope abundances (δ13C and δ15N) of fully (n = 18) and partially (n = 22) mycoheterotrophic species from each plant family as well as corresponding autotrophic reference species (n = 156). These data were used to calculate site-independent C and N stable isotope enrichment factors (ε). Then we tested for differences in N concentration, 13C and 15N enrichment among plant families and trophic strategies. Key Results We found that in addition to differentiating partially and fully mycoheterotrophic species from each other and from autotrophs, C and N stable isotope enrichment also differentiates plant species based on familial identity. Differences in N concentrations clustered at the plant family level rather than the degree of dependency on mycoheterotrophy. Conclusions We posit that differences in stable isotope composition and N concentrations are related to plant family-specific physiological interactions with fungi and their environments. PMID

  18. Interactions of Nitrogen Source and Rate and Weed Removal Timing Relative to Nitrogen Content in Corn and Weeds and Corn Grain Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Alexandra M; Everman, Wesley J; Jordan, David L; Heiniger, Ronnie W; Smyth, T Jot

    2017-01-01

    Adequate fertility combined with effective weed management is important in maximizing corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield. Corn uptake of nitrogen (N) is dependent upon many factors including weed species and density and the rate and formulation of applied N fertilizer. Understanding interactions among corn, applied N, and weeds is important in developing management strategies. Field studies were conducted in North Carolina to compare corn and weed responses to urea ammonium nitrate (UAN), sulfur-coated urea (SCU), and composted poultry litter (CPL) when a mixture of Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L.) was removed with herbicides at heights of 8 or 16 cm. These respective removal timings corresponded with 22 and 28 days after corn planting or V2 and V3 stages of growth, respectively. Differences in N content in above-ground biomass of corn were noted early in the season due to weed interference but did not translate into differences in corn grain yield. Interactions of N source and N rate were noted for corn grain yield but these factors did not interact with timing of weed control. These results underscore that timely implementation of control tactics regardless of N fertility management is important to protect corn grain yield.

  19. Interactions of Nitrogen Source and Rate and Weed Removal Timing Relative to Nitrogen Content in Corn and Weeds and Corn Grain Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Knight

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate fertility combined with effective weed management is important in maximizing corn (Zea mays L. grain yield. Corn uptake of nitrogen (N is dependent upon many factors including weed species and density and the rate and formulation of applied N fertilizer. Understanding interactions among corn, applied N, and weeds is important in developing management strategies. Field studies were conducted in North Carolina to compare corn and weed responses to urea ammonium nitrate (UAN, sulfur-coated urea (SCU, and composted poultry litter (CPL when a mixture of Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats. and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L. was removed with herbicides at heights of 8 or 16 cm. These respective removal timings corresponded with 22 and 28 days after corn planting or V2 and V3 stages of growth, respectively. Differences in N content in above-ground biomass of corn were noted early in the season due to weed interference but did not translate into differences in corn grain yield. Interactions of N source and N rate were noted for corn grain yield but these factors did not interact with timing of weed control. These results underscore that timely implementation of control tactics regardless of N fertility management is important to protect corn grain yield.

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE CONTENT OF MINERAL COMPONENTS IN GRAIN OF WINTER SPELT (TRITICUM AESTIVUM SSP SPELLED L. DEPENDING ON: TILLAGE SYSTEM, FERTILIZATION NITROGEN AND VARIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Stankowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the assessment of the influence of two cultivation systems and doses of nitrogen fertilization on the content of mineral elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium and manganese in grain of three varieties of winter spelt (Triticum asetivum ssp spelta L.. The field experiment was conducted in the period 2009-2011 in the Agricultural Experimental Station in Lipnik (53º42'N, 14º97'S, administered by West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin. The experiment was set up on brown earth composed of loamy sands of slightly acidic pH – 6.5 in 1 mol KCl. The material for the analysis was the grain of winter spelt. Three factors were compared in the analysis: two methods of soil cultivation – simplified and conventional – (I factor, four doses of nitrogen: 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N • ha-1 (II factor and three varieties: Franckenkorn, Oberkulmer Rotkorn, STH 12 (III factor. The grain of spelt (Triticum spelta L. cultivated according to the simplified system was marked by increased content of mineral elements, yet it varied significantly only for two the elements: potassium and manganese. Depending on the analyzed element, the effect of nitrogen fertilization varied. The increase in the dose resulted in a significant linear increase in nitrogen content in spelt grain, and a proportional decrease in potassium and magnesium content with no differences in the content of phosphorus, calcium and manganese. The content of mineral elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese in spelt grain varied according to a given variety. The highest content of the analyzed elements was found in grain of Franckernkorn variety, and the lowest in STH12.

  1. Effect of distance and depth on microbial biomass and mineral nitrogen content under Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Dioumacor; Diouf, Diegane; Zoubeirou, Alzouma Mayaki; Bakhoum, Niokhor; Faye, Aliou; Sall, Saidou Nourou

    2012-03-01

    The relations between plants and soil biota involve positive and negative feedbacks between soil organisms, their chemical environment, and plants. Then, characterization of microbial community functioning is important to understand these relations. An experiment was conducted in a field system in the north of Senegal for two years (2005 and 2006) in order to investigate the effect of depth and distance from Acacia senegal tree stem on soil microbial biomass and inorganic-N content. Soils were sampled during dry season (April, T(0)) and wet season (August, T(1)) along transects (R(0), foot tree; R(/2,) approximately 0.50 m distance from the stem; and R, approximately 1 m distance from the stem) and at different layers: 0-25 cm, 25-50 cm and 50-75 cm of A. senegal trees rhizosphere. Total microbial biomass and inorganic-N content were negatively correlated to the distance from tree stem and the depth. The highest values of microbial biomass and mineral nitrogen were found at the foot tree (R(0)) and at 0-25 cm layer. Inorganic-N was mostly in nitrate form (NO(3)(-)) during the dry season. In contrast, during the wet season, inorganic-N was dominated by ammoniac form (NH(4)(+)). Soil total microbial biomass and inorganic-N (NH(4)(+)+NO(3)(-)) were negatively correlated. Our results suggest a positive influence of A. senegal rhizosphere on soil microbial biomass and inorganic-N content. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of nitrogen fertilisation and irrigation on phenolic content, phenolic acid composition, and antioxidant activity of winter wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongyun; Sun, Dexiang; Li, Yaoguang; Wang, Chenyang; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2015-03-30

    Understanding the variance of antioxidant in wheat grain responses to irrigation and nitrogen (N) fertiliser management will improve the nutrient quality of wheat grain. Four N rates (0, 180, 240, and 300 kg ha(-1)) combined with irrigation times (I0, no irrigation; I1, jointing time irrigation; I2, jointing + flowering time irrigation), were used to determine the effect of N fertilisation and irrigation on total phenolic content (TPC), phenolic acid composition, and antioxidant activity (AOA) of wheat grain. Irrigation, N fertilisation and their interactions had significant effect on TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC), AOA, p-coumaric acid (PCA), as well as vanillic acid (VA) and chlorogenic acid (CA). I1 N300 treatment had the highest TPC at Zhengzhou and Wenxian (1451.5 µg g(-1) and 1397.9 µg g(-1), respectively) location, while I1 N240 resulted in the highest TFC (0.75 mg g(-1)) and VA (19.77 µg g(-1)) at Wenxian. TPC, TFC, AOA, ferulic acid (FA), PCA and VA increased with N application rate (from 180 to 300 kg N ha(-1)). An appropriate irrigation and N management improved antioxidant content and AOA in wheat grain. Generally, I1 N240 and I1 N300 treatment resulted in the higher TPC, TFC, AOA, as well as phenolic acid, i.e. FA and VA. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  4. [Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition on the biomass accumulation and allocation in south subtropical main native tree species and their mixed communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Guo-yi; Zhang, De-qiang; Duan, Hong-lang; Liu, Ju-xiu

    2011-08-01

    A 5-year experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated elevated CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, and their combination on the biomass accumulation and allocation in five south subtropical native tree species Schima superba, Ormosia pinnata, Acmena acuminatissima, Syzygium hancei, and Castanopsis hystrix and their mixed communities. The test tree species had different responses in their biomass accumulation and allocation to the elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition. Elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition increased the biomass of legume species by 49.3% and 71.0%, respectively, and promoted the biomass accumulation in sun species. Nitrogen deposition increased the biomass of shade-preference species significantly, but elevated CO2 concentration was in adverse. Elevated CO2 concentration inhibited the biomass allocation in the belowground part of sun species but promoted the biomass allocation in the belowground part of shade-preference species. Elevated CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, and their interaction all promoted the biomass accumulation in mixed communities. Elevated CO2 concentration increased the biomass accumulation in the belowground part of the communities, while nitrogen deposition increased the biomass accumulation in the aboveground part. Under the background of global climate change, Ormosia pinnata and Castanopsis hystrix tended to be the appropriate species for carbon fixation in south subtropical area.

  5. A response surface model allowing nitrogen concentration to affect organic waste-derived compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Carolla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Differing human activities which have lead to different nations’ economic development (excellent scientific, technological consequences and innovation and caused changes which have not seemed to be the most suited for preserving the resources necessary for sustaining the lives of human beings living in the present or for those of future generations. The wasteful use of different power resources is leading to their exhaustion and substances and waste are being generated leading to environmental contamination. On the other hand, inadequate sanitary conditions are also being produced which can cause difficulties in the field of public health. The Central University of Venezuela has thus proposed dealing with and satisfactorily resolving solid-waste management by exploiting the organic fraction of the waste produced by the university’s dining room for making compost. This requires implementing the composting and ensuring that the quality of the materials produced is reproducible. A useful tool for achieving the latter lies in producing a statistical design for composting, leading to a mathematical equation determining factors (independent variables influence on response (dependent variable (i.e. the likely power which initially mixed waste may have on nitrogen quality. This methodology leads to obtaining an equation allowing a response surface to be generated. This information would make it possible to control the quality of the product obtained (compost according to the conditions laid down. This study was aimed at applying the Box-Behnken experimental design in drawing up a response surface model allowing conditions in produ- cing compost to be considered where nitrogen contribution is reproducible. This statistical tool uses four factors or independent variables at three levels; they were: added waste portions (D, amount of sawdust (C and added humidity (A, as well as aeration period (B. Response measured as nutrient input indicator was

  6. Effects of Nitrogen Application Rate of Substrate and Concentration of Nutrient Solution in Hydroponics on Growth of Rooted Cuttings in Elatostema involucratum Franch. & Sav

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Satoshi Mizushima

    2015-01-01

      The effects of the nitrogen application rate of substrates and concentration of nutrient solution in hydroponics on the growth of rooted cuttings were investigated in Elatostema involucratum Franch. & Sav...

  7. Effects of dietary crude protein and rumen-degradable protein concentrations on urea recycling, nitrogen balance, omasal nutrient flow, and milk production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsvangwa, T; Davies, K L; McKinnon, J J; Christensen, D A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how interactions between dietary crude protein (CP) and rumen-degradable protein (RDP) concentrations alter urea-nitrogen recycling, nitrogen (N) balance, omasal nutrient flow, and milk production in lactating Holstein cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows (711±21kg of body weight; 91±17d in milk at the start of the experiment) were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments and 29-d experimental periods. Four cows in one Latin square were fitted with ruminal cannulas to allow ruminal and omasal sampling. The dietary treatment factors were CP (14.9 vs. 17.5%; dry matter basis) and RDP (63 vs. 69% of CP) contents. Dietary RDP concentration was manipulated by including unprocessed or micronized canola meal. Diet adaptation (d 1-20) was followed by 8d (d 21-29) of sample and data collection. Continuous intrajugular infusions of [(15)N(15)N]-urea (220mg/d) were conducted for 4d (d 25-29) with concurrent total collections of urine and feces to estimate N balance and whole-body urea kinetics. Proportions of [(15)N(15)N]- and [(14)N(15)N]-urea in urinary urea, and (15)N enrichment in feces were used to calculate urea kinetics. For the low-CP diets, cows fed the high-RDP diet had a greater DM intake compared with those fed the low-RDP diet, but the opposite trend was observed for cows fed the high-CP diets. Dietary treatment had no effect on milk yield. Milk composition and milk component yields were largely unaffected by dietary treatment; however, on the low-CP diets, milk fat yield was greater for cows fed the low-RDP diet compared with those fed the high-RDP diet, but it was unaffected by RDP concentration on the high-CP diets. On the high-CP diets, milk urea nitrogen concentration was greater in cows fed the high-RDP diet compared with those fed the low-RDP diet, but it was unaffected by RDP concentration on the low-CP diets. Ruminal NH3-N concentration tended to

  8. Fermentation with Aspergillus awamori enhanced contents of amino nitrogen and total phenolics as well as the low-density lipoprotein oxidation inhibitory activity of black soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fei; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2011-04-27

    A solid fermentation was performed on black soybeans with Aspergillus awamori. The effects of fermentation on the contents of total phenolics and amino nitrogen and on the inhibitory effect on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation of black soybeans were examined. Results revealed that fermentation significantly enhanced the LDL oxidation inhibitory activity and total phenolics and amino nitrogen contents of black soybeans. The increased content of amino nitrogen was closely related to the enhanced LDL oxidation inhibitory activity of fermented black soybeans and its water extract. Fermentation temperature and length affected the LDL oxidation inhibitory effect exerted by the prepared fermented black soybeans. The A. awamori-fermented black soybean prepared at 30 °C for 3 days exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation. The bioactive principles related to the inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation in black soybeans, regardless of fermentation, could be most efficiently extracted with water rather than 80% methanol or 80% ethanol.

  9. Luxurious Nitrogen Fertilization of Two Sugar Cane Genotypes Contrasting for Lignin Composition Causes Changes in the Stem Proteome Related to Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxidant Metabolism but Does Not Alter Lignin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Wilson, Rashaun; Portilla Llerena, Juan Pablo; Kiyota, Eduardo; Lima Reis, Karina; Boaretto, Luis Felipe; Balbuena, Tiago S; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Thelen, Jay J; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2017-10-06

    Sugar cane is an important crop for sugar and biofuel production. Its lignocellulosic biomass represents a promising option as feedstock for second-generation ethanol production. Nitrogen fertilization can affect differently tissues and its biopolymers, including the cell-wall polysaccharides and lignin. Lignin content and composition are the most important factors associated with biomass recalcitrance to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars. Thus it is important to understand the metabolic relationship between nitrogen fertilization and lignin in this feedstock. In this study, a large-scale proteomics approach based on GeLC-MS/MS was employed to identify and relatively quantify proteins differently accumulated in two contrasting genotypes for lignin composition after excessive nitrogen fertilization. From the ∼1000 nonredundant proteins identified, 28 and 177 were differentially accumulated in response to nitrogen from IACSP04-065 and IACSP04-627 lines, respectively. These proteins were associated with several functional categories, including carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein turnover, and oxidative stress. Although nitrogen fertilization has not changed lignin content, phenolic acids and lignin composition were changed in both species but not in the same way. Sucrose and reducing sugars increased in plants of the genotype IACSP04-065 receiving nitrogen.

  10. Short-term contributions of cover crop surface residue return to soil carbon and nitrogen contents in temperate Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Wu, Hanwen; Li, Guangdi; Chen, Chengrong

    2016-11-01

    Cover crop species are usually grown to control weeds. After cover crop harvest, crop residue is applied on the ground to improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little information is available about quantifying the contributions of cover crop application to soil total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents in temperate Australia. Here, we selected eight cover crop treatments, including two legume crops (vetch and field pea), four non-legume crops (rye, wheat, Saia oat, and Indian mustard), a mixture of rye and vetch, and a nil-crop control in temperate Australia to calculate the contributions of cover crops (crop growth + residue decomposition) to soil C and N contents. Cover crops were sown in May 2009 (autumn). After harvest, the crop residue was placed on the soil surface in October 2009. Soil and crop samples were collected in October 2009 after harvest and in May 2010 after 8 months of residue decomposition. We examined cover crop residue biomass, soil and crop total C and N contents, and soil microbial biomass C and N contents. The results showed that cover crop application increased the mean soil total C by 187-253 kg ha-1 and the mean soil total N by 16.3-19.1 kg ha-1 relative to the nil-crop treatment, except for the mixture treatment, which had similar total C and N contents to the nil-crop control. Cover crop application increased the mean soil microbial biomass C by 15.5-20.9 kg ha-1 and the mean soil microbial biomass N by 4.5-10.2 kg ha-1. We calculated the apparent percentage of soil total C derived from cover crop residue C losses and found that legume crops accounted for 10.6-13.9 %, whereas non-legume crops accounted for 16.4-18.4 % except for the mixture treatment (0.2 %). Overall, short-term cover crop application increased soil total C and N contents and microbial biomass C and N contents, which might help reduce N fertilizer use and improve sustainable agricultural development.

  11. The Effects of Inorganic Nitrogen form and CO2 Concentration on Wheat Yield and Nutrient Accumulation and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Eli; Myers, Samuel; Raboy, Victor; Bloom, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic N is available to plants from the soil as ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). We studied how wheat grown hydroponically to senescence in controlled environmental chambers is affected by N form (NH4+ vs. NO3−) and CO2 concentration (“subambient,” “ambient,” and “elevated”) in terms of biomass, yield, and nutrient accumulation and partitioning. Wheat supplied with NH4+ as a sole N source had the strongest response to CO2 concentration. Plants exposed to subambient and ambient CO2 concentrations typically had the greatest biomass and nutrient accumulation under both N forms. In general NH4+-supplied plants had higher concentrations of total N, P, K, S, Ca, Zn, Fe, and Cu, while NO3--supplied plants had higher concentrations of Mg, B, Mn, and NO3- - N. NH4+-supplied plants contained amounts of phytate similar to NO3−-supplied plants but had higher bioavailable Zn, which could have consequences for human health. NH4+-supplied plants allocated more nutrients and biomass to aboveground tissues whereas NO3+-supplied plants allocated more nutrients to the roots. The two inorganic nitrogen forms influenced plant growth and nutrient status so distinctly that they should be treated as separate nutrients. Moreover, plant growth and nutrient status varied in a non-linear manner with atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:22969784

  12. Manipulation of Contents of Nitrate, Phenolic Acids, Chlorophylls, and Carotenoids in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) via Contrasting Responses to Nitrogen Fertilizer When Grown in a Controlled Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Othman; Siervo, Mario; Seal, Chris J; Brandt, Kirsten

    2017-11-22

    This study aimed to use different nitrogen fertilizer regimes to produce Butterhead lettuce with such large differences in nitrate content that they could be used as treatment and placebo to study the effect of inorganic nitrate on human health. Plants were grown under controlled conditions at 27/23 °C day/night with a relatively low photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) of 150 μmol m -2 s -1 for 14 h day -1 and nitrogen supplies ranging from 26 to 154 ppm of N as ammonium nitrate in the fertigation solution. This resulted in contrasting high (∼1078 mg nitrate 100 g -1 FW) or low (∼6 mg 100 g -1 ) nitrate contents in the leaves. Contents of carotenoids and chlorophylls in fresh weight did not differ significantly between the highest and the lowest N-supply levels. However, increased nitrogen supply reduced contents of phenolic compounds from 154 to 22 mg 100 g -1 FW, dry matter content from 8.9% to 4.6%, and fresh weight per plant from 108.52 to 47.57 g/plant FW (all P < 0.001). Thus, while fertilizer treatments can provide lettuce with substantially different nitrate contents, maintaining similar pigment contents (color), they also strongly influence the contents of phenolic acids and flavones.

