WorldWideScience

Sample records for computing grid project

  1. Grid computing the European Data Grid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Segal, B; Gagliardi, F; Carminati, F

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a novel environment to support globally distributed scientific exploration involving multi- PetaByte datasets. The project will devise and develop middleware solutions and testbeds capable of scaling to handle many PetaBytes of distributed data, tens of thousands of resources (processors, disks, etc.), and thousands of simultaneous users. The scale of the problem and the distribution of the resources and user community preclude straightforward replication of the data at different sites, while the aim of providing a general purpose application environment precludes distributing the data using static policies. We will construct this environment by combining and extending newly emerging "Grid" technologies to manage large distributed datasets in addition to computational elements. A consequence of this project will be the emergence of fundamental new modes of scientific exploration, as access to fundamental scientific data is no longer constrained to the producer of...

  2. The LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Åkesson, T

    In the last ATLAS eNews I reported on the preparations for the LHC Computing Grid Project (LCGP). Significant LCGP resources were mobilized during the summer, and there have been numerous iterations on the formal paper to put forward to the CERN Council to establish the LCGP. ATLAS, and also the other LHC-experiments, has been very active in this process to maximally influence the outcome. Our main priorities were to ensure that the global aspects are properly taken into account, that the CERN non-member states are also included in the structure, that the experiments are properly involved in the LCGP execution and that the LCGP takes operative responsibility during the data challenges. A Project Launch Board (PLB) was active from the end of July until the 10th of September. It was chaired by Hans Hoffmann and had the IT division leader as secretary. Each experiment had a representative (me for ATLAS), and the large CERN member states were each represented while the smaller were represented as clusters ac...

  3. VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Krajewski, Yann Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project with Dr -.Ing. Tarek Kamel [Senior Advisor to the President for Government Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office] and Dr Nigel Hickson [VP, IGO Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office

  4. Taiwan links up to world's first LHC computing grid project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project last week to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator" (1/2 page).

  5. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A computing grid interconnects resources such as high performancecomputers, scientific databases, and computercontrolledscientific instruments of cooperating organizationseach of which is autonomous. It precedes and is quitedifferent from cloud computing, which provides computingresources by vendors to customers ...

  6. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    emergence of supercomputers led to the use of computer simula- tion as an .... Scientific and engineering applications (e.g., Tera grid secure gate way). Collaborative ... Encryption, privacy, protection from malicious software. Physical Layer.

  7. Taiwan links up to world's 1st LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator

  8. The MammoGrid Project Grids Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    McClatchey, Richard; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri; Buncic, Predrag; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Buncic, Predrag; Manset, David; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the recently EU-funded MammoGrid project is, in the light of emerging Grid technology, to develop a European-wide database of mammograms that will be used to develop a set of important healthcare applications and investigate the potential of this Grid to support effective co-working between healthcare professionals throughout the EU. The MammoGrid consortium intends to use a Grid model to enable distributed computing that spans national borders. This Grid infrastructure will be used for deploying novel algorithms as software directly developed or enhanced within the project. Using the MammoGrid clinicians will be able to harness the use of massive amounts of medical image data to perform epidemiological studies, advanced image processing, radiographic education and ultimately, tele-diagnosis over communities of medical "virtual organisations". This is achieved through the use of Grid-compliant services [1] for managing (versions of) massively distributed files of mammograms, for handling the distri...

  9. The QUANTGRID Project (RO)—Quantum Security in GRID Computing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Dulea, M.; Petre, M.; Petre, C.; Mitrica, B.; Stoica, M.; Udrea, M.; Sterian, R.; Sterian, P.

    2010-01-01

    The QUANTGRID Project, financed through the National Center for Programme Management (CNMP-Romania), is the first attempt at using Quantum Crypted Communications (QCC) in large scale operations, such as GRID Computing, and conceivably in the years ahead in the banking sector and other security tight communications. In relation with the GRID activities of the Center for Computing & Communications (Nat.'l Inst. Nucl. Phys.—IFIN-HH), the Quantum Optics Lab. (Nat.'l Inst. Plasma and Lasers—INFLPR) and the Physics Dept. (University Polytechnica—UPB) the project will build a demonstrator infrastructure for this technology. The status of the project in its incipient phase is reported, featuring tests for communications in classical security mode: socket level communications under AES (Advanced Encryption Std.), both proprietary code in C++ technology. An outline of the planned undertaking of the project is communicated, highlighting its impact in quantum physics, coherent optics and information technology.

  10. [Grid computing

    CERN Multimedia

    Wolinsky, H

    2003-01-01

    "Turn on a water spigot, and it's like tapping a bottomless barrel of water. Ditto for electricity: Flip the switch, and the supply is endless. But computing is another matter. Even with the Internet revolution enabling us to connect in new ways, we are still limited to self-contained systems running locally stored software, limited by corporate, institutional and geographic boundaries" (1 page).

  11. The DataGrid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, F

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and status of the DataGrid Project is presented, together with a brief introduction to the Grid metaphor and some references to the Grid activities and initiatives related to DataGrid. High energy physics experiments have always requested state of the art computing facilities to efficiently perform several computing activities related with the handling of large amounts of data and fairly large computing resources. Some of the ideas born inside the community to enhance the user friendliness of all the steps in the computing chain have been, sometimes, successfully applied also in other contexts: one bright example is the World Wide Web. The LHC computing challenge has triggered inside the high energy physics community, the start of the DataGrid Project. The objective of the project is to enable next generation scientific exploration requiring intensive computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases. (12 refs).

  12. Advances in Grid Computing for the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, K.; Alba Hernandez, A. F.; Bhat, S.; Box, D.; Boyd, J.; Di Benedetto, V.; Ding, P.; Dykstra, D.; Fattoruso, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kirby, M.; Kreymer, A.; Levshina, T.; Mazzacane, A.; Mengel, M.; Mhashilkar, P.; Podstavkov, V.; Retzke, K.; Sharma, N.; Teheran, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Fabric for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of differing size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certificate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have significantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the efforts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production workflows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular workflows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certificate management infrastructure called

  13. Advances in Grid Computing for the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herner, K. [Fermilab; Alba Hernandex, A. F. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab; Box, D. [Fermilab; Boyd, J. [Fermilab; Di Benedetto, V. [Fermilab; Ding, P. [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Fattoruso, M. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Kirby, M. [Fermilab; Kreymer, A. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Mazzacane, A. [Fermilab; Mengel, M. [Fermilab; Mhashilkar, P. [Fermilab; Podstavkov, V. [Fermilab; Retzke, K. [Fermilab; Sharma, N. [Fermilab; Teheran, J. [Fermilab

    2016-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientic Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of diering size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certicate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have signicantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the eorts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production work ows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular work ows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certicate management infrastructure called Distributed

  14. Recent trends in grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    Grid computing is a technology which allows uniform and transparent access to geographically dispersed computational resources, such as computers, databases, experimental and observational equipment etc. via high-speed, high-bandwidth networking. The commonly used analogy is that of electrical power grid, whereby the household electricity is made available from outlets on the wall, and little thought need to be given to where the electricity is generated and how it is transmitted. The usage of grid also includes distributed parallel computing, high through-put computing, data intensive computing (data grid) and collaborative computing. This paper reviews the historical background, software structure, current status and on-going grid projects, including applications of grid technology to nuclear fusion research. (author)

  15. Distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomidous, Marianna; Zikos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Distributed systems and grid computing systems are used to connect several computers to obtain a higher level of performance, in order to solve a problem. During the last decade, projects use the World Wide Web to aggregate individuals' CPU power for research purposes. This paper presents the existing active large scale distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health. There have been found and presented 11 active projects with more than 2000 Processing Units (PUs) each. The research focus for most of them is molecular biology and, specifically on understanding or predicting protein structure through simulation, comparing proteins, genomic analysis for disease provoking genes and drug design. Though not in all cases explicitly stated, common target diseases include research to find cure against HIV, dengue, Duchene dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, various types of cancer and influenza. Other diseases include malaria, anthrax, Alzheimer's disease. The need for national initiatives and European Collaboration for larger scale projects is stressed, to raise the awareness of citizens to participate in order to create a culture of internet volunteering altruism.

  16. LHC Computing Grid Project Launches intAction with International Support. A thousand times more computing power by 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first phase of the LHC Computing Grid project was approved at an extraordinary meeting of the Council on 20 September 2001. CERN is preparing for the unprecedented avalanche of data that will be produced by the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A thousand times more computer power will be needed by 2006! CERN's need for a dramatic advance in computing capacity is urgent. As from 2006, the four giant detectors observing trillions of elementary particle collisions at the LHC will accumulate over ten million Gigabytes of data, equivalent to the contents of about 20 million CD-ROMs, each year of its operation. A thousand times more computing power will be needed than is available to CERN today. The strategy the collabortations have adopted to analyse and store this unprecedented amount of data is the coordinated deployment of Grid technologies at hundreds of institutes which will be able to search out and analyse information from an interconnected worldwide grid of tens of thousands of computers and storag...

  17. LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Full text: We give an overview of the grid computing initiatives in the Americas. High-Energy Physics has played a very important role in the development of grid computing in the world and in Latin America it has not been different. Lately, the grid concept has expanded its reach across all branches of e-Science, and we have witnessed the birth of the first nationwide infrastructures and its use in the private sector. (author)

  18. Desktop grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cerin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Desktop Grid Computing presents common techniques used in numerous models, algorithms, and tools developed during the last decade to implement desktop grid computing. These techniques enable the solution of many important sub-problems for middleware design, including scheduling, data management, security, load balancing, result certification, and fault tolerance. The book's first part covers the initial ideas and basic concepts of desktop grid computing. The second part explores challenging current and future problems. Each chapter presents the sub-problems, discusses theoretical and practical

  19. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Craig [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Carroll, Paul [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Bell, Abigail [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  20. The CrossGrid project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, M.

    2003-01-01

    There are many large-scale problems that require new approaches to computing, such as earth observation, environmental management, biomedicine, industrial and scientific modeling. The CrossGrid project addresses realistic problems in medicine, environmental protection, flood prediction, and physics analysis and is oriented towards specific end-users: Medical doctors, who could obtain new tools to help them to obtain correct diagnoses and to guide them during operations; industries, that could be advised on the best timing for some critical operations involving risk of pollution; flood crisis teams, that could predict the risk of a flood on the basis of historical records and actual hydrological and meteorological data; physicists, who could optimize the analysis of massive volumes of data distributed across countries and continents. Corresponding applications will be based on Grid technology and could be complex and difficult to use: the CrossGrid project aims at developing several tools that will make the Grid more friendly for average users. Portals for specific applications will be designed, that should allow for easy connection to the Grid, create a customized work environment, and provide users with all necessary information to get their job done

  1. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    EnviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is a 4-years FP7 Project aiming to address the subjects of ecologically unsustainable development and inadequate resource management. The project develops a Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Black Sea Catchment region. The geospatial technologies offer very specialized functionality for Earth Science oriented applications as well as the Grid oriented technology that is able to support distributed and parallel processing. One challenge of the enviroGRIDS project is the interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures by providing the basic and the extended features of the both technologies. The geospatial interoperability technology has been promoted as a way of dealing with large volumes of geospatial data in distributed environments through the development of interoperable Web service specifications proposed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), with applications spread across multiple fields but especially in Earth observation research. Due to the huge volumes of data available in the geospatial domain and the additional introduced issues (data management, secure data transfer, data distribution and data computation), the need for an infrastructure capable to manage all those problems becomes an important aspect. The Grid promotes and facilitates the secure interoperations of geospatial heterogeneous distributed data within a distributed environment, the creation and management of large distributed computational jobs and assures a security level for communication and transfer of messages based on certificates. This presentation analysis and discusses the most significant use cases for enabling the OGC Web services interoperability with the Grid environment and focuses on the description and implementation of the most promising one. In these use cases we give a special attention to issues such as: the relations between computational grid and

  2. Resource allocation in grid computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Ger; Righter, Rhonda

    2007-01-01

    Grid computing, in which a network of computers is integrated to create a very fast virtual computer, is becoming ever more prevalent. Examples include the TeraGrid and Planet-lab.org, as well as applications on the existing Internet that take advantage of unused computing and storage capacity of

  3. Grid computing in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, R.; Kuhn, D.; Kneringer, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The future high energy physics experiments are characterized by an enormous amount of data delivered by the large detectors presently under construction e.g. at the Large Hadron Collider and by a large number of scientists (several thousands) requiring simultaneous access to the resulting experimental data. Since it seems unrealistic to provide the necessary computing and storage resources at one single place, (e.g. CERN), the concept of grid computing i.e. the use of distributed resources, will be chosen. The DataGrid project (under the leadership of CERN) develops, based on the Globus toolkit, the software necessary for computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases in a grid structure. The high energy physics group Innsbruck participates with several resources in the DataGrid test bed. In this presentation our experience as grid users and resource provider is summarized. In cooperation with the local IT-center (ZID) we installed a flexible grid system which uses PCs (at the moment 162) in student's labs during nights, weekends and holidays, which is especially used to compare different systems (local resource managers, other grid software e.g. from the Nordugrid project) and to supply a test bed for the future Austrian Grid (AGrid). (author)

  4. CMS computing on grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Wen; Sun Gongxing

    2007-01-01

    CMS has adopted a distributed system of services which implement CMS application view on top of Grid services. An overview of CMS services will be covered. Emphasis is on CMS data management and workload Management. (authors)

  5. Grid Computing Education Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  6. IBM announces global Grid computing solutions for banking, financial markets

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "IBM has announced a series of Grid projects around the world as part of its Grid computing program. They include IBM new Grid-based product offerings with business intelligence software provider SAS and other partners that address the computer-intensive needs of the banking and financial markets industry (1 page)."

  7. From testbed to reality grid computing steps up a gear

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "UK plans for Grid computing changed gear this week. The pioneering European DataGrid (EDG) project came to a successful conclusion at the end of March, and on 1 April a new project, known as Enabling Grids for E-Science in Europe (EGEE), begins" (1 page)

  8. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konagaya Akihiko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community.

  9. The StaggerGrid project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collet, Remo; Magic, Zazralt; Asplund, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, we present the STAGGERGRID, a collaborative project for the construction of a comprehensive grid of time-dependent, three-dimensional (3-D), hydrodynamic model atmospheres of solar- and late-type stars with different effective temperatures, surface gravities, and chemical...

  10. GRID computing for experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, G.R.; Martin, L.; Seviour, E.; Taylor, G.N.; Moorhead, G.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to be completed at the CERN laboratory in 2006, will generate 11 petabytes of data per year. The processing of this large data stream requires a large, distributed computing infrastructure. A recent innovation in high performance distributed computing, the GRID, has been identified as an important tool in data analysis for the LHC. GRID computing has actual and potential application in many fields which require computationally intensive analysis of large, shared data sets. The Australian experimental High Energy Physics community has formed partnerships with the High Performance Computing community to establish a GRID node at the University of Melbourne. Through Australian membership of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, Australian researchers have an opportunity to be involved in the European DataGRID project. This presentation will include an introduction to the GRID, and it's application to experimental High Energy Physics. We will present the results of our studies, including participation in the first LHC data challenge

  11. Incremental Trust in Grid Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkløv, Michael Hvalsøe; Sharp, Robin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative simulation study of some incremental trust and reputation algorithms for handling behavioural trust in large distributed systems. Two types of reputation algorithm (based on discrete and Bayesian evaluation of ratings) and two ways of combining direct trust and ...... of Grid computing systems....

  12. Discovery Mondays: 'The Grid: a universal computer'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    How can one store and analyse the 15 million billion pieces of data that the LHC will produce each year with a computer that isn't the size of a sky-scraper? The IT experts have found the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers in the world by putting them together on one network and making them work like a single computer achieving a power that has not yet been matched. The Grid, inspired from the Web, already exists - in fact, several of them exist in the field of science. The European EGEE project, led by CERN, contributes not only to the study of particle physics but to medical research as well, notably in the study of malaria and avian flu. The next Discovery Monday invites you to explore this futuristic computing technology. The 'Grid Masters' of CERN have prepared lively animations to help you understand how the Grid works. Children can practice saving the planet on the Grid video game. You will also discover other applications such as UNOSAT, a United Nations...

  13. Vehicle to Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willett Kempton; Meryl Gardner; Michael Hidrue; Fouad Kamilev; Sachin Kamboj; Jon Lilley; Rodney McGee; George Parsons; Nat Pearre; Keith Trnka

    2010-12-31

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of a two-year DOE-funded project on Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIV) with vehicle to grid power (V2G). The project included several research and development components: an analysis of US driving patterns; an analysis of the market for EVs and V2G-capable EVs; development and testing of GIV components (in-car and in-EVSE); interconnect law and policy; and development and filing of patents. In addition, development activities included GIV manufacturing and licensing of technologies developed under this grant. Also, five vehicles were built and deployed, four for the fleet of the State of Delaware, plus one for the University of Delaware fleet.

  14. Northern micro-grid project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, David; Singh, Bob

    2010-09-15

    The electrical distribution system for the Kasabonika Lake First Nation in northern Ontario (Canada) consumed 1.2 million liters of diesel fuel in 2008, amounting to 3,434 tones of CO2 emissions. The Northern Micro-Grid Project, supported by seven partners, involves integrating renewable generation & storage into the Kasabonika Lake distribution system. Through R&D and demonstration, the objectives are to reduce the amount of diesel consumed, support the distribution system exclusively on renewable resources during light loads, engage and impart knowledge/training to better position the community for future opportunities. The paper will discuss challenges, opportunities and future plans associated with the project.

  15. Southampton uni's computer whizzes develop "mini" grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    "In a bid to help its students explore the potential of grid computing, the University of Southampton's Computer Science department has developed what it calls a "lightweight grid". The system has been designed to allow students to experiment with grid technology without the complexity of inherent security concerns of the real thing. (1 page)

  16. High energy physics and grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Chuansong

    2004-01-01

    The status of the new generation computing environment of the high energy physics experiments is introduced briefly in this paper. The development of the high energy physics experiments and the new computing requirements by the experiments are presented. The blueprint of the new generation computing environment of the LHC experiments, the history of the Grid computing, the R and D status of the high energy physics grid computing technology, the network bandwidth needed by the high energy physics grid and its development are described. The grid computing research in Chinese high energy physics community is introduced at last. (authors)

  17. Proposal for grid computing for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohamad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim; Zukhaimira Zolkapli

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The use of computer clusters for computational sciences including computational physics is vital as it provides computing power to crunch big numbers at a faster rate. In compute intensive applications that requires high resolution such as Monte Carlo simulation, the use of computer clusters in a grid form that supplies computational power to any nodes within the grid that needs computing power, has now become a necessity. In this paper, we described how the clusters running on a specific application could use resources within the grid, to run the applications to speed up the computing process. (author)

  18. Grid Computing in High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them.Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software resources, regardless of location); (4) collaboration (providing tools that allow members full and fair access to all collaboration resources and enable distributed teams to work effectively, irrespective of location); and (5) education, training and outreach (providing resources and mechanisms for training students and for communicating important information to the public).It is believed that computing infrastructures based on Data Grids and optical networks can meet these challenges and can offer data intensive enterprises in high energy physics and elsewhere a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A number of Data Grid projects have been underway since 1999. Interestingly, the most exciting and far ranging of these projects are led by collaborations of high energy physicists, computer scientists and scientists from other disciplines in support of experiments with massive, near-term data needs. I review progress in this

  19. Improved visibility computation on massive grid terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, J.; Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Wolfson, O.; Agrawal, D.; Lu, C.-T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and engineering of algorithms for computing visibility maps on massive grid terrains. Given a terrain T, specified by the elevations of points in a regular grid, and given a viewpoint v, the visibility map or viewshed of v is the set of grid points of T that are

  20. Cloud Computing and Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina POPEANGĂ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern about energy consumption is leading to infrastructure that supports real-time, two-way communication between utilities and consumers, and allows software systems at both ends to control and manage power use. To manage communications to millions of endpoints in a secure, scalable and highly-available environment and to achieve these twin goals of ‘energy conservation’ and ‘demand response’, utilities must extend the same communication network management processes and tools used in the data center to the field.This paper proposes that cloud computing technology, because of its low cost, flexible and redundant architecture and fast response time, has the functionality needed to provide the security, interoperability and performance required for large-scale smart grid applications.

  1. Grid Databases for Shared Image Analysis in the MammoGrid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Hauer, T; Manset, D; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Reading, T; Rogulin, D; Schottlander, D; Solomonides, T

    2004-01-01

    The MammoGrid project aims to prove that Grid infrastructures can be used for collaborative clinical analysis of database-resident but geographically distributed medical images. This requires: a) the provision of a clinician-facing front-end workstation and b) the ability to service real-world clinician queries across a distributed and federated database. The MammoGrid project will prove the viability of the Grid by harnessing its power to enable radiologists from geographically dispersed hospitals to share standardized mammograms, to compare diagnoses (with and without computer aided detection of tumours) and to perform sophisticated epidemiological studies across national boundaries. This paper outlines the approach taken in MammoGrid to seamlessly connect radiologist workstations across a Grid using an "information infrastructure" and a DICOM-compliant object model residing in multiple distributed data stores in Italy and the UK

  2. Grid Computing Making the Global Infrastructure a Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Geoffrey C; Hey, Anthony J G

    2003-01-01

    Grid computing is applying the resources of many computers in a network to a single problem at the same time Grid computing appears to be a promising trend for three reasons: (1) Its ability to make more cost-effective use of a given amount of computer resources, (2) As a way to solve problems that can't be approached without an enormous amount of computing power (3) Because it suggests that the resources of many computers can be cooperatively and perhaps synergistically harnessed and managed as a collaboration toward a common objective. A number of corporations, professional groups, university consortiums, and other groups have developed or are developing frameworks and software for managing grid computing projects. The European Community (EU) is sponsoring a project for a grid for high-energy physics, earth observation, and biology applications. In the United States, the National Technology Grid is prototyping a computational grid for infrastructure and an access grid for people. Sun Microsystems offers Gri...

  3. Grid computing faces IT industry test

    CERN Multimedia

    Magno, L

    2003-01-01

    Software company Oracle Corp. unveiled it's Oracle 10g grid computing platform at the annual OracleWorld user convention in San Francisco. It gave concrete examples of how grid computing can be a viable option outside the scientific community where the concept was born (1 page).

  4. Grid computing infrastructure, service, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jie, Wei; Chen, Jinjun

    2009-01-01

    Offering a comprehensive discussion of advances in grid computing, this book summarizes the concepts, methods, technologies, and applications. It covers topics such as philosophy, middleware, architecture, services, and applications. It also includes technical details to demonstrate how grid computing works in the real world

  5. CMS on the GRID: Toward a fully distributed computing architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The computing systems required to collect, analyse and store the physics data at LHC would need to be distributed and global in scope. CMS is actively involved in several grid-related projects to develop and deploy a fully distributed computing architecture. We present here recent developments of tools for automating job submission and for serving data to remote analysis stations. Plans for further test and deployment of a production grid are also described

  6. Grid computing : enabling a vision for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a motivation for Grid computing based on a vision to enable a collaborative research environment. The authors vision goes beyond the connection of hardware resources. They argue that with an infrastructure such as the Grid, new modalities for collaborative research are enabled. They provide an overview showing why Grid research is difficult, and they present a number of management-related issues that must be addressed to make Grids a reality. They list projects that provide solutions to subsets of these issues

  7. Grid computing in large pharmaceutical molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Brian L; Johnson, Stephen R

    2008-07-01

    Most major pharmaceutical companies have employed grid computing to expand their compute resources with the intention of minimizing additional financial expenditure. Historically, one of the issues restricting widespread utilization of the grid resources in molecular modeling is the limited set of suitable applications amenable to coarse-grained parallelization. Recent advances in grid infrastructure technology coupled with advances in application research and redesign will enable fine-grained parallel problems, such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, which were previously inaccessible to the grid environment. This will enable new science as well as increase resource flexibility to load balance and schedule existing workloads.

  8. Governments plan data grid projects

    CERN Multimedia

    Thibodeau, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    "Some governments and not-for-profit organizations such as hospitals are beginning to look at data grid technology as a means to improve servies, lower operating costs and spur economic development." (1 page)

  9. Workflow Support for Advanced Grid-Enabled Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fenglian; Eres, M.H.; Tao, Feng; Cox, Simon J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geodise project brings computer scientists and engineer's skills together to build up a service-oriented computing environmnet for engineers to perform complicated computations in a distributed system. The workflow tool is a front GUI to provide a full life cycle of workflow functions for Grid-enabled computing. The full life cycle of workflow functions have been enhanced based our initial research and development. The life cycle starts with a composition of a workflow, followed by an ins...

  10. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang; Germain, Cé cile; Sebag, Michè le

    2010-01-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting

  11. EU grid computing effort takes on malaria

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawrence, Stacy

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is the world's most common parasitic infection, affecting more thatn 500 million people annually and killing more than 1 million. In order to help combat malaria, CERN has launched a grid computing effort (1 page)

  12. Building a cluster computer for the computing grid of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezel, J. van; Marten, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Grid Computing Centre Karlsruhe takes part in the development, test and deployment of hardware and cluster infrastructure, grid computing middleware, and applications for particle physics. The construction of a large cluster computer with thousands of nodes and several PB data storage capacity is a major task and focus of research. CERN based accelerator experiments will use GridKa, one of only 8 world wide Tier-1 computing centers, for its huge computer demands. Computing and storage is provided already for several other running physics experiments on the exponentially expanding cluster. (orig.)

  13. Mesoscale Climate Evaluation Using Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Velho, H. F.; Freitas, S. R.; Souto, R. P.; Charao, A. S.; Ferraz, S.; Roberti, D. R.; Streck, N.; Navaux, P. O.; Maillard, N.; Collischonn, W.; Diniz, G.; Radin, B.

    2012-04-01

    The CLIMARS project is focused to establish an operational environment for seasonal climate prediction for the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The dynamical downscaling will be performed with the use of several software platforms and hardware infrastructure to carry out the investigation on mesoscale of the global change impact. The grid computing takes advantage of geographically spread out computer systems, connected by the internet, for enhancing the power of computation. The ensemble climate prediction is an appropriated application for processing on grid computing, because the integration of each ensemble member does not have a dependency on information from another ensemble members. The grid processing is employed to compute the 20-year climatology and the long range simulations under ensemble methodology. BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Model) is a mesoscale model developed from a version of the RAMS (from the Colorado State University - CSU, USA). BRAMS model is the tool for carrying out the dynamical downscaling from the IPCC scenarios. Long range BRAMS simulations will provide data for some climate (data) analysis, and supply data for numerical integration of different models: (a) Regime of the extreme events for temperature and precipitation fields: statistical analysis will be applied on the BRAMS data, (b) CCATT-BRAMS (Coupled Chemistry Aerosol Tracer Transport - BRAMS) is an environmental prediction system that will be used to evaluate if the new standards of temperature, rain regime, and wind field have a significant impact on the pollutant dispersion in the analyzed regions, (c) MGB-IPH (Portuguese acronym for the Large Basin Model (MGB), developed by the Hydraulic Research Institute, (IPH) from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil) will be employed to simulate the alteration of the river flux under new climate patterns. Important meteorological input variables for the MGB-IPH are the precipitation (most relevant

  14. Physics from angular projection of rectangular grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ashmeet

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple yet interesting, problem has both scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work may help undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential applications in various branches of physical sciences, including crystallography, astrophysics, and bulk properties of materials. (paper)

  15. Integrating GRID tools to build a computing resource broker: activities of DataGrid WP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglano, C.; Barale, S.; Gaido, L.; Guarise, A.; Lusso, S.; Werbrouck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Resources on a computational Grid are geographically distributed, heterogeneous in nature, owned by different individuals or organizations with their own scheduling policies, have different access cost models with dynamically varying loads and availability conditions. This makes traditional approaches to workload management, load balancing and scheduling inappropriate. The first work package (WP1) of the EU-funded DataGrid project is addressing the issue of optimizing the distribution of jobs onto Grid resources based on a knowledge of the status and characteristics of these resources that is necessarily out-of-date (collected in a finite amount of time at a very loosely coupled site). The authors describe the DataGrid approach in integrating existing software components (from Condor, Globus, etc.) to build a Grid Resource Broker, and the early efforts to define a workable scheduling strategy

  16. Demagnifying electron projection with grid masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politycki, A.; Meyer, A.

    1978-01-01

    Tightly toleranced micro- and submicrostructures with smooth edges were realized by using transmission masks with an improved supporting grid (width of traverses 0.8 μm). Local edge shift due to the proximity effect is kept at a minimum. Supporting grids with stil narrower traverses (0.5 μm) were prepared by generating the grid pattern by electron beam writing. Masks of this kind allow projection at a demagnification ratio of 1:4, resulting in large image fields. (orig.) [de

  17. Insightful Workflow For Grid Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Charles Earl

    2008-10-09

    We developed a workflow adaptation and scheduling system for Grid workflow. The system currently interfaces with and uses the Karajan workflow system. We developed machine learning agents that provide the planner/scheduler with information needed to make decisions about when and how to replan. The Kubrick restructures workflow at runtime, making it unique among workflow scheduling systems. The existing Kubrick system provides a platform on which to integrate additional quality of service constraints and in which to explore the use of an ensemble of scheduling and planning algorithms. This will be the principle thrust of our Phase II work.

  18. Computing Flows Using Chimera and Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2006-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of flows in complexly shaped three-dimensional regions discretized by use of a direct replacement of arbitrary grid overlapping by nonstructured (DRAGON) grid. A DRAGON grid (see figure) is a combination of a chimera grid (a composite of structured subgrids) and a collection of unstructured subgrids. DRAGONFLOW incorporates modified versions of two prior Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs: OVERFLOW, which is designed to solve on chimera grids; and USM3D, which is used to solve on unstructured grids. A master module controls the invocation of individual modules in the libraries. At each time step of a simulated flow, DRAGONFLOW is invoked on the chimera portion of the DRAGON grid in alternation with USM3D, which is invoked on the unstructured subgrids of the DRAGON grid. The USM3D and OVERFLOW modules then immediately exchange their solutions and other data. As a result, USM3D and OVERFLOW are coupled seamlessly.

  19. FAULT TOLERANCE IN MOBILE GRID COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Aghila Rajagopal; M.A. Maluk Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel model for Surrogate Object based paradigm in mobile grid environment for achieving a Fault Tolerance. Basically Mobile Grid Computing Model focuses on Service Composition and Resource Sharing Process. In order to increase the performance of the system, Fault Recovery plays a vital role. In our Proposed System for Recovery point, Surrogate Object Based Checkpoint Recovery Model is introduced. This Checkpoint Recovery model depends on the Surrogate Object and the Fau...

  20. Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration, a Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yinger, Robert [Southern California Edison Company, Rosemead, CA (United States); Irwin, Mark [Southern California Edison Company, Rosemead, CA (United States)

    2015-12-29

    ISGD was a comprehensive demonstration that spanned the electricity delivery system and extended into customer homes. The project used phasor measurement technology to enable substation-level situational awareness, and demonstrated SCE’s next-generation substation automation system. It extended beyond the substation to evaluate the latest generation of distribution automation technologies, including looped 12-kV distribution circuit topology using URCIs. The project team used DVVC capabilities to demonstrate CVR. In customer homes, the project evaluated HAN devices such as smart appliances, programmable communicating thermostats, and home energy management components. The homes were also equipped with energy storage, solar PV systems, and a number of energy efficiency measures (EEMs). The team used one block of homes to evaluate strategies and technologies for achieving ZNE. A home achieves ZNE when it produces at least as much renewable energy as the amount of energy it consumes annually. The project also assessed the impact of device-specific demand response (DR), as well as load management capabilities involving energy storage devices and plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. In addition, the ISGD project sought to better understand the impact of ZNE homes on the electric grid. ISGD’s SENet enabled end-to-end interoperability between multiple vendors’ systems and devices, while also providing a level of cybersecurity that is essential to smart grid development and adoption across the nation. The ISGD project includes a series of sub-projects grouped into four logical technology domains: Smart Energy Customer Solutions, Next-Generation Distribution System, Interoperability and Cybersecurity, and Workforce of the Future. Section 2.3 provides a more detailed overview of these domains.

  1. How to deal with petabytes of data: the LHC Grid project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, D; Lloyd, S L

    2014-01-01

    We review the Grid computing system developed by the international community to deal with the petabytes of data coming from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva with particular emphasis on the ATLAS experiment and the UK Grid project, GridPP. Although these developments were started over a decade ago, this article explains their continued relevance as part of the ‘Big Data’ problem and how the Grid has been forerunner of today's cloud computing. (review article)

  2. Sustainable Smart Grid Project Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, I.

    2014-01-01

    Living together with the SG project generation issues in the last years a significant conclusion revealed from the unknown universe. Technology is not the missing condition for a real-time working country-wide SG power system realization. Technologies are developed, and 'SG-ready'. Engineering society is waiting for the signal to jump till the Moon or even farther. There are technical discussions about SG technologies. All there are marginal (ie. network safety issues, metering issues, electromobility etc.) and projects are mostly targeting the industrial players which obviously want to sell their utmost technologies taking generally not into consideration the overall social interests. The most anticipated question is: Who owns the social responsibility of the future (and as a part of it) its contemporary electric power utility system's responsibility? What should happen in order to start real development of 21st century's power system? How to open eyes of decision makers and energy institutions? Are these auxiliary SG projects natural evolution of the final solutions and systems? (author).

  3. Virtual Machine Lifecycle Management in Grid and Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzkopf, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Virtualization is the foundation for two important technologies: Virtualized Grid and Cloud Computing. Virtualized Grid Computing is an extension of the Grid Computing concept introduced to satisfy the security and isolation requirements of commercial Grid users. Applications are confined in virtual machines to isolate them from each other and the data they process from other users. Apart from these important requirements, Virtual...

  4. Grid computing techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    ''… the most outstanding aspect of this book is its excellent structure: it is as though we have been given a map to help us move around this technology from the base to the summit … I highly recommend this book …''Jose Lloret, Computing Reviews, March 2010

  5. Smart Grid Development: Multinational Demo Project Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleinikova I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses demand side management (DSM projects and stakeholders’ experience with the aim to develop, promote and adapt smart grid tehnologies in Latvia. The research aims at identifying possible system service posibilites, including demand response (DR and determining the appropriate market design for such type of services to be implemented at the Baltic power system level, with the cooperation of distribution system operator (DSO and transmission system operator (TSO. This paper is prepared as an extract from the global smart grid best practices, smart solutions and business models.

  6. Smart Grid Development: Multinational Demo Project Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikova, I.; Mutule, A.; Obushevs, A.; Antoskovs, N.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyses demand side management (DSM) projects and stakeholders' experience with the aim to develop, promote and adapt smart grid tehnologies in Latvia. The research aims at identifying possible system service posibilites, including demand response (DR) and determining the appropriate market design for such type of services to be implemented at the Baltic power system level, with the cooperation of distribution system operator (DSO) and transmission system operator (TSO). This paper is prepared as an extract from the global smart grid best practices, smart solutions and business models.

  7. The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenton-Madiec, Nicolas; Denvil, Sébastien; Greenslade, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Peer-to-Peer (P2P) enterprise system is a collaboration that develops, deploys and maintains software infrastructure for the management, dissemination, and analysis of model output and observational data. ESGF's primary goal is to facilitate advancements in Earth System Science. It is an interagency and international effort led by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and co-funded by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Science Foundation (NSF), Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling (IS-ENES) and international laboratories such as the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) german Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ), the Australian National University (ANU) National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace (IPSL), and the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC). Its main mission is to support current CMIP5 activities and prepare for future assesments. The ESGF architecture is based on a system of autonomous and distributed nodes, which interoperate through common acceptance of federation protocols and trust agreements. Data is stored at multiple nodes around the world, and served through local data and metadata services. Nodes exchange information about their data holdings and services, trust each other for registering users and establishing access control decisions. The net result is that a user can use a web browser, connect to any node, and seamlessly find and access data throughout the federation. This type of collaborative working organization and distributed architecture context en-lighted the need of integration and testing processes definition to ensure the quality of software releases and interoperability. This presentation will introduce the ESGF project and demonstrate the range of tools and processes that have been set up to support release management activities.

  8. Synchrotron Imaging Computations on the Grid without the Computing Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curri, A; Pugliese, R; Borghes, R; Kourousias, G

    2011-01-01

    Besides the heavy use of the Grid in the Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SRF) Elettra, additional special requirements from the beamlines had to be satisfied through a novel solution that we present in this work. In the traditional Grid Computing paradigm the computations are performed on the Worker Nodes of the grid element known as the Computing Element. A Grid middleware extension that our team has been working on, is that of the Instrument Element. In general it is used to Grid-enable instrumentation; and it can be seen as a neighbouring concept to that of the traditional Control Systems. As a further extension we demonstrate the Instrument Element as the steering mechanism for a series of computations. In our deployment it interfaces a Control System that manages a series of computational demanding Scientific Imaging tasks in an online manner. The instrument control in Elettra is done through a suitable Distributed Control System, a common approach in the SRF community. The applications that we present are for a beamline working in medical imaging. The solution resulted to a substantial improvement of a Computed Tomography workflow. The near-real-time requirements could not have been easily satisfied from our Grid's middleware (gLite) due to the various latencies often occurred during the job submission and queuing phases. Moreover the required deployment of a set of TANGO devices could not have been done in a standard gLite WN. Besides the avoidance of certain core Grid components, the Grid Security infrastructure has been utilised in the final solution.

  9. Financial Derivatives Market for Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, David; Lindset, Snorre; Huuse, Henning

    2007-01-01

    This Master thesis studies the feasibility and properties of a financial derivatives market on Grid computing, a service for sharing computing resources over a network such as the Internet. For the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to perform research with the world's largest and most complex machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Grid computing was developed to handle the information created. In accordance with the mandate of CERN Technology Transfer (TT) group, this thesis is a part of CERN's dissemination of the Grid technology. The thesis gives a brief overview of the use of the Grid technology and where it is heading. IT trend analysts and large-scale IT vendors see this technology as key in transforming the world of IT. They predict that in a matter of years, IT will be bought as a service, instead of a good. Commoditization of IT, delivered as a service, is a paradigm shift that will have a broad impact on all parts of the IT market, as well as on the society as a whole. Political, e...

  10. Computer Simulation of the UMER Gridded Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Haber, Irving; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kishek, Rami A; Reiser, Martin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Zou, Yun

    2005-01-01

    The electron source in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) injector employs a grid 0.15 mm from the cathode to control the current waveform. Under nominal operating conditions, the grid voltage during the current pulse is sufficiently positive relative to the cathode potential to form a virtual cathode downstream of the grid. Three-dimensional computer simulations have been performed that use the mesh refinement capability of the WARP particle-in-cell code to examine a small region near the beam center in order to illustrate some of the complexity that can result from such a gridded structure. These simulations have been found to reproduce the hollowed velocity space that is observed experimentally. The simulations also predict a complicated time-dependent response to the waveform applied to the grid during the current turn-on. This complex temporal behavior appears to result directly from the dynamics of the virtual cathode formation and may therefore be representative of the expected behavior in...

  11. Digitizing geographic data with GRIDOT; a generalized program for drawing overlay grids in various map projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.G.; Durfee, R.C.

    1976-09-01

    The GRIDOT computer program draws overlay grids on a Calcomp plotter for use in digitizing information from maps, rectified aerial photographs, and other sources of spatially distributed data related to regional environmental problems. The options of the program facilitate use of the overlays with standard maps and map projections of the continental United States. The overlay grid may be defined as a latitude-longitude grid (geodetic grid), a Universal Transverse Mercator Grid, or one of the standard state-plane coordinate system grids. The map for which the overlay is intended may be in an Albers Equal Area projection, a Lambert Conformal projection, a Polyconic projection, a Transverse Mercator projection, a Universal Transverse Mercator projection, or any of the standard state-plane projections

  12. Bringing Federated Identity to Grid Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teheran, Jeny [Fermilab

    2016-03-04

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is facing the challenge of providing scientific data access and grid submission to scientific collaborations that span the globe but are hosted at FNAL. Users in these collaborations are currently required to register as an FNAL user and obtain FNAL credentials to access grid resources to perform their scientific computations. These requirements burden researchers with managing additional authentication credentials, and put additional load on FNAL for managing user identities. Our design integrates the existing InCommon federated identity infrastructure, CILogon Basic CA, and MyProxy with the FNAL grid submission system to provide secure access for users from diverse experiments and collab orations without requiring each user to have authentication credentials from FNAL. The design automates the handling of certificates so users do not need to manage them manually. Although the initial implementation is for FNAL's grid submission system, the design and the core of the implementation are general and could be applied to other distributed computing systems.

  13. Smart Grid Development: Multinational Demo Project Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Oleinikova I.; Mutule A.; Obushevs A.; Antoskovs N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses demand side management (DSM) projects and stakeholders’ experience with the aim to develop, promote and adapt smart grid tehnologies in Latvia. The research aims at identifying possible system service posibilites, including demand response (DR) and determining the appropriate market design for such type of services to be implemented at the Baltic power system level, with the cooperation of distribution system operator (DSO) and transmission system operator (TSO). This pape...