  13. Concentrations and nitrogen isotope compositions of free amino acids in Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles of different ages as indicators of atmospheric nitrogen pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Xiao, Huayun

    2017-09-01

    Free amino acid δ15N values and concentrations of current-year new (new), current-year mature (middle-age) and previous-year (old) Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles were determined for five sites with different distances from a highway in a forest in Guiyang (SW China). Needle free amino acid concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the highway, and only the free amino acid concentrations (total free amino acid, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, valine, alanine and proline) in the middle-aged needles demonstrated a strong correlation with distance from the highway, indicating that free amino acid concentrations in middle-aged needles may be a more suitable indicator of nitrogen (N) deposition compared to new and old needles. Needle free amino acid δ15N values were more positive near the highway compared to the more distant sites and increased with increasing needle age, indicating that N deposition in this site may be dominated by isotopically heavy NOx-N from traffic emissions. In sites beyond 400 m from the highway, the δ15N values of total free amino acids, histidine, glutamine, proline, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine, lysine, arginine and serine in each age of needle were noticeably negative compared to their respective δ15N values near the highway. This suggested that needle free amino acid δ15N values from these sites were more affected by 15N-depleted atmospheric NHx-N from soil emissions. This result was further supported by the similarity in the negative moss δ15N values at these sites to the δ15N values of soil-derived NHx-N. Needle free amino acid δ15N values therefore have the potential to provide information about atmospheric N sources. We conclude that needle free amino acid concentrations are sensitive indicators of N deposition and that the age-related free amino acid δ15N values in needles can efficiently reflect atmospheric N sources. This would probably promote the application of the combined plant tissue amino acid

  14. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velescu, Andre; Valarezo, Carlos; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth. In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N), 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P), 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca) in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes. Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments. Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N and P

  15. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre eVelescu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth.In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N, 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P, 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes.Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments.Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N

  16. Mid-Season Leaf Glutamine Predicts End-Season Maize Grain Yield and Nitrogen Content in Response to Nitrogen Fertilization under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Goron

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available After uptake in cereal crops, nitrogen (N is rapidly assimilated into glutamine (Gln and other amino acids for transport to sinks. Therefore Gln has potential as an improved indicator of soil N availability compared to plant N demand. Gln has primarily been assayed to understand basic plant physiology, rather than to measure plant/soil-N under field conditions. It was hypothesized that leaf Gln at early-to-mid season could report the N application rate and predict end-season grain yield in field-grown maize. A three-year maize field experiment was conducted with N application rates ranging from 30 to 218 kg ha−1. Relative leaf Gln was assayed from leaf disk tissue using a whole-cell biosensor for Gln (GlnLux at the V3-V14 growth stages. SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index measurements were also performed. When sampled at V6 or later, GlnLux glutamine output consistently correlated with the N application rate, end-season yield, and grain N content. Yield correlation outperformed GreenSeekerTM NDVI, and was equivalent to SPAD chlorophyll, indicating the potential for yield prediction. Additionally, depleting soil N via overplanting increased GlnLux resolution to the earlier V5 stage. The results of the study are discussed in the context of luxury N consumption, leaf N remobilization, senescence, and grain fill. The potential and challenges of leaf Gln and GlnLux for the study of crop N physiology, and future N management are also discussed.

  17. Understanding the impact of influent nitrogen concentration on granule size and microbial community in a granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Li, Yongmei; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ruyi; Sun, Jing

    2015-02-01

    To better understand the effect of influent nitrogen concentration on granule size and microbial community in a granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal system, three influent nitrogen concentrations were tested while carbon concentration was an unlimited factor. The results show that although ammonium and phosphate were well removed in the tested nitrogen concentration range (20-50 mg L(-1)), granule size, the amount of phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and microbial activity were affected significantly. A possible mechanism for the effect of influent nitrogen concentration on granule size is proposed based on the experimental results. The increase in proteins/polysaccharides ratio caused by high influent nitrogen concentration plays a crucial role in granule breakage. The small granule size then weakens simultaneous nitrification-denitrification, which further causes higher nitrate concentration in the effluent and lower amount of PAOs in sludge. Consequently, phosphate concentration in the anaerobic phase decreases, which plays the secondary role in granule breakage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Albumen foam stability and s-ovalbumin contents in eggs coated with whey protein concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ACC Alleoni

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Food products such as breads, cakes, crackers, meringues, ice creams and several bakery items depend on air incorporation to maintain their texture and structure during or after processing. Proteins are utilized in the food industry since they improve texture attributes through their ability to encapsulate and retain air. The objectives of this work were to quantify s-ovalbumin contents in albumen and to determine alterations in egg white foam stability in fresh eggs, and in eggs coated and non-coated with a whey protein-based concentrate film (WPC, stored at 25°C for 28 days. The volume of drained liquid was higher in non-coated eggs than in coated eggs stored at 25°C at all storage periods. The difference on the third day of storage was in the order of 59% between coated and non-coated eggs, while on the twenty-eighth day it was 202%. During the storage period, an increase in pH and drainage volume was observed for non-coated eggs. After three days, the non-coated eggs showed a s-ovalbumin content 33% higher than coated eggs; this increase jumped to 205% at 28 days of storage. There was a positive correlation between s-ovalbumin content and the volume of drained liquid for coated and non-coated eggs; in other words, when the s-ovalbumin content increased, there was an increase in the volume of drained liquid and a decrease in foam stability. WPC coating maintain egg quality, since it is an effective barrier against the loss of CO2, avoiding changes in the pH of egg white.

  19. A model study of the effects of intermittent loss on odd nitrogen concentrations in the lower troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. W.; Hameed, S.; Matloff, G.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent box model of the lower troposphere which includes a description of photochemical and physical processes has been developed. This model has been applied to the calculation of nitric acid and NO(x)(NO + NO2) concentrations over a diurnal cycle which includes precipitation. Nitric acid concentrations and the HNO3/NO(x) ratio are found to be highly variable under the assumptions regarding the frequency, duration, and intensity of precipitation employed in this model. The chemistry of odd nitrogen compounds during the night is potentially important in establishing the level of nitric acid in the lower troposphere. These calculations also indicate that relatively large errors may occur when the continuity equation describing nitric acid variations is averaged over a diurnal cycle which includes precipitation. Interpretation of simultaneous measurements of HNO3 and NO(x) will require some knowledge of the history of the observed air mass and may require an improved understanding of nighttime odd nitrogen chemistry.

  20. Oxidative Nitration of Styrenes for the Recycling of Low-Concentrated Nitrogen Dioxide in Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Dagmar; de Salas, Cristina; Heinrich, Markus R

    2015-09-21

    The oxidative nitration of styrenes in ethyl acetate represents a metal-free, environmentally friendly, and sustainable technique to recover even low concentrations of NO2 in air. Favorable features are that the product mixture comprising nitroalcohols, nitroketones, and nitro nitrates simplifies at lower concentrations of NO2 . Experiments in a miniplant-type 10 L wet scrubber demonstrated that the recycling technique is well applicable on larger scales at which initial NO2 concentrations of >10 000 ppm were reliably reduced to less than 40 ppm. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Biomass burning and its effects on fine aerosol acidity, water content and nitrogen partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Nenes, Athanasios; Paraskevopoulou, Despina; Fourtziou, Luciana; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Liakakou, Eleni; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Daskalakis, Nikos; Weber, Rodney; Kanakidou, Maria; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol acidity is an important property that drives the partitioning of semi-volatile species, the formation of secondary particulate matter and metal and nutrient solubility. Aerosol acidity varies considerably between aerosol types, RH, temperature, the degree of atmospheric chemical aging and may also change during transport. Among aerosol different sources, sea salt and dust have been well studied and their impact on aerosol acidity and water uptake is more or less understood. Biomass burning (BB) on the other hand, despite its significance as a source in a regional and global scale, is much less understood. Currently, there is no practical and accurate enough method, to directly measure the pH of in-situ aerosol. The combination of thermodynamic models, with targeted experimental observations can provide reliable predictions of aerosol particle water and pH, using as input the concentration of gas/aerosol species, temperature (T), and relative humidity (RH). As such an example, ISORROPIA-II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) has been used for the thermodynamic analysis of measurements conducted in downtown Athens during winter 2013, in order to evaluate the effect of BB on aerosol water and acidity. Biomass burning, especially during night time, was found to contribute significantly to the increased organics concentrations, but as well to the BC component associated with wood burning, particulate nitrates, chloride, and potassium. These increased concentrations were found to impact on fine aerosol water, with Winorg having an average concentration of 11±14 μg m-3 and Worg 12±19 μg m-3 with the organic component constituting almost 38% of the total calculated submicron water. When investigating the fine aerosol acidity it was derived that aerosol was generally acidic, with average pH during strong BB influence of 2.8±0.5, value similar to the pH observed for regional aerosol influenced by important biomass burning episodes at the remote background site of

  2. Alfalfa variety selection for maximum fiber content, protein and nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhland, Christopher T. [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Knox, John [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Ward, Susan [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Agarwal, V. J. [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Frey, John [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Carrow, Duane [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Jones, Bruce [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States); Rife, James [Minnesota State Univ., Mankato, MN (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The fertile soils of Southern Minnesota are highly productive from both a natural and agricultural standpoint. We chose to examine potential feedstock in both of these settings as a focus for our study. In part one of this report we detail our findings examining potential feedstock in prairie and wetlands in the Mankato, MN area in 2009. We were able to familiarize ourselves with techniques used to isolate and quantify concentrations of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in both a classroom and laboratory setting. These techniques were then used for our experiments that examined the effects of harvest regime, irrigation and salinity on eight potential-feedstock varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

  3. Effects of Plant Density and Nitrogen Fertilizer on Dry Flower Yield and Essential Oil Content of Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Sharafi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chamomile is a valuable medicinal plant and is used as spice and herbal medicine. Application of agronomical methods has important role in increasing quantitative and qualitative traits of this medicinal plant. Fertilizer management is an important factor in successful cultivation of medicinal plants, which could have positive effects on their quantitative and qualitative indices. This experiment was conducted in order to determine the effects of plant density and nitrogen (N fertilizer on dry flower yield and essential oil content of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla using factorial randomized complete blocks design with three replications. Three N rates from urea source (0, 100 and 200 kg/ha and three plant densities (28.6, 40 and 66.7 plants per m2 were considered. The results showed that the highest single plant yield was produced in the lowest plant density (28.6 plants per m2 and application of 100 kg/ha N. The highest dry flower yield of 474.1 kg/ha and essential oil content of 0.2% was produced in 25 cm row width and fixed plant spacing of 10 cm (40 plants per m2 and application of 100 kg/ha N.

  4. Optical investigations of GaInNAs/GaAs multi-quantum wells with low nitrogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H. D.; Hetterich, M.; Dawson, M. D.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Bernklau, D.; Riechert, H.

    2002-08-01

    The optical properties of GaInNAs/GaAs multi-quantum wells were investigated by photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, as well as by photoluminescence (PL), under various excitation intensities and at various temperatures. The PLE spectra demonstrated pronounced excitonic features and the corresponding transitions were identified. At low temperatures the PL spectra were sensitive to the excitation intensity. Under fixed excitation intensity, both the peak energy and the linewidth of photoluminescence showed anomalous temperature dependence, specifically an S-shaped temperature dependence of the peak energy and a N-shaped temperature dependence of linewidth in the PL spectra. The observed results are explained consistently in terms of the exciton localization effect due to the local fluctuations of nitrogen concentration.

  5. Prediction of Soil Moisture Content and Soil Salt Concentration from Hyperspectral Laboratory and Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the simultaneous retrieval of surface soil moisture and salt concentrations using hyperspectral reflectance data in an arid environment. We conducted laboratory and outdoor field experiments in which we examined three key soil variables: soil moisture, salt and texture (silty loam, clay and silty clay. The soil moisture content models for multiple textures (M_SMC models were based on selected hyperspectral reflectance data located around 1460, 1900 and 2010 nm and resulted in R2 values higher than 0.933. Meanwhile, the soil salt concentrations were also accurately (R2 > 0.748 modeled (M_SSC models based on wavebands located at 540, 1740, 2010 and 2350 nm. When the different texture samples were mixed (SL + C + SC models, soil moisture was still accurately retrieved (R2 = 0.937 but the soil salt not as well (R2 = 0.47. After stratifying the samples by retrieved soil moisture levels, the R2 of calibrated M_SSCSMC models for soil salt concentrations improved to 0.951. This two-step method also showed applicability for analyzing soil-salt samples in the field. The M_SSCSMC models resulted in R2 values equal to 0.912 when moisture is lower than 0.15, and R2 values equal to 0.481 when soil moisture is between 0.15 and 0.2.

  6. Plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in the forearm during dynamic handgrip exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askew Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that adenosine triphosphate (ATP released from red blood cells (RBCs may contribute to the tight coupling between blood flow and oxygen demand in contracting skeletal muscle. To determine whether ATP may contribute to the vasodilatory response to exercise in the forearm, we measured arterialised and venous plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in 10 healthy young males at rest, and at 30 and 180 seconds during dynamic handgrip exercise at 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Results Venous plasma ATP concentration was elevated above rest after 30 seconds of exercise (P Conclusions Collectively these results indicate that ATP in the plasma originated from the muscle microcirculation, and are consistent with the notion that deoxygenation of the blood perfusing the muscle acts as a stimulus for ATP release. That ATP concentration was elevated just 30 seconds after the onset of exercise also suggests that ATP may be a contributing factor to the blood flow response in the transition from rest to steady state exercise.

  7. CONTENT OF NITROGEN (NO3-N IN LEACHATE WATER DEPENDING ON PLANT COVERAGE OF THE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Kaczmarski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of plant coverage of the soil on the amount of water moving through the soil profile and the concentration of N-NO3, as well as the volume of load components taken out from the soil. The lysimeters were cover by the following plants: cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L. – non-fertilized, cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L. and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. – fertilized with doses 20 kg P, 50 kg K i 120 kg N·ha-1, and red clover (Trifolium pratense L. - fertilized by 20 kg P and 50 kg K·ha-1. The study was conducted in 2009–2011 in Nowosielce, Podkarpackie province. Two sub-periods were distinguished in the vegetation season. The first period included growth of plants in the first regrowth, and the second in the second one. During the experimental period the biggest amount of water moved through the soil profile in the control object, and the least in the object with the red clover. The greatest concentration of NO3-N was found in water seepage in the object with red clover. The largest load of NO3-N was stated in this object as well. It was two times bigger than the load in the control object, by 20% bigger than in the object with perennial ryegrass and by 8% bigger than in the object with fertilized cocksfoot.

  8. Development Model of Oxide of Nitrogen Concentration and Land Use Characteristics in Bangkok Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratthapol Sillaparassamee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, NOx concentrations and land use characteristics were correlated to develop a Land Use Regression (LUR model for application in Bangkok Metropolitan, Thailand. Measured NOx concentrations data from thirteen air quality monitoring stations located in Bangkok area were analyzed to develop LUR equations. Land use data obtained from site survey method and was characterized into the following categories, i.e., building with 1-2 floors, building with 3-5 floors, building with over 5 floors, green area, road area, space area and open water. The results showed that NOx concentration positively correlated with percentage areas of building 3-5 floors, building >5 floors and road area while NOx had a negative relationship with building 1-2 floors, green area, and space area. The obtained regression model was able to predict 89% of the variation in NOx concentration.

  9. Water-removed spectra increase the retrieval accuracy when estimating savanna grass nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available savanna grass species (Digitariaeriantha). Spectral measurements were made using a spectrometer. The D. eriantha was cut, dried and chemically analyzed for foliar N and P concentrations. WR spectra were determined by calculating the residual from...

  10. Ambient nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations over a region of natural gas production, Northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S. M. Nazrul; Jackson, Peter L.; Aherne, Julian

    2016-10-01

    The Peace River district of Northeastern British Columbia, Canada is a region of natural gas production that has undergone rapid expansion since 2005. In order to assess air quality implications, Willems badge passive diffusive samplers were deployed for six two-week exposure periods between August and November 2013, at 24 sites across the region to assess the ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The highest concentrations of both species (NO2: 9.1 ppb, SO2: 1.91 ppb) during the whole study period (except the 1st exposure period), were observed in Taylor (Site 14), which is consistent with its location near major industrial sources. Emissions from industrial activities, and their interaction with meteorology and topography, result in variations in atmospheric dispersion that can increase air pollution concentrations in Taylor. However, relatively high concentrations of NO2 were also observed near the center of Chetwynd (site F20), indicating the importance of urban emissions sources in the region as well. Observations of both species from the other study sites document the spatial variability and show relatively high concentrations near Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, where unconventional oil and gas development activities are quite high. Although a few sites in Northeastern British Columbia recorded elevated concentrations of NO2 and SO2 during this investigation, the concentrations over the three-month period were well below provincial annual ambient air quality objectives. Nonetheless, given the limited observations in the region, and the accelerated importance of unconventional oil and gas extraction in meeting energy demands, it is imperative that monitoring networks are established to further assess the potential for elevated ambient concentrations associated with industrial emissions sources in the Peace River region.

  11. Effect of different day and night nutrient solution concentrations on growth, photosynthesis, and leaf NO3- content of aeroponically grown lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Albornoz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate content in leafy green vegetables has raised concerns among consumers and policy makers worldwide. Several cultural practices have been evaluated to manipulate NO3- content in fresh leaves with varying degrees of success. The present study was conducted to evaluate different concentrations of the nutrient solution applied during the day (D and night (N to aeroponically grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. in Davis, California, USA, in the spring of 2012 with the objective of assessing the effect on growth, leaf photosynthesis, and nitrate accumulation in leaves. Two different treatments in the nighttime solution concentration (D25/N75, EC: 1.8 dS m-1; and D25/N50, EC: 1.2 dS m-1, a day nutrient solution of EC 0.6 dS m-1, plus a day and night treatment with constant EC (D50/N50, EC: 1.2 dS m-1 were applied. Plant growth, leaf photosynthesis, and leaf nutrient content were evaluated after 3 wk of growth. Mean shoot weight was 106.3 g with no differences among treatments. Root biomass was lower with D25/N75 (0.14 vs. 0.85 g in the other treatments. The maximum rate of leaf photosynthesis was 66% lower with D25/N75 than in the other treatments. Nitrogen, P, K, Ca, and Mg were lower in leaf tissue in the treatments with different solution concentrations where leaf NO3- content was reduced by approximately 75%. Switching nutrient solution concentration between day and night is a viable practice to reduce NO3- in lettuce leaves with no detriment to leaf production.

  12. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO{sub 2} and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO{sub 2} and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant`s metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO{sub 2}. The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled

  13. Effects of temperature, water content and nitrogen fertilisation on emissions of nitrous oxide by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. A.; Thomson, P. E.; Clayton, H.; Mctaggart, I. P.; Conen, F.

    Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from several grassland and arable soils in the field, and from two of these soils and a forest soil transferred in large monoliths to a greenhouse. The effects of fertiliser N additions and of soil water content and temperature were investigated. Emissions were in the order grazed grassland>grassland cut for conservation>potatoes>cereal crops, and generally were higher than those from temperate natural ecosystems. Based on these data, agricultural soils constitute the major soil source of N 2O in the U.K. The highest emission recorded was 8 kg N 2O-N ha -1 over 10 months, from a grazed grassland site. Emissions varied from year to year, depending particularly on rainfall at the time of fertilisation. When soil mineral N was not limiting, exponential relationships between N 2O flux and both water-filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature were observed. The Q10 value for a sandy loam was 1.6, but ranged up to 12 for a clay loam soil at high WFPS. The high values were attributed to the increase in anaerobic zones where denitrification could take place, as respiratory demand for O 2 increased. A forest soil (peaty gley) showed an optimum water potential for N 2O emission. Diurnal fluctuations in emissions were associated with diurnal cycles in soil temperature, but with varying time lags, which could be explained by the N 2O being produced at different depths.

  14. Nitrogen concentrations in a small Mediterranean stream: 1. Nitrate 2. Ammonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Butturini

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of storm frequency as well as the groundwater and hyporheic inputs on nitrate (NO3-N and ammonium (NH4-N levels in stream water were studied in a small perennial Mediterranean catchment, Riera Major, in northeast Spain. NO3-N concentrations ranged from 0.15 to 1.9 mg l-1. Discharge explained 47% of the annual NO3-N concentration variance, but this percentage increased to 97% when single floods were analysed. The rate of change in nitrate concentration with respect to flow, ΔNO3-N/ΔQ, ranged widely from 0 to 20 μg NO3-N s l-2. The ΔNO3-N/ΔQ values fitted to a non linear model with respect to the storm flow magnitude (ΔQ (r2=0.48, d.f.=22, P3-N/ΔQ occurred at intermediate ΔQ values, whereas low ΔNO3-N/ΔQ values occurred during severe storms (ΔQ > 400 l s-1. N3-N concentrations exhibit anticlockwise hysteresis patterns with changing flow and the patterns observed for autumnal and winter storms indicated that groundwater was the main N3-N source for stream and hyporheic water. At baseflow, NO3-N concentration in groundwater was higher (t=4.75, d.f.=29, P>0.001 and co-varied with concentrations in the stream (r=0.91, d.f.=28, P3-N concentration in hyporheic water was identical to that in stream water. The role of the hyporheic zone as source or sink for ammonium was studied hyporheic was studied comparing its concentrations in stream and hyporheic zone before and after a major storm occurred in October 1994 that removed particulate organic matter stored in sediments. Results showed high ammonium concentrations (75±28 s.d. μg NH4-N l-1 before the storm flow in the hyporheic zone. After the storm, the ammonium concentration in the hyporheic dropped by 80% (13.6±8 μg N4-N l-1 and approached to the level found in stream water (11±8 μg NH4-N l-1 indicating that indisturbed hyporheic sediments act as a source for ammonium. After the storm, the ammonium concentrations in the stream, hyporheic and groundwater zones were very

  15. Influence of grassing targeted into the recharge zone on the nitrate concentrations and nitrogen leaching out of the drained catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Fučík, Petr; Kvítek, Tomáš

    2015-04-01

    Long term experiment with the land use change in tile drainage recharge zone was conducted in the catchment Dehtáře (57.9 ha, Bohemian-Moravian Highlands, Czech Republic). It is a locally typical small agricultural catchment, where the tile drainage acts as the only permanent runoff and the drainage system was built in the slope. Several drainage subsystems with various land use in their recharge and discharge zones has been monitored since 2003. Recharge zones of some subsystems were grassed since the hydrological year 2007 and nitrate concentrations, theirs trends and nitrogen loads were statistically analysed and compared with subsystems without the land use change. The statistical analysis showed that the flow-weighted nitrate concentrations before grassing the recharge zone were surprisingly higher in drainage subsystems with the permanent grassland in drained area (discharge zone) than in the subsystem under arable land. Approximately one year after grassing the recharge zone, the long-term course of NO3 concentrations became decreasing. The statistically significant decreases in nitrate concentrations of 32.1% and 25.7% were detected in drainage subsystems under the grassed recharge zone. In the same period, an increase in nitrate concentration was detected in sites without land use change. There was an increase of 10.8% in the drainage subsystem with arable land in both (recharge and discharge) zones and of 8.6% in the subsystem with grassland in the discharge zone, but arable land in the recharge zone. Evaluating the whole drainage system, the fall in nitrate concentrations by 10.5% was detected after grassing about 20% of this systems recharge zone. In association with the change in nitrate concentrations, the nitrate-nitrogen leaching decreased after grassing. In the scale of whole drainage system, the monthly average load decreased by 23% from 3.2 kg N/month/ha to 2.6 kg N/month/ha. In the drainage subsystem, where the recharge zone was grassed

  16. Combined effects of nitrogen concentration and seasonal changes on the production of lipids in Nannochloropsis oculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Martin; Lamela, Teresa; Nilsson, Emmelie; Bergé, Jean-Pascal; del Pino, Victória; Uronen, Pauliina; Legrand, Catherine

    2014-03-31

    Instead of sole nutrient starvation to boost algal lipid production, we addressed nutrient limitation at two different seasons (autumn and spring) during outdoor cultivation in flat panel photobioreactors. Lipid accumulation, biomass and lipid productivity and changes in fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis oculata were investigated under nitrogen (N) limitation (nitrate:phosphate N:P 5, N:P 2.5 molar ratio). N. oculata was able to maintain a high biomass productivity under N-limitation compared to N-sufficiency (N:P 20) at both seasons, which in spring resulted in nearly double lipid productivity under N-limited conditions (0.21 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹) compared to N-sufficiency (0.11 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹). Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased from 76% to nearly 90% of total fatty acids in N-limited cultures. Higher biomass and lipid productivity in spring could, partly, be explained by higher irradiance, partly by greater harvesting rate (~30%). Our results indicate the potential for the production of algal high value products (i.e., polyunsaturated fatty acids) during both N-sufficiency and N-limitation. To meet the sustainability challenges of algal biomass production, we propose a dual-system process: Closed photobioreactors producing biomass for high value products and inoculum for larger raceway ponds recycling waste/exhaust streams to produce bulk chemicals for fuel, feed and industrial material.

  17. Combined Effects of Nitrogen Concentration and Seasonal Changes on the Production of Lipids in Nannochloropsis oculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olofsson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Instead of sole nutrient starvation to boost algal lipid production, we addressed nutrient limitation at two different seasons (autumn and spring during outdoor cultivation in flat panel photobioreactors. Lipid accumulation, biomass and lipid productivity and changes in fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis oculata were investigated under nitrogen (N limitation (nitrate:phosphate N:P 5, N:P 2.5 molar ratio. N. oculata was able to maintain a high biomass productivity under N-limitation compared to N-sufficiency (N:P 20 at both seasons, which in spring resulted in nearly double lipid productivity under N-limited conditions (0.21 g L−1 day−1 compared to N-sufficiency (0.11 g L−1 day−1. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased from 76% to nearly 90% of total fatty acids in N-limited cultures. Higher biomass and lipid productivity in spring could, partly, be explained by higher irradiance, partly by greater harvesting rate (~30%. Our results indicate the potential for the production of algal high value products (i.e., polyunsaturated fatty acids during both N-sufficiency and N-limitation. To meet the sustainability challenges of algal biomass production, we propose a dual-system process: Closed photobioreactors producing biomass for high value products and inoculum for larger raceway ponds recycling waste/exhaust streams to produce bulk chemicals for fuel, feed and industrial material.

  18. Growth Kinetics of Diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 Cultured Using Different Types and Concentrations of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth kinetics of newly isolated diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 grown in various carbon (lactate, acetate, glycerol, malate, fructose, xylose and sucrose and nitrogen (glutamate, yeast extract, arginine, hystadine, glycine, polypeptone, tryptophan, lysine, NH4Cl and urea sources was investigated using 2 L stirred tank fermenter. The highest growth was obtained in a medium containing lactate as a carbon source, which gave the highest maximum cell concentration of 2.30 g/L, which is corresponding to maximum viable cell count of 4.60 x 10^9 cfu/mL. However, the highest cell yield (1.06 g cell/g carbon consumed was obtained in cultivation using glycerol though slightly lower maximum viable cell count was obtained (3.22 x 10^9 cfu/mL. In addition, cost for the production of live cell using glycerol was about 15 times lower than the cost using lactate. Growth performance of this bacterium when yeast extract was used as a nitrogen source was comparable to the use of pure amino acid. The medium containing 1.8 g/L glycerol and 2 g/L yeast extract was suggested as optimal for growth of this bacterium, which gave carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N of 10:1. The maximum viable cell count obtained in cultivation using optimised medium in 2 L stirred tank fermenter was 3.34 x 10^9 cfu/mL and the cells maintained its capacity for N2 fixation at 18 nmol C2H2/h.mL.

  19. Root respiration in North American forests: Effects of nitrogen concentration and temperature across biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.J. Burton; K.S. Pregitzer; R.W. Ruess; R.L. Hendrick; Mike F. Allen

    2002-01-01

    Root respiration rates have been shown to be correlated with temperature and root N concentration in studies of individual forest types or species, but it is not known how universal these relationships are across forest species adapted to widely different climatic and edaphic conditions. In order to test for broad, cross-species relationships, we measured fine root...

  20. Role of potassium and nitrogen on sugar concentration of sugar beet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugar is obtained from root of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in addition to other sources. Three important economic parameters are often considered and these are root yield, sugar concentration in root juice and total sugar yield. All the three are affected by cropping period and use of fertilisers. Existing literature suggests the ...

  1. Effect of increased systemic concentrations of urea nitrogen in crossbred heifers on in vitro fertilization (IVF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated levels of dietary N and hence systemic concentrations of urea-N have been shown to have a deleterious effect on reproductive processes. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of feeding pubertal crossbred heifers diets with moderate (M-N; 64.8% corn silage, 30.0% alfalfa h...

  2. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J

    2015-09-08

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  3. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on Dry Matter and Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium in Berseem Clover, by Cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hashem aram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil contaminations with heavy metals represent a potential risk to the biosphere and leads to increased concentration in ground and surface water. Therefore metals mobility in soil has been extensively studied in the last decades. Use of agrochemicals such as synthetic fertilizers and pesticides has resulted in soil and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity. Cadmium is a heavy metal with a strong effect on crop quality. Moreover, it is a very mobile element in the environment. Plants can easily uptake cadmium and transfer it to other organs. Experiments on the effects of cadmium on the contents of macro elements in plants are scarce and therefore the mechanism of its effect has not yet been fully explained. Contaminated soil can be remediated by chemical, physical or biological techniques. Mycorrhiza is the mutualistic symbiosis (non-pathogenic association between soil-borne fungi with the roots of higher plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are obligate biotrophs, which can form mutualistic symbioses with the roots of around 80% of plant species. Arbuscular mycorrhiza have been observed to play a vital role in metal tolerance and accumulation. Many workers have reported enhancement of phosphate uptake and growth of leguminous plants by vesicular arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF. Materials and Methods: One study performed the factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD with three replications in the greenhouse of Agriculture Faculty of Zanjan University. The examined factors include different levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae (with and without inoculation, and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm. In this study, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae species were used. These fungi were prepared by the Plant Protection Clinic in Iran – Hamedan. The soil was prepared of arable land of depth of 0-20 cm at the University of

  4. Atmospheric reactive nitrogen concentrations at ten sites with contrasting land use in an arid region of central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric concentrations of reactive nitrogen (Nr species from 2009 to 2011 are reported for ten sites in Xinjiang, China, an arid region of central Asia. Concentrations of NH3, NO2, particulate ammonium and nitrate (pNH4+ and pNO3 showed large spatial and seasonal variation and averaged 7.71, 9.68, 1.81 and 1.13 μg N m−3, and PM10 concentrations averaged 249.2 μg m−3 across all sites. Lower NH3 concentrations and higher NO2, pNH4+ and pNO3 concentrations were found in winter, reflecting serious air pollution due to domestic heating in winter and other anthropogenic sources such as increased emissions from motor traffic and industry. The increasing order of total concentrations of Nr species was alpine grassland; desert, desert-oasis ecotone; desert in an oasis; farmland; suburban and urban ecosystems. Lower ratios of secondary particles (NH4+ and NO3 were found in the desert and desert-oasis ecotone, while urban and suburban areas had higher ratios, which implied that anthropogenic activities have greatly influenced local air quality and must be controlled.

  5. Morphine and codeine concentrations in human urine following controlled poppy seeds administration of known opiate content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45 g oral poppy seed doses 8 h apart, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32 h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA(®) heroin metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM) and Lin-Zhi 6-AM immunoassays with 10 μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32 h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2000 and 300 μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2000 μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300 μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6-AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Physiological responses of wild type and putrescine-overproducing transgenic cells of poplar to variations in the form and concentration of nitrogen in the medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Jae Soon Lee; Stephanie Long; Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Subhash C. Minocha

    2004-01-01

    We determined: (a) the physiological consequences of overproduction of putrescine in transgenic poplar (Populus nigra x mnrimoviczir) cells expressing an omithine decarboxylase transgene; and (b) effects of variation in nitrogen (N) concentration of the medium on cellular polyamine concentration in transgenic and non-transgenic cells. Cells grown in...

  7. [Effects of elevated O3 concentration on nitrogen in greening tree species in southern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Hu, En-Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Tian, Yuan; Feng, Zhao-Zhong

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that rising ozone (O3) in the troposphere significantly decreased the photosynthesis and the activity of Rubisco enzyme. So it can be inferred that the N uptake and distribution within the plants could be affected by elevated O3. In this study, ten greening woody species, widely distributed in subtropical China, were exposed to charcoal-filtered air (CF, less than 20 nL · L(-1)) and elevated O3 (E-O3, mean concentration of 150 nL · L(-1)) in open top chambers. The results showed that E-O3 significantly reduced the leaves biomass in Liquidamba formosana by 20.9%, the stem biomass in Liriodendron chinense by 21.4%, the root biomass in L. formosana and L. chinense by 24.2% and 32.5%, respectively. E-O3 significantly affected the N concentration in the stem but not those in leaves and root. The N uptakes in the whole tree (Nlu), the leaves and the root were significantly affected by E-O3. Compared to CF, E-O3 significantly reduced the Nlu in L. chinense by 28.4% and Schima superba by 22.7% but significantly increased the Nlu in Neolitsea sericea by 15.5%. Elevated O3 concentration had no significant influence on N distribution within the plants across the selected 10 tree species.

  8. [Effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application level on absorption and transportation of nutrient elements in oilseed rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-ming; Zhang, Zhen-hua; Song, Hai-xing; Liu, Qiang; Rong, Xiang-min; Guan, Chun-yun; Zeng, Jing; Yuan, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Effect of elevated atmospheric-CO2 (780 µmol . mol-1) on the absorption and transportation of secondary nutrient elements (calcium, magnesium, sulphur) and micronutrient elements (iron, manganese, zinc, molybdenum and boron) in oilseed rape at the stem elongation stage were studied by greenhouse simulated method. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the content of Zn in stem was increased and the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with no nitrogen (N) application; the contents of Ca, S, B and Zn were increased, and the contents of Mg, Mn, Mo and Fe were decreased under the elevated atmospheric CO2 with N application (0.2 g N . kg-1 soil); except the content of Mo in leaf was increased, the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with two levels of N application. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the amounts of Ca and S relative to the total amount of secondary nutrient elements in stem and the amounts of B and Zn relative to the total amount of micronutrient elements in stem were increased under the elevated-CO2 treatment with both levels of N application, and the corresponding values of Mg, Fe, Mn and Mo were decreased; no-N application treatment increased the proportion of Ca distributed into the leaves, and the proportion of Mg distributed into leaves was increased by the normal-N application level; the proportions of Mn, Zn and Mo distributed into the leaves were increased at both N application levels. Without N application, the elevation of atmospheric CO2 increased the transport coefficients of SFe, Mo and SS,B, but decreased the transport coefficients of SMg,Fe, SMg, Mn and SS,Fe, indicating the proportions of Mo, S transported into the upper part of plant tissues was higher than that of Fe, and the corresponding value of B was higher than that observed for S, the corresponding value of Mg was higher than that of Fe and Mn. Under normal-N application

  9. Nitrogen concentration within Saxifraga oppositifolia in different successional stages on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Atsushi; Bekku, Yukiko S.; Hanba, Yuko T.; Nakano, Takashi; Kanda, Hiroshi

    We measured and compared the δ13C values and nitrogen concentrations within the photosynthetic parts (Np) of phototrophs growing in different successional stages and different soil conditions at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Norway. At all study sites, the Np value of vascular plants ranged from 1.0 to 2.2%. The Np value for most moss species was less than 1.0%; values for lichens were about 0.5%. No significant correlation was detected between Np and δ13C; however, different plant species occupied distinct fields on a δ13C-Np plot, with minimal overlap between species. The Np value of Saxifraga oppositifolia, which grew at all of the study sites, ranged from 1.1 to 1.5%. Differences in growth form had no effect on Np. The Np and δ13C values obtained for S. oppositifolia were confined to within a narrow range regardless of site conditions.

  10. Selection of representative calibration sample sets for near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict nitrogen concentration in grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nisha; Rinnan, Åsmund; Gislum, René

    2012-01-01

    squares regression (PLSR), a chemometric method, has been applied on NIR spectroscopy data for the determination of the nitrogen (N) concentration in these grass samples. The sample selection method based on NIR spectral data proposed by Puchwein and the CADEX (computer aided design of experiments......) algorithm were used and compared. Both Puchwein and CADEX methods provide a calibration set equally distributed in space, and both methods require a minimum prior of knowledge. The samples were also selected randomly using complete random, cultivar random (year fixed), year random (cultivar fixed......) and interaction (cultivar × year fixed) random procedures to see the influence of different factors on sample selection. Puchwein's method performed best with lowest RMSEP followed by CADEX, interaction random, year random, cultivar random and complete random. Out of 118 samples of the complete calibration set...

  11. Optimization of solid content, carbon/nitrogen ratio and food/inoculum ratio for biogas production from food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadaser-Celik, Filiz; Azgin, Sukru Taner; Yildiz, Yalcin Sevki

    2016-12-01

    Biogas production from food waste has been used as an efficient waste treatment option for years. The methane yields from decomposition of waste are, however, highly variable under different operating conditions. In this study, a statistical experimental design method (Taguchi OA9) was implemented to investigate the effects of simultaneous variations of three parameters on methane production. The parameters investigated were solid content (SC), carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) and food/inoculum ratio (F/I). Two sets of experiments were conducted with nine anaerobic reactors operating under different conditions. Optimum conditions were determined using statistical analysis, such as analysis of variance (ANOVA). A confirmation experiment was carried out at optimum conditions to investigate the validity of the results. Statistical analysis showed that SC was the most important parameter for methane production with a 45% contribution, followed by F/I ratio with a 35% contribution. The optimum methane yield of 151 l kg-1 volatile solids (VS) was achieved after 24 days of digestion when SC was 4%, C/N was 28 and F/I were 0.3. The confirmation experiment provided a methane yield of 167 l kg-1 VS after 24 days. The analysis showed biogas production from food waste may be increased by optimization of operating conditions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Effects of Controlled Release Urea on Physiological Characteristics and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Rice and NO3--N Contents in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DU Jun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted to study the effects of controlled release urea(CRU on key enzymes activities of nitrogen metabolism of rice, nitrogen use efficiency and soil and NO3--N contents, in order to verify the mechanism of CRU on increasing nitrogen use efficiency and increasing soil NO3--N accumulation. The results showed that CRU could improve significantly nitrate reductase(NR activities of rice leaves in full heading stage and milk stage, especially in milk stage. The activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamine transversase of rice leaves were obviously increased, and the enhancement continued till dough grain stage, especially in full heading stage. Meanwhile, CRU was able to promote significantly protease activity of rice leaves in milk stage and dough grain stage. The treatment of 4(CRU60%+PU40% was the best treatment of the key enzymes activities of nitrogen metabolism. CRU also had better effect on promoting glutamine synthetase and glutamine transversase activities of brown rice, and increased significantly rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency, especially the treatment of 4. CRU enhanced significantly protein contents in brown rice, therefore which improved quality of rice to some extent. Moreover, CRU could reduce NO3--N accumulation in soil profile significantly. CRU application could evidently decrease the quantity of soil NO3--N leached to deep soil and lessen the risk to ground water pollution.

  13. Nitrification and denitrification in two-chamber microbial fuel cells for treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng; Yu, Zaiji; Feng, Chunhua; Li, Wenhan

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in the aerated cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with nitrifying bacteria were investigated using two-chamber MFCs. Based on the variations of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber of four MFCs added with different concentrations of [Formula: see text] (50, 65, 130 and 230 mg/L), the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification leading to effective removal of nitrogen was confirmed. Electrochemical reaction with electrons transferred from the anode chamber was found to be the major mechanism responsible for the removal of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber. The estimated values of the first-order rate constant for nitrification and denitrification varied in the range of 0.3-1.7 day(-1) and 0.2-0.9 day(-1), revealing a decreasing trend with increases in the initial [Formula: see text] concentrations and the detected maximum concentration of the nitrification product of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber, respectively.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and metal concentration in food webs from a mining-impacted coastal lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Guirao, Lazaro [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100-Murcia (Spain)], E-mail: lamarin@um.es; Lloret, Javier; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100-Murcia (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    Two food webs from the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, differing in the distance from the desert-stream through which mining wastes were discharged, were examined by reference to essential (Zn and Cu) and non-essential (Pb and Cd) metal concentrations and stable isotopes content (C and N). The partial extraction technique applied, which reflects the availability of metals to organisms after sediment ingestion, showed higher bioavailable metal concentrations in sediments from the station influenced by the mining discharges, in agreement with the higher metal concentrations observed in organisms, which in many cases exceeded the regulatory limits established in Spanish legislation concerning seafood. Spatial differences in essential metal concentrations in the fauna suggest that several organisms are exposed to metal levels above their regulation capacity. Differences in isotopic composition were found between both food webs, the wadi-influenced station showing higher {delta}{sup 15}N values and lower {delta}{sup 13}C levels, due to the discharge of urban waste waters and by the entrance of freshwater and allochthonous marsh plants. The linear-regressions between trophic levels (as indicated by {delta}{sup 15}N) and the metal content indicated that biomagnification does not occur. In the case of invertebrates, since the 'handle strategy' of the species and the physiological requirements of the organisms, among other factors, determine the final concentration of a specific element, no clear relationships between trophic level and the metal content are to be expected. For their part, fish communities did not show clear patterns in the case of any of the analyzed metals, probably because most fish species have similar metal requirements, and because biological factors also intervened. Finally, since the study deals with metals, assumptions concerning trophic transfer factors calculation may not be suitable since the metal burden originates not only from the prey but

  15. Defecation of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by the copepod Acartia tonsa as functions of ambient food concentration and body DMSP content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, K.W.