  14. Grid Computing BOINC Redesign Mindmap with incentive system (gamification)

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchen, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Grid Computing BOINC Redesign Mindmap with incentive system (gamification) this is a PDF viewable of https://figshare.com/articles/Grid_Computing_BOINC_Redesign_Mindmap_with_incentive_system_gamification_/1265350

  15. Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thoman [Consolidated Edison Company Of New York, Inc., NY (United States)

    2014-12-28

    The Consolidated Edison, Inc., of New York (Con Edison) Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project (SGDP), sponsored by the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), demonstrated that the reliability, efficiency, and flexibility of the grid can be improved through a combination of enhanced monitoring and control capabilities using systems and resources that interoperate within a secure services framework. The project demonstrated the capability to shift, balance, and reduce load where and when needed in response to system contingencies or emergencies by leveraging controllable field assets. The range of field assets includes curtailable customer loads, distributed generation (DG), battery storage, electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, building management systems (BMS), home area networks (HANs), high-voltage monitoring, and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). The SGDP enables the seamless integration and control of these field assets through a common, cyber-secure, interoperable control platform, which integrates a number of existing legacy control and data systems, as well as new smart grid (SG) systems and applications. By integrating advanced technologies for monitoring and control, the SGDP helps target and reduce peak load growth, improves the reliability and efficiency of Con Edison’s grid, and increases the ability to accommodate the growing use of distributed resources. Con Edison is dedicated to lowering costs, improving reliability and customer service, and reducing its impact on the environment for its customers. These objectives also align with the policy objectives of New York State as a whole. To help meet these objectives, Con Edison’s long-term vision for the distribution grid relies on the successful integration and control of a growing penetration of distributed resources, including demand response (DR) resources, battery storage units, and DG. For example, Con Edison is expecting significant long-term growth of DG

  16. How should grid operators govern smart grid innovation projects? An embedded case study approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuver, Mark de; Lei, Telli van der; Lukszo, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Grid operators increasingly have to collaborate with other actors in order to realize smart grid innovations. For routine maintenance, grid operators typically acquire technologies in one-off transactions, but the innovative nature of smart grid projects may require more collaborate relationships. This paper studies how a transactional versus relational approach to governing smart grid innovation projects affects incentives for other actors to collaborate. We analyse 34 cases of smart grid innovation projects based on extensive archival data as well as interviews. We find that projects relying on relational governance are more likely to provide incentives for collaboration. Especially non-financial incentives such as reputational benefits and shared intellectual property rights are more likely to be found in projects relying on relational governance. Policy makers that wish to stimulate smart grid innovation projects should consider stimulating long-term relationships between grid operators and third parties, because such relationships are more likely to produce incentives for collaboration. - Highlights: • Smart grids require collaboration between grid operators and other actors. • We contrast transactional and relational governance of smart grid projects. • Long-term relations produce more incentives for smart grid collaboration. • Non-financial incentives are more important in long-term relations. • Policy makers should stimulate long-term relations to stimulate smart grids.

  17. Distributed computing grid experiences in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Barrass, T; Bonacorsi, D; Bunn, Julian; Capiluppi, P; Corvo, M; Darmenov, N; De Filippis, N; Donno, F; Donvito, G; Eulisse, G; Fanfani, A; Fanzago, F; Filine, A; Grandi, C; Hernández, J M; Innocente, V; Jan, A; Lacaprara, S; Legrand, I; Metson, S; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Pierro, A; Silvestris, L; Steenberg, C; Stockinger, H; Taylor, Lucas; Thomas, M; Tuura, L; Van Lingen, F; Wildish, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment is currently developing a computing system capable of serving, processing and archiving the large number of events that will be generated when the CMS detector starts taking data. During 2004 CMS undertook a large scale data challenge to demonstrate the ability of the CMS computing system to cope with a sustained data- taking rate equivalent to 25% of startup rate. Its goals were: to run CMS event reconstruction at CERN for a sustained period at 25 Hz input rate; to distribute the data to several regional centers; and enable data access at those centers for analysis. Grid middleware was utilized to help complete all aspects of the challenge. To continue to provide scalable access from anywhere in the world to the data, CMS is developing a layer of software that uses Grid tools to gain access to data and resources, and that aims to provide physicists with a user friendly interface for submitting their analysis jobs. This paper describes the data challenge experience with Grid infrastructure ...

  18. Java parallel secure stream for grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Akers, W.; Chen, Y.; Watson, W.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of high speed wide area networks makes grid computing a reality. However grid applications that need reliable data transfer still have difficulties to achieve optimal TCP performance due to network tuning of TCP window size to improve the bandwidth and to reduce latency on a high speed wide area network. The authors present a pure Java package called JPARSS (Java Parallel Secure Stream) that divides data into partitions that are sent over several parallel Java streams simultaneously and allows Java or Web applications to achieve optimal TCP performance in a gird environment without the necessity of tuning the TCP window size. Several experimental results are provided to show that using parallel stream is more effective than tuning TCP window size. In addition X.509 certificate based single sign-on mechanism and SSL based connection establishment are integrated into this package. Finally a few applications using this package will be discussed

  19. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-10-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting the changes in a grid system can help to alarm the anomalies, clean the noises, and report the new patterns. In this paper, we proposed an approach of self-adaptive change detection based on the Page-Hinkley statistic test. It handles the non-stationary distribution without the assumption of data distribution and the empirical setting of parameters. We validate the approach on the EGEE streaming jobs, and report its better performance on achieving higher accuracy comparing to the other change detection methods. Meanwhile this change detection process could help to discover the device fault which was not claimed in the system logs. © 2010 IEEE.

  20. European DataGrid project: status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunszt, P.

    2003-01-01

    The European DataGrid (EDG) project has reached, after 1.5 years, the middle of its lifetime. In this article we give an overview of the status, components, procedures and plans of the EDG project as of June 2002. The objective of the EDG project is to assist the next generation of scientific exploration, computation and analysis of large-scale data sets--from hundreds of terabytes to petabytes, across widely distributed scientific communities. The primary goal of the first phase of the EDG project was to assemble a distributed testbed to demonstrate that the EDG middleware components could be integrated into a production-quality computational Grid, as well as to gain experience with such a system. The very first version of the EDG testbed was deployed toward the end of 2001. At the first official European Union review of the project on March 1, 2002, it has been found that the project is on the right track to achieve its goals. Since then the EDG middleware, testbed components and procedures have been continuously refined according to the requirements of our user communities and our experience

  1. European DataGrid project Status and plans

    CERN Document Server

    Kunszt, Peter Z

    2003-01-01

    The European DataGrid (EDG) project has reached, after 1.5 years, the middle of its lifetime. In this article we give an overview of the status, components, procedures and plans of the EDG project as of June 2002. The objective of the EDG project is to assist the next generation of scientific exploration, computation and analysis of large-scale data sets - from hundreds of terabytes to petabytes, across widely distributed scientific communities. The primary goal of the first phase of the EDG project was to assemble a distributed testbed to demonstrate that the EDG middleware components could be integrated into a production-quality computational Grid, as well as to gain experience with such a system. The very first version of the EDG testbed was deployed toward the end of 2001. At the first official European Union review of the project on March 1, 2002, it has been found that the project is on the right track to achieve its goals. Since then the EDG middleware, testbed components and procedures have been conti...

  2. Operating the worldwide LHC computing grid: current and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J Flix; Forti, A; Girone, M; Sciaba, A

    2014-01-01

    The Wordwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse their data. It includes almost 200,000 CPU cores, 200 PB of disk storage and 200 PB of tape storage distributed among more than 150 sites. The WLCG operations team is responsible for several essential tasks, such as the coordination of testing and deployment of Grid middleware and services, communication with the experiments and the sites, followup and resolution of operational issues and medium/long term planning. In 2012 WLCG critically reviewed all operational procedures and restructured the organisation of the operations team as a more coherent effort in order to improve its efficiency. In this paper we describe how the new organisation works, its recent successes and the changes to be implemented during the long LHC shutdown in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  3. Swiss electricity grid - Benchmarking pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This article is a short version of the ENET number 210369. This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a benchmarking pilot project carried out as a second phase in the development of a formula for the regulation of an open electricity market in Switzerland. It follows on from an initial phase involving the definition of a 'blue print' and a basic concept. The aims of the pilot project - to check out the practicability of the concept - are discussed. The collection of anonymised data for the benchmarking model from over 30 electricity utilities operating on all 7 Swiss grid levels and their integration in the three areas 'Technology', 'Grid Costs' and 'Capital Invested' are discussed in detail. In particular, confidentiality and data protection aspects are looked at. The methods used in the analysis of the data are described and the results of an efficiency analysis of various utilities are presented. The report is concluded with a listing of questions concerning data collection and analysis as well as operational and capital costs that are still to be answered

  4. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Baranovski, A.; Diesburg, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kurca, T.; Mhashilkar, P.

    2007-01-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project

  5. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B; Baranovski, A; Diesburg, M; Garzoglio, G; Mhashilkar, P; Kurca, T

    2008-01-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project

  6. Lecture 7: Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Overview

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will introduce in an informal, but technically correct way the challenges that are linked to the needs of massively distributed computing architectures in the context of the LHC offline computing. The topics include technological and organizational aspects touching many aspects of LHC computing, from data access, to maintenance of large databases and huge collections of files, to the organization of computing farms and monitoring. Fabrizio Furano holds a Ph.D in Computer Science and has worked in the field of Computing for High Energy Physics for many years. Some of his preferred topics include application architectures, system design and project management, with focus on performance and scalability of data access. Fabrizio has experience in a wide variety of environments, from private companies to academic research in particular in object oriented methodologies, mainly using C++. He has also teaching experience at university level in Software Engineering and C++ Programming.

  7. The UNOSAT-GRID Project: Access to Satellite Imagery through the Grid Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Lamanna, M; Meyer, X; Lazeyras, M; Bjorgo, E; Retiere, A; Falzone, A; Venuti, N; Maccarone, S; Ugolotti, B

    2007-01-01

    UNOSAT is a United Nations activity to provide access to satellite images and geographic system services for humanitarian operations for rescue or aid activities. UNOSAT is implemented by the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and managed by the UN Office for Project Services (UNOPS). In addition, partners from different organizations constitute the UNOSAT consortium. Among these partners, CERN participates actively providing the required computational and storage resources. The critical part of the UNOSAT activity is the storage and processing of large quantities of satellite images. The fast and secure access to these images from any part of the world is mandatory during these activities. Based on two successful CERN-GRID/UNOSAT pilot projects (data storage/compression/download and image access through mobile phone), the GRIDUNOSAT project has consolidated the considerable work undertaken so far in the present activity. The main use case already demonstrated is the delivery of satellite images ...

  8. Investigating Time-Varying Drivers of Grid Project Emissions Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Emily L.; Thayer, Brandon L.; Pal, Seemita; Studarus, Karen E.

    2017-11-15

    The emissions consequences of smart grid technologies depend heavily on their context and vary not only by geographical location, but by time of year. The same technology operated to meet the same objective may increase the emissions associated with energy generation for part of the year and decrease emissions during other times. The Grid Project Impact Quantification (GridPIQ) tool provides the ability to estimate these seasonal variations and garner insight into the time-varying drivers of grid project emissions impacts. This work leverages GridPIQ to examine the emissions implications across years and seasons of adding energy storage technology to reduce daily peak demand in California and New York.

  9. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-01-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  10. National Fusion Collaboratory: Grid Computing for Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2004-05-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory Project is creating a computational grid designed to advance scientific understanding and innovation in magnetic fusion research by facilitating collaborations, enabling more effective integration of experiments, theory and modeling and allowing more efficient use of experimental facilities. The philosophy of FusionGrid is that data, codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and communication tools should be thought of as network available services, easily used by the fusion scientist. In such an environment, access to services is stressed rather than portability. By building on a foundation of established computer science toolkits, deployment time can be minimized. These services all share the same basic infrastructure that allows for secure authentication and resource authorization which allows stakeholders to control their own resources such as computers, data and experiments. Code developers can control intellectual property, and fair use of shared resources can be demonstrated and controlled. A key goal is to shield scientific users from the implementation details such that transparency and ease-of-use are maximized. The first FusionGrid service deployed was the TRANSP code, a widely used tool for transport analysis. Tools for run preparation, submission, monitoring and management have been developed and shared among a wide user base. This approach saves user sites from the laborious effort of maintaining such a large and complex code while at the same time reducing the burden on the development team by avoiding the need to support a large number of heterogeneous installations. Shared visualization and A/V tools are being developed and deployed to enhance long-distance collaborations. These include desktop versions of the Access Grid, a highly capable multi-point remote conferencing tool and capabilities for sharing displays and analysis tools over local and wide-area networks.

  11. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairouz, Malek

    2010-01-01

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10 10 collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10 9 octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10 15 octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  12. Computer Assets Recovery Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    CortesPena, Aida Yoguely

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the project that was performed during the internship of the author. The project involved locating and recovering machines in various locations that Boeing has no need for, and therefore requires that they be transferred to another user or transferred to a non-profit organization. Other projects that the author performed was an inventory of toner and printers, loading new computers and connecting them to the network.

  13. Smart grid development and households in experimental projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken

    to the electricity grids and call for the development of smart grids. The Danish Smart Grid Strategy states that ‘flexible electricity consumption’ is the main purpose of smart grids in Denmark, envisioning that future consumers will have flexible consumption of electricity. Thus, they are expected to respond...... to the supply side and consume energy when it is available. The goal of this thesis is to investigate how household consumers are integrated in smart grid development activities. More specifically, it focuses on household consumers, as they are represented in experimental projects in the smart grid area...... been little research on the area in Danish smart grid experimental projects. Overall, the consumers are expected, to some extent, to provide flexibility by changing their energy-consuming practices because of economic incentives by means of manual or automated control of devices. Moreover, the Danish...

  14. Building the US National Fusion Grid: results from the National Fusion Collaboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Burruss, J.R.; Finkelstein, A.; Flanagan, S.M.; Foster, I.T.; Fredian, T.W.; Greenwald, M.J.; Johnson, C.R.; Keahey, K.; Klasky, S.A.; Li, K.; McCune, D.C.; Papka, M.; Peng, Q.; Randerson, L.; Sanderson, A.; Stillerman, J.; Stevens, R.; Thompson, M.R.; Wallace, G.

    2004-01-01

    The US National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion research. The project is creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and making it available to more than 1000 fusion scientists in 40 institutions who perform magnetic fusion research in the United States. In particular, the project is developing and deploying a national Fusion Energy Sciences Grid (FusionGrid) that is a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The FusionGrid goal is to allow scientists at remote sites to fully participate in experimental and computational activities as if they were working at a common site thereby creating a virtual organization of the US fusion community. The project is funded by the USDOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program and unites fusion and computer science researchers to directly address these challenges

  15. Incentive Mechanism of Micro-grid Project Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Long

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the issue of cost and benefit, the investment demand and consumption demand of micro-grids are insufficient in the early stages, which makes all parties lack motivation to participate in the development of micro-grid projects and leads to the slow development of micro-grids. In order to promote the development of micro-grids, the corresponding incentive mechanism should be designed to motivate the development of micro-grid projects. Therefore, this paper builds a multi-stage incentive model of micro-grid project development involving government, grid corporation, energy supplier, equipment supplier, and the user in order to study the incentive problems of micro-grid project development. Through the solution and analysis of the model, this paper deduces the optimal subsidy of government and the optimal cooperation incentive of the energy supplier, and calculates the optimal pricing strategy of grid corporation and the energy supplier, and analyzes the influence of relevant factors on optimal subsidy and incentive. The study reveals that the cost and social benefit of micro-grid development have a positive impact on micro-grid subsidy, technical level and equipment quality of equipment supplier as well as the fact that government subsidies positively adjust the level of cooperation incentives and price incentives. In the end, the validity of the model is verified by numerical analysis, and the incentive strategy of each participant is analyzed. The research of this paper is of great significance to encourage project development of micro-grids and to promote the sustainable development of micro-grids.

  16. Grids in Europe - a computing infrastructure for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranzlmueller, D.

    2008-01-01

    Grids provide sheer unlimited computing power and access to a variety of resources to todays scientists. Moving from a research topic of computer science to a commodity tool for science and research in general, grid infrastructures are built all around the world. This talk provides an overview of the developments of grids in Europe, the status of the so-called national grid initiatives as well as the efforts towards an integrated European grid infrastructure. The latter, summarized under the title of the European Grid Initiative (EGI), promises a permanent and reliable grid infrastructure and its services in a way similar to research networks today. The talk describes the status of these efforts, the plans for the setup of this pan-European e-Infrastructure, and the benefits for the application communities. (author)

  17. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  18. GRID : unlimited computing power on your desktop Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Computational GRID is an analogy to the electrical power grid for computing resources. It decouples the provision of computing, data, and networking from its use, it allows large-scale pooling and sharing of resources distributed world-wide. Every computer, from a desktop to a mainframe or supercomputer, can provide computing power or data for the GRID. The final objective is to plug your computer into the wall and have direct access to huge computing resources immediately, just like plugging-in a lamp to get instant light. The GRID will facilitate world-wide scientific collaborations on an unprecedented scale. It will provide transparent access to major distributed resources of computer power, data, information, and collaborations.

  19. A novel algorithm for incompressible flow using only a coarse grid projection

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2010-07-26

    Large scale fluid simulation can be difficult using existing techniques due to the high computational cost of using large grids. We present a novel technique for simulating detailed fluids quickly. Our technique coarsens the Eulerian fluid grid during the pressure solve, allowing for a fast implicit update but still maintaining the resolution obtained with a large grid. This allows our simulations to run at a fraction of the cost of existing techniques while still providing the fine scale structure and details obtained with a full projection. Our algorithm scales well to very large grids and large numbers of processors, allowing for high fidelity simulations that would otherwise be intractable. © 2010 ACM.

  20. The MicroGrid: A Scientific Tool for Modeling Computational Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Song

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and dynamic nature of the Internet (and the emerging Computational Grid demand that middleware and applications adapt to the changes in configuration and availability of resources. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no simulation tools which support systematic exploration of dynamic Grid software (or Grid resource behavior. We describe our vision and initial efforts to build tools to meet these needs. Our MicroGrid simulation tools enable Globus applications to be run in arbitrary virtual grid resource environments, enabling broad experimentation. We describe the design of these tools, and their validation on micro-benchmarks, the NAS parallel benchmarks, and an entire Grid application. These validation experiments show that the MicroGrid can match actual experiments within a few percent (2% to 4%.

  1. Removal of apparent singularity in grid computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubovics, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistency test for magnetic domain wall models was suggested by Aharoni. The test consists of evaluating the ratio S = var-epsilon wall /var-epsilon wall , where var-epsilon wall is the wall energy, and var-epsilon wall is the integral of a certain function of the direction cosines of the magnetization, α, β, γ over the volume occupied by the domain wall. If the computed configuration is a good approximation to one corresponding to an energy minimum, the ratio is close to 1. The integrand of var-epsilon wall contains terms that are inversely proportional to γ. Since γ passes through zero at the centre of the domain wall, these terms have a singularity at these points. The integral is finite and its evaluation does not usually present any problems when the direction cosines are known in terms of continuous functions. In many cases, significantly better results for magnetization configurations of domain walls can be obtained by computations using finite element methods. The direction cosines are then only known at a set of discrete points, and integration over the domain wall is replaced by summation over these points. Evaluation of var-epsilon wall becomes inaccurate if the terms in the summation are taken to be the values of the integrand at the grid points, because of the large contribution of points close to where γ changes sign. The self-consistency test has recently been generalised to a larger number of cases. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a method of improving the accuracy of the evaluation of integrals in such cases. Since the self-consistency test has so far only been applied to two-dimensional magnetization configurations, the problem and its solution will be presented for that specific case. Generalisation to three or more dimensions is straight forward

  2. HEP Computing Tools, Grid and Supercomputers for Genome Sequencing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Novikov, A.; Poyda, A.; Tertychnyy, I.; Wenaus, T.

    2017-10-01

    PanDA - Production and Distributed Analysis Workload Management System has been developed to address ATLAS experiment at LHC data processing and analysis challenges. Recently PanDA has been extended to run HEP scientific applications on Leadership Class Facilities and supercomputers. The success of the projects to use PanDA beyond HEP and Grid has drawn attention from other compute intensive sciences such as bioinformatics. Recent advances of Next Generation Genome Sequencing (NGS) technology led to increasing streams of sequencing data that need to be processed, analysed and made available for bioinformaticians worldwide. Analysis of genomes sequencing data using popular software pipeline PALEOMIX can take a month even running it on the powerful computer resource. In this paper we will describe the adaptation the PALEOMIX pipeline to run it on a distributed computing environment powered by PanDA. To run pipeline we split input files into chunks which are run separately on different nodes as separate inputs for PALEOMIX and finally merge output file, it is very similar to what it done by ATLAS to process and to simulate data. We dramatically decreased the total walltime because of jobs (re)submission automation and brokering within PanDA. Using software tools developed initially for HEP and Grid can reduce payload execution time for Mammoths DNA samples from weeks to days.

  3. Auction Mechanism of Micro-Grid Project Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Long

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-grid project transfer is the primary issue of micro-grid development. The efficiency and quality of the micro-grid project transfer directly affect the quality of micro-grid project construction and development, which is very important for the sustainable development of micro-grid. This paper constructs a multi-attribute auction model of micro-grid project transfer, which reflects the characteristics of micro-grid system and the interests of stakeholders, calculates the optimal bidding strategy and analyzes the influence of relevant factors on auction equilibrium by multi-stage dynamic game with complete information, and makes a numerical simulation analysis. Results indicate that the optimal strategy of auction mechanism is positively related to power quality, energy storage quality, and carbon emissions. Different from the previous lowest price winning mechanism, the auction mechanism formed in this paper emphasizes that the energy suppliers which provide the comprehensive optimization of power quality, energy storage quality, carbon emissions, and price will win the auction, when both the project owners and energy suppliers maximize their benefits under this auction mechanism. The auction mechanism is effective because it is in line with the principle of individual rationality and incentive compatibility. In addition, the number of energy suppliers participating in the auction and the cost of the previous auction are positively related to the auction equilibrium, both of which are adjusting the equilibrium results of the auction. At the same time, the utilization rate of renewable energy and the comprehensive utilization of energy also have a positive impact on the auction equilibrium. In the end, this paper puts forward a series of policy suggestions about micro-grid project auction. The research in this paper is of great significance to improve the auction quality of micro-grid projects and promote the sustainable development of micro-grid.

  4. LHCb Distributed Data Analysis on the Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, S; Parkes, C

    2006-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments based at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. The LHC experiments will start taking an unprecedented amount of data when they come online in 2007. Since no single institute has the compute resources to handle this data, resources must be pooled to form the Grid. Where the Internet has made it possible to share information stored on computers across the world, Grid computing aims to provide access to computing power and storage capacity on geographically distributed systems. LHCb software applications must work seamlessly on the Grid allowing users to efficiently access distributed compute resources. It is essential to the success of the LHCb experiment that physicists can access data from the detector, stored in many heterogeneous systems, to perform distributed data analysis. This thesis describes the work performed to enable distributed data analysis for the LHCb experiment on the LHC Computing Grid.

  5. Global Inventory and Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, W.; Kumpavat, K.; Faasen, C.; Verheij, F.; Vaessen, P [DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    As the key enabler of a more sustainable, economical and reliable energy system, the development of smart grids has received a great deal of attention in recent times. In many countries around the world the benefits of such a system have begun to be investigated through a number of demonstration projects. With such a vast array of projects it can be difficult to keep track of changes, and to understand which best practices are currently available with regard to smart grids. This report aims to address these issues through providing a comprehensive outlook on the current status of smart grid projects worldwide.

  6. The Hel Peninsula – Smart Grid Pilot Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Noske

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the scope and results of engineering, and the scope of Smart Grid deployment in the Hel Peninsula. The following functionalities will be described: Fault Detection, Isolation & Recovery – FDIR function, Integrated Volt/Var Control (IVVC function, advanced supervision of LV grid, including distributed energy resources. The paper contains implementation results and research findings, as well as preliminary cost-benefit analysis of the project. Moreover, since Smart Metering and Smart Grid projects are being deployed in the same region – the Hel Peninisula – the benefit achieved by merging the two projects will be explained.

  7. Lambda Data Grid: Communications Architecture in Support of Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-21

    the trillions of collisions at the Large Hadron Collider produce a Higgs boson , the dark matter particle or a black hole? Can we create an...YearNuclear physics 1 PB/yearSLAC (BaBar experiments) 10 PB/yearCERN LHC ( Higgs boson search) 5 PB/yearRHIC (Quark-gluon plasma experiments) ᝺ PB/yearCEBAF...projects, taken from the very large number of projects in progress. High Energy Physics (HEP) – Finding ‘ Higgs ’ particle associated with mass is one of

  8. Digi-Clima Grid: image processing and distributed computing for recovering historical climate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Nesmachnow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Digi-Clima Grid project, whose main goals are to design and implement semi-automatic techniques for digitalizing and recovering historical climate records applying parallel computing techniques over distributed computing infrastructures. The specific tool developed for image processing is described, and the implementation over grid and cloud infrastructures is reported. A experimental analysis over institutional and volunteer-based grid/cloud distributed systems demonstrate that the proposed approach is an efficient tool for recovering historical climate data. The parallel implementations allow to distribute the processing load, achieving accurate speedup values.

  9. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamova, D; Hampl, J; Chudoba, J; Kouba, T; Svec, J; Mendez, Lorenzo P; Saiz, P

    2010-01-01

    The Czech Republic (CR) has been participating in the LHC Computing Grid project (LCG) ever since 2003 and gradually, a middle-sized Tier-2 center has been built in Prague, delivering computing services for national HEP experiments groups including the ALICE project at the LHC. We present a brief overview of the computing activities and services being performed in the CR for the ALICE experiment.

  10. ATLAS grid compute cluster with virtualized service nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J; Stonjek, S; Kluth, S

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing Grid consists of several hundred compute clusters distributed around the world as part of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). The Grid middleware and the ATLAS software which has to be installed on each site, often require a certain Linux distribution and sometimes even specific version thereof. On the other hand, mostly due to maintenance reasons, computer centres install the same operating system and version on all computers. This might lead to problems with the Grid middleware if the local version is different from the one for which it has been developed. At RZG we partly solved this conflict by using virtualization technology for the service nodes. We will present the setup used at RZG and show how it helped to solve the problems described above. In addition we will illustrate the additional advantages gained by the above setup.

  11. Smart Grid Communications Security Project, U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Frank [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    There were four groups that worked on this project in different areas related to Smart Girds and Security. They included faculty and students from electric computer and energy engineering, law, business and sociology. The results of the work are summarized in a verity of reports, papers and thesis. A major report to the Governor of Colorado’s energy office with contributions from all the groups working on this project is given bellow. Smart Grid Deployment in Colorado: Challenges and Opportunities, Report to Colorado Governor’s Energy Office and Colorado Smart Grid Task Force(2010) (Kevin Doran, Frank Barnes, and Puneet Pasrich, eds.) This report includes information on the state of the grid cyber security, privacy, energy storage and grid stability, workforce development, consumer behavior with respect to the smart grid and safety issues.

  12. Grid Computing Das wahre Web 2.0?

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    'Grid-Computing ist eine Fortentwicklung des World Wide Web, sozusagen die nchste Generation', sagte (1) Franz-Josef Pfreundt (Fraunhofer-Institut fr Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik) schon auf der CeBIT 2003 und verwies auf die NASA als Grid-Avantgarde.

  13. Colgate one of first to build global computing grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Magno, L

    2003-01-01

    "Colgate-Palmolive Co. has become one of the first organizations in the world to build an enterprise network based on the grid computing concept. Since mid-August, the consumer products firm has been working to connect approximately 50 geographically dispersed Unix servers and storage devices in an enterprise grid network" (1 page).

  14. PNNL supercomputer to become largest computing resource on the Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hewlett Packard announced that the US DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will connect a 9.3-teraflop HP supercomputer to the DOE Science Grid. This will be the largest supercomputer attached to a computer grid anywhere in the world (1 page).

  15. The Experiment Method for Manufacturing Grid Development on Single Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Youan; ZHOU Zude

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment method for the Manufacturing Grid application system development in the single personal computer environment is proposed. The characteristic of the proposed method is constructing a full prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is hosted on a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Firstly, it builds all the Manufacturing Grid physical resource nodes on an abstraction layer of a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Secondly, all the virtual Manufacturing Grid resource nodes will be connected with virtual network and the application software will be deployed on each Manufacturing Grid nodes. Then, we can obtain a prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is working in the single personal computer, and can carry on the experiment on this foundation. Compared with the known experiment methods for the Manufacturing Grid application system development, the proposed method has the advantages of the known methods, such as cost inexpensively, operation simple, and can get the confidence experiment result easily. The Manufacturing Grid application system constructed with the proposed method has the high scalability, stability and reliability. It is can be migrated to the real application environment rapidly.

  16. Secure grid-based computing with social-network based trust management in the semantic web

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špánek, Roman; Tůma, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 6 (2006), s. 475-488 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300419; GA MŠk 1M0554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : semantic web * grid computing * trust management * reconfigurable networks * security * hypergraph model * hypergraph algorithms Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  17. `95 computer system operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Hae Cho; Park, Soo Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Ho Yeun; Lee, Sung Kyu; Choi, Mi Kyung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This report describes overall project works related to the operation of mainframe computers, the management of nuclear computer codes and the project of nuclear computer code conversion. The results of the project are as follows ; 1. The operation and maintenance of the three mainframe computers and other utilities. 2. The management of the nuclear computer codes. 3. The finishing of the computer codes conversion project. 26 tabs., 5 figs., 17 refs. (Author) .new.

  18. '95 computer system operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Hae Cho; Park, Soo Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Ho Yeun; Lee, Sung Kyu; Choi, Mi Kyung

    1995-12-01

    This report describes overall project works related to the operation of mainframe computers, the management of nuclear computer codes and the project of nuclear computer code conversion. The results of the project are as follows ; 1. The operation and maintenance of the three mainframe computers and other utilities. 2. The management of the nuclear computer codes. 3. The finishing of the computer codes conversion project. 26 tabs., 5 figs., 17 refs. (Author) .new

  19. Fault tolerance in computational grids: perspectives, challenges, and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Sajjad; Nazir, Babar

    2016-01-01

    Computational grids are established with the intention of providing shared access to hardware and software based resources with special reference to increased computational capabilities. Fault tolerance is one of the most important issues faced by the computational grids. The main contribution of this survey is the creation of an extended classification of problems that incur in the computational grid environments. The proposed classification will help researchers, developers, and maintainers of grids to understand the types of issues to be anticipated. Moreover, different types of problems, such as omission, interaction, and timing related have been identified that need to be handled on various layers of the computational grid. In this survey, an analysis and examination is also performed pertaining to the fault tolerance and fault detection mechanisms. Our conclusion is that a dependable and reliable grid can only be established when more emphasis is on fault identification. Moreover, our survey reveals that adaptive and intelligent fault identification, and tolerance techniques can improve the dependability of grid working environments.

  20. 15 MW HArdware-in-the-loop Grid Simulation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigas, Nikolaos [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Fox, John Curtiss [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Collins, Randy [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Tuten, James [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Salem, Thomas [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); McKinney, Mark [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Hadidi, Ramtin [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Gislason, Benjamin [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Boessneck, Eric [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Leonard, Jesse [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2014-10-31

    The 15MW Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) Grid Simulator project was to (1) design, (2) construct and (3) commission a state-of-the-art grid integration testing facility for testing of multi-megawatt devices through a ‘shared facility’ model open to all innovators to promote the rapid introduction of new technology in the energy market to lower the cost of energy delivered. The 15 MW HIL Grid Simulator project now serves as the cornerstone of the Duke Energy Electric Grid Research, Innovation and Development (eGRID) Center. This project leveraged the 24 kV utility interconnection and electrical infrastructure of the US DOE EERE funded WTDTF project at the Clemson University Restoration Institute in North Charleston, SC. Additionally, the project has spurred interest from other technology sectors, including large PV inverter and energy storage testing and several leading edge research proposals dealing with smart grid technologies, grid modernization and grid cyber security. The key components of the project are the power amplifier units capable of providing up to 20MW of defined power to the research grid. The project has also developed a one of a kind solution to performing fault ride-through testing by combining a reactive divider network and a large power converter into a hybrid method. This unique hybrid method of performing fault ride-through analysis will allow for the research team at the eGRID Center to investigate the complex differences between the alternative methods of performing fault ride-through evaluations and will ultimately further the science behind this testing. With the final goal of being able to perform HIL experiments and demonstration projects, the eGRID team undertook a significant challenge with respect to developing a control system that is capable of communicating with several different pieces of equipment with different communication protocols in real-time. The eGRID team developed a custom fiber optical network that is based upon FPGA

  1. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-01-01

    A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing

  2. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-06-05

    A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing.

  3. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Abstract. This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid ... which mobile modes will process the tasks .... evaluation are analytical modelling, simulation ... MATLAB 7.10.0.

  4. Optimal usage of computing grid network in the fields of nuclear fusion computing task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenev, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays the nuclear power becomes the main source of energy. To make its usage more efficient, the scientists created complicated simulation models, which require powerful computers. The grid computing is the answer to powerful and accessible computing resources. The article observes, and estimates the optimal configuration of the grid environment in the fields of the complicated nuclear fusion computing tasks. (author)

  5. The 20 Tera flop Erasmus Computing Grid (ECG).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing

  6. The 20 Tera flop Erasmus Computing Grid (ECG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing

  7. Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power, it has become reasonable to decouple production and consumption resulting in the ability to construct computing grids in a similar manner as the electrical power grid. Grid computing, the secure integration of computer systems over high speed networks to provide on-demand access to data analysis capabilities and related functions, is being deployed as an alternative to traditional resource sharing among institutions. For human interaction, advanced collaborative environments are being researched and deployed to have distributed group work that is as productive as traditional meetings. The DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program initiative has sponsored several collaboratory projects, including the National Fusion Collaboratory Project, to utilize recent advances in grid computing and advanced collaborative environments to further research in several specific scientific domains. For fusion, the collaborative technology being deployed is being used in present day research and is also scalable to future research, in particular, to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiment that will require extensive collaboration capability worldwide. This paper briefly reviews the concepts of grid computing and advanced collaborative environments and gives specific examples of how these technologies are being used in fusion research today

  8. Engineering of an Extreme Rainfall Detection System using Grid Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Terzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new approach for intensive rainfall data analysis. ITHACA's Extreme Rainfall Detection System (ERDS is conceived to provide near real-time alerts related to potential exceptional rainfalls worldwide, which can be used by WFP or other humanitarian assistance organizations to evaluate the event and understand the potentially floodable areas where their assistance is needed. This system is based on precipitation analysis and it uses rainfall data from satellite at worldwide extent. This project uses the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis dataset, a NASA-delivered near real-time product for current rainfall condition monitoring over the world. Considering the great deal of data to process, this paper presents an architectural solution based on Grid Computing techniques. Our focus is on the advantages of using a distributed architecture in terms of performances for this specific purpose.

  9. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing (ISGC) 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Francois; Lin, Simon C.

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2010 (ISGC 2010), held 5-12 March at Academia Sinica, Taipei. The document includes a brief overview of the EUAsiaGrid project as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 2010. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  10. OpenZika: An IBM World Community Grid Project to Accelerate Zika Virus Drug Discovery.

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Ekins; Alexander L Perryman; Carolina Horta Andrade

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus outbreak in the Americas has caused global concern. To help accelerate this fight against Zika, we launched the OpenZika project. OpenZika is an IBM World Community Grid Project that uses distributed computing on millions of computers and Android devices to run docking experiments, in order to dock tens of millions of drug-like compounds against crystal structures and homology models of Zika proteins (and other related flavivirus targets). This will enable the identification of...

  11. Benefits Analysis of Smart Grid Projects. White paper, 2014-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Liping [China Southern Grid (China); Yu, JianCheng [State Grid of China (China); Zhang, Dong [State Grid of China (China); Mauzy, Josh [Southern California Edison, CA (United States); Shaffer, Brendan [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Dong, XuZhu [China Southern Grid (China); Agate, Will [Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vitiello, Silvia [European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Karali, Nihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Angela Xu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); He, Gang [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Zhao, Li [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Zhu, Aimee Limingming [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Smart grids are rolling out internationally, with the United States (U.S.) nearing completion of a significant USD4-plus-billion federal program funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA-2009). The emergence of smart grids is widespread across developed countries. Multiple approaches to analyzing the benefits of smart grids have emerged. The goals of this white paper are to review these approaches and analyze examples of each to highlight their differences, advantages, and disadvantages. This work was conducted under the auspices of a joint U.S.-China research effort, the Climate Change Working Group (CCWG) Implementation Plan, Smart Grid. We present comparative benefits assessments (BAs) of smart grid demonstrations in the U.S. and China along with a BA of a pilot project in Europe. In the U.S., we assess projects at two sites: (1) the University of California, Irvine campus (UCI), which consists of two distinct demonstrations: Southern California Edison’s (SCE) Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration Project (ISGD) and the UCI campus itself; and (2) the Navy Yard (TNY) area in Philadelphia, which has been repurposed as a mixed commercial-industrial, and possibly residential, development. In China, we cover several smart-grid aspects of the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city (TEC) and the Shenzhen Bay Technology and Ecology City (B-TEC). In Europe, we look at a BA of a pilot smart grid project in the Malagrotta area west of Rome, Italy, contributed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission. The Irvine sub-project BAs use the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Smart Grid Computational Tool (SGCT), which is built on methods developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The TEC sub-project BAs apply Smart Grid Multi-Criteria Analysis (SG-MCA) developed by the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC) based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) with fuzzy logic. The B-TEC and TNY sub-project BAs are evaluated using new

  12. Consumer engagement: An insight from smart grid projects in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangale, Flavia; Mengolini, Anna; Onyeji, Ijeoma

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an insight into consumer engagement in smart grid projects in Europe. Projects analysed are those included in the catalogue annexed in the JRC Report “Smart Grid projects in Europe: lessons learned and current developments”. The analysis suggests an increase in the interest in consumer engagement projects at European level and a strong focus on the residential sector, and emphasises the key importance of public funding to support these projects. The study also reveals that projects involving consumers are characterised by the pursuit of two main objectives: gaining deeper knowledge of consumer behaviour (observing and understanding the consumer) and motivating and empowering consumers to become active energy customers (engaging the consumer). The paper reviews the main activities undertaken to obtain these objectives and highlights trends and developments in the field. Finally, the paper discusses obstacles to consumer engagement and the strategies adopted by the projects surveyed to tackle them, highlighting the need to build consumer trust and to design targeted campaigns taking into consideration different consumer segments. The conclusions are in line with findings and analyses presented in the literature and underscore the need for further research and action at European level. - Highlights: • Consumers' key role in the success of the future electricity system (smart grids). • Survey on consumer engagement experiences in European smart grid projects. • Focus is on observing and understanding the consumers and on engaging them. • Trust and confidence as central elements. • Need to take into consideration different consumer segments/motivational factors

  13. GLOA: A New Job Scheduling Algorithm for Grid Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pooranian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of grid computing is to produce a virtual supercomputer by using free resources available through widespread networks such as the Internet. This resource distribution, changes in resource availability, and an unreliable communication infrastructure pose a major challenge for efficient resource allocation. Because of the geographical spread of resources and their distributed management, grid scheduling is considered to be a NP-complete problem. It has been shown that evolutionary algorithms offer good performance for grid scheduling. This article uses a new evaluation (distributed algorithm inspired by the effect of leaders in social groups, the group leaders' optimization algorithm (GLOA, to solve the problem of scheduling independent tasks in a grid computing system. Simulation results comparing GLOA with several other evaluation algorithms show that GLOA produces shorter makespans.

  14. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00416173; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machin...

  15. Soil Erosion Estimation Using Grid-based Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Vlasák

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion estimation is an important part of a land consolidation process. Universal soil loss equation (USLE was presented by Wischmeier and Smith. USLE computation uses several factors, namely R – rainfall factor, K – soil erodability, L – slope length factor, S – slope gradient factor, C – cropping management factor, and P – erosion control management factor. L and S factors are usually combined to one LS factor – Topographic factor. The single factors are determined from several sources, such as DTM (Digital Terrain Model, BPEJ – soil type map, aerial and satellite images, etc. A conventional approach to the USLE computation, which is widely used in the Czech Republic, is based on the selection of characteristic profiles for which all above-mentioned factors must be determined. The result (G – annual soil loss of such computation is then applied for a whole area (slope of interest. Another approach to the USLE computation uses grids as a main data-structure. A prerequisite for a grid-based USLE computation is that each of the above-mentioned factors exists as a separate grid layer. The crucial step in this computation is a selection of appropriate grid resolution (grid cell size. A large cell size can cause an undesirable precision degradation. Too small cell size can noticeably slow down the whole computation. Provided that the cell size is derived from the source’s precision, the appropriate cell size for the Czech Republic varies from 30m to 50m. In some cases, especially when new surveying was done, grid computations can be performed with higher accuracy, i.e. with a smaller grid cell size. In such case, we have proposed a new method using the two-step computation. The first step computation uses a bigger cell size and is designed to identify higher erosion spots. The second step then uses a smaller cell size but it make the computation only the area identified in the previous step. This decomposition allows a

  16. New challenges in grid generation and adaptivity for scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Formaggia, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects selected contributions from the “Fourth Tetrahedron Workshop on Grid Generation for Numerical Computations”, which was held in Verbania, Italy in July 2013. The previous editions of this Workshop were hosted by the Weierstrass Institute in Berlin (2005), by INRIA Rocquencourt in Paris (2007), and by Swansea University (2010). This book covers different, though related, aspects of the field: the generation of quality grids for complex three-dimensional geometries; parallel mesh generation algorithms; mesh adaptation, including both theoretical and implementation aspects; grid generation and adaptation on surfaces – all with an interesting mix of numerical analysis, computer science and strongly application-oriented problems.

  17. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems. 6 refs

  18. A gating grid driver for time projection chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangwancharoen, S.; Lynch, W.G.; Barney, J.; Estee, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Shane, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Tsang, M.B., E-mail: tsang@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Isobe, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Murakami, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-shirakawa, Kyoto 606–8502 (Japan); Xiao, Z.G. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Y.F. [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-05-01

    A simple but novel driver system has been developed to operate the wire gating grid of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). This system connects the wires of the gating grid to its driver via low impedance transmission lines. When the gating grid is open, all wires have the same voltage allowing drift electrons, produced by the ionization of the detector gas molecules, to pass through to the anode wires. When the grid is closed, the wires have alternating higher and lower voltages causing the drift electrons to terminate at the more positive wires. Rapid opening of the gating grid with low pickup noise is achieved by quickly shorting the positive and negative wires to attain the average bias potential with N-type and P-type MOSFET switches. The circuit analysis and simulation software SPICE shows that the driver restores the gating grid voltage to 90% of the opening voltage in less than 0.20 µs, for small values of the termination resistors. When tested in the experimental environment of a time projection chamber larger termination resistors were chosen so that the driver opens the gating grid in 0.35 µs. In each case, opening time is basically characterized by the RC constant given by the resistance of the switches and terminating resistors and the capacitance of the gating grid and its transmission line. By adding a second pair of N-type and P-type MOSFET switches, the gating grid is closed by restoring 99% of the original charges to the wires within 3 µs.

  19. An Offload NIC for NASA, NLR, and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awrach, James

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses distributed data management and access dynamically configurable high-speed access to data distributed and shared over wide-area high-speed network environments. An offload engine NIC (network interface card) is proposed that scales at nX10-Gbps increments through 100-Gbps full duplex. The Globus de facto standard was used in projects requiring secure, robust, high-speed bulk data transport. Novel extension mechanisms were derived that will combine these technologies for use by GridFTP, bandwidth management resources, and host CPU (central processing unit) acceleration. The result will be wire-rate encrypted Globus grid data transactions through offload for splintering, encryption, and compression. As the need for greater network bandwidth increases, there is an inherent need for faster CPUs. The best way to accelerate CPUs is through a network acceleration engine. Grid computing data transfers for the Globus tool set did not have wire-rate encryption or compression. Existing technology cannot keep pace with the greater bandwidths of backplane and network connections. Present offload engines with ports to Ethernet are 32 to 40 Gbps f-d at best. The best of ultra-high-speed offload engines use expensive ASICs (application specific integrated circuits) or NPUs (network processing units). The present state of the art also includes bonding and the use of multiple NICs that are also in the planning stages for future portability to ASICs and software to accommodate data rates at 100 Gbps. The remaining industry solutions are for carrier-grade equipment manufacturers, with costly line cards having multiples of 10-Gbps ports, or 100-Gbps ports such as CFP modules that interface to costly ASICs and related circuitry. All of the existing solutions vary in configuration based on requirements of the host, motherboard, or carriergrade equipment. The purpose of the innovation is to eliminate data bottlenecks within cluster, grid, and cloud computing systems

  20. A computer software system for integration and analysis of grid-based remote sensing data with other natural resource data. Remote Sensing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmann, S. E.; Enslin, W. R.; Hill-Rowley, R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based information system is described designed to assist in the integration of commonly available spatial data for regional planning and resource analysis. The Resource Analysis Program (RAP) provides a variety of analytical and mapping phases for single factor or multi-factor analyses. The unique analytical and graphic capabilities of RAP are demonstrated with a study conducted in Windsor Township, Eaton County, Michigan. Soil, land cover/use, topographic and geological maps were used as a data base to develope an eleven map portfolio. The major themes of the portfolio are land cover/use, non-point water pollution, waste disposal, and ground water recharge.

  1. The Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Wolf-Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Grid technology is widely emerging. Grid computing, most simply stated, is distributed computing taken to the next evolutionary level. The goal is to create the illusion of a simple, robust yet large and powerful self managing virtual computer out of a large collection of connected heterogeneous systems sharing various combinations of resources. This talk will give a short history how, out of lessons learned from the Internet, the vision of Grids was born. Then the extensible anatomy of a Grid architecture will be discussed. The talk will end by presenting a selection of major Grid projects in Europe and US and if time permits a short on-line demonstration.

  2. GIS embedded hydrological modeling: the SID&GRID project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsi, I.; Rossetto, R.; Schifani, C.

    2012-04-01

    The SID&GRID research project, started April 2010 and funded by Regione Toscana (Italy) under the POR FSE 2007-2013, aims to develop a Decision Support System (DSS) for water resource management and planning based on open source and public domain solutions. In order to quantitatively assess water availability in space and time and to support the planning decision processes, the SID&GRID solution consists of hydrological models (coupling 3D existing and newly developed surface- and ground-water and unsaturated zone modeling codes) embedded in a GIS interface, applications and library, where all the input and output data are managed by means of DataBase Management System (DBMS). A graphical user interface (GUI) to manage, analyze and run the SID&GRID hydrological models based on open source gvSIG GIS framework (Asociación gvSIG, 2011) and a Spatial Data Infrastructure to share and interoperate with distributed geographical data is being developed. Such a GUI is thought as a "master control panel" able to guide the user from pre-processing spatial and temporal data, running the hydrological models, and analyzing the outputs. To achieve the above-mentioned goals, the following codes have been selected and are being integrated: 1. Postgresql/PostGIS (PostGIS, 2011) for the Geo Data base Management System; 2. gvSIG with Sextante (Olaya, 2011) geo-algorithm library capabilities and Grass tools (GRASS Development Team, 2011) for the desktop GIS; 3. Geoserver and Geonetwork to share and discover spatial data on the web according to Open Geospatial Consortium; 4. new tools based on the Sextante GeoAlgorithm framework; 5. MODFLOW-2005 (Harbaugh, 2005) groundwater modeling code; 6. MODFLOW-LGR (Mehl and Hill 2005) for local grid refinement; 7. VSF (Thoms et al., 2006) for the variable saturated flow component; 8. new developed routines for overland flow; 9. new algorithms in Jython integrated in gvSIG to compute the net rainfall rate reaching the soil surface, as input for

  3. Parallel grid generation algorithm for distributed memory computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Stuti; Moitra, Anutosh

    1994-01-01

    A parallel grid-generation algorithm and its implementation on the Intel iPSC/860 computer are described. The grid-generation scheme is based on an algebraic formulation of homotopic relations. Methods for utilizing the inherent parallelism of the grid-generation scheme are described, and implementation of multiple levELs of parallelism on multiple instruction multiple data machines are indicated. The algorithm is capable of providing near orthogonality and spacing control at solid boundaries while requiring minimal interprocessor communications. Results obtained on the Intel hypercube for a blended wing-body configuration are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Fortran implementations bAsed on the native programming model of the iPSC/860 computer and the Express system of software tools are reported. Computational gains in execution time speed-up ratios are given.

  4. Grid computing in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, P

    2004-01-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them. Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software r...

  5. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  6. Power control for wind turbines in weak grids: Project summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    . The two case studies (Madeira, Portugal and Co. Donegal, Ireland) revealed that sometimes theleast cost and most attractive option is change in the operating strategy of the power system. This allowed that further wind energy can be integrated at competitive cost in the Madeira power system. In Co....... Donegal the options for pumped storage are goodcombined with good wind resources. Unfortunately the grid is weak. The least cost option for the feeder studied is either grid reinforcement or a power control system based on pumped storage if rather large amounts of wind energy are to be absorbed...... by thepower system. The cost estimates for the two options are in the same range. The current report is a summary of the work done in the project 'Power Control for Wind Turbines in Weak Grids'. The project has been partly funded by EU under contractJOR3-CT95-0067....

  7. Computing challenges in HEP for WLHC grid

    CERN Document Server

    Muralidharan, Servesh

    2017-01-01

    As CERN moves towards preparation for increasing the luminosity of the particle beam towards HL-LHC, predictions shows computing demand would out grow our conservative scaling estimates by over ten times. Fortunately we are talking about a time scale of roughly ten years to develop new techniques and novel solutions to address this gap in compute resources. Experiments at CERN face a unique scenario where in they need to scale both latency sensitive workloads such as data acquisition of the detectors and throughput based ones such as simulations and reconstruction of high level events and physics processes. In this talk we cover some of the ongoing research at tier-0 in CERN which investigates several aspects of throughput sensitive workloads that consume significant compute cycles.

  8. How to build a high-performance compute cluster for the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Reinefeld, A

    2001-01-01

    The success of large-scale multi-national projects like the forthcoming analysis of the LHC particle collision data at CERN relies to a great extent on the ability to efficiently utilize computing and data-storage resources at geographically distributed sites. Currently, much effort is spent on the design of Grid management software (Datagrid, Globus, etc.), while the effective integration of computing nodes has been largely neglected up to now. This is the focus of our work. We present a framework for a high- performance cluster that can be used as a reliable computing node in the Grid. We outline the cluster architecture, the management of distributed data and the seamless integration of the cluster into the Grid environment. (11 refs).

  9. PowerMatching City : A unique smart grid project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. C.J. Wiekens

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, the smart grid project 'PowerMatching City' is introduced. PowerMatching City is a living lab demonstration of the future energy system. In PowerMatching City the connected households are equipped with a mix of decentralized energy sources, hybrid heat pumps, smart appliances,

  10. Use of Emerging Grid Computing Technologies for the Analysis of LIGO Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koranda, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) today faces the challenge of enabling analysis of terabytes of LIGO data by hundreds of scientists from institutions all around the world. To meet this challenge the LSC is developing tools, infrastructure, applications, and expertise leveraging Grid Computing technologies available today, and making available to LSC scientists compute resources at sites across the United States and Europe. We use digital credentials for strong and secure authentication and authorization to compute resources and data. Building on top of products from the Globus project for high-speed data transfer and information discovery we have created the Lightweight Data Replicator (LDR) to securely and robustly replicate data to resource sites. We have deployed at our computing sites the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) Server and Client packages, developed in collaboration with our partners in the GriPhyN and iVDGL projects, providing uniform access to distributed resources for users and their applications. Taken together these Grid Computing technologies and infrastructure have formed the LSC DataGrid--a coherent and uniform environment across two continents for the analysis of gravitational-wave detector data. Much work, however, remains in order to scale current analyses and recent lessons learned need to be integrated into the next generation of Grid middleware.

  11. Computation of Asteroid Proper Elements on the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, B.; Balaz, A.; Knezevic, Z.; Potocnik, M.

    2009-12-01

    A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  12. Computation of Asteroid Proper Elements on the Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  13. Grid computing and e-science: a view from inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cozzini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available My intention is to analyze how, where and if grid computing technology is truly enabling a new way of doing science (so-called ‘e-science’. I will base my views on the experiences accumulated thus far in a number of scientific communities, which we have provided with the opportunity of using grid computing. I shall first define some basic terms and concepts and then discuss a number of specific cases in which the use of grid computing has actually made possible a new method for doing science. I will then present a case in which this did not result in a change in research methods. I will try to identify the reasons for these failures and analyze the future evolution of grid computing. I will conclude by introducing and commenting the concept of ‘cloud computing’, the approach offered and provided by major industrial actors (Google/IBM and Amazon being among the most important and what impact this technology might have on the world of research.

  14. Computation of asteroid proper elements on the Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid architecture using networks of queuing theory. This was in order to evaluate the performance of theload-balancing three tier hierarchical configuration. The throughput and resource utilizationmetrics were measured and the ...

  16. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  17. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware. (paper)

  18. WEKA-G: Parallel data mining on computational grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PIMENTA, A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is a technology that can extract useful information from large amounts of data. However, mining a database often requires a high computational power. To resolve this problem, this paper presents a tool (Weka-G, which runs in parallel algorithms used in the mining process data. As the environment for doing so, we use a computational grid by adding several features within a WAN.

  19. The LHC Computing Grid in the starting blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    Danielle Amy Venton

    2010-01-01

    As the Large Hadron Collider ramps up operations and breaks world records, it is an exciting time for everyone at CERN. To get the computing perspective, the Bulletin this week caught up with Ian Bird, leader of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). He is confident that everything is ready for the first data.   The metallic globe illustrating the Worldwide LHC Computing GRID (WLCG) in the CERN Computing Centre. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) collaboration has been in place since 2001 and for the past several years it has continually run the workloads for the experiments as part of their preparations for LHC data taking. So far, the numerous and massive simulations of the full chain of reconstruction and analysis software could only be carried out using Monte Carlo simulated data. Now, for the first time, the system is starting to work with real data and with many simultaneous users accessing them from all around the world. “During the 2009 large-scale computing challenge (...

  20. The extended RBAC model based on grid computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-gang; WANG Ru-chuan; WANG Hai-yan

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes the extended role-based access control (RBAC) model for solving dynamic and multidomain problems in grid computing, The formulated description of the model has been provided. The introduction of context and the mapping relations of context-to-role and context-to-permission help the model adapt to dynamic property in grid environment.The multidomain role inheritance relation by the authorization agent service realizes the multidomain authorization amongst the autonomy domain. A function has been proposed for solving the role inheritance conflict during the establishment of the multidomain role inheritance relation.

  1. Software, component, and service deployment in computational Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.; Blau, E.; Bletzinger, M.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Martin, S.; Russell, M.

    2002-01-01

    Grids comprise an infrastructure that enables scientists to use a diverse set of distributed remote services and resources as part of complex scientific problem-solving processes. We analyze some of the challenges involved in deploying software and components transparently in Grids. We report on three practical solutions used by the Globus Project. Lessons learned from this experience lead us to believe that it is necessary to support a variety of software and component deployment strategies. These strategies are based on the hosting environment

  2. CMS Monte Carlo production in the WLCG computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J M; Kreuzer, P; Hof, C; Khomitch, A; Mohapatra, A; Filippis, N D; Pompili, A; My, S; Abbrescia, M; Maggi, G; Donvito, G; Weirdt, S D; Maes, J; Mulders, P v; Villella, I; Wakefield, S; Guan, W; Fanfani, A; Evans, D; Flossdorf, A

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo production in CMS has received a major boost in performance and scale since the past CHEP06 conference. The production system has been re-engineered in order to incorporate the experience gained in running the previous system and to integrate production with the new CMS event data model, data management system and data processing framework. The system is interfaced to the two major computing Grids used by CMS, the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) and the Open Science Grid (OSG). Operational experience and integration aspects of the new CMS Monte Carlo production system is presented together with an analysis of production statistics. The new system automatically handles job submission, resource monitoring, job queuing, job distribution according to the available resources, data merging, registration of data into the data bookkeeping, data location, data transfer and placement systems. Compared to the previous production system automation, reliability and performance have been considerably improved. A more efficient use of computing resources and a better handling of the inherent Grid unreliability have resulted in an increase of production scale by about an order of magnitude, capable of running in parallel at the order of ten thousand jobs and yielding more than two million events per day

  3. Porting of Bio-Informatics Tools for Plant Virology on a Computational Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, A.; Muoio, A.; Iacono-Manno, M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of Tri Grid Project and PI2S2 is the creation of the first Sicilian regional computational Grid. In particular, it aims to build various software-hardware interfaces between the infrastructure and some scientific and industrial applications. In this context, we have integrated some among the most innovative computing applications in virology research inside these Grid infrastructure. Particularly, we have implemented in a complete work flow, various tools for pairwise or multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny tree construction (ClustalW-MPI), phylogenetic networks (Splits Tree), detection of recombination by phylogenetic methods (TOPALi) and prediction of DNA or RNA secondary consensus structures (KnetFold). This work will show how the ported applications decrease the execution time of the analysis programs, improve the accessibility to the data storage system and allow the use of metadata for data processing. (Author)

  4. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  5. Computing on the grid and in the cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    "The results today are only possible because of the extraordinary performance of the accelerators, including the infrastructure, the experiments, and the Grid computing." These were the words of the CERN Director General Rolf Heuer when the observation of a new particle consistent with a Higgs Boson was revealed to the world on the 4th July 2012. The end result of the all investments made to build and operate the LHC is the data that are recorded and the knowledge that can be extracted. It is the role of the global computing infrastructure to unlock the value that is encapsulated in the data. This lecture provides a detailed overview of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, an international collaboration to distribute and analyse the LHC data.

  6. Computing on the grid and in the cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    "The results today are only possible because of the extraordinary performance of the accelerators, including the infrastructure, the experiments, and the Grid computing." These were the words of the CERN Director General Rolf Heuer when the observation of a new particle consistent with a Higgs Boson was revealed to the world on the 4th July 2012. The end result of the all investments made to build and operate the LHC is the data that are recorded and the knowledge that can be extracted. It is the role of the global computing infrastructure to unlock the value that is encapsulated in the data. This lecture provides a detailed overview of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, an international collaboration to distribute and analyse the LHC data.

  7. Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration Projects; Part II. Grid Friendly™ Appliance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Brous, Jerry; Chassin, David P.; Horst, Gale R.; Kajfasz, Robert; Michie, Preston; Oliver, Terry V.; Carlon, Teresa A.; Eustis, Conrad; Jarvegren, Olof M.; Marek, W.; Munson, Ryan L.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2007-10-01

    Fifty residential electric water heaters and 150 new residential clothes dryers were modified to respond to signals received from underfrequency, load-shedding appliance controllers. Each controller monitored the power-grid voltage signal and requested that electrical load be shed by its appliance whenever electric power-grid frequency fell below 59.95 Hz. The controllers and their appliances were installed and monitored for more than a year at residential sites at three locations in Washington and Oregon. The controllers and their appliances responded reliably to each shallow underfrequency event—an average of one event per day—and shed their loads for the durations of these events. Appliance owners reported that the appliance responses were unnoticed and caused little or no inconvenience for the homes’ occupants.

  8. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin

    2007-03-01

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3 leadership expressed

  9. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Brian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burman, Kari [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elchinger, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hardison, R. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karsiwulan, D. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States); Castermans, B. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  10. Cloud computing and Reservoir project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, S.; Maraschini, A.; Pacini, F.; Biran, O.

    2009-01-01

    The support for complex services delivery is becoming a key point in current internet technology. Current trends in internet applications are characterized by on demand delivery of ever growing amounts of content. The future internet of services will have to deliver content intensive applications to users with quality of service and security guarantees. This paper describes the Reservoir project and the challenge of a reliable and effective delivery of services as utilities in a commercial scenario. It starts by analyzing the needs of a future infrastructure provider and introducing the key concept of a service oriented architecture that combines virtualisation-aware grid with grid-aware virtualisation, while being driven by business service management. This article will then focus on the benefits and the innovations derived from the Reservoir approach. Eventually, a high level view of Reservoir general architecture is illustrated.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation with the Gate software using grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuillon, R.; Hill, D.R.C.; Gouinaud, C.; El Bitar, Z.; Breton, V.; Buvat, I.

    2009-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used in emission tomography, for protocol optimization, design of processing or data analysis methods, tomographic reconstruction, or tomograph design optimization. Monte Carlo simulations needing many replicates to obtain good statistical results can be easily executed in parallel using the 'Multiple Replications In Parallel' approach. However, several precautions have to be taken in the generation of the parallel streams of pseudo-random numbers. In this paper, we present the distribution of Monte Carlo simulations performed with the GATE software using local clusters and grid computing. We obtained very convincing results with this large medical application, thanks to the EGEE Grid (Enabling Grid for E-science), achieving in one week computations that could have taken more than 3 years of processing on a single computer. This work has been achieved thanks to a generic object-oriented toolbox called DistMe which we designed to automate this kind of parallelization for Monte Carlo simulations. This toolbox, written in Java is freely available on SourceForge and helped to ensure a rigorous distribution of pseudo-random number streams. It is based on the use of a documented XML format for random numbers generators statuses. (authors)

  12. The Model of the Software Running on a Computer Equipment Hardware Included in the Grid network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Mityushkina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to building a cloud computing environment using Grid networks is proposed in this paper. The authors describe the functional capabilities, algorithm, model of software running on a computer equipment hardware included in the Grid network, that will allow to implement cloud computing environment using Grid technologies.

  13. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groep, D.; Koeroo, O.; Venekamp, G.

    2008-07-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system.

  14. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groep, D; Koeroo, O; Venekamp, G

    2008-01-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system

  15. Nbody Simulations and Weak Gravitational Lensing using new HPC-Grid resources: the PI2S2 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Costa, A.; Comparato, M.

    2008-08-01

    We present the main project of the new grid infrastructure and the researches, that have been already started in Sicily and will be completed by next year. The PI2S2 project of the COMETA consortium is funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research and will be completed in 2009. Funds are from the European Union Structural Funds for Objective 1 regions. The project, together with a similar project called Trinacria GRID Virtual Laboratory (Trigrid VL), aims to create in Sicily a computational grid for e-science and e-commerce applications with the main goal of increasing the technological innovation of local enterprises and their competition on the global market. PI2S2 project aims to build and develop an e-Infrastructure in Sicily, based on the grid paradigm, mainly for research activity using the grid environment and High Performance Computer systems. As an example we present the first results of a new grid version of FLY a tree Nbody code developed by INAF Astrophysical Observatory of Catania, already published in the CPC program Library, that will be used in the Weak Gravitational Lensing field.

  16. Research and development of grid computing technology in center for computational science and e-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Center for Computational Science and E-systems of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has carried out R and D of grid computing technology. Since 1995, R and D to realize computational assistance for researchers called Seamless Thinking Aid (STA) and then to share intellectual resources called Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) have been conducted, leading to construct an intelligent infrastructure for the atomic energy research called Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure (AEGIS) under the Japanese national project 'Development and Applications of Advanced High-Performance Supercomputer'. It aims to enable synchronization of three themes: 1) Computer-Aided Research and Development (CARD) to realize and environment for STA, 2) Computer-Aided Engineering (CAEN) to establish Multi Experimental Tools (MEXT), and 3) Computer Aided Science (CASC) to promote the Atomic Energy Research and Investigation (AERI). This article reviewed achievements in R and D of grid computing technology so far obtained. (T. Tanaka)

  17. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  18. Dynamic stability calculations for power grids employing a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K

    1982-06-01

    The aim of dynamic contingency calculations in power systems is to estimate the effects of assumed disturbances, such as loss of generation. Due to the large dimensions of the problem these simulations require considerable computing time and costs, to the effect that they are at present only used in a planning state but not for routine checks in power control stations. In view of the homogeneity of the problem, where a multitude of equal generator models, having different parameters, are to be integrated simultaneously, the use of a parallel computer looks very attractive. The results of this study employing a prototype parallel computer (SMS 201) are presented. It consists of up to 128 equal microcomputers bus-connected to a control computer. Each of the modules is programmed to simulate a node of the power grid. Generators with their associated control are represented by models of 13 states each. Passive nodes are complemented by 'phantom'-generators, so that the whole power grid is homogenous, thus removing the need for load-flow-iterations. Programming of microcomputers is essentially performed in FORTRAN.

  19. Wind power integration in island-based smart grid projects : A comparative study between Jeju Smart Grid Test-bed and Smart Grid Gotland

    OpenAIRE

    Piehl, Hampus

    2014-01-01

    Smart grids seem to be the solution to use energy from renewable and intermittent energy sources in an efficient manner. There are many research projects around the world and two of them are Jeju Smart Grid Test-bed and Smart Grid Gotland. They have in common that they are both island-based projects and connected to the Powergrid on the mainland by HVDC-link. The purpose of this thesis is to compare the two projects and find out what challenges and strategies they have related to wind power i...

  20. A novel algorithm for incompressible flow using only a coarse grid projection

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael; Zheng, Wen; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Large scale fluid simulation can be difficult using existing techniques due to the high computational cost of using large grids. We present a novel technique for simulating detailed fluids quickly. Our technique coarsens the Eulerian fluid grid

  1. Distributed Database Access in the LHC Computing Grid with CORAL

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Z; Düllmann, D; Giacomo, G; Kalkhof, A; Valassi, A; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The CORAL package is the LCG Persistency Framework foundation for accessing relational databases. From the start CORAL has been designed to facilitate the deployment of the LHC experiment database applications in a distributed computing environment. In particular we cover - improvements to database service scalability by client connection management - platform-independent, multi-tier scalable database access by connection multiplexing, caching - a secure authentication and authorisation scheme integrated with existing grid services. We will summarize the deployment experience from several experiment productions using the distributed database infrastructure, which is now available in LCG. Finally, we present perspectives for future developments in this area.

  2. Project Scheduling Heuristics-Based Standard PSO for Task-Resource Assignment in Heterogeneous Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Maw Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The task scheduling problem has been widely studied for assigning resources to tasks in heterogeneous grid environment. Effective task scheduling is an important issue for the performance of grid computing. Meanwhile, the task scheduling problem is an NP-complete problem. Hence, this investigation introduces a named “standard“ particle swarm optimization (PSO metaheuristic approach to efficiently solve the task scheduling problems in grid. Meanwhile, two promising heuristics based on multimode project scheduling are proposed to help in solving interesting scheduling problems. They are the best performance resource heuristic and the latest finish time heuristic. These two heuristics applied to the PSO scheme are for speeding up the search of the particle and improving the capability of finding a sound schedule. Moreover, both global communication topology and local ring communication topology are also investigated for efficient study of proposed scheme. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach in this investigation can successfully solve the task-resource assignment problems in grid computing and similar scheduling problems.

  3. DETERMINANTS AFFECTING THE SUCCESS OF DISTRIBUTION GRID PROJECTS IN BINH THUAN POWER COMPANY, VIETNAM

    OpenAIRE

    Pham Van Tai* & Le Duc Thu

    2017-01-01

    The research identified the critical factors affecting the success of the distribution grid project in Binh Thuan Power Company, clarify the mutual relationship between the critical factors affecting the success of the distribution grid project in Binh Thuan Power Company and recommended and rated the solution to enhance the success of the distribution grid project in Binh Thuan Power Company. The research had found fours critical factors: External factors of project, Controlling and coordina...

  4. Multiobjective Variable Neighborhood Search algorithm for scheduling independent jobs on computational grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Selvi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Grid computing solves high performance and high-throughput computing problems through sharing resources ranging from personal computers to super computers distributed around the world. As the grid environments facilitate distributed computation, the scheduling of grid jobs has become an important issue. In this paper, an investigation on implementing Multiobjective Variable Neighborhood Search (MVNS algorithm for scheduling independent jobs on computational grid is carried out. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been evaluated with Min–Min algorithm, Simulated Annealing (SA and Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP algorithm. Simulation results show that MVNS algorithm generally performs better than other metaheuristics methods.

  5. Open Compute Project at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The Open Compute Project, OCP ( http://www.opencompute.org/), was launched by Facebook in 2011 with the objective of building efficient computing infrastructures at lowest possible cost. The technologies are released as open hardware design, with the goal to develop servers and data centers following the model traditionally associated with open source software projects. We have been following the OCP project for some time and decided to buy two OCP twin servers in 2013 to get some hands-on experience. The servers have been tested and compared with our standard hardware regularly acquired through large tenders. In this presentation we will give some relevant results from this testing and also discuss some of the more important differences that can matter for a larger deployment at CERN. Finally it will outline the details for a possible project for a larger deployment of OCP hardware for production use at CERN.

  6. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid - an application survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen, P; Ing, Wong Kiing; Danquah, Michael Kobina; Sidhu, Amandeep S; Abu-Siada, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The smart grid is the emerging energy system wherein the application of information technology, tools and techniques that make the grid run more efficiently. It possesses demand response capacity to help balance electrical consumption with supply. The challenges and opportunities of emerging and future smart grids can be addressed by cloud computing. To focus on these requirements, we provide an in-depth survey on different cloud computing applications for energy management in the smart grid architecture. In this survey, we present an outline of the current state of research on smart grid development. We also propose a model of cloud based economic power dispatch for smart grid. (paper)

  7. The GridPP DIRAC project - DIRAC for non-LHC communities

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, D; Currie, R; Fayer, S; Huffman, A; Martyniak, J; Rand, D; Richards, A

    2015-01-01

    The GridPP consortium in the UK is currently testing a multi-VO DIRAC service aimed at non-LHC VOs. These VOs (Virtual Organisations) are typically small and generally do not have a dedicated computing support post. The majority of these represent particle physics experiments (e.g. NA62 and COMET), although the scope of the DIRAC service is not limited to this field. A few VOs have designed bespoke tools around the EMI-WMS & LFC, while others have so far eschewed distributed resources as they perceive the overhead for accessing them to be too high. The aim of the GridPP DIRAC project is to provide an easily adaptable toolkit for such VOs in order to lower the threshold for access to distributed resources such as Grid and cloud computing. As well as hosting a centrally run DIRAC service, we will also publish our changes and additions to the upstream DIRAC codebase under an open-source license. We report on the current status of this project and show increasing adoption of DIRAC within the non-LHC communiti...

  8. The GridPP DIRAC project - DIRAC for non-LHC communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, D.; Colling, D.; Currie, R.; Fayer, S.; Huffman, A.; Martyniak, J.; Rand, D.; Richards, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GridPP consortium in the UK is currently testing a multi-VO DIRAC service aimed at non-LHC VOs. These VOs (Virtual Organisations) are typically small and generally do not have a dedicated computing support post. The majority of these represent particle physics experiments (e.g. NA62 and COMET), although the scope of the DIRAC service is not limited to this field. A few VOs have designed bespoke tools around the EMI-WMS & LFC, while others have so far eschewed distributed resources as they perceive the overhead for accessing them to be too high. The aim of the GridPP DIRAC project is to provide an easily adaptable toolkit for such VOs in order to lower the threshold for access to distributed resources such as Grid and cloud computing. As well as hosting a centrally run DIRAC service, we will also publish our changes and additions to the upstream DIRAC codebase under an open-source license. We report on the current status of this project and show increasing adoption of DIRAC within the non-LHC communities.

  9. WE-EF-207-04: An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion (IPSF) Approach to Estimate Missing Projection Signal in Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to reduce scatter and lag artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, information is missing in each projection because certain areas are blocked by the grid. A previous solution to this issue is acquiring 2 complimentary projections at each position, which increases scanning time. This study reports our first Result using an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) method to estimate missing projection in our prototype SMOG-based CBCT system. Methods: An in-house SMOG assembling with a 1:1 grid of 3 mm gap has been installed in a CBCT benchtop. The grid moves back and forth in a 3-mm amplitude and up-to 20-Hz frequency. A control program in LabView synchronizes the grid motion with the platform rotation and x-ray firing so that the grid patterns for any two neighboring projections are complimentary. A Catphan was scanned with 360 projections. After scatter correction, the IPSF algorithm was applied to estimate missing signal for each projection using the information from the 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct CBCT images. The CBCTs were compared to those reconstructed using normal projections without applying the SMOG system. Results: The SMOG-IPSF method may reduce image dose by half due to the blocked radiation by the grid. The method almost completely removed scatter related artifacts, such as the cupping artifacts. The evaluation of line pair patterns in the CatPhan suggested that the spatial resolution degradation was minimal. Conclusion: The SMOG-IPSF is promising in reducing scatter artifacts and improving image quality while reducing radiation dose

  10. WE-EF-207-04: An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion (IPSF) Approach to Estimate Missing Projection Signal in Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to reduce scatter and lag artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, information is missing in each projection because certain areas are blocked by the grid. A previous solution to this issue is acquiring 2 complimentary projections at each position, which increases scanning time. This study reports our first Result using an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) method to estimate missing projection in our prototype SMOG-based CBCT system. Methods: An in-house SMOG assembling with a 1:1 grid of 3 mm gap has been installed in a CBCT benchtop. The grid moves back and forth in a 3-mm amplitude and up-to 20-Hz frequency. A control program in LabView synchronizes the grid motion with the platform rotation and x-ray firing so that the grid patterns for any two neighboring projections are complimentary. A Catphan was scanned with 360 projections. After scatter correction, the IPSF algorithm was applied to estimate missing signal for each projection using the information from the 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct CBCT images. The CBCTs were compared to those reconstructed using normal projections without applying the SMOG system. Results: The SMOG-IPSF method may reduce image dose by half due to the blocked radiation by the grid. The method almost completely removed scatter related artifacts, such as the cupping artifacts. The evaluation of line pair patterns in the CatPhan suggested that the spatial resolution degradation was minimal. Conclusion: The SMOG-IPSF is promising in reducing scatter artifacts and improving image quality while reducing radiation dose.

  11. Geospatial Applications on Different Parallel and Distributed Systems in enviroGRIDS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodila, D.; Bacu, V.; Gorgan, D.

    2012-04-01

    The execution of Earth Science applications and services on parallel and distributed systems has become a necessity especially due to the large amounts of Geospatial data these applications require and the large geographical areas they cover. The parallelization of these applications comes to solve important performance issues and can spread from task parallelism to data parallelism as well. Parallel and distributed architectures such as Grid, Cloud, Multicore, etc. seem to offer the necessary functionalities to solve important problems in the Earth Science domain: storing, distribution, management, processing and security of Geospatial data, execution of complex processing through task and data parallelism, etc. A main goal of the FP7-funded project enviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is the development of a Spatial Data Infrastructure targeting this catchment region but also the development of standardized and specialized tools for storing, analyzing, processing and visualizing the Geospatial data concerning this area. For achieving these objectives, the enviroGRIDS deals with the execution of different Earth Science applications, such as hydrological models, Geospatial Web services standardized by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and others, on parallel and distributed architecture to maximize the obtained performance. This presentation analysis the integration and execution of Geospatial applications on different parallel and distributed architectures and the possibility of choosing among these architectures based on application characteristics and user requirements through a specialized component. Versions of the proposed platform have been used in enviroGRIDS project on different use cases such as: the execution of Geospatial Web services both on Web and Grid infrastructures [2] and the execution of SWAT hydrological models both on Grid and Multicore architectures [3]. The current

  12. The GLOBE-Consortium: The Erasmus Computing Grid – Building a Super-Computer at Erasmus MC for FREE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTo meet the enormous computational needs of live-science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing grids in the world – The Erasmus Computing Grid.

  13. Projection of the rotation form Navier-Stokes equation onto the half-staggered grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ji Ryong [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    A projection method for computing incompressible fluid flow is proposed. For the method, the rotation form Navier-Stokes equation (NSE), for which the velocity and the total pressure are employed, is discretized on the half-staggered, finite difference spatial grid. The total pressure couples the static pressure gradient and the convection of momentum in the continuous NSE while the half-staggered grid provides weak pressure-velocity coupling in discrete space. These two features interact synergistically for the discretized NSE to produce smooth pressure fields without additional numerical artifacts such as the momentum interpolation. The method preserves the kinetic energy at the inviscid limit condition. Numerical solutions of the decaying Taylor vortex, the inviscid Taylor vortex, the sudden expansion channel and the square-prism wake are presented.

  14. CERN database services for the LHC computing grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girone, M [CERN IT Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: maria.girone@cern.ch

    2008-07-15

    Physics meta-data stored in relational databases play a crucial role in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments and also in the operation of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. A large proportion of non-event data such as detector conditions, calibration, geometry and production bookkeeping relies heavily on databases. Also, the core Grid services that catalogue and distribute LHC data cannot operate without a reliable database infrastructure at CERN and elsewhere. The Physics Services and Support group at CERN provides database services for the physics community. With an installed base of several TB-sized database clusters, the service is designed to accommodate growth for data processing generated by the LHC experiments and LCG services. During the last year, the physics database services went through a major preparation phase for LHC start-up and are now fully based on Oracle clusters on Intel/Linux. Over 100 database server nodes are deployed today in some 15 clusters serving almost 2 million database sessions per week. This paper will detail the architecture currently deployed in production and the results achieved in the areas of high availability, consolidation and scalability. Service evolution plans for the LHC start-up will also be discussed.

  15. CERN database services for the LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girone, M

    2008-01-01

    Physics meta-data stored in relational databases play a crucial role in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments and also in the operation of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. A large proportion of non-event data such as detector conditions, calibration, geometry and production bookkeeping relies heavily on databases. Also, the core Grid services that catalogue and distribute LHC data cannot operate without a reliable database infrastructure at CERN and elsewhere. The Physics Services and Support group at CERN provides database services for the physics community. With an installed base of several TB-sized database clusters, the service is designed to accommodate growth for data processing generated by the LHC experiments and LCG services. During the last year, the physics database services went through a major preparation phase for LHC start-up and are now fully based on Oracle clusters on Intel/Linux. Over 100 database server nodes are deployed today in some 15 clusters serving almost 2 million database sessions per week. This paper will detail the architecture currently deployed in production and the results achieved in the areas of high availability, consolidation and scalability. Service evolution plans for the LHC start-up will also be discussed

  16. Power Grid Construction Project Portfolio Optimization Based on Bi-level programming model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Erdong; Li, Shangqi

    2017-08-01

    As the main body of power grid operation, county-level power supply enterprises undertake an important emission to guarantee the security of power grid operation and safeguard social power using order. The optimization of grid construction projects has been a key issue of power supply capacity and service level of grid enterprises. According to the actual situation of power grid construction project optimization of county-level power enterprises, on the basis of qualitative analysis of the projects, this paper builds a Bi-level programming model based on quantitative analysis. The upper layer of the model is the target restriction of the optimal portfolio; the lower layer of the model is enterprises’ financial restrictions on the size of the enterprise project portfolio. Finally, using a real example to illustrate operation proceeding and the optimization result of the model. Through qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis, the bi-level programming model improves the accuracy and normative standardization of power grid enterprises projects.

  17. Backfilling the Grid with Containerized BOINC in the ATLAS computing

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wenjing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Virtualization is a commonly used solution for utilizing the opportunistic computing resources in the HEP field, as it provides a unified software and OS layer that the HEP computing tasks require over the heterogeneous opportunistic computing resources. However there is always performance penalty with virtualization, especially for short jobs which are always the case for volunteer computing tasks, the overhead of virtualization becomes a big portion in the wall time, hence it leads to low CPU efficiency of the jobs. With the wide usage of containers in HEP computing, we explore the possibility of adopting the container technology into the ATLAS BOINC project, hence we implemented a Native version in BOINC, which uses the singularity container or direct usage of the target OS to replace VirtualBox. In this paper, we will discuss 1) the implementation and workflow of the Native version in the ATLAS BOINC; 2) the performance measurement of the Native version comparing to the previous Virtualization version. 3)...

  18. LHCb: The Evolution of the LHCb Grid Computing Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Arrabito, L; Bouvet, D; Cattaneo, M; Charpentier, P; Clarke, P; Closier, J; Franchini, P; Graciani, R; Lanciotti, E; Mendez, V; Perazzini, S; Nandkumar, R; Remenska, D; Roiser, S; Romanovskiy, V; Santinelli, R; Stagni, F; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Ubeda Garcia, M; Vedaee, A; Zhelezov, A

    2012-01-01

    The increase of luminosity in the LHC during its second year of operation (2011) was achieved by delivering more protons per bunch and increasing the number of bunches. Taking advantage of these changed conditions, LHCb ran with a higher pileup as well as a much larger charm physics introducing a bigger event size and processing times. These changes led to shortages in the offline distributed data processing resources, an increased need of cpu capacity by a factor 2 for reconstruction, higher storage needs at T1 sites by 70\\% and subsequently problems with data throughput for file access from the storage elements. To accommodate these changes the online running conditions and the Computing Model for offline data processing had to be adapted accordingly. This paper describes the changes implemented for the offline data processing on the Grid, relaxing the Monarc model in a first step and going beyond it subsequently. It further describes other operational issues discovered and solved during 2011, present the ...

  19. Distributed Monitoring Infrastructure for Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Pedro; Bhatt, Kislay; Chand, Phool; Collados, David; Duggal, Vibhuti; Fuente, Paloma; Hayashi, Soichi; Imamagic, Emir; Joshi, Pradyumna; Kalmady, Rajesh; Karnani, Urvashi; Kumar, Vaibhav; Lapka, Wojciech; Quick, Robert; Tarragon, Jacobo; Teige, Scott; Triantafyllidis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    The journey of a monitoring probe from its development phase to the moment its execution result is presented in an availability report is a complex process. It goes through multiple phases such as development, testing, integration, release, deployment, execution, data aggregation, computation, and reporting. Further, it involves people with different roles (developers, site managers, VO managers, service managers, management), from different middleware providers (ARC, dCache, gLite, UNICORE and VDT), consortiums (WLCG, EMI, EGI, OSG), and operational teams (GOC, OMB, OTAG, CSIRT). The seamless harmonization of these distributed actors is in daily use for monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure. In this paper we describe the monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure from the operational perspective. We explain the complexity of the journey of a monitoring probe from its execution on a grid node to the visualization on the MyWLCG portal where it is exposed to other clients. This monitoring workflow profits from the i...