    2001-01-01

    The dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) defecation rate of Acartia tonsa (calanoid copepod)feeding on Tetraselmis impellucida (prasinophyte) was correlated with food concentration and copepod body DMSP content. Copepod fecal pellets represent a highly concentrated source of DMSP and thus play an im...... an important role in DMSP flux and microbial processes in the ocean....

  16. Reduction of arsenic content in a complex galena concentrate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Alejandro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioleaching is a process that has been used in the past in mineral pretreatment of refractory sulfides, mainly in the gold, copper and uranium benefit. This technology has been proved to be cheaper, more efficient and environmentally friendly than roasting and high pressure moisture heating processes. So far the most studied microorganism in bioleaching is Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. There are a few studies about the benefit of metals of low value through bioleaching. From all of these, there are almost no studies dealing with complex minerals containing arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Reduction and/or elimination of arsenic in these ores increase their value and allows the exploitation of a vast variety of minerals that today are being underexploited. Results Arsenopyrite was totally oxidized. The sum of arsenic remaining in solution and removed by sampling represents from 22 to 33% in weight (yield of the original content in the mineral. The rest of the biooxidized arsenic form amorphous compounds that precipitate. Galena (PbS was totally oxidized too, anglesite (PbSO4 formed is virtually insoluble and remains in the solids. The influence of seven factors in a batch process was studied. The maximum rate of arsenic dissolution in the concentrate was found using the following levels of factors: small surface area of particle exposure, low pulp density, injecting air and adding 9 K medium to the system. It was also found that ferric chloride and carbon dioxide decreased the arsenic dissolution rate. Bioleaching kinetic data of arsenic solubilization were used to estimate the dilution rate for a continuous culture. Calculated dilution rates were relatively small (0.088–0.103 day-1. Conclusion Proper conditions of solubilization of arsenic during bioleaching are key features to improve the percentage (22 to 33% in weight of arsenic removal. Further studies are needed to determine other factors that influence specifically the

  17. Organic and Nitrogen Fertilization of Soil under ‘Syrah’ Grapevine: Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Nitrate Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi José Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Viticulture is an activity of great social and economic importance in the lower-middle region of the São Francisco River valley in northeastern Brazil. In this region, the fertility of soils under vineyards is generally poor. To assess the effects of organic and nitrogen fertilization on chemical properties and nitrate concentrations in an Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo (Typic Plinthustalf, a field experiment was carried out in Petrolina, Pernambuco, on Syrah grapevines. Treatments consisted of two rates of organic fertilizer (0 and 30 m3 ha-1 and five N rates (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg ha-1, in a randomized block design arranged in split plots, with five replications. The organic fertilizer levels represented the main plots and the N levels, the subplots. The source of N was urea and the source of organic fertilizer was goat manure. Irrigation was applied through a drip system and N by fertigation. At the end of the third growing season, soil chemical properties were determined and nitrate concentration in the soil solution (extracted by porous cups was determined. Organic fertilization increased organic matter, pH, EC, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, sum of bases, base saturation, and CEC, but decreased exchangeable Cu concentration in the soil by complexation of Cu in the organic matter. Organic fertilization raised the nitrate concentration in the 0.20-0.40 m soil layer, making it leachable. Nitrate concentration in the soil increased as N rates increased, up to more than 300 mg kg-1 in soil and nearly 800 mg L-1 in the soil solution, becoming prone to leaching losses.

  18. Evaluation of Yield, Yield Components and Essential Oil Content of Marigold (Calendula officinalis L. with the Use of Nitrogen and Vermicompost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pazoki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmenal problems resulting from application of nitrogen fertilizers in the production plant materials led agricultural specialists to use clean and alternative methods to towards the organic farming and use of organic fertilizers. In this study, thus, the effect of nitrogen and vermicompost fertilizer rates on yield, yield components, essential oil content and some morphological traits of marigold was studied in a split plot experiment based on completely randomized blocks design with 3 replications in Shahr-e-Rey region during 2013 growing season. Nitrogen rates with 3 levels (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg.ha-1 were assigned to main plots and vermicompost with 3 levels (0, 10, and 20 t.ha-1 to the sub plots. Mean comparison of simple effects indicated that the plants treated with 120 kg.ha-1 nitrogen fertilizer and 20 t.ha-1 organic fertilizer vermicompost produced higher trait values under study than control (non application of vermincompost. Interaction effect of experimented factors was significant on all traits under evaluation. Thus, highest seed yield (1567 kg.ha-1, biological yield (6664 kg.ha-1 and essential oil yield (8.85 kg.ha-1 obtained by the application of 120 kg.ha-1 nitrogen fertilizer and 20 t.ha-1 varmicompost. Based on the results obtained it could be said that nitrogen and vermicompost may improve seed and biological yield and yield components of marigold.

  19. Regulation of nitrogen uptake and assimilation: Effects of nitrogen source, root-zone pH, and aerial CO2 concentration on growth and productivity of soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D.; Tolley-Henry, L.

    1989-01-01

    An important feature of controlled-environment crop production systems such as those to be used for life support of crews during space exploration is the efficient utilization of nitrogen supplies. Making decisions about the best sources of these supplies requires research into the relationship between nitrogen source and the physiological processes which regulate vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Work done in four areas within this research objective is reported: (1) experiments on the effects of root-zone pH on preferential utilization of NO3(-) versus NH4(+) nitrogen; (2) investigation of processes at the whole-plant level that regulate nitrogen uptake; (3) studies of the effects of atmospheric CO2 and NO3(-) supply on the growth of soybeans; and (4) examination of the role of NO3(-) uptake in enhancement of root respiration.

  20. Nitrogen fractions and mineral content in different lupin species (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, and Lupinus luteus). Changes induced by the alpha-galactoside extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, Jesus M; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Urbano, Gloria

    2007-09-05

    The protein and mineral composition of different varieties of three different lupin species (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, and Lupinus luteus) and the effect of alpha-galactoside removal by means of a hydroalcoholic extraction process on such composition were studied in relationship to nutrient distribution among the different anatomical parts of the seed (embryo, cotyledon, and seed coat). The extent of processing-derived protein insolubilization was assessed by both chemical and electrophoretic techniques and related to the amount of nitrogen soluble in H(2)O, NaCl, ethanol, NaOH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate/beta-mercaptoethanol (SDS/BME). The alpha-galactoside extraction process caused a significant increase in the amount of total and insoluble nitrogen and decreased the amount of soluble protein nitrogen, without affecting the content of soluble nonprotein nitrogen. alpha-Galactoside extraction was not effective at decreasing the levels of Mn present in lupins, and processing caused an increase in the content of this mineral in all of the species studied with the exception of L. albus var. multolupa. In general, the effect of processing on mineral content varied with the different lupin species, and mineral losses were lower in L. luteus.

  1. Modelling deposition and air concentration of reduced nitrogen in Poland and sensitivity to variability in annual meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Maciej; Dore, Anthony J; Błaś, Marek; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2011-04-01

    The relative contribution of reduced nitrogen to acid and eutrophic deposition in Europe has increased recently as a result of European policies which have been successful in reducing SO(2) and NO(x) emissions but have had smaller impacts on ammonia (NH(3)) emissions. In this paper the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used to calculate the spatial patterns of annual average ammonia and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) air concentrations and reduced nitrogen (NH(x)) dry and wet deposition with a 5 km × 5 km grid for years 2002-2005. The modelled air concentrations of NH(3) and dry deposition of NH(x) show similar spatial patterns for all years considered. The largest year to year changes were found for wet deposition, which vary considerably with precipitation amount. The FRAME modelled air concentrations and wet deposition are in reasonable agreement with available measurements (Pearson's correlation coefficients above 0.6 for years 2002-2005), and with spatial patterns of concentrations and deposition of NH(x) reported with the EMEP results, but show larger spatial gradients. The error statistics show that the FRAME model results are in better agreement with measurements if compared with EMEP estimates. The differences in deposition budgets calculated with FRAME and EMEP do not exceed 17% for wet and 6% for dry deposition, with FRAME estimates higher than for EMEP wet deposition for modelled period and lower or equal for dry deposition. The FRAME estimates of wet deposition budget are lower than the measurement-based values reported by the Chief Inspectorate of Environmental Protection of Poland, with the differences by approximately 3%. Up to 93% of dry and 53% of wet deposition of NH(x) in Poland originates from national sources. Over the western part of Poland and mountainous areas in the south, transboundary transport can contribute over 80% of total (dry + wet) NH(x) deposition. The spatial pattern of the relative contribution of

  2. The effect of nitrogen nutrition on growth and on plant hormones content in Scots pine (Pinus silvestris L. seedlings grown under light of different intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Michniewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pine seedlings were cultivated in the Ingested nutrient solution containing N as NH4Cl at concentrations of 0 and 500 ppm, under a 16-hr day, at a light intensity of 1500 and 500 lx and temperature ± 20°C. Measurements of seedlings and determination of plant hormones were performed 8 weeks after sowing. It was found that more intensive light stimulated initiation of needles and lateral roots as well as elongation of needles and roots, and increased the fresh weight and dry matter of these organs. Growth stimulation of needles was correlated with an increase in free gibberellins, cytokinins, an ABA-like inhibitor and with a decrease in auxins and water content of tissues. A similar effect of light on plant hormones (except ABA was also observed in roots. The level of this inhibitor depended on N nutrition. Nitrogen bad a similar effect as light on the growth and initiation of needles and lateral roots. However, it strongly inhibited elongation of roots and increased the water content of the tissues. In needles N increased the level of GAs and auxins, under both light variants, as well as the level of cytokinins, under more intensive light. It decreased the amount of ABA-like inhibitor. In roots the effect of N nutrition on the level of plant hormones depended upon the light intensity. Under light of low intensity N decreased the level of GAs and ABA, increased the level of auxins and had nonsignificant influence on the level of cytokinins. Under more intensive light it had no effect on the GAs and auxin levels and increased the level of cytoikinins and the ABA-like inhibitor.

  3. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile - Marine sources and diagenetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Friedrich; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Rosner, Martin; Sepúlveda, Fernando; Vásquez, Paulina; Wilke, Hans; Kasemann, Simone A

    2017-01-01

    Seabird excrements (guano) have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy) of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic signatures towards very

  4. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile - Marine sources and diagenetic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Lucassen

    Full Text Available Seabird excrements (guano have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic

  5. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile – Marine sources and diagenetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Rosner, Martin; Sepúlveda, Fernando; Vásquez, Paulina; Wilke, Hans; Kasemann, Simone A.

    2017-01-01

    Seabird excrements (guano) have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy) of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic signatures towards very

  6. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...

  7. Climatic warming increases winter wheat yield but reduces grain nitrogen concentration in east China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlu Tian

    Full Text Available Climatic warming is often predicted to reduce wheat yield and grain quality in China. However, direct evidence is still lacking. We conducted a three-year experiment with a Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI facility to examine the responses of winter wheat growth and plant N accumulation to a moderate temperature increase of 1.5°C predicted to prevail by 2050 in East China. Three warming treatments (AW: all-day warming; DW: daytime warming; NW: nighttime warming were applied for an entire growth period. Consistent warming effects on wheat plant were recorded across the experimental years. An increase of ca. 1.5°C in daily, daytime and nighttime mean temperatures shortened the length of pre-anthesis period averagely by 12.7, 8.3 and 10.7 d (P<0.05, respectively, but had no significant impact on the length of the post-anthesis period. Warming did not significantly alter the aboveground biomass production, but the grain yield was 16.3, 18.1 and 19.6% (P<0.05 higher in the AW, DW and NW plots than the non-warmed plot, respectively. Warming also significantly increased plant N uptake and total biomass N accumulation. However, warming significantly reduced grain N concentrations while increased N concentrations in the leaves and stems. Together, our results demonstrate differential impacts of warming on the depositions of grain starch and protein, highlighting the needs to further understand the mechanisms that underlie warming impacts on plant C and N metabolism in wheat.

  8. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...... a theoretical approach, which takes complexity as fundamental premise for modern society (Luhmann, 1985, 2002). In educational situations conditionally valuable content generally will exceed what can actually be taught within the frames of an education. In pedagogy this situation is often referred...... to as ‘abundance of material’, and in many cases it is not obvious, how the line between actually chosen and conditionally relevant content can be draw. Difficulties in drawing the line between actual educational content and conditionally relevant content can be handled in different way. One way, quite efficient...

  9. EFFECTS OF PROTEIN-XANTHOPHYLL (PX CONCENTRATE OF ALFALFA ADDITIVE TO CRUDE PROTEIN-REDUCED DIETS ON NITROGEN EXCRETION, GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND MEAT QUALITY OF PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz GRELA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The infl uence of protein-xanthophyll (PX concentrate of alfalfa supplement to crude protein-reduced diets was examined in relation to nitrogen excretion, performance parameters and pig meat quality. The investigations included 60 growers (PL x PLW x Duroc crossbreeds assigned to 3 groups. The conclusion is that there is a large potential to decrease nitrogen emission to the environment by 10% lowering of dietary crude protein intake along with reduced animal growth rate and elevated mixture utilization. Inclusion of a protein-xanthophyll concentrate (PX of alfalfa to the diet is likely to diminish disadvantageous productive parameters arising from limiting of total crude protein level in relation to the requirements of pigs feeding norms [1993]. At the same time, it improves feed nitrogen utilization and reduces noxious odour emissions from a piggery. The components of a protein-xanthophyll concentrate (PX contribute to increased liver and kidney weight.

  10. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen addition on the growth of Calamagrostis angustifolia in Sanjiang Plain freshwater marsh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-Ying; Liu, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Yang

    2011-06-01

    By using open top chamber, an experiment with two levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (350 and 700 micromol x mol(-1)) and three levels of nitrogen supply (0, 5, and 15 g N x m(-2)) was conducted to investigate the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen supply on the growth of Calamagrostis angustifolia in the freshwater marsh of Sanjiang Plain. Under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the phenophase of C. angustifolia advanced. Jointing stage was advanced by 1-2 d, and maturity stage was advanced by 3 d. Elevated atmospheric CO2 promoted the tillering of C. angustifolia, with the increment of tiller number under 0, 5, and 15 g x m(-2) of nitrogen supply being 8.2% (P 0.05), respectively. Elevated atmospheric CO2 also promoted the aboveground biomass at jointing and heading stages, the increment being 12.4% and 20.9% (P CO2 concentration depended on nitrogen supply level. Under sufficient nitrogen supply, the promotion effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on the biomass of C. angustifolia was higher.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of atrazine and desethylatrazine at sub-microgram per liter concentrations in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreglmann, Kathrin; Hoeche, Martina; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Reinnicke, Sandra; Elsner, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Environmental degradation of organic micropollutants is difficult to monitor due to their diffuse and ubiquitous input. Current approaches-concentration measurements over time, or daughter-to-parent compound ratios-may fall short, because they do not consider dilution, compound-specific sorption characteristics or alternative degradation pathways. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers an alternative approach based on evidence from isotope values. Until now, however, the relatively high limits for precise isotope analysis by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) have impeded CSIA of sub-microgram-per-liter scale micropollutant concentrations in field samples. This study presents the first measurements of C and N isotope ratios of the herbicide atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine at concentrations of 100 to 1,000 ng/L in natural groundwater samples. Solid-phase extraction and preparative HPLC were tested and validated for preconcentration and cleanup of groundwater samples of up to 10 L without bias by isotope effects. Matrix interferences after solid-phase extraction could be greatly reduced by a preparative HPLC cleanup step prior to GC-IRMS analysis. Sensitivity was increased by a factor of 6 to 8 by changing the injection method from large-volume to cold-on-column injection on the GC-IRMS system. Carbon and nitrogen isotope values of field samples showed no obvious correlation with concentrations or desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios. Contrary to expectations, however, δ (13) C values of desethylatrazine were consistently less negative than those of atrazine from the same sites. Potentially, this line of evidence may contain information about further desethylatrazine degradation. In such a case, the common practice of using desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios would underestimate natural atrazine degradation.

  12. Influence of Rhizobia Inoculation on Biomass Gain and Tissue Nitrogen Content of Leucaena leucocephala Seedlings under Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pereyra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anticipated increases in the frequency of heat waves and drought spells may have negative effects on the ability of leguminous trees to fix nitrogen (N. In seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti or Rhizobium tropici, we investigated how the developmental stage and a short drought influenced overall biomass and the accumulation of carbon and N in plant tissues. In early developmental stages, the number of nodules and nodule biomass were correlated with total plant biomass and δ15N, and nodules and roots contributed 33%–35% of the seedling total N. Seedlings associated with R. tropici fixed more N and exhibited higher overall biomass compared with M. loti seedlings. Four and a half months after inoculation (140 days after inoculation, DAI, a short (15-day drought inhibited seedling growth and caused a decline in total plant N, with the smallest decline in R. tropici seedlings. After 15 days of drought, i.e., 155 DAI, the nodules had accumulated proline, but the total amino acid concentration did not change. Our results indicate that N-fixation is independent of seedlings growth. In addition, R. tropici is a better choice than M. loti as a symbiont for Leucaena seedlings for forest restoration and agroforestry applications under increasingly drier conditions.

  13. Highly concentrated, stable nitrogen-doped graphene for supercapacitors: Simultaneous doping and reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Baojiang [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Heilongjiang University, Harbin (China); Tian Chungui; Wang Lei; Sun Li; Chen Chen; Nong Xiaozhen [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Heilongjiang University, Harbin (China); Qiao Yingjie, E-mail: qiaoyingjie@hrbeu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China); Fu Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Heilongjiang University, Harbin (China)

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we developed a concentrated ammonia-assisted hydrothermal method to obtain N-doped graphene sheets by simultaneous N-doping and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets. The effects of hydrothermal temperature on the surface chemistry and the structure of N-doped graphene sheets were also investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of N-doped graphene reveals that the highest doping level of 7.2% N is achieved at 180 Degree-Sign C for 12 h. N binding configurations of sample consist of pyridine N, quaternary N, and pyridine-N oxides. N doping is accompanied by the reduction of GO with decreases in oxygen levels from 34.8% in GO down to 8.5% in that of N-doped graphene. Meanwhile, the sample exhibits excellent N-doped thermal stability. Electrical measurements demonstrate that products have higher capacitive performance than that of pure graphene, the maximum specific capacitance of 144.6 F/g can be obtained which ascribe the pseudocapacitive effect from the N-doping. The samples also show excellent long-term cycle stability of capacitive performance.

  14. Associations between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide: A quantitative research synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Q. Y.; Svendsgaard, D.; Kotchmar, D. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Although positive associations between ambient NO2 concentrations and personal exposures have generally been found by exposure studies, the strength of the associations varied among studies. Differences in results could be related to differences in study design and in exposure factors. However, the effects of study design, exposure factors, and sampling and measurement errors on the strength of the personal-ambient associations have not been evaluated quantitatively in a systematic manner. A quantitative research synthesis was conducted to examine these issues based on peer-reviewed publications in the past 30 years. Factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations across the studies were also examined with meta-regression. Ambient NO2 was found to be significantly associated with personal NO2 exposures, with estimates of 0.42, 0.16, and 0.72 for overall pooled, longitudinal and daily average correlation coefficients based on random-effects meta-analysis. This conclusion was robust after correction for publication bias with correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.16 and 0.45. We found that season and some population characteristics, such as pre-existing disease, were significant factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations. More meaningful and rigorous comparisons would be possible if greater detail were published on the study design (e.g. local and indoor sources, housing characteristics, etc.) and data quality (e.g., detection limits and percent of data above detection limits).