  20. Data grids a new computational infrastructure for data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, P

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-first-century scientific and engineering enterprises are increasingly characterized by their geographic dispersion and their reliance on large data archives. These characteristics bring with them unique challenges. First, the increasing size and complexity of modern data collections require significant investments in information technologies to store, retrieve and analyse them. Second, the increased distribution of people and resources in these projects has made resource sharing and collaboration across significant geographic and organizational boundaries critical to their success. In this paper I explore how computing infrastructures based on data grids offer data-intensive enterprises a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A detailed example of a data grid framework is presented for a Large Hadron Collider experiment, where a hierarchical set of laboratory and university resources comprising petaflops of processing power and a multi- petabyte data archive must be ...

  1. Grid Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The aim of Grid computing is to enable the easy and open sharing of resources between large and highly distributed communities of scientists and institutes across many independent administrative domains. Convincing site security officers and computer centre managers to allow this to happen in view of today's ever-increasing Internet security problems is a major challenge. Convincing users and application developers to take security seriously is equally difficult. This paper will describe the main Grid security issues, both in terms of technology and policy, that have been tackled over recent years in LCG and related Grid projects. Achievements to date will be described and opportunities for future improvements will be addressed.

  2. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipčič, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Fifteen Chinese High-Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC-CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC-CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte Carlo Simulation in SCEAPI and have been providing CPU power since fall 2015.

  3. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Chinese High Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte C...

  4. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen Chinese High-Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC-CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC-CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte C...

  5. Integration of a neuroimaging processing pipeline into a pan-canadian computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie-Courchesne, S; Chouinard-Decorte, F; Doyon, J; Bellec, P; Rioux, P; Sherif, T; Rousseau, M-E; Das, S; Adalat, R; Evans, A C; Craddock, C; Margulies, D; Chu, C; Lyttelton, O

    2012-01-01

    The ethos of the neuroimaging field is quickly moving towards the open sharing of resources, including both imaging databases and processing tools. As a neuroimaging database represents a large volume of datasets and as neuroimaging processing pipelines are composed of heterogeneous, computationally intensive tools, such open sharing raises specific computational challenges. This motivates the design of novel dedicated computing infrastructures. This paper describes an interface between PSOM, a code-oriented pipeline development framework, and CBRAIN, a web-oriented platform for grid computing. This interface was used to integrate a PSOM-compliant pipeline for preprocessing of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging into CBRAIN. We further tested the capacity of our infrastructure to handle a real large-scale project. A neuroimaging database including close to 1000 subjects was preprocessed using our interface and publicly released to help the participants of the ADHD-200 international competition. This successful experiment demonstrated that our integrated grid-computing platform is a powerful solution for high-throughput pipeline analysis in the field of neuroimaging.

  6. Computer applications in project KARP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, R.P.; Siddiqui, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    For effective project implementation of Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant (KARP) at Kalpakkam, an elaborate Management Information Systems (MIS) was developed in-house for physical and financial progress monitoring and reporting. Computer aided design software for design of process piping layout was also developed and implemented for generation of process cell piping drawings for construction purposes. Modelling and simulation studies were carried out to optimize process parameters and fault tree analysis techniques utilised for evaluating plant availability factors. (author). 2 tabs

  7. Neural network algorithm for image reconstruction using the grid friendly projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierniak, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The presented paper describes a development of original approach to the reconstruction problem using a recurrent neural network. Particularly, the 'grid-friendly' angles of performed projections are selected according to the discrete Radon transform (DRT) concept to decrease the number of projections required. The methodology of our approach is consistent with analytical reconstruction algorithms. Reconstruction problem is reformulated in our approach to optimization problem. This problem is solved in present concept using method based on the maximum likelihood methodology. The reconstruction algorithm proposed in this work is consequently adapted for more practical discrete fan beam projections. Computer simulation results show that the neural network reconstruction algorithm designed to work in this way improves obtained results and outperforms conventional methods in reconstructed image quality. (author)

  8. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  9. Meet the Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Yurkewicz, Katie

    2005-01-01

    Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries

  10. Multidimensional Environmental Data Resource Brokering on Computational Grids and Scientific Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Raffaele; Giunta, Giulio; Laccetti, Giuliano

    Grid computing has widely evolved over the past years, and its capabilities have found their way even into business products and are no longer relegated to scientific applications. Today, grid computing technology is not restricted to a set of specific grid open source or industrial products, but rather it is comprised of a set of capabilities virtually within any kind of software to create shared and highly collaborative production environments. These environments are focused on computational (workload) capabilities and the integration of information (data) into those computational capabilities. An active grid computing application field is the fully virtualization of scientific instruments in order to increase their availability and decrease operational and maintaining costs. Computational and information grids allow to manage real-world objects in a service-oriented way using industrial world-spread standards.

  11. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations on an ARC-enabled computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Jon K; Samset, Bjørn H

    2011-01-01

    Grid computing opens new possibilities for running heavy Monte Carlo simulations of physical systems in parallel. The presentation gives an overview of GaMPI, a system for running an MPI-based random walker simulation on grid resources. Integrating the ARC middleware and the new storage system Chelonia with the Ganga grid job submission and control system, we show that MPI jobs can be run on a world-wide computing grid with good performance and promising scaling properties. Results for relatively communication-heavy Monte Carlo simulations run on multiple heterogeneous, ARC-enabled computing clusters in several countries are presented.

  12. Kids at CERN Grids for Kids programme leads to advanced computing knowledge.

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Children as young as 10 are learning computing skills, such as middleware, parallel processing and supercomputing, at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, last week. The initiative for 10 to 12 years olds is part of the Grids for Kids programme, which aims to introduce Grid computing as a tool for research.

  13. Grid computing in pakistan and: opening to large hadron collider experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, N.; Osman, A.; Mahmood, A.; Rana, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A grid computing facility was developed at sister institutes Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) and Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS) in collaboration with Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid during early years of the present decade. The Grid facility PAKGRID-LCG2 as one of the grid node in Pakistan was developed employing mainly local means and is capable of supporting local and international research and computational tasks in the domain of LHC Computing Grid. Functional status of the facility is presented in terms of number of jobs performed. The facility developed provides a forum to local researchers in the field of high energy physics to participate in the LHC experiments and related activities at European particle physics research laboratory (CERN), which is one of the best physics laboratories in the world. It also provides a platform of an emerging computing technology (CT). (author)

  14. Overview of NREL Distribution Grid Integration Cost Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Kelsey A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ding, Fei [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mather, Barry A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Palmintier, Bryan S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Denholm, Paul L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-12

    This presentation was given at the 2017 NREL Workshop 'Benchmarking Distribution Grid Integration Costs Under High Distributed PV Penetrations.' It provides a brief overview of recent and ongoing NREL work on distribution system grid integration costs, as well as challenges and needs from the community.

  15. Argonne to lead 8 DOE Grid Modernization Projects | Argonne National

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverters Develop a holistic attack-resilient architecture and layered cyber-physical solution portfolio to ensuring that the grid is resilient and secure to withstand growing cyber security and climate challenges vehicles to buildings, as well as system-level vehicle-grid integration, analysis and cyber security. Find

  16. CDF GlideinWMS usage in Grid computing of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvada, Marian; Sfiligoi, Igor; Benjamin, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Many members of large science collaborations already have specialized grids available to advance their research in the need of getting more computing resources for data analysis. This has forced the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting Grid resources. Nowadays, CDF experiment is increasingly relying on glidein-based computing pools for data reconstruction. Especially, Monte Carlo production and user data analysis, serving over 400 users by central analysis farm middleware (CAF) on the top of Condor batch system and CDF Grid infrastructure. Condor is designed as distributed architecture and its glidein mechanism of pilot jobs is ideal for abstracting the Grid computing by making a virtual private computing pool. We would like to present the first production use of the generic pilot-based Workload Management System (glideinWMS), which is an implementation of the pilot mechanism based on the Condor distributed infrastructure. CDF Grid computing uses glideinWMS for its data reconstruction on the FNAL campus Grid, user analysis and Monte Carlo production across Open Science Grid (OSG). We review this computing model and setup used including CDF specific configuration within the glideinWMS system which provides powerful scalability and makes Grid computing working like in a local batch environment with ability to handle more than 10000 running jobs at a time.

  17. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa M. Reda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  18. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Naglaa M; Tawfik, A; Marzok, Mohamed A; Khamis, Soheir M

    2015-11-01

    Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  19. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, F; Crépeault, B; Duchesne, S

    2012-01-01

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  20. Campus Grids: Bringing Additional Computational Resources to HEP Researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2012-01-01

    It is common at research institutions to maintain multiple clusters that represent different owners or generations of hardware, or that fulfill different needs and policies. Many of these clusters are consistently under utilized while researchers on campus could greatly benefit from these unused capabilities. By leveraging principles from the Open Science Grid it is now possible to utilize these resources by forming a lightweight campus grid. The campus grids framework enables jobs that are submitted to one cluster to overflow, when necessary, to other clusters within the campus using whatever authentication mechanisms are available on campus. This framework is currently being used on several campuses to run HEP and other science jobs. Further, the framework has in some cases been expanded beyond the campus boundary by bridging campus grids into a regional grid, and can even be used to integrate resources from a national cyberinfrastructure such as the Open Science Grid. This paper will highlight 18 months of operational experiences creating campus grids in the US, and the different campus configurations that have successfully utilized the campus grid infrastructure.

  1. Porting of Scientific Applications to Grid Computing on GridWay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herrera

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion and adoption of Grid technologies is prevented by the lack of a standard programming paradigm to port existing applications among different environments. The Distributed Resource Management Application API has been proposed to aid the rapid development and distribution of these applications across different Distributed Resource Management Systems. In this paper we describe an implementation of the DRMAA standard on a Globus-based testbed, and show its suitability to express typical scientific applications, like High-Throughput and Master-Worker applications. The DRMAA routines are supported by the functionality offered by the GridWay2 framework, which provides the runtime mechanisms needed for transparently executing jobs on a dynamic Grid environment based on Globus. As cases of study, we consider the implementation with DRMAA of a bioinformatics application, a genetic algorithm and the NAS Grid Benchmarks.

  2. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

    2011-10-05

    The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power

  3. ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D project

    CERN Document Server

    Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

    2013-01-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

  4. Project Scheduling Heuristics-Based Standard PSO for Task-Resource Assignment in Heterogeneous Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ruey-Maw; Wang, Chuin-Mu

    2011-01-01

    The task scheduling problem has been widely studied for assigning resources to tasks in heterogeneous grid environment. Effective task scheduling is an important issue for the performance of grid computing. Meanwhile, the task scheduling problem is an NP-complete problem. Hence, this investigation introduces a named “standard“ particle swarm optimization (PSO) metaheuristic approach to efficiently solve the task scheduling problems in grid. Meanwhile, two promising heuristics based on multimo...

  5. ATES Smart Grids research project overview and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Martin; Jaxa-Rozen, Marc; Rostampour, Vahab

    2016-04-01

    Background: ATES is application is growing Application of seasonal Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) contributes to energy saving and Greenhouse Gas (GHG)-reduction goals (CBS, 2015; EU, 2010, 2014). Recently it was shown that ATES is applicable in several parts of the world (Bloemendal et al., 2015). While in most parts of the world adoption is just beginning, in the Netherlands progressive building energy efficiency regulation already caused the adoption of ATES to take off (Heekeren and Bakema, 2015; Sommer et al., 2015). As a result of the large number of ATES systems in the Netherlands, the subsurface plays a crucial role in the energy saving objectives of The Netherlands (Kamp, 2015; SER, 2013). Problem: suboptimal use of the subsurface for energy storage ATES systems accumulate in urban areas, as can be expected with a large growth of ATES systems; at many locations in Dutch cities demand for ATES transcends the available space in the subsurface (Li, 2014; Sommer et al., 2015). Within in the Dutch legal framework and state of technology optimal use of the subsurface is not secured; i.e. minimizing the total GHG emissions in a certain area. (Bloemendal et al., 2014; Li, 2014). The most important aspects in this problem are A) the permanent and often unused claim resulting from static permits and B) excessive safety zones around wells to prevent interaction. Both aspects result in an artificial reduction of subsurface space for potential new ATES systems. Recent research has shown that ground energy storage systems could be placed much closer to each other (Bakr et al., 2013; Sommer et al., 2015), and a controlled/limited degree of interaction between them can actually benefit the overall energy savings of an entire area. Solution: the approach and first results of our research project on ATES Smart Grids The heating and cooling demand of buildings is a dynamic and hard to predict process, due to effects such as weather, climate change, changing function

  6. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France; ACTES, 2e colloque LCG-France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin (eds.) [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand, Campus des Cezeaux, 24, avenue des Landais, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2007-03-15

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3

  7. Demand side management scheme in smart grid with cloud computing approach using stochastic dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofana Reka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a cloud computing framework in smart grid environment by creating small integrated energy hub supporting real time computing for handling huge storage of data. A stochastic programming approach model is developed with cloud computing scheme for effective demand side management (DSM in smart grid. Simulation results are obtained using GUI interface and Gurobi optimizer in Matlab in order to reduce the electricity demand by creating energy networks in a smart hub approach.

  8. Greedy and metaheuristics for the offline scheduling problem in grid computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette

    In grid computing a number of geographically distributed resources connected through a wide area network, are utilized as one computations unit. The NP-hard offline scheduling problem in grid computing consists of assigning jobs to resources in advance. In this paper, five greedy heuristics and two....... All heuristics solve instances with up to 2000 jobs and 1000 resources, thus the results are useful both with respect to running times and to solution values....

  9. ATLAS Tier-2 at the Compute Resource Center GoeGrid in Göttingen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Quadt, Arnulf; Weber, Pavel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    GoeGrid is a grid resource center located in Göttingen, Germany. The resources are commonly used, funded, and maintained by communities doing research in the fields of grid development, computer science, biomedicine, high energy physics, theoretical physics, astrophysics, and the humanities. For the high energy physics community, GoeGrid serves as a Tier-2 center for the ATLAS experiment as part of the world-wide LHC computing grid (WLCG). The status and performance of the Tier-2 center is presented with a focus on the interdisciplinary setup and administration of the cluster. Given the various requirements of the different communities on the hardware and software setup the challenge of the common operation of the cluster is detailed. The benefits are an efficient use of computer and personpower resources.

  10. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watthanai Pinthong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software.

  11. High-throughput landslide modelling using computational grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M.; Metson, S.; Holcombe, L.; Anderson, M.; Newbold, D.; Brook, N.

    2012-04-01

    physicists and geographical scientists are collaborating to develop methods for providing simple and effective access to landslide models and associated simulation data. Particle physicists have valuable experience in dealing with data complexity and management due to the scale of data generated by particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC generates tens of petabytes of data every year which is stored and analysed using the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). Tools and concepts from the WLCG are being used to drive the development of a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) platform to provide access to hosted landslide simulation software and data. It contains advanced data management features and allows landslide simulations to be run on the WLCG, dramatically reducing simulation runtimes by parallel execution. The simulations are accessed using a web page through which users can enter and browse input data, submit jobs and visualise results. Replication of the data ensures a local copy can be accessed should a connection to the platform be unavailable. The platform does not know the details of the simulation software it runs, so it is therefore possible to use it to run alternative models at similar scales. This creates the opportunity for activities such as model sensitivity analysis and performance comparison at scales that are impractical using standalone software.

  12. Enabling Grid Computing resources within the KM3NeT computing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippidis Christos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KM3NeT is a future European deep-sea research infrastructure hosting a new generation neutrino detectors that – located at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea – will open a new window on the universe and answer fundamental questions both in particle physics and astrophysics. International collaborative scientific experiments, like KM3NeT, are generating datasets which are increasing exponentially in both complexity and volume, making their analysis, archival, and sharing one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. These experiments, in their majority, adopt computing models consisting of different Tiers with several computing centres and providing a specific set of services for the different steps of data processing such as detector calibration, simulation and data filtering, reconstruction and analysis. The computing requirements are extremely demanding and, usually, span from serial to multi-parallel or GPU-optimized jobs. The collaborative nature of these experiments demands very frequent WAN data transfers and data sharing among individuals and groups. In order to support the aforementioned demanding computing requirements we enabled Grid Computing resources, operated by EGI, within the KM3NeT computing model. In this study we describe our first advances in this field and the method for the KM3NeT users to utilize the EGI computing resources in a simulation-driven use-case.

  13. Grid technologies and applications: architecture and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ian Foster

    2001-01-01

    The 18 months since CHEP'2000 have seen significant advances in Grid computing, both within and outside high energy physics. While in early 2000, Grid computing was a novel concept that most CHEP attendees were being exposed to for the first time, now considerable consensus is seen on Grid architecture, a solid and widely adopted technology base, major funding initiatives, a wide variety of projects developing applications and technologies, and major deployment projects aimed at creating robust Grid infrastructures. The author provides a summary of major developments and trends, focusing on the Globus open source Grid software project and the GriPhyN data grid project

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Analysis of a Generic Missile With Grid Fins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeSpirito, James

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study demonstrating an approach for using viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations to calculate the flow field and aerodynamic coefficients for a missile with grid fin...

  15. Bibliography. Computer-Oriented Projects, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L., Comp.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of references on computer-oriented projects. Includes information on computers; hands-on versus simulations; games; instruction; students' attitudes and learning styles; artificial intelligence; tutoring; and application of spreadsheets. (RT)

  16. Task-and-role-based access-control model for computational grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Tao; HONG Fan; WU Chi; SUN Ling-li

    2007-01-01

    Access control in a grid environment is a challenging issue because the heterogeneous nature and independent administration of geographically dispersed resources in grid require access control to use fine-grained policies. We established a task-and-role-based access-control model for computational grid (CG-TRBAC model), integrating the concepts of role-based access control (RBAC) and task-based access control (TBAC). In this model, condition restrictions are defined and concepts specifically tailored to Workflow Management System are simplified or omitted so that role assignment and security administration fit computational grid better than traditional models; permissions are mutable with the task status and system variables, and can be dynamically controlled. The CG-TRBAC model is proved flexible and extendible. It can implement different control policies. It embodies the security principle of least privilege and executes active dynamic authorization. A task attribute can be extended to satisfy different requirements in a real grid system.

  17. A priori modeling of chemical reactions on computational grid platforms: Workflows and data models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampino, S.; Monari, A.; Rossi, E.; Evangelisti, S.; Laganà, A.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The quantum framework of the Grid Empowered Molecular Simulator GEMS assembled on the European Grid allows the ab initio evaluation of the dynamics of small systems starting from the calculation of the electronic properties. Highlights: ► The grid based GEMS simulator accurately models small chemical systems. ► Q5Cost and D5Cost file formats provide interoperability in the workflow. ► Benchmark runs on H + H 2 highlight the Grid empowering. ► O + O 2 and N + N 2 calculated k (T)’s fall within the error bars of the experiment. - Abstract: The quantum framework of the Grid Empowered Molecular Simulator GEMS has been assembled on the segment of the European Grid devoted to the Computational Chemistry Virtual Organization. The related grid based workflow allows the ab initio evaluation of the dynamics of small systems starting from the calculation of the electronic properties. Interoperability between computational codes across the different stages of the workflow was made possible by the use of the common data formats Q5Cost and D5Cost. Illustrative benchmark runs have been performed on the prototype H + H 2 , N + N 2 and O + O 2 gas phase exchange reactions and thermal rate coefficients have been calculated for the last two. Results are discussed in terms of the modeling of the interaction and advantages of using the Grid is highlighted.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Stability to Induced Deadlocks for Computing Grids with Various Node Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana R. Shmeleva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the classification and applications of switching methods, their advantages and disadvantages. A model of a computing grid was constructed in the form of a colored Petri net with a node which implements cut-through packet switching. The model consists of packet switching nodes, traffic generators and guns that form malicious traffic disguised as usual user traffic. The characteristics of the grid model were investigated under a working load with different intensities. The influence of malicious traffic such as traffic duel was estimated on the quality of service parameters of the grid. A comparative analysis of the computing grids stability was carried out with nodes which implement the store-and-forward and cut-through switching technologies. It is shown that the grids performance is approximately the same under work load conditions, and under peak load conditions the grid with the node implementing the store-and-forward technology is more stable. The grid with nodes implementing SAF technology comes to a complete deadlock through an additional load which is less than 10 percent. After a detailed study, it is shown that the traffic duel configuration does not affect the grid with cut-through nodes if the workload is increases to the peak load, at which the grid comes to a complete deadlock. The execution intensity of guns which generate a malicious traffic is determined by a random function with the Poisson distribution. The modeling system CPN Tools is used for constructing models and measuring parameters. Grid performance and average package delivery time are estimated in the grid on various load options.

  19. Group Projects and the Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Group projects in computer science are normally delivered with reference to good software engineering practice. The discipline of software engineering is rapidly evolving, and the application of the latest 'agile techniques' to group projects causes a potential conflict with constraints imposed by regulating bodies on the computer science…

  20. 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud and Internet Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Barolli, Leonard; Amato, Flora

    2017-01-01

    P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing technologies have been very fast established as breakthrough paradigms for solving complex problems by enabling aggregation and sharing of an increasing variety of distributed computational resources at large scale. The aim of this volume is to provide latest research findings, innovative research results, methods and development techniques from both theoretical and practical perspectives related to P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing as well as to reveal synergies among such large scale computing paradigms. This proceedings volume presents the results of the 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud And Internet Computing (3PGCIC-2016), held November 5-7, 2016, at Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea.

  1. Computer graphics and research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingtrakul, P.

    1994-01-01

    This report was prepared as an account of scientific visualization tools and application tools for scientists and engineers. It is provided a set of tools to create pictures and to interact with them in natural ways. It applied many techniques of computer graphics and computer animation through a number of full-color presentations as computer animated commercials, 3D computer graphics, dynamic and environmental simulations, scientific modeling and visualization, physically based modelling, and beavioral, skelatal, dynamics, and particle animation. It took in depth at original hardware and limitations of existing PC graphics adapters contain syste m performance, especially with graphics intensive application programs and user interfaces

  2. ATLAS computing operations within the GridKa Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J; Walker, R; Olszewski, A; Nderitu, S; Serfon, C; Duckeck, G

    2010-01-01

    The organisation and operations model of the ATLAS T1-T2 federation/Cloud associated to the GridKa T1 in Karlsruhe is described. Attention is paid to Cloud level services and the experience gained during the last years of operation. The ATLAS GridKa Cloud is large and divers spanning 5 countries, 2 ROC's and is currently comprised of 13 core sites. A well defined and tested operations model in such a Cloud is of the utmost importance. We have defined the core Cloud services required by the ATLAS experiment and ensured that they are performed in a managed and sustainable manner. Services such as Distributed Data Management involving data replication,deletion and consistency checks, Monte Carlo Production, software installation and data reprocessing are described in greater detail. In addition to providing these central services we have undertaken several Cloud level stress tests and developed monitoring tools to aid with Cloud diagnostics. Furthermore we have defined good channels of communication between ATLAS, the T1 and the T2's and have pro-active contributions from the T2 manpower. A brief introduction to the GridKa Cloud is provided followed by a more detailed discussion of the operations model and ATLAS services within the Cloud.

  3. Minimizing the negative effects of device mobility in cell-based ad-hoc wireless computational grids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudali, P

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an outline of research being conducted to minimize the disruptive effects of device mobility in wireless computational grid networks. The proposed wireless grid framework uses the existing GSM cellular architecture, with emphasis...

  4. Reaching for the cloud: on the lessons learned from grid computing technology transfer process to the biomedical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Yassene; Dickmann, Frank; Sax, Ulrich; von Voigt, Gabriele; Smith, Matthew; Rienhoff, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Natural scientists such as physicists pioneered the sharing of computing resources, which led to the creation of the Grid. The inter domain transfer process of this technology has hitherto been an intuitive process without in depth analysis. Some difficulties facing the life science community in this transfer can be understood using the Bozeman's "Effectiveness Model of Technology Transfer". Bozeman's and classical technology transfer approaches deal with technologies which have achieved certain stability. Grid and Cloud solutions are technologies, which are still in flux. We show how Grid computing creates new difficulties in the transfer process that are not considered in Bozeman's model. We show why the success of healthgrids should be measured by the qualified scientific human capital and the opportunities created, and not primarily by the market impact. We conclude with recommendations that can help improve the adoption of Grid and Cloud solutions into the biomedical community. These results give a more concise explanation of the difficulties many life science IT projects are facing in the late funding periods, and show leveraging steps that can help overcoming the "vale of tears".

  5. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE-CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  6. Project PEACH at UCLH: Student Projects in Healthcare Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Navin; Mohamedally, Dean; Taylor, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A collaboration between clinicians at UCLH and the Dept of Computer Science at UCL is giving students of computer science the opportunity to undertake real healthcare computing projects as part of their education. This is enabling the creation of a significant research computing platform within the Trust, based on open source components and hosted in the cloud, while providing a large group of students with experience of the specific challenges of health IT.

  7. New data processing technologies at LHC: From Grid to Cloud Computing and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Salvo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Since a few years the LHC experiments at CERN are successfully using the Grid Computing Technologies for their distributed data processing activities, on a global scale. Recently, the experience gained with the current systems allowed the design of the future Computing Models, involving new technologies like Could Computing, virtualization and high performance distributed database access. In this paper we shall describe the new computational technologies of the LHC experiments at CERN, comparing them with the current models, in terms of features and performance.

  8. CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on spatial grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios, Luis F; Fernandez, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on a variety of spatial grids is presented. The program reads as unique input wavefunction files written by standard quantum packages and calculates the electron density rho(r), promolecule and density difference function, gradient of rho(r), Laplacian of rho(r), information entropy, electrostatic potential, kinetic energy densities G(r) and K(r), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL) function. These properties can be calculated on a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional grids that can be processed by widely used graphics programs to render high-resolution images. CheckDen offers also other options as extracting separate atom contributions to the property computed, converting grid output data into CUBE and OpenDX volumetric data formats, and perform arithmetic combinations with grid files in all the recognized formats.

  9. Reliable multicast for the Grid: a case study in experimental computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekovee, Maziar; Barcellos, Marinho P; Daw, Michael

    2005-08-15

    In its simplest form, multicast communication is the process of sending data packets from a source to multiple destinations in the same logical multicast group. IP multicast allows the efficient transport of data through wide-area networks, and its potentially great value for the Grid has been highlighted recently by a number of research groups. In this paper, we focus on the use of IP multicast in Grid applications, which require high-throughput reliable multicast. These include Grid-enabled computational steering and collaborative visualization applications, and wide-area distributed computing. We describe the results of our extensive evaluation studies of state-of-the-art reliable-multicast protocols, which were performed on the UK's high-speed academic networks. Based on these studies, we examine the ability of current reliable multicast technology to meet the Grid's requirements and discuss future directions.

  10. ATLAS computing activities and developments in the Italian Grid cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, L; Ciocca, C; K, M; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Martini, A; Barberis, D; Brunengo, A; Corosu, M; Barberis, S; Carminati, L; Campana, S; Di, A; Capone, V; Carlino, G; Doria, A; Esposito, R; Merola, L; De, A; Luminari, L

    2012-01-01

    The large amount of data produced by the ATLAS experiment needs new computing paradigms for data processing and analysis, which involve many computing centres spread around the world. The computing workload is managed by regional federations, called “clouds”. The Italian cloud consists of a main (Tier-1) center, located in Bologna, four secondary (Tier-2) centers, and a few smaller (Tier-3) sites. In this contribution we describe the Italian cloud facilities and the activities of data processing, analysis, simulation and software development performed within the cloud, and we discuss the tests of the new computing technologies contributing to evolution of the ATLAS Computing Model.

  11. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W → μν; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  12. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-12-14

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W {yields} {mu}{nu}; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  13. Erasmus Computing Grid: Het bouwen van een 20 Tera-FLOPS Virtuele Supercomputer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); J.H. van den Berg (Jan); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHet Erasmus Medisch Centrum en de Hogeschool Rotterdam zijn in 2005 een samenwerking begonnen teneinde de ongeveer 95% onbenutte rekencapaciteit van hun computers beschikbaar te maken voor onderzoek en onderwijs. Deze samenwerking heeft geleid tot het Erasmus Computing GRID (ECG),

  14. The GLOBE-Consortium: The Erasmus Computing Grid and The Next Generation Genome Viewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live-science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop

  15. Qualities of Grid Computing that can last for Ages | Asagba | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grid computing has emerged as an important new field, distinguished from conventional distributed computing based on its abilities on large-scale resource sharing and services. And it will even become more popular because of the benefits it can offer over the traditional supercomputers, and other forms of distributed ...

  16. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Francois

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 09), held 21-23 April. This document contains 14 sections, including a progress report on general Asia-EU Grid activities as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 09. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  17. An interprojection sensor fusion approach to estimate blocked projection signal in synchronized moving grid-based CBCT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong; Kong, Vic [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 (United States); Ren, Lei; Giles, William; Zhang, You [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Jin, Jian-Yue, E-mail: jjin@gru.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 and Department of Radiology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A preobject grid can reduce and correct scatter in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, half of the signal in each projection is blocked by the grid. A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to acquire two complimentary projections at each gantry position and merge them into one complete projection. That approach, however, suffers from increased scanning time and the technical difficulty of accurately merging the two projections per gantry angle. Herein, the authors present a new SMOG approach which acquires a single projection per gantry angle, with complimentary grid patterns for any two adjacent projections, and use an interprojection sensor fusion (IPSF) technique to estimate the blocked signal in each projection. The method may have the additional benefit of reduced imaging dose due to the grid blocking half of the incident radiation. Methods: The IPSF considers multiple paired observations from two adjacent gantry angles as approximations of the blocked signal and uses a weighted least square regression of these observations to finally determine the blocked signal. The method was first tested with a simulated SMOG on a head phantom. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), which represents the difference of the recovered CBCT image to the original image without the SMOG, was used to evaluate the ability of the IPSF in recovering the missing signal. The IPSF approach was then tested using a Catphan phantom on a prototype SMOG assembly installed in a bench top CBCT system. Results: In the simulated SMOG experiment, the SNRs were increased from 15.1 and 12.7 dB to 35.6 and 28.9 dB comparing with a conventional interpolation method (inpainting method) for a projection and the reconstructed 3D image, respectively, suggesting that IPSF successfully recovered most of blocked signal. In the prototype SMOG experiment, the authors have successfully reconstructed a CBCT image using the IPSF-SMOG approach. The detailed geometric features in the

  18. An interprojection sensor fusion approach to estimate blocked projection signal in synchronized moving grid-based CBCT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Kong, Vic; Ren, Lei; Giles, William; Zhang, You; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A preobject grid can reduce and correct scatter in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, half of the signal in each projection is blocked by the grid. A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to acquire two complimentary projections at each gantry position and merge them into one complete projection. That approach, however, suffers from increased scanning time and the technical difficulty of accurately merging the two projections per gantry angle. Herein, the authors present a new SMOG approach which acquires a single projection per gantry angle, with complimentary grid patterns for any two adjacent projections, and use an interprojection sensor fusion (IPSF) technique to estimate the blocked signal in each projection. The method may have the additional benefit of reduced imaging dose due to the grid blocking half of the incident radiation. Methods: The IPSF considers multiple paired observations from two adjacent gantry angles as approximations of the blocked signal and uses a weighted least square regression of these observations to finally determine the blocked signal. The method was first tested with a simulated SMOG on a head phantom. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), which represents the difference of the recovered CBCT image to the original image without the SMOG, was used to evaluate the ability of the IPSF in recovering the missing signal. The IPSF approach was then tested using a Catphan phantom on a prototype SMOG assembly installed in a bench top CBCT system. Results: In the simulated SMOG experiment, the SNRs were increased from 15.1 and 12.7 dB to 35.6 and 28.9 dB comparing with a conventional interpolation method (inpainting method) for a projection and the reconstructed 3D image, respectively, suggesting that IPSF successfully recovered most of blocked signal. In the prototype SMOG experiment, the authors have successfully reconstructed a CBCT image using the IPSF-SMOG approach. The detailed geometric features in the

  19. Smart grid. Research project of EON Bayern. Research project ''Grid of the future''; Smart-Grid. Forschungsprojekt der Eon Bayern. Forschungsprojekt ''Netz der Zukunft''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garhamer, Michael [Eon Bayern AG, Regensburg (Germany). Bereich Grundsatzaufgaben, Assetmanagement

    2012-03-12

    In February 2010, several smart-grid investigations were initiated by EON's regional utility companies and the EON Energie AG (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany). The focal points of research were: (1) Integration of an enhanced wind energy supply in the medium and high voltage grids; (2) Intelligent local power station; (3) Longitudinal voltage regulator / voltage conditioner and controllable local power transformers; (4) Configuration and investigation of a district with modern building technology, photovoltaic systems and electric vehicles; (5) Integration of an enhanced solar feeding in low and medium voltage grids. The findings relating to the purchase behaviour and supply behaviour of the grids enable customers to optimize the existing planning fundamentals. Future technical and legal innovations are explored previously in the project area and implemented.

  20. Development of an international matrix-solver prediction system on a French-Japanese international grid computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tatekawa, Takayuki; Teshima, Naoya; Caniou, Yves; Guivarch, Ronan; Dayde, Michel; Ramet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The 'Research and Development of International Matrix-Solver Prediction System (REDIMPS)' project aimed at improving the TLSE sparse linear algebra expert website by establishing an international grid computing environment between Japan and France. To help users in identifying the best solver or sparse linear algebra tool for their problems, we have developed an interoperable environment between French and Japanese grid infrastructures (respectively managed by DIET and AEGIS). Two main issues were considered. The first issue is how to submit a job from DIET to AEGIS. The second issue is how to bridge the difference of security between DIET and AEGIS. To overcome these issues, we developed APIs to communicate between different grid infrastructures by improving the client API of AEGIS. By developing a server deamon program (SeD) of DIET which behaves like an AEGIS user, DIET can call functions in AEGIS: authentication, file transfer, job submission, and so on. To intensify the security, we also developed functionalities to authenticate DIET sites and DIET users in order to access AEGIS computing resources. By this study, the set of software and computers available within TLSE to find an appropriate solver is enlarged over France (DIET) and Japan (AEGIS). (author)

  1. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  2. Definition, modeling and simulation of a grid computing system for high throughput computing

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, E; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study and compare grid and global computing systems and outline the benefits of having an hybrid system called dirac. To evaluate the dirac scheduling for high throughput computing, a new model is presented and a simulator was developed for many clusters of heterogeneous nodes belonging to a local network. These clusters are assumed to be connected to each other through a global network and each cluster is managed via a local scheduler which is shared by many users. We validate our simulator by comparing the experimental and analytical results of a M/M/4 queuing system. Next, we do the comparison with a real batch system and we obtain an average error of 10.5% for the response time and 12% for the makespan. We conclude that the simulator is realistic and well describes the behaviour of a large-scale system. Thus we can study the scheduling of our system called dirac in a high throughput context. We justify our decentralized, adaptive and oppor! tunistic approach in comparison to a centralize...

  3. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  4. Cloud Computing for Pharmacometrics: Using AWS, NONMEM, PsN, Grid Engine, and Sonic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduja, S; Jewell, P; Aron, E; Pharai, N

    2015-09-01

    Cloud computing allows pharmacometricians to access advanced hardware, network, and security resources available to expedite analysis and reporting. Cloud-based computing environments are available at a fraction of the time and effort when compared to traditional local datacenter-based solutions. This tutorial explains how to get started with building your own personal cloud computer cluster using Amazon Web Services (AWS), NONMEM, PsN, Grid Engine, and Sonic.

  5. Norwegian computers in European energy research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    16 NORD computers have been ordered for the JET data acquisition and storage system. The computers will be arranged in a 'double star' configuration, developed by CERN. Two control consoles each have their own computer. All computers for communication, control, diagnostics, consoles and testing are NORD-100s while the computer for data storage and analysis is a NORD-500. The operating system is SINTRAN CAMAC SERIAL HIGHWAY with fibre optics to be used for long communications paths. The programming languages FORTRAN, NODAL, NORD PL, PASCAL and BASIC may be used. The JET project and TOKAMAK type machines are briefly described. (JIW)

  6. Telecommunication Technologies for Smart Grid Projects with Focus on Smart Metering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta Andreadou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a study of the smart grid projects realised in Europe and presents their technological solutions with a focus on smart metering Low Voltage (LV applications. Special attention is given to the telecommunications technologies used. For this purpose, we present the telecommunication technologies chosen by several European utilities for the accomplishment of their smart meter national roll-outs. Further on, a study is performed based on the European Smart Grid Projects, highlighting their technological options. The range of the projects analysed covers the ones including smart metering implementation as well as those in which smart metering applications play a significant role in the overall project success. The survey reveals that various topics are directly or indirectly linked to smart metering applications, like smart home/building, energy management, grid monitoring and integration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES. Therefore, the technological options that lie behind such projects are pointed out. For reasons of completeness, we also present the main characteristics of the telecommunication technologies that are found to be used in practice for the LV grid.

  7. Experimental Demonstration of a Self-organized Architecture for Emerging Grid Computing Applications on OBS Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Hong, Xiaobin; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    As Grid computing continues to gain popularity in the industry and research community, it also attracts more attention from the customer level. The large number of users and high frequency of job requests in the consumer market make it challenging. Clearly, all the current Client/Server(C/S)-based architecture will become unfeasible for supporting large-scale Grid applications due to its poor scalability and poor fault-tolerance. In this paper, based on our previous works [1, 2], a novel self-organized architecture to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids is proposed. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for consumer-oriented Grids.

  8. Surface Modeling, Grid Generation, and Related Issues in Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Steering Committee for Surface Modeling and Grid Generation (SMAGG) sponsored a workshop on surface modeling, grid generation, and related issues in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions at Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, May 9-11, 1995. The workshop provided a forum to identify industry needs, strengths, and weaknesses of the five grid technologies (patched structured, overset structured, Cartesian, unstructured, and hybrid), and to exchange thoughts about where each technology will be in 2 to 5 years. The workshop also provided opportunities for engineers and scientists to present new methods, approaches, and applications in SMAGG for CFD. This Conference Publication (CP) consists of papers on industry overview, NASA overview, five grid technologies, new methods/ approaches/applications, and software systems.

  9. Proceedings of the Spanish Conference on e-Science Grid Computing. March 1-2, 2007. Madrid (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, J.; Mayo, R.; Munoz, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Conference on e-Science Grid Computing and the EGEE-EELA Industrial Day (http://webrt.ciemat.es:8000/e-science/index.html) are the first edition of this open forum for the integration of Grid Technologies and its applications in the Spanish community. It has been organised by CIEMAT and CETA-CIEMAT, sponsored by IBM and HP and supported by the European Community through their funded projects EELA, EUChinaGrid and EUMedGrid. To all of them, the conference is very grateful. e-Science is the concept that defines those activities developed by using geographically distributed resources, which scientists (or whoever) can access through the Internet. However, commercial Internet does not fulfil resources such as calculus and massive storage -most frequently in demand in the field of e-Science- since they require high-speed networks devoted to research. These networks, alongside the collaborative work applications developed within them, are creating an ideal scenario for interaction among researchers. Thus, this technology that interconnects a huge variety of computers, information repositories, applications software and scientific tools will change the society in the next few years. The science, industry and services systems will benefit from his immense capacity of computation that will improve the quality of life and the well-being of citizens. The future generation of technologies, which will reach all of these areas in society, such as research, medicine, engineering, economy and entertainment will be based on integrated computers and networks, rendering a very high quality of services and applications through a friendly interface. The conference aims at becoming a liaison framework between Spanish and International developers and users of e-Science applications and at implementing these technologies in Spain. It intends to be a forum where the state of the art of different European projects on e- Science is shown, as well as developments in the research

  10. GridFactory - Distributed computing on ephemeral resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko

    2011-01-01

    A novel batch system for high throughput computing is presented. The system is specifically designed to leverage virtualization and web technology to facilitate deployment on cloud and other ephemeral resources. In particular, it implements a security model suited for forming collaborations...

  11. Fast calculation method of computer-generated hologram using a depth camera with point cloud gridding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Shi, Chen-Xiao; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Yan-Ling; Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2018-03-01

    We propose a fast calculation method for a computer-generated hologram (CGH) of real objects that uses a point cloud gridding method. The depth information of the scene is acquired using a depth camera and the point cloud model is reconstructed virtually. Because each point of the point cloud is distributed precisely to the exact coordinates of each layer, each point of the point cloud can be classified into grids according to its depth. A diffraction calculation is performed on the grids using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain a CGH. The computational complexity is reduced dramatically in comparison with conventional methods. The feasibility of the proposed method was confirmed by numerical and optical experiments.

  12. Insights from stakeholders of five residential smart grid pilot projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obinna, U.; Joore, P.; Wauben, L.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents insights and perceptions of stakeholders involved in the development and implementation of residential smart grid pilot projects in the Netherlands, adding to the limited information that is currently available in this area, while expectations about the potential benefits of

  13. Survey of Energy Computing in the Smart Grid Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Kumar; Arun Agarwala

    2013-01-01

    Resource optimization, with advance computing tools, improves the efficient use of energy resources. The renewable energy resources are instantaneous and needs to be conserve at the same time. To optimize real time process, the complex design, includes plan of resources and control for effective utilization. The advances in information communication technology tools enables data formatting and analysis results in optimization of use the renewable resources for sustainable energy solution on s...

  14. From the web to the grid and beyond. Computing paradigms driven by high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Rene; Carminati, Federico; Galli Carminati, Giuliana

    2012-01-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the Web, and grid- and cloud computing. The important issue of intellectual property regulations for distributed software engineering and computing is also addressed. Aptly, the book closes with a visionary chapter of what may lie ahead. Approachable and requiring only basic understanding of physics and computer sciences, this book is intended for both education and research. (orig.)

  15. From the web to the grid and beyond. Computing paradigms driven by high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Rene; Carminati, Federico [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Galli Carminati, Giuliana (eds.) [Hopitaux Universitaire de Geneve, Chene-Bourg (Switzerland). Unite de la Psychiatrie du Developpement Mental

    2012-07-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the Web, and grid- and cloud computing. The important issue of intellectual property regulations for distributed software engineering and computing is also addressed. Aptly, the book closes with a visionary chapter of what may lie ahead. Approachable and requiring only basic understanding of physics and computer sciences, this book is intended for both education and research. (orig.)

  16. A portable grid-enabled computing system for a nuclear material study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujita, Yuichi; Arima, Tatsumi; Takekawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    We have built a portable grid-enabled computing system specialized for our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program to study Pu material easily. Experimental approach to reveal properties of Pu materials is often accompanied by some difficulties such as radiotoxicity of actinides. Since a computational approach reveals new aspects to researchers without such radioactive facilities, we address an MD computation. In order to have more realistic results about e.g., melting point or thermal conductivity, we need a large scale of parallel computations. Most of application users who don't have supercomputers in their institutes should use a remote supercomputer. For such users, we have developed the portable and secured grid-enabled computing system to utilize a grid computing infrastructure provided by Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL). This system enables us to access remote supercomputers in the ITBL system seamlessly from a client PC through its graphical user interface (GUI). Typically it enables seamless file accesses on the GUI. Furthermore monitoring of standard output or standard error is available to see progress of an executed program. Since the system provides fruitful functionalities which are useful for parallel computing on a remote supercomputer, application users can concentrate on their researches. (author)

  17. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  18. Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project Technology Performance Report Volume 1: Technology Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Ron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), a $179 million project that was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in late 2009, was one of the largest and most comprehensive demonstrations of electricity grid modernization ever completed. The project was one of 16 regional smart grid demonstrations funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It was the only demonstration that included multiple states and cooperation from multiple electric utilities, including rural electric co-ops, investor-owned, municipal, and other public utilities. No fewer than 55 unique instantiations of distinct smart grid systems were demonstrated at the projects’ sites. The local objectives for these systems included improved reliability, energy conservation, improved efficiency, and demand responsiveness. The demonstration developed and deployed an innovative transactive system, unique in the world, that coordinated many of the project’s distributed energy resources and demand-responsive components. With the transactive system, additional regional objectives were also addressed, including the mitigation of renewable energy intermittency and the flattening of system load. Using the transactive system, the project coordinated a regional response across the 11 utilities. This region-wide connection from the transmission system down to individual premises equipment was one of the major successes of the project. The project showed that this can be done and assets at the end points can respond dynamically on a wide scale. In principle, a transactive system of this type might eventually help coordinate electricity supply, transmission, distribution, and end uses by distributing mostly automated control responsibilities among the many distributed smart grid domain members and their smart devices.

  19. From the Web to the Grid and beyond computing paradigms driven by high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carminati, Federico; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana

    2012-01-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the ...

  20. Grid interoperability: the interoperations cookbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, L; Schulz, M [CERN (Switzerland)], E-mail: Laurence.Field@cern.ch, E-mail: Markus.Schulz@cern.ch

    2008-07-01

    Over recent years a number of grid projects have emerged which have built grid infrastructures that are now the computing backbones for various user communities. A significant number of these communities are limited to one grid infrastructure due to the different middleware and procedures used in each grid. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable virtual organizations to access resources independent of the grid project affiliation. This paper gives an overview of grid interoperation and describes the current methods used to bridge the differences between grids. Actual use cases encountered during the last three years are discussed and the most important interfaces required for interoperability are highlighted. A summary of the standardisation efforts in these areas is given and we argue for moving more aggressively towards standards.

  1. Grid interoperability: the interoperations cookbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, L; Schulz, M

    2008-01-01

    Over recent years a number of grid projects have emerged which have built grid infrastructures that are now the computing backbones for various user communities. A significant number of these communities are limited to one grid infrastructure due to the different middleware and procedures used in each grid. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable virtual organizations to access resources independent of the grid project affiliation. This paper gives an overview of grid interoperation and describes the current methods used to bridge the differences between grids. Actual use cases encountered during the last three years are discussed and the most important interfaces required for interoperability are highlighted. A summary of the standardisation efforts in these areas is given and we argue for moving more aggressively towards standards

  2. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose.

  3. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose

  4. Grid resilience governance of the future: analyzing the role of associations in experimental smart grid projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Imke; Vasenev, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Local generation decentralizes urban grids. Soon new actors, such as associations, might enter the traditional energy domain. As electrical grids are critical for society, new actors will need to collaborate with other city-level stakeholders to ensure proper grid functioning in times of crisis.

  5. User's Manual for FOMOCO Utilities-Force and Moment Computation Tools for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    1996-01-01

    In the numerical computations of flows around complex configurations, accurate calculations of force and moment coefficients for aerodynamic surfaces are required. When overset grid methods are used, the surfaces on which force and moment coefficients are sought typically consist of a collection of overlapping surface grids. Direct integration of flow quantities on the overlapping grids would result in the overlapped regions being counted more than once. The FOMOCO Utilities is a software package for computing flow coefficients (force, moment, and mass flow rate) on a collection of overset surfaces with accurate accounting of the overlapped zones. FOMOCO Utilities can be used in stand-alone mode or in conjunction with the Chimera overset grid compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW. The software package consists of two modules corresponding to a two-step procedure: (1) hybrid surface grid generation (MIXSUR module), and (2) flow quantities integration (OVERINT module). Instructions on how to use this software package are described in this user's manual. Equations used in the flow coefficients calculation are given in Appendix A.

  6. Economic models for management of resources in peer-to-peer and grid computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Stockinger, Heinz; Giddy, Jonathan; Abramson, David

    2001-07-01

    The accelerated development in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) and Grid computing has positioned them as promising next generation computing platforms. They enable the creation of Virtual Enterprises (VE) for sharing resources distributed across the world. However, resource management, application development and usage models in these environments is a complex undertaking. This is due to the geographic distribution of resources that are owned by different organizations or peers. The resource owners of each of these resources have different usage or access policies and cost models, and varying loads and availability. In order to address complex resource management issues, we have proposed a computational economy framework for resource allocation and for regulating supply and demand in Grid computing environments. The framework provides mechanisms for optimizing resource provider and consumer objective functions through trading and brokering services. In a real world market, there exist various economic models for setting the price for goods based on supply-and-demand and their value to the user. They include commodity market, posted price, tenders and auctions. In this paper, we discuss the use of these models for interaction between Grid components in deciding resource value and the necessary infrastructure to realize them. In addition to normal services offered by Grid computing systems, we need an infrastructure to support interaction protocols, allocation mechanisms, currency, secure banking, and enforcement services. Furthermore, we demonstrate the usage of some of these economic models in resource brokering through Nimrod/G deadline and cost-based scheduling for two different optimization strategies on the World Wide Grid (WWG) testbed that contains peer-to-peer resources located on five continents: Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.

  7. Computer experiments with a coarse-grid hydrodynamic climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenchikov, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    A climate model is developed on the basis of the two-level Mintz-Arakawa general circulation model of the atmosphere and a bulk model of the upper layer of the ocean. A detailed model of the spectral transport of shortwave and longwave radiation is used to investigate the radiative effects of greenhouse gases. The radiative fluxes are calculated at the boundaries of five layers, each with a pressure thickness of about 200 mb. The results of the climate sensitivity calculations for mean-annual and perpetual seasonal regimes are discussed. The CCAS (Computer Center of the Academy of Sciences) climate model is used to investigate the climatic effects of anthropogenic changes of the optical properties of the atmosphere due to increasing CO 2 content and aerosol pollution, and to calculate the sensitivity to changes of land surface albedo and humidity

  8. [''R"--project for statistical computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessau, R.B.; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2008-01-01

    An introduction to the R project for statistical computing (www.R-project.org) is presented. The main topics are: 1. To make the professional community aware of "R" as a potent and free software for graphical and statistical analysis of medical data; 2. Simple well-known statistical tests are fai...... are fairly easy to perform in R, but more complex modelling requires programming skills; 3. R is seen as a tool for teaching statistics and implementing complex modelling of medical data among medical professionals Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/28......An introduction to the R project for statistical computing (www.R-project.org) is presented. The main topics are: 1. To make the professional community aware of "R" as a potent and free software for graphical and statistical analysis of medical data; 2. Simple well-known statistical tests...

  9. Project GRACE A grid based search tool for the global digital library

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, Frank; Vigen, Jens; Prazak, Petra; The Seventh International Conference on Electronic Theses and Dissertations

    2004-01-01

    The paper will report on the progress of an ongoing EU project called GRACE - Grid Search and Categorization Engine (http://www.grace-ist.org). The project participants are CERN, Sheffield Hallam University, Stockholm University, Stuttgart University, GL 2006 and Telecom Italia. The project started in 2002 and will finish in 2005, resulting in a Grid based search engine that will search across a variety of content sources including a number of electronic thesis and dissertation repositories. The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) is expanding and is clearly an interesting movement for a community advocating open access to ETD. However, the OAI approach alone may not be sufficiently scalable to achieve a truly global ETD Digital Library. Many universities simply offer their collections to the world via their local web services without being part of any federated system for archiving and even those dissertations that are provided with OAI compliant metadata will not necessarily be picked up by a centralized OAI Ser...

  10. Constructing users in the smart grid - insights from the Danish eFlex project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Sophie; Røpke, Inge

    2013-01-01

    ) and transport (electric cars). In the process of radically transforming the electricity system, strategic system builders need to align many forces, including consumers, who play an important role in the functioning of such large networked systems. System builders need to explore, for instance, whether and how......The smart grid is promoted as one of the key elements in a low-carbon transition in many countries. In Denmark, the dominant framing of the smart grid emphasises the challenge of integrating much more wind power into the electricity system and using electricity for heating (heat pumps...... users can be motivated to be flexible in relation to moving electricity consumption over time. This paper reports on one of the first smart-grid-related projects in Denmark in which consumer aspects have been central and where potentials for flexible electricity consumption have been tested. The aim...

  11. The research on multi-projection correction based on color coding grid array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Han, Cheng; Bai, Baoxing; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yunxiu

    2017-10-01

    There are many disadvantages such as lower timeliness, greater manual intervention in multi-channel projection system, in order to solve the above problems, this paper proposes a multi-projector correction technology based on color coding grid array. Firstly, a color structured light stripe is generated by using the De Bruijn sequences, then meshing the feature information of the color structured light stripe image. We put the meshing colored grid intersection as the center of the circle, and build a white solid circle as the feature sample set of projected images. It makes the constructed feature sample set not only has the perceptual localization, but also has good noise immunity. Secondly, we establish the subpixel geometric mapping relationship between the projection screen and the individual projectors by using the structure of light encoding and decoding based on the color array, and the geometrical mapping relation is used to solve the homography matrix of each projector. Lastly the brightness inconsistency of the multi-channel projection overlap area is seriously interfered, it leads to the corrected image doesn't fit well with the observer's visual needs, and we obtain the projection display image of visual consistency by using the luminance fusion correction algorithm. The experimental results show that this method not only effectively solved the problem of distortion of multi-projection screen and the issue of luminance interference in overlapping region, but also improved the calibration efficient of multi-channel projective system and reduced the maintenance cost of intelligent multi-projection system.

  12. Grid: From EGEE to EGI and from INFN-Grid to IGI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giselli, A.; Mazzuccato, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the last fifteen years the approach of the computational Grid has changed the way to use computing resources. Grid computing has raised interest worldwide in academia, industry, and government with fast development cycles. Great efforts, huge funding and resources have been made available through national, regional and international initiatives aiming at providing Grid infrastructures, Grid core technologies, Grid middle ware and Grid applications. The Grid software layers reflect the architecture of the services developed so far by the most important European and international projects. In this paper Grid e-Infrastructure story is given, detailing European, Italian and international projects such as EGEE, INFN-Grid and NAREGI. In addition the sustainability issue in the long-term perspective is described providing plans by European and Italian communities with EGI and IGI.

  13. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  14. Experimental and computational investigations of heat and mass transfer of intensifier grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, Leonid; Oleksyuk, Dmitry; Semchenkov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses experimental and numerical investigations on intensification of thermal and mass exchange which were performed by National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' over the past years. Recently, many designs of heat mass transfer intensifier grids have been proposed. NRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' has accomplished a large scope of experimental investigations to study efficiency of intensifier grids of various types. The outcomes of experimental investigations can be used in verification of computational models and codes. On the basis of experimental data, we derived correlations to calculate coolant mixing and critical heat flux mixing in rod bundles equipped with intensifier grids. The acquired correlations were integrated in subchannel code SC-INT.

  15. PVUSA: The value of photovoltaics in the distribution system. The Kerman Grid-Support Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, H.J.; Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    As part of the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications Applications (PVUSA) Project Pacific Gas Electric Company (PG&E) built the Kerman 500-kW photovoltaic power plant. Located near the end of a distribution feeder in a rural section of Fresno County, the plant was not built so much to demonstrate PV technology, but to evaluate its interaction with the local distribution grid and quantify available nontraditional grid-support benefits (those other than energy and capacity). As demand for new generation began to languish in the 1980s, and siting and permitting of power plants and transmission lines became more involved, utilities began considering smaller, distributed power sources. Potential benefits include shorter construction lead time, less capital outlay, and better utilization of existing assets. The results of a PG&E study in 1990/1991 of the benefits from a PV system to the distribution grid prompted the PVUSA Project to construct a plant at Kerman. Completed in 1993, the plant is believed to be the first one specifically built to evaluate the multiple benefits to the grid of a strategically sited plant. Each of nine discrete benefits were evaluated in detail by first establishing the technical impact, then translating the results into present economic value. Benefits span the entire system from distribution feeder to the generation fleet. This work breaks new ground in evaluation of distributed resources, and suggests that resource planning practices be expanded to account for these non-traditional benefits.

  16. Comprehensive evaluation of power grid projects' investment benefits under the reform of transmission and distribution price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Wang, Gang; Zuo, Yi; Fan, Lisha; Ling, Yunpeng

    2017-03-01

    On March 15, 2015, the Central Office issued the "Opinions on Further Deepening the Reform of Electric Power System" (Zhong Fa No. 9). This policy marks the central government officially opened a new round of electricity reform. As a programmatic document under the new situation to comprehensively promote the reform of the power system, No. 9 document will be approved as a separate transmission and distribution of electricity prices, which is the first task of promoting the reform of the power system. Grid tariff reform is not only the transmission and distribution price of a separate approval, more of the grid company input-output relationship and many other aspects of deep-level adjustments. Under the background of the reform of the transmission and distribution price, the main factors affecting the input-output relationship, such as the main business, electricity pricing, and investment approval, financial accounting and so on, have changed significantly. The paper designed the comprehensive evaluation index system of power grid projects' investment benefits under the reform of transmission and distribution price to improve the investment efficiency of power grid projects after the power reform in China.

  17. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  18. Smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Bae

    2001-11-01

    This book describes press smart grid from basics to recent trend. It is divided into ten chapters, which deals with smart grid as green revolution in energy with introduction, history, the fields, application and needed technique for smart grid, Trend of smart grid in foreign such as a model business of smart grid in foreign, policy for smart grid in U.S.A, Trend of smart grid in domestic with international standard of smart grid and strategy and rood map, smart power grid as infrastructure of smart business with EMS development, SAS, SCADA, DAS and PQMS, smart grid for smart consumer, smart renewable like Desertec project, convergence IT with network and PLC, application of an electric car, smart electro service for realtime of electrical pricing system, arrangement of smart grid.

  19. A Global Computing Grid for LHC; Una red global de computacion para LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Calama, J. M.; Colino Arriero, N.

    2013-06-01

    An innovative computing infrastructure has played an instrumental role in the recent discovery of the Higgs boson in the LHC and has enabled scientists all over the world to store, process and analyze enormous amounts of data in record time. The Grid computing technology has made it possible to integrate computing center resources spread around the planet, including the CIEMAT, into a distributed system where these resources can be shared and accessed via Internet on a transparent, uniform basis. A global supercomputer for the LHC experiments. (Author)

  20. The performance model of dynamic virtual organization (VO) formations within grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. Within the grid computing context, successful dynamic VO formations mean a number of individuals and institutions associated with certain resources join together and form new VOs in order to effectively execute tasks within given time steps. To date, while the concept of VOs has been accepted, few research has been done on the impact of effective dynamic virtual organization formations. In this paper, we develop a performance model of dynamic VOs formation and analyze the effect of different complex organizational structures and their various statistic parameter properties on dynamic VO formations from three aspects: (1) the probability of a successful VO formation under different organizational structures and statistic parameters change, e.g. average degree; (2) the effect of task complexity on dynamic VO formations; (3) the impact of network scales on dynamic VO formations. The experimental results show that the proposed model can be used to understand the dynamic VO formation performance of the simulated organizations. The work provides a good path to understand how to effectively schedule and utilize resources based on the complex grid network and therefore improve the overall performance within grid environment.

  1. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  2. gCube Grid services

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    gCube is a service-based framework for eScience applications requiring collaboratory, on-demand, and intensive information processing. It provides to these communities Virtual Research Environments (VREs) to support their activities. gCube is build on top of standard technologies for computational Grids, namely the gLite middleware. The software was produced by the DILIGENT project and will continue to be supported and further developed by the D4Science project. gCube reflects within its name a three-sided interpretation of the Grid vision of resource sharing: sharing of computational resources, sharing of structured data, and sharing of application services. As such, gCube embodies the defining characteristics of computational Grids, data Grids, and virtual data Grids. Precisely, it builds on gLite middleware for managing distributed computations and unstructured data, includes dedicated services for managing data and metadata, provides services for distributed information retrieval, allows the orchestration...

  3. Grids to aid breast cancer diagnosis and research

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Mammo Grid project is studying the commercial possibilities for its distributed computing environment taht emplys existing Grid technologies for the creation of a European database of mammogram data (1 page)

  4. Climate modelling on the GRID Experiences in the EU-project EELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Quiruelas, V.; Fernandez, J.; Cofino, A. S.; Gutierrez, J. M.; Baeza Retamal, C.; Abarca del Rio, R.; Miguel San Martin, R.; Carrillo, M.

    2007-07-01

    Recent trends in climate modeling find in GRID computing a powerful way to achieve results by sharing computing and data distributed resources. In particular, ensemble prediction is based on the generation of multiple simulations from perturbed model conditions to sample the existing uncertainties. In this work, we present a GRID application consisting of a sequence of two state-of-the-art climate models (one global model and one regional model), operable through a web portal (based on Genius). The main goal of the application is providing ensemble-based regional predictions. This requires managing a complex work flow involving long-term jobs and job dependencies in a user-transparent way. In doing so, we identified the weaknesses of current middle ware tools and developed a robust work flow by merging the optimal existing applications with an underlying self-developed work flow application based on the communication with metadata catalogs (currently AMGA) storing application status and dynamic model output generation. As an illustrative scientific challenge, the application is applied to study the El Nino phenomenon, by simulating an El Nino year with different forcing conditions and analyzing the precipitation response over south-american countries subject to flooding risk. GRID computing; Climate models; CAM model; WRF model; Work flow. (Author)

  5. Climate modelling on the GRID Experiences in the EU-project EELA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Quiruelas, V.; Fernandez, J.; Cofino, A. S.; Gutierrez, J. M.; Baeza Retamal, C.; Abarca del Rio, R.; Miguel San Martin, R.; Carrillo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent trends in climate modeling find in GRID computing a powerful way to achieve results by sharing computing and data distributed resources. In particular, ensemble prediction is based on the generation of multiple simulations from perturbed model conditions to sample the existing uncertainties. In this work, we present a GRID application consisting of a sequence of two state-of-the-art climate models (one global model and one regional model), operable through a web portal (based on Genius). The main goal of the application is providing ensemble-based regional predictions. This requires managing a complex work flow involving long-term jobs and job dependencies in a user-transparent way. In doing so, we identified the weaknesses of current middle ware tools and developed a robust work flow by merging the optimal existing applications with an underlying self-developed work flow application based on the communication with metadata catalogs (currently AMGA) storing application status and dynamic model output generation. As an illustrative scientific challenge, the application is applied to study the El Nino phenomenon, by simulating an El Nino year with different forcing conditions and analyzing the precipitation response over south-american countries subject to flooding risk. GRID computing; Climate models; CAM model; WRF model; Work flow. (Author)

  6. A gateway for phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing featuring GARLI 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Adam L; Zwickl, Derrick J; Cummings, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    We introduce molecularevolution.org, a publicly available gateway for high-throughput, maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing. The gateway features a garli 2.0 web service that enables a user to quickly and easily submit thousands of maximum likelihood tree searches or bootstrap searches that are executed in parallel on distributed computing resources. The garli web service allows one to easily specify partitioned substitution models using a graphical interface, and it performs sophisticated post-processing of phylogenetic results. Although the garli web service has been used by the research community for over three years, here we formally announce the availability of the service, describe its capabilities, highlight new features and recent improvements, and provide details about how the grid system efficiently delivers high-quality phylogenetic results. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  7. Remote data access in computational jobs on the ATLAS data grid

    CERN Document Server

    Begy, Volodimir; The ATLAS collaboration; Lassnig, Mario

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the technique of remote data access from computational jobs on the ATLAS data grid. In comparison to traditional data movement and stage-in approaches it is well suited for data transfers which are asynchronous with respect to the job execution. Hence, it can be used for optimization of data access patterns based on various policies. In this study, remote data access is realized with the HTTP and WebDAV protocols, and is investigated in the context of intra- and inter-computing site data transfers. In both cases, the typical scenarios for application of remote data access are identified. The paper also presents an analysis of parameters influencing the data goodput between heterogeneous storage element - worker node pairs on the grid.

  8. An Efficient Approach for Fast and Accurate Voltage Stability Margin Computation in Large Power Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Yi Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient approach for the computation of voltage stability margin (VSM in a large-scale power grid. The objective is to accurately and rapidly determine the load power margin which corresponds to voltage collapse phenomena. The proposed approach is based on the impedance match-based technique and the model-based technique. It combines the Thevenin equivalent (TE network method with cubic spline extrapolation technique and the continuation technique to achieve fast and accurate VSM computation for a bulk power grid. Moreover, the generator Q limits are taken into account for practical applications. Extensive case studies carried out on Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE benchmark systems and the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower, Taipei, Taiwan system are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. Automatic knowledge extraction in sequencing analysis with multiagent system and grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roberto; Zato, Carolina; Benito, Rocío; Bajo, Javier; Hernández, Jesús M; De Paz, Juan F; Vera, Vicente; Corchado, Juan M

    2012-12-01

    Advances in bioinformatics have contributed towards a significant increase in available information. Information analysis requires the use of distributed computing systems to best engage the process of data analysis. This study proposes a multiagent system that incorporates grid technology to facilitate distributed data analysis by dynamically incorporating the roles associated to each specific case study. The system was applied to genetic sequencing data to extract relevant information about insertions, deletions or polymorphisms.

  10. Automatic knowledge extraction in sequencing analysis with multiagent system and grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in bioinformatics have contributed towards a significant increase in available information. Information analysis requires the use of distributed computing systems to best engage the process of data analysis. This study proposes a multiagent system that incorporates grid technology to facilitate distributed data analysis by dynamically incorporating the roles associated to each specific case study. The system was applied to genetic sequencing data to extract relevant information about insertions, deletions or polymorphisms.

  11. Grid computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Some of today's large-scale scientific activities - modelling climate change, Earth observation, studying the human genome and particle physics experiments - involve handling millions of bytes of data very rapidly." (1 page)

  12. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  13. Constructing users in the smart grid. Insights from the Danish eFlex project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyborg, S.; Roepke, I. [Center for Design, Innovation and Sustainable Transition, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-11-15

    The smart grid is promoted as one of the key elements in a low-carbon transition in many countries. In Denmark, the dominant framing of the smart grid emphasises the challenge of integrating much more wind power into the electricity system and using electricity for heating (heat pumps) and transport (electric cars). In the process of radically transforming the electricity system, strategic system builders need to align many forces, including consumers, who play an important role in the functioning of such large networked systems. System builders need to explore, for instance, whether and how users can be motivated to be flexible in relation to moving electricity consumption over time. This paper reports on one of the first smart-grid-related projects in Denmark in which consumer aspects have been central and where potentials for flexible electricity consumption have been tested. The aim of the paper is to explore what can be learned from such experiments and which roles they play in the construction of the smart grid. In this context, the concept of the 'aligned user' is introduced.

  14. An improved ant colony optimization algorithm with fault tolerance for job scheduling in grid computing systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajara Idris

    Full Text Available The Grid scheduler, schedules user jobs on the best available resource in terms of resource characteristics by optimizing job execution time. Resource failure in Grid is no longer an exception but a regular occurring event as resources are increasingly being used by the scientific community to solve computationally intensive problems which typically run for days or even months. It is therefore absolutely essential that these long-running applications are able to tolerate failures and avoid re-computations from scratch after resource failure has occurred, to satisfy the user's Quality of Service (QoS requirement. Job Scheduling with Fault Tolerance in Grid Computing using Ant Colony Optimization is proposed to ensure that jobs are executed successfully even when resource failure has occurred. The technique employed in this paper, is the use of resource failure rate, as well as checkpoint-based roll back recovery strategy. Check-pointing aims at reducing the amount of work that is lost upon failure of the system by immediately saving the state of the system. A comparison of the proposed approach with an existing Ant Colony Optimization (ACO algorithm is discussed. The experimental results of the implemented Fault Tolerance scheduling algorithm show that there is an improvement in the user's QoS requirement over the existing ACO algorithm, which has no fault tolerance integrated in it. The performance evaluation of the two algorithms was measured in terms of the three main scheduling performance metrics: makespan, throughput and average turnaround time.

  15. A transport layer protocol for the future high speed grid computing: SCTP versus fast tcp multihoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.J.; Mian, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) is designed for reliable data transfer on the global Internet today. One of its strong points is its use of flow control algorithm that allows TCP to adjust its congestion window if network congestion is occurred. A number of studies and investigations have confirmed that traditional TCP is not suitable for each and every type of application, for example, bulk data transfer over high speed long distance networks. TCP sustained the time of low-capacity and short-delay networks, however, for numerous factors it cannot be capable to efficiently deal with today's growing technologies (such as wide area Grid computing and optical-fiber networks). This research work surveys the congestion control mechanism of transport protocols, and addresses the different issues involved for transferring the huge data over the future high speed Grid computing and optical-fiber networks. This work also presents the simulations to compare the performance of FAST TCP multihoming with SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) multihoming in high speed networks. These simulation results show that FAST TCP multihoming achieves bandwidth aggregation efficiently and outperforms SCTP multihoming under a similar network conditions. The survey and simulation results presented in this work reveal that multihoming support into FAST TCP does provide a lot of benefits like redundancy, load-sharing and policy-based routing, which largely improves the whole performance of a network and can meet the increasing demand of the future high-speed network infrastructures (such as in Grid computing). (author)

  16. Solution of Poisson equations for 3-dimensional grid generations. [computations of a flow field over a thin delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method for generating three dimensional, finite difference grids about complicated geometries by using Poisson equations is developed. The inhomogenous terms are automatically chosen such that orthogonality and spacing restrictions at the body surface are satisfied. Spherical variables are used to avoid the axis singularity, and an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) solution scheme is used to accelerate the computations. Computed results are presented that show the capability of the method. Since most of the results presented have been used as grids for flow-field computations, this is indicative that the method is a useful tool for generating three-dimensional grids about complicated geometries.

  17. The open science grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, R.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE and NSF Laboratories and Universities and Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus

  18. Computational model for turbulent flow around a grid spacer with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomu Ikeno; Takeo Kajishima

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are important factors in subchannel analysis to predict onset of DNB. However, universal correlations are difficult since these factors are significantly affected by the geometry of subchannel and a grid spacer with mixing vane. Therefore, we propose a computational model to estimate these factors. Computational model: To represent the effect of geometry of grid spacer in computational model, we applied a large eddy simulation (LES) technique in couple with an improved immersed-boundary method. In our previous work (Ikeno, et al., NURETH-10), detailed properties of turbulence in subchannel were successfully investigated by developing the immersed boundary method in LES. In this study, additional improvements are given: new one-equation dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model is introduced to account for the complex geometry without any artificial modification; the higher order accuracy is maintained by consistent treatment for boundary conditions for velocity and pressure. NUMERICAL TEST AND DISCUSSION: Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are affected strongly by the arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. Therefore, computations are carried out for each of convolute and periodic arrangements, and for each of 30 degree and 20 degree inclinations. The difference in turbulent mixing coefficient due to these factors is reasonably predicted by our method. (An example of this numerical test is shown in Fig. 1.) Turbulent flow of the problem includes unsteady separation behind the mixing vane and vortex shedding in downstream. Anisotropic distribution of turbulent stress is also appeared in rod gap. Therefore, our computational model has advantage for assessing the influence of arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. By coarser computational mesh, one can screen several candidates for spacer design. Then, by finer mesh, more quantitative analysis is possible. By such a scheme, we believe this method is useful

  19. Thermal Protection System Cavity Heating for Simplified and Actual Geometries Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations with Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) Cavity Heating is predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) on unstructured grids for both simplified cavities and actual cavity geometries. Validation was performed using comparisons to wind tunnel experimental results and CFD predictions using structured grids. Full-scale predictions were made for simplified and actual geometry configurations on the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a mission support timeframe.

  20. Advanced Grid-Friendly Controls Demonstration Project for Utility-Scale PV Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; O' Neill, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A typical photovoltaic (PV) power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. The availability and dissemination of actual test data showing the viability of advanced utility-scale PV controls among all industry stakeholders can leverage PV's value from being simply an energy resource to providing additional ancillary services that range from variability smoothing and frequency regulation to power quality. Strategically partnering with a selected utility and/or PV power plant operator is a key condition for a successful demonstration project. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Office selected the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to be a principal investigator in a two-year project with goals to (1) identify a potential partner(s), (2) develop a detailed scope of work and test plan for a field project to demonstrate the gird-friendly capabilities of utility-scale PV power plants, (3) facilitate conducting actual demonstration tests, and (4) disseminate test results among industry stakeholders via a joint NREL/DOE publication and participation in relevant technical conferences. The project implementation took place in FY 2014 and FY 2015. In FY14, NREL established collaborations with AES and First Solar Electric, LLC, to conduct demonstration testing on their utility-scale PV power plants in Puerto Rico and Texas, respectively, and developed test plans for each partner. Both Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas expressed interest in this project because of the importance of such advanced controls for the reliable operation of their power systems under high penetration levels of variable renewable generation. During FY15, testing was completed on both plants, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of

  1. 2nd Generation QUATARA Flight Computer Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, Jay; Keys, Andrew; Fraticelli, Jose Molina; Capo-Iugo, Pedro; Peeples, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Single core flight computer boards have been designed, developed, and tested (DD&T) to be flown in small satellites for the last few years. In this project, a prototype flight computer will be designed as a distributed multi-core system containing four microprocessors running code in parallel. This flight computer will be capable of performing multiple computationally intensive tasks such as processing digital and/or analog data, controlling actuator systems, managing cameras, operating robotic manipulators and transmitting/receiving from/to a ground station. In addition, this flight computer will be designed to be fault tolerant by creating both a robust physical hardware connection and by using a software voting scheme to determine the processor's performance. This voting scheme will leverage on the work done for the Space Launch System (SLS) flight software. The prototype flight computer will be constructed with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components which are estimated to survive for two years in a low-Earth orbit.

  2. Intelligent battery energy management and control for vehicle-to-grid via cloud computing network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayyam, Hamid; Abawajy, Jemal; Javadi, Bahman; Goscinski, Andrzej; Stojcevski, Alex; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The intelligent battery energy management substantially reduces the interactions of PEV with parking lots. • The intelligent battery energy management improves the energy efficiency. • The intelligent battery energy management predicts the road load demand for vehicles. - Abstract: Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) provide new opportunities to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust emission. PEVs need to draw and store energy from an electrical grid to supply propulsive energy for the vehicle. As a result, it is important to know when PEVs batteries are available for charging and discharging. Furthermore, battery energy management and control is imperative for PEVs as the vehicle operation and even the safety of passengers depend on the battery system. Thus, scheduling the grid power electricity with parking lots would be needed for efficient charging and discharging of PEV batteries. This paper aims to propose a new intelligent battery energy management and control scheduling service charging that utilize Cloud computing networks. The proposed intelligent vehicle-to-grid scheduling service offers the computational scalability required to make decisions necessary to allow PEVs battery energy management systems to operate efficiently when the number of PEVs and charging devices are large. Experimental analyses of the proposed scheduling service as compared to a traditional scheduling service are conducted through simulations. The results show that the proposed intelligent battery energy management scheduling service substantially reduces the required number of interactions of PEV with parking lots and grid as well as predicting the load demand calculated in advance with regards to their limitations. Also it shows that the intelligent scheduling service charging using Cloud computing network is more efficient than the traditional scheduling service network for battery energy management and control

  3. WISDOM-II: Screening against multiple targets implicated in malaria using computational grid infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Colin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite continuous efforts of the international community to reduce the impact of malaria on developing countries, no significant progress has been made in the recent years and the discovery of new drugs is more than ever needed. Out of the many proteins involved in the metabolic activities of the Plasmodium parasite, some are promising targets to carry out rational drug discovery. Motivation Recent years have witnessed the emergence of grids, which are highly distributed computing infrastructures particularly well fitted for embarrassingly parallel computations like docking. In 2005, a first attempt at using grids for large-scale virtual screening focused on plasmepsins and ended up in the identification of previously unknown scaffolds, which were confirmed in vitro to be active plasmepsin inhibitors. Following this success, a second deployment took place in the fall of 2006 focussing on one well known target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, and on a new promising one, glutathione-S-transferase. Methods In silico drug design, especially vHTS is a widely and well-accepted technology in lead identification and lead optimization. This approach, therefore builds, upon the progress made in computational chemistry to achieve more accurate in silico docking and in information technology to design and operate large scale grid infrastructures. Results On the computational side, a sustained infrastructure has been developed: docking at large scale, using different strategies in result analysis, storing of the results on the fly into MySQL databases and application of molecular dynamics refinement are MM-PBSA and MM-GBSA rescoring. The modeling results obtained are very promising. Based on the modeling results, In vitro results are underway for all the targets against which screening is performed. Conclusion The current paper describes the rational drug discovery activity at large scale, especially molecular docking using FlexX software

  4. Large Atmospheric Computation on the Earth Simulator: The LACES Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Desgagné

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Atmospheric Computation on the Earth Simulator (LACES project is a joint initiative between Canadian and Japanese meteorological services and academic institutions that focuses on the high resolution simulation of Hurricane Earl (1998. The unique aspect of this effort is the extent of the computational domain, which covers all of North America and Europe with a grid spacing of 1 km. The Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community (MC2 model is shown to parallelize effectively on the Japanese Earth Simulator (ES supercomputer; however, even using the extensive computing resources of the ES Center (ESC, the full simulation for the majority of Hurricane Earl's lifecycle takes over eight days to perform and produces over 5.2 TB of raw data. Preliminary diagnostics show that the results of the LACES simulation for the tropical stage of Hurricane Earl's lifecycle compare well with available observations for the storm. Further studies involving advanced diagnostics have commenced, taking advantage of the uniquely large spatial extent of the high resolution LACES simulation to investigate multiscale interactions in the hurricane and its environment. It is hoped that these studies will enhance our understanding of processes occurring within the hurricane and between the hurricane and its planetary-scale environment.

  5. AEP Ohio gridSMART Demonstration Project Real-Time Pricing Demonstration Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek; Marinovici, Maria C.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.

    2014-02-01

    This report contributes initial findings from an analysis of significant aspects of the gridSMART® Real-Time Pricing (RTP) – Double Auction demonstration project. Over the course of four years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) worked with American Electric Power (AEP), Ohio and Battelle Memorial Institute to design, build, and operate an innovative system to engage residential consumers and their end-use resources in a participatory approach to electric system operations, an incentive-based approach that has the promise of providing greater efficiency under normal operating conditions and greater flexibility to react under situations of system stress. The material contained in this report supplements the findings documented by AEP Ohio in the main body of the gridSMART report. It delves into three main areas: impacts on system operations, impacts on households, and observations about the sensitivity of load to price changes.

  6. Projection computation based on pixel in simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xu; Chen Zhiqiang; Xiong Hua; Zhang Li

    2005-01-01

    SART is an important arithmetic of image reconstruction, in which the projection computation takes over half of the reconstruction time. An efficient way to compute projection coefficient matrix together with memory optimization is presented in this paper. Different from normal method, projection lines are located based on every pixel, and the following projection coefficient computation can make use of the results. Correlation of projection lines and pixels can be used to optimize the computation. (authors)

  7. The Future of Distributed Computing Systems in ATLAS: Boldly Venturing Beyond Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando Harald; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has seen big changes over the past couple of years to accommodate new types of distributed computing resources: clouds, HPCs, volunteer computers and other external resources. While PanDA was originally designed for fairly homogeneous resources available through the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, the new resources are heterogeneous, at diverse scales and with diverse interfaces. Up to a fifth of the resources available to ATLAS are of such new types and require special techniques for integration into PanDA. In this talk, we present the nature and scale of these resources. We provide an overview of the various challenges faced, spanning infrastructure, software distribution, workload requirements, scaling requirements, workflow management, data management, network provisioning, and associated software and computing facilities. We describe the strategies for integrating these heterogeneous resources into ...

  8. Forecasting Model for Network Throughput of Remote Data Access in Computing Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Begy, Volodimir; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Computing grids are one of the key enablers of eScience. Researchers from many fields (e.g. High Energy Physics, Bioinformatics, Climatology, etc.) employ grids to run computational jobs in a highly distributed manner. The current state of the art approach for data access in the grid is data placement: a job is scheduled to run at a specific data center, and its execution starts only when the complete input data has been transferred there. This approach has two major disadvantages: (1) the jobs are staying idle while waiting for the input data; (2) due to the limited infrastructure resources, the distributed data management system handling the data placement, may queue the transfers up to several days. An alternative approach is remote data access: a job may stream the input data directly from storage elements, which may be located at local or remote data centers. Remote data access brings two innovative benefits: (1) the jobs can be executed asynchronously with respect to the data transfer; (2) when combined...

  9. From the CERN web: grid computing, night shift, ridge effect and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...   Schoolboy uses grid computing to analyse satellite data 9 December - by David Lugmayer  At just 16, Cal Hewitt, a student at Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys in the United Kingdom became the youngest person to receive grid certification – giving him access to huge grid-computing resources. Hewitt uses these resources to help analyse data from the LUCID satellite detector, which a team of students from the school launched into space last year. Continue to read…    Night shift in the CMS Control Room (Photo: Andrés Delannoy). On Seagull Soup and Coffee Deficiency: Night Shift at CMS 8 December – CMS Collaboration More than half a year, a school trip to CERN, and a round of 13 TeV collisions later, the week-long internship we completed at CMS over E...

  10. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid; Le calcul scientifique des experiences LHC: une grille de production mondiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairouz, Malek [Universite Joseph-Fourier, LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3, Grenoble I, 38 (France)

    2010-08-15

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10{sup 10} collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10{sup 9} octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10{sup 15} octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  11. Understanding and Mastering Dynamics in Computing Grids Processing Moldable Tasks with User-Level Overlay

    CERN Document Server

    Moscicki, Jakub Tomasz

    Scientic communities are using a growing number of distributed systems, from lo- cal batch systems, community-specic services and supercomputers to general-purpose, global grid infrastructures. Increasing the research capabilities for science is the raison d'^etre of such infrastructures which provide access to diversied computational, storage and data resources at large scales. Grids are rather chaotic, highly heterogeneous, de- centralized systems where unpredictable workloads, component failures and variability of execution environments are commonplace. Understanding and mastering the hetero- geneity and dynamics of such distributed systems is prohibitive for end users if they are not supported by appropriate methods and tools. The time cost to learn and use the interfaces and idiosyncrasies of dierent distributed environments is another challenge. Obtaining more reliable application execution times and boosting parallel speedup are important to increase the research capabilities of scientic communities. L...