  15. The use of crude protein content to predict concentrations of lysine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    methionine in grain harvested from selected cultivars of wheat, barley and triticale grown in the Western Cape ... lysine and methionine content of South African wheat, barley and triticale grain from CP content. Keywords: Lysine .... and lysine content and nutritional value of normal and Opaque-2 corn. J. Anim. Sci. 57, 1345.

  16. Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in sequencing batch reactors: effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen concentration and influent particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wylie, Jason; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Removal of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from municipal wastewaters is required to mitigate eutrophication of receiving water bodies. While most treatment plants achieve good N removal using influent carbon (C), the use of influent C to facilitate enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is poorly explored. A number of operational parameters can facilitate optimum use of influent C and this study investigated the effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during aerobic period and influent solids on biological P and N removal in sequencing batch reactors (SRBs) using municipal wastewaters. Increasing cycle length from 3 to 6 h increased P removal efficiency, which was attributed to larger portion of N being removed via nitrite pathway and more biodegradable organic C becoming available for EBPR. Further increasing cycle length from 6 to 8 h decreased P removal efficiencies as the demand for biodegradable organic C for denitrification increased as a result of complete nitrification. Decreasing DO concentration in the aerobic period from 2 to 0.8 mg L(-1) increased P removal efficiency but decreased nitrification rates possibly due to oxygen limitation. Further, sedimented wastewater was proved to be a better influent stream than non-sedimented wastewater possibility due to the detrimental effect of particulate matter on biological nutrient removal.

  17. Assessment of Various Remote Sensing Technologies in Biomass and Nitrogen Content Estimation Using AN Agricultural Test Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsi, R.; Viljanen, N.; Kaivosoja, J.; Hakala, T.; Pandžić, M.; Markelin, L.; Honkavaara, E.

    2017-10-01

    Multispectral and hyperspectral imaging is usually acquired by satellite and aircraft platforms. Recently, miniaturized hyperspectral 2D frame cameras have showed great potential to precise agriculture estimations and they are feasible to combine with lightweight platforms, such as drones. Drone platform is a flexible tool for remote sensing applications with environment and agriculture. The assessment and comparison of different platforms such as satellite, aircraft and drones with different sensors, such as hyperspectral and RGB cameras is an important task in order to understand the potential of the data provided by these equipment and to select the most appropriate according to the user applications and requirements. In this context, open and permanent test fields are very significant and helpful experimental environment, since they provide a comparative data for different platforms, sensors and users, allowing multi-temporal analyses as well. Objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of an open permanent test field in context of precision agriculture. Satellite (Sentinel-2), aircraft and drones with hyperspectral and RGB cameras were assessed in this study to estimate biomass, using linear regression models and in-situ samples. Spectral data and 3D information were used and compared in different combinations to investigate the quality of the models. The biomass estimation accuracies using linear regression models were better than 90 % for the drone based datasets. The results showed that the use of spectral and 3D features together improved the estimation model. However, estimation of nitrogen content was less accurate with the evaluated remote sensing sensors. The open and permanent test field showed to be suitable to provide an accurate and reliable reference data for the commercial users and farmers.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF VARIOUS REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGIES IN BIOMASS AND NITROGEN CONTENT ESTIMATION USING AN AGRICULTURAL TEST FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Näsi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multispectral and hyperspectral imaging is usually acquired by satellite and aircraft platforms. Recently, miniaturized hyperspectral 2D frame cameras have showed great potential to precise agriculture estimations and they are feasible to combine with lightweight platforms, such as drones. Drone platform is a flexible tool for remote sensing applications with environment and agriculture. The assessment and comparison of different platforms such as satellite, aircraft and drones with different sensors, such as hyperspectral and RGB cameras is an important task in order to understand the potential of the data provided by these equipment and to select the most appropriate according to the user applications and requirements. In this context, open and permanent test fields are very significant and helpful experimental environment, since they provide a comparative data for different platforms, sensors and users, allowing multi-temporal analyses as well. Objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of an open permanent test field in context of precision agriculture. Satellite (Sentinel-2, aircraft and drones with hyperspectral and RGB cameras were assessed in this study to estimate biomass, using linear regression models and in-situ samples. Spectral data and 3D information were used and compared in different combinations to investigate the quality of the models. The biomass estimation accuracies using linear regression models were better than 90 % for the drone based datasets. The results showed that the use of spectral and 3D features together improved the estimation model. However, estimation of nitrogen content was less accurate with the evaluated remote sensing sensors. The open and permanent test field showed to be suitable to provide an accurate and reliable reference data for the commercial users and farmers.

  19. [Influence of drug concentration and blending technology on the content uniformity of mixture for low dose warfarin tablets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbl, Jan; Muselík, Jan; Franc, Aleš; Mikušová, Jana; Dolejší, Zuzana; Vetchý, David

    Warfarin is a drug with narrow therapeutic index. Individualization of dose and thorough therapy monitoring is compensated by long time use in praxis and low therapy cost. Considering the low dose usually administered, critical parameter of solid dosage form is its uniformity of content. It has to not only meet the criteria set by pharmacopoeia, but to meet them on statisticall significant level also.This experimental study asseses impact of warfarin concentration and blending time after adition of lubricant on uniformity of content of mixtures and tablets made of them. It concludes, that concentration in 2-2,7% range is optimal and its increase or decrease has a negative effect on uniformity of content. It also confirms 5 minutes of blending after lubricant addition to be adequate, as employing longer blending times leads to mixture overblending.Key words: content uniformity warfarin blending time narrow therapeutic index.

  20. Indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide from burning solid fuels for cooking and heating in Yunnan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, W J; Downward, G S; Wei, H; Rothman, N; Reiss, B; Xu, J; Bassig, B A; Li, J; He, J; Hosgood, H D; Wu, G; Chapman, R S; Tian, L; Wei, F; Caporaso, N E; Vermeulen, R; Lan, Q

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese national pollution census has indicated that the domestic burning of solid fuels is an important contributor to nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ) and sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) emissions in China. To characterize indoor NO2 and SO2 air concentrations in relation to solid fuel use and stove ventilation in the rural counties of Xuanwei and Fuyuan, in Yunnan Province, China, which have among the highest lung cancer rates in the nation, a total of 163 participants in 30 selected villages were enrolled. Indoor 24-h NO2 and SO2 samples were collected in each household over two consecutive days. Compared to smoky coal, smokeless coal use was associated with higher NO2 concentrations [geometric mean (GM) = 132 μg/m(3) for smokeless coal and 111 μg/m(3) for smoky coal, P = 0.065] and SO2 [limit of detection = 24 μg/m(3) ; percentage detected (%Detect) = 86% for smokeless coal and 40% for smoky coal, P < 0.001]. Among smoky coal users, significant variation of NO2 and SO2 air concentrations was observed across different stove designs and smoky coal sources in both counties. Model construction indicated that the measurements of both pollutants were influenced by stove design. This exposure assessment study has identified high levels of NO2 and SO2 as a result of burning solid fuels for cooking and heating. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. The Addition of White Turmeric (Curcuma zedoaria Concentrated Base on Quality Antioxidant Activity, Total Phenol, Protein Content and Salt Content of Salted Egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu’addimah Mu’addimah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research was to determine the effect of Curcuma zedoaria concentrated addition on quality antioxidant activity, total phenols, protein content and salt content of salted egg. The materials were duck’s egg, water, salt, and essence of white turmeric. The method was experiment using Complete Randomized Design (CRD with five treatments and three for replications. The Curcuma zedoaria juice research were divided into P0 (0%, P1 (10%, P2 (20%, P3 (30% and P4 (40%. Data was analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and then continued by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT, if it was found significant effect among treatmeants. The result showed that the addition of Curcuma zedoaria juice indicated highly significant different effect (P<0.01 on antioxidant activity, protein content and salt content, but significantly effect (P<0.05 on total phenol. The best treatment was the addition of Curcuma zedoaria juice 40% were indicated of antioxidant activity, total phenol, protein content and the salt content was 99.80 mg/g, 0.16%, 9.96%, 2.43% respectively.

  3. Effect of nitrogen fertilisation of Galega orientalis Lam. on the yield and content K, Na, Ca and Mg in the plant and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symanowicz Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the response of biomass yield and the content of K, Na, Ca and Mg in the eastern galega and soil under the influence of nitrogen in the form of (15NH42SO4. Three-year field experiment (2005–2007 was carried out on experimental plots belonging to the University of Natural Sciences - Humanities in Siedlce (52°17’N, 22°28’E. Nitrogen 15N was applied as ammonium sulphate at a dose of early spring 1.66 g N.m−2. In each year of the study were collected three cuts of eastern galega budding phase. Shown yield of dry weight of the test plant. The content of K, Na, Ca and Mg in the eastern galega and soil were determined by ICP-AES emission spectrometer with inductively coupled plasma. Subsequently, the uptake and marked weight ratios of macronutrients.

  4. Over-expression of a tobacco nitrate reductase gene in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. increases seed protein content and weight without augmenting nitrogen supplying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Heavy nitrogen (N application to gain higher yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. resulted in increased production cost and environment pollution. How to diminish the N supply without losing yield and/or quality remains a challenge. To meet the challenge, we integrated and expressed a tobacco nitrate reductase gene (NR in transgenic wheat. The 35S-NR gene was transferred into two winter cultivars, "Nongda146" and "Jimai6358", by Agrobacterium-mediation. Over-expression of the transgene remarkably enhanced T1 foliar NR activity and significantly augmented T2 seed protein content and 1000-grain weight in 63.8% and 68.1% of T1 offspring (total 67 individuals analyzed, respectively. Our results suggest that constitutive expression of foreign nitrate reductase gene(s in wheat might improve nitrogen use efficiency and thus make it possible to increase seed protein content and weight without augmenting N supplying.

  5. Interactive effects of nitrogen and light on growth rates and RUBISCO content of small and large centric diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Among marine phytoplankton groups, diatoms span the widest range of cell size, with resulting effects upon their nitrogen uptake, photosynthesis and growth responses to light. We grew two strains of marine centric diatoms differing by ~4 orders of magnitude in cell biovolume in high (enriched artificial seawater with ~500 µmol L(-1) µmol L(-1) NO3(-)) and lower-nitrogen (enriched artificial seawater with Nitrogen and total protein per cell decreased with increasing growth light in both species when grown under the lower-nitrogen media. Cells growing under lower-nitrogen media increased their cellular allocation to RUBISCO and their rate of electron transport away from PSII, for the smaller diatom under low growth light and for the larger diatom across the range of growth lights. The smaller coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is able to exploit high nitrogen in growth media by up-regulating growth rate, but the same high-nitrogen growth media inhibits growth of the larger diatom species.

  6. Differential Effects of Legume Species on the Recovery of Soil Microbial Communities, and Carbon and Nitrogen Contents, in Abandoned Fields of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Hua; Jiao, Shu Mei; Gao, Rong Qing; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2012-12-01

    Plant-soil interactions are known to influence a wide range of ecosystem-level functions. Moreover, the recovery of these functions is of importance for the successful restoration of soils that have been degraded through intensive and/or inappropriate land use. Here, we assessed the effect of planting treatments commonly used to accelerate rates of grassland restoration, namely introduction of different legume species Medicago sativa, Astragalus adsurgens, Melilotus suaveolens, on the recovery of soil microbial communities and carbon and nitrogen contents in abandoned fields of the Loess Plateau, China. The results showed effects were species-specific, and either positive, neutral or negative depending on the measure and time-scale. All legumes increased basal respiration and metabolic quotient and had a positive effect on activity and functional diversity of the soil microbial community, measured using Biolog EcoPlate. However, soil under Astragalus adsurgens had the highest activity and functional diversity relative to the other treatments. Soil carbon and nitrogen content and microbial biomass were effectively restored in 3-5 years by introducing Medicago sativa and Astragalus adsurgens into early abandoned fields. Soil carbon and nitrogen content were retarded in 3-5 years and microbial biomass was retarded in the fifth year by introducing Melilotus suaveolens. Overall, the restoration practices of planting legumes can significantly affect soil carbon and nitrogen contents, and the biomass, activity, and functional diversity of soil microbial community. Therefore, we propose certain legume species could be used to accelerate ecological restoration of degraded soils, hence assist in the protection and preservation of the environment.

  7. How exogenous nitric oxide regulates nitrogen assimilation in wheat seedlings under different nitrogen sources and levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Islam, Shahidul; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman; Juhasz, Angela; Ma, Wujun

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most important nutrients for plants and nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling plant growth regulator involved in nitrogen assimilation. Understanding the influence of exogenous NO on nitrogen metabolism at the gene expression and enzyme activity levels under different sources of nitrogen is vitally important for increasing nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). This study investigated the expression of key genes and enzymes in relation to nitrogen assimilation in two Australian wheat cultivars, a popular high NUE cv. Spitfire and a normal NUE cv. Westonia, under different combinations of nitrogen and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as the NO donor. Application of NO increased the gene expressions and activities of nitrogen assimilation pathway enzymes in both cultivars at low levels of nitrogen. At high nitrogen supplies, the expressions and activities of N assimilation genes increased in response to exogenous NO only in cv. Spitfire but not in cv. Westonia. Exogenous NO caused an increase in leaf NO content at low N supplies in both cultivars, while under high nitrogen treatments, cv. Spitfire showed an increase under ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) treatment but cv. Westonia was not affected. N assimilation gene expression and enzyme activity showed a clear relationship between exogenous NO, N concentration and N forms in primary plant nitrogen assimilation. Results reveal the possible role of NO and different nitrogen sources on nitrogen assimilation in Triticum aestivum plants.

  8. How exogenous nitric oxide regulates nitrogen assimilation in wheat seedlings under different nitrogen sources and levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Balotf

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is one of the most important nutrients for plants and nitric oxide (NO as a signaling plant growth regulator involved in nitrogen assimilation. Understanding the influence of exogenous NO on nitrogen metabolism at the gene expression and enzyme activity levels under different sources of nitrogen is vitally important for increasing nitrogen use efficiency (NUE. This study investigated the expression of key genes and enzymes in relation to nitrogen assimilation in two Australian wheat cultivars, a popular high NUE cv. Spitfire and a normal NUE cv. Westonia, under different combinations of nitrogen and sodium nitroprusside (SNP as the NO donor. Application of NO increased the gene expressions and activities of nitrogen assimilation pathway enzymes in both cultivars at low levels of nitrogen. At high nitrogen supplies, the expressions and activities of N assimilation genes increased in response to exogenous NO only in cv. Spitfire but not in cv. Westonia. Exogenous NO caused an increase in leaf NO content at low N supplies in both cultivars, while under high nitrogen treatments, cv. Spitfire showed an increase under ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3 treatment but cv. Westonia was not affected. N assimilation gene expression and enzyme activity showed a clear relationship between exogenous NO, N concentration and N forms in primary plant nitrogen assimilation. Results reveal the possible role of NO and different nitrogen sources on nitrogen assimilation in Triticum aestivum plants.

  9. Elevated NH 3 and NO 2 air concentrations and nitrogen deposition rates in the vicinity of a highway in Southern Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Manfred; Jakobi, Gert; Feicht, Ernst; Bernhardt, Markus; Fischer, Anton

    A transect study consisting of air concentration and deposition measurements of nitrogen compounds was performed to estimate the potential influence of car emissions on the nitrogen input to ecosystems. Therefore, two transects each consisting of 4 plots, the first in a coniferous forest and the second one in an extensively farmed grassland, were installed perpendicular to a highway south of Munich (Bavaria). Both profiles were influenced mainly by car emissions and showed only small local influences caused by agricultural activities. In the framework of a pilot study based upon denuder measurements we found a strong temporal dependency of both nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and ammonia (NH 3) concentrations on traffic density. In the main study air concentrations of NO 2 and NH 3 were measured by passive samplers; they used as the basis for the estimation of dry deposition. These estimations have been compared with the results of analyses from simultaneously conducted canopy throughfall deposition and open air bulk measurements of nitrate (NO 3-) and ammonium (NH 4+). Additionally, within the forest transect the variety of different soil vegetation species was recorded and quantified. We obtained a strong gradient of gas concentrations along both profiles. Whereas the bulk deposition remained quite constant along the non-forested transect, the nitrogen throughfall deposition rate diminished substantially with the distance from the highway. The deposition rate at the forest edge was twice of that inside. The nitrogen load estimated for the examined forest in the vicinity of the highway was comparable to other forest ecosystems situated near diffuse emission sources from agriculture. It could be shown that changes in soil composition and soil vegetation along the forest transect are caused by decreasing nitrogen deposition with distance from the highway. The application of road salt in winter leads to further impacts.

  10. A leaf gas exchange model that accounts for intra-canopy variability by considering leaf nitrogen content and local acclimation to radiation in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jorge A; Louarn, Gaëtan; Perez Peña, Jorge; Ojeda, Hernán; Simonneau, Thierry; Lebon, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas exchange within a plant is a prerequisite for scaling up from leaves to canopies. We evaluated whether leaf traits were reliable predictors of the effects of leaf ageing and leaf irradiance on leaf photosynthetic capacity (V(cmax) , J(max) ) in field-grown vines (Vitis vinifera L). Simultaneously, we measured gas exchange, leaf mass per area (LMA) and nitrogen content (N(m) ) of leaves at different positions within the canopy and at different phenological stages. Daily mean leaf irradiance cumulated over 10 d (PPFD(10) ) was obtained by 3D modelling of the canopy structure. N(m) decreased over the season in parallel to leaf ageing while LMA was mainly affected by leaf position. PPFD(10) explained 66, 28 and 73% of the variation of LMA, N(m) and nitrogen content per area (N(a) ), respectively. Nitrogen content per unit area (N(a) = LMA × N(m) ) was the best predictor of the intra-canopy variability of leaf photosynthetic capacity. Finally, we developed a classical photosynthesis-stomatal conductance submodel and by introducing N(a) as an input, the model accurately simulated the daily pattern of gas exchange for leaves at different positions in the canopy and at different phenological stages during the season. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  12. The effects of nitrogen starter fertilizer and plant density on yield, yield components and oil and protein content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroomandan, P; Khoramivafa, M; Haghi, Y; Ebrahimi, A

    2009-02-15

    Effects of nitrogen starter fertilizer and plant density on yield and oil and protein content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) are not well understood, because nitrogen starter fertilizer and plant density has been tested separately. Two years field experiment was conducted to evaluate effects of these factors on yield, yield components, oil and protein content in 2006 and 2007 in Kermanshah, Iran. The experiment was conducted on soybean (var. Williams) as a split-plot based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications. Nitrogen starter fertilizer treatments were arranged in three rates (0, 40, 80 kg ha(-1)) as main plots and plant density as sub plots arranged with three levels (15, 30, 45 plant m(-2)). Based on similarity treatments and experimental designs, the results of analysis of combined variance and mean comparisons showed significant (528.4 kg ha(-1) yield increase as density increased from 30 to 45 plant m(-2) and nitrogen starter fertilizer increased from 0 to 40 kg ha(-1) in two years. Analysis of correlation showed a positive significant correlation between yield and number of seed per plant (r = 0.724), number of pods and yield (r = 0.463), thousand seed weight and yield (r = 0.437). A linear regression was found between yield and number of seed per plant, number of pods and thousand seed weight (yield = 37.58 + 0.73x1-0.14x2 + 0.7x3; r2 = 0.56); p < 0.01). Seed protein was unaffected by plant densities, but nitrogen application changed it. Dissimilarly, oil content has a diverse respond to treatments. This experiment showed density of 45 plant m(-2) and application of nitrogen starter fertilizer 40 kg ha(-1) are optimum and increase grain yield under condition of our experiment. We suggest to conduct some experiments for understanding of linear relationship for number of pod for understanding of linear relationship for number of pod for levels of nitrogen starter and quadratic relationship for number of seed for levels of density.

  13. Modelling the concentrations of nitrogen and water-soluble carbohydrates in grass herbage ingested by cattle under strip-grazing management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, N.J.; Schulte, R.P.O.

    2008-01-01

    There is scope of increasing the nitrogen (N) efficiency of grazing cattle through manipulation of the energy and N concentrations in the herbage ingested. Because of asymmetric grazing by cattle between individual plant parts, it has not yet been established how this translates into the

  14. Photosynthetic acclimation of overstory Populus tremuloides and understory Acer saccharum to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration: interactions with shade and soil nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Kubiske; Donald R. Zak; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Yu Takeuchi

    2002-01-01

    We exposed Populus tremuloides Michx. and Acer saccharum Marsh. to a factorial combination of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and high-nitrogen (N) and low-N soil treatments in open-top chambers for 3 years. Our objective was to compare photosynthetic...

  15. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased nitrogen deposition on growth and chemical composition of ombrotrophic Sphagnum balticum and oligo-mesotrophic Sphagnum papillosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heijden, E; Jauhiainen, J; Silvola, J; Vasander, H; Kuiper, PJC

    2000-01-01

    The ombrotrophic Sphagnum balticum (Russ.) C. Jens. and the oligo-mesotrophic Sphagnum papillosum Lindb. were grown at ambient (360 mu l l(-1)) and at elevated (720 mu l l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentrations and at different nitrogen deposition rates, varying between 0 and 30kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), The

  16. Increasing fermentation efficiency at high sugar concentrations by supplementing an additional source of nitrogen during the exponential phase of the tequila fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizon, Javier; Gschaedler, Anne

    2002-11-01

    In the tequila industry, fermentation is traditionally achieved at sugar concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 g x L(-1). In this work, the behaviour of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (isolated from the juices of the Agave tequilana Weber blue variety) during the agave juice fermentation is compared at different sugar concentrations to determine if it is feasible for the industry to run fermentation at higher sugar concentrations. Fermentation efficiency is shown to be higher (above 90%) at a high concentration of initial sugar (170 g x L(-1)) when an additional source of nitrogen (a mixture of amino acids and ammonium sulphate, different than a grape must nitrogen composition) is added during the exponential growth phase.

  17. Phases and defects upon the solidification of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svyazhin, A. G.; Kaputkina, L. M.; Bazhenov, V. E.; Skuza, Z.; Siwka, E.; Kindop, V. E.

    2015-06-01

    One of the technological problems in alloying molten steels with nitrogen is the precipitation of nitrogen into the gas phase upon the solidification of steels and the formation of nitrogen bubbles and porosity in steel ingots with the result that potentials of nitrogen as an alloying element are used incompletely. The formation of bubbles and pores in nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels occurs heterogeneously and is limited by the desorption rate of nitrogen from the molten-metal surface into bubbles. For this reason, it is convenient to determine the critical nitrogen concentration in steels as the concentration at which in the process of equilibrium solidification the content of nitrogen in the residual liquid phase at all temperatures of semisolid state does not exceed its solubility in the residual liquid at a given pressure. Hereafter, this concentration should be refined experimentally for concrete conditions of solidification. To calculate the nitrogen concentration in the arising phases, a Thermo-Calc software can be employed.

  18. Altitudinal Variation in Leaf Nitrogen Concentration on the Eastern Slope of Mount Gongga on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weiqi; Wang, Guoan; Han, Wenxuan

    2012-01-01

    Mount Gongga spans 6500 m in elevation and has intact and continuous vertical vegetation belts, ranging from subtropical evergreen broad-leaved vegetation to an alpine frigid sparse grass and desert zone. Investigating the altitudinal trends in leaf nitrogen (N) on Mount Gongga can increase our understanding of the global biogeography of foliar N. In this study, 460 leaf samples from mosses, ferns, and seed plants were collected along an altitudinal gradient on the eastern slope of Mount Gongga, and the variation in leaf N concentration (mass basis) with elevation was analyzed. There are considerable differences in leaf N between mosses and ferns, mosses and seed plants, C4 and C3 plants, and evergreen and deciduous woody plants. The general altitudial pattern of leaf N in Mount Gongga plants was that leaf N kept increasing until an elevation of about 2200 m above sea level, with a corresponding mean annual temperature (MAT) of 8.5°C, and then decreased with increasing elevation. However, the evergreen woody plants displayed a decline trend in leaf N across the altitude gradient. Our findings provide an insight into the altitudinal variation in leaf N. PMID:23028570

  19. Altitudinal variation in leaf nitrogen concentration on the eastern slope of Mount Gongga on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Shi

    Full Text Available Mount Gongga spans 6500 m in elevation and has intact and continuous vertical vegetation belts, ranging from subtropical evergreen broad-leaved vegetation to an alpine frigid sparse grass and desert zone. Investigating the altitudinal trends in leaf nitrogen (N on Mount Gongga can increase our understanding of the global biogeography of foliar N. In this study, 460 leaf samples from mosses, ferns, and seed plants were collected along an altitudinal gradient on the eastern slope of Mount Gongga, and the variation in leaf N concentration (mass basis with elevation was analyzed. There are considerable differences in leaf N between mosses and ferns, mosses and seed plants, C(4 and C(3 plants, and evergreen and deciduous woody plants. The general altitudial pattern of leaf N in Mount Gongga plants was that leaf N kept increasing until an elevation of about 2200 m above sea level, with a corresponding mean annual temperature (MAT of 8.5°C, and then decreased with increasing elevation. However, the evergreen woody plants displayed a decline trend in leaf N across the altitude gradient. Our findings provide an insight into the altitudinal variation in leaf N.

  20. Nitrogen-Phosphorous Fertilizers on the Base of Concentrated Ammonium Nitrate Solution and Central Kyzylkum Phosphate Raw Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmed Reymov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents obtaining of nitrogen-phosphate fertilizers by reacting ordinary phosphate powder from Central Kyzylkum (Uzbekistan with 70-90% ammonium nitrate solution at 100ºС. Chemical composition of the fertilizers was determined fully. Relevant consistence of acceptable forms of Р2О5 and СаО in the product extremely decreased by the increase of amount of phosphate raw material (PRM in reaction mixture. The addition of phosphate additive into ammonium nitrate solution significantly increases toughness of ammonium nitrate granules and their growth velocity proportionally by phosphate powder added. Herewith, initial concentration of ammonium nitrate did not effect practically on the granule’s toughness. It is described that, phosphate additive decreases the speed of solubility of ammonium nitrate granules almost up to 1.83 times. On our opinion, decrease of fertilizer solubility is the result of growing phosphorite share in the products. The more is the phosphorite share, the more slowly dissolution process of the fertilizer granule does occur.

  1. Mercury concentrations and pools in four Sierra Nevada forest sites, and relationships to organic carbon and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Obrist

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents data on mercury (Hg concentrations, stochiometric relations to carbon (C and nitrogen (N, and Hg pool sizes in four Sierra Nevada forest sites of similar exposure and precipitation regimes, and hence similar atmospheric deposition, to evaluate how ecosystem parameters control Hg retention in ecosystems. In all four sites, the largest amounts of Hg reside in soils which account for 94–98% of ecosystem pools. Hg concentrations and Hg/C ratios increase in the following order: Green Needles/Leavesr2=0.58 and N and C (r2=0.64 in decomposing litter, but a positive correlation between litter Hg and N (r2=0.70. These inverse relations may reflect preferential retention of N and Hg over C during decomposition, or may be due to older age of decomposed litter layers which are exposed to longer-term atmospheric Hg deposition in the field. The results indicate that litter Hg levels depend on decomposition stage and may not follow generally observed positive relationships between Hg and organic C.

    Mineral soil layers show strong positive correlations of Hg to C across all sites and soil horizons (r2=0.83, but Hg concentrations are even more closely related to N with a similar slope to that observed in litter (r2=0.92. Soil N levels alone explain over 90% of Hg pool sizes across the four Sierra Nevada forest sites. This suggests that soil organic N and C groups provide sorption sites for Hg to retain atmospheric deposition. However, the patterns could be due to indirect relationships where high soil N and C levels reflect high ecosystem productivity which leads to corresponding high atmospheric Hg deposition inputs via leaf litterfall and plant senescence. Our results also show that two of the sites previously affected by

  2. Variação do teor de nitrogênio em ramos produtivos de caquizeiro Change the content of nitrogen in productive branches of persimmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval Xavier de Aguiar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resposta do caquizeiro (Diospyros kaki L. à adubação nitrogenada. O experimento foi conduzido em um pomar comercial no município de Faxinal, Estado do Paraná, nas coordenadas geográficas S 23º 57' 35'', W51º 13'34'', altitude de 999 metros. A cultivar estudada foi "Giombo". Utilizou-se de 9 tratamentos, sendo uma testemunha sem aplicação de nitrogênio (N, e os demais resultante das épocas de aplicação de N (Maturação fisiológica dos frutos, início de poda, final de florescimento e em 15-12-06, combinadas com duas doses de N (80 e 160 kg/ha. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados e 4 repetições. A parcela experimental foi constituída de 3 plantas, sendo a planta central usada para avaliação. A cada quarenta e cinco dias após o início da adubação, foram retirados aleatoriamente de cada tratamento oito ramos produtivos em diferentes pontos da planta. Na folha, os tratamentos IP e MF apresentaram os maiores teores de N na primavera e no verão, e uma diminuição significativa na fase final do ciclo antes da senescência e queda.Na folha e no ramo, todos os tratamentos resultaram em teor de N semelhante no final do ciclo.A época de aplicação, início de poda, foi a época que demonstrou menor variação de N, independentemente da dose.The objective was to evaluate the change in content of nitrogen in productive branches of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. to nitrogen fertilization. The experiment was conducted in a commercial orchard in the municipality of Faxinal, state of Paraná, in geographical coordinates S 23 º 57 '35'', W51 ° 13'34'', altitude of 999 meters. The cultivar studied was "Giombo. 9 was used treatments, and a control without application of nitrogen (N, and the remainder resulting from the application in time of physiological maturity of fruits, pruning the top, end of flowering and 15/12/06 and combined with two doses of N (80 and 160 kg / ha

  3. Effects of yogurt supplemented with fish oil on plasma lipid and glucose concentrations, and liver lipid contents in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu; Kawashima, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the effects of yogurt supplemented with fish oil on plasma lipid and glucose concentrations, and hepatic lipid contents in mice. Male Crlj:CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed five experimental diets for 12 weeks. The experimental diets were as follows: without yogurt and fish oil (control diet); 10% (w/w) yogurt without fish oil [10% FO(-)]; 10% yogurt with fish oil [10% FO(+)]; 30% yogurt without fish oil [30% FO(-)]; 30% yogurt with fish oil [30% FO(+)]. Plasma triacylglycerol concentrations in the 10% FO(+) and 30% FO(-) groups were significantly lower than that in the control diet group (p cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations were significantly lower in the 30% FO(+) group than in the control diet group (p cholesterol contents in the 30% FO(+) group were significantly lower than those in the control diet group (p yogurt with fish oil.

  4. Graphene quantum dots with nitrogen-doped content dependence for highly efficient dual-modality photodynamic antimicrobial therapy and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Shuo; Chen, Hua-Han; Chen, Shih-Yao; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Pei-Chi; Hou, Yung-I; Shao, Yu-Ting; Kao, Hui-Fang; Lilian Hsu, Chih-Li; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Shean-Jen; Wu, Shang-Rung; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2017-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species is the main contributor to photodynamic therapy. The results of this study show that a nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dot, serving as a photosensitizer, was capable of generating a higher amount of reactive oxygen species than a nitrogen-free graphene quantum dot in photodynamic therapy when photoexcited for only 3 min of 670 nm laser exposure (0.1 W cm -2 ), indicating highly improved antimicrobial effects. In addition, we found that higher nitrogen-bonding compositions of graphene quantum dots more efficiently performed photodynamic therapy actions than did the lower compositions that underwent identical treatments. Furthermore, the intrinsically emitted luminescence from nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and high photostability simultaneously enabled it to act as a promising contrast probe for tracking and localizing bacteria in biomedical imaging. Thus, the dual modality of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots presents possibilities for future clinical applications, and in particular multidrug resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemistry of the normal dura mater of the human brain determination of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur and nitrogen contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio M. Canelas

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur, and nitrogen were determined in samples of apparently normal dura mater removed from 18 subjects recently dead by craniocerebral trauma. The average concentrations expressed in dry weight were: water 79.55 g/100 g ± 2.52; sodium 1.63 mequiv/100 g ±0.27; potassium 3.68 mequiv/100 g ± 0.66; calcium 119.84 mg/100 g ± 107.40; phosphorus 68.2 mg/100 g ± 34.5; magnesium 0.61 mequiv/100 g ± 0.37; copper 249.8 /xg/100 g ± 109.4; iron 0.82 mg/100 g ± 0.28; sulfur 490.7 mg/100 g ± 22.5; nitrogen 3.33 g/100 g ± 0.17.

  6. Nitrate concentration-shift cultivation to enhance protein content of heterotrophic microalga Chlorella vulgaris: Over-compensation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tonghui; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Yu; Li, Xingrui; Zhang, Yongkui

    2017-06-01

    Protein production from microalgae requires both high cell density during cultivation and high protein content in cells. Heterotrophic microalgae can achieve high cell density, and yet are confronted with the problem of low protein content. Based on over-compensation strategy, a new concentration-shift method was proposed to cultivate heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris, aiming to increase protein content. With a prior starvation period, microalgae utilized more nitrate and accumulated more proteins compared to one-stage cultivation. Considering the convenience of operation, nitrate-added culture was adopted for producing heterotrophic microalgae, rather than sterile centrifugal culture. Operating parameters including nitrate concentration in N-deficient medium, N-starved time and nitrate concentration in N-rich medium were optimized, which were 0.18gl(-1), 38h and 2.45gl(-1), respectively. Under the optimized conditions, protein content in heterotrophic Chlorella reached 44.3%. Furthermore, the heterotrophic microalga was suggested to be a potential single-cell protein source according to the amino acid composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined effect of crude fat content and initial substrate concentration on batch anaerobic digestion characteristics of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqin; Lang, Qianqian; Fang, Ming; Li, Xin; Bah, Hamidou; Dong, Hongmin; Dong, Renjie

    2017-05-01

    The mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) characteristics of food waste (FW) with different crude fat (CF) contents and four initial substrate concentrations (4, 6, 8, and 10gVS/L) were investigated. The maximum methane yields of FW with CF contents of 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, and 35% were 565.0, 580.2, 606.0, 630.2 and 573.0mLCH4/gVSadded, respectively. An acidification trend with a drop in pH (0.4) were found for CF contents of 30% (10gVS/L) and 35% (8 and 10gVS/L). A 35% CF content in FW led to decrease in the first-order degradation constant of approximately by 40%. The modified Gompertz model showed that the lag phase (λ) was prolonged from 0.4 to 7.1days when the CF content in FW and initial substrate concentration were increased to 35% and 10gVS/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Xanthan biopolymers: A review of methods for the determination of concentration and for the measurement of acetate and pyruvate content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Kevin C.; Nasr-El-Din, Hisham A. (Petroleum Recovery Institute, Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1993-07-26

    Xanthan gum is used extensively for enhanced oil recovery as a mobility control agent, in drilling operations to increase the suspension capacity of the drilling mud, and in gels to improve the volumetric sweep efficiency. Flow properties, injectivity, and adsorption characteristics depend on acetate and pyruvate content of xanthan. This review discusses various methods and techniques available for measuring the concentration of xanthan and its pyruvate and acetate content in laboratory and field samples. It includes a description of the principles of each method, advantages, limitations, interferences, and other information necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  9. The interactive impact of root branch order and soil genetic horizon on root respiration and nitrogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocha, Lidia K; Bulaj, Bartosz; Kutczynska, Paulina; Mucha, Joanna; Rutkowski, Pawel; Zadworny, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    In general, respiration (RS) is highly correlated with nitrogen concentration (N) in plant organs, including roots, which exhibit a positive N-RS relationship. Less is known, however, about the relationship between N and RS in roots of different branch orders within an individual tree along a vertical soil profile; this is especially true in trees with contrasting life strategies, such as pioneer Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) vs mid-successional sessile oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.). In the present research, the impact of root branch order, as represented by those with absorptive vs transporting ability, and soil genetic horizon on root N, RS and the N-RS relationship was examined. Mean RS and total N concentration differed significantly among root branch orders and was significantly higher in absorptive roots than in transporting roots. The soil genetic horizon differentially affected root RS in Scots pine vs sessile oak. The genetic horizon mostly affected RS in absorptive roots of Scots pine and transporting roots in sessile oak. Root N was the highest in absorptive roots and most affected by soil genetic horizon in both tree species. Root N was not correlated with soil N, although N levels were higher in roots growing in fertile soil genetic horizons. Overall, RS in different root branch orders was positively correlated with N in both species. The N-RS relationship in roots, pooled by soil genetic horizon, was significant in both species, but was only significant in sessile oak when roots were pooled by root branch order. In both tree species, a significant interaction was found between the soil genetic horizon and root branch order with root function; however, species-specific responses were found. Both root N, which was unaffected by soil N, and the positive N-RS relationship consistently observed in different genetic horizons suggest that root function prevails over environmental factors, such as soil genetic horizon. © The Author 2017. Published by

  10. The use of crude protein content to predict concentrations of lysine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    proteins provided by energy sources (i.e. cereal grains), as protein sources are more ... Lysine concentrations were determined with a Beckman System 6300 High .... The biological value of maize protein (Cromwell et al., 1983), wheat protein.

  11. PRODUCTION OF NICKEL CONCENTRATE OF WORKED-OUT METAL-CONTAINING CATALYSTS WITH LOW NICKEL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The carried out series of experiments confirmed the technical reasonability of enrichment of exhaust nickel catalysts with the purpose of their further usage as nickel concentrates for alloying of casting alloys.

  12. The Form in Which Nitrogen Is Supplied Affects the Polyamines, Amino Acids, and Mineral Composition of Sweet Pepper Fruit under an Elevated CO2 Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, Maria C; Otálora, Ginés; Porras, Manuel E; Sánchez-Guerrero, Mari C; Lorenzo, Pilar; Medrano, Evangelina; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effect of supplying nitrogen, as NO3(-) or as NO3(-)/NH4(+), on the composition of fruits of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Melchor) plants grown with different CO2 concentrations ([CO2]): ambient or elevated (800 μmol mol(-1)). The results show that the application of NH4(+) and high [CO2] affected the chroma related to the concentrations of chlorophylls. The concentrations of Ca, Cu, Mg, P, and Zn were significantly reduced in the fruits of plants nourished with NH4(+), the loss of Fe being more dramatic at increased [CO2], which was also the case with the protein concentration. The concentration of total phenolics was increased by NH4(+), being unaffected by [CO2]. Globally, the NH4(+) was the main factor that affected fruit free amino acid concentrations. Polyamines were affected differently: putrescine was increased by elevated [CO2], while the response of cadaverine depended on the form of N supplied.

  13. A new method combining soil oxygen concentration measurements with the quantification of gross nitrogen turnover rates and associated formation of N2O and N2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, Adrian; Dannenmann, Michael; Sörgel, Christoph; Meier, Rudi; Meyer, Astrid; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and the expansion of land use have led to significant changes in terrestrial ecosystems. These include changes in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and therewith implications for biodiversity, water cycle and pedosphere-atmosphere exchange. To understand these impacts detailed research on nitrogen turnover and fluxes are conducted at various (semi-) natural and managed ecosystems in the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. In this context, we execute 15N tracing analyses on soil samples in our stable isotope laboratory including a new experimental setup. The soils were sampled from different forest ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro varying in altitude (1600 - 4500 m) and will be analyzed for gross rates of ammonification and nitrification, gross rates of microbial inorganic N uptake as well as for the gaseous losses of ^15N2 and ^15N2O using ^15NH4+ and ^15NO3- tracing and pool dilution approaches. Since nitrogen turnover of nitrification and denitrification is dependent on soil oxygen concentrations we developed an incubation method which allows to adjust soil samples to different oxygen concentrations. For this purpose, soil is incubated in glass bottles with side tubes to ensure a constant gas flow over the whole incubation time. To adjust the oxygen levels in the laboratory experiment as close as possible to the natural conditions, we started to monitor soil oxygen concentrations with a FirestingO2 Sensor (Pyroscience) connected to a timer and a datalogger (MSR 145 IP 60 E3333) at a Mt. Kilimanjaro rainforest site. The equipment is complemented with soil temperature, moisture and pressure sensors (MSR 145 IP 60). A solar panel connected to an energy source guarantees a working time for over 2 years by a measuring frequency of 20 seconds each 30 minutes. The new laboratory incubation method together with in-situ oxygen concentration measurements in soils will facilitate laboratory incubations with realistic oxygen concentrations and thus will allow for a better

  14. Algal community characteristics and response to nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in streams in the Ozark Plateaus, Southern Missouri, 1993-95 and 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femmer, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient and algae data were collected in the 1990s and 2000s by the U.S. Geological Survey for the National Water- Quality Assessment program in the Ozark Highlands, southern Missouri. These data were collected at sites of differing drainage area, land use, nutrient concentrations, and physiography. All samples were collected at sites with a riffle/pool structure and cobble/gravel bed material. A total of 60 samples from 45 sites were available for analyses to determine relations between nutrient concentrations and algal community structure in this region. This information can be used by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to develop the State's nutrient criteria plan. Water samples collected for this study had total nitrogen concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 4.41 milligram per liter (mg/L) with a median of 0.26 mg/L, and total phosphorus concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 0.78 mg/L with a median of 0.007 mg/L. These nutrient concentrations were transformed into nutrient categories consisting of varying percentiles of data. Algal community data were entered into the U.S. Geological Survey's Algae Data Analysis System for the computation of more than 250 metrics. These metrics were correlated with nutrient categories, and four metrics with the strongest relation with the nutrient data were selected. These metrics were Organic Nitrogen Tolerance, Oxygen Tolerance, Bahls Pollution Class, and the Saprobien index with the 25th and 80th percentile nutrient categories. These data indicate that near the 80th percentile (Total Nitrogen = 0.84 mg/L, Total Phosphorus = 0.035 mg/L) the algae communities significantly changed from nitrogen-fixing species dominance to those species more tolerant of eutrophic conditions.

  15. Does nitrogen fertilization history affects short-term microbial responses and chemical properties of soils submitted to different glyphosate concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivelle, Elodie; Verzeaux, Julien; Chabot, Amélie; Roger, David; Spicher, Fabien; Lacoux, Jérôme; Nava-Saucedo, Jose-Edmundo; Catterou, Manuella; Tétu, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide, with agriculture holding the largest market share. The agronomic and socioeconomic utilities of glyphosate are well established; however, our knowledge of the potential effects of glyphosate applied in the presence or absence of long-term N fertilization on microbial functional activities and the availability of soil nutrients remains limited. Using an ex situ approach with soils that did (N+) or did not (N0) receive synthetic N fertilization for 6 years, we assessed the impact of different rates (no glyphosate, CK; field rate, FR; 100 × field rate, 100FR) of glyphosate application on biological and chemical parameters. We observed that, after immediate application (1 day), the highest dose of glyphosate (100FR) negatively affected the alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity in soils without N fertilization history and decreased the cation exchange capacity (CEC) in N0 compared to CK and FR treatments with N+. Conversely, the 100FR application increased nitrate (NO3-) and available phosphorus (PO43-) regardless of N fertilization history. Then, after 8 and 15 days, the N+\\100FR and N+\\FR treatments exhibited the lowest values for dehydrogenase (DH) and AlP activities, respectively, while urease (URE) activity was mainly affected by N fertilization. After 15 days and irrespective of N fertilization history, the FR glyphosate application negatively affected the degradation of carbon substrates by microbial communities (expressed as the average well color development, AWCD). By contrast, the 100FR treatment positively affected AWCD, increasing PO43- by 5 and 16% and NO3- by 126 and 119% in the N+ and N0 treatments, respectively. In addition, the 100FR treatment resulted in an increase in the average net nitrification rate. Principal component analysis revealed that the 100FR glyphosate treatment selected microbial communities that were able to metabolize amine substrates

  16. Does nitrogen fertilization history affects short-term microbial responses and chemical properties of soils submitted to different glyphosate concentrations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Nivelle

    Full Text Available The use of nitrogen (N fertilizer and glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide, with agriculture holding the largest market share. The agronomic and socioeconomic utilities of glyphosate are well established; however, our knowledge of the potential effects of glyphosate applied in the presence or absence of long-term N fertilization on microbial functional activities and the availability of soil nutrients remains limited. Using an ex situ approach with soils that did (N+ or did not (N0 receive synthetic N fertilization for 6 years, we assessed the impact of different rates (no glyphosate, CK; field rate, FR; 100 × field rate, 100FR of glyphosate application on biological and chemical parameters. We observed that, after immediate application (1 day, the highest dose of glyphosate (100FR negatively affected the alkaline phosphatase (AlP activity in soils without N fertilization history and decreased the cation exchange capacity (CEC in N0 compared to CK and FR treatments with N+. Conversely, the 100FR application increased nitrate (NO3- and available phosphorus (PO43- regardless of N fertilization history. Then, after 8 and 15 days, the N+\\100FR and N+\\FR treatments exhibited the lowest values for dehydrogenase (DH and AlP activities, respectively, while urease (URE activity was mainly affected by N fertilization. After 15 days and irrespective of N fertilization history, the FR glyphosate application negatively affected the degradation of carbon substrates by microbial communities (expressed as the average well color development, AWCD. By contrast, the 100FR treatment positively affected AWCD, increasing PO43- by 5 and 16% and NO3- by 126 and 119% in the N+ and N0 treatments, respectively. In addition, the 100FR treatment resulted in an increase in the average net nitrification rate. Principal component analysis revealed that the 100FR glyphosate treatment selected microbial communities that were able to metabolize amine substrates

  17. Ultraviolet-B radiation and nitrogen affect nutrient concentrations and the amount of nutrients acquired by above-ground organs of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carlos M; Coutinho, João F; Bacelar, Eunice A; Gonçalves, Berta M; Björn, Lars Olof; Moutinho Pereira, José

    2012-01-01

    UV-B radiation effects on nutrient concentrations in above-ground organs of maize were investigated at silking and maturity at different levels of applied nitrogen under field conditions. The experiment simulated a 20% stratospheric ozone depletion over Portugal. At silking, UV-B increased N, K, Ca, and Zn concentrations, whereas at maturity Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu increased and N, P and Mn decreased in some plant organs. Generally, at maturity, N, Ca, Cu, and Mn were lower, while P, K, and Zn concentrations in stems and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were higher in N-starved plants. UV-B and N effects on shoot dry biomass were more pronounced than on nutrient concentrations. Nutrient uptake decreased under high UV-B and increased with increasing N application, mainly at maturity harvest. Significant interactions UV-B x N were observed for NUE and for concentration and mass of some elements. For instance, under enhanced UV-B, N, Cu, Zn, and Mn concentrations decreased in leaves, except on N-stressed plants, whereas they were less affected by N nutrition. In order to minimize nutritional, economical, and environmental negative consequences, fertiliser recommendations based on element concentration or yield goals may need to be adjusted.

  18. Influence of olive oil solid waste applications on soil pH, electrical conductivity, soil nitrogen transformations, carbon content and aggregate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavdir, Yasemin; Killi, Dilek

    2008-05-01

    Some of the agricultural wastes have important economic potentials to be used as a plant nutrition and/or soil conditioner. Olive oil solid waste (OSW) is one of them. The aim of this study was to determine effects of OSW on soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), improving soil nitrogen (N) status, soil aggregate stability and soil carbon contents. Different rates of OSW (control, 2%, 4% and 8%, w/w) were applied to coarse soils and incubated for 2 months. OSW applications decreased soil pH values. The mean EC value of soil measured 2 months after the incubation was greater than that of the first month. Application of OSW at the rate of 8% has significantly increased soil total organic nitrogen contents. OSW applications at the rate of 8% (w/w) significantly increased both mean SOC content (3.5%) and aggregate stability (88%) after 2 months of incubation (psoil structure of coarse textured soil in short term.

  19. Bone computed tomography mineral content evaluation in chickens: effects of substances in homeopathic concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canello, Sergio; Gasparini, Gabriele; Luisetto, Patrizio; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Pomerri, Fabio

    2016-02-01

    Ninety-six cobb race chickens were equally divided in 4 groups and randomly assigned to receive a standard treatment feed + homeopathic concentrations of Symphytum (S.) officinalis (9CH), or standard treatment feed + homeopathic concentrations of Tricalcarea (4CH), or standard treatment feed + homeopathic concentrations of Calcarea (C.) carbonica (30CH) or a placebo (the same feed but without any homeopathic compound) in order to assess the ability of the homeopathic compounds to increase the concentration of calcium hydroxyapatite in the sternal spongy bone tissue. We measured the concentration of calcium hydroxyapatite in the sternal spongy bone tissue of all chickens by means of a computed tomography (CT). 30%, 36% and 63% increase of sternum spongy-bone mineralization was observed after a 2 years period in the treatment groups with S. officinalis (9CH), Tricalcarea (4CH) (*P < 0.05) and C. carbonica (30CH) (***P < 0.001) respectively. Bone mineralization is usually low in battery chickens reared in commercial poultry-sheds, creating a weakness of the whole animal supporting apparatus. Homeopathic preparations with bone-tissue tropism may improve their health quality. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  1. Photosynthesis acclimation, leaf nitrogen concentration, and growth of four tree species over 3 years in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen treatment in subtropical China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhou, Guoyi; Duan, Honglang; Li, Yuelin; Zhang, Deqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Xu, Zhihong [Griffith Univ., Nathan, Brisbane (Australia). Centre for Forestry and Horticultural Research

    2011-10-15

    Up to date, most studies about the plant photosynthetic acclimation responses to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration have been performed in temperate areas, which are often N limited under natural conditions and with low ambient N deposition. It is unclear whether photosynthetic downregulation is alleviated with increased N availability, for example, from increased N deposition due to fossil fuel combustion in the tropics and subtropics. Awareness of plant photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2} concentration will contribute to the better understanding and prediction of future forest productivity under global change. Four tree species, Schima superba Gardn. et Champ., Ormosia pinnata (Lour.) Merr, Castanopsis hystrix AC. DC., and Acmena acuminatissima (Blume) Merr. et Perry were exposed to a factorial combination of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} concentration at ca. 700 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1}) and N deposition (ambient and ambient + 100 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}) in open-top chambers in southern China for 3 years since March 2005. Light-saturated net photosynthetic rate, leaf N concentration, and tree growth of all species were measured. The CO{sub 2} treatments did not affect light-saturated net photosynthetic rate of all species grown with the high N treatment. However, S. superba grown with the low N treatment (ambient) had 23% and 47% greater net photosynthesis in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for December 2006 and November 2007 (20 and 31 months after the treatments were applied), respectively, and A. acuminatissima grown with the low N treatment had 173%, 26%, and 121% greater net photosynthesis in trees grown in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for July 2006 (16 months after the treatments), December 2006 (20 months), and November 2007 (31 months), respectively, whereas

  2. Cheese intake in large amounts lowers LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with butter intake of equal fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerpsted, Julie; Leedo, Eva; Tholstrup, Tine

    2011-12-01

    Despite its high content of saturated fatty acids, cheese does not seem to increase plasma total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations when compared with an equivalent intake of fat from butter. This effect may be due to the high calcium content of cheese, which results in a higher excretion of fecal fat. The objective was to compare the effects of diets of equal fat content rich in either hard cheese or butter or a habitual diet on blood pressure and fasting serum blood lipids, C-reactive protein, glucose, and insulin. We also examined whether fecal fat excretion differs with the consumption of cheese or butter. The study was a randomized dietary intervention consisting of two 6-wk crossover periods and a 14-d run-in period during which the subjects consumed their habitual diet. The study included 49 men and women who replaced part of their habitual dietary fat intake with 13% of energy from cheese or butter. After 6 wk, the cheese intervention resulted in lower serum total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations and higher glucose concentrations than did the butter intervention. Cheese intake did not increase serum total or LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with the run-in period, during which total fat and saturated fat intakes were lower. Fecal fat excretion did not differ between the cheese and butter periods. Cheese lowers LDL cholesterol when compared with butter intake of equal fat content and does not increase LDL cholesterol compared with a habitual diet. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01140165.

  3. Changes in Growth and Oil Yield Indices of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Hyola 401 in Different Concentrations andTimes of Application of Supplementary Nitrogen Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tousi Kehal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of concentration and time of supplementary nitrogen fertilizer spray on growth indices of rapeseed (cv. Hyola 401, a field experiment was conducted at Rice Research Institute of Iran as a randomized complete blocks design with 16 treatments and 3 replications in 2008-2009. The treatments included concentration of nitrogen fertilizer (urea at two levels (5 and 10 ppm in seven levels of application time:1 spraying at 6-8- leaf stage, 2 beginning of stem elongation, 3 prior to flowering, 4 at 6-8- leaf stage + beginning of stem elongation, 5 at 6-8- leaf + prior to flowering, 6 beginning of stem elongation+ prior to flowering, and 7 at 6-8- leaf + beginning of stem elongation+ prior to flowering, which were compared with two control treatments (no fertilizer nitrogen and conventional soil fertilization. Results showed that significant difference was observed between spray treatments including concentration and times of nitrogen application, between controls and between controls with spray treatments, of grain and oil yield, crop growth rate (CGR, leaf area index (LAI and leaf area duration (LAD. Application of nitrogen (10 ppm at the beginning of stem elongation+ prior to flowering stages produced maximum grain yield (4221.7 kg/ha and oil yield (1771.1 kg/ha. Spray treatments produced maximum oil yield index (15.3% compared to controls. Maximum LAI (6.9 and 5.6 respectively, CGR (15.2 and 14.3 g/m2.10 GDD, respectively and LAD (1204 and 1029 cm2/10 GDD, respectively were also obtained from spray application of nitrogen (10 ppm at the beginning of stem elongation+ prior to flowering stages and at 6-8-leaf stage + beginning of stem elongation + prior to flowering. According to the results of the present investigation, it seems that foliar application of supplementary nitrogen fertilizer at the end growth stages (beginning of stem elongation and prior to flowering of rapeseed plants may help to enhance growth indices

  4. Extensive Operating Experiments on the Conversion of Fuel-Bound Nitrogen into Nitrogen Oxides in the Combustion of Wood Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Dzurenda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wide, targeted, operational experiment on the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to nitrogen oxides. The experiment was implemented by studying the production of energy in 16-grate boilers. The conversion factor was determined based on the nitrogen content in individual types of dendromass and on nitrogen oxide emissions in flue gases. In measuring emissions, 103 average values for the concentration of nitrous oxide were found. Every average value was set using three consecutive half-hour emission measurements. The specific thermal output of the boilers was 300 to 2500 kW. The nitrogen content in the deliberately selected dendromass was within a wide interval of Ndaf values between 0.04% and 1.26%. The dependence of the conversion factor, XNOx, upon the content of fuel-bound nitrogen is very accurately expressed by the power function.

  5. Investigations into the influence of organic fertilizer on the nitrogen content in the soil and the musts of grapes from the varieties 'Blauburger', 'Pinot noir', 'Blaufränkisch' and 'Riesling'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehofer, Martin; Schmuckenschlager, Bernhard; Hanak, Karel; Vitovec, Norbert; Schober, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    The influence of compost and of a Commercial organic fertilizer based on malt sprouts and vinasse on the nitrogen content in the soil and must, on the humus content and on maturity and yield was determined with four grapevine varieties in two experimental plots over a period of five years. In the year 2008 before application of organic fertilizers humus content was between 2.7 % and 3.8 %. In 2012 the values were between 2.3 % and 3.9 %. All values corresponded to the content level 'medium'. In one experimental plot humus content in the topsoil of the control variant and the variant with the Commercial organic fertilizer decreased over the period 2008 to 2012, whereas it remained unchanged in the compost variant. In the topsoil of the other experimental plot an increase of humus content in the compost variant was observed over the period 2008 to 2012. The content of Mineral Nitrogen in the soil (0 to 60 cm) was influenced by the sampling date, the weather conditions and the trial variant (control, compost, Commercial organic fertilizer). During the five years of Research the extrapolated content of Nitrogen in the soil was between 9 and 122.5 kg/ha, resp., 8 and 110 kg/ha in the two plots. In one plot in the control variant the mean value of total mineral nitrogen content per hectare of all sampling dates of all years was 33.2 kg/ha which was statistically significantly lower than the value of the organic commercial fertilizer variant with 51.2 kg/ha. The mean value of the total mineral nitrogen content of the compost variant of all sampling dates of all years was 37.7 kg/ha. In the soil of the second plot the highest mean value of total Mineral Nitrogen was determined in the organic Commercial fertilizer variant with 44.3 kg/ha. In the compost variant this value was 30.3 kg/ha and in the control variant 33.1 kg/ha. With the organic fertilizer variant, effects on the Nitrogen content in must were observed. In 2008 in the compost variant an increase of Nitrogen

  6. Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide and Nitrogen Oxides From a 25 kW Boiler Supplied Periodically and Continuously with Wood Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juszczak Marek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the fuel feeding mode (continuous or periodic with different stand-by/operation time ratios on carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NO, NOx concentration values in the flue gas was analysed for coniferous wood pellet firing. Experiments were performed in a 25 kW water boiler equipped with an over-fed wood pellet furnace located in a full scale heat station simulating real-life conditions. Influence of oxygen concentration and temperature in the combustion chamber on carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide concentrations was presented in diagrams. Dust and hydrocarbon concentrations were also monitored. It was concluded that the commonly used periodic fuel supply does not necessarily cause a significant increase of carbon monoxide concentration, as compared to the continuous fuel feeding mode. Continuous fuel supply can even induce higher carbon monoxide concentrations when fuel mass stream is not chosen properly. Each time new fuel type is used in a specific furnace, one should perform experiments to determine the adequate settings (stand-by/operation time ratio, fuel mass streams, air stream to obtain the optimal, lowest possible emission for a certain boiler heat output

  7. Ecological studies of aquatic moss pillars in Antarctic lakes 1. Macro structure and carbon, nitrogen and Chlorophyll a contents

    OpenAIRE

    Kudoh,Sakae; Tsuchiya,Yasutaka; Ayukawa,Eri; Imura,Satoshi; Kanda,Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Structures of a typical 'moss pillar' submerged in Antarctic lakes were investigated to analyze the sizes, age distribution, and composition such as shoot density, dry weight, carbon, nitrogen and chlorophyll a using a sample collected from lake B-4 Ike in the Skarvsnes region, East Antarctica. The moss pillar was mainly composed of shoots of a moss species, Leptobryum sp. Most of the green shoots of the species were located at the top surface of the pillar, and brownish old shoots with promi...

  8. Dry matter and nitrogen accumulation are not affected by superoptimal concentration of ammonium in flowing solution culture with pH control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, J. W.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While it is known that superoptimal concentrations of the nitrate (NO3-) ion in solution culture do not increase NO3- uptake or dry matter accumulation, the same is not known for the ammonium (NH4+) ion. An experiment was conducted utilizing flowing solution culture with pH control to investigate the influence of superoptimal NH4+ concentrations on dry matter, nitrogen (N), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) accumulation by nonnodulated soybean plants. Increasing the NH4+ concentration in solution from 1 to 10 mM did not affect dry matter or N accumulation. Accumulations of K, Ca, and Mg were slightly decreased with increased NH4+ concentration. The NH4+ uptake system, which is saturated at less than 1mM NH4+, is able to regulate uptake of NH4+ at concentrations as high as 10 mM.

  9. A comparative evaluation of nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dheer; Chopra, Anju; Patel, Mitra Bhanu; Sarpal, Amarjit Singh [Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Faridabad (India). Research and Development Centre

    2011-07-15

    Although the concentration of nitrogen compounds in crude oil is relatively low, they can become more concentrated in petroleum distillates and poison the catalysts used in refining processes. They cause undesirable deposits, color formation and odor in products; they also contribute to air pollution and some are highly carcinogenic. The poisoned catalyst becomes deactivated for hydrodesulfurization and unable to remove sulfur from middle distillates. In order to understand the effect on catalytic processes, it is desirable to identify the nitrogen compounds in various petroleum distillates. This paper compares the nitrogen species profiles in different petroleum distillates using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector. In addition, four different petroleum distillate samples from different refineries were analyzed to find the variation in their nitrogen profiles. The nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillate samples were identified as anilines, quinolines, indoles, and carbazoles and their alkyl derivatives. Quantitation was carried out against known reference standards. The quantitative data were compared to the total nitrogen content determined by elemental analysis. (orig.)

  10. Achieving low effluent NO3-N and TN concentrations in low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio without using external carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiashun; Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Xue, Zhaoxia; Otache, Y. Martins; Feng, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Two mathematical models were used to optimize the performance of a full-scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated treatment plant, a plug-flow bioreactors operated in a 3-stage phoredox process configuration, anaerobic anoxic oxic (A2/O). The ASM2d implemented on the platform of WEST2011 software and the BioWin activated sludge/anaerobic digestion (AS/AD) models were used in this study with the aim of consistently achieving the designed effluent criteria at a low operational cost. Four ASM2d parameters (the reduction factor for denitrification , the maximum growth rate of heterotrophs (µH), the rate constant for stored polyphosphates in PAOs ( q pp), and the hydrolysis rate constant ( k h)) were adjusted. Whereas three BioWin parameters (aerobic decay rate ( b H), heterotrophic dissolved oxygen (DO) half saturation ( K OA), and Y P/acetic) were adjusted. Calibration of the two models was successful; both models have average relative deviations (ARD) less than 10% for all the output variables. Low effluent concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) were achieved in a full-scale BNR treatment plant having low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio (COD/TKN). The effluent total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen concentrations were improved by 50% and energy consumption was reduced by approximately 25%, which was accomplished by converting the two-pass aerobic compartment of the plug-flow bioreactor to anoxic reactors and being operated in an alternating mode. Findings in this work are helpful in improving the operation of wastewater treatment plant while eliminating the cost of external carbon source and reducing energy consumption.

  11. Antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and flavonoid concentrations of different plant parts of Teucrium polium L. subsp. polium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Stankovic

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Total phenolic content, concentration of flavonoids and in vitro antioxidant activity of twenty different extracts from the whole plant and plant parts (leaves, flowers and stems of Teucrium polium were determined. The total phenolic contents ranged between 14.57 to 157.84 mg of GaA/g of extract. The concentrations of flavonoids varied from 6.48 to 139.87 mg of Ru/g of extract. Antioxidant activity was determined in vitro using DPPH reagent and expressed as concentration of each extract required to inhibit radical by 50% (IC50 values that ranged from 26.30 to 2190.75 µg/ml. The methanolic leaves extract contain the greatest concentration of phenolic compounds (157.84 mg of GaA/g and showed strong antioxidant activity (IC50 = 26.30 µg/ml. Ginkgo and Green tea extracts were analyzed for comparison, and the results indicated that some extracts of T. polium were equal in activity with Ginkgo or Green tea and some appeared to have greater activity. The obtained results suggest strong antioxidant activity and large contribution of separate analysis for the maximum exploitation of active phenolic compounds from T. polium. Based on this information, plant parts of this plant are natural sources of antioxidant substances of high importance.

  12. An Examination of the Sensitivity of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations to the Important Factors Affecting Air Quality Inside a Public Transportation Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kadiyala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the sensitivity of sulfur dioxide (SO2, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations to the important factors affecting air quality inside a public transportation bus. Additionally, this study quantified the in-bus contaminant concentrations in relation to the ranked statistically significant variables. The independent variables to which the monitored contaminant concentrations are the most sensitive to were determined using regression trees and the analysis of variance. A comprehensive one-year database, of the monitored contaminant concentrations and the independent factors that affect an indoor microenvironment (meteorology, monitoring periods, outdoor sources, and ventilation settings was developed to study the sensitivity of monitored in-bus contaminants. SO2 concentrations were extremely sensitive to the month, weather conditions, and heavy vehicles. NO concentrations were sensitive to the month/season, ventilation, and ambient temperature; while NO2 concentrations were additionally sensitive to the monitoring period and the ambient mixing ratio. Quantified in-bus relationships revealed NO and NO2 concentrations to be less than 0.6 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively. SO2 concentrations of 0.4 ppm were observed in the fall-winter months, when the lead heavy vehicles were at a minimum density of 56 per hour; < 0.4 ppm SO2 concentrations remained for the rest of the year.

  13. Effect of Hydrogel and Irrigation Regimes on Chlorophyll Content, Nitrogen and Some Growth Indices and Yield of Forage Millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Keshavarz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress has an important role in yield reduction of crops. To investigate the effects of applying zeolite hydrogel (as a superabsorbent in reduction of adverse effects of drought stress on chlorophyll content, nitrogen, growth indices and their relationships with quantitative and qualitative yield of pearl millet (cv. Nitrifeed, a split plot experiment (in space and time, based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications, was carried out at Research Farm of Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman, Iran, in 2011. Treatments included drought stress at four levels (irrigation at 40, 60, 80 and 100% of field capacity as the main factor and superabsorbent hydrogel at three levels (0, 150 and 300 kg/ha as the sub-factor. Results revealed that there was a positive and significant correlation (r = 0.97** between chlorophyll content and leaf nitrogen percentage. Also, significant correlation was observed between these traits and forage fresh and dry weight of forage, protein yield and raw fiber percentage of the forage. As drought stress increased, the measured traits showed a descending trend. The superabsorbent polymer increased the fresh and dry weight of forage, growth indices and qualitative traits of pearl millet. Mean fresh weight of forage, chlorophyll content, protein content and percentage of fiber showed no significant difference between 100% and 80% irrigation levels. Superabsorbent application led to 20% water saving. Therefore, it can be said that superabsorbent hydrogel application under drought stress will improve yield, qualitative traits and growth indices of pearl millet through increasing soil water holding capacity, reducing nutrient leaching, fast and optimal growth of roots and better soil aeration.

  14. Effect of Nitrogen Content on Physical and Chemical Properties of TiN Thin Films Prepared by DC Magnetron Sputtering with Supported Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, A.; Kannan, R.; Gunasekhar, K. R.; Rajashabala, S.

    2017-10-01

    Amorphous titanium nitride (TiN) thin films have been prepared on silicon (Si) and glass substrates by direct-current (DC) reactive magnetron sputtering with a supported discharge (triode). Nitrogen gas (N2) at partial pressure of 0.3 Pa, 0.4 Pa, 0.5 Pa, and 0.6 Pa was used to prepare the TiN thin films, maintaining total pressure of argon and N2 of about 0.7 Pa. The chemical, microstructural, optical, and electrical properties of the TiN thin films were systematically studied. Presence of different phases of Ti with nitrogen (N), oxygen (O2), and carbon (C) elements was revealed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization. Increase in the nitrogen pressure from 0.3 Pa to 0.6 Pa reduced the optical bandgap of the TiN thin film from 2.9 eV to 2.7 eV. Photoluminescence study showed that TiN thin film deposited at N2 partial pressure of 0.3 Pa exhibited three shoulder peaks at 330 nm, 335 nm, and 340 nm, which disappeared when the sample was deposited with N2 partial pressure of 0.6 Pa. Increase in the nitrogen content decreased the electrical resistivity of the TiN thin film from 3200 μΩ cm to 1800 μΩ cm. Atomic force microscopy studies of the TiN thin films deposited with N2 partial pressure of 0.6 Pa showed a uniform surface pattern associated with accumulation of fine grains. The results and advantages of this method of preparing TiN thin films are also reported.

  15. Legacy effects of diversity in space and time driven by winter cover crop biomass and nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barel, J.M.; Kuijper, T.W.M.; Boer, de W.; Douma, Bob; Deyn, de G.B.

    2018-01-01

    1. Plant diversity can increase nitrogen cycling and decrease soil-borne pests, which are feedback mechanisms influencing subsequent plant growth. The relative strength of these mechanisms is unclear, as is the influence of preceding plant quantity and quality. Here, we studied how plant diversity

  16. Legacy effects of diversity in space and time driven by winter cover crop biomass and nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barel, Janna M.; Kuyper, Thomas W.; de Boer, Wietse; Douma, Jacob C.; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.

    2018-01-01

    * Plant diversity can increase nitrogen cycling and decrease soil-borne pests, which are feedback mechanisms influencing subsequent plant growth. The relative strength of these mechanisms is unclear, as is the influence of preceding plant quantity and quality. Here, we studied how plant diversity in

  17. Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.

    1998-01-01

    Animal slurries are stored for a variable period of time before application in the field. The effect of cattle slurry storage time and temperature on the subsequent mineralization of C and N in soil was studied under laboratory conditions. Urine and faeces from a dairy cow were sampled separately...... and mixed to a slurry. After 4 weeks of storage under anaerobic conditions at 15 degrees C, the NH4+ N content exceeded the original urinary N content of the slurry; the NH4+ content increased only slightly during the following 16 weeks of storage. After 4 weeks of storage, the proportion of slurry C...... to a sandy and a sandy loam soil. After 1 week, the preceding storage period (0-20 weeks) and temperature (5 degrees C or 15 degrees C) had no significant effect on the net release of inorganic N from the slurry in soil. Thus, the increased NH4+ content in the slurry after storage was followed by increased...

  18. Response of P, K, Mg and NO 3 -N contents of carrots to irrigation, soil compaction, and nitrogen fertilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. PIETOLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Soils ploughed in autumn were loosened by different tillage tools, or compacted to a depth of 25-30 cm by a tractor weighing 3 Mg (once or three times before seed bed preparation for carrot under moist soil condition. Sprinkler irrigation was also applied to mineral soils when the soil moisture in top soil was 50% of plant-available water capacity, and the response of additional N application of 30 kg ha-1 was studied in an organic soil. Higher soil moisture tended to promote nutrient uptake, as the P content of carrot tap roots was increased by irrigation in loam. Compaction of organic soil low in P increased P and K contents and uptake by carrot roots and shoots. In severely compacted clay soil, the nutrient use decreased by increasing soil compactness. NO3-N contents were the highest in early season (25-30 mg kg-1 fresh matter and decreased with advancing season. In loam, NO3-N content was increased by irrigation or loosening. Increasing the N fertilisation of organic soil from 30 kg ha-1 to 60 kg ha-1 increased the NO3-N content 30%. Soil type and its nutrient status, weather conditions, and growth stage had much more significant influence on the P, K, and Mg contents of carrots than soil treatments.

  19. Combined influence of barium sulfate content and co-monomer concentration on properties of PMMA bone cements for vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V; Cervantes-Uc, José M; Vázquez, Blanca; Román, Julio San

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the combined influence of barium sulfate content and co-monomer concentration on the properties of acrylic bone cement for percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) was investigated using a response surface methodology. Cements were prepared with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and either diethyl amino ethyl methacrylate (DEAEM) or dimethyl amino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM) as co-monomer in the liquid phase, while variable amounts of barium sulfate were incorporated to the solid phase in order to improve the radiopacity of cements. It was found that various properties such as peak temperature, setting time, residual monomer content, mechanical properties and injectability, had an effect on the occurrence of interactions (combined effect) between the barium sulfate and DEAEM in bone cements formulations when independent variables were at their maximum.

  20. Effect on digestion and performance of dietary protein content and of increased substitution of lucerne hay with soya-bean protein concentrate in starter diets for young rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, S; Gómez-Conde, M S; Pérez de Rozas, A M; Badiola, I; Carabaño, R; De Blas, J C

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of protein source / availability on the intestinal microbiota, digestive traits and nutritional performance of early-weaned rabbits. The effects of supplemental antibiotics in the drinking water were also evaluated. Four isoenergetic and isofibrous diets were formulated: a control diet with a high protein (207 g/kg dry matter (DM)) and lucerne hay content (HPHL), a diet with low crude protein (CP) (179 g/kg DM) and high lucerne hay content (LPHL) and low protein diets in which the lucerne hay in diet LPHL was replaced partially (LPML) or totally (LPLL) with soya-bean protein concentrate. Rabbits, weaned at 25 days (52 per diet), were fed the experimental diets for a 2-week period and thereafter received a commercial diet until 56 days of age. The incidence of mortality was investigated using 70 animals per diet without supplemental medication. The profile of the ileal microbiota was studied at 35 days of age in rabbits treated (18 per diet) or not (12 per diet) with antibiotic. As expected, supplementation with antibiotics effectively reduced fattening mortality rate and microbial biodiversity. However, lowering of also the dietary CP content led to a reduction in the mortality rate ( P treated with (by 80%) or without (by 39%) antibiotics. In addition, there was a reduction ( P < 0.05) in the frequency of Clostridium perfringens in non-medicated animals. Neither jejunal morphology nor growth performance, over the whole fattening period, was affected by dietary CP content of the experimental diets. However, with HPHL, feed efficiency was higher (by 4.8%; P < 0.01) than with LPHL diets. Substitution of lucerne hay with soya-bean meal in low protein diets did not affect apparent faecal or ileal digestibility of DM and CP. However, the ileal digestibility of cystine, alanine, aspartic acid, and proline was lowered ( P < 0.05) with increasing substitution by soya bean. Nevertheless, ileal CP flow, incidence of

  1. A new approach to estimate the in situ fractional degradation rate of organic matter and nitrogen in wheat yeast concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, L H; van Laar, H; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J

    2015-03-01

    In the classic in situ method, small particles are removed during rinsing and hence their fractional degradation rate cannot be determined. A new approach was developed to estimate the fractional degradation rate of nutrients in small particles. This approach was based on an alternative rinsing method to reduce the particulate matter loss during rinsing and on quantifying the particulate matter loss that occurs during incubation in the rumen itself. To quantify particulate matter loss during incubation, loss of small particles during the in situ incubation was studied using undegradable silica with different particle sizes. Particulate matter loss during incubation was limited to particles smaller than ~40 μm with a mean fractional particulate matter loss rate of 0.035 h-1 (first experiment) and 0.073 h-1 (second experiment) and an undegradable fraction of 0.001 and 0.050, respectively. In the second experiment, the fractional particulate matter loss rate after rinsing in a water bath at 50 strokes per minute (s.p.m.) (0.215 h-1) and the undegradable fraction at 20 s.p.m. (0.461) were significantly larger than that upon incubation in the rumen, whereas the fractional particulate matter loss rate (0.140 and 0.087 h-1, respectively) and the undegradable fraction (0.330 and 0.075, respectively) after rinsing at 30 and 40 s.p.m. did not differ with that upon rumen incubation. This new approach was applied to estimate the in situ fractional degradation rate of insoluble organic matter (OM) and insoluble nitrogen (N) in three different wheat yeast concentrates (WYC). These WYC were characterised by a high fraction of small particles and estimating their fractional degradation rate was not possible using the traditional washing machine rinsing method. The new rinsing method increased the mean non-washout fraction of OM and N in these products from 0.113 and 0.084 (washing machine method) to 0.670 and 0.782, respectively. The mean effective degradation (ED) without

  2. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus supply on growth, chlorophyll content and tissue composition of the macroalga Chaetomorpha linum (O.F. Müll, Kütz, in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Menéndez

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dissolved nutrients on growth, nutrient content and uptake rates of Chaetomorpha linum in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Tancada, Ebro delta, NE Spain was studied in laboratory experiments. Water was enriched with distinct forms of nitrogen, such as nitrate or ammonium and phosphorus. Enrichment with N, P or with both nutrients resulted in a significant increase in the tissue content of these nutrients. N-enrichment was followed by an increase in chlorophyll content after 4 days of treatment, although the difference was only significant when nitrate was added without P. P-enrichment had no significant effect on chlorophyll content. In all the treatments an increase in biomass was obseved after 10 days. This increase was higher in the N+P treatments. In all the treatments the uptake rate was significantly higher when nutrients were added than in control jars. The uptake rate of N, as ammonium, and P were significantly higher when they were added alone while that of N as nitrate was higher in the N+P treatment. In the P-enriched cultures, the final P-content of macroalgal tissues was ten-fold that of the initial tissue concentrations, thereby indicating luxury P-uptake. Moreover, at the end of the incubation the N:P ratio increased to 80, showing that P rather than N was the limiting factor for C. linum in the Tancada lagoon. The relatively high availability of N is related to the N inputs from rice fields that surround the lagoon and to P binding in sediments.

  3. Recent Nitrogen Deposition In Poland Monitored With The Moss Pleurozium Schreberi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapusta Paweł

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, atmospheric deposition of nitrogen was determined for Poland by moss biomonitoring. Nitrogen content was measured in the moss Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid. Mitt. sampled in 2010 from 320 sites evenly distributed throughout the country. Mosses (green parts contained an average 1.56% nitrogen. The result places Poland among the European countries most polluted by airborne nitrogen. The highest nitrogen concentrations were found in mosses from the central and southern parts of the country, and the lowest in samples from some eastern and northern regions. Multiple regression showed that this variability was due mostly to nitrogen emissions from agricultural and industrial areas (moss nitrogen was positively associated with the consumption of mineral nitrogen fertilizers and the magnitude of particulate pollution. Some details of the spatial variability of the nitrogen data indicate that local and regional point sources of pollution (e.g., chemical plants played an important role in shaping the nitrogen deposition pattern

  4. Evaluation of between-cow variation in milk urea and rumen ammonia nitrogen concentrations and the association with nitrogen utilization and diet digestibility in lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtanen, P; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Krizsan, S J; Shingfield, K J

    2015-05-01

    Concentrations of milk urea N (MUN) are influenced by dietary crude protein concentration and intake and could therefore be used as a biomarker of the efficiency of N utilization for milk production (milk N/N intake; MNE) in lactating cows. In the present investigation, data from milk-production trials (production data set; n=1,804 cow/period observations from 21 change-over studies) and metabolic studies involving measurements of nutrient flow at the omasum in lactating cows (flow data set; n=450 cow/period observations from 29 studies) were used to evaluate the influence of between-cow variation on the relationship of MUN with MNE, urinary N (UN) output, and diet digestibility. All measurements were made on cows fed diets based on grass silage supplemented with a range of protein supplements. Data were analyzed by mixed-model regression analysis with diet within experiment and period within experiment as random effects, allowing the effect of diet and period to be excluded. Between-cow coefficient of variation in MUN concentration and MNE was 0.13 and 0.07 in the production data set and 0.11 and 0.08 in the flow data set, respectively. Based on residual variance, the best model for predicting MNE developed from the production data set was MNE (g/kg)=238 + 7.0 × milk yield (MY; kg/d) - 0.064 × MY(2) - 2.7 × MUN (mg/dL) - 0.10 body weight (kg). For the flow data set, including both MUN and rumen ammonia N concentration with MY in the model accounted for more variation in MNE than when either term was used with MY alone. The best model for predicting UN excretion developed from the production data set (n=443) was UN (g/d)=-29 + 4.3 × dry matter intake (kg/d) + 4.3 × MUN + 0.14 × body weight. Between-cow variation had a smaller influence on the association of MUN with MNE and UN output than published estimates of these relationships based on treatment means, in which differences in MUN generally arise from variation in dietary crude protein concentration. For

  5. [Changes in cortikosteron concentration--a marker of stress-response under the influence of terahertz radiations at nitrogen oxide frequencies of 150, 176-150, 664 GHz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Tsymbal, A A; Antipova, O N; Krenitskiĭ, A P; Maĭborodin, A V

    2008-11-01

    Influence of electromagnetic radiation ofterahertz frequencies of molecular spectrum of radiation and absorption oxide nitrogen of 150, 176-150, 664 GHz by means of device KVCH-NO forming specified spectra, on concentration at stress-realizing hormone cortikosteron in conditions of sharp and chronic stress was is studied. It is shown that preliminary continuous 15-minute influence by electromagnetic radiation of terahertz range at frequencies of oxide nitrogen 150, 176-150, 664 GHz limits development of stress-reaction due to reduction of allocation by a of adrenal glands of glucocorticoids, in particular cortikosteron, that led restriction of excessive activation of stress-realizing system. The given fact serves as the proof of stress-limiting function of electromagnetic radiation at the given range.

  6. Does nitrogen fertilization history affects short-term microbial responses and chemical properties of soils submitted to different glyphosate concentrations?

    OpenAIRE

    Nivelle, Elodie; Verzeaux, Julien; Chabot, Am?lie; Roger, David; Spicher, Fabien; Lacoux, J?r?me; Nava-Saucedo, Jose-Edmundo; Catterou, Manuella; T?tu, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide, with agriculture holding the largest market share. The agronomic and socioeconomic utilities of glyphosate are well established; however, our knowledge of the potential effects of glyphosate a