  12. Numerical Nuclear Second Derivatives on a Computing Grid: Enabling and Accelerating Frequency Calculations on Complex Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzuhsiung; Berry, John F

    2018-06-04

    The computation of nuclear second derivatives of energy, or the nuclear Hessian, is an essential routine in quantum chemical investigations of ground and transition states, thermodynamic calculations, and molecular vibrations. Analytic nuclear Hessian computations require the resolution of costly coupled-perturbed self-consistent field (CP-SCF) equations, while numerical differentiation of analytic first derivatives has an unfavorable 6 N ( N = number of atoms) prefactor. Herein, we present a new method in which grid computing is used to accelerate and/or enable the evaluation of the nuclear Hessian via numerical differentiation: NUMFREQ@Grid. Nuclear Hessians were successfully evaluated by NUMFREQ@Grid at the DFT level as well as using RIJCOSX-ZORA-MP2 or RIJCOSX-ZORA-B2PLYP for a set of linear polyacenes with systematically increasing size. For the larger members of this group, NUMFREQ@Grid was found to outperform the wall clock time of analytic Hessian evaluation; at the MP2 or B2LYP levels, these Hessians cannot even be evaluated analytically. We also evaluated a 156-atom catalytically relevant open-shell transition metal complex and found that NUMFREQ@Grid is faster (7.7 times shorter wall clock time) and less demanding (4.4 times less memory requirement) than an analytic Hessian. Capitalizing on the capabilities of parallel grid computing, NUMFREQ@Grid can outperform analytic methods in terms of wall time, memory requirements, and treatable system size. The NUMFREQ@Grid method presented herein demonstrates how grid computing can be used to facilitate embarrassingly parallel computational procedures and is a pioneer for future implementations.

  13. WNoDeS, a tool for integrated Grid and Cloud access and computing farm virtualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomoni, Davide; Italiano, Alessandro; Ronchieri, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    INFN CNAF is the National Computing Center, located in Bologna, Italy, of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN). INFN CNAF, also called the INFN Tier-1, provides computing and storage facilities to the International High-Energy Physics community and to several multi-disciplinary experiments. Currently, the INFN Tier-1 supports more than twenty different collaborations; in this context, optimization of the usage of computing resources is essential. This is one of the main drivers behind the development of a software called WNoDeS (Worker Nodes on Demand Service). WNoDeS, developed at INFN CNAF and deployed on the INFN Tier-1 production infrastructure, is a solution to virtualize computing resources and to make them available through local, Grid or Cloud interfaces. It is designed to be fully integrated with a Local Resource Management System; it is therefore inherently scalable and permits full integration with existing scheduling, policing, monitoring, accounting and security workflows. WNoDeS dynamically instantiates Virtual Machines (VMs) on-demand, i.e. only when the need arises; these VMs can be tailored and used for purposes like batch job execution, interactive analysis or service instantiation. WNoDeS supports interaction with user requests through traditional batch or Grid jobs and also via the Open Cloud Computing Interface standard, making it possible to allocate compute, storage and network resources on a pay-as-you-go basis. User authentication is supported via several authentication methods, while authorization policies are handled via gLite Argus. WNoDeS is an ambitious solution aimed at virtualizing cluster resources in medium or large scale computing centers, with up to several thousands of Virtual Machines up and running at any given time. In this paper, we describe the WNoDeS architecture.

  14. WNoDeS, a tool for integrated Grid and Cloud access and computing farm virtualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomoni, Davide; Italiano, Alessandro; Ronchieri, Elisabetta

    2011-12-01

    INFN CNAF is the National Computing Center, located in Bologna, Italy, of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN). INFN CNAF, also called the INFN Tier-1, provides computing and storage facilities to the International High-Energy Physics community and to several multi-disciplinary experiments. Currently, the INFN Tier-1 supports more than twenty different collaborations; in this context, optimization of the usage of computing resources is essential. This is one of the main drivers behind the development of a software called WNoDeS (Worker Nodes on Demand Service). WNoDeS, developed at INFN CNAF and deployed on the INFN Tier-1 production infrastructure, is a solution to virtualize computing resources and to make them available through local, Grid or Cloud interfaces. It is designed to be fully integrated with a Local Resource Management System; it is therefore inherently scalable and permits full integration with existing scheduling, policing, monitoring, accounting and security workflows. WNoDeS dynamically instantiates Virtual Machines (VMs) on-demand, i.e. only when the need arises; these VMs can be tailored and used for purposes like batch job execution, interactive analysis or service instantiation. WNoDeS supports interaction with user requests through traditional batch or Grid jobs and also via the Open Cloud Computing Interface standard, making it possible to allocate compute, storage and network resources on a pay-as-you-go basis. User authentication is supported via several authentication methods, while authorization policies are handled via gLite Argus. WNoDeS is an ambitious solution aimed at virtualizing cluster resources in medium or large scale computing centers, with up to several thousands of Virtual Machines up and running at any given time. In this paper, we descrive the WNoDeS architecture.

  15. Introducing Enabling Computational Tools to the Climate Sciences: Multi-Resolution Climate Modeling with Adaptive Cubed-Sphere Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, Christiane [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The research investigates and advances strategies how to bridge the scale discrepancies between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global cloud-resolving simulations. In particular, the research explores new frontiers in computational geoscience by introducing high-order Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques into climate research. AMR and statically-adapted variable-resolution approaches represent an emerging trend for atmospheric models and are likely to become the new norm in future-generation weather and climate models. The research advances the understanding of multi-scale interactions in the climate system and showcases a pathway how to model these interactions effectively with advanced computational tools, like the Chombo AMR library developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is interdisciplinary and combines applied mathematics, scientific computing and the atmospheric sciences. In this research project, a hierarchy of high-order atmospheric models on cubed-sphere computational grids have been developed that serve as an algorithmic prototype for the finite-volume solution-adaptive Chombo-AMR approach. The foci of the investigations have lied on the characteristics of both static mesh adaptations and dynamically-adaptive grids that can capture flow fields of interest like tropical cyclones. Six research themes have been chosen. These are (1) the introduction of adaptive mesh refinement techniques into the climate sciences, (2) advanced algorithms for nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, (3) an assessment of the interplay between resolved-scale dynamical motions and subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, (4) evaluation techniques for atmospheric model hierarchies, (5) the comparison of AMR refinement strategies and (6) tropical cyclone studies with a focus on multi-scale interactions and variable-resolution modeling. The results of this research project

  16. Dosimetry in radiotherapy and brachytherapy by Monte-Carlo GATE simulation on computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiam, Ch.O.

    2007-10-01

    Accurate radiotherapy treatment requires the delivery of a precise dose to the tumour volume and a good knowledge of the dose deposit to the neighbouring zones. Computation of the treatments is usually carried out by a Treatment Planning System (T.P.S.) which needs to be precise and fast. The G.A.T.E. platform for Monte-Carlo simulation based on G.E.A.N.T.4 is an emerging tool for nuclear medicine application that provides functionalities for fast and reliable dosimetric calculations. In this thesis, we studied in parallel a validation of the G.A.T.E. platform for the modelling of electrons and photons low energy sources and the optimized use of grid infrastructures to reduce simulations computing time. G.A.T.E. was validated for the dose calculation of point kernels for mono-energetic electrons and compared with the results of other Monte-Carlo studies. A detailed study was made on the energy deposit during electrons transport in G.E.A.N.T.4. In order to validate G.A.T.E. for very low energy photons (<35 keV), three models of radioactive sources used in brachytherapy and containing iodine 125 (2301 of Best Medical International; Symmetra of Uro- Med/Bebig and 6711 of Amersham) were simulated. Our results were analyzed according to the recommendations of task group No43 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (A.A.P.M.). They show a good agreement between G.A.T.E., the reference studies and A.A.P.M. recommended values. The use of Monte-Carlo simulations for a better definition of the dose deposited in the tumour volumes requires long computing time. In order to reduce it, we exploited E.G.E.E. grid infrastructure where simulations are distributed using innovative technologies taking into account the grid status. Time necessary for the computing of a radiotherapy planning simulation using electrons was reduced by a factor 30. A Web platform based on G.E.N.I.U.S. portal was developed to make easily available all the methods to submit and manage G

  17. WRF4G project: Adaptation of WRF Model to Distributed Computing Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García Díez, Markel; Blanco Real, Jose C.; Fernández, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays Grid Computing is powerful computational tool which is ready to be used for scientific community in different areas (such as biomedicine, astrophysics, climate, etc.). However, the use of this distributed computing infrastructures (DCI) is not yet common practice in climate research, and only a few teams and applications in this area take advantage of this infrastructure. Thus, the first objective of this project is to popularize the use of this technology in the atmospheric sciences area. In order to achieve this objective, one of the most used applications has been taken (WRF; a limited- area model, successor of the MM5 model), that has a user community formed by more than 8000 researchers worldwide. This community develop its research activity on different areas and could benefit from the advantages of Grid resources (case study simulations, regional hind-cast/forecast, sensitivity studies, etc.). The WRF model is been used as input by many energy and natural hazards community, therefore those community will also benefit. However, Grid infrastructures have some drawbacks for the execution of applications that make an intensive use of CPU and memory for a long period of time. This makes necessary to develop a specific framework (middleware). This middleware encapsulates the application and provides appropriate services for the monitoring and management of the jobs and the data. Thus, the second objective of the project consists on the development of a generic adaptation of WRF for Grid (WRF4G), to be distributed as open-source and to be integrated in the official WRF development cycle. The use of this WRF adaptation should be transparent and useful to face any of the previously described studies, and avoid any of the problems of the Grid infrastructure. Moreover it should simplify the access to the Grid infrastructures for the research teams, and also to free them from the technical and computational aspects of the use of the Grid. Finally, in order to

  18. MEDUSA - An overset grid flow solver for network-based parallel computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merritt H.; Pallis, Jani M.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing improvement in processing speed has made it feasible to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for simple three-dimensional flows on advanced workstations. Combining multiple workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows the application of programming principles learned on MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) distributed memory parallel computers to the solution of larger problems. An overset-grid flow solution code has been developed which uses a cluster of workstations as a network-based parallel computer. Inter-process communication is provided by the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software. Solution speed equivalent to one-third of a Cray-YMP processor has been achieved from a cluster of nine commonly used engineering workstation processors. Load imbalance and communication overhead are the principal impediments to parallel efficiency in this application.

  19. NASA's Information Power Grid: Large Scale Distributed Computing and Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Vaziri, Arsi; Hinke, Tom; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Feiereisen, William J.; Thigpen, William; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale science and engineering are done through the interaction of people, heterogeneous computing resources, information systems, and instruments, all of which are geographically and organizationally dispersed. The overall motivation for Grids is to facilitate the routine interactions of these resources in order to support large-scale science and engineering. Multi-disciplinary simulations provide a good example of a class of applications that are very likely to require aggregation of widely distributed computing, data, and intellectual resources. Such simulations - e.g. whole system aircraft simulation and whole system living cell simulation - require integrating applications and data that are developed by different teams of researchers frequently in different locations. The research team's are the only ones that have the expertise to maintain and improve the simulation code and/or the body of experimental data that drives the simulations. This results in an inherently distributed computing and data management environment.

  20. Techniques and environments for big data analysis parallel, cloud, and grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dehuri, Satchidananda; Kim, Euiwhan; Wang, Gi-Name

    2016-01-01

    This volume is aiming at a wide range of readers and researchers in the area of Big Data by presenting the recent advances in the fields of Big Data Analysis, as well as the techniques and tools used to analyze it. The book includes 10 distinct chapters providing a concise introduction to Big Data Analysis and recent Techniques and Environments for Big Data Analysis. It gives insight into how the expensive fitness evaluation of evolutionary learning can play a vital role in big data analysis by adopting Parallel, Grid, and Cloud computing environments.

  1. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill

    2000-01-01

    We use the term "Grid" to refer to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. This infrastructure includes: (1) Tools for constructing collaborative, application oriented Problem Solving Environments / Frameworks (the primary user interfaces for Grids); (2) Programming environments, tools, and services providing various approaches for building applications that use aggregated computing and storage resources, and federated data sources; (3) Comprehensive and consistent set of location independent tools and services for accessing and managing dynamic collections of widely distributed resources: heterogeneous computing systems, storage systems, real-time data sources and instruments, human collaborators, and communications systems; (4) Operational infrastructure including management tools for distributed systems and distributed resources, user services, accounting and auditing, strong and location independent user authentication and authorization, and overall system security services The vision for NASA's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks. Such Grids will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. Examples of these problems include: (1) Coupled, multidisciplinary simulations too large for single systems (e.g., multi-component NPSS turbomachine simulation); (2) Use of widely distributed, federated data archives (e.g., simultaneous access to metrological, topological, aircraft performance, and flight path scheduling databases supporting a National Air Space Simulation systems}; (3

  2. Editorial for special section of grid computing journal on “Cloud Computing and Services Science‿

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ivanov, Ivan I.

    This editorial briefly discusses characteristics, technology developments and challenges of cloud computing. It then introduces the papers included in the special issue on "Cloud Computing and Services Science" and positions the work reported in these papers with respect to the previously mentioned

  3. Towards a global service registry for the world-wide LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Laurence; Pradillo, Maria Alandes; Girolamo, Alessandro Di

    2014-01-01

    The World-Wide LHC Computing Grid encompasses a set of heterogeneous information systems; from central portals such as the Open Science Grid's Information Management System and the Grid Operations Centre Database, to the WLCG information system, where the information sources are the Grid services themselves. Providing a consistent view of the information, which involves synchronising all these informations systems, is a challenging activity that has lead the LHC virtual organisations to create their own configuration databases. This experience, whereby each virtual organisation's configuration database interfaces with multiple information systems, has resulted in the duplication of effort, especially relating to the use of manual checks for the handling of inconsistencies. The Global Service Registry aims to address this issue by providing a centralised service that aggregates information from multiple information systems. It shows both information on registered resources (i.e. what should be there) and available resources (i.e. what is there). The main purpose is to simplify the synchronisation of the virtual organisation's own configuration databases, which are used for job submission and data management, through the provision of a single interface for obtaining all the information. By centralising the information, automated consistency and validation checks can be performed to improve the overall quality of information provided. Although internally the GLUE 2.0 information model is used for the purpose of integration, the Global Service Registry in not dependent on any particular information model for ingestion or dissemination. The intention is to allow the virtual organisation's configuration databases to be decoupled from the underlying information systems in a transparent way and hence simplify any possible future migration due to the evolution of those systems. This paper presents the Global Service Registry architecture, its advantages

  4. Towards a Global Service Registry for the World-Wide LHC Computing Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurence; Alandes Pradillo, Maria; Di Girolamo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    The World-Wide LHC Computing Grid encompasses a set of heterogeneous information systems; from central portals such as the Open Science Grid's Information Management System and the Grid Operations Centre Database, to the WLCG information system, where the information sources are the Grid services themselves. Providing a consistent view of the information, which involves synchronising all these informations systems, is a challenging activity that has lead the LHC virtual organisations to create their own configuration databases. This experience, whereby each virtual organisation's configuration database interfaces with multiple information systems, has resulted in the duplication of effort, especially relating to the use of manual checks for the handling of inconsistencies. The Global Service Registry aims to address this issue by providing a centralised service that aggregates information from multiple information systems. It shows both information on registered resources (i.e. what should be there) and available resources (i.e. what is there). The main purpose is to simplify the synchronisation of the virtual organisation's own configuration databases, which are used for job submission and data management, through the provision of a single interface for obtaining all the information. By centralising the information, automated consistency and validation checks can be performed to improve the overall quality of information provided. Although internally the GLUE 2.0 information model is used for the purpose of integration, the Global Service Registry in not dependent on any particular information model for ingestion or dissemination. The intention is to allow the virtual organisation's configuration databases to be decoupled from the underlying information systems in a transparent way and hence simplify any possible future migration due to the evolution of those systems. This paper presents the Global Service Registry architecture, its advantages compared to the

  5. Assessment of instruments in facilitating investment in off-grid renewable energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xunpeng; Liu, Xiying; Yao, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Renewable off-grid solution plays a critical role in supporting rural electrification. However, off-grid Renewable Energy (OGRE) project financing faces significant challenges due to limited financing access, low affordability of consumers, high transactions costs and etc. Various supporting instruments have been implemented to facilitate OGRE investment. This study assesses the effectiveness of those instruments with a framework consists of three dimensions: feasibility, sustainability and replicability. The weights of each dimension in the framework and the scores of each instrument are assessed by expert surveys based on the Delphi method. It is suggested that all the three dimensions should be taken into consideration while assessing the instruments, among which feasibility and sustainability are considered as the most important dimensions in the assessment framework. Furthermore, the top-5 most effective instruments in facilitating OGRE investment are local engagement in operation and maintenance, loan guarantee, start-up grant, end user financing, and concessional finance. Developing countries that need to increase electrification, such as most of the ASEAN member states, could use these top scored instruments despite of their limited amount of public finance. - Highlights: •Assess the effectiveness of instruments for promoting financing for OGRE projects. •A three-dimension assessment framework: feasibility, sustainability, replicability. •Use online surveys and the Delphi method to collect experts’ assessment. •The most effective instruments: local engagement, loan guarantee, and start-up grant.

  6. The Grid2003 Production Grid Principles and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, I; Gose, S; Maltsev, N; May, E; Rodríguez, A; Sulakhe, D; Vaniachine, A; Shank, J; Youssef, S; Adams, D; Baker, R; Deng, W; Smith, J; Yu, D; Legrand, I; Singh, S; Steenberg, C; Xia, Y; Afaq, A; Berman, E; Annis, J; Bauerdick, L A T; Ernst, M; Fisk, I; Giacchetti, L; Graham, G; Heavey, A; Kaiser, J; Kuropatkin, N; Pordes, R; Sekhri, V; Weigand, J; Wu, Y; Baker, K; Sorrillo, L; Huth, J; Allen, M; Grundhoefer, L; Hicks, J; Luehring, F C; Peck, S; Quick, R; Simms, S; Fekete, G; Van den Berg, J; Cho, K; Kwon, K; Son, D; Park, H; Canon, S; Jackson, K; Konerding, D E; Lee, J; Olson, D; Sakrejda, I; Tierney, B; Green, M; Miller, R; Letts, J; Martin, T; Bury, D; Dumitrescu, C; Engh, D; Gardner, R; Mambelli, M; Smirnov, Y; Voeckler, J; Wilde, M; Zhao, Y; Zhao, X; Avery, P; Cavanaugh, R J; Kim, B; Prescott, C; Rodríguez, J; Zahn, A; McKee, S; Jordan, C; Prewett, J; Thomas, T; Severini, H; Clifford, B; Deelman, E; Flon, L; Kesselman, C; Mehta, G; Olomu, N; Vahi, K; De, K; McGuigan, P; Sosebee, M; Bradley, D; Couvares, P; De Smet, A; Kireyev, C; Paulson, E; Roy, A; Koranda, S; Moe, B; Brown, B; Sheldon, P

    2004-01-01

    The Grid2003 Project has deployed a multi-virtual organization, application-driven grid laboratory ("GridS") that has sustained for several months the production-level services required by physics experiments of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (ATLAS and CMS), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey project, the gravitational wave search experiment LIGO, the BTeV experiment at Fermilab, as well as applications in molecular structure analysis and genome analysis, and computer science research projects in such areas as job and data scheduling. The deployed infrastructure has been operating since November 2003 with 27 sites, a peak of 2800 processors, work loads from 10 different applications exceeding 1300 simultaneous jobs, and data transfers among sites of greater than 2 TB/day. We describe the principles that have guided the development of this unique infrastructure and the practical experiences that have resulted from its creation and use. We discuss application requirements for grid services deployment and configur...

  7. The Erasmus Computing Grid - Building a Super-Computer for FREE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting

  8. The self-adaptation to dynamic failures for efficient virtual organization formations in grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous and dynamic resources, dynamic failures in the distributed grid environment usually occur more than in traditional computation platforms, which cause failed VO formations. In this paper, we develop a novel self-adaptive mechanism to dynamic failures during VO formations. Such a self-adaptive scheme allows an individual and member of VOs to automatically find other available or replaceable one once a failure happens and therefore makes systems automatically recover from dynamic failures. We define dynamic failure situations of a system by using two standard indicators: mean time between failures (MTBF) and mean time to recover (MTTR). We model both MTBF and MTTR as Poisson distributions. We investigate and analyze the efficiency of the proposed self-adaptation mechanism to dynamic failures by comparing the success probability of VO formations before and after adopting it in three different cases: (1) different failure situations; (2) different organizational structures and scales; (3) different task complexities. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme can automatically adapt to dynamic failures and effectively improve the dynamic VO formation performance in the event of node failures, which provide a valuable addition to the field.

  9. Helicopter Rotor Blade Computation in Unsteady Flows Using Moving Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jasim; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1996-01-01

    An overset grid thin-layer Navier-Stokes code has been extended to include dynamic motion of helicopter rotor blades through relative grid motion. The unsteady flowfield and airloads on an AH-IG rotor in forward flight were computed to verify the methodology and to demonstrate the method's potential usefulness towards comprehensive helicopter codes. In addition, the method uses the blade's first harmonics measured in the flight test to prescribe the blade motion. The solution was impulsively started and became periodic in less than three rotor revolutions. Detailed unsteady numerical flow visualization techniques were applied to the entire unsteady data set of five rotor revolutions and exhibited flowfield features such as blade vortex interaction and wake roll-up. The unsteady blade loads and surface pressures compare well against those from flight measurements. Details of the method, a discussion of the resulting predicted flowfield, and requirements for future work are presented. Overall, given the proper blade dynamics, this method can compute the unsteady flowfield of a general helicopter rotor in forward flight.

  10. Service task partition and distribution in star topology computer grid subject to data security constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Yanping [Collaborative Autonomic Computing Laboratory, School of Computer Science, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China); Levitin, Gregory, E-mail: levitin@iec.co.il [Collaborative Autonomic Computing Laboratory, School of Computer Science, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China); Israel electric corporation, P. O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel)

    2011-11-15

    The paper considers grid computing systems in which the resource management systems (RMS) can divide service tasks into execution blocks (EBs) and send these blocks to different resources. In order to provide a desired level of service reliability the RMS can assign the same blocks to several independent resources for parallel execution. The data security is a crucial issue in distributed computing that affects the execution policy. By the optimal service task partition into the EBs and their distribution among resources, one can achieve the greatest possible service reliability and/or expected performance subject to data security constraints. The paper suggests an algorithm for solving this optimization problem. The algorithm is based on the universal generating function technique and on the evolutionary optimization approach. Illustrative examples are presented. - Highlights: > Grid service with star topology is considered. > An algorithm for evaluating service reliability and data security is presented. > A tradeoff between the service reliability and data security is analyzed. > A procedure for optimal service task partition and distribution is suggested.

  11. Service task partition and distribution in star topology computer grid subject to data security constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yanping; Levitin, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers grid computing systems in which the resource management systems (RMS) can divide service tasks into execution blocks (EBs) and send these blocks to different resources. In order to provide a desired level of service reliability the RMS can assign the same blocks to several independent resources for parallel execution. The data security is a crucial issue in distributed computing that affects the execution policy. By the optimal service task partition into the EBs and their distribution among resources, one can achieve the greatest possible service reliability and/or expected performance subject to data security constraints. The paper suggests an algorithm for solving this optimization problem. The algorithm is based on the universal generating function technique and on the evolutionary optimization approach. Illustrative examples are presented. - Highlights: → Grid service with star topology is considered. → An algorithm for evaluating service reliability and data security is presented. → A tradeoff between the service reliability and data security is analyzed. → A procedure for optimal service task partition and distribution is suggested.

  12. Off-grid community electrification projects based on wind and solar energies: A case study in Nicaragua

    OpenAIRE

    Ranaboldo, Matteo; Domenech, Bruno; Reyes, Gustavo Alberto; Ferrer Martí, Laia; Pastor Moreno, Rafael; García Villoria, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite various institutional efforts, about 22% of the total Nicaraguan population still do not have access to electricity. Due to the dispersed nature of many rural inhabitants, off-grid electrification systems that use renewable energy sources are a reliable and sustainable option to provide electricity to isolated communities. In this study, the design of an off-grid electrification project based on hybrid wind-photovoltaic systems in a rural community of Nicaragua is developed. Firstly t...

  13. Parallel discontinuous Galerkin FEM for computing hyperbolic conservation law on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinrong; Duan, Zhijian

    2018-04-01

    High-order resolution Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods (DGFEM) has been known as a good method for solving Euler equations and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grid, but it costs too much computational resources. An efficient parallel algorithm was presented for solving the compressible Euler equations. Moreover, the multigrid strategy based on three-stage three-order TVD Runge-Kutta scheme was used in order to improve the computational efficiency of DGFEM and accelerate the convergence of the solution of unsteady compressible Euler equations. In order to make each processor maintain load balancing, the domain decomposition method was employed. Numerical experiment performed for the inviscid transonic flow fluid problems around NACA0012 airfoil and M6 wing. The results indicated that our parallel algorithm can improve acceleration and efficiency significantly, which is suitable for calculating the complex flow fluid.

  14. Maui Smart Grid Demonstration Project Managing Distribution System Resources for Improved Service Quality and Reliability, Transmission Congestion Relief, and Grid Support Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-30

    The Maui Smart Grid Project (MSGP) is under the leadership of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The project team includes Maui Electric Company, Ltd. (MECO), Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO), Sentech (a division of SRA International, Inc.), Silver Spring Networks (SSN), Alstom Grid, Maui Economic Development Board (MEDB), University of Hawaii-Maui College (UHMC), and the County of Maui. MSGP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC26-08NT02871, with approximately 50% co-funding supplied by MECO. The project was designed to develop and demonstrate an integrated monitoring, communications, database, applications, and decision support solution that aggregates renewable energy (RE), other distributed generation (DG), energy storage, and demand response technologies in a distribution system to achieve both distribution and transmission-level benefits. The application of these new technologies and procedures will increase MECO’s visibility into system conditions, with the expected benefits of enabling more renewable energy resources to be integrated into the grid, improving service quality, increasing overall reliability of the power system, and ultimately reducing costs to both MECO and its customers.

  15. Advances in Grid and Pervasive Computing: 5th International Conference, GPC 2010, Hualien, Taiwan, May 10-13, 2010: Proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellavista, P.; Chang, R.-S.; Chao, H.-C.; Lin, S.-F.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the 5th international conference, CPC 2010, held in Hualien, Taiwan in May 2010. The 67 full papers are selected from 184 submissions and focus on topics such as cloud and Grid computing, peer-to-peer and pervasive computing, sensor and mobile networks,

  16. CERN readies world's biggest science grid The computing network now encompasses more than 100 sites in 31 countries

    CERN Multimedia

    Niccolai, James

    2005-01-01

    If the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is to yield miraculous discoveries in particle physics, it may also require a small miracle in grid computing. By a lack of suitable tools from commercial vendors, engineers at the famed Geneva laboratory are hard at work building a giant grid to store and process the vast amount of data the collider is expected to produce when it begins operations in mid-2007 (2 pages)

  17. First Tuesday@CERN - THE GRID GETS REAL !

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    A few years ago, "the Grid" was just a vision dreamt up by some computer scientists who wanted to share processor power and data storage capacity between computers around the world - in much the same way as today's Web shares information seamlessly between millions of computers. Today, Grid technology is a huge enterprise, involving hundreds of software engineers, and generating exciting opportunities for industry. "Computing on demand", "utility computing", "web services", and "virtualisation" are just a few of the buzzwords in the IT industry today that are intimately connected to the development of Grid technology. For this third First Tuesday @CERN, the panel will survey some of the latest major breakthroughs in building international computer Grids for science. It will also provide a snapshot of Grid-related industrial activities, with contributions from both major players in the IT sector as well as emerging Grid technology start-ups. Panel: - Les Robertson, Head of the LHC Computing Grid Project, IT ...

  18. The Erasmus Computing Grid – Building a Super-Computer for Free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); A. Abuseiris (Anis); R.M. de Graaf (Rob); M. Lesnussa (Michael); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting factor for

  19. Competitiveness in organizational integrated computer system project management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenovic GHERASIM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The organizational integrated computer system project management aims at achieving competitiveness by unitary, connected and personalised treatment of the requirements for this type of projects, along with the adequate application of all the basic management, administration and project planning principles, as well as of the basic concepts of the organisational information management development. The paper presents some aspects of organizational computer systems project management competitiveness with the specific reference to some Romanian companies’ projects.

  20. Availability measurement of grid services from the perspective of a scientific computing centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, H; Koenig, T

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is the merger of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe. The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) was one of the first new organizational units of KIT, combining the former Institute for Scientific Computing of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Computing Centre of the University. IT service management according to the worldwide de-facto-standard 'IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)' was chosen by SCC as a strategic element to support the merging of the two existing computing centres located at a distance of about 10 km. The availability and reliability of IT services directly influence the customer satisfaction as well as the reputation of the service provider, and unscheduled loss of availability due to hardware or software failures may even result in severe consequences like data loss. Fault tolerant and error correcting design features are reducing the risk of IT component failures and help to improve the delivered availability. The ITIL process controlling the respective design is called Availability Management. This paper discusses Availability Management regarding grid services delivered to WLCG and provides a few elementary guidelines for availability measurements and calculations of services consisting of arbitrary numbers of components.

  1. Introducing MCgrid 2.0: Projecting cross section calculations on grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Hartland, Nathan; Schumann, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    MCgrid is a software package that provides access to interpolation tools for Monte Carlo event generator codes, allowing for the fast and flexible variation of scales, coupling parameters and PDFs in cutting edge leading- and next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. We present the upgrade to version 2.0 which has a broader scope of interfaced interpolation tools, now providing access to fastNLO, and features an approximated treatment for the projection of MC@NLO-type calculations onto interpolation grids. MCgrid 2.0 also now supports the extended information provided through the HepMC event record used in the recent SHERPA version 2.2.0. The additional information provided therein allows for the support of multi-jet merged QCD calculations in a future update of MCgrid.

  2. Nonlinear Projective-Iteration Methods for Solving Transport Problems on Regular and Unstructured Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Adrian Constantinescu; Loren Roberts; William Wieselquist

    2007-01-01

    This is a project in the field of fundamental research on numerical methods for solving the particle transport equation. Numerous practical problems require to use unstructured meshes, for example, detailed nuclear reactor assembly-level calculations, large-scale reactor core calculations, radiative hydrodynamics problems, where the mesh is determined by hydrodynamic processes, and well-logging problems in which the media structure has very complicated geometry. Currently this is an area of very active research in numerical transport theory. main issues in developing numerical methods for solving the transport equation are the accuracy of the numerical solution and effectiveness of iteration procedure. The problem in case of unstructured grids is that it is very difficult to derive an iteration algorithm that will be unconditionally stable

  3. TWENTIES Project. Wind power for wide-area control of the grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Juan Carlos; Combarros, Clara; Veguillas, Roberto; Hermosa, Mikel Joseba [Iberdrola Renovables, Madrid (Spain); Rubio, David [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion (Spain); Egido, Ignacio [Comillas Univ. (ES). Inst. de Investigacion Tecnologica (IIT)

    2011-07-01

    Europe faces a great challenge with the 2020 scenario in which the renewable energy installed capacity in Europe should increase from its present value of approximately 80 GW to 230 GW in 2020. The future high penetration levels of wind and other renewable energies in the power system require decision makers and stakeholders of the electrical sector to work together to develop new ancillary services and to make the necessary changes to the grid infrastructure in Europe. This background is in line with the SYSERWIND demonstration lead by Iberdrola Renovables and included in the TWENTIES project, with three more partners taking part in this package: Red Electrica de Espana (REE), IIT and Gamesa Eolica. This paper introduces a first phase of preliminary work to define, install and test a Secondary Frequency Control and a Voltage Management System in a wide area, along a transport line. (orig.)

  4. The Erasmus Computing Grid - Building a Super-Computer Virtually for Free at the Erasmus Medical Center and the Hogeschool Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop

  5. Coordinated Use of Heterogeneous Infrastructures for Scientific Computing at CIEMAT by means of Grid Technologies; Aprovechamiento Coordinado de las Infraestructuras Heterogeneas para Calculo Cientifico Participadas por el CIEMAT por medio de Tecnologias Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio-Montero, A. J.

    2008-08-06

    Usually, research data centres maintain platforms from a wide range of architectures to cover the computational needs of their scientists. These centres are also frequently involved in diverse national and international Grid projects. Besides, it is very difficult to achieve a complete and efficient utilization of these recourses, due to the heterogeneity in their hardware and software configurations and their unequal use along the time. This report offers a solution to the problem of enabling a simultaneous and coordinated access to the variety of computing infrastructures and platforms available in great Research Organisms such as CIEMAT. For this purpose, new Grid technologies have been deployed in order to facilitate a common interface which enables the final user to access the internal and external resources. The previous computing infrastructure has not been modified and the independence on its administration has been guaranteed. For a sake of comparison, a feasibility study has been performed with the execution of the Drift Kinetic Equation solver (Dikes) tool, a high throughput scientific application used in the TJ-II Flexible Heliac at National Fusion Laboratory. (Author) 35 refs.

  6. Automated agents for management and control of the ALICE Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoras, C; Carminati, F; Legrand, I; Voicu, R

    2010-01-01

    A complex software environment such as the ALICE Computing Grid infrastructure requires permanent control and management for the large set of services involved. Automating control procedures reduces the human interaction with the various components of the system and yields better availability of the overall system. In this paper we will present how we used the MonALISA framework to gather, store and display the relevant metrics in the entire system from central and remote site services. We will also show the automatic local and global procedures that are triggered by the monitored values. Decision-taking agents are used to restart remote services, alert the operators in case of problems that cannot be automatically solved, submit production jobs, replicate and analyze raw data, resource load-balance and other control mechanisms that optimize the overall work flow and simplify day-to-day operations. Synthetic graphical views for all operational parameters, correlations, state of services and applications as we...

  7. Resource allocation on computational grids using a utility model and the knapsack problem

    CERN Document Server

    Van der ster, Daniel C; Parra-Hernandez, Rafael; Sobie, Randall J

    2009-01-01

    This work introduces a utility model (UM) for resource allocation on computational grids and formulates the allocation problem as a variant of the 0–1 multichoice multidimensional knapsack problem. The notion of task-option utility is introduced, and it is used to effect allocation policies. We present a variety of allocation policies, which are expressed as functions of metrics that are both intrinsic and external to the task and resources. An external user-defined credit-value metric is shown to allow users to intervene in the allocation of urgent or low priority tasks. The strategies are evaluated in simulation against random workloads as well as those drawn from real systems. We measure the sensitivity of the UM-derived schedules to variations in the allocation policies and their corresponding utility functions. The UM allocation strategy is shown to optimally allocate resources congruent with the chosen policies.

  8. "DCC+G : Direct Current Components and Grid" : project poster presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rykov, K.

    2014-01-01

    380 V DC power grids are the most energy-efficient electricity distribution method in buildings. Furthermore, building-integrated solar power systems with DC grid connection are lower cost and have a faster return on investment (ROI) than classical 230V/400V AC power distribution grids. Thus DC

  9. Desktop Grid Computing with BOINC and its Use for Solving the RND telecommunication Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Rodriguez, M. A.; Vega-Perez, D.; Gomez-Pulido, J. A.; Sanchez-Perez, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    An important problem in mobile/cellular technology is trying to cover a certain geographical area by using the smallest number of radio antennas, and looking for the biggest cover rate. This is the well known Telecommunication problem identified as Radio Network Design (RND). This optimization problem can be solved by bio-inspired algorithms, among other options. In this work we use the PBIL (Population-Based Incremental Learning) algorithm, that has been little studied in this field but we have obtained very good results with it. PBIL is based on genetic algorithms and competitive learning (typical in neural networks), being a population evolution model based on probabilistic models. Due to the high number of configuration parameters of the PBIL, and because we want to test the RND problem with numerous variants, we have used grid computing with BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing). In this way, we have been able to execute thousands of experiments in few days using around 100 computers at the same time. In this paper we present the most interesting results from our work. (Author)

  10. Grid interoperability: joining grid information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechl, M; Field, L

    2008-01-01

    A grid is defined as being 'coordinated resource sharing and problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations'. Over recent years a number of grid projects, many of which have a strong regional presence, have emerged to help coordinate institutions and enable grids. Today, we face a situation where a number of grid projects exist, most of which are using slightly different middleware. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable Virtual Organizations to access resources at the institutions independent of their grid project affiliation. Grid interoperation is usually a bilateral activity between two grid infrastructures. Recently within the Open Grid Forum, the Grid Interoperability Now (GIN) Community Group is trying to build upon these bilateral activities. The GIN group is a focal point where all the infrastructures can come together to share ideas and experiences on grid interoperation. It is hoped that each bilateral activity will bring us one step closer to the overall goal of a uniform grid landscape. A fundamental aspect of a grid is the information system, which is used to find available grid services. As different grids use different information systems, interoperation between these systems is crucial for grid interoperability. This paper describes the work carried out to overcome these differences between a number of grid projects and the experiences gained. It focuses on the different techniques used and highlights the important areas for future standardization

  11. Computer Simulation Performed for Columbia Project Cooling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jasim

    2005-01-01

    This demo shows a high-fidelity simulation of the air flow in the main computer room housing the Columbia (10,024 intel titanium processors) system. The simulation asseses the performance of the cooling system and identified deficiencies, and recommended modifications to eliminate them. It used two in house software packages on NAS supercomputers: Chimera Grid tools to generate a geometric model of the computer room, OVERFLOW-2 code for fluid and thermal simulation. This state-of-the-art technology can be easily extended to provide a general capability for air flow analyses on any modern computer room. Columbia_CFD_black.tiff

  12. Can the BestGrid Process Improve Stakeholder Involvement in Electricity Transmission Projects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Komendantova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Union has set ambitious targets for deployment of renewable energy sources to reach goals of climate change mitigation and energy security policies. However, the current state of electricity transmission infrastructure is a major bottleneck for further scaling up of renewable energy in the EU. Several thousands of kilometers of new lines have to be constructed and upgraded to accommodate growing volumes of intermittent renewable electricity. In many countries, construction of electricity transmission projects has been delayed for several years due to concerns of local stakeholders. The innovative BESTGRID approach, reported here, brings together transmission system operators (TSOs and non-governmental organizations (NGOs to discuss and understand the nature of stakeholder concerns. This paper has three objectives: (1 to understand stakeholder concerns about the deployment of electricity transmission grids in four pilot projects according to five guiding principles: need, transparency, engagement, environment, and impacts on human health as well as benefits; (2 to understand how these principles can be addressed to provide a basis for better decision-making outcomes; and (3 to evaluate the BESTGRID process based on feedback received from stakeholders and the level of participation achieved according to the ladder of Arnstein. This paper goes beyond a discussion of “measures to mitigate opposition” to understand how dialogue between TSOs and the public—represented mainly by NGOs and policy-makers—might lead to a better decision-making process and more sustainable electricity transmission infrastructure deployment.

  13. Effect of computational grid on accurate prediction of a wind turbine rotor using delayed detached-eddy simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangga, Galih; Weihing, Pascal; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald [University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The present study focuses on the impact of grid for accurate prediction of the MEXICO rotor under stalled conditions. Two different blade mesh topologies, O and C-H meshes, and two different grid resolutions are tested for several time step sizes. The simulations are carried out using Delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) with two eddy viscosity RANS turbulence models, namely Spalart- Allmaras (SA) and Menter Shear stress transport (SST) k-ω. A high order spatial discretization, WENO (Weighted essentially non- oscillatory) scheme, is used in these computations. The results are validated against measurement data with regards to the sectional loads and the chordwise pressure distributions. The C-H mesh topology is observed to give the best results employing the SST k-ω turbulence model, but the computational cost is more expensive as the grid contains a wake block that increases the number of cells.

  14. A multi VO Grid infrastructure at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellrich, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    As a centre for research with particle accelerators and synchrotron light, DESY operates a Grid infrastructure in the context of the EU-project EGEE and the national Grid initiative D-GRID. All computing and storage resources are located in one Grid infrastructure which supports a number of Virtual Organizations of different disciplines, including non-HEP groups such as the Photon Science community. Resource distribution is based on fair share methods without dedicating hardware to user groups. Production quality of the infrastructure is guaranteed by embedding it into the DESY computer centre.

  15. DataGrid passes its exams

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DataGrid, the European project to build a computational and data-intensive grid infrastructure, is now entering its third year. Thanks to its achievements in 2002, it has just come out of its latest annual review with flying colours.

  16. Beyond grid security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeft, B; Epting, U; Koenig, T

    2008-01-01

    While many fields relevant to Grid security are already covered by existing working groups, their remit rarely goes beyond the scope of the Grid infrastructure itself. However, security issues pertaining to the internal set-up of compute centres have at least as much impact on Grid security. Thus, this talk will present briefly the EU ISSeG project (Integrated Site Security for Grids). In contrast to groups such as OSCT (Operational Security Coordination Team) and JSPG (Joint Security Policy Group), the purpose of ISSeG is to provide a holistic approach to security for Grid computer centres, from strategic considerations to an implementation plan and its deployment. The generalised methodology of Integrated Site Security (ISS) is based on the knowledge gained during its implementation at several sites as well as through security audits, and this will be briefly discussed. Several examples of ISS implementation tasks at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be presented, including segregation of the network for administration and maintenance and the implementation of Application Gateways. Furthermore, the web-based ISSeG training material will be introduced. This aims to offer ISS implementation guidance to other Grid installations in order to help avoid common pitfalls

  17. The role of the state in sustainable energy transitions: A case study of large smart grid demonstration projects in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Daphne Ngar-yin; Wu, Yun-Ying; Ip, Jasper Chi-man; Hills, Peter Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Smart grids represent one of the most significant evolutionary changes in energy management systems as they enable decentralised energy systems, the use of large-scale renewable energy as well as major improvements in demand-side-management. Japan is one of the pioneers in smart grid deployment. The Japanese model is characterised by a government-led, community-oriented, and business-driven approach with the launch of four large-scale smart-community demonstration projects. Our case study of large smart grid demonstration projects in Japan found that the Japanese government has demonstrated its high governing capacity in terms of leadership, recombinative capacity, institutional capacity, enabling capacity, and inducement capacity. However, the major limitations of the government in introducing some critical regulatory changes have constrained the smart grid deployment from advancing to a higher-order form of smart grid developments. This paper calls for more attention to be given to the importance of regulatory changes that are essential to overcome the technological lock-in, and the complementary roles of non-state actors such as the business sector and consumers to strengthen the governing capacity of the state. - Highlights: • Smart grids introduce evolutionary changes in energy management systems. • The Japanese model is government-led, community-oriented, and business-driven. • The Japanese government has demonstrated its high governing capacity. • But the limitations of the government have constrained the smart grid developments. • More attention needs to be given to regulatory changes and non-state actors

  18. CERISE - Combining energy and spatial information standards as enabler for smart grids - TKI smart grid project : TKISG01010 - D4.1 Semantic mappings to harmonize energy, geo and government-related information models. Work package 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.; Knibbe, F.; Quak, C.W.; Janssen, P.; Stap, R.; Daniele, L.

    2015-01-01

    Version 1.0 - Final The CERISE-SG project (Combining Energy and Geo information standards as enabler for Smart Grids) focuses on interoperability with a special interest in the information exchanges between smart grids and their surroundings. We hereby focus on the exchange of information to and

  19. SU-D-12A-01: An Inter-Projection Interpolation (IPI) Approach for the Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG) to Reduce Dose in Cone Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Synchronized moving grid is a promising technique to reduce scatter and ghost artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, it requires 2 projections in the same gantry angle to obtain full information due to signal blockage by the grid. We proposed an inter-projection interpolation (IPI) method to estimate blocked signals, which may reduce the scan time and the dose. This study aims to provide a framework to achieve a balance between speed, dose and image quality. Methods: The IPI method is based on the hypothesis that an abrupt signal in a projection can be well predicted by the information in the two immediate neighboring projections if the gantry angle step is small. The study was performed on a Catphan and a head phantom. The SMOG was simulated by erasing the information (filling with “0”) of the areas in each projection corresponding to the grid. An IPI algorithm was applied on each projection to recover the erased information. FDK algorithm was used to reconstruct CBCT images for the IPI-processed projections, and compared with the original image in term of signal to noise ratio (SNR) measured in the whole reconstruction image range. The effect of gantry angle step was investigated by comparing the CBCT images from projection sets of various gantry intervals, with IPI-predicted projections to fill the missing projection in the interval. Results: The IPI procession time was 1.79s±0.53s for each projection. SNR after IPI was 29.0db and 28.1db for the Catphan and head phantom, respectively, comparing to 15.3db and 22.7db for an inpainting based interpolation technique. SNR was 28.3, 28.3, 21.8, 19.3 and 17.3 db for gantry angle intervals of 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 degrees, respectively. Conclusion: IPI is feasible to estimate the missing information, and achieve an reasonable CBCT image quality with reduced dose and scan time. This study is supported by NIH/NCI grant 1R01CA166948-01

  20. Investigation of Storage Options for Scientific Computing on Grid and Cloud Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several new storage technologies, such as Lustre, Hadoop, OrangeFS, and BlueArc, have emerged. While several groups have run benchmarks to characterize them under a variety of configurations, more work is needed to evaluate these technologies for the use cases of scientific computing on Grid clusters and Cloud facilities. This paper discusses our evaluation of the technologies as deployed on a test bed at FermiCloud, one of the Fermilab infrastructure-as-a-service Cloud facilities. The test bed consists of 4 server-class nodes with 40 TB of disk space and up to 50 virtual machine clients, some running on the storage server nodes themselves. With this configuration, the evaluation compares the performance of some of these technologies when deployed on virtual machines and on “bare metal” nodes. In addition to running standard benchmarks such as IOZone to check the sanity of our installation, we have run I/O intensive tests using physics-analysis applications. This paper presents how the storage solutions perform in a variety of realistic use cases of scientific computing. One interesting difference among the storage systems tested is found in a decrease in total read throughput with increasing number of client processes, which occurs in some implementations but not others.

  1. Long range Debye-Hückel correction for computation of grid-based electrostatic forces between biomacromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can be used to study very large molecular systems, such as models of the intracellular environment, using atomic-detail structures. Such simulations require strategies to contain the computational costs, especially for the computation of interaction forces and energies. A common approach is to compute interaction forces between macromolecules by precomputing their interaction potentials on three-dimensional discretized grids. For long-range interactions, such as electrostatics, grid-based methods are subject to finite size errors. We describe here the implementation of a Debye-Hückel correction to the grid-based electrostatic potential used in the SDA BD simulation software that was applied to simulate solutions of bovine serum albumin and of hen egg white lysozyme. We found that the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic correction increased the accuracy of both the protein-protein interaction profiles and the protein diffusion coefficients at low ionic strength. An advantage of this method is the low additional computational cost required to treat long-range electrostatic interactions in large biomacromolecular systems. Moreover, the implementation described here for BD simulations of protein solutions can also be applied in implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations that make use of gridded interaction potentials

  2. EIAGRID: In-field optimization of seismic data acquisition by real-time subsurface imaging using a remote GRID computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, B. Z.; Vallenilla Ferrara, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The constant growth of contaminated sites, the unsustainable use of natural resources, and, last but not least, the hydrological risk related to extreme meteorological events and increased climate variability are major environmental issues of today. Finding solutions for these complex problems requires an integrated cross-disciplinary approach, providing a unified basis for environmental science and engineering. In computer science, grid computing is emerging worldwide as a formidable tool allowing distributed computation and data management with administratively-distant resources. Utilizing these modern High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies, the GRIDA3 project bundles several applications from different fields of geoscience aiming to support decision making for reasonable and responsible land use and resource management. In this abstract we present a geophysical application called EIAGRID that uses grid computing facilities to perform real-time subsurface imaging by on-the-fly processing of seismic field data and fast optimization of the processing workflow. Even though, seismic reflection profiling has a broad application range spanning from shallow targets in a few meters depth to targets in a depth of several kilometers, it is primarily used by the hydrocarbon industry and hardly for environmental purposes. The complexity of data acquisition and processing poses severe problems for environmental and geotechnical engineering: Professional seismic processing software is expensive to buy and demands large experience from the user. In-field processing equipment needed for real-time data Quality Control (QC) and immediate optimization of the acquisition parameters is often not available for this kind of studies. As a result, the data quality will be suboptimal. In the worst case, a crucial parameter such as receiver spacing, maximum offset, or recording time turns out later to be inappropriate and the complete acquisition campaign has to be repeated. The

  3. Handling Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Critical Service Incidents : The infrastructure and experience behind nearly 5 years of GGUS ALARMs

    CERN Multimedia

    Dimou, M; Dulov, O; Grein, G

    2013-01-01

    In the Wordwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) project the Tier centres are of paramount importance for storing and accessing experiment data and for running the batch jobs necessary for experiment production activities. Although Tier2 sites provide a significant fraction of the resources a non-availability of resources at the Tier0 or the Tier1s can seriously harm not only WLCG Operations but also the experiments' workflow and the storage of LHC data which are very expensive to reproduce. This is why availability requirements for these sites are high and committed in the WLCG Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). In this talk we describe the workflow of GGUS ALARMs, the only 24/7 mechanism available to LHC experiment experts for reporting to the Tier0 or the Tier1s problems with their Critical Services. Conclusions and experience gained from the detailed drills performed in each such ALARM for the last 4 years are explained and the shift with time of Type of Problems met. The physical infrastructure put in place to ...

  4. INFN-Pisa scientific computation environment (GRID, HPC and Interactive Analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezzini, S; Carboni, A; Caruso, G; Ciampa, A; Coscetti, S; Mazzoni, E; Piras, S

    2014-01-01

    The INFN-Pisa Tier2 infrastructure is described, optimized not only for GRID CPU and Storage access, but also for a more interactive use of the resources in order to provide good solutions for the final data analysis step. The Data Center, equipped with about 6700 production cores, permits the use of modern analysis techniques realized via advanced statistical tools (like RooFit and RooStat) implemented in multicore systems. In particular a POSIX file storage access integrated with standard SRM access is provided. Therefore the unified storage infrastructure is described, based on GPFS and Xrootd, used both for SRM data repository and interactive POSIX access. Such a common infrastructure allows a transparent access to the Tier2 data to the users for their interactive analysis. The organization of a specialized many cores CPU facility devoted to interactive analysis is also described along with the login mechanism integrated with the INFN-AAI (National INFN Infrastructure) to extend the site access and use to a geographical distributed community. Such infrastructure is used also for a national computing facility in use to the INFN theoretical community, it enables a synergic use of computing and storage resources. Our Center initially developed for the HEP community is now growing and includes also HPC resources fully integrated. In recent years has been installed and managed a cluster facility (1000 cores, parallel use via InfiniBand connection) and we are now updating this facility that will provide resources for all the intermediate level HPC computing needs of the INFN theoretical national community.

  5. Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project

    OpenAIRE

    Bogner, Scott; Bulgac, Aurel; Carlson, Joseph A.; Engel, Jonathan; Fann, George; Furnstahl, Richard J.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Hagen, Gaute; Horoi, Mihai; Johnson, Calvin W.; Kortelainen, Markus; Lusk, Ewing; Maris, Pieter; Nam, Hai Ah; Navratil, Petr

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  6. GENIE - Generation of computational geometry-grids for internal-external flow configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress realized in the development of a master geometry-grid generation code GENIE is presented. The grid refinement process is enhanced by developing strategies to utilize bezier curves/surfaces and splines along with weighted transfinite interpolation technique and by formulating new forcing function for the elliptic solver based on the minimization of a non-orthogonality functional. A two step grid adaptation procedure is developed by optimally blending adaptive weightings with weighted transfinite interpolation technique. Examples of 2D-3D grids are provided to illustrate the success of these methods.

  7. Computing segmentations directly from x-ray projection data via parametric deformable curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Hansen, Per Christian

    2018-01-01

    We describe an efficient algorithm that computes a segmented reconstruction directly from x-ray projection data. Our algorithm uses a parametric curve to define the segmentation. Unlike similar approaches which are based on level-sets, our method avoids a pixel or voxel grid; hence the number...... of unknowns is reduced to the set of points that define the curve, and attenuation coefficients of the segments. Our current implementation uses a simple closed curve and is capable of separating one object from the background. However, our basic algorithm can be applied to an arbitrary topology and multiple...

  8. Identification of observables for future grids - The framework developed in the ELECTRA project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, K.; Marinelli, M.; Morch, A.Z.; Jakobsen, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    The main subject of this paper is the classification and identification of observables for present and future grids. In order to make an inventory of present and potentially new observables, a systematic classification and identification of observables for future grids is conducted. After first

  9. New solutions for effective access powerline solutions. The European smart grid project DLC+VIT4IP; Neue Ansaetz fuer leistungsfaehige Access-Powerline-Loesungen. Das Europaeische Smart-Grid Projekt DLC+VIT4IP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Georg [devolo AG, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    By the European DLC+VIT4IP project the development of innovative smart grid solutions for a better handling of energy resources is forced. Smart grid ensures the stable operation of a decentralized electric supply network, where more and more small suppliers contribute by solar or wind energy technology. Business customers as well as private customers benefit from smart grid, as they get instant information about their actual consumption by the Internet. Covered by the project there will be developed new approaches of access powerline communications which provide an effective, IPv6 based communication e.g. between electric meters at home and the power net station. (orig.)

  10. Data security on the national fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  11. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  12. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  13. Data security on the national fusion grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  14. Security on the US fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, J.R.; Fredian, T.W.; Thompson, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This has led to the development of the U.S. fusion grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large U.S. fusion research facilities and with users both in the U.S. and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  15. Automated agents for management and control of the ALICE Computing Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoras, C; Betev, L; Carminati, F; Legrand, I; Voicu, R

    2010-01-01

    A complex software environment such as the ALICE Computing Grid infrastructure requires permanent control and management for the large set of services involved. Automating control procedures reduces the human interaction with the various components of the system and yields better availability of the overall system. In this paper we will present how we used the MonALISA framework to gather, store and display the relevant metrics in the entire system from central and remote site services. We will also show the automatic local and global procedures that are triggered by the monitored values. Decision-taking agents are used to restart remote services, alert the operators in case of problems that cannot be automatically solved, submit production jobs, replicate and analyze raw data, resource load-balance and other control mechanisms that optimize the overall work flow and simplify day-to-day operations. Synthetic graphical views for all operational parameters, correlations, state of services and applications as well as the full history of all monitoring metrics are available for the ent ire system that now encompasses 85 sites all over the world, mo re than 14000 CPU cores and 10PB of storage.

  16. Role of proactive behaviour enabled by advanced computational intelligence and ICT in Smart Energy Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, P.H.; Kling, W.L.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Venayagamoorthy, G.K.; Croes, R.

    2013-01-01

    Significant increase in renewable energy production and new forms of consumption has enormous impact to the electrical power grid operation. A Smart Energy Grid (SEG) is needed to overcome the challenge of a sustainable and reliable energy supply by merging advanced ICT and control techniques to

  17. Pervasive Computing Support for Hospitals: An Overview of the Activity-Based Computing Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bardram, Jakob E

    2007-01-01

    The activity-based computing project researched pervasive computing support for clinical hospital work. Such technologies have potential for supporting the mobile, collaborative, and disruptive use of heterogeneous embedded devices in a hospital......The activity-based computing project researched pervasive computing support for clinical hospital work. Such technologies have potential for supporting the mobile, collaborative, and disruptive use of heterogeneous embedded devices in a hospital...

  18. Blueprint and First Experiences Bridging Hardware Virtualization and Global Grids for Advanced Scientific Computing: Designing and Building a Global Edge Services Framework (ESF) for OSG, EGEE, and LCG

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, A S; Vaniachine, A; Wurthwein, F; Foster, I; Sotomayor, B; Freeman, T

    2006-01-01

    We report on first experiences with building and operating an edge services framework (ESF) based on Xen virtual machines instantiated via the workspace service in Globus toolkit, and developed as a joint project between EGEE, LCG, and OSG. Many computing facilities are architected with their compute and storage clusters behind firewalls. Edge services (ES) are instantiated on a small set of gateways to provide access to these clusters via standard grid interfaces. Experience on EGEE, LCG, and OSG has shown that at least two issues are of critical importance when designing an infrastructure in support of ES. The first concerns ES configuration. It is impractical to assume that each virtual organization (VO) using a facility will employ the same ES configuration, or that different configurations will coexist easily. Even within a VO, it should be possible to run different versions of the same ES simultaneously. The second issue concerns resource allocation: it is essential that an ESF be able to effectively gu...

  19. Vote for the GridCafé!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN's GridCafé website (http://www.gridcafe.org) has been nominated for the 8th Annual Webby Awards, together with four other finalists in the Technical Achievement category. The Webby Awards have been hailed as the "online Oscars" by Time Magazine, and are the leading international honours for websites, so this nomination represents a significant achievement. The winner in this category last year was Google. The GridCafé website, which was launched at Telecom '03 and forms part of the Microcosm exhibit on computing, introduces Grid technology to the general public, and provides information on all major Grid projects around the world, focusing in particular on the pioneering Grid developments being carried out by CERN and its many international partners for the Large Hadron Collider project. Being nominated for a Webby Award represents a great opportunity to draw positive media attention to Grid technology, to CERN and to science in general. Last year's nominees were covered...

  20. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, S.; Bulgac, A.; Carlson, J.; Engel, J.; Fann, G.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Gandolfi, S.; Hagen, G.; Horoi, M.; Johnson, C.; Kortelainen, M.; Lusk, E.; Maris, P.; Nam, H.; Navratil, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Ng, E.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Ormand, E.; Papenbrock, T.; Pei, J.; Pieper, S. C.; Quaglioni, S.; Roche, K. J.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Sosonkina, M.; Terasaki, J.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  1. Grid and Entrepreneurship Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN openlab is organising a special workshop about Grid opportunities for entrepreneurship. This one-day event will provide an overview of what is involved in spin-off technology, with a special reference to the context of computing and data Grids. Lectures by experienced entrepreneurs will introduce the key concepts of entrepreneurship and review, in particular, the industrial potential of EGEE (the EU co-funded Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project, led by CERN). Case studies will be given by CEOs of European start-ups already active in the Grid and computing cluster area, and regional experts will provide an overview of efforts in several European regions to stimulate entrepreneurship. This workshop is designed to encourage students and researchers involved or interested in Grid technology to consider the entrepreneurial opportunities that this technology may create in the coming years. This workshop is organized as part of the CERN openlab student programme, which is co-sponsored by CERN, HP, ...

  2. An investigation of the RCS (radar cross section) computation of grid cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the aperture of a cavity is covered by a metallic grid net. This metallic grid is to reduce RCS deduced by impinging radar ray on the aperture. A radar ray incident on a grid net installed on a cavity may create six types of propagation. 1-Incident rays entering inside the cavity and backscattered from it.2-Incidebnt rays on the grid net and created reection rays as an array of scatterers. These rays may create a wave with phase difference of 180 degree with respect to the exiting rays from the cavity.3-Incident rays on the grid net create surface currents owing on the net and make travelling waves, which regenerate the magnetic and electric fields. These fields make again propagated waves against incident ones.4-Creeping waves.5-Diffracted rays due to leading edges of net’s elements.6-Mutual impedance among elements of the net could be effective on the resultant RCS. Therefore, the author compares the effects of three out of six properties to a cavity without grid net. This comparison shows that RCS prediction of cavity having a grid net is much more reduced than that of without one

  3. An investigation of the RCS (radar cross section) computation of grid cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabihi, Ahmad [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, the aperture of a cavity is covered by a metallic grid net. This metallic grid is to reduce RCS deduced by impinging radar ray on the aperture. A radar ray incident on a grid net installed on a cavity may create six types of propagation. 1-Incident rays entering inside the cavity and backscattered from it.2-Incidebnt rays on the grid net and created reection rays as an array of scatterers. These rays may create a wave with phase difference of 180 degree with respect to the exiting rays from the cavity.3-Incident rays on the grid net create surface currents owing on the net and make travelling waves, which regenerate the magnetic and electric fields. These fields make again propagated waves against incident ones.4-Creeping waves.5-Diffracted rays due to leading edges of net’s elements.6-Mutual impedance among elements of the net could be effective on the resultant RCS. Therefore, the author compares the effects of three out of six properties to a cavity without grid net. This comparison shows that RCS prediction of cavity having a grid net is much more reduced than that of without one.

  4. Conservative Overset Grids for Overflow For The Sonic Wave Atmospheric Propagation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onufer, Jeff T.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1999-01-01

    Methods are presented that can be used to make multiple, overset grids communicate in a conservative manner. The methods are developed for use with the Chimera overset method using the PEGSUS code and the OVERFLOW solver.

  5. Identification of observables for future grids – the framework developed in the ELECTRA project

    OpenAIRE

    Visscher, Klaas; Marinelli, Mattia; Morch, Andrei Z.; Jakobsson, Sigurd Hofsmo

    2015-01-01

    The main subject of this paper is the classification and identification of observables for present and future grids. In order to make an inventory of present and potentially new observables, a systematic classification and identification of observables for future grids is conducted. After first introducing some fundamental definitions for observables, observables are further classified by the characteristic time scale where they are used in the physical power system. For actual use in control...

  6. Integration of case study approach, project design and computer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integration of case study approach, project design and computer modeling in managerial accounting education ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... in the Laboratory of Management Accounting and Controlling Systems at the ...

  7. A Review of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Smart Grid Projects and Their Implications for China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Marnay, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Feng, Wei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhou, Nan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Karali, Nihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The Chinese government has paid growing attention to renewable energy development and has set ambitious goals for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions reduction and energy savings. Smart grid (SG) technologies have been regarded as emerging ways to integrate renewable energy and to help achieve these climate and energy goals. This report first reviews completed SG demonstrations under the U.S. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); especially two key programs: the SG Investment Grant (SGIG) and the SG Demonstration Project (SGDP). Under the SGIG, the larger of the two programs, over $3.4 billion was used to help industry deploy existing advanced SG technologies and tools to improve grid performance and reduce costs. Including industry investment, a total of $8 billion was spent on 99 cost-shared projects, which involved more than 200 participating electric utilities and other organizations. These projects aimed to modernize the electric grid, strengthen cyber security, improve interoperability, and collect comprehensive data on SG operations and benefits.

  8. iSERVO: Implementing the International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory by Integrating Computational Grid and Geographical Information Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Mehmet; Aydin, Galip; Donnellan, Andrea; Fox, Geoffrey; Granat, Robert; Grant, Lisa; Lyzenga, Greg; McLeod, Dennis; Pallickara, Shrideep; Parker, Jay; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; Sayar, Ahmet; Tullis, Terry

    2006-12-01

    We describe the goals and initial implementation of the International Solid Earth Virtual Observatory (iSERVO). This system is built using a Web Services approach to Grid computing infrastructure and is accessed via a component-based Web portal user interface. We describe our implementations of services used by this system, including Geographical Information System (GIS)-based data grid services for accessing remote data repositories and job management services for controlling multiple execution steps. iSERVO is an example of a larger trend to build globally scalable scientific computing infrastructures using the Service Oriented Architecture approach. Adoption of this approach raises a number of research challenges in millisecond-latency message systems suitable for internet-enabled scientific applications. We review our research in these areas.

  9. The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program - Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, G.; Otto, S.; Lyzenga, G.; Rogstad, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program wwhich studies basic issues in computational science is described. The research builds on initial work where novel concurrent hardware, the necessary systems software to use it and twenty significant scientific implementations running on the initial 32, 64, and 128 node hypercube machines have been constructed. A major goal of the program will be to extend this work into new disciplines and more complex algorithms including general packages that decompose arbitrary problems in major application areas. New high-performance concurrent processors with up to 1024-nodes, over a gigabyte of memory and multigigaflop performance are being constructed. The implementations cover a wide range of problems in areas such as high energy and astrophysics, condensed matter, chemical reactions, plasma physics, applied mathematics, geophysics, simulation, CAD for VLSI, graphics and image processing. The products of the research program include the concurrent algorithms, hardware, systems software, and complete program implementations.

  10. Sustainability Evaluation of Power Grid Construction Projects Using Improved TOPSIS and Least Square Support Vector Machine with Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxiao Niu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric power industry is of great significance in promoting social and economic development and improving people’s living standards. Power grid construction is a necessary part of infrastructure construction, whose sustainability plays an important role in economic development, environmental protection and social progress. In order to effectively evaluate the sustainability of power grid construction projects, in this paper, we first identified 17 criteria from four dimensions including economy, technology, society and environment to establish the evaluation criteria system. After that, the grey incidence analysis was used to modify the traditional Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS, which made it possible to evaluate the sustainability of electric power construction projects based on visual angle of similarity and nearness. Then, in order to simplify the procedure of experts scoring and computation, on the basis of evaluation results of the improved TOPSIS, the model using Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm (MFOA to optimize the Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM was established. Finally, a numerical example was given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  11. Numerical evaluation of methods for computing tomographic projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.; Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods for computing forward/back projections of 2-D images can be viewed as numerical integration techniques. The accuracy of any ray-driven projection method can be improved by increasing the number of ray-paths that are traced per projection bin. The accuracy of pixel-driven projection methods can be increased by dividing each pixel into a number of smaller sub-pixels and projecting each sub-pixel. The authors compared four competing methods of computing forward/back projections: bilinear interpolation, ray-tracing, pixel-driven projection based upon sub-pixels, and pixel-driven projection based upon circular, rather than square, pixels. This latter method is equivalent to a fast, bi-nonlinear interpolation. These methods and the choice of the number of ray-paths per projection bin or the number of sub-pixels per pixel present a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy. To solve the problem of assessing backprojection accuracy, the analytical inverse Fourier transform of the ramp filtered forward projection of the Shepp and Logan head phantom is derived

  12. Shining examples of grid applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Hammerle, Hannelore

    2006-01-01

    Users in more than 150 virtual organisations from fields as diverse as biomedicine, earth Sciences and high-energy physics are now using the distributed computing infrastructure of the enabling grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) project, which shows the wide adoption and versatiblity of this new technology (1 page)

  13. Characterization of antigenetic serotypes from the dengue virus in Venezuela by means of Grid Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isea, Raúl; Montes, Esther; Rubio-Montero, Antonio J; Rosales, José D; Rodríguez-Pascual, Manuel A; Mayo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    This work determines the molecular epidemiology of dengue virus in Venezuela by means of phylogenetic calculations performed on the EELA-2 Grid infrastructure with the PhyloGrid application, an open source tool that allows users performing phylogeny reconstruction in their research. In this study, a total of 132 E nucleotide gene sequences of dengue virus from Venezuela recorded in GenBank(R) have been processed in order to reproduce and validate the topology described in the literature.

  14. The Challenge '88 Project: Interfacing of Chemical Instruments to Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jim; Verghese, Manoj

    The main part of this project involved using a computer, either an Apple or an IBM, as a chart recorder for the infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrophotometers. The computer "reads" these machines and displays spectra on its monitor. The graphs can then be stored for future reference and manipulation. The program to…

  15. Development and Execution of an Impact Cratering Application on a Computational Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Huedo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact cratering is an important geological process of special interest in Astrobiology. Its numerical simulation comprises the execution of a high number of tasks, since the search space of input parameter values includes the projectile diameter, the water depth and the impactor velocity. Furthermore, the execution time of each task is not uniform because of the different numerical properties of each experimental configuration. Grid technology is a promising platform to execute this kind of applications, since it provides the end user with a performance much higher than that achievable on any single organization. However, the scheduling of each task on a Grid involves challenging issues due to the unpredictable and heterogeneous behavior of both the Grid and the numerical code. This paper evaluates the performance of a Grid infrastructure based on the Globus toolkit and the GridWay framework, which provides the adaptive and fault tolerance functionality required to harness Grid resources, in the simulation of the impact cratering process. The experiments have been performed on a testbed composed of resources shared by five sites interconnected by RedIRIS, the Spanish Research and Education Network.

  16. Computing the maximum volume inscribed ellipsoid of a polytopic projection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhen, Jianzhe; den Hertog, Dick

    We introduce a novel scheme based on a blending of Fourier-Motzkin elimination (FME) and adjustable robust optimization techniques to compute the maximum volume inscribed ellipsoid (MVE) in a polytopic projection. It is well-known that deriving an explicit description of a projected polytope is

  17. Computing the Maximum Volume Inscribed Ellipsoid of a Polytopic Projection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhen, J.; den Hertog, D.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel scheme based on a blending of Fourier-Motzkin elimination (FME) and adjustable robust optimization techniques to compute the maximum volume inscribed ellipsoid (MVE) in a polytopic projection. It is well-known that deriving an explicit description of a projected polytope is

  18. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-01-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning,…

  19. The Cc1 Project – System For Private Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Chwastowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of the Cloud Computing system developed at IFJ PAN are described. The project is financed from the structural resources provided by the European Commission and the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (Innovative Economy, National Cohesion Strategy. The system delivers a solution for carrying out computer calculations on a Private Cloud computing infrastructure. It consists of an intuitive Web based user interface, a module for the users and resources administration and the standard EC2 interface implementation. Thanks to the distributed character of the system it allows for the integration of a geographically distant federation of computer clusters within a uniform user environment.

  20. Computational comparison of the effect of mixing grids of 'swirler' and 'run-through' types on flow parameters and the behavior of steam phase in WWER fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, S.; Sergeev, V.

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained using the TURBOFLOW computer code are presented for the numerical calculations of space distributions of coolant flow, heating and boiling characteristics in WWER fuel assemblies with regard to the effect of mixing grids of 'Swirler' and 'Run-through' types installed in FA on the above processes. The nature of the effect of these grids on coolant flow was demonstrated to be different. Thus, the relaxation length of cross flows after passing a 'Run-through' grid is five times as compared to a 'Swirler'-type grid, which correlates well with the experimental data. At the same time, accelerations occurring in the flow downstream of a 'Swirler'-type grid are by an order of magnitude greater than those after a 'Run-through' grid. As a result, the efficiency of one-phase coolant mixing is much higher for the grids of 'Run-through' type, while the efficiency of steam removal from fuel surface is much higher for 'Swirler'-type grids. To achieve optimal removal of steam from fuel surface it has been proposed to install into fuel assemblies two 'Swirler'-type grids in tandem at a distance of about 10 cm from each other with flow swirling in opposite directions. 'Run-through' grids would be appropriate for use for mixing in fuel assemblies with a high non-uniformity of fuel-by-fuel power generation. (authors)

  1. Towards Agent-Based Model Specification in Smart Grid: A Cognitive Agent-based Computing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Waseem; Niazi, Muaz A.; Iantovics, Laszlo Barna

    2017-01-01

    A smart grid can be considered as a complex network where each node represents a generation unit or a consumer. Whereas links can be used to represent transmission lines. One way to study complex systems is by using the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm. An ABM is a way of representing a complex system of autonomous agents interacting with each other. Previously, a number of studies have been presented in the smart grid domain making use of the ABM paradigm. However, to the best of our know...

  2. ESIF 2016: Modernizing Our Grid and Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Becelaere, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-09

    This 2016 annual report highlights work conducted at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) in FY 2016, including grid modernization, high-performance computing and visualization, and INTEGRATE projects.

  3. Grids for Kids gives next-generation IT an early start

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    "Grids for Kids gives children a crash course in grid computing," explains co-organiser Anna Cook of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project. "We introduce them to concepts such as middleware, parallel processing and supercomputing, and give them opportunities for hands-on learning.

  4. Numerical Computation of a Viscous Flow around a Circular Cylinder on a Cartesian Grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a novel cut-cell Cartesian grid method that preserves the spectral properties of convection and diffusion. That is, convection is discretised by a skew-symmetric operator and diffusion is approximated by a symmetric positive-definite coefficient matrix. Such a symmetry-preserving

  5. Kids Enjoy Grids

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I want to come back and work here when I'm older,' was the spontaneous reaction of one of the children invited to CERN by the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project for a 'Grids for Kids' day at the end of January. The EGEE project is led by CERN, and the EGEE gender action team organized the day to introduce children to grid technology at an early age. The school group included both boys and girls, aged 9 to 11. All of the presenters were women. 'In general, before this visit, the children thought that scientists always wore white coats and were usually male, with wild Einstein-like hair,' said Jackie Beaver, the class's teacher at the Institut International de Lancy, a school near Geneva. 'They were surprised and pleased to see that women became scientists, and that scientists were quite 'normal'.' The half-day event included presentations about why Grids are needed, a visit of the computer centre, some online games, and plenty of time for questions. In the end, everyone agreed that it was a big success a...

  6. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  7. Computer-integrated design and information management for nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Martin-Guirado, L.; Nebrera, F.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past seven years, Empresarios Agrupados has been developing a comprehensive, computer-integrated system to perform the majority of the engineering, design, procurement and construction management activities in nuclear, fossil-fired as well as hydro power plant projects. This system, which is already in a production environment, comprises a large number of computer programs and data bases designed using a modular approach. Each software module, dedicated to meeting the needs of a particular design group or project discipline, facilitates the performance of functional tasks characteristic of the power plant engineering process

  8. The Activity-Based Computing Project - A Software Architecture for Pervasive Computing Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    . Special attention should be drawn to publication [25], which gives an overview of the ABC project to the IEEE Pervasive Computing community; the ACM CHI 2006 [19] paper that documents the implementation of the ABC technology; and the ACM ToCHI paper [12], which is the main publication of the project......, documenting all of the project’s four objectives. All of these publication venues are top-tier journals and conferences within computer science. From a business perspective, the project had the objective of incorporating relevant parts of the ABC technology into the products of Medical Insight, which has been...... done. Moreover, partly based on the research done in the ABC project, the company Cetrea A/S has been founded, which incorporate ABC concepts and technologies in its products. The concepts of activity-based computing have also been researched in cooperation with IBM Research, and the ABC project has...

  9. COMPUTER GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION, IN TREBLE ORTHOGONAL PROJECTION, OF A POINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLONOVSCHI Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the stages of understanding and study, by students, of descriptive geometry, the treble orthogonal projection of a point, creates problems in the situations in that one or more descriptive coordinates are zero. Starting from these considerations the authors have created an original computer program which offers to the students the possibility to easily understanding of the way in which a point is represented, in draught, in the treble orthogonal projection whatever which are its values of the descriptive coordinates.

  10. When energy grids become intelligent: smart grid standardisation in the starting-blocks; interconnection in Europe: 50 billions Euros to boost all networks; smart electric grids feed new projects; The United States and Europe connect standards on smart electric grids; smart metering: standards place their marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedey, Fabienne; Tourneur, Jean-Claude; Barthet, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    As talking about smart grids has became a leitmotiv, their development appears to be complex as it requires all the actors (carriers, dealers, providers, decentralised producers, consumers, equipment manufacturers, and so on) to share a same transverse vision. A European cooperation group has been set up which gathers representatives of the European electrical and telecommunication industry. Beside, the European Commission has presented a plan which comprises 50 billions Euros of investments to improve all networks in the fields of transports, energy and digital technology. In France, six projects on smart grids gathered 115 millions Euros. At the international level, the NIST and SGCG have been asked to cooperatively elaborate a standard framework for smart grids. But smart metering concerns other fields than electricity...

  11. Search for β2 adrenergic receptor ligands by virtual screening via grid computing and investigation of binding modes by docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Bai

    Full Text Available We designed a program called MolGridCal that can be used to screen small molecule database in grid computing on basis of JPPF grid environment. Based on MolGridCal program, we proposed an integrated strategy for virtual screening and binding mode investigation by combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and free energy calculations. To test the effectiveness of MolGridCal, we screened potential ligands for β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR from a database containing 50,000 small molecules. MolGridCal can not only send tasks to the grid server automatically, but also can distribute tasks using the screensaver function. As for the results of virtual screening, the known agonist BI-167107 of β2AR is ranked among the top 2% of the screened candidates, indicating MolGridCal program can give reasonable results. To further study the binding mode and refine the results of MolGridCal, more accurate docking and scoring methods are used to estimate the binding affinity for the top three molecules (agonist BI-167107, neutral antagonist alprenolol and inverse agonist ICI 118,551. The results indicate agonist BI-167107 has the best binding affinity. MD simulation and free energy calculation are employed to investigate the dynamic interaction mechanism between the ligands and β2AR. The results show that the agonist BI-167107 also has the lowest binding free energy. This study can provide a new way to perform virtual screening effectively through integrating molecular docking based on grid computing, MD simulations and free energy calculations. The source codes of MolGridCal are freely available at http://molgridcal.codeplex.com.

  12. Computer Assisted Project-Based Instruction: The Effects on Science Achievement, Computer Achievement and Portfolio Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz; Dede, Dinçer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of computer assisted project-based instruction on learners' achievement in a science and technology course, in a computer course and in portfolio development. With this aim in mind, a quasi-experimental design was used and a sample of 70 seventh grade secondary school students from Org. Esref…

  13. Cooperative Strategy for Optimal Management of Smart Grids by Wavelet RNNs and Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tina, Giuseppe Marco; Tramontana, Emiliano

    2016-08-01

    Advanced smart grids have several power sources that contribute with their own irregular dynamic to the power production, while load nodes have another dynamic. Several factors have to be considered when using the owned power sources for satisfying the demand, i.e., production rate, battery charge and status, variable cost of externally bought energy, and so on. The objective of this paper is to develop appropriate neural network architectures that automatically and continuously govern power production and dispatch, in order to maximize the overall benefit over a long time. Such a control will improve the fundamental work of a smart grid. For this, status data of several components have to be gathered, and then an estimate of future power production and demand is needed. Hence, the neural network-driven forecasts are apt in this paper for renewable nonprogrammable energy sources. Then, the produced energy as well as the stored one can be supplied to consumers inside a smart grid, by means of digital technology. Among the sought benefits, reduced costs and increasing reliability and transparency are paramount.

  14. The ZAP Project: Designing Interactive Computer Tools for Learning Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Casper; Eysink, Tessa; de Jong, Ton

    2006-01-01

    In the ZAP project, a set of interactive computer programs called "ZAPs" was developed. The programs were designed in such a way that first-year students experience psychological phenomena in a vivid and self-explanatory way. Students can either take the role of participant in a psychological experiment, they can experience phenomena themselves,…

  15. Computer-aided engineering for Qinshan CANDU projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhizhang; Goland, D.

    1999-01-01

    The author briefly describes AECL's work in applying computer-aided engineering tools to the Qinshan CANDU Project. The main emphases will be to introduce the major CADD software tools and their use in civil design, process design and EI and C design. Other special software tools and non-CADD tools and their applications are also briefly introduced

  16. The grid

    OpenAIRE

    Morrad, Annie; McArthur, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Project Anywhere Project title: The Grid   Artists: Annie Morrad: Artist/Senior Lecturer, University of Lincoln, School of Film and Media, Lincoln, UK   Dr Ian McArthur: Hybrid Practitioner/Senior Lecturer, UNSW Art & Design, UNSW Australia, Sydney, Australia   Annie Morrad is a London-based artist and musician and senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln, UK. Dr Ian McArthur is a Sydney-based hybrid practitione...

  17. A comparison of some anthropometric parameters between an Italian and a UK population: 'proof of principle' of a European project using MammoGrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.; Thompson, D.; Del Frate, C.; Cordell, M.; Highnam, R.; Tromans, C.; Warsi, I.; Ding, J.; Sala, E.; Estrella, F.; Solomonides, A.E.; Odeh, M.; McClatchey, R.; Bazzocchi, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Brady, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the use of grid technology to produce a database of mammograms and supporting patient data, specifically using breast density as a biomarker of risk for breast cancer, for epidemiological purposes. Method: The cohort comprised 1737 women from the UK and Italy, aged 28-87 years, mean 54.7 years, who underwent mammography after giving consent to the use of their data in the project. Information regarding height, weight, and exposure data (mAs and kV) was recorded. The computer program Generate-SMF was applied to all films in the database to measure breast volume, dense breast volume, and thereby percentage density. Visual readings of density using a six-category classification system were also available for 596 women. Results: The UK and Italian participants were similar in height, but the UK women were significantly heavier with a slightly higher body mass index (BMI), despite being younger. Both absolute and percentage breast density were significantly higher in the Udine cohort. Images from the medio-lateral projection (MLO) give a significantly lower percentage density than cranio-caudal (CC) images (p < 0.0001). Total breast volume is negatively associated with percentage density, as are BMI and age (p < 0.0001 for all), although 80% of the variability in percentage density remains unexplained. Conclusion: The study offers proof of principle that confederated databases generated using Grid technology provide a useful and adaptable environment for large quantities of image, numerical, and qualitative data suitable for epidemiological research using the example of mammographic density as a biomarker of risk for breast cancer

  18. Reconstruction and identification of electrons in the Atlas experiment. Setup of a Tier 2 of the computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derue, F.

    2008-03-01

    The origin of the mass of elementary particles is linked to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Its study will be one of the main efforts of the Atlas experiment at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, starting in 2008. In most cases, studies will be limited by our knowledge of the detector performances, as the precision of the energy reconstruction or the efficiency to identify particles. This manuscript presents a work dedicated to the reconstruction of electrons in the Atlas experiment with simulated data and data taken during the combined test beam of 2004. The analysis of the Atlas data implies the use of a huge amount of computing and storage resources which brought to the development of a world computing grid. (author)

  19. FDTD parallel computational analysis of grid-type scattering filter characteristics for medical X-ray image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu; Goto, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis depends on the intensity of transmitted and scattered waves in X-ray propagation in biomedical media. X-ray is scattered and absorbed by tissues, such as fat, bone and internal organs. However, image processing for medical diagnosis, based on the scattering and absorption characteristics of these tissues in X-ray spectrum is not so much studied. To obtain precise information of tissues in a living body, the accurate characteristics of scattering and absorption are required. In this paper, X-ray scattering and absorption in biomedical media are studied using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In FDTD method, the size of analysis space is very limited by the performance of available computers. To overcome this limitation, parallel and successive FDTD method is introduced. As a result of computer simulation, the amplitude of transmitted and scattered waves are presented numerically. The fundamental filtering characteristics of grid-type filter are also shown numerically. (author)

  20. A new major SETI project based on Project SERENDIP data and 100,000 personal computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III; Werthimer, Dan; Bowyer, Stuart; Cobb, Jeff; Gedye, David; Anderson, David

    1997-01-01

    We are now developing an innovative SETI project involving massively parallel computation on desktop computers scattered around the world. The public will be uniquely involved in a real scientific project. Individuals will download a screensaver program that will not only provide the usual attractive graphics when their computer is idle, but will also perform sophisticated analysis of SETI data using the host computer. The data are tapped off Project SERENDIP IV's receiver and SETI survey operating on the 305-m-diameter Arecibo radio telescope. We make a continuous tape-recording of a 2-MHz bandwidth signal centered on the 21-cm H I line. The data on these tapes are then preliminarily screened and parceled out by a server that supplies small chunks of data over the Internet to clients possessing the screen-saver software. After the client computer has automatically analyzed a complete chunk of data a report on the best candidate signals is sent back to the server, whereupon a new chunk of data is sent out. If 50,000-100,000 customers can be achieved, the computing power will be equivalent to a substantial fraction of atypical supercomputer, and the project will cover a volume of parameter space comparable to that of SERENDIP IV.

  1. A Taxonomy for Modeling Flexibility and a Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Dispatch in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mette Højgaard; Edlund, Kristian; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The word flexibility is central to Smart Grid literature, but still a formal definition of flexibility is pending. This paper present a taxonomy for flexibility modeling denoted Buckets, Batteries and Bakeries. We consider a direct control Virtual Power Plant (VPP), which is given the task...... of servicing a portfolio of flexible consumers by use of a fluctuating power supply. Based on the developed taxonomy we first prove that no causal optimal dispatch strategies exist for the considered problem. We then present two heuristic algorithms for solving the balancing task: Predictive Balancing...

  2. The UK Human Genome Mapping Project online computing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysavy, F R; Bishop, M J; Gibbs, G P; Williams, G W

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of computing and networking facilities developed by the Medical Research Council to provide online computing support to the Human Genome Mapping Project (HGMP) in the UK. The facility is connected to a number of other computing facilities in various centres of genetics and molecular biology research excellence, either directly via high-speed links or through national and international wide-area networks. The paper describes the design and implementation of the current system, a 'client/server' network of Sun, IBM, DEC and Apple servers, gateways and workstations. A short outline of online computing services currently delivered by this system to the UK human genetics research community is also provided. More information about the services and their availability could be obtained by a direct approach to the UK HGMP-RC.

  3. Grid today, clouds on the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiers, Jamie

    2009-04-01

    By the time of CCP 2008, the largest scientific machine in the world - the Large Hadron Collider - had been cooled down as scheduled to its operational temperature of below 2 degrees Kelvin and injection tests were starting. Collisions of proton beams at 5+5 TeV were expected within one to two months of the initial tests, with data taking at design energy ( 7+7 TeV) foreseen for 2009. In order to process the data from this world machine, we have put our "Higgs in one basket" - that of Grid computing [The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), in: Proceedings of the Conference on Computational Physics 2006 (CCP 2006), vol. 177, 2007, pp. 219-223]. After many years of preparation, 2008 saw a final "Common Computing Readiness Challenge" (CCRC'08) - aimed at demonstrating full readiness for 2008 data taking, processing and analysis. By definition, this relied on a world-wide production Grid infrastructure. But change - as always - is on the horizon. The current funding model for Grids - which in Europe has been through 3 generations of EGEE projects, together with related projects in other parts of the world, including South America - is evolving towards a long-term, sustainable e-infrastructure, like the European Grid Initiative (EGI) [The European Grid Initiative Design Study, website at http://web.eu-egi.eu/]. At the same time, potentially new paradigms, such as that of "Cloud Computing" are emerging. This paper summarizes the results of CCRC'08 and discusses the potential impact of future Grid funding on both regional and international application communities. It contrasts Grid and Cloud computing models from both technical and sociological points of view. Finally, it discusses the requirements from production application communities, in terms of stability and continuity in the medium to long term.

  4. Chimera Grid Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Buning, Pieter G.; Meakin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) is a software package for performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis utilizing the Chimera-overset-grid method. For modeling flows with viscosity about geometrically complex bodies in relative motion, the Chimera-overset-grid method is among the most computationally cost-effective methods for obtaining accurate aerodynamic results. CGT contains a large collection of tools for generating overset grids, preparing inputs for computer programs that solve equations of flow on the grids, and post-processing of flow-solution data. The tools in CGT include grid editing tools, surface-grid-generation tools, volume-grid-generation tools, utility scripts, configuration scripts, and tools for post-processing (including generation of animated images of flows and calculating forces and moments exerted on affected bodies). One of the tools, denoted OVERGRID, is a graphical user interface (GUI) that serves to visualize the grids and flow solutions and provides central access to many other tools. The GUI facilitates the generation of grids for a new flow-field configuration. Scripts that follow the grid generation process can then be constructed to mostly automate grid generation for similar configurations. CGT is designed for use in conjunction with a computer-aided-design program that provides the geometry description of the bodies, and a flow-solver program.

  5. Analytical simulation platform describing projections in computed tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the patient dose, several approaches such as spectral imaging using photon counting detectors and statistical image reconstruction, are being considered. Although image-reconstruction algorithms may significantly enhance image quality in reconstructed images with low dose, true signal-to-noise properties are mainly determined by image quality in projections. We are developing an analytical simulation platform describing projections to investigate how quantum-interaction physics in each component configuring CT systems affect image quality in projections. This simulator will be very useful for an improved design or optimization of CT systems in economy as well as the development of novel image-reconstruction algorithms. In this study, we present the progress of development of the simulation platform with an emphasis on the theoretical framework describing the generation of projection data. We have prepared the analytical simulation platform describing projections in computed tomography systems. The remained further study before the meeting includes the following: Each stage in the cascaded signal-transfer model for obtaining projections will be validated by the Monte Carlo simulations. We will build up energy-dependent scatter and pixel-crosstalk kernels, and show their effects on image quality in projections and reconstructed images. We will investigate the effects of projections obtained from various imaging conditions and system (or detector) operation parameters on reconstructed images. It is challenging to include the interaction physics due to photon-counting detectors into the simulation platform. Detailed descriptions of the simulator will be presented with discussions on its performance and limitation as well as Monte Carlo validations. Computational cost will also be addressed in detail. The proposed method in this study is simple and can be used conveniently in lab environment

  6. Ubiquitous healthcare computing with SEnsor Grid Enhancement with Data Management System (SEGEDMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preve, Nikolaos

    2011-12-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) can be deployed to monitor the health of patients suffering from critical diseases. Also a wireless network consisting of biomedical sensors can be implanted into the patient's body and can monitor the patients' conditions. These sensor devices, apart from having an enormous capability of collecting data from their physical surroundings, are also resource constraint in nature with a limited processing and communication ability. Therefore we have to integrate them with the Grid technology in order to process and store the collected data by the sensor nodes. In this paper, we proposed the SEnsor Grid Enhancement Data Management system, called SEGEDMA ensuring the integration of different network technologies and the continuous data access to system users. The main contribution of this work is to achieve the interoperability of both technologies through a novel network architecture ensuring also the interoperability of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and HL7 standards. According to the results, SEGEDMA can be applied successfully in a decentralized healthcare environment.

  7. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed

  8. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  9. Grid generation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liseikin, Vladimir D

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to structured and unstructured grid methods in scientific computing, addressing graduate students, scientists as well as practitioners. Basic local and integral grid quality measures are formulated and new approaches to mesh generation are reviewed. In addition to the content of the successful first edition, a more detailed and practice oriented description of monitor metrics in Beltrami and diffusion equations is given for generating adaptive numerical grids. Also, new techniques developed by the author are presented, in particular a technique based on the inverted form of Beltrami’s partial differential equations with respect to control metrics. This technique allows the generation of adaptive grids for a wide variety of computational physics problems, including grid clustering to given function values and gradients, grid alignment with given vector fields, and combinations thereof. Applications of geometric methods to the analysis of numerical grid behavior as well as grid ge...

  10. apeNEXT A Multi-Tflops LQCD Computing Project

    CERN Document Server

    Alfieri, R; Onofri, E.; Bartoloni, A.; Battista, C.; Cabibbo, N.; Cosimi, M.; Lonardo, A.; Michelotti, A.; Rapuano, F.; Proietti, B.; Rossetti, D.; Sacco, G.; Tassa, S.; Torelli, M.; Vicini, P.; Boucaud, Philippe; Pene, O.; Errico, W.; Magazzu, G.; Sartori, L.; Schifano, F.; Tripiccione, R.; De Riso, P.; Petronzio, R.; Destri, C.; Frezzotti, R.; Marchesini, G.; Gensch, U.; Kretzschmann, A.; Leich, H.; Paschedag, N.; Schwendicke, U.; Simma, H.; Sommer, R.; Sulanke, K.; Wegner, P.; Pleiter, D.; Jansen, K.; Fucci, A.; Martin, B.; Pech, J.; Panizzi, E.; Petricola, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a slightly modified and reduced version of the proposal of the {\\bf apeNEXT} project, which was submitted to DESY and INFN in spring 2000. .It presents the basic motivations and ideas of a next generation lattice QCD (LQCD) computing project, whose goal is the construction and operation of several large scale Multi-TFlops LQCD engines, providing an integrated peak performance of tens of TFlops, and a sustained (double precision) performance on key LQCD kernels of about 50% of peak speed.

  11. Computational performance of a projection and rescaling algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Javier; Soheili, Negar

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents a computational implementation of a {\\em projection and rescaling algorithm} for finding most interior solutions to the pair of feasibility problems \\[ \\text{find} \\; x\\in L\\cap\\mathbb{R}^n_{+} \\;\\;\\;\\; \\text{ and } \\; \\;\\;\\;\\; \\text{find} \\; \\hat x\\in L^\\perp\\cap\\mathbb{R}^n_{+}, \\] where $L$ denotes a linear subspace in $\\mathbb{R}^n$ and $L^\\perp$ denotes its orthogonal complement. The projection and rescaling algorithm is a recently developed method that combines a {\\...

  12. Project Management of a personnel radiation records computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labenski, T.

    1984-01-01

    Project Management techniques have been used to develop a data base management information system to provide storage and retrieval of personnel radiation and Health Physics records. The system is currently being developed on a Hewlett Packard 1000 Series E Computer with provisions to include plant radiation survey information, radiation work permit information, inventory management for Health Physics supplies and instrumentation, and control of personnel access to radiological controlled areas. The methodologies used to manage the overall project are presented along with selection and management of software vendors

  13. Computational methods for planning and evaluating geothermal energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goumas, M.G.; Lygerou, V.A.; Papayannakis, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    In planning, designing and evaluating a geothermal energy project, a number of technical, economic, social and environmental parameters should be considered. The use of computational methods provides a rigorous analysis improving the decision-making process. This article demonstrates the application of decision-making methods developed in operational research for the optimum exploitation of geothermal resources. Two characteristic problems are considered: (1) the economic evaluation of a geothermal energy project under uncertain conditions using a stochastic analysis approach and (2) the evaluation of alternative exploitation schemes for optimum development of a low enthalpy geothermal field using a multicriteria decision-making procedure. (Author)

  14. Permafrost sub-grid heterogeneity of soil properties key for 3-D soil processes and future climate projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are massive carbon stocks stored in permafrost-affected soils due to the 3-D soil movement process called cryoturbation. For a reliable projection of the past, recent and future Arctic carbon balance, and hence climate, a reliable concept for representing cryoturbation in a land surface model (LSM is required. The basis of the underlying transport processes is pedon-scale heterogeneity of soil hydrological and thermal properties as well as insulating layers, such as snow and vegetation. Today we still lack a concept of how to reliably represent pedon-scale properties and processes in a LSM. One possibility could be a statistical approach. This perspective paper demonstrates the importance of sub-grid heterogeneity in permafrost soils as a pre-requisite to implement any lateral transport parametrization. Representing such heterogeneity at the sub-pixel size of a LSM is the next logical step of model advancements. As a result of a theoretical experiment, heterogeneity of thermal and hydrological soil properties alone lead to a remarkable initial sub-grid range of subsoil temperature of 2 deg C, and active-layer thickness of 150 cm in East Siberia. These results show the way forward in representing combined lateral and vertical transport of water and soil in LSMs.

  15. Computing infrastructure for ATLAS data analysis in the Italian Grid cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Martini, A; Barberis, D; Brunengo, A; Corosu, M; Campana, S; Girolamo, A Di; Carlino, G; Doria, A; Merola, L; Musto, E; Ciocca, C; Jha, M K; Cobal, M; Pascolo, F; Salvo, A De; Luminari, L; Sanctis, U De; Galeazzi, F

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS data are distributed centrally to Tier-1 and Tier-2 sites. The first stages of data selection and analysis take place mainly at Tier-2 centres, with the final, iterative and interactive, stages taking place mostly at Tier-3 clusters. The Italian ATLAS cloud consists of a Tier-1, four Tier-2s, and Tier-3 sites at each institute. Tier-3s that are grid-enabled are used to test code that will then be run on a larger scale at Tier-2s. All Tier-3s offer interactive data access to their users and the possibility to run PROOF. This paper describes the hardware and software infrastructure choices taken, the operational experience after 10 months of LHC data, and discusses site performances.

  16. Simulation modeling of cloud computing for smart grid using CloudSim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mehmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a smart grid cloud has been simulated using CloudSim. Various parameters like number of virtual machines (VM, VM Image size, VM RAM, VM bandwidth, cloudlet length, and their effect on cost and cloudlet completion time in time-shared and space-shared resource allocation policy have been studied. As the number of cloudlets increased from 68 to 178, greater number of cloudlets completed their execution with high cloudlet completion time in time-shared allocation policy as compared to space-shared allocation policy. Similar trend has been observed when VM bandwidth is increased from 1 Gbps to 10 Gbps and VM RAM is increased from 512 MB to 5120 MB. The cost of processing increased linearly with respect to increase in number of VMs, VM Image size and cloudlet length.

  17. DIRAC distributed computing services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2014-01-01

    DIRAC Project provides a general-purpose framework for building distributed computing systems. It is used now in several HEP and astrophysics experiments as well as for user communities in other scientific domains. There is a large interest from smaller user communities to have a simple tool like DIRAC for accessing grid and other types of distributed computing resources. However, small experiments cannot afford to install and maintain dedicated services. Therefore, several grid infrastructure projects are providing DIRAC services for their respective user communities. These services are used for user tutorials as well as to help porting the applications to the grid for a practical day-to-day work. The services are giving access typically to several grid infrastructures as well as to standalone computing clusters accessible by the target user communities. In the paper we will present the experience of running DIRAC services provided by the France-Grilles NGI and other national grid infrastructure projects.

  18. The Open Science Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; / /LBL, Berkeley; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Avery, Paul; /Florida U.; Blackburn, Kent; /Caltech; Wenaus, Torre; /Brookhaven; Wurthwein, Frank; /UC, San Diego; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  19. Applying the min-projection strategy to improve the transient performance of the three-phase grid-connected inverter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baygi, Mahdi Oloumi; Ghazi, Reza; Monfared, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Applying the min-projection strategy (MPS) to a three-phase grid-connected inverter to improve its transient performance is the main objective of this paper. For this purpose, the inverter is first modeled as a switched linear system. Then, the feasibility of the MPS technique is investigated and the stability criterion is derived. Hereafter, the fundamental equations of the MPS for the control of the inverter are obtained. The proposed scheme is simulated in PSCAD/EMTDC environment. The validity of the MPS approach is confirmed by comparing the obtained results with those of VOC method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method despite its simplicity provides an excellent transient performance, fully decoupled control of active and reactive powers, acceptable THD level and a reasonable switching frequency. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, Erik L.; Scannapieco, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, ρ i u di = ρ i (u i -u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  1. Power-Efficient Computing: Experiences from the COSA Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cesini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is today one of the most relevant issues in operating HPC systems for scientific applications. The use of unconventional computing systems is therefore of great interest for several scientific communities looking for a better tradeoff between time-to-solution and energy-to-solution. In this context, the performance assessment of processors with a high ratio of performance per watt is necessary to understand how to realize energy-efficient computing systems for scientific applications, using this class of processors. Computing On SOC Architecture (COSA is a three-year project (2015–2017 funded by the Scientific Commission V of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, which aims to investigate the performance and the total cost of ownership offered by computing systems based on commodity low-power Systems on Chip (SoCs and high energy-efficient systems based on GP-GPUs. In this work, we present the results of the project analyzing the performance of several scientific applications on several GPU- and SoC-based systems. We also describe the methodology we have used to measure energy performance and the tools we have implemented to monitor the power drained by applications while running.

  2. Two-qubit quantum computing in a projected subspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Qiao; Ruda, H.E.; Zhan, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    A formulation for performing quantum computing in a projected subspace is presented, based on the subdynamical kinetic equation (SKE) for an open quantum system. The eigenvectors of the kinetic equation are shown to remain invariant before and after interaction with the environment. However, the eigenvalues in the projected subspace exhibit a type of phase shift to the evolutionary states. This phase shift does not destroy the decoherence-free (DF) property of the subspace because the associated fidelity is 1. This permits a universal formalism to be presented--the eigenprojectors of the free part of the Hamiltonian for the system and bath may be used to construct a DF projected subspace based on the SKE. To eliminate possible phase or unitary errors induced by the change in the eigenvalues, a cancellation technique is proposed, using the adjustment of the coupling time, and applied to a two-qubit computing system. A general criteria for constructing a DF-projected subspace from the SKE is discussed. Finally, a proposal for using triangulation to realize a decoherence-free subsystem based on SKE is presented. The concrete formulation for a two-qubit model is given exactly. Our approach is general and appears to be applicable to any type of decoherence

  3. Les Robertson, CERN's LCG project manager

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    "The LCG will provide a vital test-bed for the new Grid computing technologies that are set to revolutionise the way scientists use the world's computing resources in areas ranging from fundamental research to medical diagnosis," said Les Robertson, CERN's LCG project manager. The Grid is a new method of sharing processing power between computers in centres around the world.

  4. The Impact of Grid on Health Care Digital Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    Donno, Flavia; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Grid computing has attracted worldwide attention in a variety of applications like Health Care. In this paper we identified the Grid services that could facilitate the integration and interoperation of Health Care data and frameworks world-wide. While many of the current Health Care Grid projects address issues such as data location and description on the Grid and the security aspects, the problems connected to data storage, integrity, preservation and distribution have been neglected. We describe the currently available Grid storage services and protocols that can come in handy when dealing with those problems. We further describe a Grid infrastructure to build a cooperative Health Care environment based on currently available Grid services and a service able to validate it.

  5. Clean development mechanism and off-grid small-scale hydropower projects: Evaluation of additionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanwar, Nitin

    2007-01-01

    The global climate change mitigation policies and their stress on sustainable development have made electrification of rural mountainous villages, using small hydro, an attractive destination for potential clean development mechanism (CDM) projects. This invariably involves judging the additionality of such projects. The paper suggests a new approach to judge the additionality of such stand-alone small hydropower projects. This has been done by breaking up additionality into two components: external and local. The external additionality is project developer dependent. For determining the local additionality, the paper takes into account the probability of a village getting electrified over a period of time, which is kept equal to the possible crediting period. This is done by defining an electrification factor (EF) whose value depends on the degree of isolation, financial constraints and institutional constraints encountered while electrifying a mountainous village. Using this EF, the additionality of a CDM project can be judged in a much easier and accurate way. The paper is based on the data and inputs gathered during site visits to many isolated villages located in the eastern Indian Himalayas

  6. Porting Erasmus Computing Grid (Condor enabled Applications for EDGeS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc); T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting

  7. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, S; Chadwick, K; Garzoglio, G; Noh, S

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  8. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  9. Numerical Study of Detonation Wave Propagation in the Variable Cross-Section Channel Using Unstructured Computational Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lopato

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the numerical study of detonation wave initiation and propagation in the variable cross-section axisymmetric channel filled with the model hydrogen-air mixture. The channel models the large-scale device for the utilization of worn-out tires. Mathematical model is based on two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations supplemented by global chemical kinetics model. The finite volume computational algorithm of the second approximation order for the calculation of two-dimensional flows with detonation waves on fully unstructured grids with triangular cells is developed. Three geometrical configurations of the channel are investigated, each with its own degree of the divergence of the conical part of the channel from the point of view of the pressure from the detonation wave on the end wall of the channel. The problem in consideration relates to the problem of waste recycling in the devices based on the detonation combustion of the fuel.

  10. Projects to get you off the grid rain barrels, chicken coops, and solar panels

    CERN Document Server

    Instructablescom

    2014-01-01

    Instructables is back with this compact book focused on a series of projects designed to get you thinking creatively about thinking green. Twenty Instructables illustrate just how simple it can be to make your own backyard chicken coop, or turn a wine barrel into a rainwater collector.Illustrated with dozens of full-color photographs per project accompanying easy-to-follow instructions, this Instructables collection utilizes the best that the online community has to offer, turning a far-reaching group of people into a mammoth database churning out ideas to make life better, easier, and in this

  11. How is value created and captured in smart grids? : a review of the literature and an analysis of pilot projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, E.; Alkemade, F.

    2016-01-01

    Profitable business models for value creation and value capture with smart grid services are pivotal to realize the transition to smart and sustainable electricity grids. In addition to knowledge regarding the technical characteristics of smart grids, we need to know what drives companies and

  12. Grid workflow job execution service 'Pilot'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamardin, Lev; Kryukov, Alexander; Demichev, Andrey; Ilyin, Vyacheslav

    2011-12-01

    'Pilot' is a grid job execution service for workflow jobs. The main goal for the service is to automate computations with multiple stages since they can be expressed as simple workflows. Each job is a directed acyclic graph of tasks and each task is an execution of something on a grid resource (or 'computing element'). Tasks may be submitted to any WS-GRAM (Globus Toolkit 4) service. The target resources for the tasks execution are selected by the Pilot service from the set of available resources which match the specific requirements from the task and/or job definition. Some simple conditional execution logic is also provided. The 'Pilot' service is built on the REST concepts and provides a simple API through authenticated HTTPS. This service is deployed and used in production in a Russian national grid project GridNNN.

  13. Grid workflow job execution service 'Pilot'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamardin, Lev; Kryukov, Alexander; Demichev, Andrey; Ilyin, Vyacheslav

    2011-01-01

    'Pilot' is a grid job execution service for workflow jobs. The main goal for the service is to automate computations with multiple stages since they can be expressed as simple workflows. Each job is a directed acyclic graph of tasks and each task is an execution of something on a grid resource (or 'computing element'). Tasks may be submitted to any WS-GRAM (Globus Toolkit 4) service. The target resources for the tasks execution are selected by the Pilot service from the set of available resources which match the specific requirements from the task and/or job definition. Some simple conditional execution logic is also provided. The 'Pilot' service is built on the REST concepts and provides a simple API through authenticated HTTPS. This service is deployed and used in production in a Russian national grid project GridNNN.

  14. Identification of observables for future grids – the framework developed in the ELECTRA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visscher, Klaas; Marinelli, Mattia; Morch, Andrei Z.

    2015-01-01

    , and system input signal. A survey of existing and potential Control Triples was conducted among partners in the European ELECTRA project, resulting in a spreadsheet inventory. The main findings are presented and a few major observability needs for realising the so-called “vertical integration” of control...

  15. Uniformity on the grid via a configuration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor V Terekhov et al.

    2003-01-01

    As Grid permeates modern computing, Grid solutions continue to emerge and take shape. The actual Grid development projects continue to provide higher-level services that evolve in functionality and operate with application-level concepts which are often specific to the virtual organizations that use them. Physically, however, grids are comprised of sites whose resources are diverse and seldom project readily onto a grid's set of concepts. In practice, this also creates problems for site administrators who actually instantiate grid services. In this paper, we present a flexible, uniform framework to configure a grid site and its facilities, and otherwise describe the resources and services it offers. We start from a site configuration and instantiate services for resource advertisement, monitoring and data handling; we also apply our framework to hosting environment creation. We use our ideas in the Information Management part of the SAM-Grid project, a grid system which will deliver petabyte-scale data to the hundreds of users. Our users are High Energy Physics experimenters who are scattered worldwide across dozens of institutions and always use facilities that are shared with other experiments as well as other grids. Our implementation represents information in the XML format and includes tools written in XQuery and XSLT

  16. The Neurona at Home project: Simulating a large-scale cellular automata brain in a distributed computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, L.; Villanueva-Oller, J.; Moraño, J. A.; Villanueva, R.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) has become the standard open source solution for grid computing in the Internet. Volunteers use their computers to complete an small part of the task assigned by a dedicated server. We have developed a BOINC project called Neurona@Home whose objective is to simulate a cellular automata random network with, at least, one million neurons. We consider a cellular automata version of the integrate-and-fire model in which excitatory and inhibitory nodes can activate or deactivate neighbor nodes according to a set of probabilistic rules. Our aim is to determine the phase diagram of the model and its behaviour and to compare it with the electroencephalographic signals measured in real brains.

  17. Hacking the lights out. The computer virus threat to the electrical grid; Angriff auf das Stromnetz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, David M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2011-10-15

    The Stuxnet virus which had penetrated in secured facilities to enrich uranium in Iran by June 2007 has made clear that a virus that was developed by experts for industrial automation may cause a large damage in a technical infrastructure. Our electricity network consists of a variety of networks whose components are monitored and controlled by computers or programmable logic controllers. This is a potential target of an attack for computers. Simulations suggest that a sophisticated attack can paralyze a large portion of the electricity networks. With this in mind the safety precautions are being greatly increased.

  18. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  19. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamová, Dagmar; Chudoba, Jiří; Kouba, T.; Lorenzo, P.M.; Saiz, P.; Švec, Jan; Hampl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 7 (2010), s. 1-9 E-ISSN 1742-6596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : accelerators * PARTICLE PHYSICS * computer data analysis Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  20. Erasmus Computing Grid : Het Bouwen van een 20 TeraFLOP Virtuelle Supercomputer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHet Erasmus Medische Centrum (Erasmus MC) en Hogeschool Rotterdam (HR) zijn in 2005 een unieke samenwerking begonnen om 95% van de capaciteit op al haar computers en die van anderen beschikbaar te maken voor onderzoek en onderwijs. Deze samenwerking heeft geleid tot het Erasmus

  1. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  2. The Use of Grid Storage Protocols for Healthcare Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donno, F; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Grid computing has attracted worldwide attention for a variety of domains. Healthcare projects focus on data mining and standardization techniques, the issue of data accessibility and transparency over the storage systems on the Grid has seldom been tackled. In this position paper, we identify the key issues and requirements imposed by Healthcare applications and point out how Grid Storage Technology can be used to satisfy those requirements. The main contribution of this work is the identification of the characteristics and protocols that make Grid Storage technology attractive for building a Healthcare data storage infrastructure.

  3. A flexible privacy enhanced and secured ICT architecture for a smart grid project with active cosumers in the city of Zwolle-NL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montes Portela, C.; Rooden, H.; Kohlmann, J.; Leersum, van D.; Geldtmeijer, D.A.M.; Slootweg, J.G.; van Eekelen, Marko

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the ICT architecture for a Smart Grid project with consumer interaction in the city of Zwolle, the Netherlands. It describes the privacy and security enhancing measures applied to ensure a positive sum of necessary functionality and respect for consumer’s privacy and secure

  4. The European Union's four-man team of experts attending a demonstration of the DataGrid Project at CERN in early February.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The DataGrid Project is reviewed by a team of European experts on a yearly basis. At the beginning of February it passed the second of these reviews with flying colours, the four experts issuing enthusiastic statements on the latest progress made, which was quite considerable in 2002.

  5. Software for Distributed Computation on Medical Databases: A Demonstration Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Narasimhan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bringing together the information latent in distributed medical databases promises to personalize medical care by enabling reliable, stable modeling of outcomes with rich feature sets (including patient characteristics and treatments received. However, there are barriers to aggregation of medical data, due to lack of standardization of ontologies, privacy concerns, proprietary attitudes toward data, and a reluctance to give up control over end use. Aggregation of data is not always necessary for model fitting. In models based on maximizing a likelihood, the computations can be distributed, with aggregation limited to the intermediate results of calculations on local data, rather than raw data. Distributed fitting is also possible for singular value decomposition. There has been work on the technical aspects of shared computation for particular applications, but little has been published on the software needed to support the "social networking" aspect of shared computing, to reduce the barriers to collaboration. We describe a set of software tools that allow the rapid assembly of a collaborative computational project, based on the flexible and extensible R statistical software and other open source packages, that can work across a heterogeneous collection of database environments, with full transparency to allow local officials concerned with privacy protections to validate the safety of the method. We describe the principles, architecture, and successful test results for the site-stratified Cox model and rank-k singular value decomposition.

  6. A computational genomics pipeline for prokaryotic sequencing projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyuk, Andrey O; Katz, Lee S; Agrawal, Sonia; Hagen, Matthew S; Conley, Andrew B; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Nelakuditi, Viswateja; Humphrey, Jay C; Sammons, Scott A; Govil, Dhwani; Mair, Raydel D; Tatti, Kathleen M; Tondella, Maria L; Harcourt, Brian H; Mayer, Leonard W; Jordan, I King

    2010-08-01

    New sequencing technologies have accelerated research on prokaryotic genomes and have made genome sequencing operations outside major genome sequencing centers routine. However, no off-the-shelf solution exists for the combined assembly, gene prediction, genome annotation and data presentation necessary to interpret sequencing data. The resulting requirement to invest significant resources into custom informatics support for genome sequencing projects remains a major impediment to the accessibility of high-throughput sequence data. We present a self-contained, automated high-throughput open source genome sequencing and computational genomics pipeline suitable for prokaryotic sequencing projects. The pipeline has been used at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the analysis of Neisseria meningitidis and Bordetella bronchiseptica genomes. The pipeline is capable of enhanced or manually assisted reference-based assembly using multiple assemblers and modes; gene predictor combining; and functional annotation of genes and gene products. Because every component of the pipeline is executed on a local machine with no need to access resources over the Internet, the pipeline is suitable for projects of a sensitive nature. Annotation of virulence-related features makes the pipeline particularly useful for projects working with pathogenic prokaryotes. The pipeline is licensed under the open-source GNU General Public License and available at the Georgia Tech Neisseria Base (http://nbase.biology.gatech.edu/). The pipeline is implemented with a combination of Perl, Bourne Shell and MySQL and is compatible with Linux and other Unix systems.

  7. Post-Disaster Image Processing for Damage Analysis Using GENESI-DR, WPS and Grid Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Bielski, Conrad; Gentilini, Simone; Pappalardo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the two year Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations-Digital Repositories (GENESI-DR) project was to build an open and seamless access service to Earth science digital repositories for European and world-wide science users. In order to showcase GENESI-DR, one of the developed technology demonstrators focused on fast search, discovery, and access to remotely sensed imagery in the context of post-disaster building damage assessment. This paper descri...

  8. Integrating Flexible Sensor and Virtual Self-Organizing DC Grid Model With Cloud Computing for Blood Leakage Detection During Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Tzan; Jong, Tai-Lang; Li, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2017-08-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious complications during hemodialysis. From the hemodialysis survey reports, these life-threatening events occur to attract nephrology nurses and patients themselves. When the venous needle and blood line are disconnected, it takes only a few minutes for an adult patient to lose over 40% of his / her blood, which is a sufficient amount of blood loss to cause the patient to die. Therefore, we propose integrating a flexible sensor and self-organizing algorithm to design a cloud computing-based warning device for blood leakage detection. The flexible sensor is fabricated via a screen-printing technique using metallic materials on a soft substrate in an array configuration. The self-organizing algorithm constructs a virtual direct current grid-based alarm unit in an embedded system. This warning device is employed to identify blood leakage levels via a wireless network and cloud computing. It has been validated experimentally, and the experimental results suggest specifications for its commercial designs. The proposed model can also be implemented in an embedded system.

  9. Final Technical Report: Sparse Grid Scenario Generation and Interior Algorithms for Stochastic Optimization in a Parallel Computing Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrotra, Sanjay [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The support from this grant resulted in seven published papers and a technical report. Two papers are published in SIAM J. on Optimization [87, 88]; two papers are published in IEEE Transactions on Power Systems [77, 78]; one paper is published in Smart Grid [79]; one paper is published in Computational Optimization and Applications [44] and one in INFORMS J. on Computing [67]). The works in [44, 67, 87, 88] were funded primarily by this DOE grant. The applied papers in [77, 78, 79] were also supported through a subcontract from the Argonne National Lab. We start by presenting our main research results on the scenario generation problem in Sections 1–2. We present our algorithmic results on interior point methods for convex optimization problems in Section 3. We describe a new ‘central’ cutting surface algorithm developed for solving large scale convex programming problems (as is the case with our proposed research) with semi-infinite number of constraints in Section 4. In Sections 5–6 we present our work on two application problems of interest to DOE.

  10. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  11. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course…

  12. Replica consistency in a Data Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenici, Andrea; Donno, Flavia; Pucciani, Gianni; Stockinger, Heinz; Stockinger, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    A Data Grid is a wide area computing infrastructure that employs Grid technologies to provide storage capacity and processing power to applications that handle very large quantities of data. Data Grids rely on data replication to achieve better performance and reliability by storing copies of data sets on different Grid nodes. When a data set can be modified by applications, the problem of maintaining consistency among existing copies arises. The consistency problem also concerns metadata, i.e., additional information about application data sets such as indices, directories, or catalogues. This kind of metadata is used both by the applications and by the Grid middleware to manage the data. For instance, the Replica Management Service (the Grid middleware component that controls data replication) uses catalogues to find the replicas of each data set. Such catalogues can also be replicated and their consistency is crucial to the correct operation of the Grid. Therefore, metadata consistency generally poses stricter requirements than data consistency. In this paper we report on the development of a Replica Consistency Service based on the middleware mainly developed by the European Data Grid Project. The paper summarises the main issues in the replica consistency problem, and lays out a high-level architectural design for a Replica Consistency Service. Finally, results from simulations of different consistency models are presented

  13. The GEWEX LandFlux project: evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally gridded forcing data

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew

    2016-01-26

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Exchanges (GEWEX) LandFlux project, four commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman–Monteith-based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to the coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance.

    Using surface flux observations from 45 globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overall statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m−2; 0.65), followed

  14. The GEWEX LandFlux project: evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally gridded forcing data

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew; Ershadi, Ali; Jimenez, C.; Miralles, Diego G.; Michel, D.; Wood, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Exchanges (GEWEX) LandFlux project, four commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman–Monteith-based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to the coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance.

    Using surface flux observations from 45 globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overall statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m−2; 0.65), followed

  15. The GEWEX LandFlux project: evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally gridded forcing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, M. F.; Ershadi, A.; Jimenez, C.; Miralles, D. G.; Michel, D.; Wood, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Exchanges (GEWEX) LandFlux project, four commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman-Monteith-based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to the coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance. Using surface flux observations from 45 globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overall statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m-2; 0.65), followed closely by GLEAM (0.68; 64 W m-2

  16. The GEWEX LandFlux project: evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally-gridded forcing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, M. F.; Ershadi, A.; Jimenez, C.; Miralles, D. G.; Michel, D.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the GEWEX LandFlux project, four commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman-Monteith based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance. Using surface flux observations from forty-five globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overally statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m-2; 0.65), followed closely by GLEAM (0.68; 64 W m-2; 0.62), with values in

  17. The GEWEX LandFlux project: evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally-gridded forcing data

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew

    2015-08-24

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the GEWEX LandFlux project, four commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman-Monteith based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance.

    Using surface flux observations from forty-five globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overally statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m−2; 0.65), followed closely by GLEAM (0.68; 64 W m

  18. A Step Towards A Computing Grid For The LHC Experiments ATLAS Data Challenge 1

    CERN Document Server

    Sturrock, R; Epp, B; Ghete, V M; Kuhn, D; Mello, A G; Caron, B; Vetterli, M C; Karapetian, G V; Martens, K; Agarwal, A; Poffenberger, P R; McPherson, R A; Sobie, R J; Amstrong, S; Benekos, N C; Boisvert, V; Boonekamp, M; Brandt, S; Casado, M P; Elsing, M; Gianotti, F; Goossens, L; Grote, M; Hansen, J B; Mair, K; Nairz, A; Padilla, C; Poppleton, A; Poulard, G; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Rosati, S; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Wengler, T; Xu, G F; Ping, J L; Chudoba, J; Kosina, J; Lokajícek, M; Svec, J; Tas, P; Hansen, J R; Lytken, E; Nielsen, J L; Wäänänen, A; Tapprogge, Stefan; Calvet, D; Albrand, S; Collot, J; Fulachier, J; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Viret, S; Wielers, M; Bernardet, K; Corréard, S; Rozanov, A; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Arnault, C; Bourdarios, C; Hrivnác, J; Lechowski, M; Parrour, G; Perus, A; Rousseau, D; Schaffer, A; Unal, G; Derue, F; Chevalier, L; Hassani, S; Laporte, J F; Nicolaidou, R; Pomarède, D; Virchaux, M; Nesvadba, N; Baranov, S; Putzer, A; Khonich, A; Duckeck, G; Schieferdecker, P; Kiryunin, A E; Schieck, J; Lagouri, T; Duchovni, E; Levinson, L; Schrager, D; Negri, G; Bilokon, H; Spogli, L; Barberis, D; Parodi, F; Cataldi, G; Gorini, E; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Cavalli, D; Heldmann, M; Lari, T; Perini, L; Rebatto, D; Resconi, S; Tatarelli, F; Vaccarossa, L; Biglietti, M; Carlino, G; Conventi, F; Doria, A; Merola, L; Polesello, G; Vercesi, V; De Salvo, A; Di Mattia, A; Luminari, L; Nisati, A; Reale, M; Testa, M; Farilla, A; Verducci, M; Cobal, M; Santi, L; Hasegawa, Y; Ishino, M; Mashimo, T; Matsumoto, H; Sakamoto, H; Tanaka, J; Ueda, I; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Fornaini, A; Gorfine, G; Groep, D; Templon, J; Köster, L J; Konstantinov, A; Myklebust, T; Ould-Saada, F; Bold, T; Kaczmarska, A; Malecki, P; Szymocha, T; Turala, M; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Khoreauli, G; Gromova, N; Tsulaia, V; Minaenko, A A; Rudenko, R; Slabospitskaya, E; Solodkov, A; Gavrilenko, I; Nikitine, N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Toms, K; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Kervesan, B; Bosman, M; González, S; Sánchez, J; Salt, J; Andersson, N; Nixon, L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Kónya, B; Smirnova, O G; Sandgren, A; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Gollub, N; Hellman, S; Lipniacka, A; Corso-Radu, A; Pérez-Réale, V; Lee, S C; CLin, S C; Ren, Z L; Teng, P K; Faulkner, P J W; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A; Brochu, F; Lester, C; Thompson, S; Kennedy, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Henderson, R; Jones, R; Kartvelishvili, V G; Smizanska, M; Washbrook, A J; Drohan, J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moyse, E; Salih, S; Loken, J; Baines, J T M; Candlin, D; Candlin, R; Clifft, R; Li, W; McCubbin, N A; George, S; Lowe, A; Buttar, C; Dawson, I; Moraes, A; Tovey, Daniel R; Gieraltowski, J; Malon, D; May, E; LeCompte, T J; Vaniachine, A; Adams, D L; Assamagan, Ketevi A; Baker, R; Deng, W; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Gibbard, B; Ma, H; Nevski, P; Paige, F; Rajagopalan, S; Smith, J; Undrus, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D; Calafiura, P; Canon, S; Costanzo, D; Hinchliffe, Ian; Lavrijsen, W; Leggett, C; Marino, M; Quarrie, D R; Sakrejda, I; Stravopoulos, G; Tull, C; Loch, P; Youssef, S; Shank, J T; Engh, D; Frank, E; Sen-Gupta, A; Gardner, R; Meritt, F; Smirnov, Y; Huth, J; Grundhoefer, L; Luehring, F C; Goldfarb, S; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Gao, Y; Ryan, T; De, K; Sosebee, M; McGuigan, P; Ozturk, N

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration at CERN is preparing for the data taking and analysis at the LHC that will start in 2007. Therefore, a series of Data Challenges was started in 2002 whose goals are the validation of the Computing Model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made for the final offline computing environment. A major feature of the first Data Challenge (DC1) was the preparation and the deployment of the software required for the production of large event samples as a worldwide distributed activity. It should be noted that it was not an option to "run the complete production at CERN" even if we had wanted to; the resources were not available at CERN to carry out the production on a reasonable time-scale. The great challenge of organising and carrying out this large-scale production at a significant number of sites around the world had therefore to be faced. However, the benefits of this are manifold: apart from realising the require...

  19. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chetty, Indrin J; Jaffray, David A; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique has the advantages of enhancing the CNR

  20. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Lei; Yin Fangfang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Jaffray, David A.; Jin Jianyue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. Results: SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Conclusions: Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique