WorldWideScience

Sample records for computing enabled 3-d

  1. 3D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F. de; Lopes, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    The histomorphometric analysis is based on stereologic concepts and was originally applied to biologic samples. This technique has been used to evaluate different complex structures such as ceramic filters, net structures and cancellous objects that are objects with inner connected structures. The measured histomorphometric parameters of structure are: sample volume to total reconstructed volume (BV/TV), sample surface to sample volume (BS/BV), connection thickness (Tb Th ), connection number (Tb N ) and connection separation (Tb Sp ). The anisotropy was evaluated as well. These parameters constitute the base of histomorphometric analysis. The quantification is realized over cross-sections recovered by cone beam reconstruction, where a real-time microfocus radiographic system is used as tomographic system. The three-dimensional (3D) histomorphometry, obtained from tomography, corresponds to an evolution of conventional method that is based on 2D analysis. It is more coherent with morphologic and topologic context of the sample. This work shows result from 3D histomorphometric quantification to characterize objects examined by 3D computer tomography. The results, which characterizes the internal structures of ceramic foams with different porous density, are compared to results from conventional methods

  2. Recon3D enables a three-dimensional view of gene variation in human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Sahoo, Swagatika; Zielinski, Daniel C.

    2018-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions have helped uncover the molecular basis of metabolism. Here we present Recon3D, a computational resource that includes three-dimensional (3D) metabolite and protein structure data and enables integrated analyses of metabolic functions in humans. We use Recon3D...

  3. Infra Red 3D Computer Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The infra red 3D mouse is a three dimensional input device to a computer. It works by determining the position of an arbitrary object (like a hand) by emitting infra red signals from a number of locations and measuring the reflected intensities. To maximize stability, robustness, and use of bandw......The infra red 3D mouse is a three dimensional input device to a computer. It works by determining the position of an arbitrary object (like a hand) by emitting infra red signals from a number of locations and measuring the reflected intensities. To maximize stability, robustness, and use...

  4. Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  5. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  6. Processing-in-Memory Enabled Graphics Processors for 3D Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Chenhao; Song, Shuaiwen; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Weigong; Fu, Xin

    2017-02-06

    The performance of 3D rendering of Graphics Processing Unit that convents 3D vector stream into 2D frame with 3D image effects significantly impact users’ gaming experience on modern computer systems. Due to the high texture throughput in 3D rendering, main memory bandwidth becomes a critical obstacle for improving the overall rendering performance. 3D stacked memory systems such as Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) provide opportunities to significantly overcome the memory wall by directly connecting logic controllers to DRAM dies. Based on the observation that texel fetches significantly impact off-chip memory traffic, we propose two architectural designs to enable Processing-In-Memory based GPU for efficient 3D rendering.

  7. Practical algorithms for 3D computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, R Stuart

    2013-01-01

    ""A valuable book to accompany any course that mixes the theory and practice of 3D graphics. The book's web site has many useful programs and code samples.""-Karen Rafferty, Queen's University, Belfast""The topics covered by this book are backed by the OpenFX modeling and animation software. This is a big plus in that it provides a practical perspective and encourages experimentation. … [This] will offer students a more interesting and hands-on learning experience, especially for those wishing to pursue a career in computer game development.""-Naganand Madhavapeddy, GameDeveloper>

  8. New generation of 3D desktop computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerjanc, Robert; Pastoor, Siegmund

    1997-05-01

    Today's computer interfaces use 2-D displays showing windows, icons and menus and support mouse interactions for handling programs and data files. The interface metaphor is that of a writing desk with (partly) overlapping sheets of documents placed on its top. Recent advances in the development of 3-D display technology give the opportunity to take the interface concept a radical stage further by breaking the design limits of the desktop metaphor. The major advantage of the envisioned 'application space' is, that it offers an additional, immediately perceptible dimension to clearly and constantly visualize the structure and current state of interrelations between documents, videos, application programs and networked systems. In this context, we describe the development of a visual operating system (VOS). Under VOS, applications appear as objects in 3-D space. Users can (graphically connect selected objects to enable communication between the respective applications. VOS includes a general concept of visual and object oriented programming for tasks ranging from, e.g., low-level programming up to high-level application configuration. In order to enable practical operation in an office or at home for many hours, the system should be very comfortable to use. Since typical 3-D equipment used, e.g., in virtual-reality applications (head-mounted displays, data gloves) is rather cumbersome and straining, we suggest to use off-head displays and contact-free interaction techniques. In this article, we introduce an autostereoscopic 3-D display and connected video based interaction techniques which allow viewpoint-depending imaging (by head tracking) and visually controlled modification of data objects and links (by gaze tracking, e.g., to pick, 3-D objects just by looking at them).

  9. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  10. Computer Animation for Articulated 3D Characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the computer animation literature, mainly concentrating on articulated characters and at least some degree of interactivity or real time simulation. Advances in dierent techniques such as key-frame, motion capture (also known as mocap), dynamics, inverse kinematics (IK),

  11. Design for scalability in 3D computer graphics architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes useful methods and techniques for designing scalable hybrid parallel rendering architectures for 3D computer graphics. Various techniques for utilizing parallelism in a pipelines system are analyzed. During the Ph.D study a prototype 3D graphics architecture named Hybris has...

  12. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part II: Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  13. Computational optical tomography using 3-D deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Nehmetallah, George

    2018-04-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) offer a promising performance for many image processing areas, such as super-resolution, deconvolution, image classification, denoising, and segmentation, with outstanding results. Here, we develop for the first time, to our knowledge, a method to perform 3-D computational optical tomography using 3-D DCNN. A simulated 3-D phantom dataset was first constructed and converted to a dataset of phase objects imaged on a spatial light modulator. For each phase image in the dataset, the corresponding diffracted intensity image was experimentally recorded on a CCD. We then experimentally demonstrate the ability of the developed 3-D DCNN algorithm to solve the inverse problem by reconstructing the 3-D index of refraction distributions of test phantoms from the dataset from their corresponding diffraction patterns.

  14. Results of comparative RBMK neutron computation using VNIIEF codes (cell computation, 3D statics, 3D kinetics). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, A.N.; Zhitnik, A.K.; Zvenigorodskaya, O.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In conformity with the protocol of the Workshop under Contract {open_quotes}Assessment of RBMK reactor safety using modern Western Codes{close_quotes} VNIIEF performed a neutronics computation series to compare western and VNIIEF codes and assess whether VNIIEF codes are suitable for RBMK type reactor safety assessment computation. The work was carried out in close collaboration with M.I. Rozhdestvensky and L.M. Podlazov, NIKIET employees. The effort involved: (1) cell computations with the WIMS, EKRAN codes (improved modification of the LOMA code) and the S-90 code (VNIIEF Monte Carlo). Cell, polycell, burnup computation; (2) 3D computation of static states with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes and comparison with results of computation with the NESTLE code (USA). The computations were performed in the geometry and using the neutron constants presented by the American party; (3) 3D computation of neutron kinetics with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes. These computations were performed in two formulations, both being developed in collaboration with NIKIET. Formulation of the first problem maximally possibly agrees with one of NESTLE problems and imitates gas bubble travel through a core. The second problem is a model of the RBMK as a whole with imitation of control and protection system controls (CPS) movement in a core.

  15. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  16. Performance measurements in 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.; Cooper, W.A.; Gruber, R.; Schwenn, U.

    1989-10-01

    The 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability code TERPSICHORE has been designed to take advantage of vector and microtasking capabilities of the latest CRAY computers. To keep the number of operations small most efficient algorithms have been applied in each computational step. The program investigates the stability properties of fusion reactor relevant plasma configurations confined by magnetic fields. For a typical 3D HELIAS configuration that has been considered we obtain an overall performance in excess of 1 Gflops on an eight processor CRAY-YMP machine. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  17. New computational methodology for large 3D neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; Roy, R.; Koclas, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new computational methodology, based on 3D characteristics method, dedicated to solve very large 3D problems without spatial homogenization. In order to eliminate the input/output problems occurring when solving these large problems, we set up a new computing scheme that requires more CPU resources than the usual one, based on sweeps over large tracking files. The huge capacity of storage needed in some problems and the related I/O queries needed by the characteristics solver are replaced by on-the-fly recalculation of tracks at each iteration step. Using this technique, large 3D problems are no longer I/O-bound, and distributed CPU resources can be efficiently used. (authors)

  18. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  19. Efficient Computation of Casimir Interactions between Arbitrary 3D Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M. T. Homer; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce an efficient technique for computing Casimir energies and forces between objects of arbitrarily complex 3D geometries. In contrast to other recently developed methods, our technique easily handles nonspheroidal, nonaxisymmetric objects, and objects with sharp corners. Using our new technique, we obtain the first predictions of Casimir interactions in a number of experimentally relevant geometries, including crossed cylinders and tetrahedral nanoparticles.

  20. 3D artefact for concurrent scale calibration in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A novel artefact for calibration of the scale in 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is presented. The artefact comprises a carbon fibre tubular structure on which a number of reference ruby spheres are glued. The artefact is positioned and scanned together with the workpiece inside the CT scanner...

  1. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  2. 3D data processing with advanced computer graphics tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Ekstrand, Laura; Grieve, Taylor; Eisenmann, David J.; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2012-09-01

    Often, the 3-D raw data coming from an optical profilometer contains spiky noises and irregular grid, which make it difficult to analyze and difficult to store because of the enormously large size. This paper is to address these two issues for an optical profilometer by substantially reducing the spiky noise of the 3-D raw data from an optical profilometer, and by rapidly re-sampling the raw data into regular grids at any pixel size and any orientation with advanced computer graphics tools. Experimental results will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  4. Parallel Computer System for 3D Visualization Stereo on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Zori, Sergii A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes the organization of a parallel computer system based on Graphic Processors Unit (GPU) for 3D stereo image synthesis. The development is based on the modified ray tracing method developed by the authors for fast search of tracing rays intersections with scene objects. The system allows significant increase in the productivity for the 3D stereo synthesis of photorealistic quality. The generalized procedure of 3D stereo image synthesis on the Graphics Processing Unit/Graphics Processing Clusters (GPU/GPC) is proposed. The efficiency of the proposed solutions by GPU implementation is compared with single-threaded and multithreaded implementations on the CPU. The achieved average acceleration in multi-thread implementation on the test GPU and CPU is about 7.5 and 1.6 times, respectively. Studying the influence of choosing the size and configuration of the computational Compute Unified Device Archi-tecture (CUDA) network on the computational speed shows the importance of their correct selection. The obtained experimental estimations can be significantly improved by new GPUs with a large number of processing cores and multiprocessors, as well as optimized configuration of the computing CUDA network.

  5. 3 D flow computations under a reactor vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, O.; Bonnin, O.; Hofmann, F.; Hecker, M.

    1995-12-01

    The flow under a vessel cover of a pressurised water reactor is investigated by using several computations and a physical model. The case presented here is turbulent, isothermal and incompressible. Computations are made with N3S code using a k-epsilon model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are on the whole satisfying. Some local improvements are expected either with more sophisticated turbulence models or with mesh refinements automatically computed by using the adaptive meshing technique which has been just implemented in N3S for 3D cases. (authors). 6 refs., 7 figs

  6. 2-D and 3-D computations of curved accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to save computer memory, a long accelerator magnet may be computed by treating the long central region and the end regions separately. The dipole magnets for the injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), employ magnet iron consisting of parallel laminations, stacked with a uniform radius of curvature of 33.379 m. Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential has a different form for a straight magnet (x-y coordinates), a magnet with surfaces curved about a common center (r-θ coordinates), and a magnet with parallel laminations like the APS injector dipole. Yet pseudo 2-D computations for the three geometries give basically identical results, even for a much more strongly curved magnet. Hence 2-D (x-y) computations of the central region and 3-D computations of the end regions can be combined to determine the overall magnetic behavior of the magnets. 1 ref., 6 figs

  7. 3D computer visualization and animation of CANDU reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, T.; Echlin, M.; Tonner, P.; Sur, B.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer visualization and animation models of typical CANDU reactor cores (Darlington, Point Lepreau) have been developed using world-wide-web (WWW) browser based tools: JavaScript, hyper-text-markup language (HTML) and virtual reality modeling language (VRML). The 3D models provide three-dimensional views of internal control and monitoring structures in the reactor core, such as fuel channels, flux detectors, liquid zone controllers, zone boundaries, shutoff rods, poison injection tubes, ion chambers. Animations have been developed based on real in-core flux detector responses and rod position data from reactor shutdown. The animations show flux changing inside the reactor core with the drop of shutoff rods and/or the injection of liquid poison. The 3D models also provide hypertext links to documents giving specifications and historical data for particular components. Data in HTML format (or other format such as PDF, etc.) can be shown in text, tables, plots, drawings, etc., and further links to other sources of data can also be embedded. This paper summarizes the use of these WWW browser based tools, and describes the resulting 3D reactor core static and dynamic models. Potential applications of the models are discussed. (author)

  8. Enabling personalized implant and controllable biosystem development through 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Neerajha; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Karabulut, Erdem; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    The impact of additive manufacturing in our lives has been increasing constantly. One of the frontiers in this change is the medical devices. 3D printing technologies not only enable the personalization of implantable devices with respect to patient-specific anatomy, pathology and biomechanical properties but they also provide new opportunities in related areas such as surgical education, minimally invasive diagnosis, medical research and disease models. In this review, we cover the recent clinical applications of 3D printing with a particular focus on implantable devices. The current technical bottlenecks in 3D printing in view of the needs in clinical applications are explained and recent advances to overcome these challenges are presented. 3D printing with cells (bioprinting); an exciting subfield of 3D printing, is covered in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and current developments in bioinks are discussed. Also emerging applications of bioprinting beyond health, such as biorobotics and soft robotics, are introduced. As the technical challenges related to printing rate, precision and cost are steadily being solved, it can be envisioned that 3D printers will become common on-site instruments in medical practice with the possibility of custom-made, on-demand implants and, eventually, tissue engineered organs with active parts developed with biorobotics techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Nonfullerene Small Molecule Acceptor with 3D Interlocking Geometry Enabling Efficient Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Singh, Ranbir; Sin, Dong Hun; Kim, Heung Gyu; Song, Kyu Chan; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-01-06

    A new 3D nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor is reported. The 3D interlocking geometry of the small-molecule acceptor enables uniform molecular conformation and strong intermolecular connectivity, facilitating favorable nanoscale phase separation and electron charge transfer. By employing both a novel polymer donor and a nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor in the solution-processed organic solar cells, a high-power conversion efficiency of close to 6% is demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. 3D printed auto-mixing chip enables rapid smartphone diagnosis of anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevniak, Kimberly; Campbell, Matthew; Myers, Timothy; Hodges, Abby; He, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Clinical diagnosis requiring central facilities and site visits can be burdensome for patients in resource-limited or rural areas. Therefore, development of a low-cost test that utilizes smartphone data collection and transmission would beneficially enable disease self-management and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost i POC 3D diagnostic strategy which integrates 3D design and printing of microfluidic POC device with smartphone-based disease diagnosis in one process as a stand-alone system, offering strong adaptability for establishing diagnostic capacity in resource-limited areas and low-income countries. We employ smartphone output (AutoCAD 360 app) and readout (color-scale analytical app written in-house) functionalities for rapid 3D printing of microfluidic auto-mixers and colorimetric detection of blood hemoglobin levels. The auto-mixing of reagents with blood via capillary force has been demonstrated in 1 second without the requirement of external pumps. We employed this i POC 3D system for point-of-care diagnosis of anemia using a training set of patients (n anemia  = 16 and n healthy  = 6), which showed consistent measurements of blood hemoglobin levels (a.u.c. = 0.97) and comparable diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, compared with standard clinical hematology analyzer. Capable of 3D fabrication flexibility and smartphone compatibility, this work presents a novel diagnostic strategy for advancing personalized medicine and mobile healthcare.

  11. Computer-aided segmentation system for 3D chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Komagata, Takanobu; Ogura, Takashi; Iwao, Yuma; Goto, Toshiyuki; Asakura, Akira; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    We will introduce the quantitative analysis of the chest CT images using computer-assisted segmentation system (Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation; GHNC). This system can divide the lung into several patterns, for example, normal, emphysema and fibrous lesion, and measure each lesion volume quantitatively. We analyzed 3D-CT images of 20 patients with lung cancer. GHNC could measure the volumes of emphysema and fibrosis lesions, respectively. GHNC analysis will be feasible for preoperative CT evaluation, especially in the patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. (author)

  12. Magnetic field computations for ISX using GFUN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between measured magnetic fields and the magnetic fields calculated by the three-dimensional computer program GFUN-3D for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX). Several iron models are considered ranging in sophistication from 50 to 222 tetrahedra iron elements. The effects of air gaps and the efforts made to simulate effects of grain orientation and packing factor are detailed. The results obtained are compared with the measured magnetic fields, and explanations are presented to account for the variations which occur

  13. 3-D computer graphics based on integral photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemura, T; Yoshida, T; Harashima, H

    2001-02-12

    Integral photography (IP), which is one of the ideal 3-D photographic technologies, can be regarded as a method of capturing and displaying light rays passing through a plane. The NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories have developed a real-time IP system using an HDTV camera and an optical fiber array. In this paper, the authors propose a method of synthesizing arbitrary views from IP images captured by the HDTV camera. This is a kind of image-based rendering system, founded on the 4-D data space Representation of light rays. Experimental results show the potential to improve the quality of images rendered by computer graphics techniques.

  14. Computational Modelling of Piston Ring Dynamics in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dlugoš Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced computational models of a piston assembly based on the level of virtual prototypes require a detailed description of piston ring behaviour. Considering these requirements, the piston rings operate in regimes that cannot, in general, be simplified into an axisymmetric model. The piston and the cylinder liner do not have a perfect round shape, mainly due to machining tolerances and external thermo-mechanical loads. If the ring cannot follow the liner deformations, a local loss of contact occurs resulting in blow-by and increased consumption of lubricant oil in the engine. Current computational models are unable to implement such effects. The paper focuses on the development of a flexible 3D piston ring model based on the Timoshenko beam theory using the multibody system (MBS. The MBS model is compared to the finite element method (FEM solution.

  15. Computation of 3D form factors in complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, N.

    1989-01-01

    The calculation of radiant interchange among opaque surfaces in a complex environment poses the general problem of determining the visible and hidden parts of the environment. In many thermal engineering applications, surfaces are separated by radiatively non-participating media and may be idealized as diffuse emitters and reflectors. Consenquently the net radiant energy fluxes are intimately related to purely geometrical quantities called form factors, that take into account hidden parts: the problem is reduced to the form factor evaluation. This paper presents the method developed for the computation of 3D form factors in the finite-element module of the system TRIO, which is a general computer code for thermal and fluid flow analysis. The method is derived from an algorithm devised for synthetic image generation. A comparison is performed with the standard contour integration method also implemented and suited to convex geometries. Several illustrative examples of finite-element thermal calculations in radiating enclosures are given

  16. 3D computer model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    The VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field simulation was performed with the help of the three-dimensional (3D) software. The following aspects of the system were considered: 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the median plane, 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the extraction region, 3D calculation of the stray magnetic field. 8 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Enabling Symmetric Collaboration in Public Spaces through 3D Mobile Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Donaji Barrera Machuca

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has been common in workplaces in various engineering settings and in our daily activities. However, how to effectively engage collaborators with collaborative tasks has long been an issue due to various situational and technical constraints. The research in this paper addresses the issue in a specific scenario, which is how to enable users to interact with public information from their own perspective. We describe a 3D mobile interaction technique that allows users to collaborate with other people by creating a symmetric and collaborative ambience. This in turn can increase their engagement with public displays. In order to better understand the benefits and limitations of this technique, we conducted a usability study with a total of 40 participants. The results indicate that the 3D mobile interaction technique promotes collaboration between users and also improves their engagement with the public displays.

  18. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  19. Enabling Flexible Polymer Tandem Solar Cells by 3D Ptychographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind

    2015-01-01

    one after the other by wet processing leaves plenty of room for error and the process development calls for an analytical technique that enables 3D reconstruction of the layer stack with the possibility to probe thickness, density, and chemistry of the individual layers in the stack. The use......The realization of a complete tandem polymer solar cell under ambient conditions using only printing and coating methods on a flexible substrate results in a fully scalable process but also requires accurate control during layer formation to succeed. The serial process where the layers are added...

  20. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora S Marks

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org. This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of

  1. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2016-02-01

    Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems during root canal treatment to avoid iatrogenic damage of the root. Digital endodontic treatment planning for anterior teeth with severely obliterated root canal systems was accomplished with the aid of computer software, based on cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) scans and intra-oral scans of the dentition. On the basis of these scans, endodontic guides were created for the planned treatment through digital designing and rapid prototyping fabrication. The custom-made guides allowed for an uncomplicated and predictable canal location and management. The method of digital designing and rapid prototyping of endodontic guides allows for reliable and predictable location of root canals of teeth with calcifically metamorphosed root canal systems. The endodontic directional guide facilitates difficult endodontic treatments at little additional cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A 3D computer graphics approach to brachytherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Frank; Wawro, Martin; Wilke, Carsten

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) can significantly reduce the risk of restenosis after interventional treatment of stenotic arteries, if planned and applied correctly. In order to facilitate computer-based IVB planning, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the stenotic artery based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) sequences is desirable. For this purpose, the frames of the IVUS sequence are properly aligned in space, possible gaps inbetween the IVUS frames are filled by interpolation with radial basis functions known from scattered data interpolation. The alignment procedure uses additional information which is obtained from biplane X-ray angiography performed simultaneously during the capturing of the IVUS sequence. After IVUS images and biplane angiography data are acquired from the patient, the vessel-wall borders and the IVUS catheter are detected by an active contour algorithm. Next, the twist (relative orientation) between adjacent IVUS frames is determined by a sequential triangulation method. The absolute orientation of each frame is established by a stochastic analysis based on anatomical landmarks. Finally, the reconstructed 3D vessel model is visualized by methods of combined volume and polygon rendering. The reconstruction is then used for the computation of the radiation-distribution within the tissue, emitted from a beta-radiation source. All these steps are performed during the percutaneous intervention.

  3. Standardized acquisition, storing and provision of 3D enabled spatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, B.; Maier, S.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.

    2017-05-01

    In the area of working with spatial data, in addition to the classic, two-dimensional geometrical data (maps, aerial images, etc.), the needs for three-dimensional spatial data (city models, digital elevation models, etc.) is increasing. Due to this increased demand the acquiring, storing and provision of 3D enabled spatial data in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is more and more important. Existing proprietary solutions quickly reaches their limits during data exchange and data delivery to other systems. They generate a large workload, which will be very costly. However, it is noticeable that these expenses and costs can generally be significantly reduced using standards. The aim of this research is therefore to develop a concept in the field of three-dimensional spatial data that runs on existing standards whenever possible. In this research, the military image analysts are the preferred user group of the system. To achieve the objective of the widest possible use of standards in spatial 3D data, existing standards, proprietary interfaces and standards under discussion have been analyzed. Since the here used GIS of the Fraunhofer IOSB is already using and supporting OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) and NATO-STANAG (NATO-Standardization Agreement) standards for the most part of it, a special attention for possible use was laid on their standards. The most promising standard is the OGC standard 3DPS (3D Portrayal Service) with its occurrences W3DS (Web 3D Service) and WVS (Web View Service). A demo system was created, using a standardized workflow from the data acquiring, storing and provision and showing the benefit of our approach.

  4. CROSSPLOT-3/CON-3D, 3-D and Stereoscopic Computer-Aided Design Graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotch, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Description of program or function: CROSSPLOT3 is a general three- dimensional point plotting program which generates scatterplots of a data matrix from any user-specified viewpoint. Images can be rotated for a movie-like effect enhancing stereo perception. A number of features can be invoked by the user including: color, class distinction, flickering, sectioning, projections to grid surfaces, and drawing a plane. Plots may be viewed in real time as they are generated. CON3D generates three-dimensional surfaces plus contours on a lower plane from either data on a rectangular grid or an analytical function z=f(x,y). The user may choose any viewing perspective. Plots may be generated in color with many refinements under user control

  5. Computationally efficient storage of 3D particle intensity and position data for use in 3D PIV and 3D PTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, C; Buchmann, N A; Soria, J

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volumetric velocity measurement techniques, such as tomographic or holographic particle image velocimetry (PIV), rely upon the computationally intensive formation, storage and localized interrogation of multiple 3D particle intensity fields. Calculation of a single velocity field typically requires the extraction of particle intensities into tens of thousands of 3D sub-volumes or discrete particle clusters, the processing of which can significantly affect the performance of 3D cross-correlation based PIV and 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). In this paper, a series of popular and customized volumetric data formats are presented and investigated using synthetic particle volumes and experimental data arising from tomographic PIV measurements of a turbulent boundary layer. Results show that the use of a sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format with a sub-grid size of 16 × 16 × 16 points provides the best performance for cross-correlation based PIV analysis, while a particle clustered non-zero intensity format provides the best format for PTV applications. In practical tomographic PIV measurements the sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format offered a 29% improvement in reconstruction times, while providing a 93% reduction in volume data requirements and a 28% overall improvement in cross-correlation based velocity analysis and validation times. (paper)

  6. Weight prediction of broiler chickens using 3D computer vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Lisouski, Pavel; Ahrendt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    a platform weigher which may also include ill birds. In the current study, a fully-automatic 3D camera-based weighing system for broilers have been developed and evaluated in a commercial production environment. Specifically, a low-cost 3D camera (Kinect) that directly returned a depth image was employed...

  7. PONDEROSA, an automated 3D-NOESY peak picking program, enables automated protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Kim, Jin Hae; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2011-06-15

    PONDEROSA (Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction of Shift Assignments) accepts input information consisting of a protein sequence, backbone and sidechain NMR resonance assignments, and 3D-NOESY ((13)C-edited and/or (15)N-edited) spectra, and returns assignments of NOESY crosspeaks, distance and angle constraints, and a reliable NMR structure represented by a family of conformers. PONDEROSA incorporates and integrates external software packages (TALOS+, STRIDE and CYANA) to carry out different steps in the structure determination. PONDEROSA implements internal functions that identify and validate NOESY peak assignments and assess the quality of the calculated three-dimensional structure of the protein. The robustness of the analysis results from PONDEROSA's hierarchical processing steps that involve iterative interaction among the internal and external modules. PONDEROSA supports a variety of input formats: SPARKY assignment table (.shifts) and spectrum file formats (.ucsf), XEASY proton file format (.prot), and NMR-STAR format (.star). To demonstrate the utility of PONDEROSA, we used the package to determine 3D structures of two proteins: human ubiquitin and Escherichia coli iron-sulfur scaffold protein variant IscU(D39A). The automatically generated structural constraints and ensembles of conformers were as good as or better than those determined previously by much less automated means. The program, in the form of binary code along with tutorials and reference manuals, is available at http://ponderosa.nmrfam.wisc.edu/.

  8. Interactive virtual simulation using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Yajima, Naoki; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the authors' advanced presurgical interactive virtual simulation technique using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The authors performed interactive virtual simulation prior to surgery in 26 patients with trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm. The 3D computer graphics models for interactive virtual simulation were composed of the brainstem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, vessels, and skull individually created by the image analysis, including segmentation, surface rendering, and data fusion for data collected by 3-T MRI and 64-row multidetector CT systems. Interactive virtual simulation was performed by employing novel computer-aided design software with manipulation of a haptic device to imitate the surgical procedures of bone drilling and retraction of the cerebellum. The findings were compared with intraoperative findings. In all patients, interactive virtual simulation provided detailed and realistic surgical perspectives, of sufficient quality, representing the lateral suboccipital route. The causes of trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm determined by observing 3D computer graphics models were concordant with those identified intraoperatively in 25 (96%) of 26 patients, which was a significantly higher rate than the 73% concordance rate (concordance in 19 of 26 patients) obtained by review of 2D images only (p computer graphics model provided a realistic environment for performing virtual simulations prior to MVD surgery and enabled us to ascertain complex microsurgical anatomy.

  9. 3D Printing device adaptable to Computer Numerical Control (CNC)

    OpenAIRE

    GARDAN , Julien; Danesi , F.; Roucoules , Lionel; Schneider , A.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the development of a 3D printing device for the additive manufacturing adapted to a CNC machining. The application involves the integration of a specific printing head. Additive manufacturing technology is most commonly used for modeling, prototyping, tooling through an exclusive machine or 3D printer. A global review and analysis of technologies show the additive manufacturing presents little independent solutions [6][9]. The problem studied especially the additive manu...

  10. Development of Adjustable 3D computational phantoms for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, Zohal Alnour Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy has become an essential part of breast cancer treatment and it was given a great concern during last decades due to aspects of managing breast cancer successfully, reducing recurrence and breast cancer mortality. Monte Carlo simulation has been used heavily in this issue. To use monte Carlo the suitable data set must be found to perform the study. This process is not straight forward and difficult to achieve and an effort is needed to obtain it. In this work we aimed to develop a methodology for obtaining 3D adjustable computational phantoms with different breast sizes to treat this problem. At first make human software was used to generate outer surfaces models with desired anthropomorphic features for our purpose. Three breasts cup sizes have been developed: small (A), medium (C) and large (D) according to European standardization system of dress, then blender software was used to join skeleton and internal organs outer surfaces of the body models in correct anatomical positions and the results were poly mesh anthropomorphic phantom has three breast sizes easy to manipulate positioning and modifying, the prepared models have been voxelised in 3D matrixes (256*256*256) using Binvox software, then voxelised models prepared in suitable formats for Gate (mhd/raw) in 70 axial slice with voxel dimension of 1.394*1.394*5 mm 3 for width, depth and length respectively. Gate monte Carlo was used to simulate the irradiation of virtual tumor bed site in left breasts with direct field electron beam, each breast size was treated with five energies 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV by field size 5*5 cm 2 , and 100 cm source surface distance (SSD). The results were studied to evaluate the effect of breast size variation on dose distribution. According to criteria of tumor bed coverage by 100% 90% normalised maximum dose and minimum dose to heart and lug which are considering the organs at risks, results show the energy 6 MeV give under cover to tumor bed in the small, medium

  11. Integrated computer-aided forensic case analysis, presentation, and documentation based on multimodal 3D data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornik, Alexander; Urschler, Martin; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Bischof, Horst; Krauskopf, Astrid; Schwark, Thorsten; Scheurer, Eva; Yen, Kathrin

    2018-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crime scene documentation using 3D scanners and medical imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly applied in forensic casework. Together with digital photography, these modalities enable comprehensive and non-invasive recording of forensically relevant information regarding injuries/pathologies inside the body and on its surface. Furthermore, it is possible to capture traces and items at crime scenes. Such digitally secured evidence has the potential to similarly increase case understanding by forensic experts and non-experts in court. Unlike photographs and 3D surface models, images from CT and MRI are not self-explanatory. Their interpretation and understanding requires radiological knowledge. Findings in tomography data must not only be revealed, but should also be jointly studied with all the 2D and 3D data available in order to clarify spatial interrelations and to optimally exploit the data at hand. This is technically challenging due to the heterogeneous data representations including volumetric data, polygonal 3D models, and images. This paper presents a novel computer-aided forensic toolbox providing tools to support the analysis, documentation, annotation, and illustration of forensic cases using heterogeneous digital data. Conjoint visualization of data from different modalities in their native form and efficient tools to visually extract and emphasize findings help experts to reveal unrecognized correlations and thereby enhance their case understanding. Moreover, the 3D case illustrations created for case analysis represent an efficient means to convey the insights gained from case analysis to forensic non-experts involved in court proceedings like jurists and laymen. The capability of the presented approach in the context of case analysis, its potential to speed up legal procedures and to ultimately enhance legal certainty is demonstrated by introducing a number of

  12. Enabling 3D Tele-Immersion with Live Reconstructed Mesh Geometry with Fast Mesh Compression and Linear Rateless Coding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Mekuria (Rufael); M. Sanna (Michele); E Izquierdo (Ebroul); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstract3D Tele-immersion enables participants in remote locations to share, in real-time, an activity. It offers users interactive and immersive experiences, but it challenges current media streaming solutions. Work in the past has mainly focused on the efficient delivery of image-based 3D

  13. Enabling 3D Tele-Immersion with Live Reconstructed Mesh Geometry with Fast Mesh Compression and Linear Rateless Coding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, R.; Sanna, M.; Izquierdo, E; Bulterman, D.; Garcia, P.

    2014-01-01

    3-D tele-immersion (3DTI) enables participants in remote locations to share, in real time, an activity. It offers users interactive and immersive experiences, but it challenges current media-streaming solutions. Work in the past has mainly focused on the efficient delivery of image-based 3-D videos

  14. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    Objectives: Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems

  15. Rough-Surface-Enabled Capacitive Pressure Sensors with 3D Touch Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilsoo; Lee, Jaehong; Kim, Gwangmook; Kim, Youngjae; Kang, Subin; Cho, Sungjun; Kim, SeulGee; Kim, Jae-Kang; Lee, Wooyoung; Kim, Dae-Eun; Kang, Shinill; Kim, DaeEun; Lee, Taeyoon; Shim, Wooyoung

    2017-11-01

    Fabrication strategies that pursue "simplicity" for the production process and "functionality" for a device, in general, are mutually exclusive. Therefore, strategies that are less expensive, less equipment-intensive, and consequently, more accessible to researchers for the realization of omnipresent electronics are required. Here, this study presents a conceptually different approach that utilizes the inartificial design of the surface roughness of paper to realize a capacitive pressure sensor with high performance compared with sensors produced using costly microfabrication processes. This study utilizes a writing activity with a pencil and paper, which enables the construction of a fundamental capacitor that can be used as a flexible capacitive pressure sensor with high pressure sensitivity and short response time and that it can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas. Furthermore, the paper-based pressure sensors are integrated into a fully functional 3D touch-pad device, which is a step toward the realization of omnipresent electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-11-23

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  17. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed-Baker Habhab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  18. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites . Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  19. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  20. Recent advances in Optical Computed Tomography (OCT) imaging system for three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul; Farah Rosli, Nurul; Zain, Shafirah Mohd; Zin, Hafiz M.

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy delivery techniques for cancer treatment are becoming more complex and highly focused, to enable accurate radiation dose delivery to the cancerous tissue and minimum dose to the healthy tissue adjacent to tumour. Instrument to verify the complex dose delivery in radiotherapy such as optical computed tomography (OCT) measures the dose from a three-dimensional (3D) radiochromic dosimeter to ensure the accuracy of the radiotherapy beam delivery to the patient. OCT measures the optical density in radiochromic material that changes predictably upon exposure to radiotherapy beams. OCT systems have been developed using a photodiode and charged coupled device (CCD) as the detector. The existing OCT imaging systems have limitation in terms of the accuracy and the speed of the measurement. Advances in on-pixel intelligence CMOS image sensor (CIS) will be exploited in this work to replace current detector in OCT imaging systems. CIS is capable of on-pixel signal processing at a very fast imaging speed (over several hundred images per second) that will allow improvement in the 3D measurement of the optical density. The paper will review 3D radiochromic dosimeters and OCT systems developed and discuss how CMOS based OCT imaging will provide accurate and fast optical density measurements in 3D. The paper will also discuss the configuration of the CMOS based OCT developed in this work and how it may improve the existing OCT system.

  1. Automatic Plant Annotation Using 3D Computer Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael

    In this thesis 3D reconstruction was investigated for application in precision agriculture where previous work focused on low resolution index maps where each pixel represents an area in the field and the index represents an overall crop status in that area. 3D reconstructions of plants would allow...... reconstruction in occluded areas. The trinocular setup was used for both window correlation based and energy minimization based algorithms. A novel adaption of symmetric multiple windows algorithm with trinocular vision was developed. The results were promising and allowed for better disparity estimations...... on steep sloped surfaces. Also, a novel adaption of a well known graph cut based disparity estimation algorithm with trinocular vision was developed and tested. The results were successful and allowed for better disparity estimations on steep sloped surfaces. After finding the disparity maps each...

  2. Coupling of the computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX with the 3D neutron kinetic core model DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.; Grahn, A.; Rohde, U.; Schuetze, J.; Frank, Th.

    2010-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX has been coupled with the neutron-kinetic core model DYN3D. ANSYS CFX calculates the fluid dynamics and related transport phenomena in the reactors coolant and provides the corresponding data to DYN3D. In the fluid flow simulation of the coolant, the core itself is modeled within the porous body approach. DYN3D calculates the neutron kinetics and the fuel behavior including the heat transfer to the coolant. The physical data interface between the codes is the volumetric heat release rate into the coolant. In the prototype that is currently available, the coupling is restricted to single-phase flow problems. In the time domain an explicit coupling of the codes has been implemented so far. Steady-state and transient verification calculations for two small-size test problems confirm the correctness of the implementation of the prototype coupling. The first test problem was a mini-core consisting of nine real-size fuel assemblies with quadratic cross section. Comparison was performed with the DYN3D stand-alone code. In the steady state, the effective multiplication factor obtained by the DYN3D/ANSYS CFX codes hows a deviation of 9.8 pcm from the DYN3D stand-alone solution. This difference can be attributed to the use of different water property packages in the two codes. The transient test case simulated the withdrawal of the control rod from the central fuel assembly at hot zero power in the same mini-core. Power increase during the introduction of positive reactivity and power reduction due to fuel temperature increase are calculated in the same manner by the coupled and the stand-alone codes. The maximum values reached during the power rise differ by about 1 MW at a power level of 50 MW. Beside the different water property packages, these differences are caused by the use of different flow solvers. The same calculations were carried for a mini-core with seven real-size fuel assemblies with hexagonal cross section in

  3. Computer-Aided Manufacturing of 3D Workpieces

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Victoria Anghel Drugarin; Mihaela Dorica Stroia

    2017-01-01

    Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) assumes to use dedicated software for controlling machine tools and similar devices in the process of workpieces manufacturing. CAM is, in fact, an application technology that uses computer software and machinery to simplify and automate manufacturing processes. CAM is the inheritor of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and is often used conjunctively with computer-aided design (CAD). Advanced CAM solutions are forthcoming and have a large ...

  4. Computation of transient 3-D eddy current in nonmagnetic conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to solve transient three-dimensional (3-D) eddy current problems for nonmagnetic conductor. Integral equation formulation in terms of vector potential is used to simplify the matching of boundary conditions. The resulting equations and their numerical approximation were shown to be singular and to require special handling. Several types of symmetries were introduced. They not only reduce the number of algebraic equations to be solved, but also modify the nature of the equations and render them nonsingular. Temporal behavior was obtained with the Runge-Kutta method. The program is tested in several examples of eddy currents for its spatial and temporal profiles, shielding, boundary surface effects, and application of various symmetry options

  5. Facile method of building hydroxyapatite 3D scaffolds assembled from porous hollow fibers enabling nutrient delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamon, David; Da Silva Teixeira, Sandra; Dutczak, S.M.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, diffusion through scaffold and tissue usually limits transport, and forms potentially hypoxic regions. Several methods are used for preparation of 3D hydroxyapatite scaffolds, however, production of a scaffold including porous hollow fibers for nutrition delivery is difficult and

  6. PROTOTYPING A SENSOR ENABLED 3D CITYMODEL ON GEOSPATIAL MANAGED OBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kjems; J. Kolář

    2013-01-01

    One of the major development efforts within the GI Science domain are pointing at sensor based information and the usage of real time information coming from geographic referenced features in general. At the same time 3D City models are mostly justified as being objects for visualization purposes rather than constituting the foundation of a geographic data representation of the world. The combination of 3D city models and real time information based systems though can provide a whole...

  7. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  8. Single Additive Enables 3D Printing of Highly Loaded Iron Oxide Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodaei, Amin; Akhlaghi, Omid; Khani, Navid; Aytas, Tunahan; Sezer, Dilek; Tatli, Buse; Menceloglu, Yusuf Z; Koc, Bahattin; Akbulut, Ozge

    2018-03-21

    A single additive, a grafted copolymer, is designed to ensure the stability of suspensions of highly loaded iron oxide nanoparticles (IOPs) and to facilitate three-dimensional (3D) printing of these suspensions in the filament form. This poly (ethylene glycol)-grafted copolymer of N-[3(dimethylamino)propyl]methacrylamide and acrylic acid harnesses both electrostatic and steric repulsion to realize an optimum formulation for 3D printing. When used at 1.15 wt % (by the weight of IOPs), the suspension attains ∼81 wt % solid loading-96% of the theoretical limit as calculated by the Krieger-Dougherty equation. Rectangular, thick-walled toroidal, and thin-walled toroidal magnetic cores and a porous lattice structure are fabricated to demonstrate the utilization of this suspension as an ink for 3D printing. The electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic cores are characterized through impedance spectroscopy (IS) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), respectively. The IS indicates the possibility of utilizing wire-wound 3D printed cores as the inductive coils. The VSM verifies that the magnetic properties of IOPs before and after the ink formulation are kept almost unchanged because of the low dosage of the additive. This particle-targeted approach for the formulation of 3D printing inks allows embodiment of a fully aqueous system with utmost target material content.

  9. Fast Eigensolver for Computing 3D Earth's Normal Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; De Hoop, M. V.; Li, R.; Xi, Y.; Saad, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel parallel computational approach to compute Earth's normal modes. We discretize Earth via an unstructured tetrahedral mesh and apply the continuous Galerkin finite element method to the elasto-gravitational system. To resolve the eigenvalue pollution issue, following the analysis separating the seismic point spectrum, we utilize explicitly a representation of the displacement for describing the oscillations of the non-seismic modes in the fluid outer core. Effectively, we separate out the essential spectrum which is naturally related to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. We introduce two Lanczos approaches with polynomial and rational filtering for solving this generalized eigenvalue problem in prescribed intervals. The polynomial filtering technique only accesses the matrix pair through matrix-vector products and is an ideal candidate for solving three-dimensional large-scale eigenvalue problems. The matrix-free scheme allows us to deal with fluid separation and self-gravitation in an efficient way, while the standard shift-and-invert method typically needs an explicit shifted matrix and its factorization. The rational filtering method converges much faster than the standard shift-and-invert procedure when computing all the eigenvalues inside an interval. Both two Lanczos approaches solve for the internal eigenvalues extremely accurately, comparing with the standard eigensolver. In our computational experiments, we compare our results with the radial earth model benchmark, and visualize the normal modes using vector plots to illustrate the properties of the displacements in different modes.

  10. Computational 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are developing a comprehensive, morphologically-realistic computational model of the human respiratory system that can be used to study the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of contaminants, while being adaptable for age, race, gender, and health/disease status. The model ...

  11. Automatic Grading of 3D Computer Animation Laboratory Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Carlevaris, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a delicate task in the overall teaching process because it may require significant time and may be prone to subjectivity. Subjectivity is especially true for disciplines in which perceptual factors play a key role in the evaluation. In previous decades, computer-based assessment techniques were developed to address the…

  12. Carbon nanotube based 3-D matrix for enabling three-dimensional nano-magneto-electronics [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Hong

    Full Text Available This letter describes the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT-based arrays with estimated 2-nm thick cobalt (Co nanoparticles deposited inside individual tubes to unravel the possibility of using the unique templates for ultra-high-density low-energy 3-D nano-magneto-electronic devices. The presence of oriented 2-nm thick Co layers within individual nanotubes in the CNT-based 3-D matrix is confirmed through VSM measurements as well as an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS.

  13. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    OpenAIRE

    Hosny, Khalid M.; Hafez, Mohamed A.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add m...

  14. Efficacy of 3D-positron emission tomography/computed tomography for upper abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Koji; Nakahara, Tadaki

    2014-04-01

    Recent advancement in computed tomography (CT) enables us to obtain high spatial resolution image and made it possible to construct extensive high-definition three-dimensional (3D) images. But a lack of contrast resolution in CT alone is still remained problem. Meanwhile, as fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) can visualize tumors in high contrast, we can create 3D images fusing the accumulation in tumors on PET/CT images. Such images can play the role of a "map of body" which makes it easy to understand the anatomical information before surgery. We also try to evaluate segmental liver function by using PET/CT fusion images. By using (11) C-methionine PET/contrast-enhanced CT, superior image quality compared to single photon emission computed tomography/CT can be obtained. CT, especially with contrast enhancement for obtaining anatomical imaging information plus PET for obtaining functional imaging information is a highly compatible combination, and adding these two types information will further increase clinical usefulness. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  15. FaceWarehouse: a 3D facial expression database for visual computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Weng, Yanlin; Zhou, Shun; Tong, Yiying; Zhou, Kun

    2014-03-01

    We present FaceWarehouse, a database of 3D facial expressions for visual computing applications. We use Kinect, an off-the-shelf RGBD camera, to capture 150 individuals aged 7-80 from various ethnic backgrounds. For each person, we captured the RGBD data of her different expressions, including the neutral expression and 19 other expressions such as mouth-opening, smile, kiss, etc. For every RGBD raw data record, a set of facial feature points on the color image such as eye corners, mouth contour, and the nose tip are automatically localized, and manually adjusted if better accuracy is required. We then deform a template facial mesh to fit the depth data as closely as possible while matching the feature points on the color image to their corresponding points on the mesh. Starting from these fitted face meshes, we construct a set of individual-specific expression blendshapes for each person. These meshes with consistent topology are assembled as a rank-3 tensor to build a bilinear face model with two attributes: identity and expression. Compared with previous 3D facial databases, for every person in our database, there is a much richer matching collection of expressions, enabling depiction of most human facial actions. We demonstrate the potential of FaceWarehouse for visual computing with four applications: facial image manipulation, face component transfer, real-time performance-based facial image animation, and facial animation retargeting from video to image.

  16. Prototyping a sensor enabled 3D citymodel on geospatial managed objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Erik; Kolář, Jan

    2013-01-01

    rather than constituting the foundation of a geographic data representation of the world. The combination of 3D city models and real time information based systems though can provide a whole new setup for data fusion within an urban environment and provide time critical information preserving our limited......One of the major development efforts within the GI Science domain are pointing at sensor based information and the usage of real time information coming from geographic referenced features in general. At the same time 3D City models are mostly justified as being objects for visualization purposes...... one constraint software design complex. On several occasions we have been advocating for a new end advanced formulation of real world features using the concept of Geospatial Managed Objects (GMO). This paper presents the outcome of the InfraWorld project, a 4 million Euro project financed primarily...

  17. An Innovative Direct-Interaction-Enabled Augmented-Reality 3D System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsiung Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous augmented-reality (AR applications have required users to observe the integration of real and virtual images on a display. This study proposes a novel concept regarding AR applications. By integrating AR techniques with marker identification, virtual-image output, imaging, and image-interaction processes, this study rendered virtual images that can interact with predefined markers in a real three-dimensional (3D environment.

  18. Using computed tomography and 3D printing to construct custom prosthetics attachments and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liacouras, Peter C; Sahajwalla, Divya; Beachler, Mark D; Sleeman, Todd; Ho, Vincent B; Lichtenberger, John P

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic devices the military uses to restore function and mobility to our wounded warriors are highly advanced, and in many instances not publically available. There is considerable research aimed at this population of young patients who are extremely active and desire to take part in numerous complex activities. While prosthetists design and manufacture numerous devices with standard materials and limb assemblies, patients often require individualized prosthetic design and/or modifications to enable them to participate fully in complex activities. Prosthetists and engineers perform research and implement digitally designs in collaboration to generate equipment for their patient's rehabilitation needs. 3D printing allows for these devices to be manufactured from an array of materials ranging from plastic to titanium alloy. Many designs require form fitting to a prosthetic socket or a complex surface geometry. Specialty items can be scanned using computed tomography and digitally reconstructed to produce a virtual 3D model the engineer can use to design the necessary features of the desired prosthetic, device, or attachment. Completed devices are tested for fit and function. Numerous custom prostheses and attachments have been successfully translated from the research domain to clinical reality, in particular, those that feature the use of computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. The purpose of this project is to describe the research pathways to implementation for the following clinical designs: sets of bilateral hockey skates; custom weightlifting prosthetic hands; and a wine glass holder. This article will demonstrate how to incorporate CT imaging and 3D printing in the design and manufacturing process of custom attachments and assistive technology devices. Even though some of these prosthesis attachments may be relatively simple in design to an engineer, they have an enormous impact on the lives of our wounded warriors.

  19. CudaPre3D: An Alternative Preprocessing Algorithm for Accelerating 3D Convex Hull Computation on the GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEI, G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the calculating of convex hulls for point sets, a preprocessing procedure that is to filter the input points by discarding non-extreme points is commonly used to improve the computational efficiency. We previously proposed a quite straightforward preprocessing approach for accelerating 2D convex hull computation on the GPU. In this paper, we extend that algorithm to being used in 3D cases. The basic ideas behind these two preprocessing algorithms are similar: first, several groups of extreme points are found according to the original set of input points and several rotated versions of the input set; then, a convex polyhedron is created using the found extreme points; and finally those interior points locating inside the formed convex polyhedron are discarded. Experimental results show that: when employing the proposed preprocessing algorithm, it achieves the speedups of about 4x on average and 5x to 6x in the best cases over the cases where the proposed approach is not used. In addition, more than 95 percent of the input points can be discarded in most experimental tests.

  20. Prototyping a Sensor Enabled 3d Citymodel on Geospatial Managed Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjems, E.; Kolář, J.

    2013-09-01

    One of the major development efforts within the GI Science domain are pointing at sensor based information and the usage of real time information coming from geographic referenced features in general. At the same time 3D City models are mostly justified as being objects for visualization purposes rather than constituting the foundation of a geographic data representation of the world. The combination of 3D city models and real time information based systems though can provide a whole new setup for data fusion within an urban environment and provide time critical information preserving our limited resources in the most sustainable way. Using 3D models with consistent object definitions give us the possibility to avoid troublesome abstractions of reality, and design even complex urban systems fusing information from various sources of data. These systems are difficult to design with the traditional software development approach based on major software packages and traditional data exchange. The data stream is varying from urban domain to urban domain and from system to system why it is almost impossible to design a complete system taking care of all thinkable instances now and in the future within one constraint software design complex. On several occasions we have been advocating for a new end advanced formulation of real world features using the concept of Geospatial Managed Objects (GMO). This paper presents the outcome of the InfraWorld project, a 4 million Euro project financed primarily by the Norwegian Research Council where the concept of GMO's have been applied in various situations on various running platforms of an urban system. The paper will be focusing on user experiences and interfaces rather then core technical and developmental issues. The project was primarily focusing on prototyping rather than realistic implementations although the results concerning applicability are quite clear.

  1. Using Videos and 3D Animations for Conceptual Learning in Basic Computer Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Unal; Yilmaz, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on a one-semester study to investigate the effect of videos and 3D animations on students' conceptual understandings about basic computer units. A quasi-experimental design was carried out in two classrooms; videos and 3D animations were used in classroom activities in one group and those were used for homework in the other…

  2. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D; Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Fotiadou, Anastasia F; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2016-07-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K&L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. • CT is being increasingly used to assess bony involvement in osteoarthritis • CBM provides accurate and reliable quantitative analysis of cortical bone thickness • Cortical bone is thicker at the superior femoral head-neck with worse osteoarthritis • Regions of increased thickness co-locate with impingement and osteophyte formation • Quantitative 3D bone analysis could enable clinical disease prediction and therapy development.

  3. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Allen, Mark G; Yoon, Yong-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array. (paper)

  4. Enabling Technologies for Entrepreneurial Opportunities in 3D printing of SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwas, Andrew; MacDonald, Eric; Muse, Dan; Wicker, Ryan; Kief, Craig; Aarestad, Jim; Zemba, Mike; Marshall, Bill; Tolbert, Carol; Connor, Brett

    2014-01-01

    A consortium of innovative experts in additive manufacturing (AM) comprising Northrup Grumman Technical Services, University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and Youngstown State University, have made significant breakthroughs in the goal of creating the first complete 3D printed small satellite. Since AM machines are relatively inexpensive, this should lead to many entrepreneurial opportunities for the small satellite community. Our technology advancements are focused on the challenges of embedding key components within the structure of the article. We have demonstrated, using advanced fused deposition modeling techniques, complex geometric shapes which optimize the spacecraft design. The UTEP Keck Center has developed a method that interrupts the printing process to insert components into specific cavities, resulting in a spacecraft that has minimal internal space allocated for what traditionally were functional purposes. This allows us to increase experiment and instrument capability by provided added volume in a confined small satellite space. Leveraging initial progress made on a NASA contract, the team investigated the potential of new materials that exploit the AM process, producing candidate compositions that exceed the capabilities of traditional materials. These "new materials" being produced and tested include some that have improved radiation shielding, increased permeability, enhanced thermal properties, better conductive properties, and increased structural performance. The team also investigated materials that were previously not possible to be made. Our testing included standard mechanical tests such as vibration, tensile, thermal cycling, and impact resistance as well as radiation and electromagnetic tests. The initial results of these products and their performance will be presented and compared with standard properties. The new materials with

  5. Physical-dosimetric enabling a dual linear accelerator 3D planning systems for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, Rodolfo; Martinez, William; Arelis, Lores; Morales, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The process of commissioning clinical linear accelerator requires a dual comprehensive study of the therapeutic beam parameters, both photons Electron. All information gained by measuring physical and dosimetric these beams must be analyzed, processed and refined for further modeling in computer-based treatment planning (RTPS). Of professionalism of this process will depend on the accuracy and precision of the calculations the prescribed doses. This paper aims to demonstrate availability clinical linear accelerator system-RTPS with late radiotherapy treatments shaped beam of photons and electrons. (author)

  6. Application of advanced virtual reality and 3D computer assisted technologies in tele-3D-computer assisted surgery in rhinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapan, Ivica; Vranjes, Zeljko; Prgomet, Drago; Lukinović, Juraj

    2008-03-01

    The real-time requirement means that the simulation should be able to follow the actions of the user that may be moving in the virtual environment. The computer system should also store in its memory a three-dimensional (3D) model of the virtual environment. In that case a real-time virtual reality system will update the 3D graphic visualization as the user moves, so that up-to-date visualization is always shown on the computer screen. Upon completion of the tele-operation, the surgeon compares the preoperative and postoperative images and models of the operative field, and studies video records of the procedure itself Using intraoperative records, animated images of the real tele-procedure performed can be designed. Virtual surgery offers the possibility of preoperative planning in rhinology. The intraoperative use of computer in real time requires development of appropriate hardware and software to connect medical instrumentarium with the computer and to operate the computer by thus connected instrumentarium and sophisticated multimedia interfaces.

  7. Application of computer virtual simulation technology in 3D animation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Can

    2017-11-01

    In the continuous development of computer technology, the application system of virtual simulation technology has been further optimized and improved. It also has been widely used in various fields of social development, such as city construction, interior design, industrial simulation and tourism teaching etc. This paper mainly introduces the virtual simulation technology used in 3D animation. Based on analyzing the characteristics of virtual simulation technology, the application ways and means of this technology in 3D animation are researched. The purpose is to provide certain reference for the 3D effect promotion days after.

  8. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Hosny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add more complexity reduction. The comparison with existing methods was performed, where the numerical experiments and the complexity analysis ensured the efficiency of the proposed method especially with image and objects of large sizes.

  9. Novel 3-D Computer Model Can Help Predict Pathogens’ Roles in Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand how bacterial and viral infections contribute to human cancers, four NCI at Frederick scientists turned not to the lab bench, but to a computer. The team has created the world’s first—and currently, only—3-D computational approach for studying interactions between pathogen proteins and human proteins based on a molecular adaptation known as interface mimicry.

  10. 3D-SoftChip: A Novel Architecture for Next-Generation Adaptive Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Mike Myung-Ok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel architecture for next-generation adaptive computing systems, which we term 3D-SoftChip. The 3D-SoftChip is a 3-dimensional (3D vertically integrated adaptive computing system combining state-of-the-art processing and 3D interconnection technology. It comprises the vertical integration of two chips (a configurable array processor and an intelligent configurable switch through an indium bump interconnection array (IBIA. The configurable array processor (CAP is an array of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs, while the intelligent configurable switch (ICS comprises a switch block, 32-bit dedicated RISC processor for control, on-chip program/data memory, data frame buffer, along with a direct memory access (DMA controller. This paper introduces the novel 3D-SoftChip architecture for real-time communication and multimedia signal processing as a next-generation computing system. The paper further describes the advanced HW/SW codesign and verification methodology, including high-level system modeling of the 3D-SoftChip using SystemC, being used to determine the optimum hardware specification in the early design stage.

  11. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAVALCANTI Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  12. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, M G; Ruprecht, A; Vannier, M W

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT) reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  13. Hacking for astronomy: can 3D printers and open-hardware enable low-cost sub-/millimeter instrumentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl

    2014-07-01

    There have been several exciting developments in the technologies commonly used n in the hardware hacking community. Advances in low cost additive-manufacturing processes (i.e. 3D-printers) and the development of openhardware projects, which have produced inexpensive and easily programmable micro-controllers and micro-computers (i.e. Arduino and Raspberry Pi) have opened a new door for individuals seeking to make their own devices. Here we describe the potential for these technologies to reduce costs in construction and development of submillimeter/millimeter astronomical instrumentation. Specifically we have begun a program to measure the optical properties of the custom plastics used in 3D-printers as well as the printer accuracy and resolution to assess the feasibility of directly printing sub- /millimeter transmissive optics. We will also discuss low cost designs for cryogenic temperature measurement and control utilizing Arduino and Raspberry Pi.

  14. Meta!Blast computer game: a pipeline from science to 3D art to education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, William; Campbell, P. J.; Bassham, Diane; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2012-03-01

    Meta!Blast (http://www.metablast.org) is designed to address the challenges students often encounter in understanding cell and metabolic biology. Developed by faculty and students in biology, biochemistry, computer science, game design, pedagogy, art and story, Meta!Blast is being created using Maya (http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/) and the Unity 3D (http://unity3d.com/) game engine, for Macs and PCs in classrooms; it has also been exhibited in an immersive environment. Here, we describe the pipeline from protein structural data and holographic information to art to the threedimensional (3D) environment to the game engine, by which we provide a publicly-available interactive 3D cellular world that mimics a photosynthetic plant cell.

  15. The use of 3D computer graphics in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal vascular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Iijima, Akira; Shojima, Masaaki; Nishido, Hajime; Saito, Nobuhito

    2011-12-01

    Digital subtraction (DS) angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Recently, multidetectorrow spiral CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiography have been introduced as screening examinations before DS angiography. These methods, however, do not always determine the accurate location of an arteriovenous shunt because the resulting images lack information about the spinal cord or the dura mater. Between April 2009 and December 2010, 13 patients underwent imaging evaluations for spinal vascular malformations at the authors' university hospital. This group included 8 patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), 3 with perimedullary AVFs, and 2 with intramedullary arteriovenous malformations. Using data from these patients, the authors attempted to develop 3D computer graphics (CG) based upon the fusion of 3D rotational angiography and postmyelographic CT. They subsequently verified the accuracy of this imaging method. Ten of these 13 patients underwent surgical treatment for their lesions (11 AVFs), and for these 11 lesions the authors compared the diagnoses obtained using 3D CG with those obtained using conventional DS angiography. In all 13 cases, 3D CG images of the spinal lesions were successfully developed using the patients' actual data. Four (36%) of 11 AVFs were correctly identified using DS angiography, whereas 10 (91%) were correctly identified using 3D CG. Results from 3D CG of spinal AVFs corresponded well with operative findings, and 3D CG was significantly better than conventional DS angiography at predicting AVF location (p = 0.024, Fisher exact test). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case series in which 3D CG of spinal vascular malformations was used to provide simultaneous, stereoscopic visualization of the spinal vascular system, spinal cord, dura mater, and bone. The 3D CG method provides precise visual images for the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions.

  16. Computation of 3D neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabha, Hem; Marleau, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computations of 3D neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell is performed by Carlvik’s method of collision probability. ► Carlvik’s method requires computation of track lengths in the geometry. ► Equations are developed to compute tracks, in 2D and 3D, in hexagons and are implemented in a program HX7. ► The program HX7 is implemented in NXT module of the code DRAGON, where tracks in pins are computed. ► The tracks are plotted and fluxes are compared with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. - Abstract: In this paper we are presenting the method of computation of three dimensional (3D) neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell. Carlvik’s collision probability method of solving neutron transport equation for computing fluxes has been used here. This method can consider exact geometrical details of the given geometry. While using this method, track length computations are required to be done. We have described here the method of computing tracks in one 3D hexagon. A program HX7 has been developed for this purpose. This program has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON, where tracks in the pins are computed. For computing tracks in 3D, first we use the tracks computed in the two dimensions (2D) and then we project them in the third dimension. We have developed equations for this purpose. In both the regions, fuel pin as well as in the moderator surrounding the pin the fluxes are assumed to be uniform. A uniform source is assumed in the moderator region. Reflecting boundary conditions are applied on all the sides as well as on the top and bottom surfaces. One group 2D and 3D fluxes are compared with the respective results obtained by the EXCELT module of DRAGON. To check the computations, tracks are plotted and errors in the computations are obtained. It is observed by using both the modules EXCELT and NXT that the fluxes in the pins converge faster and in the moderator region fluxes converge very slowly

  17. Development of 3-D Radiosurgery Planning System Using IBM Personal Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Tae Suk; Park, Charn Il; Ha, Sung Whan; Kang, Wee Saing; Suh, Doug Young; Park, Sung Hun

    1993-01-01

    Recently, stereotactic radiosurgery plan is required with the information of 3-D image and dose distribution. A project has been doing if developing LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery since April 1991. The purpose of this research is to develop 3-D radiosurgery planning system using personal computer. The procedure of this research is based on two steps. The first step is to develop 3-D localization system, which input the image information of the patient, coordinate transformation, the position and shape of target, and patient contour into computer system using CT image and stereotactic frame. The second step is to develop 3-D dose planning system, which compute dose distribution on image plane, display on high resolution monitor both isodose distribution and patient image simultaneously and develop menu-driven planning system. This prototype of radiosurgery planning system was applied recently for several clinical cases. It was shown that our planning system is fast, accurate and efficient while making it possible to handle various kinds of image modalities such as angiography, CT and MRI. It makes it possible to develop general 3-D planning system using beam eye view or CT simulation in radiation therapy in future

  18. Introduction of the ASP3D Computer Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP3D code is the result of a decade of developmental work on improvements to the small perturbation formulation, performed while the author was employed as a Senior Research Scientist in the Configuration Aerodynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ASP3D code is a significant improvement to the state-of-the-art for transonic aeroelastic analyses over the CAP-TSD code (Computational Aeroelasticity Program Transonic Small Disturbance), which was developed principally by the author in the mid-1980s. The author is in a unique position as the developer of both computer programs to compare, contrast, and ultimately make conclusions regarding the underlying formulations and utility of each code. The paper describes the salient features of the ASP3D code including the rationale for improvements in comparison with CAP-TSD. Numerous results are presented to demonstrate the ASP3D capability. The general conclusion is that the new ASP3D capability is superior to the older CAP-TSD code because of the myriad improvements developed and incorporated.

  19. Computational and experimental analysis of supersonic air ejector: Turbulence modeling and assessment of 3D effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzelli, Federico; Little, Adrienne B.; Garimella, Srinivas; Bartosiewicz, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational and experimental assessment of computational techniques for ejector flows. • Comparisons to 2D/3D (k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and stress–ω RSM) turbulence models. • k–ω SST model performs best while ε-based models more accurate at low motive pressures. • Good on-design agreement across 2D and 3D models; off-design needs 3D simulations. - Abstract: Numerical and experimental analyses are performed on a supersonic air ejector to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly-used computational techniques when predicting ejector flow characteristics. Three series of experimental curves at different operating conditions are compared with 2D and 3D simulations using RANS, steady, wall-resolved models. Four different turbulence models are tested: k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and the stress–ω Reynolds Stress Model. An extensive analysis is performed to interpret the differences between numerical and experimental results. The results show that while differences between turbulence models are typically small with respect to the prediction of global parameters such as ejector inlet mass flow rates and Mass Entrainment Ratio (MER), the k–ω SST model generally performs best whereas ε-based models are more accurate at low motive pressures. Good agreement is found across all 2D and 3D models at on-design conditions. However, prediction at off-design conditions is only acceptable with 3D models, making 3D simulations mandatory to correctly predict the critical pressure and achieve reasonable results at off-design conditions. This may partly depend on the specific geometry under consideration, which in the present study has a rectangular cross section with low aspect ratio.

  20. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EarthServer - an FP7 project to enable the web delivery and analysis of 3D/4D models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, John; Sen, Marcus; Passmore, James

    2013-04-01

    EarthServer aims at open access and ad-hoc analytics on big Earth Science data, based on the OGC geoservice standards Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The WCS model defines "coverages" as a unifying paradigm for multi-dimensional raster data, point clouds, meshes, etc., thereby addressing a wide range of Earth Science data including 3D/4D models. WCPS allows declarative SQL-style queries on coverages. The project is developing a pilot implementing these standards, and will also investigate the use of GeoSciML to describe coverages. Integration of WCPS with XQuery will in turn allow coverages to be queried in combination with their metadata and GeoSciML description. The unified service will support navigation, extraction, aggregation, and ad-hoc analysis on coverage data from SQL. Clients will range from mobile devices to high-end immersive virtual reality, and will enable 3D model visualisation using web browser technology coupled with developing web standards. EarthServer is establishing open-source client and server technology intended to be scalable to Petabyte/Exabyte volumes, based on distributed processing, supercomputing, and cloud virtualization. Implementation will be based on the existing rasdaman server technology developed. Services using rasdaman technology are being installed serving the atmospheric, oceanographic, geological, cryospheric, planetary and general earth observation communities. The geology service (http://earthserver.bgs.ac.uk/) is being provided by BGS and at present includes satellite imagery, superficial thickness data, onshore DTMs and 3D models for the Glasgow area. It is intended to extend the data sets available to include 3D voxel models. Use of the WCPS standard allows queries to be constructed against single or multiple coverages. For example on a single coverage data for a particular area can be selected or data with a particular range of pixel values. Queries on multiple surfaces can be

  2. Interpretation of mandibular condyle fractures using 2D- and 3D-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa e Silva Adriana Paula de Andrade da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT has been increasingly used in the examination of patients with craniofacial trauma. This technique is useful in the examination of the temporomandibular joint and allows the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle. Aiming to verify whether the three-dimensional reconstructed images from CT (3D-CT produce more effective visual information than the two-dimensional (2D-CT ones, we evaluated 2D-CT and 3D-CT examinations of 18 patients with mandibular condyle fractures. We observed that 2D-CT and 3D-CT reconstructed images produced similar information for the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle, although the 3D-CT allowed a better visualization of the position and displacement of bone fragments, as well as the comminution of fractures. These results, together with the possibility of refining and manipulating perspectives in 3D images, reinforce the importance of its use in the surgical planning and evaluation of treatment. We concluded that 3D-CT presented supplementary information for a more effective diagnosis of mandibular condyle fractures.

  3. Novel fully integrated computer system for custom footwear: from 3D digitization to manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Pascal-Simon; Beaulieu, Eric; Liu, Zhaoheng

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a recently developed custom footwear system, which integrates 3D digitization technology, range image fusion techniques, a 3D graphical environment for corrective actions, parametric curved surface representation and computer numerical control (CNC) machining. In this system, a support designed with the help of biomechanics experts can stabilize the foot in a correct and neutral position. The foot surface is then captured by a 3D camera using active ranging techniques. A software using a library of documented foot pathologies suggests corrective actions on the orthosis. Three kinds of deformations can be achieved. The first method uses previously scanned pad surfaces by our 3D scanner, which can be easily mapped onto the foot surface to locally modify the surface shape. The second kind of deformation is construction of B-Spline surfaces by manipulating control points and modifying knot vectors in a 3D graphical environment to build desired deformation. The last one is a manual electronic 3D pen, which may be of different shapes and sizes, and has an adjustable 'pressure' information. All applied deformations should respect a G1 surface continuity, which ensure that the surface can accustom a foot. Once the surface modification process is completed, the resulting data is sent to manufacturing software for CNC machining.

  4. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  5. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  6. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid dyn...

  7. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  8. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  9. Analyzing 3D xylem networks in Vitis vinifera using High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent developments in High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) have made it possible to visualize three dimensional (3D) xylem networks without time consuming, labor intensive physical sectioning. Here we describe a new method to visualize complex vessel networks in plants and produce a quantitat...

  10. Postinfarct VSD management using 3D computer printing assisted percutaneous closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Lazkani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Postinfarct VSD (PIVSD carries a grim prognosis. The mainstay of management has been surgical repair. The advent of septal occluder devices has offered an attractive alternative to surgical repair. Most PIVSD have serpiginous tracts with necrotic tissue, which makes assessing the defect challenging. 3D computer printing has become useful in preprocedure planning of complex surgical procedures in multiple subspecialties.

  11. 3-D computations and measurements of accelerator magnets for the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), requires dipole, quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets for each of its circular accelerator systems. Three-dimensional (3-D) field computations are needed to eliminate unwanted multipole fields from the ends of long quadrupole and dipole magnets and to guarantee that the flux levels in the poles of short magnets will not cause saturation. Measurements of the magnets show good agreement with the computations

  12. Computer assisted determination of acetabular cup orientation using 2D-3D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan

    2010-01-01

    2D-3D image-based registration methods have been developed to measure acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These methods require registration of both the prosthesis and the CT images to 2D radiographs and compute implant position with respect to a reference. The application of these methods is limited in clinical practice due to two limitations: (1) the requirement of a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the prosthesis, which may be unavailable due to the proprietary concerns of the manufacturer, and (2) the requirement of either multiple radiographs or radiograph-specific calibration, usually unavailable for retrospective studies. In this paper, we propose a new method to address these limitations. A new formulation for determination of post-operative cup orientation, which couples a radiographic measurement with 2D-3D image matching, was developed. In our formulation, the radiographic measurement can be obtained with known methods so that the challenge lies in the 2D-3D image matching. To solve this problem, a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining a landmark-to-ray 2D-3D alignment with a robust intensity-based 2D-3D registration was used. The hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme allows computing both the post-operative cup orientation with respect to an anatomical reference and the pelvic tilt and rotation with respect to the X-ray imaging table/plate. The method was validated using 2D adult cadaver hips. Using the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme, our method showed a mean accuracy of 1.0 ± 0.7 (range from 0.1 to 2.0 ) for inclination and 1.7 ± 1.2 (range from 0.0 to 3.9 ) for anteversion, taking the measurements from post-operative CT images as ground truths. Our new solution formulation and the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme facilitate estimation of post-operative cup orientation and measurement of pelvic tilt and rotation. (orig.)

  13. Massive parallelization of a 3D finite difference electromagnetic forward solution using domain decomposition methods on multiple CUDA enabled GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A.

    2010-12-01

    3D forward solvers lie at the core of inverse formulations used to image the variation of electrical conductivity within the Earth's interior. This property is associated with variations in temperature, composition, phase, presence of volatiles, and in specific settings, the presence of groundwater, geothermal resources, oil/gas or minerals. The high cost of 3D solutions has been a stumbling block to wider adoption of 3D methods. Parallel algorithms for modeling frequency domain 3D EM problems have not achieved wide scale adoption, with emphasis on fairly coarse grained parallelism using MPI and similar approaches. The communications bandwidth as well as the latency required to send and receive network communication packets is a limiting factor in implementing fine grained parallel strategies, inhibiting wide adoption of these algorithms. Leading Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) companies now produce GPUs with hundreds of GPU processor cores per die. The footprint, in silicon, of the GPU's restricted instruction set is much smaller than the general purpose instruction set required of a CPU. Consequently, the density of processor cores on a GPU can be much greater than on a CPU. GPUs also have local memory, registers and high speed communication with host CPUs, usually through PCIe type interconnects. The extremely low cost and high computational power of GPUs provides the EM geophysics community with an opportunity to achieve fine grained (i.e. massive) parallelization of codes on low cost hardware. The current generation of GPUs (e.g. NVidia Fermi) provides 3 billion transistors per chip die, with nearly 500 processor cores and up to 6 GB of fast (DDR5) GPU memory. This latest generation of GPU supports fast hardware double precision (64 bit) floating point operations of the type required for frequency domain EM forward solutions. Each Fermi GPU board can sustain nearly 1 TFLOP in double precision, and multiple boards can be installed in the host computer system. We

  14. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders.

  15. Single, aligned carbon nanotubes in 3D nanoscale architectures enabled by top-down and bottom-up manufacturable processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Anupama B; Megerian, Krikor G; Von Allmen, Paul; Baron, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches for forming single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 μm deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by using chemically amplified resists and high density, low pressure plasma etching techniques to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used in the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 deg. C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. Such scalable, high throughput top-down fabrication processes, when integrated with the bottom-up tube synthesis techniques, should accelerate the development of plasma grown tubes for a wide variety of applications in electronics, such as nanoelectromechanical systems, interconnects, field emitters and sensors. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting the Ni catalyst thickness, as well as the pressure and plasma power during growth.

  16. Histomorphometric quantification of human pathological bones from synchrotron radiation 3D computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Liebert P.; Braz, Delson

    2011-01-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify pathological samples of human bone. Samples of human bones were cut into small blocks (8 mm x 8 mm x 10 mm) with a precision saw and then imaged. The computed microtomographies were obtained at SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Italy). The obtained 3D images yielded excellent resolution and details of intra-trabecular bone structures, including marrow present inside trabeculae. Histomorphometric quantification was compared to literature as well. (author)

  17. Fast precalculated triangular mesh algorithm for 3D binary computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kaczorowski, Andrzej; Wilkinson, Tim D

    2014-12-10

    A new method for constructing computer-generated holograms using a precalculated triangular mesh is presented. The speed of calculation can be increased dramatically by exploiting both the precalculated base triangle and GPU parallel computing. Unlike algorithms using point-based sources, this method can reconstruct a more vivid 3D object instead of a "hollow image." In addition, there is no need to do a fast Fourier transform for each 3D element every time. A ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator is used to display the binary hologram within our experiment and the hologram of a base right triangle is produced by utilizing just a one-step Fourier transform in the 2D case, which can be expanded to the 3D case by multiplying by a suitable Fresnel phase plane. All 3D holograms generated in this paper are based on Fresnel propagation; thus, the Fresnel plane is treated as a vital element in producing the hologram. A GeForce GTX 770 graphics card with 2 GB memory is used to achieve parallel computing.

  18. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed

  19. High-contrast differentiation resolution 3D imaging of rodent brain by X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T.; Novotná, M.; Kavková, M.; Tesařová, M.; Kaucká, M.; Szarowská, B.; Adameyko, I.; Hrubá, E.; Buchtová, M.; Dražanová, E.; Starčuk, Z.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-02-01

    The biomedically focused brain research is largely performed on laboratory mice considering a high homology between the human and mouse genomes. A brain has an intricate and highly complex geometrical structure that is hard to display and analyse using only 2D methods. Applying some fast and efficient methods of brain visualization in 3D will be crucial for the neurobiology in the future. A post-mortem analysis of experimental animals' brains usually involves techniques such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography. These techniques are employed to visualize abnormalities in the brains' morphology or reparation processes. The X-ray computed microtomography (micro CT) plays an important role in the 3D imaging of internal structures of a large variety of soft and hard tissues. This non-destructive technique is applied in biological studies because the lab-based CT devices enable to obtain a several-micrometer resolution. However, this technique is always used along with some visualization methods, which are based on the tissue staining and thus differentiate soft tissues in biological samples. Here, a modified chemical contrasting protocol of tissues for a micro CT usage is introduced as the best tool for ex vivo 3D imaging of a post-mortem mouse brain. This way, the micro CT provides a high spatial resolution of the brain microscopic anatomy together with a high tissue differentiation contrast enabling to identify more anatomical details in the brain. As the micro CT allows a consequent reconstruction of the brain structures into a coherent 3D model, some small morphological changes can be given into context of their mutual spatial relationships.

  20. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paoli Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast and preoperative (radiographic template models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  1. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast) and preoperative (radiographic template) models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology. PMID:21338504

  2. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Han, Seung Ho

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  3. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  4. Development of a 3-D flow analysis computer program for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, H. Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. K.; Whang, Y. D.; Kim, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D computational fluid dynamics program TASS-3D is being developed for the flow analysis of primary coolant system consists of complex geometries such as SMART. A pre/post processor also is being developed to reduce the pre/post processing works such as a computational grid generation, set-up the analysis conditions and analysis of the calculated results. TASS-3D solver employs a non-orthogonal coordinate system and FVM based on the non-staggered grid system. The program includes the various models to simulate the physical phenomena expected to be occurred in the integral reactor and will be coupled with core dynamics code, core T/H code and the secondary system code modules. Currently, the application of TASS-3D is limited to the single phase of liquid, but the code will be further developed including 2-phase phenomena expected for the normal operation and the various transients of the integrator reactor in the next stage

  5. A substructure method to compute the 3D fluid-structure interaction during blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.; Axisa, F.; Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1983-08-01

    The waves generated by a sudden rupture of a PWR primary pipe have an important mechanical effect on the internal structures of the vessel. This fluid-structure interaction has a strong 3D aspect. 3D finite element explicit methods can be applied. These methods take into account the non linearities of the problem but the calculation is heavy and expensive. We describe in this paper another type of method based on a substructure procedure: the vessel, internals and contained fluid are axisymmetrically described (AQUAMODE computer code). The pipes and contained fluid are monodimensionaly described (TEDEL-FLUIDE Computer Code). These substructures are characterized by their natural modes. Then, they are connected to another (connection of both structural and fluid nodes) the TRISTANA Computer Code. This method allows to compute correctly and cheaply the 3D fluid-structure effects. The treatment of certain non linearities is difficult because of the modal characterization of the substructures. However variations of contact conditions versus time can be introduced. We present here some validation tests and comparison with experimental results of the litterature

  6. Feasibility of differential quantification of 3D temporomandibular kinematics during various oral activities using a cone-beam computed tomography-based 3D fluoroscopic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: A new CBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic method was proposed and shown to be capable of quantitatively differentiating TMJ movement patterns among complicated functional activities. It also enabled a complete description of the rigid-body mandibular motion and descriptions of as many reference points as needed for future clinical applications. It will be helpful for dental practice and for a better understanding of the functions of the TMJ.

  7. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  8. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borman, V D; Bogovalov, S V; Borisevich, V D; Tronin, I V; Tronin, V N

    2016-01-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there. (paper)

  9. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide [University of Tsukba, Institute of Applied Physics, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan)], E-mail: yatagai@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  11. PID - 3D: a software to develop mathematical human phantoms for use in computational dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The PID-3D software, written in Visual C++, contains tools developed for building and editing of three-dimensional geometric figures formed of voxels (volume pixels). These tools were projected to be used, together with those already developed by the Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq), such as the FANTOMAS and DIP software, in computational dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The main objective of this paper is to develop various voxel-based geometric solids to build voxel phantoms (meaning models), anthropomorphic or not. The domain of this technique of development of geometric solids is important for the GDN/CNPq, because it allows the use of just one Monte Carlo code to simulate the transportation, interaction and deposition of radiation in tomographic and mathematical phantoms. Building a particular geometric solid the user needs to inform to the PID-3D software, the location and the size of the parallelepiped that involves it. Each built solid can be saved in a binary file of the type SGI (file containing the size and the numeric values that constitutes the 3D matrix that represents the solid, commonly used by GDN/CNPq). The final mathematical phantom is built starting from these SGI files and the SGI file resulting constitutes a voxel phantom. With this approach the software's user does not have to manipulate the equations and inequalities of the solids that represent the organs and tissues of the phantom. The 3D-PID software, associated with the FANTOMAS and DIP software are tools produced by GDN/CNPq, providing a new technique for building of 3D scenes in dosimetric evaluations using voxel phantoms. To validate the PID-3D software one built, step by step, a phantom similar to the MIRD-5 stylized phantom. (author)

  12. Full 3-D OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Pérez-Merino, P.; Martinez-Enriquez, E.; Velasco-Ocana, M.; Marcos, S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared measured wave aberrations in pseudophakic eyes implanted with aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) with simulated aberrations from numerical ray tracing on customized computer eye models, built using quantitative 3-D OCT-based patient-specific ocular geometry. Experimental and simulated aberrations show high correlation (R = 0.93; poptical geometrical and surgically-related factors to image quality, and are an excellent tool for characterizing and improving cataract surgery. PMID:27231608

  13. Comparison of traditional methods with 3D computer models in the instruction of hepatobiliary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Alexander W; Durack, Jeremy C; Sandhu, Parmbir; Chen, Eric M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Breiman, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether an interactive three-dimensional presentation depicting liver and biliary anatomy is more effective for teaching medical students than a traditional textbook format presentation of the same material. Forty-six medical students volunteered for participation in this study. Baseline demographic information, spatial ability, and knowledge of relevant anatomy were measured. Participants were randomized into two groups and presented with a computer-based interactive learning module comprised of animations and still images to highlight various anatomical structures (3D group), or a computer-based text document containing the same images and text without animation or interactive features (2D group). Following each teaching module, students completed a satisfaction survey and nine-item anatomic knowledge post-test. The 3D group scored higher on the post-test than the 2D group, with a mean score of 74% and 64%, respectively; however, when baseline differences in pretest scores were accounted for, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.33). Spatial ability did not statistically significantly correlate with post-test scores for the 3D group or the 2D group. In the post-test satisfaction survey the 3D group expressed a statistically significantly higher overall satisfaction rating compared to students in the 2D control group (4.5 versus 3.7 out of 5, P = 0.02). While the interactive 3D multimedia module received higher satisfaction ratings from students, it neither enhanced nor inhibited learning of complex hepatobiliary anatomy compared to an informationally equivalent traditional textbook style approach. . Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. A computational modeling approach for the characterization of mechanical properties of 3D alginate tissue scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K; Yan, K C; Sun, W

    2008-01-01

    Scaffold guided tissue engineering is an innovative approach wherein cells are seeded onto biocompatible and biodegradable materials to form 3-dimensional (3D) constructs that, when implanted in the body facilitate the regeneration of tissue. Tissue scaffolds act as artificial extracellular matrix providing the environment conducive for tissue growth. Characterization of scaffold properties is necessary to understand better the underlying processes involved in controlling cell behavior and formation of functional tissue. We report a computational modeling approach to characterize mechanical properties of 3D gellike biomaterial, specifically, 3D alginate scaffold encapsulated with cells. Alginate inherent nonlinearity and variations arising from minute changes in its concentration and viscosity make experimental evaluation of its mechanical properties a challenging and time consuming task. We developed an in silico model to determine the stress-strain relationship of alginate based scaffolds from experimental data. In particular, we compared the Ogden hyperelastic model to other hyperelastic material models and determined that this model was the most suitable to characterize the nonlinear behavior of alginate. We further propose a mathematical model that represents the alginate material constants in Ogden model as a function of concentrations and viscosity. This study demonstrates the model capability to predict mechanical properties of 3D alginate scaffolds.

  15. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  16. 3-D heat transfer computer calculations of the performance of the IAEA's air-bath calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Kaizermann, S.; Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.

    1989-01-01

    A three dimensional (3-D) heat transfer computer code was developed to study and optimize the design parameters and to better understand the performance characteristics of the IAEA's air-bath calorimeters. The computer model accounts for heat conduction and radiation in the complex materials of the calorimeter and for heat convection and radiation at its outer surface. The temperature servo controller is modelled as an integral part of the heat balance equations in the system. The model predictions will be validated against test data using the ANL bulk calorimeter. 11 refs., 6 figs

  17. OpenCL-based vicinity computation for 3D multiresolution mesh compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachicha, Soumaya; Elkefi, Akram; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2017-03-01

    3D multiresolution mesh compression systems are still widely addressed in many domains. These systems are more and more requiring volumetric data to be processed in real-time. Therefore, the performance is becoming constrained by material resources usage and an overall reduction in the computational time. In this paper, our contribution entirely lies on computing, in real-time, triangles neighborhood of 3D progressive meshes for a robust compression algorithm based on the scan-based wavelet transform(WT) technique. The originality of this latter algorithm is to compute the WT with minimum memory usage by processing data as they are acquired. However, with large data, this technique is considered poor in term of computational complexity. For that, this work exploits the GPU to accelerate the computation using OpenCL as a heterogeneous programming language. Experiments demonstrate that, aside from the portability across various platforms and the flexibility guaranteed by the OpenCL-based implementation, this method can improve performance gain in speedup factor of 5 compared to the sequential CPU implementation.

  18. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristovich, K Y; Khan, S H

    2010-01-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  19. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The development of powerful computer clusters and efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) made possible the computation of seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous 3D earth. However, the cost of theses computations is still problematic for global scale tomography that requires hundreds of such simulations. Part of the ongoing research effort is dedicated to the development of faster modeling methods based on the spectral element method. Capdeville et al. (2002) proposed to couple SEM simulations with normal modes calculation (C-SEM). Nissen-Meyer et al. (2007) used 2D SEM simulations to compute 3D seismograms in a 1D earth model. Thanks to these developments, and for the first time, Lekic et al. (2011) developed a 3D global model of the upper mantle using SEM simulations. At the local and continental scale, adjoint tomography that is using a lot of SEM simulation can be implemented on current computers (Tape, Liu et al. 2009). Due to their smaller size, these models offer higher resolution. They provide us with images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. In an attempt to teleport such local adjoint tomographic inversions into the deep earth, we are developing a hybrid method where SEM computation are limited to a region of interest within the earth. That region can have an arbitrary shape and size. Outside this region, the seismic wavefield is extrapolated to obtain synthetic data at the Earth's surface. A key feature of the method is the use of a time reversal mirror to inject the wavefield induced by distant seismic source into the region of interest (Robertsson and Chapman 2000). We compute synthetic seismograms as follow: Inside the region of interest, we are using regional spectral element software RegSEM to compute wave propagation in 3D. Outside this region, the wavefield is extrapolated to the surface by convolution with the Green's functions from the mirror to the seismic stations. For now, these

  20. New solutions and applications of 3D computer tomography image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Ira; Kroll, Julia; Verl, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    As nowadays the industry aims at fast and high quality product development and manufacturing processes a modern and efficient quality inspection is essential. Compared to conventional measurement technologies, industrial computer tomography (CT) is a non-destructive technology for 3D-image data acquisition which helps to overcome their disadvantages by offering the possibility to scan complex parts with all outer and inner geometric features. In this paper new and optimized methods for 3D image processing, including innovative ways of surface reconstruction and automatic geometric feature detection of complex components, are presented, especially our work of developing smart online data processing and data handling methods, with an integrated intelligent online mesh reduction. Hereby the processing of huge and high resolution data sets is guaranteed. Besides, new approaches for surface reconstruction and segmentation based on statistical methods are demonstrated. On the extracted 3D point cloud or surface triangulation automated and precise algorithms for geometric inspection are deployed. All algorithms are applied to different real data sets generated by computer tomography in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new tools. Since CT is an emerging technology for non-destructive testing and inspection more and more industrial application fields will use and profit from this new technology.

  1. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes as measured by 3D echocardiography and ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Funari, Marcelo B. G.; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT-3D-Echo) and ultrafast computed tomography (CT) are two novel methods for the analysis of LV ejection fraction and volumes. Objective: To compare LVEF and volume measurements as obtained using RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast CT. Methods: Thirty nine consecutive patients (27 men, mean age of 57+- 12 years) were studied using RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT. LVEF and LV volumes were analyzed. Statistical analysis: coefficient of correlation (r: Pearson), Bland-Altman analysis, linear regression analysis, 95% CI, p 5 .58)%; end-diastolic volume ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (87+-27.8) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 11.4 to 78 (33.1+-13.6) ml. CT scan measurements: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86% (67.8+-7.78); end-diastolic volume ranged from 51 to 186 (106.5+-30.3) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 7 to 72 (35.5+-13.4)ml. Correlations between RT-3D-Echo and CT were: LVEF (r: 0.7888, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6301 to 0.8843); end-diastolic volume (r: 0.7695, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.5995 to 0.8730); end-systolic volume (r: 0.8119, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6673 to 0.8975). Conclusion: Good correlation between LVEF and ventricular volume parameters as measured by RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT was found in the present case series. (author)

  3. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: Hardware setup, reconstruction methods and first clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmeke, Hartmut; Hopp, Torsten; Zapf, Michael; Kaiser, Clemens; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2017-11-01

    A promising candidate for improved imaging of breast cancer is ultrasound computer tomography (USCT). Current experimental USCT systems are still focused in elevation dimension resulting in a large slice thickness, limited depth of field, loss of out-of-plane reflections, and a large number of movement steps to acquire a stack of images. 3D USCT emitting and receiving spherical wave fronts overcomes these limitations. We built an optimized 3D USCT, realizing for the first time the full benefits of a 3D system. The point spread function could be shown to be nearly isotropic in 3D, to have very low spatial variability and fit the predicted values. The contrast of the phantom images is very satisfactory in spite of imaging with a sparse aperture. The resolution and imaged details of the reflectivity reconstruction are comparable to a 3 T MRI volume. Important for the obtained resolution are the simultaneously obtained results of the transmission tomography. The KIT 3D USCT was then tested in a pilot study on ten patients. The primary goals of the pilot study were to test the USCT device, the data acquisition protocols, the image reconstruction methods and the image fusion techniques in a clinical environment. The study was conducted successfully; the data acquisition could be carried out for all patients with an average imaging time of six minutes per breast. The reconstructions provide promising images. Overlaid volumes of the modalities show qualitative and quantitative information at a glance. This paper gives a summary of the involved techniques, methods, and first results.

  4. Initial evaluation of image performance of a 3-D x-ray system: phantom-based comparison of 3-D tomography with conventional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Robyn Melanie; Garcia, Meritxell Alzamora; Amsler, Felix; Voigt, Johannes; Fieselmann, Andreas; Falkowski, Anna Lucja; Stieltjes, Bram; Hirschmann, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Phantom-based initial performance assessment of a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray system and comparison of 3-D tomography with computed tomography (CT) were proposed. A 3-D image quality phantom was scanned with a prototype version of 3-D cone-beam CT imaging implemented on a twin robotic x-ray system using three trajectories (163 deg = table, 188 deg = upright, and 200 deg = side), six tube voltages (60, 70, 81, 90, 100, and 121 kV), and four detector doses (0.348, 0.696, 1.740, and [Formula: see text]). CT was obtained with a clinical protocol. Spatial resolution (line pairs/cm) and soft-tissue-contrast resolution were assessed by two independent readers. Radiation dose was assessed. Descriptive and analysis of variance (ANOVA) ([Formula: see text]) were performed. With 3-D tomography, a maximum of 16 lp/cm was visible and best soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 2 mm at 30 Hounsfield units (HU) for 160 projections. With CT, 10 lp/cm was visible and soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 4 mm at 20 HU. The upright trajectory yielded significantly better spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast, and the side trajectory yielded significantly higher soft tissue contrast than the table trajectory ([Formula: see text]). Radiation dose was higher in 3-D tomography (45 to 704 mGycm) than CT (44 mGycm). Three-dimensional tomography renders overall equal or higher spatial resolution and comparable soft tissue contrast to CT for medium- and high-dose protocols in the side and upright trajectories, but with higher radiation doses.

  5. Correlation of 3D Shift and 3D Tilt of the Patella in Patients With Recurrent Dislocation of the Patella and Healthy Volunteers: An In Vivo Analysis Based on 3-Dimensional Computer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuzo; Toritsuka, Yukiyoshi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Horibe, Shuji; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Shino, Konsei

    2017-11-01

    The concepts of lateral deviation and lateral inclination of the patella, characterized as shift and tilt, have been applied in combination to evaluate patellar malalignment in patients with patellar dislocation. It is not reasonable, however, to describe the 3-dimensional (3D) positional relation between the patella and the femur according to measurements made on 2-dimensional (2D) images. The current study sought to clarify the relation between lateral deviation and inclination of the patella in patients with recurrent dislocation of the patella (RDP) by redefining them via 3D computer models as 3D shift and 3D tilt. Descriptive laboratory study. Altogether, 60 knees from 56 patients with RDP and 15 knees from 10 healthy volunteers were evaluated. 3D shift and tilt of the patella were analyzed with 3D computer models created by magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained at 10° intervals of knee flexion (0°-50°). 3D shift was defined as the spatial distance between the patellar reference point and the midsagittal plane of the femur; it is expressed as a percentage of the interepicondylar width. 3D tilt was defined as the spatial angle between the patellar reference plane and the transepicondylar axis. Correlations between the 2 parameters were assessed with the Pearson correlation coefficient. The patients' mean Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.895 ± 0.186 (range, -0.073 to 0.997; median, 0.965). In all, 56 knees (93%) had coefficients >0.7 (strong correlation); 1 knee (2%), >0.4 (moderate correlation); 2 knees (3%), >0.2 (weak correlation); and 1 knee (2%), correlation). The mean correlation coefficient of the healthy volunteers was 0.645 ± 0.448 (range, -0.445 to 0.982; median, 0.834). A statistically significant difference was found in the distribution of the correlation coefficients between the patients and the healthy volunteers ( P = .0034). When distribution of the correlation coefficients obtained by the 3D analyses was compared with that by the 2

  6. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  7. The current status of the development of the technology on 3D computer simulation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Park, Seung Kook; Chung, Un Soo; Jung, Ki Jung

    2002-05-01

    The development background and property of the COSIDA, which is the 3D computer simulation system for the analysis on the dismantling procedure of the nuclear facilities in Japan was reviewed. The function of the visualization on the work area, Kinematics analysis and dismantling scenario analysis, which are the sub systems of the COSIDA, has been investigated. The physical, geometrical and radiological properties were modelled in 2D or 3D in the sub system of the visualization of the work area. In the sub system of the kinematics analysis, the command set on the basic work procedure for the control of the motion of the models at a cyber space was driven. The suitability of the command set was estimated by the application of COSIDA to the programming on the motion of the remote dismantling tools for dismantling the components of the nuclear facilities at cyber space

  8. 3D streamers simulation in a pin to plane configuration using massively parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, J.-M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Dessante, P.; Jacobs, C.; Renon, N.; Yousfi, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns the 3D simulation of corona discharge using high performance computing (HPC) managed with the message passing interface (MPI) library. In the field of finite volume methods applied on non-adaptive mesh grids and in the case of a specific 3D dynamic benchmark test devoted to streamer studies, the great efficiency of the iterative R&B SOR and BiCGSTAB methods versus the direct MUMPS method was clearly demonstrated in solving the Poisson equation using HPC resources. The optimization of the parallelization and the resulting scalability was undertaken as a function of the HPC architecture for a number of mesh cells ranging from 8 to 512 million and a number of cores ranging from 20 to 1600. The R&B SOR method remains at least about four times faster than the BiCGSTAB method and requires significantly less memory for all tested situations. The R&B SOR method was then implemented in a 3D MPI parallelized code that solves the classical first order model of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air. The 3D code capabilities were tested by following the development of one, two and four coplanar streamers generated by initial plasma spots for 6 ns. The preliminary results obtained allowed us to follow in detail the formation of the tree structure of a corona discharge and the effects of the mutual interactions between the streamers in terms of streamer velocity, trajectory and diameter. The computing time for 64 million of mesh cells distributed over 1000 cores using the MPI procedures is about 30 min ns-1, regardless of the number of streamers.

  9. Computer system to manage information rigs by 3D electronic models; Sistema computacional para administrar la informacion de plataformas petroleras mediante modelos electronicos 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Bustos, Jesus; Segura Ozuna, Victor Octavio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-06-22

    The evolution and incorporation of new hardware technologies, as well as recent advances in computer systems have enabled the development of applications of computer aided design of most complete scope, such as those used for the design of industrial process plants. This article describes a software system developed to complement the capabilities of one of these systems for the design of process plants. A 3D electronic model is generated through the user interface of the design system that at the same time gives the user the ability to generate, publish, review and control the engineering document that are generated during the entire life cycle of a marine oil platform, a very particular type of industrial process plant. This way, the user obtains not only a tool for the design of an industrial plant, but also a system for managing information and engineering documents that are developed. This allows the user to do a more efficient job by putting at his disposal and in the same system, all documents and information required to perform his duty. [Spanish] La evolucion e incorporacion de nuevas tecnologias de hardware, junto con los avances recientes en sistemas de computo ha permitido el desarrollo de aplicaciones de interesante diseno de computo de mayor alcance, tales como los que se emplean en las plantas de procesos industriales. Este articulo describe un sistema de software desarrollado para complementar las capacidades de uno de estos sistemas para el diseno de proceso. Un modelo electronico se genera por medio de la interfaz de usuario del sistema de diseno, que al mismo tiempo da al usuario la capacidad para crear, publicar, revisar y controlar los documentos de ingenieria que se producen durante el ciclo de vida completo de una plataforma marina petrolera, un tipo muy particular de planta de proceso industrial. De este modo, el usuario no solo obtiene una herramienta para el diseno de una planta industrial, sino tambien un sistema para manejar informacion y

  10. Parallel performances of three 3D reconstruction methods on MIMD computers: Feldkamp, block ART and SIRT algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, C.; Chassery, J.M.; Peyrin, F.; Girerd, C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the parallel implementations of reconstruction methods in 3D tomography. 3D tomography requires voluminous data and long computation times. Parallel computing, on MIMD computers, seems to be a good approach to manage this problem. In this study, we present the different steps of the parallelization on an abstract parallel computer. Depending on the method, we use two main approaches to parallelize the algorithms: the local approach and the global approach. Experimental results on MIMD computers are presented. Two 3D images reconstructed from realistic data are showed

  11. Electrostatic Self-Assembly Enabling Integrated Bulk and Interfacial Sodium Storage in 3D Titania-Graphene Hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Gui-Liang [Chemical; Xiao, Lisong [Center; Sheng, Tian [Collaborative; Liu, Jianzhao [Chemical; Hu, Yi-Xin [Chemical; Department; Ma, Tianyuan [Chemical; Amine, Rachid [Materials; Xie, Yingying [Chemical; Zhang, Xiaoyi [X-ray Science; Liu, Yuzi [Nanoscience; Ren, Yang [X-ray Science; Sun, Cheng-Jun [X-ray Science; Heald, Steve M. [X-ray Science; Kovacevic, Jasmina [Center; Sehlleier, Yee Hwa [Center; Schulz, Christof [Center; Mattis, Wenjuan Liu [Microvast Power Solutions, 12603; Sun, Shi-Gang [Collaborative; Wiggers, Hartmut [Center; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical; Amine, Khalil [Chemical

    2017-12-15

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries have attracted increased attention for energy storage due to the natural abundance of sodium. However, it remains a huge challenge to develop versatile electrode materials with favorable properties, which requires smart structure design and good mechanistic understanding. Herein, we reported a general and scalable approach to synthesize 3D titania-graphene hybrid via electrostatic-interaction-induced self-assembly. Synchrotron X-ray probe, transmission electron microscopy and computational modeling revealed that the strong interaction between Titania and graphene through comparably strong van-der-Waals forces not only facilitates bulk Na+ intercalation but also enhances the interfacial sodium storage. As a result, the titania-graphene hybrid exhibits exceptional long-term cycle stability up to 5000 cycles, and ultrahigh rate capability up to 20 C for sodium storage. Furthermore, density function theory calculation indicated that the interfacial Li+, K+, Mg2+ and Al3+ storage can be enhanced as well. The proposed general strategy opens up new avenues to create versatile materials for advanced battery systems.

  12. Electrostatic Self-Assembly Enabling Integrated Bulk and Interfacial Sodium Storage in 3D Titania-Graphene Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gui-Liang; Xiao, Lisong; Sheng, Tian; Liu, Jianzhao; Hu, Yi-Xin; Ma, Tianyuan; Amine, Rachid; Xie, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Yuzi; Ren, Yang; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Heald, Steve M; Kovacevic, Jasmina; Sehlleier, Yee Hwa; Schulz, Christof; Mattis, Wenjuan Liu; Sun, Shi-Gang; Wiggers, Hartmut; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

    2018-01-10

    Room-temperature sodium-ion batteries have attracted increased attention for energy storage due to the natural abundance of sodium. However, it remains a huge challenge to develop versatile electrode materials with favorable properties, which requires smart structure design and good mechanistic understanding. Herein, we reported a general and scalable approach to synthesize three-dimensional (3D) titania-graphene hybrid via electrostatic-interaction-induced self-assembly. Synchrotron X-ray probe, transmission electron microscopy, and computational modeling revealed that the strong interaction between titania and graphene through comparably strong van der Waals forces not only facilitates bulk Na + intercalation but also enhances the interfacial sodium storage. As a result, the titania-graphene hybrid exhibits exceptional long-term cycle stability up to 5000 cycles, and ultrahigh rate capability up to 20 C for sodium storage. Furthermore, density function theory calculation indicated that the interfacial Li + , K + , Mg 2+, and Al 3+ storage can be enhanced as well. The proposed general strategy opens up new avenues to create versatile materials for advanced battery systems.

  13. New Algorithm to Enable Construction and Display of 3D Structures from Scanning Probe Microscopy Images Acquired Layer-by-Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, William Nanqiao; Wang, Shuo; Ventrici de Souza, Joao Francisco; Kuhl, Tonya L; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2018-06-11

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely known for high-resolution imaging of surface structures and nanolithography in two dimension (2D), which provides important physical insights in surface science and material science. This work reports a new algorithm to enable construction and display of layer-by-layer 3D structures from SPM images. The algorithm enables alignment of SPM images acquired during layer-by-layer deposition, removal of redundant features, and faithfully constructs the deposited 3D structures. The display uses a "see-through" strategy to enable the structure of each layer to be visible. The results demonstrate high spatial accuracy as well as algorithm versatility; users can set parameters for reconstruction and display as per image quality and research needs. To the best of our knowledge, this method represents the first report to enable SPM technology for 3D imaging construction and display. The detailed algorithm is provided to facilitate usage of the same approach in any SPM software. These new capabilities support wide applications of SPM that require 3D image reconstruction and display, such as 3D nanoprinting, and 3D additive and subtractive manufacturing and imaging.

  14. Use of computational simulation for evaluation of 3D printed phantoms for application in clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeriano, Caio César Santos

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of a phantom is to represent the change in the radiation field caused by absorption and scattering in a given tissue or organ of interest. Its geometrical characteristics and composition should be as close as possible to the values associated with its natural analogue. Anatomical structures can be transformed into 3D virtual objects by medical imaging techniques (e.g. Computed Tomography) and printed by rapid prototyping using materials, for example, polylactic acid. Its production for specific patients requires fulfilling requirements such as geometric accuracy with the individual's anatomy and tissue equivalence, so that usable measurements can be made, and be insensitive to the radiation effects. The objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of 3D printed materials when exposed to different photon beams, with emphasis on the quality of radiotherapy (6 MV), aiming its application in clinical dosimetry. For this, 30 thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Ti were used. The equivalence between the PMMA and the printed PLA for the thermoluminescent response of 30 dosimeters of CaSO 4 : Dy was also analyzed. The irradiations with radiotherapy photon beams were simulated using the Eclipse TM treatment planning system,with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm and the Acuros ® XB Advanced Dose Calculation algorithm. In addition to the use of Eclipse TM and dosimetric tests, computational simulations were realized using the MCNP5 code. Simulations with the MCNP5 code were performed to calculate the attenuation coefficient of printed plates exposed to different radiodiagnosis X-rays qualities and to develop a computational model of 3D printed plates. (author)

  15. Comparison of 3D computer-aided with manual cerebral aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Buhk, J.H.; Schoenfeld, M.; Goebell, E.; Fiehler, J.; Forkert, N.D.

    2013-01-01

    To compare intra- and inter-observer reliability of aneurysm measurements obtained by a 3D computer-aided technique with standard manual aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities. A total of 21 patients with 29 cerebral aneurysms were studied. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA), contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA). Aneurysm neck and depth diameters were manually measured by two observers in each modality. Additionally, semi-automatic computer-aided diameter measurements were performed using 3D vessel surface models derived from CE- (CE-com) and TOF-MRA (TOF-com) datasets. Bland-Altman analysis (BA) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer agreement. BA revealed the narrowest relative limits of intra- and inter-observer agreement for aneurysm neck and depth diameters obtained by TOF-com (ranging between ±5.3 % and ±28.3 %) and CE-com (ranging between ±23.3 % and ±38.1 %). Direct measurements in DSA, TOF-MRA and CE-MRA showed considerably wider limits of agreement. The highest ICCs were observed for TOF-com and CE-com (ICC values, 0.92 or higher for intra- as well as inter-observer reliability). Computer-aided aneurysm measurement in 3D offers improved intra- and inter-observer reliability and a reproducible parameter extraction, which may be used in clinical routine and as objective surrogate end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  16. Traveltime computation and imaging from rugged topography in 3D TTI media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoyong; Wang, Huazhong; Yang, Qinyong; Fang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    Foothill areas with rugged topography are of great potential for oil and gas seismic exploration, but subsurface imaging in these areas is very challenging. Seismic acquisition with larger offset and wider azimuth is necessary for seismic imaging in complex areas. However, the scale anisotropy in this case must be taken into account. To generalize the pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) to 3D transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axes (VTI) and tilted symmetry axes (TTI) from rugged topography, a new dynamic programming approach for the first-arrival traveltime computation method is proposed. The first-arrival time on every uniform mesh point is calculated based on Fermat's principle with simple calculus techniques and a systematic mapping scheme. In order to calculate the minimum traveltime, a set of nonlinear equations is solved on each mesh point, where the group velocity is determined by the group angle. Based on the new first-arrival time calculation method, the corresponding PSDM and migration velocity analysis workflow for 3D anisotropic media from rugged surface is developed. Numerical tests demonstrate that the proposed traveltime calculation method is effective in both VTI and TTI media. The migration results for 3D field data show that it is necessary to choose a smooth datum to remove the high wavenumber move-out components for PSDM with rugged topography and take anisotropy into account to achieve better images.

  17. Traveltime computation and imaging from rugged topography in 3D TTI media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shaoyong; Wang, Huazhong; Yang, Qinyong; Fang, Wubao

    2014-01-01

    Foothill areas with rugged topography are of great potential for oil and gas seismic exploration, but subsurface imaging in these areas is very challenging. Seismic acquisition with larger offset and wider azimuth is necessary for seismic imaging in complex areas. However, the scale anisotropy in this case must be taken into account. To generalize the pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) to 3D transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axes (VTI) and tilted symmetry axes (TTI) from rugged topography, a new dynamic programming approach for the first-arrival traveltime computation method is proposed. The first-arrival time on every uniform mesh point is calculated based on Fermat's principle with simple calculus techniques and a systematic mapping scheme. In order to calculate the minimum traveltime, a set of nonlinear equations is solved on each mesh point, where the group velocity is determined by the group angle. Based on the new first-arrival time calculation method, the corresponding PSDM and migration velocity analysis workflow for 3D anisotropic media from rugged surface is developed. Numerical tests demonstrate that the proposed traveltime calculation method is effective in both VTI and TTI media. The migration results for 3D field data show that it is necessary to choose a smooth datum to remove the high wavenumber move-out components for PSDM with rugged topography and take anisotropy into account to achieve better images. (paper)

  18. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  19. Coronary computed tomography angiography with 320-row detector and using the AIDR-3D: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasdelli Neto, Roberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Bianco, Danilo Perussi; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Szarf, Gilberto; Teles, Gustavo Borges da Silva; Shoji, Hamilton; Santana Netto, Pedro Vieira; Passos, Rodrigo Bastos Duarte; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Ishikawa, Walther Yoshiharu; Lima, Joao Paulo Bacellar Costa; Rocha, Marcelo Assis; Marcos, Vinicius Neves; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Failla, Bruna Bonaventura

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) is a powerful non-invasive imaging method to evaluate coronary artery disease. Nowadays, coronary CTA estimated effective radiation dose can be dramatically reduced using state-of-the-art scanners, such as 320-row detector CT (320-CT), without changing coronary CTA diagnostic accuracy. To optimize and further reduce the radiation dose, new iterative reconstruction algorithms were released recently by several CT manufacturers, and now they are used routinely in coronary CTA. This paper presents our first experience using coronary CTA with 320-CT and the Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). In addition, we describe the current indications for coronary CTA in our practice as well as the acquisition standard protocols and protocols related to CT application for radiation dose reduction. In conclusion, coronary CTA radiation dose can be dramatically reduced following the 'as low as reasonable achievable' principle by combination of exam indication and well-documented technics for radiation dose reduction, such as beta blockers, low-kV, and also the newest iterative dose reduction software as AIDR-3D. (author)

  20. 3-D electromagnetic plasma particle simulations on the Intel Delta parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Liewer, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC code has been developed on the 512 node Intel Touchstone Delta MIMD parallel computer. This code is based on the General Concurrent PIC algorithm which uses a domain decomposition to divide the computation among the processors. The 3D simulation domain can be partitioned into 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional sub-domains. Particles must be exchanged between processors as they move among the subdomains. The Intel Delta allows one to use this code for very-large-scale simulations (i.e. over 10 8 particles and 10 6 grid cells). The parallel efficiency of this code is measured, and the overall code performance on the Delta is compared with that on Cray supercomputers. It is shown that their code runs with a high parallel efficiency of ≥ 95% for large size problems. The particle push time achieved is 115 nsecs/particle/time step for 162 million particles on 512 nodes. Comparing with the performance on a single processor Cray C90, this represents a factor of 58 speedup. The code uses a finite-difference leap frog method for field solve which is significantly more efficient than fast fourier transforms on parallel computers. The performance of this code on the 128 node Cray T3D will also be discussed

  1. A 3D edge detection technique for surface extraction in computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Ontiveros, S.; Jiménez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors influence the measurement uncertainty when using computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications. One of the most critical steps is the surface extraction phase. An incorrect determination of the surface may significantly increase the measurement uncertainty. This paper...... presents an edge detection method for the surface extraction based on a 3D Canny algorithm with sub-voxel resolution. The advantages of this method are shown in comparison with the most commonly used technique nowadays, i.e. the local threshold definition. Both methods are applied to reference standards...

  2. Computer Simulation of Robotic Device Components in 3D Printer Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kiselev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a relevant problem "Computer simulation of robotic device components in manufacturing on a 3D printer" and highlights the problem of computer simulation based on the cognitive programming technology of robotic device components. The paper subject is urgent because computer simulation of force-torque and accuracy characteristics of robot components in terms of their manufacturing properties and conditions from polymeric and metallic materials is of paramount importance for programming and manufacturing on the 3D printers. Two types of additive manufacturing technologies were used:1. FDM (Fused deposition modeling - layered growth of products from molten plastic strands;2. SLM (Selective laser melting - selective laser sintering of metal powders, which, in turn, create:• conditions for reducing the use of expensive equipment;• reducing weight and increasing strength through optimization of  the lattice structures when using a bionic design;• a capability to implement mathematical modeling of individual components of robotic and other devices in terms of appropriate characteristics;• a 3D printing capability to create unique items, which cannot be made by other known methods.The paper aim was to confirm the possibility of ensuring the strength and accuracy characteristics of cases when printing from polymeric and metallic materials on a 3D printer. The investigation emphasis is on mathematical modeling based on the cognitive programming technology using the additive technologies in their studies since it is, generally, impossible to make the obtained optimized structures on the modern CNC machines.The latter allows us to create a program code to be clear to other developers without cost, additional time for development, adaptation and implementation.Year by year Russian companies increasingly use a 3D-print system in mechanical engineering, aerospace industry, and for scientific purposes. Machines for the additive

  3. The history of visual magic in computers how beautiful images are made in CAD, 3D, VR and AR

    CERN Document Server

    Peddie, Jon

    2013-01-01

    If you have ever looked at a fantastic adventure or science fiction movie, or an amazingly complex and rich computer game, or a TV commercial where cars or gas pumps or biscuits behaved liked people and wondered, ""How do they do that?"",  then you've experienced the magic of 3D worlds generated by a computer.3D in computers began as a way to represent automotive designs and illustrate the construction of molecules. 3D graphics use evolved to visualizations of simulated data and artistic representations of imaginary worlds. In order to overcome the processing limitations of the computer, graph

  4. 3D virtual human atria: A computational platform for studying clinical atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanidi, Oleg V; Colman, Michael A; Stott, Jonathan; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-10-01

    Despite a vast amount of experimental and clinical data on the underlying ionic, cellular and tissue substrates, the mechanisms of common atrial arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation, AF) arising from the functional interactions at the whole atria level remain unclear. Computational modelling provides a quantitative framework for integrating such multi-scale data and understanding the arrhythmogenic behaviour that emerges from the collective spatio-temporal dynamics in all parts of the heart. In this study, we have developed a multi-scale hierarchy of biophysically detailed computational models for the human atria--the 3D virtual human atria. Primarily, diffusion tensor MRI reconstruction of the tissue geometry and fibre orientation in the human sinoatrial node (SAN) and surrounding atrial muscle was integrated into the 3D model of the whole atria dissected from the Visible Human dataset. The anatomical models were combined with the heterogeneous atrial action potential (AP) models, and used to simulate the AP conduction in the human atria under various conditions: SAN pacemaking and atrial activation in the normal rhythm, break-down of regular AP wave-fronts during rapid atrial pacing, and the genesis of multiple re-entrant wavelets characteristic of AF. Contributions of different properties of the tissue to mechanisms of the normal rhythm and arrhythmogenesis were investigated. Primarily, the simulations showed that tissue heterogeneity caused the break-down of the normal AP wave-fronts at rapid pacing rates, which initiated a pair of re-entrant spiral waves; and tissue anisotropy resulted in a further break-down of the spiral waves into multiple meandering wavelets characteristic of AF. The 3D virtual atria model itself was incorporated into the torso model to simulate the body surface ECG patterns in the normal and arrhythmic conditions. Therefore, a state-of-the-art computational platform has been developed, which can be used for studying multi

  5. NURBS-based 3-d anthropomorphic computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models used in the evaluation of absorbed dose distributions within the human body. Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilised for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (equation-based) and (2) voxel (image-based) phantoms describing human anatomy through the use of mathematical surface equations and 3-D voxel matrices, respectively. However, stylized phantoms have limitations in defining realistic organ contours and positioning as compared to voxel phantoms, which are themselves based on medical images of human subjects. In turn, voxel phantoms that have been developed through medical image segmentation have limitations in describing organs that are presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography image. The present paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of these existing classes of computational phantoms and introduces a hybrid approach to a computational phantom construction based on non-uniform rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface animation technology that takes advantage of the most desirable features of the former two phantom types. (authors)

  6. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is

  7. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals’ Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs’ behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals’ quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog’s shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  8. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  9. Clinical usefulness of facial soft tissues thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Han, Seung Ho; Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Chong Kwan; Park, Chang Seo

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images. One cadaver that had sound facial soft tissues was chosen for the study. The cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT under following scanning protocols about slice thickness and table speed: 3 mm and 3 mm/sec, 5 mm and 5 mm/sec, 7 mm and 7 mm/sec. The acquired data were reconstructed 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 mm reconstruction interval respectively and the images were transferred to a personal computer. Using a program developed to measure facial soft tissue thickness in 3D image, the facial soft tissue thickness was measured. After the ten-time repeation of the measurement for ten times, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements using the three scanning protocols. Comparison according to the areas was analysed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant intraobserver differences in the measurements of the facial soft tissue thickness using the three scanning protocols (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between measurements in the 3 mm slice thickness and those in the 5 mm, 7 mm slice thickness (p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the 14 of the total 30 measured points in the 5 mm slice thickness and 22 in the 7 mm slice thickness. The facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D images of 7 mm slice thickness is acceptable clinically, but those of 5 mm slice thickness is recommended for the more accurate measurement

  10. Sulfiphilic nickel phosphosulfide enabled Li_2S impregnation in 3D graphene cages for Li-S batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Guangmin; Sun, Jie; Jin, Yang; Chen, Wei; Zu, Chenxi

    2017-01-01

    A 3D graphene cage with a thin layer of electrodeposited nickel phosphosulfide for Li_2S impregnation, using ternary nickel phosphosulphide as a highly conductive coating layer for stabilized polysulfide chemistry, is accomplished by the combination of theoretical and experimental studies. As a result, the 3D interconnected graphene cage structure leads to high capacity, good rate capability and excellent cycling stability in a Li_2S cathode.

  11. "Let's get physical": advantages of a physical model over 3D computer models and textbooks in learning imaging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Daniel; Williams, Sarah B; Lam, Richard; Weller, Renate

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information plays an important part in medical and veterinary education. Appreciating complex 3D spatial relationships requires a strong foundational understanding of anatomy and mental 3D visualization skills. Novel learning resources have been introduced to anatomy training to achieve this. Objective evaluation of their comparative efficacies remains scarce in the literature. This study developed and evaluated the use of a physical model in demonstrating the complex spatial relationships of the equine foot. It was hypothesized that the newly developed physical model would be more effective for students to learn magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the foot than textbooks or computer-based 3D models. Third year veterinary medicine students were randomly assigned to one of three teaching aid groups (physical model; textbooks; 3D computer model). The comparative efficacies of the three teaching aids were assessed through students' abilities to identify anatomical structures on MR images. Overall mean MRI assessment scores were significantly higher in students utilizing the physical model (86.39%) compared with students using textbooks (62.61%) and the 3D computer model (63.68%) (P < 0.001), with no significant difference between the textbook and 3D computer model groups (P = 0.685). Student feedback was also more positive in the physical model group compared with both the textbook and 3D computer model groups. Our results suggest that physical models may hold a significant advantage over alternative learning resources in enhancing visuospatial and 3D understanding of complex anatomical architecture, and that 3D computer models have significant limitations with regards to 3D learning. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, G.; Plessel, T.; Merritt, F.; Watson, V.

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers. 7 refs

  13. A new 3-D integral code for computation of accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Kettunen, L.

    1991-01-01

    For computing accelerator magnets, integral codes have several advantages over finite element codes; far-field boundaries are treated automatically, and computed field in the bore region satisfy Maxwell's equations exactly. A new integral code employing edge elements rather than nodal elements has overcome the difficulties associated with earlier integral codes. By the use of field integrals (potential differences) as solution variables, the number of unknowns is reduced to one less than the number of nodes. Two examples, a hollow iron sphere and the dipole magnet of Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron, show the capability of the code. The CPU time requirements are comparable to those of three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element codes. Experiments show that in practice it can realize much of the potential CPU time saving that parallel processing makes possible. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  15. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Dick [Fermilab

    2015-11-19

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize “opportunistic” resources — resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS — to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  16. Topology optimization aided structural design: Interpretation, computational aspects and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakis, Georgios; Kanellopoulos, Ioannis; Sotiropoulos, Stefanos; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2017-10-01

    Construction industry has a major impact on the environment that we spend most of our life. Therefore, it is important that the outcome of architectural intuition performs well and complies with the design requirements. Architects usually describe as "optimal design" their choice among a rather limited set of design alternatives, dictated by their experience and intuition. However, modern design of structures requires accounting for a great number of criteria derived from multiple disciplines, often of conflicting nature. Such criteria derived from structural engineering, eco-design, bioclimatic and acoustic performance. The resulting vast number of alternatives enhances the need for computer-aided architecture in order to increase the possibility of arriving at a more preferable solution. Therefore, the incorporation of smart, automatic tools in the design process, able to further guide designer's intuition becomes even more indispensable. The principal aim of this study is to present possibilities to integrate automatic computational techniques related to topology optimization in the phase of intuition of civil structures as part of computer aided architectural design. In this direction, different aspects of a new computer aided architectural era related to the interpretation of the optimized designs, difficulties resulted from the increased computational effort and 3D printing capabilities are covered here in.

  17. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  18. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  19. Cloud4Psi: cloud computing for 3D protein structure similarity searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Małysiak-Mrozek, Bożena; Kłapciński, Artur

    2014-10-01

    Popular methods for 3D protein structure similarity searching, especially those that generate high-quality alignments such as Combinatorial Extension (CE) and Flexible structure Alignment by Chaining Aligned fragment pairs allowing Twists (FATCAT) are still time consuming. As a consequence, performing similarity searching against large repositories of structural data requires increased computational resources that are not always available. Cloud computing provides huge amounts of computational power that can be provisioned on a pay-as-you-go basis. We have developed the cloud-based system that allows scaling of the similarity searching process vertically and horizontally. Cloud4Psi (Cloud for Protein Similarity) was tested in the Microsoft Azure cloud environment and provided good, almost linearly proportional acceleration when scaled out onto many computational units. Cloud4Psi is available as Software as a Service for testing purposes at: http://cloud4psi.cloudapp.net/. For source code and software availability, please visit the Cloud4Psi project home page at http://zti.polsl.pl/dmrozek/science/cloud4psi.htm. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Soft computing approach to 3D lung nodule segmentation in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, P; Pietka, E

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, multilevel approach to the segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography studies. It is based on two branches of computational intelligence: the fuzzy connectedness (FC) and the evolutionary computation. First, the image and auxiliary data are prepared for the 3D FC analysis during the first stage of an algorithm - the masks generation. Its main goal is to process some specific types of nodules connected to the pleura or vessels. It consists of some basic image processing operations as well as dedicated routines for the specific cases of nodules. The evolutionary computation is performed on the image and seed points in order to shorten the FC analysis and improve its accuracy. After the FC application, the remaining vessels are removed during the postprocessing stage. The method has been validated using the first dataset of studies acquired and described by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and by its latest release - the LIDC-IDRI (Image Database Resource Initiative) database. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turmezei, Tom D.; Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Fotiadou, Anastasia F.; Poole, Kenneth E.S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K and L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K and L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  2. Creating computer aided 3D model of spleen and kidney based based on Visible Human Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldur, Muhammad M.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of computer aided 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction technique on visualization and modeling of gross anatomical structures with an affordable methodology applied on the spleen and kidney. From The Visible Human Project Dataset cryosection images, developed by the National Library of Medicine, the spleen and kidney sections were preferred to be used due to their highly distinct contours. The software used for the reconstruction were Surf Driver 3.5.3 for Mac and Cinema 4D X L version 7.1 for Mac OS X. This study was carried out in May 2004 at the Department of Anatomy, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. As a result of this study, it is determined that these 2 programs could be effectively used both for 3D modeling of the mentioned organs and volumetric analyses on these models. It is also seen that it is possible to hold the physical models of these gross anatomical digital ones with stereolithography technique by means of the data exchange file format provided by the program and present such images as anaglyph. Surf Driver 3.5.3 for Mac OS and Cinema 4 DXL version 7.1 for Mac OS X can be used effectively for reconstruction of gross anatomical structures from serial parallel sections with distinct contours such as spleen and kidney and the animation of models. These software constitute a highly effective way of getting volumetric calculations, spatial relations and morphometrical measurements of reconstructed structures. (author)

  3. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  4. A 3-D Computational Study of a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) Spanwise Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Upender K.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2015-01-01

    Results of a computational study carried out to explore the effects of various elastomer configurations joining spanwise contiguous Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) segments are reported here. This research is carried out as a proof-of-concept study that will seek to push the flight envelope in cruise with drag optimization as the objective. The cruise conditions can be well off design such as caused by environmental conditions, maneuvering, etc. To handle these off-design conditions, flap deflection is used so when the flap is deflected in a given direction, the aircraft angle of attack changes accordingly to maintain a given lift. The angle of attack is also a design parameter along with the flap deflection. In a previous 2D study,1 the effect of camber was investigated and the results revealed some insight into the relative merit of various camber settings of the VCCTEF. The present state of the art has not advanced sufficiently to do a full 3-D viscous analysis of the whole NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) wing with VCCTEF deployed with elastomers. Therefore, this study seeks to explore the local effects of three contiguous flap segments on lift and drag of a model devised here to determine possible trades among various flap deflections to achieve desired lift and drag results. Although this approach is an approximation, it provides new insights into the "local" effects of the relative deflections of the contiguous spanwise flap systems and various elastomer segment configurations. The present study is a natural extension of the 2-D study to assess these local 3-D effects. Design cruise condition at 36,000 feet at free stream Mach number of 0.797 and a mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) based Reynolds number of 30.734x10(exp 6) is simulated for an angle of attack (AoA) range of 0 to 6 deg. In the previous 2-D study, the calculations revealed that the parabolic arc camber (1x2x3) and circular arc camber (VCCTEF222) offered the best L

  5. Fatigue of hybrid glass/carbon composites: 3D computational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2014-01-01

    3D computational simulations of fatigue of hybrid carbon/glass fiber reinforced composites is carried out using X-FEM and multifiber unit cell models. A new software code for the automatic generation of unit cell multifiber models of composites with randomly misaligned fibers of various properties...... and geometrical parameters is developed. With the use of this program code and the X-FEM method, systematic investigations of the effect of microstructure of hybrid composites (fraction of carbon versus glass fibers, misalignment, and interface strength) and the loading conditions (tensile versus compression...... cyclic loading effects) on fatigue behavior of the materials are carried out. It was demonstrated that the higher fraction of carbon fibers in hybrid composites is beneficial for the fatigue lifetime of the composites under tension-tension cyclic loading, but might have negative effect on the lifetime...

  6. Three dimensional field computation software package DE3D and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu; Zhang Tianjue; Yan Weili

    1992-07-01

    A software package, DE3D that can be run on PC for three dimensional electrostatic and magnetostatic field analysis has been developed in CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy). Two scalar potential method and special numerical techniques have made the code with high precision. It can be used for electrostatic and magnetostatic fields computations with complex boundary conditions. In the most cases, the result accuracy is better than 1% comparing with the measured. In some situations, the results are more acceptable than the other codes because some tricks are used for the current integral. Typical examples, design of a cyclotron magnet and magnetic elements on its beam transport line, given in the paper show how the program helps the designer to improve the design of the product. The software package could bring advantages to the producers and designers

  7. CAIPIRINHA accelerated SPACE enables 10-min isotropic 3D TSE MRI of the ankle for optimized visualization of curved and oblique ligaments and tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vivek; Fritz, Benjamin; Johnson, Rory; Gilson, Wesley D; Raithel, Esther; Fritz, Jan

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that a fourfold CAIPIRINHA accelerated, 10-min, high-resolution, isotropic 3D TSE MRI prototype protocol of the ankle derives equal or better quality than a 20-min 2D TSE standard protocol. Following internal review board approval and informed consent, 3-Tesla MRI of the ankle was obtained in 24 asymptomatic subjects including 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE TSE prototype and 20-min 2D TSE standard protocols. Outcome variables included image quality and visibility of anatomical structures using 5-point Likert scales. Non-parametric statistical testing was used. P values ≤0.001 were considered significant. Edge sharpness, contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, fat suppression and magic angle effects were without statistical difference on 2D and 3D TSE images (p > 0.035). Fluid was mildly brighter on intermediate-weighted 2D images (p acceleration enables high-spatial resolution oblique and curved planar MRI of the ankle and visualization of ligaments, tendons and joints equally well or better than a more time-consuming anisotropic 2D TSE MRI. • High-resolution 3D TSE MRI improves visualization of ankle structures. • Limitations of current 3D TSE MRI include long scan times. • 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE allows now a fourfold-accelerated data acquisition. • 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE enables high-spatial-resolution ankle MRI within 10 min. • 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE produces equal-or-better quality than 20-min 2D TSE.

  8. Computation of a high-resolution MRI 3D stereotaxic atlas of the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ella, Arsène; Delgadillo, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2017-02-15

    The sheep model was first used in the fields of animal reproduction and veterinary sciences and then was utilized in fundamental and preclinical studies. For more than a decade, magnetic resonance (MR) studies performed on this model have been increasingly reported, especially in the field of neuroscience. To contribute to MR translational neuroscience research, a brain template and an atlas are necessary. We have recently generated the first complete T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W MR population average images (or templates) of in vivo sheep brains. In this study, we 1) defined a 3D stereotaxic coordinate system for previously established in vivo population average templates; 2) used deformation fields obtained during optimized nonlinear registrations to compute nonlinear tissues or prior probability maps (nlTPMs) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) tissues; 3) delineated 25 external and 28 internal sheep brain structures by segmenting both templates and nlTPMs; and 4) annotated and labeled these structures using an existing histological atlas. We built a quality high-resolution 3D atlas of average in vivo sheep brains linked to a reference stereotaxic space. The atlas and nlTPMs, associated with previously computed T1W and T2W in vivo sheep brain templates and nlTPMs, provide a complete set of imaging space that are able to be imported into other imaging software programs and could be used as standardized tools for neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods, such as image registration, image segmentation, identification of brain structures, implementation of recording devices, or neuronavigation. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:676-692, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Modular Approaches to Earth Science Scientific Computing: 3D Electromagnetic Induction Modeling as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, K.; Egbert, G.; Siripunvaraporn, W.

    2003-12-01

    We are developing a modular system for three-dimensional inversion of electromagnetic (EM) induction data, using an object oriented programming approach. This approach allows us to modify the individual components of the inversion scheme proposed, and also reuse the components for variety of problems in earth science computing howsoever diverse they might be. In particular, the modularity allows us to (a) change modeling codes independently of inversion algorithm details; (b) experiment with new inversion algorithms; and (c) modify the way prior information is imposed in the inversion to test competing hypothesis and techniques required to solve an earth science problem. Our initial code development is for EM induction equations on a staggered grid, using iterative solution techniques in 3D. An example illustrated here is an experiment with the sensitivity of 3D magnetotelluric inversion to uncertainties in the boundary conditions required for regional induction problems. These boundary conditions should reflect the large-scale geoelectric structure of the study area, which is usually poorly constrained. In general for inversion of MT data, one fixes boundary conditions at the edge of the model domain, and adjusts the earth?s conductivity structure within the modeling domain. Allowing for errors in specification of the open boundary values is simple in principle, but no existing inversion codes that we are aware of have this feature. Adding a feature such as this is straightforward within the context of the modular approach. More generally, a modular approach provides an efficient methodology for setting up earth science computing problems to test various ideas. As a concrete illustration relevant to EM induction problems, we investigate the sensitivity of MT data near San Andreas Fault at Parkfield (California) to uncertainties in the regional geoelectric structure.

  10. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamfai Chan

    Full Text Available Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs. Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  11. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A.; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target’s nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer’s heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  12. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  13. Analysis of 3D Prints by X-ray Computed Microtomography and Terahertz Pulsed Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markl, Daniel; Zeitler, J Axel; Rasch, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 3D printer was used to realise compartmental dosage forms containing multiple active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) formulations. This work demonstrates the microstructural characterisation of 3D printed solid dosage forms using X-ray computed microtomography (XμCT) and terahertz pulsed...... imaging (TPI). METHODS: Printing was performed with either polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polylactic acid (PLA). The structures were examined by XμCT and TPI. Liquid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) formulations containing saquinavir and halofantrine were incorporated into the 3D printed...... was characterised by XμCT and TPI on the basis of the computer-aided design (CAD) models of the dosage form (compartmentalised PVA structures were 7.5 ± 0.75% larger than designed; n = 3). CONCLUSIONS: The 3D printer can reproduce specific structures very accurately, whereas the 3D prints can deviate from...

  14. Improvement of 2D ERT measurements conducted along a small earth-filled dyke using 3D topographic data and 3D computation of geometric factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bièvre, Grégory; Oxarango, Laurent; Günther, Thomas; Goutaland, David; Massardi, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of earth-filled dykes characterization and monitoring, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) turns out to be a commonly used method. 2D sections are generally acquired along the dyke crest thus putting forward the question of 3D artefacts in the inversion process. This paper proposes a methodology based on 3D direct numerical simulations of the ERT acquisition using a realistic topography of the study site. It allows computing ad hoc geometrical factors which can be used for the inversion of experimental ERT data. The method is first evaluated on a set of synthetic dyke configurations. Then, it is applied to experimental static and time-lapse ERT data set acquired before and after repair works carried out on a leaking zone of an earth-filled canal dyke in the centre of France. The computed geometric factors are lower than the analytic geometric factors in a range between -8% and - 18% for measurements conducted on the crest of the dyke. They exhibit a maximum under-estimation for intermediate electrode spacings in the Wenner and Schlumberger configurations. In the same way, for measurements conducted on the mid-slope of the dyke, the computed geometric factors are higher for short electrode spacings (+18%) and lower for lower for large electrode spacings (-8%). The 2D inversion of the synthetic data with these computed geometric factors provides a significant improvement of the agreement with the original resistivity. Two experimental profiles conducted on the same portion of the dyke but at different elevations also reveal a better agreement using this methodology. The comparison with apparent resistivity from EM31 profiling along the stretch of the dyke also supports this evidence. In the same way, some spurious effects which affected the time-lapse data were removed and improved the global readability of the time-lapse resistivity sections. The benefit on the structural interpretation of ERT images remains moderate but allows a better

  15. A New Energy-Based Method for 3-D Finite-Element Nonlinear Flux Linkage computation of Electrical Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for computation of the nonlinear flux linkage in 3-D finite-element models (FEMs) of electrical machines. Accurate computation of the nonlinear flux linkage in 3-D FEM is not an easy task. Compared to the existing energy-perturbation method, the new technique......-perturbation method. The new method proposed is validated using experimental results on two different permanent magnet machines....

  16. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  17. CAIPIRINHA accelerated SPACE enables 10-min isotropic 3D TSE MRI of the ankle for optimized visualization of curved and oblique ligaments and tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalia, Vivek [University of Vermont Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Burlington, VT (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fritz, Benjamin [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Johnson, Rory [Siemens Healthcare USA, Inc, Cary, NC (United States); Gilson, Wesley D. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Inc, Baltimore, MD (United States); Raithel, Esther [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that a fourfold CAIPIRINHA accelerated, 10-min, high-resolution, isotropic 3D TSE MRI prototype protocol of the ankle derives equal or better quality than a 20-min 2D TSE standard protocol. Following internal review board approval and informed consent, 3-Tesla MRI of the ankle was obtained in 24 asymptomatic subjects including 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE TSE prototype and 20-min 2D TSE standard protocols. Outcome variables included image quality and visibility of anatomical structures using 5-point Likert scales. Non-parametric statistical testing was used. P values ≤0.001 were considered significant. Edge sharpness, contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, fat suppression and magic angle effects were without statistical difference on 2D and 3D TSE images (p > 0.035). Fluid was mildly brighter on intermediate-weighted 2D images (p < 0.001), whereas 3D images had substantially less partial volume, chemical shift and no pulsatile-flow artifacts (p < 0.001). Oblique and curved planar 3D images resulted in mildly-to-substantially improved visualization of joints, spring, bifurcate, syndesmotic, collateral and sinus tarsi ligaments, and tendons (p < 0.001, respectively). 3D TSE MRI with CAIPIRINHA acceleration enables high-spatial resolution oblique and curved planar MRI of the ankle and visualization of ligaments, tendons and joints equally well or better than a more time-consuming anisotropic 2D TSE MRI. (orig.)

  18. CAIPIRINHA accelerated SPACE enables 10-min isotropic 3D TSE MRI of the ankle for optimized visualization of curved and oblique ligaments and tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vivek; Fritz, Benjamin; Johnson, Rory; Gilson, Wesley D.; Raithel, Esther; Fritz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a fourfold CAIPIRINHA accelerated, 10-min, high-resolution, isotropic 3D TSE MRI prototype protocol of the ankle derives equal or better quality than a 20-min 2D TSE standard protocol. Following internal review board approval and informed consent, 3-Tesla MRI of the ankle was obtained in 24 asymptomatic subjects including 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE TSE prototype and 20-min 2D TSE standard protocols. Outcome variables included image quality and visibility of anatomical structures using 5-point Likert scales. Non-parametric statistical testing was used. P values ≤0.001 were considered significant. Edge sharpness, contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, fat suppression and magic angle effects were without statistical difference on 2D and 3D TSE images (p > 0.035). Fluid was mildly brighter on intermediate-weighted 2D images (p < 0.001), whereas 3D images had substantially less partial volume, chemical shift and no pulsatile-flow artifacts (p < 0.001). Oblique and curved planar 3D images resulted in mildly-to-substantially improved visualization of joints, spring, bifurcate, syndesmotic, collateral and sinus tarsi ligaments, and tendons (p < 0.001, respectively). 3D TSE MRI with CAIPIRINHA acceleration enables high-spatial resolution oblique and curved planar MRI of the ankle and visualization of ligaments, tendons and joints equally well or better than a more time-consuming anisotropic 2D TSE MRI. (orig.)

  19. Computation of 3D thermohydraulics in partially blocked bundles during the reflood phase of a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, G.M.; Briere, E.; Fornaciari, G.

    1994-06-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), ballooning of the fuel rod claddings may occur during a LOCA, since the fuel rod claddings are heated up, and the system pressure is low. The severe blockages that may result induce cross-flow diversion and three-dimensional effects on thermohydraulics in the core bundle, during the reflood phase. To improve the knowledge of these phenomena and their physical modelling in the code CATHARE, 3D computer codes are needed. In 1990, EDF has started up a development and validation program of the 3D THYC computer code to analyze the thermohydraulics of the flow during the reflood phase, in partially blocked bundles. The main objective is to calculate the temperatures of the rods above the quench front, when they are cooled by superheated steam with saturated droplets. First, this paper introduces the THYC model developed for reflood studies. Secondly, we report the first qualification results on a Flooding Experiments with Blocked Array (FEBA) test. Thirdly, we analyze the model predictions on a large break LOCA transient, in a 900 MW PWR 11x11 core area with a 3x3 central blockage. THYC simulates the transient in the bundle around and above the blockage, until the quench front enters the computational domain. Previously, a 1D CATHARE simulation gives the boundary conditions and, in the reactor core case, the deformation of the blocked fuel rods. The results analysis focused on the time evolution of the clad temperatures in the blocked and in the bypass region. In the FEBA test simulation, the main observations are properly predicted within the blockage. Temperatures are lower in blocked rod sleeves than in unblocked rod claddings since the steam gap reduces the power transmitted by the heater rod to the sleeve. In the core case, the model predicts the opposite result. Within the blockage, ballooned rod temperatures are higher than non-ballooned rod ones. We show by sensitivity studies that these behaviour difference between FEBA rods

  20. Potential hazards of viewing 3-D stereoscopic television, cinema and computer games: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Peter A

    2011-03-01

    The visual stimulus provided by a 3-D stereoscopic display differs from that of the real world because the image provided to each eye is produced on a flat surface. The distance from the screen to the eye remains fixed, providing a single focal distance, but the introduction of disparity between the images allows objects to be located geometrically in front of, or behind, the screen. Unlike in the real world, the stimulus to accommodation and the stimulus to convergence do not match. Although this mismatch is used positively in some forms of Orthoptic treatment, a number of authors have suggested that it could negatively lead to the development of asthenopic symptoms. From knowledge of the zone of clear, comfortable, single binocular vision one can predict that, for people with normal binocular vision, adverse symptoms will not be present if the discrepancy is small, but are likely if it is large, and that what constitutes 'large' and 'small' are idiosyncratic to the individual. The accommodation-convergence mismatch is not, however, the only difference between the natural and the artificial stimuli. In the former case, an object located in front of, or behind, a fixated object will not only be perceived as double if the images fall outside Panum's fusional areas, but it will also be defocused and blurred. In the latter case, however, it is usual for the producers of cinema, TV or computer game content to provide an image that is in focus over the whole of the display, and as a consequence diplopic images will be sharply in focus. The size of Panum's fusional area is spatial frequency-dependent, and because of this the high spatial frequencies present in the diplopic 3-D image will provide a different stimulus to the fusion system from that found naturally. © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  1. Computer-assisted diagnostic system for neurodegenerative dementia using brain SPECT and 3D-SSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazunari; Kanda, Tomonori; Uemura, Takafumi; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yoshikawa, Toshiki; Shimada, Kenichi; Ohkawa, Shingo; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    To develop a computer-assisted automated diagnostic system to distinguish among Alzheimer disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild dementia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images with injection of N-Isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained from patients with mild degenerative dementia. First, datasets from 20 patients mild AD, 15 patients with dementia with DLB, and 17 healthy controls were used to develop an automated diagnosing system based on three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP). AD- and DLB-specific regional templates were created using 3D-SSP, and critical Z scores in the templates were established. Datasets from 50 AD patients, 8 DLB patients, and 10 patients with non-AD/DLB type degenerative dementia (5 with frontotemporal dementia and 5 with progressive supranuclear palsy) were then used to test the diagnostic accuracy of the optimized automated system in comparison to the diagnostic interpretation of conventional IMP-SPECT images. These comparisons were performed to differentiate AD and DLB from non-AD/DLB and to distinguish AD from DLB. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The area under the ROC curve (Az) and the accuracy of the automated diagnosis system were 0.89 and 82%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the visual inspection were 0.84 and 77%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the combination of visual inspection and this system were 0.96 and 91%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 66%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The system developed in the present study achieved as good discrimination of AD, DLB, and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild dementia

  2. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  3. The effects of 3D interactive animated graphics on student learning and attitudes in computer-based instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hye Sun

    Visuals are most extensively used as instructional tools in education to present spatially-based information. Recent computer technology allows the generation of 3D animated visuals to extend the presentation in computer-based instruction. Animated visuals in 3D representation not only possess motivational value that promotes positive attitudes toward instruction but also facilitate learning when the subject matter requires dynamic motion and 3D visual cue. In this study, three questions are explored: (1) how 3D graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with 2D graphics; (2) how animated graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with static graphics; and (3) whether the use of 3D graphics, when they are supported by interactive animation, is the most effective visual cues to improve learning and to develop positive attitudes. A total of 145 eighth-grade students participated in a 2 x 2 factorial design study. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of four computer-based instructions: 2D static; 2D animated; 3D static; and 3D animated. The results indicated that: (1) Students in the 3D graphic condition exhibited more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the 2D graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of 3D graphic condition and that of 2D graphic condition. However, students in the 3D graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the 2D graphic condition. (2) Students in the animated graphic condition exhibited slightly more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the static graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of animated graphic condition and that of static graphic condition. However, students in the animated graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the static graphic condition. (3) Students in the 3D animated graphic condition

  4. Detecting and visualizing internal 3D oleoresin in agarwood by means of micro-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Roslan Yahya; Mat Rosol Awang

    2012-01-01

    Detection and analysis of oleoresin is particularly significant since the commercial value of agarwood is related to the quantity of oleoresins that are present. A modern technique of non-destructive may reach the interior region of the wood. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. The aim of this paper is to explore the potential of high resolution non-destructive 3D visualization technique, X-ray micro-computed tomography, as imaging tools to visualize micro-structure oleoresin in agarwood. Investigations involving desktop X-ray micro-tomography system on high grade agarwood sample, performed at the Centre of Tomography in Nuclear Malaysia, demonstrate the applicability of the method. Prior to experiments, a reference test was conducted to stimulate the attenuation of oleoresin in agarwood. Based on the experiment results, micro-CT imaging with voxel size 7.0 μm is capable to of detecting oleoresin and pores in agarwood. This imaging technique, although sophisticated can be used for standard development especially in grading of agarwood for commercial activities. (author)

  5. Computer-assisted 3D kinematic analysis of all leg joints in walking insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Bender

    Full Text Available High-speed video can provide fine-scaled analysis of animal behavior. However, extracting behavioral data from video sequences is a time-consuming, tedious, subjective task. These issues are exacerbated where accurate behavioral descriptions require analysis of multiple points in three dimensions. We describe a new computer program written to assist a user in simultaneously extracting three-dimensional kinematics of multiple points on each of an insect's six legs. Digital video of a walking cockroach was collected in grayscale at 500 fps from two synchronized, calibrated cameras. We improved the legs' visibility by painting white dots on the joints, similar to techniques used for digitizing human motion. Compared to manual digitization of 26 points on the legs over a single, 8-second bout of walking (or 106,496 individual 3D points, our software achieved approximately 90% of the accuracy with 10% of the labor. Our experimental design reduced the complexity of the tracking problem by tethering the insect and allowing it to walk in place on a lightly oiled glass surface, but in principle, the algorithms implemented are extensible to free walking. Our software is free and open-source, written in the free language Python and including a graphical user interface for configuration and control. We encourage collaborative enhancements to make this tool both better and widely utilized.

  6. UAV and Computer Vision in 3D Modeling of Cultural Heritage in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrile, Vincenzo; Gelsomino, Vincenzo; Bilotta, Giuliana

    2017-08-01

    On the Waterfront Italo Falcomatà of Reggio Calabria you can admire the most extensive tract of the walls of the Hellenistic period of ancient city of Rhegion. The so-called Greek Walls are one of the most significant and visible traces of the past linked to the culture of Ancient Greece in the site of Reggio Calabria territory. Over the years this stretch of wall has always been a part, to the reconstruction of Reggio after the earthquake of 1783, the outer walls at all times, restored countless times, to cope with the degradation of the time and the adjustments to the technical increasingly innovative and sophisticated siege. They were the subject of several studies on history, for the study of the construction techniques and the maintenance and restoration of the same. This note describes the methodology for the implementation of a three-dimensional model of the Greek Walls conducted by the Geomatics Laboratory, belonging to DICEAM Department of University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria. 3D modeling we made is based on imaging techniques, such as Digital Photogrammetry and Computer Vision, by using a drone. The acquired digital images were then processed using commercial software Agisoft PhotoScan. The results denote the goodness of the technique used in the field of cultural heritage, attractive alternative to more expensive and demanding techniques such as laser scanning.

  7. Segmentation of 3D ultrasound computer tomography reflection images using edge detection and surface fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    An essential processing step for comparison of Ultrasound Computer Tomography images to other modalities, as well as for the use in further image processing, is to segment the breast from the background. In this work we present a (semi-) automated 3D segmentation method which is based on the detection of the breast boundary in coronal slice images and a subsequent surface fitting. The method was evaluated using a software phantom and in-vivo data. The fully automatically processed phantom results showed that a segmentation of approx. 10% of the slices of a dataset is sufficient to recover the overall breast shape. Application to 16 in-vivo datasets was performed successfully using semi-automated processing, i.e. using a graphical user interface for manual corrections of the automated breast boundary detection. The processing time for the segmentation of an in-vivo dataset could be significantly reduced by a factor of four compared to a fully manual segmentation. Comparison to manually segmented images identified a smoother surface for the semi-automated segmentation with an average of 11% of differing voxels and an average surface deviation of 2mm. Limitations of the edge detection may be overcome by future updates of the KIT USCT system, allowing a fully-automated usage of our segmentation approach.

  8. Optimal design of wind barriers using 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Wu, X.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Desertification is a significant global environmental and ecological problem that requires human-regulated control and management. Wind barriers are commonly used to reduce wind velocity or trap drifting sand in arid or semi-arid areas. Therefore, optimal design of wind barriers becomes critical in Aeolian engineering. In the current study, we perform 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for flow passing through wind barriers with different structural parameters. To validate the simulation results, we first inter-compare the simulated flow field results with those from both wind-tunnel experiments and field measurements. Quantitative analyses of the shelter effect are then conducted based on a series of simulations with different structural parameters (such as wind barrier porosity, row numbers, inter-row spacing and belt schemes). The results show that wind barriers with porosity of 0.35 could provide the longest shelter distance (i.e., where the wind velocity reduction is more than 50%) thus are recommended in engineering designs. To determine the optimal row number and belt scheme, we introduce a cost function that takes both wind-velocity reduction effects and economical expense into account. The calculated cost function show that a 3-row-belt scheme with inter-row spacing of 6h (h as the height of wind barriers) and inter-belt spacing of 12h is the most effective.

  9. Dynamic 3-D computer graphics for designing a diagnostic tool for patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila; Papathomas, Thomas V; Silverstein, Steven M; Kourtev, Hristiyan; Papayanopoulos, John F

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a novel procedure that uses dynamic 3-D computer graphics as a diagnostic tool for assessing disease severity in schizophrenia patients, based on their reduced influence of top-down cognitive processes in interpreting bottom-up sensory input. Our procedure uses the hollow-mask illusion, in which the concave side of the mask is misperceived as convex, because familiarity with convex faces dominates sensory cues signaling a concave mask. It is known that schizophrenia patients resist this illusion and their resistance increases with illness severity. Our method uses virtual masks rendered with two competing textures: (a) realistic features that enhance the illusion; (b) random-dot visual noise that reduces the illusion. We control the relative weights of the two textures to obtain psychometric functions for controls and patients and assess illness severity. The primary novelty is the use of a rotating mask that is easy to implement on a wide variety of portable devices and avoids the use of elaborate stereoscopic devices that have been used in the past. Thus our method, which can also be used to assess the efficacy of treatments, provides clinicians the advantage to bring the test to the patient's own environment, instead of having to bring patients to the clinic.

  10. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  11. Evolution of Cloud Computing and Enabling Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rabi Prasad Padhy; Manas Ranjan Patra

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the history of forecasting software over the past 25 years, concentrating especially on the interaction between computing and technologies from mainframe computing to cloud computing. The cloud computing is latest one. For delivering the vision of  various  of computing models, this paper lightly explains the architecture, characteristics, advantages, applications and issues of various computing models like PC computing, internet computing etc and related technologie...

  12. KNOW-BLADE task-3.3 report: Rotor blade computations with 3D vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Reck, M.

    2005-01-01

    The present report describes the work done in work package WP3.3: Aerodynamic Accessories in 3D in the EC project KNOW-BLADE. Vortex generators (VGs) are modelled in 3D Navier-Stokes solvers and applied on the flow around an airfoil and a wind turbineblade. Three test cases have been investigated...

  13. Algorithms for Fast Computing of the 3D-DCT Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hanus

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The algorithm for video compression based on the Three-DimensionalDiscrete Cosine Transform (3D-DCT is presented. The original algorithmof the 3D-DCT has high time complexity. We propose several enhancementsto the original algorithm and make the calculation of the DCT algorithmfeasible for future real-time video compression.

  14. A 3D gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of fusion plasma microturbulence on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    One of the grand challenge problems now supported by HPCC is the Numerical Tokamak Project. A goal of this project is the study of low-frequency micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas, which are believed to cause energy loss via turbulent thermal transport across the magnetic field lines. An important tool in this study is gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Gyrokinetic, as opposed to fully-kinetic, methods are particularly well suited to the task because they are optimized to study the frequency and wavelength domain of the microinstabilities. Furthermore, many researchers now employ low-noise delta(f) methods to greatly reduce statistical noise by modelling only the perturbation of the gyrokinetic distribution function from a fixed background, not the entire distribution function. In spite of the increased efficiency of these improved algorithms over conventional PIC algorithms, gyrokinetic PIC simulations of tokamak micro-turbulence are still highly demanding of computer power--even fully-vectorized codes on vector supercomputers. For this reason, we have worked for several years to redevelop these codes on massively parallel computers. We have developed 3D gyrokinetic PIC simulation codes for SIMD and MIMD parallel processors, using control-parallel, data-parallel, and domain-decomposition message-passing (DDMP) programming paradigms. This poster summarizes our earlier work on codes for the Connection Machine and BBN TC2000 and our development of a generic DDMP code for distributed-memory parallel machines. We discuss the memory-access issues which are of key importance in writing parallel PIC codes, with special emphasis on issues peculiar to gyrokinetic PIC. We outline the domain decompositions in our new DDMP code and discuss the interplay of different domain decompositions suited for the particle-pushing and field-solution components of the PIC algorithm.

  15. Estimating Mass Properties of Dinosaurs Using Laser Imaging and 3D Computer Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Karl T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I.

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  16. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl T Bates

    Full Text Available Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize

  17. Three-dimensional (3D)- computed tomography bronchography and angiography combined with 3D-video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) versus conventional 2D-VATS anatomic pulmonary segmentectomy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yun-Bin; Xu, Chun; Li, Chang; Ding, Cheng; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Compared to the pulmonary lobe, the anatomical structure of the pulmonary segment is relatively complex and prone to variation, thus the risk and difficulty of segmentectomy is increased. We compared three-dimensional computed tomography bronchography and angiography (3D-CTBA) combined with 3D video-assisted thoracic surgery (3D-VATS) to perform segmentectomy to conventional two-dimensional (2D)-VATS for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the data of randomly selected patients who underwent 3D-CTBA combined with 3D-VATS (3D-CTBA-VATS) or 2D-VATS at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University Hospital, from January 2014 to May 2017. The operative duration of 3D group was significantly shorter than the 2D group (P 0.05). The extent of intraoperative bleeding and postoperative drainage in the 3D group was significantly lower than in the 2D group (P 3D group was shorter than in the 2D group (P 0.05). However, hemoptysis and pulmonary air leakage (>3d) occurred significantly less frequently in the 3D than in the 2D group (P 3D-CTBA-VATS is a more accurate and smooth technique and leads to reduced intraoperative and postoperative complications. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  19. 3D Graphical User Interface on Personal Computer using P5 Data Glove

    OpenAIRE

    Ms Khyati r. Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents Essential Reality works on 3D HCI for changing 2D visual to 3D visual. The mouse is the critical interface to handle 3D graphical objects. Using data glove its possible to put it on like a normal glove and it then acts as an input device that senses finger movements and hand position and orientation (3 coordinates) in real time. The limitation of surface do not allow large no of windows and icons to be positioned on the screen. If more no of windows are forcibly open some ...

  20. Conversion and improvement of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D to the NMFECC CDC 7600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, T.C.

    1980-06-01

    The implementation of a version of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D on the CDC 7600 at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center is reported. A new iteration technique that greatly increases the probability of convergence and reduces computation time by about 30% for calculations with nonlinear, ferromagnetic materials is included. The use of GFUN3D on the NMFE network is discussed, and suggestions for future work are presented. Appendix A consists of revisions to the GFUN3D User Guide (published by Rutherford Laboratory( that are necessary to use this version. Appendix B contains input and output for some sample calculations. Appendix C is a detailed discussion of the old and new iteration techniques

  1. 3D-printed conductive static mixers enable all-vanadium redox flow battery using slurry electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percin, Korcan; Rommerskirchen, Alexandra; Sengpiel, Robert; Gendel, Youri; Wessling, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    State-of-the-art all-vanadium redox flow batteries employ porous carbonaceous materials as electrodes. The battery cells possess non-scalable fixed electrodes inserted into a cell stack. In contrast, a conductive particle network dispersed in the electrolyte, known as slurry electrode, may be beneficial for a scalable redox flow battery. In this work, slurry electrodes are successfully introduced to an all-vanadium redox flow battery. Activated carbon and graphite powder particles are dispersed up to 20 wt% in the vanadium electrolyte and charge-discharge behavior is inspected via polarization studies. Graphite powder slurry is superior over activated carbon with a polarization behavior closer to the standard graphite felt electrodes. 3D-printed conductive static mixers introduced to the slurry channel improve the charge transfer via intensified slurry mixing and increased surface area. Consequently, a significant increase in the coulombic efficiency up to 95% and energy efficiency up to 65% is obtained. Our results show that slurry electrodes supported by conductive static mixers can be competitive to state-of-the-art electrodes yielding an additional degree of freedom in battery design. Research into carbon properties (particle size, internal surface area, pore size distribution) tailored to the electrolyte system and optimization of the mixer geometry may yield even better battery properties.

  2. [Fabrication and accuracy research on 3D printing dental model based on cone beam computed tomography digital modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Rong; Yin, Le-Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yan, Li-Yi; Wang, Ning; Liu, Gang; An, Xiao-Li; Liu, Bin

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to build a digital dental model with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), to fabricate a virtual model via 3D printing, and to determine the accuracy of 3D printing dental model by comparing the result with a traditional dental cast. CBCT of orthodontic patients was obtained to build a digital dental model by using Mimics 10.01 and Geomagic studio software. The 3D virtual models were fabricated via fused deposition modeling technique (FDM). The 3D virtual models were compared with the traditional cast models by using a Vernier caliper. The measurements used for comparison included the width of each tooth, the length and width of the maxillary and mandibular arches, and the length of the posterior dental crest. 3D printing models had higher accuracy compared with the traditional cast models. The results of the paired t-test of all data showed that no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). Dental digital models built with CBCT realize the digital storage of patients' dental condition. The virtual dental model fabricated via 3D printing avoids traditional impression and simplifies the clinical examination process. The 3D printing dental models produced via FDM show a high degree of accuracy. Thus, these models are appropriate for clinical practice.

  3. The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC): Showcasing Mathematical and Computational Physics in a Critical Atmospheric Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC) is an on-going initiative involving an international group of over 30 researchers engaged in the numerical modeling of three-dimensional radiative transfer as applied to clouds. Because of their strong variability and extreme opacity, clouds are indeed a major source of uncertainty in the Earth's local radiation budget (at GCM grid scales). Also 3D effects (at satellite pixel scales) invalidate the standard plane-parallel assumption made in the routine of cloud-property remote sensing at NASA and NOAA. Accordingly, the test-cases used in I3RC are based on inputs and outputs which relate to cloud effects in atmospheric heating rates and in real-world remote sensing geometries. The main objectives of I3RC are to (1) enable participants to improve their models, (2) publish results as a community, (3) archive source code, and (4) educate. We will survey the status of I3RC and its plans for the near future with a special emphasis on the mathematical models and computational approaches. We will also describe some of the prime applications of I3RC's efforts in climate models, cloud-resolving models, and remote-sensing observations of clouds, or that of the surface in their presence. In all these application areas, computational efficiency is the main concern and not accuracy. One of I3RC's main goals is to document the performance of as wide a variety as possible of three-dimensional radiative transfer models for a small but representative number of ``cases.'' However, it is dominated by modelers working at the level of linear transport theory (i.e., they solve the radiative transfer equation) and an overwhelming majority of these participants use slow-but-robust Monte Carlo techniques. This means that only a small portion of the efficiency vs. accuracy vs. flexibility domain is currently populated by I3RC participants. To balance this natural clustering the present authors have organized a systematic outreach towards

  4. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); NECTAR Imaging srl Imola (Italy); Casali, F. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, M. [CEFLA Dental Group Imola (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  5. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A.; Casali, F.; Bontempi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  6. MRI of the cartilages of the knee, 3-D imaging with a rapid computer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G.; Bohndorf, K.; Prescher, A.; Drobnitzky, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    2-D spin-echo sequences were compared with 3-D gradient-echo sequences using normal and cadaver knee joints. The important advantages of 3-D-imaging are: sections of less than 1 mm, reconstruction in any required plane, which can be related to the complex anatomy of the knee joint, and very good distinction between intra-articular fluid, fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. (orig./GDG).

  7. 3D exemplar-based random walks for tooth segmentation from cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yuru, E-mail: peiyuru@cis.pku.edu.cn; Ai, Xingsheng; Zha, Hongbin [Department of Machine Intelligence, School of EECS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Tianmin [School of Stomatology, Stomatology Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Ma, Gengyu [uSens, Inc., San Jose, California 95110 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Tooth segmentation is an essential step in acquiring patient-specific dental geometries from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Tooth segmentation from CBCT images is still a challenging task considering the comparatively low image quality caused by the limited radiation dose, as well as structural ambiguities from intercuspation and nearby alveolar bones. The goal of this paper is to present and discuss the latest accomplishments in semisupervised tooth segmentation with adaptive 3D shape constraints. Methods: The authors propose a 3D exemplar-based random walk method of tooth segmentation from CBCT images. The proposed method integrates semisupervised label propagation and regularization by 3D exemplar registration. To begin with, the pure random walk method is to get an initial segmentation of the teeth, which tends to be erroneous because of the structural ambiguity of CBCT images. And then, as an iterative refinement, the authors conduct a regularization by using 3D exemplar registration, as well as label propagation by random walks with soft constraints, to improve the tooth segmentation. In the first stage of the iteration, 3D exemplars with well-defined topologies are adapted to fit the tooth contours, which are obtained from the random walks based segmentation. The soft constraints on voxel labeling are defined by shape-based foreground dentine probability acquired by the exemplar registration, as well as the appearance-based probability from a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In the second stage, the labels of the volume-of-interest (VOI) are updated by the random walks with soft constraints. The two stages are optimized iteratively. Instead of the one-shot label propagation in the VOI, an iterative refinement process can achieve a reliable tooth segmentation by virtue of exemplar-based random walks with adaptive soft constraints. Results: The proposed method was applied for tooth segmentation of twenty clinically captured CBCT

  8. FALL3D: A computational model for transport and deposition of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2009-06-01

    FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic ashes and lapilli. The model solves the advection-diffusion-sedimentation (ADS) equation on a structured terrain-following grid using a second-order finite differences (FD) explicit scheme. Different parameterizations for the eddy diffusivity tensor and for the particle terminal settling velocities can be used. The code, written in FORTRAN 90, is available in both serial and parallel versions for Windows and Unix/Linux/Mac X operating systems (OS). A series of pre- and post-process utility programs and OS-dependent scripts to launch them are also included in the FALL3D distribution package. Although the model has been designed to forecast volcanic ash concentration in the atmosphere and ash loading at ground, it can also be used to model the transport of any kind of airborne solid particles. The model inputs are meteorological data, topography, grain-size distribution, shape and density of particles, and mass rate of particle injected into the atmosphere. Optionally, FALL3D can be coupled with the output of the meteorological processor CALMET, a diagnostic model which generates 3-D time-dependent zero-divergence wind fields from mesoscale forecasts incorporating local terrain effects. The FALL3D model can be a tool for short-term ash deposition forecasting and for volcanic fallout hazard assessment. As an example, an application to the 22 July 1998 Etna eruption is also presented.

  9. Stretchable All-Gel-State Fiber-Shaped Supercapacitors Enabled by Macromolecularly Interconnected 3D Graphene/Nanostructured Conductive Polymer Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panpan; Jin, Zhaoyu; Peng, Lele; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Dan; Jin, Yong; Yu, Guihua

    2018-05-01

    Nanostructured conductive polymer hydrogels (CPHs) have been extensively applied in energy storage owing to their advantageous features, such as excellent electrochemical activity and relatively high electrical conductivity, yet the fabrication of self-standing and flexible electrode-based CPHs is still hampered by their limited mechanical properties. Herein, macromolecularly interconnected 3D graphene/nanostructured CPH is synthesized via self-assembly of CPHs and graphene oxide macrostructures. The 3D hybrid hydrogel shows uniform interconnectivity and enhanced mechanical properties due to the strong macromolecular interaction between the CPHs and graphene, thus greatly reducing aggregation in the fiber-shaping process. A proof-of-concept all-gel-state fibrous supercapacitor based on the 3D polyaniline/graphene hydrogel is fabricated to demonstrate the outstanding flexibility and mouldability, as well as superior electrochemical properties enabled by this 3D hybrid hydrogel design. The proposed device can achieve a large strain (up to ≈40%), and deliver a remarkable volumetric energy density of 8.80 mWh cm -3 (at power density of 30.77 mW cm -3 ), outperforming many fiber-shaped supercapacitors reported previously. The all-hydrogel design opens up opportunities in the fabrication of next-generation wearable and portable electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A new computational method for studies of 3-D dislocation-precipitate interactions in reactor steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, A.; Gohniem, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    To enable computational design of advanced steels for reactor pressure vessels and core structural components, we present a new computational method for studies of the interaction between dislocations and precipitates. The method is based on three-dimensional parametric dislocation dynamics, Eshelby's inclusion and inhomogeneity solutions, and boundary and volume element numerical models. Results from this new method are successfully compared to recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results, and show good agreement with atomistic simulations. Then the method is first applied to the investigation of the critical shear stress (CSS) of precipitates sheared by successive dislocation cuttings. The simulations reveal that the CSS is reduced when dislocations cut precipitates, and that it can be as low as half the original value for a completely sheared precipitate. The influence of precipitate geometry and the ratio of precipitate-to-matrix elastic shear modulus on the CSS is presented, and the dependence of the interaction stress between dislocations and precipitates on their relative geometry is discussed. Finally an extension of the method to incorporate the dislocation core contribution to the CSS is highlighted. (author)

  11. CS651 Computer Systems Security Foundations 3d Imagination Cyber Security Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Roy S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-02

    3d Imagination is a new company that bases its business on selling and improving 3d open source related hardware. The devices that they sell include 3d imagers, 3d printers, pick and place machines and laser etchers. They have a fast company intranet for ease in sharing, storing and printing large, complex 3d designs. They have an employee set that requires a variety of operating systems including Windows, Mac and a variety of Linux both for running business services as well as design and test machines. There are a wide variety of private networks for testing transfer rates to and from the 3d devices, without interference with other network tra c. They do video conferencing conferencing with customers and other designers. One of their machines is based on the project found at delta.firepick.org(Krassenstein, 2014; Biggs, 2014), which in future, will perform most of those functions. Their devices all include embedded systems, that may have full blown operating systems. Most of their systems are designed to have swappable parts, so when a new technology is born, it can be quickly adopted by people with 3d Imagination hardware. This company is producing a fair number of systems and components, however to get the funding they need to mass produce quality parts, so they are preparing for an IPO to raise the funds they need. They would like to have a cyber-security audit performed so they can give their investors con dence that they are protecting their data, customers information and printers in a proactive manner.

  12. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  13. View-based 3-D object retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Content-based 3-D object retrieval has attracted extensive attention recently and has applications in a variety of fields, such as, computer-aided design, tele-medicine,mobile multimedia, virtual reality, and entertainment. The development of efficient and effective content-based 3-D object retrieval techniques has enabled the use of fast 3-D reconstruction and model design. Recent technical progress, such as the development of camera technologies, has made it possible to capture the views of 3-D objects. As a result, view-based 3-D object retrieval has become an essential but challenging res

  14. FALL3D: A Computational Model for Trans-port and Deposition of Volcanic Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2008-01-01

    FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of 8 volcanic ash. The model solves the advection-diffusion-sedimentation (ADS) equa- 9 tion on a structured terrain-following grid using a second-order Finite Differences 10 (FD) explicit scheme. Different parameterizations for the eddy diffusivity tensor 11 and for the particle terminal settling velocities can be used. The code, written 12 in FORTRAN 90, is available in both serial and parallel ver...

  15. Comparing the Use of 3D Photogrammetry and Computed Tomography in Assessing the Severity of Single-Suture Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Olivia A; Saber, Nikoo; Stephens, Derek; Clausen, April; Drake, James; Forrest, Christopher; Phillips, John

    2017-05-01

    Single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is diagnosed using clinical assessment and computed tomography (CT). With increasing awareness of the associated risks of radiation exposure, the use of CT is particularly concerning in patients with craniosynostosis since they are exposed at a younger age and more frequently than the average child. Three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry is advantageous-it involves no radiation, is conveniently obtainable within clinic, and does not require general anaesthesia. This study aims to assess how 3D photogrammetry compares to CT in the assessment of craniosynostosis severity, to quantify surgical outcomes, and analyze the validity of 3D photogrammetry in craniosynostosis. Computed tomography images and 3D photographs of patients who underwent craniosynostosis surgery were assessed and aligned to best fit. The intervening area between the CT and 3D photogrammetry curves at the supraorbital bar (bandeau) level in axial view was calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t test. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were determined and equivalence margins were applied. In total, 41 pairs of CTs and 3D photographs were analyzed. The 95% confidence interval was 198.16 to 264.18 mm 2 and the mean was 231.17 mm 2 . When comparisons were made in the same bandeau region omitting the temporalis muscle, the 95% confidence interval was 108.94 to 147.38 mm 2 , and the mean was 128.16 mm 2 . Although statistically significant difference between the modalities was found, they can be attributable to the dampening effect of soft tissue. Within certain error margins, 3D photogrammetry is comparable to CT in assessing the severity of single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. However, a dampening effect can be attributable to the soft tissue. Three-dimensional photogrammetry may be more applicable for severe cases of craniosynostosis but not milder deformity. It may also be beneficial for assessing the overall appearance and

  16. SUV navigator enables rapid [18F]-FDG PET/CT image interpretation compared with 2D ROI and 3D VOI evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okizaki, Atsutaka; Nakayama Michihiro; Ishitoya, Shunta; Nakajima, Kaori; Yamashina Masaaki; Aburano, Tamio; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) is a useful technique for assessing malignant tumors. Measurements of SUV max in multiple lesions per patient frequently require many time-consuming procedures. To address this issue, we designed a novel interface named SUV Navigator (SUVnavi), and the purpose of this study was to investigate its utility. We measured SUV max in 661 lesions from 100 patients with malignant tumors. Diagnoses and SUV max measurements were made with SUVnavi, 2D, and 3D measurements. SUV measurement accuracy in each method were also evaluated. The average reduction in time with SUVnavi versus 2D was 53.8% and 3D was 37.5%; time required with SUVnavi was significantly shorter than with 2D and 3D (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The time reduction and lesion number had a positive correlation (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). SUV max agreed with precise SUV max in all lesions measured with SUVnavi and 3D but in only 466 of 661 lesions (70.5%) measured with 2D. Conclusion SUVnavi may be useful for rapid [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomogra phy/computed tomography ([ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT) image interpretation without reducing the accuracy of SUV max measurement. (author)

  17. A collaborative computing framework of cloud network and WBSN applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Chen, Min; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    As cloud computing and wireless body sensor network technologies become gradually developed, ubiquitous healthcare services prevent accidents instantly and effectively, as well as provides relevant information to reduce related processing time and cost. This study proposes a co-processing intermediary framework integrated cloud and wireless body sensor networks, which is mainly applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. In this study, the main focuses includes distributed computing and resource allocation of processing sensing data over the computing architecture, network conditions and performance evaluation. Through this framework, the transmissions and computing time of sensing data are reduced to enhance overall performance for the services of fall events detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

  18. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H.; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren Yijin

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. Materials and methods: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D surface models were created of the mandible using two different segmentation protocols. The one series of 3D models was segmented by a commercial software company, while the other series was done by an experienced 3D clinician. The heads were then macerated following a standard process. A high resolution laser surface scanner was used to make a 3D model of the macerated mandibles, which acted as the reference 3D model or “gold standard”. The 3D models generated from the two rendering protocols were compared with the “gold standard” using a point-based rigid registration algorithm to superimpose the three 3D models. The linear difference at 25 anatomic and cephalometric landmarks between the laser surface scan and the 3D models generate from the two rendering protocols was measured repeatedly in two sessions with one week interval. Results: The agreement between the repeated measurement was excellent (ICC = 0.923–1.000). The mean deviation from the gold standard by the 3D models generated from the CS group was 0.330 mm ± 0.427, while the mean deviation from the Clinician's rendering was 0.763 mm ± 0.392. The surface models segmented by both CS and DS protocols tend to be larger than those of the reference models. In the DS group, the biggest mean differences with the LSS models were found at the points ConLatR (CI: 0.83–1.23), ConMedR (CI: −3.16 to 2.25), CoLatL (CI: −0.68 to 2.23), Spine (CI: 1.19–2.28), ConAntL (CI: 0.84–1.69), ConSupR (CI: −1.12 to 1.47) and RetMolR (CI: 0.84–1.80). Conclusion: The Commercially segmented models resembled the reality more closely than the Doctor's segmented models. If 3D models are needed for surgical drilling

  19. Lagrangian Finite Element Method for 3D Time-Dependent Viscoelastic Flow Computations using Integral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2000-01-01

    The 3D-LIM has as yet been used to simulate the following two three-dimensional problems. First, the method has been used to simulete for viscoelastic end-plate instability that occurs under certain conditions in the transient filament stretching apparatus for pressure sensitive adhesives (polyme...

  20. Enabling Earth Science Through Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sean; Riofrio, Andres; Shams, Khawaja; Freeborn, Dana; Springer, Paul; Chafin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing holds tremendous potential for missions across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Several flight missions are already benefiting from an investment in cloud computing for mission critical pipelines and services through faster processing time, higher availability, and drastically lower costs available on cloud systems. However, these processes do not currently extend to general scientific algorithms relevant to earth science missions. The members of the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment task at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have worked closely with the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission to integrate cloud computing into their science data processing pipeline. This paper details the efforts involved in deploying a science data system for the CARVE mission, evaluating and integrating cloud computing solutions with the system and porting their science algorithms for execution in a cloud environment.

  1. CIECAM02 and Perception of Colour in 3D Computer Generated Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratuž Nika

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kljub tehnološkemu napredku zadnjih stoletij in desetletij se še vedno soočamo s problematiko prikaza in upodobitve barve v različnih medijih in ohranjanja zaznave barve. Ena od možnosti, za katero se lahko odločimo pri zagotavljanju stalne barvne zaznave, so modeli barvnega zaznavanja. Trenutno je aktualen CIECAM02, ki se še vedno ne uporablja v 3D računalniški grafi ki, s katero se vsak dan srečujemo. Namen raziskave je bil pregled barvnih prostorov v 3D računalniški grafiki, pregled reprodukcije barv in materialov, algoritmov za senčenje ter izbranih sodobnih tehnologij upodabljanja za doseganje korektne končne vizualizacije. V nadaljevanju smo želeli proučiti model barvnega zaznavanja CIECAM02 do te mere, da bi ga lahko uporabili v povezavi s 3D računalniško grafiko. V ta namen smo v programu Blender postavili testno sceno in jo upodobili s tremi upodobljevalniki: Blender Render in Cycles, ki sta že vgrajena, in z dodatkom Yafaray. Izkazalo se je, da CIECAM02 lahko uporabimo tudi v 3D prostoru in da z njegovo uporabo dobimo boljše rezultate ujemanja barv pri spremembi ozadja. Poleg tega smo ugotovili, da barv ne upodabljajo vsi upodobljevalniki enako. Omenjena raziskava je aktualna za vse, ki želijo svoje dvo- ali tridimezionalne izdelke predstaviti s pomočjo 3D računalniške grafike, torej tudi za področje vizualizacij oblačil in tekstilnih izdelkov, ki se uporabljajo pri modnem oblikovanju in oblikovanju interjerjev, avtomobilski, navtični in letalski industriji ter tudi širše, kjer so dovršene 3D vizualizacije tekstilij in oblačil nepogrešljivi element vizualnih in grafičnih komunikacij.

  2. The use of 3D CADD (Computer Aided Design and Drafting) models in operation and maintenance cost reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didsbury, R.; Bains, N.; Cho, U.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The use of three dimensional(3D) computer-aided design and drafting(CADD) models, and the associated information technology and databases, in the engineering and construction phases of large projects is well established and yielding significant improvements in project cost, schedule and quality. The information contained in these models can also be extremely valuable to operating plants, particularly when the visual and spatial information contained in the 3D models is interfaced to other plant information databases. Indeed many plant owners and operators in the process and power industries are already using this technology to assist with such activities as plant configuration management, staff training, work planning and radiation protection. This paper will explore the application of 3D models and the associated databases in an operating plant environment and describe the resulting operational benefits and cost reduction benefits. Several industrial experience case studies will be presented along with suggestions for further future applications. (author). 4 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  3. Computer-assisted operational planning for pediatric abdominal surgery. 3D-visualized MRI with volume rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.; Holland-Cunz, S.; Waag, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    Exact surgical planning is necessary for complex operations of pathological changes in anatomical structures of the pediatric abdomen. 3D visualization and computer-assisted operational planning based on CT data are being increasingly used for difficult operations in adults. To minimize radiation exposure and for better soft tissue contrast, sonography and MRI are the preferred diagnostic methods in pediatric patients. Because of manifold difficulties 3D visualization of these MRI data has not been realized so far, even though the field of embryonal malformations and tumors could benefit from this. A newly developed and modified raycasting-based powerful 3D volume rendering software (VG Studio Max 1.2) for the planning of pediatric abdominal surgery is presented. With the help of specifically developed algorithms, a useful surgical planning system is demonstrated. Thanks to the easy handling and high-quality visualization with enormous gain of information, the presented system is now an established part of routine surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  4. [Computer-assisted operational planning for pediatric abdominal surgery. 3D-visualized MRI with volume rendering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, P; Tröger, J; Holland-Cunz, S; Waag, K L; Schenk, J P

    2006-08-01

    Exact surgical planning is necessary for complex operations of pathological changes in anatomical structures of the pediatric abdomen. 3D visualization and computer-assisted operational planning based on CT data are being increasingly used for difficult operations in adults. To minimize radiation exposure and for better soft tissue contrast, sonography and MRI are the preferred diagnostic methods in pediatric patients. Because of manifold difficulties 3D visualization of these MRI data has not been realized so far, even though the field of embryonal malformations and tumors could benefit from this.A newly developed and modified raycasting-based powerful 3D volume rendering software (VG Studio Max 1.2) for the planning of pediatric abdominal surgery is presented. With the help of specifically developed algorithms, a useful surgical planning system is demonstrated. Thanks to the easy handling and high-quality visualization with enormous gain of information, the presented system is now an established part of routine surgical planning.

  5. GeoBuilder: a geometric algorithm visualization and debugging system for 2D and 3D geometric computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jyh-Da; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Lee, Gen-Cher; Huang, Jeng-Hung; Lee, Der-Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm visualization is a unique research topic that integrates engineering skills such as computer graphics, system programming, database management, computer networks, etc., to facilitate algorithmic researchers in testing their ideas, demonstrating new findings, and teaching algorithm design in the classroom. Within the broad applications of algorithm visualization, there still remain performance issues that deserve further research, e.g., system portability, collaboration capability, and animation effect in 3D environments. Using modern technologies of Java programming, we develop an algorithm visualization and debugging system, dubbed GeoBuilder, for geometric computing. The GeoBuilder system features Java's promising portability, engagement of collaboration in algorithm development, and automatic camera positioning for tracking 3D geometric objects. In this paper, we describe the design of the GeoBuilder system and demonstrate its applications.

  6. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, H.-P.; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou Chuan

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A z ) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  7. Computer aided detection system for Osteoporosis using low dose thoracic 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Harada, Masafumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro

    2018-02-01

    The patient of osteoporosis is about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of healthy life problems in the aging society. It is necessary to do early stage detection and treatment in order to prevent the osteoporosis. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3D) image analysis with higher resolution and shorter scan time. The 3D image analysis of thoracic vertebra can be used for supporting to diagnosis of osteoporosis. This analysis can be used for lung cancer detection at the same time. We develop method of shape analysis and CT values of spongy bone for the detection osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and lung cancer screening show high extraction rate by the thoracic vertebral evaluation CT images. In addition, we created standard pattern of CT value per thoracic vertebra for male age group using 298 low dose data.

  8. Evolutionary computation applied to the reconstruction of 3-D surface topography in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tetsuji; Li, Xiaoyuan; Nakahira, Kenji; Ito, Dai

    2005-10-01

    A genetic algorithm has been applied to the line profile reconstruction from the signals of the standard secondary electron (SE) and/or backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope. This method solves the topographical surface reconstruction problem as one of combinatorial optimization. To extend this optimization approach for three-dimensional (3-D) surface topography, this paper considers the use of a string coding where a 3-D surface topography is represented by a set of coordinates of vertices. We introduce the Delaunay triangulation, which attains the minimum roughness for any set of height data to capture the fundamental features of the surface being probed by an electron beam. With this coding, the strings are processed with a class of hybrid optimization algorithms that combine genetic algorithms and simulated annealing algorithms. Experimental results on SE images are presented.

  9. Computer Tool for Automatically Generated 3D Illustration in Real Time from Archaeological Scanned Pieces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis López; Germán Arroyo; Domingo Martín

    2012-01-01

    The graphical documentation process of archaeological pieces requires the active involvement of a professional artist to recreate beautiful illustrations using a wide variety of expressive techniques. Frequently, the artist’s work is limited by the inconvenience of working only with the photographs of the pieces he is going to illustrate. This paper presents a software tool that allows the easy generation of illustrations in real time from 3D scanned models. The developed interface allows the...

  10. Fatigue of multiscale composites with secondary nanoplatelet reinforcement: 3D computational analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    3D numerical simulations of fatigue damage of multiscale fiber reinforced polymer composites with secondary nanoclay reinforcement are carried out. Macro–micro FE models of the multiscale composites are generated automatically using Python based software. The effect of the nanoclay reinforcement....... Multiscale composites with exfoliated nanoreinforcement and aligned nanoplatelets ensure the better fatigue resistance than those with intercalated/clustered and randomly oriented nanoreinforcement....

  11. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  12. Computational Identification of Genomic Features That Influence 3D Chromatin Domain Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Raphaël; Cuvier, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in long-range Hi-C contact mapping have revealed the importance of the 3D structure of chromosomes in gene expression. A current challenge is to identify the key molecular drivers of this 3D structure. Several genomic features, such as architectural proteins and functional elements, were shown to be enriched at topological domain borders using classical enrichment tests. Here we propose multiple logistic regression to identify those genomic features that positively or negatively influence domain border establishment or maintenance. The model is flexible, and can account for statistical interactions among multiple genomic features. Using both simulated and real data, we show that our model outperforms enrichment test and non-parametric models, such as random forests, for the identification of genomic features that influence domain borders. Using Drosophila Hi-C data at a very high resolution of 1 kb, our model suggests that, among architectural proteins, BEAF-32 and CP190 are the main positive drivers of 3D domain borders. In humans, our model identifies well-known architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, as well as ZNF143 and Polycomb group proteins as positive drivers of domain borders. The model also reveals the existence of several negative drivers that counteract the presence of domain borders including P300, RXRA, BCL11A and ELK1.

  13. Fractographic classification in metallic materials by using 3D processing and computer vision techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ximena Bastidas-Rodríguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Failure analysis aims at collecting information about how and why a failure is produced. The first step in this process is a visual inspection on the flaw surface that will reveal the features, marks, and texture, which characterize each type of fracture. This is generally carried out by personnel with no experience that usually lack the knowledge to do it. This paper proposes a classification method for three kinds of fractures in crystalline materials: brittle, fatigue, and ductile. The method uses 3D vision, and it is expected to support failure analysis. The features used in this work were: i Haralick’s features and ii the fractal dimension. These features were applied to 3D images obtained from a confocal laser scanning microscopy Zeiss LSM 700. For the classification, we evaluated two classifiers: Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine. The performance evaluation was made by extracting four marginal relations from the confusion matrix: accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision, plus three evaluation methods: Receiver Operating Characteristic space, the Individual Classification Success Index, and the Jaccard’s coefficient. Despite the classification percentage obtained by an expert is better than the one obtained with the algorithm, the algorithm achieves a classification percentage near or exceeding the 60 % accuracy for the analyzed failure modes. The results presented here provide a good approach to address future research on texture analysis using 3D data.

  14. Use of micro computed-tomography and 3D printing for reverse engineering of mouse embryo nasal capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesařová, M.; Zikmund, T.; Kaiser, J.; Kaucká, M.; Adameyko, I.; Jaroš, J.; Paloušek, D.; Škaroupka, D.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of increasingly complex cartilage in vertebrate embryos is one of the key tasks of developmental biology. This is especially important to study shape-organizing processes during initial skeletal formation and growth. Advanced imaging techniques that are reflecting biological needs give a powerful impulse to push the boundaries of biological visualization. Recently, techniques for contrasting tissues and organs have improved considerably, extending traditional 2D imaging approaches to 3D . X-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), which allows 3D imaging of biological objects including their internal structures with a resolution in the micrometer range, in combination with contrasting techniques seems to be the most suitable approach for non-destructive imaging of embryonic developing cartilage. Despite there are many software-based ways for visualization of 3D data sets, having a real solid model of the studied object might give novel opportunities to fully understand the shape-organizing processes in the developing body. In this feasibility study we demonstrated the full procedure of creating a real 3D object of mouse embryo nasal capsule, i.e. the staining, the μCT scanning combined by the advanced data processing and the 3D printing

  15. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  16. Applications of 3-D reconstruction and 3-D image analysis using computer graphics in surgery of the oral and maxillofacial regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Yamauchi, Asanori; Madachi, Fujio; Furuta, Isao

    1988-12-01

    Using the 2-D data provided by CT-Tomography and MRI-tomography of oral and maxillofacial diseases (cyst, benign tumor, primary tumor and regional lymphnodes of malignant tumor), 3-D images were reconstructed and spatial analysis was attempted. We report the general concepts. The hardware used consisted of the Hewlett-Packard HP-9000/300, which utilizes a 16-bit CPU. A digitizer was used to construct 3-D images from serial CT-tomography and MRI-tomography images. Output was displayed on a color monitor and photographs. The 3 cases on which we used this technique included a 19-year-old male with plunging ranula, a 50-year-old male with maxillary pleomorphic adenoma, and a 58-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (T/sub 3/N/sub 3/M/sub 0/). As 3-D reconstruction can be done in any arbitrary direction or cross section, it is possible to spatially determine the position of the disease inside the body, its progression, and its relationship with adjacent organs. Through image analysis, it is possible to better understand the volume and surface area of the disease. 3-D image reconstruction is an effective tool in the determination of diagnosis, therapeutic guidelines, and surgical indications, as well as effectiveness of treatment.

  17. Applications of 3-D reconstruction and 3-D image analysis using computer graphics in surgery of the oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Yamauchi, Asanori; Madachi, Fujio; Furuta, Isao

    1988-01-01

    Using the 2-D data provided by CT-Tomography and MRI-tomography of oral and maxillofacial diseases (cyst, benign tumor, primary tumor and regional lymphnodes of malignant tumor), 3-D images were reconstructed and spatial analysis was attempted. We report the general concepts. The hardware used consisted of the Hewlett-Packard HP-9000/300, which utilizes a 16-bit CPU. A digitizer was used to construct 3-D images from serial CT-tomography and MRI-tomography images. Output was displayed on a color monitor and photographs. The 3 cases on which we used this technique included a 19-year-old male with plunging ranula, a 50-year-old male with maxillary pleomorphic adenoma, and a 58-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (T 3 N 3 M 0 ). As 3-D reconstruction can be done in any arbitrary direction or cross section, it is possible to spatially determine the position of the disease inside the body, its progression, and its relationship with adjacent organs. Through image analysis, it is possible to better understand the volume and surface area of the disease. 3-D image reconstruction is an effective tool in the determination of diagnosis, therapeutic guidelines, and surgical indications, as well as effectiveness of treatment. (author)

  18. Implementation of Headtracking and 3D Stereo with Unity and VRPN for Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores low-cost hardware and software methods to provide depth cues traditionally absent in monocular displays. The use of a VRPN server in conjunction with a Microsoft Kinect and/or Nintendo Wiimote to provide head tracking information to a Unity application, and NVIDIA 3D Vision for retinal disparity support, is discussed. Methods are suggested to implement this technology with NASA's EDGE simulation graphics package, along with potential caveats. Finally, future applications of this technology to astronaut crew training, particularly when combined with an omnidirectional treadmill for virtual locomotion and NASA's ARGOS system for reduced gravity simulation, are discussed.

  19. 3D-computation of a thermal process in a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study deals with the resistive zone propagation in a superconducting coil during a quench, taking into account both the flux density distribution and the anisotropy of the thermal parameters. A Finite Difference Method is used to solve the heat diffusion equation and the flux density is calculated by means of a semi-analytical method. The 3-D model is suitable to describe the quench of thick coils and it can be applied to the study of thermal stability. As an application, a 10 kJ-solenoid is studied

  20. COMPUTER GRAPHICS MEETS IMAGE FUSION: THE POWER OF TEXTURE BAKING TO SIMULTANEOUSLY VISUALISE 3D SURFACE FEATURES AND COLOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Verhoeven

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  1. Computer Graphics Meets Image Fusion: the Power of Texture Baking to Simultaneously Visualise 3d Surface Features and Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM) approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D) digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  2. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-01-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants. (paper)

  3. Speech-enabled Computer-aided Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesa-Lao, Bartolomé

    2014-01-01

    The present study has surveyed post-editor trainees’ views and attitudes before and after the introduction of speech technology as a front end to a computer-aided translation workbench. The aim of the survey was (i) to identify attitudes and perceptions among post-editor trainees before performing...... a post-editing task using automatic speech recognition (ASR); and (ii) to assess the degree to which post-editors’ attitudes and expectations to the use of speech technology changed after actually using it. The survey was based on two questionnaires: the first one administered before the participants...

  4. FLASHRAD: A 3D Rad Hard Memory Module For High Performance Space Computers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The computing capabilities of onboard spacecraft are a major limiting factor for accomplishing many classes of future missions. Although technology development...

  5. Computer assisted surgery with 3D robot models and visualisation of the telesurgical action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the support of virtual reality computer action in the procedures of surgical robotics. Computer support gives a direct representation of the surgical theatre. The modelization of the procedure in course and in development gives a psychological reaction towards safety and reliability. Robots similar to the ones used by the manufacturing industry can be used with little modification as very effective surgical tools. They have high precision, repeatability and are versatile in integrating with the medical instrumentation. Now integrated surgical rooms, with computer and robot-assisted intervention, are operating. The computer is the element for a decision taking aid, and the robot works as a very effective tool.

  6. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 μm where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force

  7. Computational Finite Element Software Assisted Development of a 3D Inductively Coupled Power Transfer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Raval

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To date inductively coupled power transfer (ICPT systems have already found many practical applications including battery charging pads. In fact, current charging platforms tend to largely support only one- or two-dimensional planar movement in load. This paper proposes a new concept of extending the aspect ratios of the operating power transfer volume of ICPT systems to support arbitrary three dimensional load movements with respect to the primary coils. This is done by use of modern finite element method analysis software to propose the primary and secondary magnetic structures of such an ICPT system. Firstly, two primary magnetic structures are proposed based on contrasting modes of operation and different field directions. This includes a single-phase and multi-phase current model. Next, a secondary magnetic structure is customized to be compatible with both primary structures. The resulting system is shown to produce a 3D power transfer volume for battery cell charging applications.

  8. Computer Tool for Automatically Generated 3D Illustration in Real Time from Archaeological Scanned Pieces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis López

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The graphical documentation process of archaeological pieces requires the active involvement of a professional artist to recreate beautiful illustrations using a wide variety of expressive techniques. Frequently, the artist’s work is limited by the inconvenience of working only with the photographs of the pieces he is going to illustrate. This paper presents a software tool that allows the easy generation of illustrations in real time from 3D scanned models. The developed interface allows the user to simulate very elaborate artistic styles through the creation of diagrams by using the available virtual lights. The software processes the diagrams to render an illustration from any given angle or position. Among the available virtual lights, there are well known techniques as silhouettes enhancement, hatching or toon shading.

  9. The history and principles of optical computed tomography for scanning 3-D radiation dosimeters: 2008 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The current status of optical CT for 3-D radiation dosimetry is reviewed. The technique is first placed in its historical context, pointing out the relationship with other methods of optical imaging and showing how optical-CT has emerged independently in several different fields and under different names. The theoretical background of the method is described briefly and this provides the foundation for an explanation of the different types of scanner. The relative advantages and disadvantages of instruments based on scanned lasers and pixelated (area) detectors are presented. The latest generation of 'fast laser scanners' is described and the review is concluded with a discussion of the different radiation-sensitive materials used as samples in optical CT.

  10. An Effective Approach of Teeth Segmentation within the 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Based on Deformable Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xutang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to extract the pixels of teeth from 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT image, in this paper, a novel 3D segmentation approach based on deformable surface mode is developed for 3D tooth model reconstruction. Different forces are formulated to handle the segmentation problem by using different strategies. First, the proposed method estimates the deformation force of vertex model by simulating the deformation process of a bubble under the action of internal pressure and external force field. To handle the blurry boundary, a “braking force” is proposed deriving from the 3D gradient information calculated by transforming the Sobel operator into three-dimension representation. In addition, a “border reinforcement” strategy is developed for handling the cases with complicate structures. Moreover, the proposed method combines affine cell image decomposition (ACID grid reparameterization technique to handle the unstable changes of topological structure and deformability during the deformation process. The proposed method was performed on 510 CBCT images. To validate the performance, the results were compared with those of two other well-studied methods. Experimental results show that the proposed approach had a good performance in handling the cases with complicate structures and blurry boundaries well, is effective to converge, and can successfully achieve the reconstruction task of various types of teeth in oral cavity.

  11. Cusps enable line attractors for neural computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zhuocheng; Zhang, Jiwei; Sornborger, Andrew T.; Tao, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Here, line attractors in neuronal networks have been suggested to be the basis of many brain functions, such as working memory, oculomotor control, head movement, locomotion, and sensory processing. In this paper, we make the connection between line attractors and pulse gating in feed-forward neuronal networks. In this context, because of their neutral stability along a one-dimensional manifold, line attractors are associated with a time-translational invariance that allows graded information to be propagated from one neuronal population to the next. To understand how pulse-gating manifests itself in a high-dimensional, nonlinear, feedforward integrate-and-fire network, we use a Fokker-Planck approach to analyze system dynamics. We make a connection between pulse-gated propagation in the Fokker-Planck and population-averaged mean-field (firing rate) models, and then identify an approximate line attractor in state space as the essential structure underlying graded information propagation. An analysis of the line attractor shows that it consists of three fixed points: a central saddle with an unstable manifold along the line and stable manifolds orthogonal to the line, which is surrounded on either side by stable fixed points. Along the manifold defined by the fixed points, slow dynamics give rise to a ghost. We show that this line attractor arises at a cusp catastrophe, where a fold bifurcation develops as a function of synaptic noise; and that the ghost dynamics near the fold of the cusp underly the robustness of the line attractor. Understanding the dynamical aspects of this cusp catastrophe allows us to show how line attractors can persist in biologically realistic neuronal networks and how the interplay of pulse gating, synaptic coupling, and neuronal stochasticity can be used to enable attracting one-dimensional manifolds and, thus, dynamically control the processing of graded information.

  12. Cusps enable line attractors for neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhuocheng; Zhang, Jiwei; Sornborger, Andrew T.; Tao, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Line attractors in neuronal networks have been suggested to be the basis of many brain functions, such as working memory, oculomotor control, head movement, locomotion, and sensory processing. In this paper, we make the connection between line attractors and pulse gating in feed-forward neuronal networks. In this context, because of their neutral stability along a one-dimensional manifold, line attractors are associated with a time-translational invariance that allows graded information to be propagated from one neuronal population to the next. To understand how pulse-gating manifests itself in a high-dimensional, nonlinear, feedforward integrate-and-fire network, we use a Fokker-Planck approach to analyze system dynamics. We make a connection between pulse-gated propagation in the Fokker-Planck and population-averaged mean-field (firing rate) models, and then identify an approximate line attractor in state space as the essential structure underlying graded information propagation. An analysis of the line attractor shows that it consists of three fixed points: a central saddle with an unstable manifold along the line and stable manifolds orthogonal to the line, which is surrounded on either side by stable fixed points. Along the manifold defined by the fixed points, slow dynamics give rise to a ghost. We show that this line attractor arises at a cusp catastrophe, where a fold bifurcation develops as a function of synaptic noise; and that the ghost dynamics near the fold of the cusp underly the robustness of the line attractor. Understanding the dynamical aspects of this cusp catastrophe allows us to show how line attractors can persist in biologically realistic neuronal networks and how the interplay of pulse gating, synaptic coupling, and neuronal stochasticity can be used to enable attracting one-dimensional manifolds and, thus, dynamically control the processing of graded information.

  13. Computer holography: 3D digital art based on high-definition CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, K; Arima, Y; Nishi, H; Yamashita, H; Yoshizaki, Y; Ogawa, K; Nakahara, S

    2013-01-01

    Our recent works of high-definition computer-generated holograms (CGH) and the techniques used for the creation, such as the polygon-based method, silhouette method and digitized holography, are summarized and reviewed in this paper. The concept of computer holography is proposed in terms of integrating and crystalizing the techniques into novel digital art.

  14. A Smart Cage With Uniform Wireless Power Distribution in 3D for Enabling Long-Term Experiments With Freely Moving Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental chamber with uniform wireless power distribution in 3D for enabling long-term biomedical experiments with small freely moving animal subjects. The implemented power transmission chamber prototype is based on arrays of parallel resonators and multicoil inductive links, to form a novel and highly efficient wireless power transmission system. The power transmitter unit includes several identical resonators enclosed in a scalable array of overlapping square coils which are connected in parallel to provide uniform power distribution along x and y. Moreover, the proposed chamber uses two arrays of primary resonators, facing each other, and connected in parallel to achieve uniform power distribution along the z axis. Each surface includes 9 overlapped coils connected in parallel and implemented into two layers of FR4 printed circuit board. The chamber features a natural power localization mechanism, which simplifies its implementation and ease its operation by avoiding the need for active detection and control mechanisms. A single power surface based on the proposed approach can provide a power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 69% and a power delivered to the load (PDL) of 120 mW, for a separation distance of 4 cm, whereas the complete chamber prototype provides a uniform PTE of 59% and a PDL of 100 mW in 3D, everywhere inside the chamber with a size of 27×27×16 cm(3).

  15. A novel structured dictionary for fast processing of 3D medical images, with application to computed tomography restoration and denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Davood; Ward, Rabab K.

    2016-03-01

    Sparse representation of signals in learned overcomplete dictionaries has proven to be a powerful tool with applications in denoising, restoration, compression, reconstruction, and more. Recent research has shown that learned overcomplete dictionaries can lead to better results than analytical dictionaries such as wavelets in almost all image processing applications. However, a major disadvantage of these dictionaries is that their learning and usage is very computationally intensive. In particular, finding the sparse representation of a signal in these dictionaries requires solving an optimization problem that leads to very long computational times, especially in 3D image processing. Moreover, the sparse representation found by greedy algorithms is usually sub-optimal. In this paper, we propose a novel two-level dictionary structure that improves the performance and the speed of standard greedy sparse coding methods. The first (i.e., the top) level in our dictionary is a fixed orthonormal basis, whereas the second level includes the atoms that are learned from the training data. We explain how such a dictionary can be learned from the training data and how the sparse representation of a new signal in this dictionary can be computed. As an application, we use the proposed dictionary structure for removing the noise and artifacts in 3D computed tomography (CT) images. Our experiments with real CT images show that the proposed method achieves results that are comparable with standard dictionary-based methods while substantially reducing the computational time.

  16. 3D CFD computations of trasitional flows using DES and a correlation based transition model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Zahle, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    a circular cylinder from Re = 10 to 1 × 106 reproducing the cylinder drag crisis. The computations show good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the behaviour seen in experiments. This case shows that the methodology performs smoothly from the laminar cases at low Re to the turbulent cases at high Re......The present article describes the application of the correlation based transition model of Menter et al. in combination with the Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) methodology to two cases with large degree of flow separation typically considered difficult to compute. Firstly, the flow is computed over...

  17. Teaching 3D computer animation to illustrators: the instructor as translator and technical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Wobbe F

    2012-01-01

    An art instructor discusses the difficulties he's encountered teaching computer graphics skills to undergraduate art students. To help the students, he introduced an automated-rigging script for character animation.

  18. Introduction to programmable shader in real time 3D computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Syuhei; Kirii, Keisuke; Matsumura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Kenichiro

    2004-01-01

    Nevertheless the visualization of large-scale data had played the important role which influences informational usefulness in the basic field of science, the high-end graphics system or the exclusive system needed to be used. On the other hand, in recent years, the progress speed of the capability of the video game console or the graphics board for PC has a remarkable thing reflecting the expansion tendency of TV game market in and outside the country. Especially, the ''programmable shader'' technology in which the several graphics chip maker has started implementation is the innovative technology which can also be called change of generation of real-time 3D graphics, and the scope of the visual expression technique has spread greatly. However, it cannot say that the development/use environment of software which used programmable shader are fully generalized, and the present condition is that the grope of the applied technology to overly the ultra high-speed/quality visualization of large-scale data is not prograssing. We provide the outline of programmable shader technology and consider the possibility of the application to large-scale data visualization. (author)

  19. Systematic Standardized and Individualized Assessment of Masticatory Cycles Using Electromagnetic 3D Articulography and Computer Scripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Fuentes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory movements are studied for decades in odontology; a better understanding of them could improve dental treatments. The aim of this study was to describe an innovative, accurate, and systematic method of analyzing masticatory cycles, generating comparable quantitative data. The masticatory cycles of 5 volunteers (Class I, 19 ± 1.7 years without articular or dental occlusion problems were evaluated using 3D electromagnetic articulography supported by MATLAB software. The method allows the trajectory morphology of the set of chewing cycles to be analyzed from different views and angles. It was also possible to individualize the trajectory of each cycle providing accurate quantitative data, such as number of cycles, cycle areas in frontal view, and the ratio between each cycle area and the frontal mandibular border movement area. There was a moderate negative correlation (−0.61 between the area and the number of cycles: the greater the cycle area, the smaller the number of repetitions. Finally it was possible to evaluate the area of the cycles through time, which did not reveal a standardized behavior. The proposed method provided reproducible, intelligible, and accurate quantitative and graphical data, suggesting that it is promising and may be applied in different clinical situations and treatments.

  20. Uav and Computer Vision, Detection of Infrastructure Losses and 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrile, V.; Bilotta, G.; Nunnari, A.

    2017-11-01

    The degradation of buildings, or rather the decline of their initial performances following external agents both natural (cold-thaw, earthquake, salt, etc.) and artificial (industrial field, urban setting, etc.), in the years lead to the necessity of developing Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) intended to give useful information for an explanation of a potential deterioration without damaging the state of buildings. An accurate examination of damages, of the repeat of cracks in condition of similar stress, indicate the existence of principles that control the creation of these events. There is no doubt that a precise visual analysis is at the bottom of a correct evaluation of the building. This paper deals with the creation of 3D models based on the capture of digital images, through autopilot flight UAV, for civil buildings situated on the area of Reggio Calabria. The following elaboration is done thanks to the use of commercial software, based on specific algorithms of the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique. SfM represents an important progress in the aerial and terrestrial survey field obtaining results, in terms of time and quality, comparable to those achievable through more traditional data capture methodologies.

  1. UAV AND COMPUTER VISION, DETECTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE LOSSES AND 3D MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barrile

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of buildings, or rather the decline of their initial performances following external agents both natural (cold-thaw, earthquake, salt, etc. and artificial (industrial field, urban setting, etc., in the years lead to the necessity of developing Non-Destructive Testing (NDT intended to give useful information for an explanation of a potential deterioration without damaging the state of buildings. An accurate examination of damages, of the repeat of cracks in condition of similar stress, indicate the existence of principles that control the creation of these events. There is no doubt that a precise visual analysis is at the bottom of a correct evaluation of the building. This paper deals with the creation of 3D models based on the capture of digital images, through autopilot flight UAV, for civil buildings situated on the area of Reggio Calabria. The following elaboration is done thanks to the use of commercial software, based on specific algorithms of the Structure from Motion (SfM technique. SfM represents an important progress in the aerial and terrestrial survey field obtaining results, in terms of time and quality, comparable to those achievable through more traditional data capture methodologies.

  2. A computational framework for 3D mechanical modeling of plant morphogenesis with cellular resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Boudon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth.

  3. Association of achondroplasia with Down syndrome: difficulty in prenatal diagnosis by sonographic and 3-D helical computed tomographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Akimune; Murotsuki, Jun; Kamimura, Miki; Kimura, Masato; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Kanno, Junko; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia and Down syndrome are relatively common conditions individually. But co-occurrence of both conditions in the same patient is rare and there have been no reports of fetal analysis of this condition by prenatal sonographic and three-dimensional (3-D) helical computed tomography (CT). Prenatal sonographic findings seen in persons with Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, cardiac defects, and echogenic bowel were not found in the patient. A prenatal 3-D helical CT revealed a large head with frontal bossing, metaphyseal flaring of the long bones, and small iliac wings, which suggested achondroplasia. In a case with combination of achondroplasia and Down syndrome, it may be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence prenatally without typical markers of Down syndrome. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  4. Comparison of surface extraction techniques performance in computed tomography for 3D complex micro-geometry dimensional measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torralba, Marta; Jiménez, Roberto; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2018-01-01

    micro-geometries as well (i.e., in the sub-mm dimensional range). However, there are different factors that may influence the CT process performance, being one of them the surface extraction technique used. In this paper, two different extraction techniques are applied to measure a complex miniaturized......The number of industrial applications of computed tomography (CT) for dimensional metrology in 100–103 mm range has been continuously increasing, especially in the last years. Due to its specific characteristics, CT has the potential to be employed as a viable solution for measuring 3D complex...... dental file by CT in order to analyze its contribution to the final measurement uncertainty in complex geometries at the mm to sub-mm scales. The first method is based on a similarity analysis: the threshold determination; while the second one is based on a gradient or discontinuity analysis: the 3D...

  5. 3D hierarchical computational model of wood as a cellular material with fibril reinforced, heterogeneous multiple layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A 3D hierarchical computational model of deformation and stiffness of wood, which takes into account the structures of wood at several scale levels (cellularity, multilayered nature of cell walls, composite-like structures of the wall layers) is developed. At the mesoscale, the softwood cell...... cellular model. With the use of the developed hierarchical model, the influence of the microstructure, including microfibril angles (MFAs, which characterizes the orientation of the cellulose fibrils with respect to the cell axis), the thickness of the cell wall, the shape of the cell cross...... is presented as a 3D hexagon-shape-tube with multilayered walls. The layers in the softwood cell are considered as considered as composite reinforced by microfibrils (celluloses). The elastic properties of the layers are determined with Halpin–Tsai equations, and introduced into mesoscale finite element...

  6. Reducing computational costs in large scale 3D EIT by using a sparse Jacobian matrix with block-wise CGLS reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C L; Wei, H Y; Soleimani, M; Adler, A

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a fast and cost-effective technique to provide a tomographic conductivity image of a subject from boundary current–voltage data. This paper proposes a time and memory efficient method for solving a large scale 3D EIT inverse problem using a parallel conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. The 3D EIT system with a large number of measurement data can produce a large size of Jacobian matrix; this could cause difficulties in computer storage and the inversion process. One of challenges in 3D EIT is to decrease the reconstruction time and memory usage, at the same time retaining the image quality. Firstly, a sparse matrix reduction technique is proposed using thresholding to set very small values of the Jacobian matrix to zero. By adjusting the Jacobian matrix into a sparse format, the element with zeros would be eliminated, which results in a saving of memory requirement. Secondly, a block-wise CG method for parallel reconstruction has been developed. The proposed method has been tested using simulated data as well as experimental test samples. Sparse Jacobian with a block-wise CG enables the large scale EIT problem to be solved efficiently. Image quality measures are presented to quantify the effect of sparse matrix reduction in reconstruction results. (paper)

  7. Reducing computational costs in large scale 3D EIT by using a sparse Jacobian matrix with block-wise CGLS reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C L; Wei, H Y; Adler, A; Soleimani, M

    2013-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a fast and cost-effective technique to provide a tomographic conductivity image of a subject from boundary current-voltage data. This paper proposes a time and memory efficient method for solving a large scale 3D EIT inverse problem using a parallel conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. The 3D EIT system with a large number of measurement data can produce a large size of Jacobian matrix; this could cause difficulties in computer storage and the inversion process. One of challenges in 3D EIT is to decrease the reconstruction time and memory usage, at the same time retaining the image quality. Firstly, a sparse matrix reduction technique is proposed using thresholding to set very small values of the Jacobian matrix to zero. By adjusting the Jacobian matrix into a sparse format, the element with zeros would be eliminated, which results in a saving of memory requirement. Secondly, a block-wise CG method for parallel reconstruction has been developed. The proposed method has been tested using simulated data as well as experimental test samples. Sparse Jacobian with a block-wise CG enables the large scale EIT problem to be solved efficiently. Image quality measures are presented to quantify the effect of sparse matrix reduction in reconstruction results.

  8. Memory allocation and computations for Laplace’s equation of 3-D arbitrary boundary problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsay Tswn-Syau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computation iteration schemes and memory allocation technique for finite difference method were presented in this paper. The transformed form of a groundwater flow problem in the generalized curvilinear coordinates was taken to be the illustrating example and a 3-dimensional second order accurate 19-point scheme was presented. Traditional element-by-element methods (e.g. SOR are preferred since it is simple and memory efficient but time consuming in computation. For efficient memory allocation, an index method was presented to store the sparse non-symmetric matrix of the problem. For computations, conjugate-gradient-like methods were reported to be computationally efficient. Among them, using incomplete Choleski decomposition as preconditioner was reported to be good method for iteration convergence. In general, the developed index method in this paper has the following advantages: (1 adaptable to various governing and boundary conditions, (2 flexible for higher order approximation, (3 independence of problem dimension, (4 efficient for complex problems when global matrix is not symmetric, (5 convenience for general sparse matrices, (6 computationally efficient in the most time consuming procedure of matrix multiplication, and (7 applicable to any developed matrix solver.

  9. Validation of MCNP and ORIGEN-S 3-D computational model for reactivity predictions during BR2 operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Ponsard, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Belgian Material Test Reactor (MTR) BR2 is strongly heterogeneous high flux engineering test reactor at SCK-CEN (Centre d'Etude de l'energie Nucleaire) in Mol at a thermal power 60 to 100 MW. It deploys highly enriched uranium, water cooled concentric plate fuel elements, positioned inside a beryllium reflector with complex hyperboloid arrangement of test holes. The objective of this paper is the validation of a MCNP and ORIGEN-S 3D model for reactivity predictions of the entire BR2 core during reactor operation. We employ the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C for evaluating the effective multiplication factor k eff and 3D space dependent specific power distribution. The 1D code ORIGEN-S is used for calculation of isotopic fuel depletion versus burn up and preparation of a database (DB) with depleted fuel compositions. The approach taken is to evaluate the 3D power distribution at each time step and along with DB to evaluate the 3D isotopic fuel depletion at the next step and to deduce the corresponding shim rods positions of the reactor operation. The capabilities of the both codes are fully exploited without constraints on the number of involved isotope depletion chains or increase of the computational time. The reactor has a complex operation, with important shutdowns between cycles, and its reactivity is strongly influenced by poisons, mainly 3 He and 6 Li from the beryllium reflector, and burnable absorbers 149 Sm and 10 B in the fresh UAlx fuel. Our computational predictions for the shim rods position at various restarts are within 0.5$ (β eff =0.0072). (author)

  10. Computation of 3D steady Navier-Stokes flow with free-surface gravity waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.R.; Koren, B.; Raven, H.C.; Armfield, S.; Morgan, P.; Srinivas, K,

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an iterative method for the computation of stationary gravity-wave solutions is investigated, using a novel formulation of the free-surface (FS) boundary-value problem. This method requires the solution of a sequence of stationary Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes subproblems employing

  11. Computation of 3D steady Navier-Stokes flow with free-surface gravity waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Lewis; B. Koren (Barry); H.C. Raven

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper an iterative method for the computation of stationary gravity-wave solutions is investigated, using a novel formulation of the free-surface (FS) boundary-value problem. This method requires the solution of a sequence of stationary Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes subproblems

  12. A computationally efficient 3D finite-volume scheme for violent liquid–gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oxtoby, Oliver F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a semi-implicit volume-of-fluid free-surface-modelling methodology for flow problems involving violent free-surface motion. For efficient computation, a hybrid-unstructured edge-based vertex-centred finite volume discretisation...

  13. Point Cloud-Based Automatic Assessment of 3D Computer Animation Courseworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Gianluca; Lamberti, Fabrizio; Gatteschi, Valentina; Demartini, Claudio; Montuschi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Computer-supported assessment tools can bring significant benefits to both students and teachers. When integrated in traditional education workflows, they may help to reduce the time required to perform the evaluation and consolidate the perception of fairness of the overall process. When integrated within on-line intelligent tutoring systems,…

  14. Workflow Support for Advanced Grid-Enabled Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fenglian; Eres, M.H.; Tao, Feng; Cox, Simon J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geodise project brings computer scientists and engineer's skills together to build up a service-oriented computing environmnet for engineers to perform complicated computations in a distributed system. The workflow tool is a front GUI to provide a full life cycle of workflow functions for Grid-enabled computing. The full life cycle of workflow functions have been enhanced based our initial research and development. The life cycle starts with a composition of a workflow, followed by an ins...

  15. Solving linear systems in FLICA-4, thermohydraulic code for 3-D transient computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaire, G.

    1995-01-01

    FLICA-4 is a computer code, developed at the CEA (France), devoted to steady state and transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor cores, for small size problems (around 100 mesh cells) as well as for large ones (more than 100000), on, either standard workstations or vector super-computers. As for time implicit codes, the largest time and memory consuming part of FLICA-4 is the routine dedicated to solve the linear system (the size of which is of the order of the number of cells). Therefore, the efficiency of the code is crucially influenced by the optimization of the algorithms used in assembling and solving linear systems: direct methods as the Gauss (or LU) decomposition for moderate size problems, iterative methods as the preconditioned conjugate gradient for large problems. 6 figs., 13 refs

  16. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  17. 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamic Computations Using Lattice-QCD-Inspired Equations of State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Yogiro; Andrade, Rone P.G.; Grassi, Frederique; Socolowski, Otavio; Kodama, Takeshi; Tavares, Bernardo; Padula, Sandra S.

    2006-01-01

    In this communication, we report results of three-dimensional hydrodynamic computations, by using equations of state with a critical end point as suggested by the lattice QCD. Some of the results are an increase of the multiplicity in the mid-rapidity region and a larger elliptic-flow parameter v 2 . We discuss also the effcts of the initial-condition fluctuations and the continuous emission

  18. 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamic Computations Using Lattice-QCD-Inspired Equations of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, Yogiro [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Andrade, Rone P.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Grassi, Frederique [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Socolowski, Otavio [Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica (Brazil); Kodama, Takeshi [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tavares, Bernardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Padula, Sandra S. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Brazil)

    2006-08-07

    In this communication, we report results of three-dimensional hydrodynamic computations, by using equations of state with a critical end point as suggested by the lattice QCD. Some of the results are an increase of the multiplicity in the mid-rapidity region and a larger elliptic-flow parameter v{sub 2}. We discuss also the effcts of the initial-condition fluctuations and the continuous emission.

  19. High-contrast differentiation resolution 3D imaging of rodent brain by X-ray computed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zikmund, T.; Novotná, M.; Kavková, M.; Tesařová, M.; Kaucká, M.; Szarowská, B.; Idameyko, I.; Hrubá, Eva; Buchtová, Marcela; Dražanová, Eva; Starčuk, Zenon; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2018), č. článku C02039. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-37368G Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : computerized tomography * computed radiography * MRI Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  20. The application of the 3D transient computational fluid dynamics to the radionuclide dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eliene B.S. da; Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de

    2013-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) provides powerful tools for the study of dispersion of radionuclides, including problems where there is radioactive decay. This work presents a treatment to the dispersion of radionuclides through the usage of CFD, namely from the internal dispersion to the external one through either atmospheric or aquatic via. The first one is of fundamental importance, for example, to optimize the design of a room that will shelter the radioactive material, with the intent of aiming at the safety and the minimization of the dose in case of dispersion. The second one concerns the external dispersion, being of major relevance in accidents with releasing out from nuclear power plants, in order to study the safety analysis and also the environmental impact in the surroundings of the installation. In this work, the equations governing momentum, energy and transport with decay of radioactive materials are discretized in order that numerical solutions can be obtained. Finite element meshes and techniques for parallel and distributed computing are combined into a computer code, designed to take into account the effect of turbulence locally in the dispersion of the radioactive material released. Additionally, the code developed employs Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulence. (author)

  1. Reduction of metal artifact in three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) with dental impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W S; Kim, K D; Shin, H K; Lee, S H

    2007-01-01

    Metal Artifact still remains one of the main drawbacks in craniofacial Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D CT). In this study, we tried to test the efficacy of additional silicone dental impression materials as a "tooth shield" for the reduction of metal artifact caused by metal restorations and orthodontic appliances. 6 phantoms with 4 teeth were prepared for this in vitro study. Orthodontic bracket, bands and amalgam restorations were placed in each tooth to reproduce various intraoral conditions. Standardized silicone shields were fabricated and placed around the teeth. CT image acquisition was performed with and without silicone shields. Maximum value, mean, and standard deviation of Hounsfield Units (HU) were compared with the presence of silicone shields. In every situation, metal artifacts were reduced in quality and quantity when silicone shields are used. Amalgam restoration made most serious metal artifact. Silicone shields made by dental impression material might be effective way to reduce the metal artifact caused by dental restoration and orthodontic appliances. This will help more excellent 3D image from 3D CT in craniofacial area.

  2. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  3. The simulation methods based on 1D/3D collaborative computing for the vehicle integrated thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Pengyu; Gao, Qing; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1D/3D collaborative computing simulation method for vehicle thermal management. • Analyzing the influence of the thermodynamic systems and the engine compartment geometry on the vehicle performance. • Providing the basis for the matching energy consumptions of thermodynamic systems in the underhood. - Abstract: The vehicle integrated thermal management containing the engine cooling circuit, the air conditioning circuit, the turbocharged inter-cooled circuit, the engine lubrication circuit etc. is the important means of enhancing power performance, promoting economy, saving energy and reducing emission. In this study, a 1D/3D collaborative simulation method is proposed with the engine cooling circuit and air conditioning circuit being the research object. The mathematical characterizations of the multiple thermodynamic systems are achieved by 1D calculation and the underhood structure is described by 3D simulation. Through analyzing the engine compartment integrated heat transfer process, the model of the integrated thermal management system is formed after coupling the cooling circuit and air conditioning circuit. This collaborative simulation method establishes structured correlation of engine-cooling and air conditioning thermal dissipation in the engine compartment, comprehensively analyzing the engine working process and air condition operational process in order to research the interaction effect of them. In the calculation examples, to achieve the integrated optimization of multiple thermal systems design and performance prediction, by describing the influence of system thermomechanical parameters and operating duty to underhood heat transfer process, performance evaluation of the engine cooling circuit and the air conditioning circuit are realized.

  4. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system with a 3D algorithm for small acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Fernandez, James; Deshpande, Ruchi; Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Acute Intracranial hemorrhage (AIH) requires urgent diagnosis in the emergency setting to mitigate eventual sequelae. However, experienced radiologists may not always be available to make a timely diagnosis. This is especially true for small AIH, defined as lesion smaller than 10 mm in size. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the detection of small AIH would facilitate timely diagnosis. A previously developed 2D algorithm shows high false positive rates in the evaluation based on LAC/USC cases, due to the limitation of setting up correct coordinate system for the knowledge-based classification system. To achieve a higher sensitivity and specificity, a new 3D algorithm is developed. The algorithm utilizes a top-hat transformation and dynamic threshold map to detect small AIH lesions. Several key structures of brain are detected and are used to set up a 3D anatomical coordinate system. A rule-based classification of the lesion detected is applied based on the anatomical coordinate system. For convenient evaluation in clinical environment, the CAD module is integrated with a stand-alone system. The CAD is evaluated by small AIH cases and matched normal collected in LAC/USC. The result of 3D CAD and the previous 2D CAD has been compared.

  5. 3D Computer graphics simulation to obtain optimal surgical exposure during microvascular decompression of the glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Matsushima, Toshio; Kawashima, Masatou; Nakahara, Yukiko; Takahashi, Yuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Oishi, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2013-10-01

    The affected artery in glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) is most often the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from the caudal side or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) from the rostral side. This technical report describes two representative cases of GPN, one with PICA as the affected artery and the other with AICA, and demonstrates the optimal approach for each affected artery. We used 3D computer graphics (3D CG) simulation to consider the ideal transposition of the affected artery in any position and approach. Subsequently, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery based on this simulation. For PICA, we used the transcondylar fossa approach in the lateral recumbent position, very close to the prone position, with the patient's head tilted anteriorly for caudal transposition of PICA. In contrast, for AICA, we adopted a lateral suboccipital approach with opening of the lateral cerebellomedullary fissure, to visualize better the root entry zone of the glossopharyngeal nerve and to obtain a wide working space in the cerebellomedullary cistern, for rostral transposition of AICA. Both procedures were performed successfully. The best surgical approach for MVD in patients with GPN is contingent on the affected artery--PICA or AICA. 3D CG simulation provides tailored approach for MVD of the glossopharyngeal nerve, thereby ensuring optimal surgical exposure.

  6. μCT of ex-vivo stained mouse hearts and embryos enables a precise match between 3D virtual histology, classical histology and immunochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Emanuel; Martin, Sabine; Lazzarini, Marcio; Tromba, Giuliana; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Pinkert-Leetsch, Diana; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Alves, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    The small size of the adult and developing mouse heart poses a great challenge for imaging in preclinical research. The aim of the study was to establish a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) ex-vivo staining approach that efficiently enhances the x-ray attenuation of soft-tissue to allow high resolution 3D visualization of mouse hearts by synchrotron radiation based μCT (SRμCT) and classical μCT. We demonstrate that SRμCT of PTA stained mouse hearts ex-vivo allows imaging of the cardiac atrium, ventricles, myocardium especially its fibre structure and vessel walls in great detail and furthermore enables the depiction of growth and anatomical changes during distinct developmental stages of hearts in mouse embryos. Our x-ray based virtual histology approach is not limited to SRμCT as it does not require monochromatic and/or coherent x-ray sources and even more importantly can be combined with conventional histological procedures. Furthermore, it permits volumetric measurements as we show for the assessment of the plaque volumes in the aortic valve region of mice from an ApoE-/- mouse model. Subsequent, Masson-Goldner trichrome staining of paraffin sections of PTA stained samples revealed intact collagen and muscle fibres and positive staining of CD31 on endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry illustrates that our approach does not prevent immunochemistry analysis. The feasibility to scan hearts already embedded in paraffin ensured a 100% correlation between virtual cut sections of the CT data sets and histological heart sections of the same sample and may allow in future guiding the cutting process to specific regions of interest. In summary, since our CT based virtual histology approach is a powerful tool for the 3D depiction of morphological alterations in hearts and embryos in high resolution and can be combined with classical histological analysis it may be used in preclinical research to unravel structural alterations of various heart diseases. PMID:28178293

  7. Ultrafast layer based computer-generated hologram calculation with sparse template holographic fringe pattern for 3-D object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Gu; Man Ro, Yong

    2017-11-27

    In this paper, we propose a new ultrafast layer based CGH calculation that exploits the sparsity of hologram fringe pattern in 3-D object layer. Specifically, we devise a sparse template holographic fringe pattern. The holographic fringe pattern on a depth layer can be rapidly calculated by adding the sparse template holographic fringe patterns at each object point position. Since the size of sparse template holographic fringe pattern is much smaller than that of the CGH plane, the computational load can be significantly reduced. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves 10-20 msec for 1024x1024 pixels providing visually plausible results.

  8. Using the Microsoft Kinect™ to assess 3-D shoulder kinematics during computer use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Robertson, Michelle; Chen, Karen B; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-11-01

    Shoulder joint kinematics has been used as a representative indicator to investigate musculoskeletal symptoms among computer users for office ergonomics studies. The traditional measurement of shoulder kinematics normally requires a laboratory-based motion tracking system which limits the field studies. In the current study, a portable, low cost, and marker-less Microsoft Kinect™ sensor was examined for its feasibility on shoulder kinematics measurement during computer tasks. Eleven healthy participants performed a standardized computer task, and their shoulder kinematics data were measured by a Kinect sensor and a motion tracking system concurrently. The results indicated that placing the Kinect sensor in front of the participants would yielded a more accurate shoulder kinematics measurements then placing the Kinect sensor 15° or 30° to one side. The results also showed that the Kinect sensor had a better estimate on shoulder flexion/extension, compared with shoulder adduction/abduction and shoulder axial rotation. The RMSE of front-placed Kinect sensor on shoulder flexion/extension was less than 10° for both the right and the left shoulder. The measurement error of the front-placed Kinect sensor on the shoulder adduction/abduction was approximately 10° to 15°, and the magnitude of error is proportional to the magnitude of that joint angle. After the calibration, the RMSE on shoulder adduction/abduction were less than 10° based on an independent dataset of 5 additional participants. For shoulder axial rotation, the RMSE of front-placed Kinect sensor ranged between approximately 15° to 30°. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor can provide some insight on shoulder kinematics for improving office ergonomics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical application of 3D computer simulation for upper limb surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Tsuyoshi; Moritomo, Hisao; Oka, Kunihiro; Arimitsu, Sayuri; Shimada, Kozo

    2008-01-01

    To perform precise orthopaedic surgery, we have been developing a surgical method using a custom-made surgical device designed based on preoperative three-dimensional computer simulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preliminary results of its clinical application for corrective osteotomy of the upper extremity. Twenty patients with long bone deformities of the upper extremities (four cubitus varus deformities, nine malunited forearm fractures, six malunited distal radial fractures and one congenital deformity of the forearm) participated in this study. Three-dimensional computer models of the affected bone and the contralateral normal bone were constructed from computed tomography data. By comparing these models, the three-dimensional deformity axis and the accurate amount of deformity around it were quantified. Three-dimensional deformity correction was then simulated. A custom-made osteotomy template was designed and manufactured as a real plastic model aiming to reproduce the preoperative simulation in the actual operation. In the operation, we put the template on the bone surface, cut the bone through a slit on the template, and corrected the deformity as preoperatively simulated, followed by internal fixation. Radiographic and clinical evaluations were made in all cases before surgery and at the most recent follow-up. Corrective osteotomy was achieved as simulated in all cases. All patients had bone fusion within six months. Regarding the cubitus varus deformity, the average carrying angle and tilting angle were 5deg and 28deg after surgery. For malunited forearm fractures, angular deformities on radiographs were nearly nonexistent after surgery. All radiographic parameters in malunited distal radius fractures were normalized. The range of forearm rotation in cases of forearm malunion and that of wrist flexion-extension in cases of malunited distal radius improved after surgery. (author)

  10. Computational Topology Counterexamples with 3D Visualization of Bézier Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available For applications in computing, Bézier curves are pervasive and are defined by a piecewise linear curve L which is embedded in R3 and yields a smooth polynomial curve C embedded in R3. It is of interest to understand when L and C have the same embeddings. One class ofc ounterexamples is shown for L being unknotted, while C is knotted. Another class of counterexamples is created where L is equilateral and simple, while C is self-intersecting. These counterexamples were discovered using curve visualizing software and numerical algorithms that produce general procedures to create more examples.

  11. Computer simulation of 2-D and 3-D ion beam extraction and acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ido, Shunji; Nakajima, Yuji [Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The two-dimensional code and the three-dimensional code have been developed to study the physical features of the ion beams in the extraction and acceleration stages. By using the two-dimensional code, the design of first electrode(plasma grid) is examined in regard to the beam divergence. In the computational studies by using the three-dimensional code, the axis-off model of ion beam is investigated. It is found that the deflection angle of ion beam is proportional to the gap displacement of the electrodes. (author)

  12. How computer science can help in understanding the 3D genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Yoli; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Lio', Pietro

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome conformation capture techniques are producing a huge amount of data about the architecture of our genome. These data can provide us with a better understanding of the events that induce critical regulations of the cellular function from small changes in the three-dimensional genome architecture. Generating a unified view of spatial, temporal, genetic and epigenetic properties poses various challenges of data analysis, visualization, integration and mining, as well as of high performance computing and big data management. Here, we describe the critical issues of this new branch of bioinformatics, oriented at the comprehension of the three-dimensional genome architecture, which we call 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', looking beyond the currently available tools and methods, and highlight yet unaddressed challenges and the potential approaches that could be applied for tackling them. Our review provides a map for researchers interested in using computer science for studying 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', to achieve a better understanding of the biological processes that occur inside the nucleus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Automated Computational Processing of 3-D MR Images of Mouse Brain for Phenotyping of Living Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christopher S; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett; Gonzales, Aaron; Bearer, Elaine L

    2017-07-05

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides a method to obtain anatomical information from the brain in vivo that is not typically available by optical imaging because of this organ's opacity. MR is nondestructive and obtains deep tissue contrast with 100-µm 3 voxel resolution or better. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) may be used to observe axonal transport and localized neural activity in the living rodent and avian brain. Such enhancement enables researchers to investigate differences in functional circuitry or neuronal activity in images of brains of different animals. Moreover, once MR images of a number of animals are aligned into a single matrix, statistical analysis can be done comparing MR intensities between different multi-animal cohorts comprising individuals from different mouse strains or different transgenic animals, or at different time points after an experimental manipulation. Although preprocessing steps for such comparisons (including skull stripping and alignment) are automated for human imaging, no such automated processing has previously been readily available for mouse or other widely used experimental animals, and most investigators use in-house custom processing. This protocol describes a stepwise method to perform such preprocessing for mouse. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. A computer code for the prediction of mill gases and hot air distribution between burners sections as input parameters for 3D CFD furnace calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucakovic, Dragan; Zivanovic, Titoslav; Beloshevic, Srdjan

    2006-01-01

    Current computer technology development enables application of powerful software packages that can provide a reliable insight into real operating conditions of a steam boiler in the Thermal Power Plant. Namely, an application of CFD code to the 3D analysis of combustion and heat transfer in a furnace provides temperature, velocity and concentration fields in both cross sectional and longitudinal planes of the observed furnace. In order to obtain reliable analytical results, which corresponds to real furnace conditions, it is necessary to accurately predict a distribution of mill gases and hot air between burners' sections, because these parameters are input values for the furnace 3D calculation. Regarding these tasks, the computer code for the prediction of mill gases and hot air distribution has been developed at the Department for steam boilers of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. The code is based on simultaneous calculations of material and heat balances for fan mill and air tracts. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology of performed calculations and results obtained for the steam boiler furnace of 350 MWe Thermal Power Plant equipped with eight fan mills. Key words: mill gases, hot air, aerodynamic calculation, air tract, mill tract.

  15. Implementation of a 3D plasma particle-in-cell code on a MIMD parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Lyster, P.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code has been implemented on the Intel Delta MIMD parallel supercomputer using the General Concurrent PIC algorithm. The GCPIC algorithm uses a domain decomposition to divide the computation among the processors: A processor is assigned a subdomain and all the particles in it. Particles must be exchanged between processors as they move. Results are presented comparing the efficiency for 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional partitions of the three dimensional domain. This algorithm has been found to be very efficient even when a large fraction (e.g. 30%) of the particles must be exchanged at every time step. On the 512-node Intel Delta, up to 125 million particles have been pushed with an electrostatic push time of under 500 nsec/particle/time step

  16. Computation of 3-D magnetostatic fields using a reduced scalar potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, O.; Preis, K.; Vrisk, G.; Richter, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents some improvements to the finite element computation of static magnetic fields in three dimensions using a reduced magnetic scalar potential. New methods are described for obtaining an edge element representation of the rotational part of the magnetic field from a given source current distribution. In the case when the current distribution is not known in advance, a boundary value problem is set up in terms of a current vector potential. An edge element representation of the solution can be directly used in the subsequent magnetostatic calculation. The magnetic field in a D.C. arc furnace is calculated by first determining the current distribution in terms of a current vector potential. A three dimensional problem involving a permanent magnet as well as a coil is solved and the magnetic field in some points is compared with measurement results

  17. Characterization of 3-D particle distribution and effects on recrystallization studied by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridy, J.M.; Marthinsen, K.; Rouns, T.N.; Lippert, K.B.; Nes, E.; Richmond, O.

    1992-12-01

    Artificial particle distribution in three dimensions with different degree of clustering have been generated and used as nucleation sites for the simulation of particle stimulated recrystallization with site saturation nucleation kinetics. The clustering has a strong effect on both the Avrami exponent and the resulting sectioned grain size distributions. The Avrami exponent decreases rapidly from the expected value of 3 with the degree of clustering. A value of less than 1.5 is obtained for the Avrami exponent with a strongly clustered distribution of nucleation sites. The size distributions of sectioned grain areas are considerably broadened with clustering, but are still far from the log-normal distributions observed experimentally. A computer program has been developed to generate particle distributions whose pair correlation functions match experimentally measured functions. 15 refs., 6 figs

  18. Users manual for CAFE-3D : a computational fluid dynamics fire code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Imane; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma

    2005-01-01

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code has been developed to model all relevant fire physics for predicting the thermal response of massive objects engulfed in large fires. It provides realistic fire thermal boundary conditions for use in design of radioactive material packages and in risk-based transportation studies. The CAFE code can be coupled to commercial finite-element codes such as MSC PATRAN/THERMAL and ANSYS. This coupled system of codes can be used to determine the internal thermal response of finite element models of packages to a range of fire environments. This document is a user manual describing how to use the three-dimensional version of CAFE, as well as a description of CAFE input and output parameters. Since this is a user manual, only a brief theoretical description of the equations and physical models is included

  19. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  20. Microscopic description of fission dynamics: Toward a 3D computation of the time dependent GCM equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regnier D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to perform calculations with more than two collective degree of freedom. Meanwhile, it is well-known from both semi-phenomenological and fully microscopic approaches that at least four or five dimensions may play a role in the dynamics of fission. To overcome this limitation, we develop the code FELIX aiming to solve the TDGCM+GOA equation for an arbitrary number of collective variables. In this talk, we report the recent progress toward this enriched description of fission dynamics. We will briefly present the numerical methods adopted as well as the status of the latest version of FELIX. Finally, we will discuss fragments yields obtained within this approach for the low energy fission of major actinides.

  1. Microscopic description of fission dynamics: Toward a 3D computation of the time dependent GCM equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to perform calculations with more than two collective degree of freedom. Meanwhile, it is well-known from both semi-phenomenological and fully microscopic approaches that at least four or five dimensions may play a role in the dynamics of fission. To overcome this limitation, we develop the code FELIX aiming to solve the TDGCM+GOA equation for an arbitrary number of collective variables. In this talk, we report the recent progress toward this enriched description of fission dynamics. We will briefly present the numerical methods adopted as well as the status of the latest version of FELIX. Finally, we will discuss fragments yields obtained within this approach for the low energy fission of major actinides.

  2. Preliminary development of a global 3-D magnetohydrodynamic computational model for solar wind-cometary and planetary interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahara, S.S.

    1986-05-01

    This is the final summary report by Resource Management Associates, Inc., of the first year's work under Contract No. NASW-4011 to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The work under this initial phase of the contract relates to the preliminary development of a global, 3-D magnetohydrodynamic computational model to quantitatively describe the detailed continuum field and plasma interaction process of the solar wind with cometary and planetary bodies throughout the solar system. The work extends a highly-successful, observationally-verified computational model previously developed by the author, and is appropriate for the global determination of supersonic, super-Alfvenic solar wind flows past planetary obstacles. This report provides a concise description of the problems studied, a summary of all the important research results, and copies of the publications

  3. Convergence acceleration of two-phase flow calculations in FLICA-4. A thermal-hydraulic 3D computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.

    1995-01-01

    Time requirements for 3D two-phase flow steady state calculations are generally long. Usually, numerical methods for steady state problems are iterative methods consisting in time-like methods that are marched to a steady state. Based on the eigenvalue spectrum of the iteration matrix for various flow configuration, two convergence acceleration techniques are discussed; over-relaxation and eigenvalue annihilation. This methods were applied to accelerate the convergence of three dimensional steady state two-phase flow calculations within the FLICA-4 computer code. These acceleration methods are easy to implement and no extra computer memory is required. Successful results are presented for various test problems and a saving of 30 to 50 % in CPU time have been achieved. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs

  4. On the future of 3-D visualization in non-medical industrial x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of imaging is to capture and record the details of an object for both current and future analysis in a transportable and archival format. Generally, the development and understanding of the relationships of the features of interest thus revealed in the image is ultimately essential for the beneficial utilization of that that knowledge. Modern advanced imaging methods utilized in both medical and industrial applications are predominantly of a digital format, and increasingly moving from a 2-D to 3-D modality to allow for significantly improved detail resolution and clarity of volumetric visualization. Conventional digital radiography (DR), for example, compresses an entire object volume onto a 2-D planar image with consequent lack of spatial resolution and considerable loss of small volume feature resolution. Computed tomography (CT) overcomes both of these limitations, providing the highly desirable capability of precise 3-D detection, localization and characterization of multiple features throughout the subject object volume. CT has the further capability to reconstruct virtual 3-D solid object images with arbitrary and reversible planar sectioning and of variable transparency to clearly visualize features of different densities in situ within an otherwise opaque object. While tomographic imaging is utilized in various medical CT, MRI, PET, EBCT and 3-D Ultrasound modalities, only the X-ray CT imaging is briefly discussed here as it presents comparable high quality images and is quite similar and synergistic with industrial XCT. Medical CT procedures started in the late 1970's (originally known as CAT Scan) and have progressed to the extent of being experienced and accepted by much of the general population. Non-Medical CT (or Industrial XCT) technology has historically followed in the shadow of Medical CT but remains today considerably less pervasive. There are however increasingly several important equipment and application distinctions. These will

  5. Computer-aided detection of brain metastasis on 3D MR imaging: Observer performance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Sunwoo

    Full Text Available To assess the effect of computer-aided detection (CAD of brain metastasis (BM on radiologists' diagnostic performance in interpreting three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance (MR imaging using follow-up imaging and consensus as the reference standard.The institutional review board approved this retrospective study. The study cohort consisted of 110 consecutive patients with BM and 30 patients without BM. The training data set included MR images of 80 patients with 450 BM nodules. The test set included MR images of 30 patients with 134 BM nodules and 30 patients without BM. We developed a CAD system for BM detection using template-matching and K-means clustering algorithms for candidate detection and an artificial neural network for false-positive reduction. Four reviewers (two neuroradiologists and two radiology residents interpreted the test set images before and after the use of CAD in a sequential manner. The sensitivity, false positive (FP per case, and reading time were analyzed. A jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC method was used to determine the improvement in the diagnostic accuracy.The sensitivity of CAD was 87.3% with an FP per case of 302.4. CAD significantly improved the diagnostic performance of the four reviewers with a figure-of-merit (FOM of 0.874 (without CAD vs. 0.898 (with CAD according to JAFROC analysis (p < 0.01. Statistically significant improvement was noted only for less-experienced reviewers (FOM without vs. with CAD, 0.834 vs. 0.877, p < 0.01. The additional time required to review the CAD results was approximately 72 sec (40% of the total review time.CAD as a second reader helps radiologists improve their diagnostic performance in the detection of BM on MR imaging, particularly for less-experienced reviewers.

  6. Computer-aided detection of brain metastasis on 3D MR imaging: Observer performance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Leonard; Kim, Young Jae; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Kwang-Gi; Kang, Ji Hee; Kang, Yeonah; Bae, Yun Jung; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kim, Jihang; Lee, Kyong Joon; Lee, Seung Hyun; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of computer-aided detection (CAD) of brain metastasis (BM) on radiologists' diagnostic performance in interpreting three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using follow-up imaging and consensus as the reference standard. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study. The study cohort consisted of 110 consecutive patients with BM and 30 patients without BM. The training data set included MR images of 80 patients with 450 BM nodules. The test set included MR images of 30 patients with 134 BM nodules and 30 patients without BM. We developed a CAD system for BM detection using template-matching and K-means clustering algorithms for candidate detection and an artificial neural network for false-positive reduction. Four reviewers (two neuroradiologists and two radiology residents) interpreted the test set images before and after the use of CAD in a sequential manner. The sensitivity, false positive (FP) per case, and reading time were analyzed. A jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method was used to determine the improvement in the diagnostic accuracy. The sensitivity of CAD was 87.3% with an FP per case of 302.4. CAD significantly improved the diagnostic performance of the four reviewers with a figure-of-merit (FOM) of 0.874 (without CAD) vs. 0.898 (with CAD) according to JAFROC analysis (p reviewers (FOM without vs. with CAD, 0.834 vs. 0.877, p review the CAD results was approximately 72 sec (40% of the total review time). CAD as a second reader helps radiologists improve their diagnostic performance in the detection of BM on MR imaging, particularly for less-experienced reviewers.

  7. Efficient computational methods for electromagnetic imaging with applications to 3D magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, Michal Adam

    The motivation for this work is the forward and inverse problem for magnetotellurics, a frequency domain electromagnetic remote-sensing geophysical method used in mineral, geothermal, and groundwater exploration. The dissertation consists of four papers. In the first paper, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a representation of any vector field in H(curl) by a vector lying in H(curl) and H(div). It allows us to represent electric or magnetic fields by another vector field, for which nodal finite element approximation may be used in the case of non-constant electromagnetic properties. With this approach, the system matrix does not become ill-posed for low-frequency. In the second paper, we consider hexahedral finite element approximation of an electric field for the magnetotelluric forward problem. The near-null space of the system matrix for low frequencies makes the numerical solution unstable in the air. We show that the proper solution may obtained by applying a correction on the null space of the curl. It is done by solving a Poisson equation using discrete Helmholtz decomposition. We parallelize the forward code on multicore workstation with large RAM. In the next paper, we use the forward code in the inversion. Regularization of the inversion is done by using the second norm of the logarithm of conductivity. The data space Gauss-Newton approach allows for significant savings in memory and computational time. We show the efficiency of the method by considering a number of synthetic inversions and we apply it to real data collected in Cascade Mountains. The last paper considers a cross-frequency interpolation of the forward response as well as the Jacobian. We consider Pade approximation through model order reduction and rational Krylov subspace. The interpolating frequencies are chosen adaptively in order to minimize the maximum error of interpolation. Two error indicator functions are compared. We prove a theorem of almost always lucky failure in the

  8. A fully 3D approach for metal artifact reduction in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, Bärbel; Weyers, Imke; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography imaging metal objects in the region of interest introduce inconsistencies during data acquisition. Reconstructing these data leads to an image in spatial domain including star-shaped or stripe-like artifacts. In order to enhance the quality of the resulting image the influence of the metal objects can be reduced. Here, a metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach is proposed that is based on a recomputation of the inconsistent projection data using a fully three-dimensional Fourier-based interpolation. The success of the projection space restoration depends sensitively on a sensible continuation of neighboring structures into the recomputed area. Fortunately, structural information of the entire data is inherently included in the Fourier space of the data. This can be used for a reasonable recomputation of the inconsistent projection data. Methods: The key step of the proposed MAR strategy is the recomputation of the inconsistent projection data based on an interpolation using nonequispaced fast Fourier transforms (NFFT). The NFFT interpolation can be applied in arbitrary dimension. The approach overcomes the problem of adequate neighborhood definitions on irregular grids, since this is inherently given through the usage of higher dimensional Fourier transforms. Here, applications up to the third interpolation dimension are presented and validated. Furthermore, prior knowledge may be included by an appropriate damping of the transform during the interpolation step. This MAR method is applicable on each angular view of a detector row, on two-dimensional projection data as well as on three-dimensional projection data, e.g., a set of sequential acquisitions at different spatial positions, projection data of a spiral acquisition, or cone-beam projection data. Results: Results of the novel MAR scheme based on one-, two-, and three-dimensional NFFT interpolations are presented. All results are compared in projection data space and spatial

  9. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of an innovative start-up method of high temperature fuel cells using dynamic 3d model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupecki Jakub

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a numerical analysis of an innovative method for starting systems based on high temperature fuel cells. The possibility of preheating the fuel cell stacks from the cold state to the nominal working conditions encounters several limitations related to heat transfer and stability of materials. The lack of rapid and safe start-up methods limits the proliferation of MCFCs and SOFCs. For that reason, an innovative method was developed and verified using the numerical analysis presented in the paper. A dynamic 3D model was developed that enables thermo-fluidic investigations and determination of measures for shortening the preheating time of the high temperature fuel cell stacks. The model was implemented in ANSYS Fluent computational fluid dynamic (CFD software and was used for verification of the proposed start-up method. The SOFC was chosen as a reference fuel cell technology for the study. Results obtained from the study are presented and discussed.

  10. 3D computer-aided detection for digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison with 2D computer-aided detection for digital mammography in the detection of calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, A Jung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Song, Sung Eun; Shin, Sung Ui; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the performance of 3D computer-aided detection (CAD) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in the detection of calcifications in comparison with 2D CAD for digital mammography (DM). Between 2012 and 2013, both 3D CAD and 2D CAD systems were retrospectively applied to the calcification data set including 69 calcifications (31 malignant calcifications and 38 benign calcifications) and the normal data set including 20 bilateral normal mammograms. Each data set consisted of paired DBT and DM images. Sensitivities for the detection of malignant calcifications were calculated from the calcification data set. False-positive mark rates were calculated from the normal data set. They were compared between the two systems. Sensitivities of 3D CAD [100% (31/31) at levels 2, 1, and 0] were same as those of the 2D CAD system [100% (31/31) at levels 2 and 1] (p = 1.0, respectively). The mean value of false-positive marks per view with 3D CAD was higher than that with 2D CAD at level 2 (0.52 marks ± 0.91 vs. 0.07 marks ± 0.26, p = 0.009). 3D CAD for DBT showed equivalent sensitivity, albeit with a higher false-positive mark rate, than 2D CAD for DM in the detection of calcifications.

  11. Computational Sensing of Staphylococcus aureus on Contact Lenses Using 3D Imaging of Curved Surfaces and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veli, Muhammed; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2018-03-27

    We present a cost-effective and portable platform based on contact lenses for noninvasively detecting Staphylococcus aureus, which is part of the human ocular microbiome and resides on the cornea and conjunctiva. Using S. aureus-specific antibodies and a surface chemistry protocol that is compatible with human tears, contact lenses are designed to specifically capture S. aureus. After the bacteria capture on the lens and right before its imaging, the captured bacteria are tagged with surface-functionalized polystyrene microparticles. These microbeads provide sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for the quantification of the captured bacteria on the contact lens, without any fluorescent labels, by 3D imaging of the curved surface of each lens using only one hologram taken with a lens-free on-chip microscope. After the 3D surface of the contact lens is computationally reconstructed using rotational field transformations and holographic digital focusing, a machine learning algorithm is employed to automatically count the number of beads on the lens surface, revealing the count of the captured bacteria. To demonstrate its proof-of-concept, we created a field-portable and cost-effective holographic microscope, which weighs 77 g, controlled by a laptop. Using daily contact lenses that are spiked with bacteria, we demonstrated that this computational sensing platform provides a detection limit of ∼16 bacteria/μL. This contact-lens-based wearable sensor can be broadly applicable to detect various bacteria, viruses, and analytes in tears using a cost-effective and portable computational imager that might be used even at home by consumers.

  12. Effects of computing parameters and measurement locations on the estimation of 3D NPS in non-stationary MDCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Bolard, Gregory; Bulling, Shelley; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François O; Verdun, François R

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of computing parameters and the location of volumes of interest (VOI) on the calculation of 3D noise power spectrum (NPS) in order to determine an optimal set of computing parameters and propose a robust method for evaluating the noise properties of imaging systems. Noise stationarity in noise volumes acquired with a water phantom on a 128-MDCT and a 320-MDCT scanner were analyzed in the spatial domain in order to define locally stationary VOIs. The influence of the computing parameters in the 3D NPS measurement: the sampling distances bx,y,z and the VOI lengths Lx,y,z, the number of VOIs NVOI and the structured noise were investigated to minimize measurement errors. The effect of the VOI locations on the NPS was also investigated. Results showed that the noise (standard deviation) varies more in the r-direction (phantom radius) than z-direction plane. A 25 × 25 × 40 mm(3) VOI associated with DFOV = 200 mm (Lx,y,z = 64, bx,y = 0.391 mm with 512 × 512 matrix) and a first-order detrending method to reduce structured noise led to an accurate NPS estimation. NPS estimated from off centered small VOIs had a directional dependency contrary to NPS obtained from large VOIs located in the center of the volume or from small VOIs located on a concentric circle. This showed that the VOI size and location play a major role in the determination of NPS when images are not stationary. This study emphasizes the need for consistent measurement methods to assess and compare image quality in CT. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The description of condyle position in disc displacement with reduction using Cone Beam Computed Tomography 3D radiographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Rahmayani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the temporomandibular joint disorders that mostly occurs is disc displacement with reduction. Disc displacement that causes the displacement of condyle position can be evaluated by using radiograph. The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT-3D is a radiograph equipment which is able to capture the condyle position from many directions. This research was aimed to see the condyle position in patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms. This research was conducted to 11 patients with symptoms of disc displacement with reduction and 3 patients without symptoms of disc displacement with reduction as the counterpart. What was conducted to the sample was the radiographic imaging using CBCT-3D radiography, followed by measuring the joint space distance in the sagittal and coronal directions. The result of the research was analyzed using the T-test. Statistically, the result of the test showed a significant difference ( = 0.05 between patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms and the patients without symptoms, in sagittal and coronal views. The conclusion led to the difference in condyle positions in patients with the disc displacement with reduction and patients without the symptoms which meant there was a condyle position displacement that caused the distance alteration in joint space in sagittal and coronal directions.

  14. Reservoir core porosity in the Resende formation using 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Milena F.S.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Rocha, Paula Lucia F. da

    2009-01-01

    The storage capacity and production of oil are influenced, among other things, by rocks and fluids characteristics. Porosity is one of the most important characteristics to be analyzed in oil industry, mainly in oil prospection because it represents the direct capacity of storage fluids in the rocks. By definition, porosity is the ratio of pore volume to the total bulk volume of the formation, expressed in percentage, being able to be absolute or effective. The aim of this study was to calculate porosity by 3D High-Resolution X-ray Computed Microtomography using core plugs from Resende Formation which were collected in Porto Real, Rio de Janeiro State. This formation is characterized by sandstones and fine conglomerates with associated fine siliciclastic sediments, and the paleoenviroment is interpreted as a braided fluvial system. For acquisitions data, it was used a 3D high resolution microtomography system which has a microfocus X-ray tube (spot size < 5μm) and a 12-bit cooled X-ray camera (CCD fiber-optically coupled to a scintillator) operated at 100 kV and 100 μA. Twenty-two samples taken at different depths from two boreholes were analyzed. A total of 961 slices were performed with a resolution of 14.9 μm. The results demonstrated that μ-CT is a reliable and effective technique. Through the images and data it was possible to quantify the porosity and to view the size and shape of porous. (author)

  15. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-05-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  16. EVALUATION OF SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF RAMP TUNNEL STRUCTURE DURING LEVEL-2 EARTHQUAKE BY MASSIVE 3D NUMERICAL COMPUTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takemine; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Muneo; Dobashi, Hiroshi; Ohbo, Naoto

    Quasi non-linear 3D FEM earthquake response analysises with level-2 earthquake are conducted for a ramp tunnel structure of Tokyo metropolitan express way central circular line the Yamate tunnel. Large-scale numerical computation with solid elements is highly required for examination of seismic response of large tunnel in case of level-2 earthquake. The results are obtained as follows: i) In level-2 earthquake, stress concentration in ramp tunnel becomes great near geological interface between two layers of high impedance contrast. ii) The response is not obtained as a superposition of two-dimensional responses which is an assumption in conventional design methods because the distribution of displacements in the direction of tunnel axis at cross-section of ramp tunnel structure near geological interface does not linearly distribute. iii) Evaluation of stress in addition to section force is desirable for the correct evaluation of the three-dimensional response of tunnel structure.

  17. The DANTE Boltzmann transport solver: An unstructured mesh, 3-D, spherical harmonics algorithm compatible with parallel computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhee, J.M.; Roberts, R.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A spherical harmonics research code (DANTE) has been developed which is compatible with parallel computer architectures. DANTE provides 3-D, multi-material, deterministic, transport capabilities using an arbitrary finite element mesh. The linearized Boltzmann transport equation is solved in a second order self-adjoint form utilizing a Galerkin finite element spatial differencing scheme. The core solver utilizes a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Other distinguishing features of the code include options for discrete-ordinates and simplified spherical harmonics angular differencing, an exact Marshak boundary treatment for arbitrarily oriented boundary faces, in-line matrix construction techniques to minimize memory consumption, and an effective diffusion based preconditioner for scattering dominated problems. Algorithm efficiency is demonstrated for a massively parallel SIMD architecture (CM-5), and compatibility with MPP multiprocessor platforms or workstation clusters is anticipated

  18. Steady-State VEP-Based Brain-Computer Interface Control in an Immersive 3D Gaming Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an effective EEG-based brain-computer interface design for binary control in a visually elaborate immersive 3D game. The BCI uses the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP generated in response to phase-reversing checkerboard patterns. Two power-spectrum estimation methods were employed for feature extraction in a series of offline classification tests. Both methods were also implemented during real-time game play. The performance of the BCI was found to be robust to distracting visual stimulation in the game and relatively consistent across six subjects, with 41 of 48 games successfully completed. For the best performing feature extraction method, the average real-time control accuracy across subjects was 89%. The feasibility of obtaining reliable control in such a visually rich environment using SSVEPs is thus demonstrated and the impact of this result is discussed.

  19. The Cell-CT 3D Cell Imaging Technology Platform Enables the Detection of Lung Cancer Using the Non-Invasive LuCED Sputum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael G.; Hayenga, Jon; Neumann, Thomas; Katdare, Rahul; Presley, Chris; Steinhauer, David; Bell, Timothy; Lancaster, Christy; Nelson, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    The war against cancer has yielded important advances in the early diagnosis and treatment of certain cancer types, but the poor detection rate and 5-year survival rate for lung cancer remains little changed over the past 40 years. Early detection through emerging lung cancer screening programs promises the most reliable means of improving mortality. Sputum cytology has been tried without success because sputum contains few malignant cells that are difficult for cytologists to detect. However, research has shown that sputum contains diagnostic malignant cells and could serve as a means of lung cancer detection if those cells could be detected and correctly characterized. Recently, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial reported that screening by three consecutive low-dose X-ray CT scans provides a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality compared to chest X-ray. This reduction in mortality, however, comes with an unacceptable false positive rate that increases patient risks and the overall cost of lung cancer screening. This article reviews the LuCED® test for detecting early lung cancer. LuCED is based on patient sputum that is enriched for bronchial epithelial cells. The enriched sample is then processed on the Cell-CT®, which images cells in three dimensions with sub-micron resolution. Algorithms are applied to the 3D cell images to extract morphometric features that drive a classifier to identify cells that have abnormal characteristics. The final status of these candidate abnormal cells is established by the pathologist's manual review. LuCED promotes accurate cell classification which could enable cost effective detection of lung cancer. PMID:26148817

  20. The diagnosis and conservative treatment of a complex type 3 dens invaginatus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D plastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, A; Telishevsky-Strauss, Y; Leitner, A; Metzger, Z

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the use of 3D plastic models, printed from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data, for accurate diagnosis and conservative treatment of a complex case of dens invaginatus. A chronic apical abscess with a draining sinus tract was diagnosed during the treatment planning stage of orthodontic therapy. Radiographic examination revealed a large radiolucent area associated with an invaginated right maxillary central incisor, which was found to contain a vital pulp. The affected tooth was strategic in the dental arch. Conventional periapical radiographs provided only partial information about the invagination and its relationship with the main root canal and with the periapical tissues. A limited-volume CBCT scan of the maxilla did not show evidence of communication between the infected invagination and the pulp in the main root canal, which could explain the pulp vitality. A novel method was adopted to allow for instrumentation, disinfection and filling of the invagination, without compromising the vitality of the pulp in the complex root canal system. The CBCT data were used to produce precise 3D plastic models of the tooth. These models facilitated the treatment planning process and the trial of treatment approaches. This approach allowed the vitality of the pulp to be maintained in the complex root canal space of the main root canal whilst enabling the healing of the periapical tissues. Even when extensive periapical pathosis is associated with a tooth with type III dens invaginatus, pulp sensibility tests should be performed. CBCT is a diagnostic tool that may allow for the management of such teeth with complex anatomy. 3D printed plastic models may be a valuable aid in the process of assessing and planning effective treatment modalities and practicing them ex vivo before actually performing the clinical procedure. Unconventional technological approaches may be required for detailed treatment planning of complex cases of dens invaginatus. © 2012

  1. ProtDCal: A program to compute general-purpose-numerical descriptors for sequences and 3D-structures of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Paz, Waldo; Green, James; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2015-05-16

    The exponential growth of protein structural and sequence databases is enabling multifaceted approaches to understanding the long sought sequence-structure-function relationship. Advances in computation now make it possible to apply well-established data mining and pattern recognition techniques to these data to learn models that effectively relate structure and function. However, extracting meaningful numerical descriptors of protein sequence and structure is a key issue that requires an efficient and widely available solution. We here introduce ProtDCal, a new computational software suite capable of generating tens of thousands of features considering both sequence-based and 3D-structural descriptors. We demonstrate, by means of principle component analysis and Shannon entropy tests, how ProtDCal's sequence-based descriptors provide new and more relevant information not encoded by currently available servers for sequence-based protein feature generation. The wide diversity of the 3D-structure-based features generated by ProtDCal is shown to provide additional complementary information and effectively completes its general protein encoding capability. As demonstration of the utility of ProtDCal's features, prediction models of N-linked glycosylation sites are trained and evaluated. Classification performance compares favourably with that of contemporary predictors of N-linked glycosylation sites, in spite of not using domain-specific features as input information. ProtDCal provides a friendly and cross-platform graphical user interface, developed in the Java programming language and is freely available at: http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/ProtDCal/ . ProtDCal introduces local and group-based encoding which enhances the diversity of the information captured by the computed features. Furthermore, we have shown that adding structure-based descriptors contributes non-redundant additional information to the features-based characterization of polypeptide systems. This

  2. Integration of Multiple Cues for Robust 3D Object Description: A Computational and Psychophysical Study with Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farag, Aly

    2001-01-01

    ...., provides a 3D - to - 3D mapping. The research focuses on the representation and fusion of information form differing image sources and the use of machine learning techniques to perform the fusion...

  3. DNA-Enabled Integrated Molecular Systems for Computation and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Computational devices can be chemically conjugated to different strands of DNA that are then self-assembled according to strict Watson − Crick binding rules... DNA -Enabled Integrated Molecular Systems for Computation and Sensing Craig LaBoda,† Heather Duschl,† and Chris L. Dwyer*,†,‡ †Department of...guided folding of DNA , inspired by nature, allows designs to manipulate molecular-scale processes unlike any other material system. Thus, DNA can be

  4. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Erik G; Bozdag, Doruk; Catalyurek, Umit V; Devine, Karen D; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H; Hovland, Paul D; Pothen, Alex; Strout, Michelle Mills

    2007-01-01

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation

  5. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Erik G [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Bozdag, Doruk [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Catalyurek, Umit V [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Devine, Karen D [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gebremedhin, Assefaw H [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Hovland, Paul D [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Pothen, Alex [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Strout, Michelle Mills [Computer Science, Colorado State University (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation.

  6. FUN3D Manual: 13.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2018-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.3, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  7. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  8. FUN3D Manual: 13.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.1, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  9. FUN3D Manual: 13.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.2, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  10. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  11. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  12. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  13. Self-Assembly Template Driven 3D Inverse Opal Microspheres Functionalized with Catalyst Nanoparticles Enabling a Highly Efficient Chemical Sensing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianshuang; Can, Inci; Zhang, Sufang; He, Junming; Sun, Peng; Liu, Fangmeng; Lu, Geyu

    2018-02-14

    The design of semiconductor metal oxides (SMOs) with well-ordered porous structure has attracted tremendous attention owing to their larger specific surface area. Herein, three-dimensional inverse opal In 2 O 3 microspheres (3D-IO In 2 O 3 MSs) were fabricated through one-step ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) which employed self-assembly sulfonated polystyrene (S-PS) spheres as a sacrificial template. The spherical pores observed in the 3D-IO In 2 O 3 MSs had diameters of about 4 and 80 nm. Subsequently, the catalytic palladium oxide nanoparticles (PdO NPs) were loaded on 3D-IO In 2 O 3 MSs via a simple impregnation method, and their gas sensing properties were investigated. In a comparison with pristine 3D-IO In 2 O 3 MSs, the 3D-IO PdO@In 2 O 3 MSs exhibited a 3.9 times higher response (R air /R gas = 50.9) to 100 ppm acetone at 250 °C and a good acetone selectivity. The detection limit for acetone could extend down to ppb level. Furthermore, the 3D-IO PdO@In 2 O 3 MSs-based sensor also possess good long-term stability. The extraordinary sensing performance can be attributed to the novel 3D periodic porous structure, highly three-dimensional interconnection, larger specific surface area, size-tunable (meso- and macroscale) bimodal pores, and PdO NP catalysts.

  14. An efficient implementation of 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data with GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Liu, Linong; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2018-02-01

    De-absorption pre-stack time migration (QPSTM) compensates for the absorption and dispersion of seismic waves by introducing an effective Q parameter, thereby making it an effective tool for 3D, high-resolution imaging of seismic data. Although the optimal aperture obtained via stationary-phase migration reduces the computational cost of 3D QPSTM and yields 3D stationary-phase QPSTM, the associated computational efficiency is still the main problem in the processing of 3D, high-resolution images for real large-scale seismic data. In the current paper, we proposed a division method for large-scale, 3D seismic data to optimize the performance of stationary-phase QPSTM on clusters of graphics processing units (GPU). Then, we designed an imaging point parallel strategy to achieve an optimal parallel computing performance. Afterward, we adopted an asynchronous double buffering scheme for multi-stream to perform the GPU/CPU parallel computing. Moreover, several key optimization strategies of computation and storage based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) were adopted to accelerate the 3D stationary-phase QPSTM algorithm. Compared with the initial GPU code, the implementation of the key optimization steps, including thread optimization, shared memory optimization, register optimization and special function units (SFU), greatly improved the efficiency. A numerical example employing real large-scale, 3D seismic data showed that our scheme is nearly 80 times faster than the CPU-QPSTM algorithm. Our GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing framework significant reduces the computational cost and facilitates 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data.

  15. Wearable 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yoshitsugu; Imura, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    Wearable 3D measurement realizes to acquire 3D information of an objects or an environment using a wearable computer. Recently, we can send voice and sound as well as pictures by mobile phone in Japan. Moreover it will become easy to capture and send data of short movie by it. On the other hand, the computers become compact and high performance. And it can easy connect to Internet by wireless LAN. Near future, we can use the wearable computer always and everywhere. So we will be able to send the three-dimensional data that is measured by wearable computer as a next new data. This paper proposes the measurement method and system of three-dimensional data of an object with the using of wearable computer. This method uses slit light projection for 3D measurement and user"s motion instead of scanning system.

  16. Combinatorial algorithms enabling computational science: tales from the front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Boman, Erik G; Devine, Karen; Gebremedhin, Assefaw; Hendrickson, Bruce; Hovland, Paul; Munson, Todd; Pothen, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played a crucial enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. The importance of discrete algorithms continues to grow with the demands of new applications and advanced architectures. This paper surveys some recent developments in this rapidly changing and highly interdisciplinary field

  17. Combinatorial algorithms enabling computational science: tales from the front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Boman, Erik G [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Devine, Karen [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gebremedhin, Assefaw [Computer Science Department, Old Dominion University (United States); Hendrickson, Bruce [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Hovland, Paul [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Munson, Todd [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Pothen, Alex [Computer Science Department, Old Dominion University (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played a crucial enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. The importance of discrete algorithms continues to grow with the demands of new applications and advanced architectures. This paper surveys some recent developments in this rapidly changing and highly interdisciplinary field.

  18. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  19. Computer assisted tomography tandem and ovoids (CATTO): results of a 3D CT based assessment of bladder and rectal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebara, Wade; Weeks, Ken; Hahn, Carol; Montana, Gustavo; Anscher, Mitchell

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectal dose rates in tandem and ovoid applications using two different dosimetry systems: traditional orthogonal radiograph-based dosimetry (TORD) vs. computer assisted tomography tandem and ovoids dosimetry (CATTO). Materials and Methods: From August 1992 through February 1996, 22 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix received the brachytherapy component of their radiotherapy with a CT-compatible Fletcher-Suit-Delclos device. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomic reconstructions were created with axial CT images. Three-dimensional dose calculations were then performed, and the isodose map was superimposed on the 3D anatomic reconstructions. Maximum bladder (B max ) and rectal (R max ) dose rates were determined from the result of calculating the dose rate to each point on the 3D surface of those organs. Three-dimensional computer displays were also obtained to determine the anatomic positions of the largest dose. Additionally, orthogonal radiography, with contrast in a Foley catheter balloon and a radio-opaque rectal tube was used to define rectal and bladder points. The dose rates at these points were calculated using a commercial treatment planning system. The effect of the tungsten shielding was ignored in the TORD calculations, but included in the CATTO calculations. Bladder and rectal dose rates determined by each dosimetry system were compared. Results: The B max calculated using the CATTO system was higher in all 22 patients when compared with the TORD system. The average B max for the patients using TORD was 43.4 cGy/hr, as compared to 86.2 cGy/hr using the CATTO system (p = 0.0083). The location of B max on CATTO was never at the Foley bulb where the maximum bladder dose was calculated with TORD. It was located approximately 1 cm superior to the colpostats and just anterior to the tandem in (16(22)) patients. R max was higher in (17(22)) patients using the CATTO system when compared with TORD. The average R max using TORD

  20. Impact of respiratory movement on the computed tomographic images of small lung tumors in three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Kagei, Kenji; Nishioka, Takeshi; Bo Xo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning has often been performed while patients breathe freely, under the assumption that the computed tomography (CT) images represent the average position of the tumor. We investigated the impact of respiratory movement on the free-breathing CT images of small lung tumors using sequential CT scanning at the same table position. Methods: Using a preparatory free-breathing CT scan, the patient's couch was fixed at the position where each tumor showed its maximum diameter on image. For 16 tumors, over 20 sequential CT images were taken every 2 s, with a 1-s acquisition time occurring during free breathing. For each tumor, the distance between the surface of the CT table and the posterior border of the tumor was measured to determine whether the edge of the tumor was sufficiently included in the planning target volume (PTV) during normal breathing. Results: In the sequential CT scanning, the tumor itself was not visible in the examination slice in 21% (75/357) of cases. There were statistically significant differences between lower lobe tumors (39.4%, 71/180) and upper lobe tumors (0%, 0/89) (p < 0.01) and between lower lobe tumors and middle lobe tumor (8.9%, 4/45) (p < 0.01) in the incidence of the disappearance of the tumor from the image. The mean difference between the maximum and minimum distances between the surface of the CT table and the posterior border of the tumor was 6.4 mm (range 2.1-24.4). Conclusion: Three-dimensional treatment planning for lung carcinoma would significantly underdose many lesions, especially those in the lower lobe. The excess 'safety margin' might call into question any additional benefit of 3D treatment. More work is required to determine how to control respiratory movement

  1. Internal structures of scaffold-free 3D cell cultures visualized by synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldamli, Belma; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Tübel, Jutta; Schauwecker, Johannes; Burgkart, Rainer; Jürgens, Philipp; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Sader, Robert; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Recently the importance of the third dimension in cell biology has been better understood, resulting in a re-orientation towards three-dimensional (3D) cultivation. Yet adequate tools for their morphological characterization have to be established. Synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT) allows visualizing such biological systems with almost isotropic micrometer resolution, non-destructively. We have applied SRμCT for studying the internal morphology of human osteoblast-derived, scaffold-free 3D cultures, termed histoids. Primary human osteoblasts, isolated from femoral neck spongy bone, were grown as 2D culture in non-mineralizing osteogenic medium until a rather thick, multi-cellular membrane was formed. This delicate system was intentionally released to randomly fold itself. The folded cell cultures were grown to histoids of cubic milli- or centimeter size in various combinations of mineralizing and non-mineralizing osteogenic medium for a total period of minimum 56 weeks. The SRμCT-measurements were performed in the absorption contrast mode at the beamlines BW 2 and W 2 (HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany), operated by the GKSS-Research Center. To investigate the entire volume of interest several scans were performed under identical conditions and registered to obtain one single dataset of each sample. The histoids grown under different conditions exhibit similar external morphology of globular or ovoid shape. The SRμCT-examination revealed the distinctly different morphological structures inside the histoids. One obtains details of the histoids that permit to identify and select the most promising slices for subsequent histological characterization.

  2. Computational modeling of pitching cylinder-type ocean wave energy converters using 3D MPI-parallel simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freniere, Cole; Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Ocean Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are devices that convert energy from ocean waves into electricity. To aid in the design of WECs, an advanced computational framework has been developed which has advantages over conventional methods. The computational framework simulates the performance of WECs in a virtual wave tank by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in 3D, capturing the fluid-structure interaction, nonlinear and viscous effects. In this work, we present simulations of the performance of pitching cylinder-type WECs and compare against experimental data. WECs are simulated at both model and full scales. The results are used to determine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number. The KC number is representative of viscous drag behavior on a bluff body in an oscillating flow, and is considered an important indicator of the dynamics of a WEC. Studying the effects of the KC number is important for determining the validity of the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory, which are heavily relied on in the conventional approaches to modeling WECs. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Use of computed tomography slices 3D-reconstruction as a powerful tool to improve manufacturing processes on aeroengine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, C.; Dastarac, D.

    2000-01-01

    TURBOMECA has been using computed tomography for several years as an inner-health analysis powerful tool for engine components. From 2D slices of the examined part, detailed information about lacks or inclusions could easily be extracted. But, measurements on internal features were quickly required because no other NDT methods were able to do it. CT has thus logically become a powerful 2D dimensional measuring tool. Recently, with new software and the latest computers able to deal with huge files, CT has become a powerful 3D digitization tool and now, TOMO ADOUR can offer a complete solution for reverse engineering of complex parts. Several months ago, TURBOMECA introduced CT into many development, validation and industrialization processes and has demonstrated how to take corrective actions to process deviation on their aeroengine components by: extracting the nonexisting CAD model of a part, generating CAD compatible data to check dimensional conformity and, eventually correct design misfits or manufacturing drifts, highlighting the metallurgical health of first article parts, making the decision of repairing the defining the appropriate method, generating a file (.STL) to build a rapid prototype or a file to pilot tool parts for machining, calculating physical properties such as behavior or flow analysis on a 'real' model. The image also allows a drawing to be made of a part that was originally produced by a supplier or competitor. This paper will be illustrated with a large number of examples

  4. Modeling warm dense matter experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR code and the move toward exascale computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.; Liu, W.; Barnard, J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, G.; Eder, D.; Fisher, A.; Masters, N.; Bertozzi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li + ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related computational changes on general modeling codes in fusion. (authors)

  5. Study of Propagation Mechanisms in Dynamical Railway Environment to Reduce Computation Time of 3D Ray Tracing Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Hairoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better assess the behaviours of the propagation channel in a confined environment such as a railway tunnel for subway application, we present an optimization method for a deterministic channel simulator based on 3D ray tracing associated to the geometrical optics laws and the uniform theory of diffraction. This tool requires a detailed description of the environment. Thus, the complexity of this model is directly bound to the complexity of the environment and specifically to the number of facets that compose it. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to identify facets that have no significant impact on the wave propagation. This allows us to simplify the description of the geometry of the modelled environment by removing them and by this way, to reduce the complexity of our model and therefore its computation time. A comparative study between full and simplified environment is led and shows the impact of this proposed method on the characteristic parameters of the propagation channel. Thus computation time obtained from the simplified environment is 6 times lower than the one of the full model without significant degradation of simulation accuracy.

  6. Underwater 3D filming

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” ) and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Unde...

  7. Working Towards New Transformative Geoscience Analytics Enabled by Petascale Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, R.; Wyborn, L.

    2012-04-01

    Currently the top 10 supercomputers in the world are petascale and already exascale computers are being planned. Cloud computing facilities are becoming mainstream either as private or commercial investments. These computational developments will provide abundant opportunities for the earth science community to tackle the data deluge which has resulted from new instrumentation enabling data to be gathered at a greater rate and at higher resolution. Combined, the new computational environments should enable the earth sciences to be transformed. However, experience in Australia and elsewhere has shown that it is not easy to scale existing earth science methods, software and analytics to take advantage of the increased computational capacity that is now available. It is not simply a matter of 'transferring' current work practices to the new facilities: they have to be extensively 'transformed'. In particular new Geoscientific methods will need to be developed using advanced data mining, assimilation, machine learning and integration algorithms. Software will have to be capable of operating in highly parallelised environments, and will also need to be able to scale as the compute systems grow. Data access will have to improve and the earth science community needs to move from the file discovery, display and then locally download paradigm to self describing data cubes and data arrays that are available as online resources from either major data repositories or in the cloud. In the new transformed world, rather than analysing satellite data scene by scene, sensor agnostic data cubes of calibrated earth observation data will enable researchers to move across data from multiple sensors at varying spatial data resolutions. In using geophysics to characterise basement and cover, rather than analysing individual gridded airborne geophysical data sets, and then combining the results, petascale computing will enable analysis of multiple data types, collected at varying

  8. Grid computing : enabling a vision for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a motivation for Grid computing based on a vision to enable a collaborative research environment. The authors vision goes beyond the connection of hardware resources. They argue that with an infrastructure such as the Grid, new modalities for collaborative research are enabled. They provide an overview showing why Grid research is difficult, and they present a number of management-related issues that must be addressed to make Grids a reality. They list projects that provide solutions to subsets of these issues

  9. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.C.E.; Williams, J.J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution

  10. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.; Eder, E.; Liu, W.; Barnard, J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, G.; Fisher, A.; Masers, N.; Bertozzi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  11. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data...

  12. Stereological measures of trabecular bone structure: comparison of 3D micro computed tomography with 2D histological sections in human proximal tibial bone biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Laib, A.; Koller, B.

    2005-01-01

    Stereology applied on histological sections is the 'gold standard' for obtaining quantitative information on cancellous bone structure. Recent advances in micro computed tomography (microCT) have made it possible to acquire three-dimensional (3D) data non-destructively. However, before the 3D...... methods can be used as a substitute for the current 'gold standard' they have to be verified against the existing standard. The aim of this study was to compare bone structural measures obtained from 3D microCT data sets with those obtained by stereology performed on conventional histological sections...... tibial metaphysis. The biopsies were embedded in methylmetacrylate before microCT scanning in a Scanco microCT 40 scanner at a resolution of 20 x 20 x 20 microm3, and the 3D data sets were analysed with a computer program. After microCT scanning, 16 sections were cut from the central 2 mm of each biopsy...

  13. Measurement of left atrial volume by 2D and 3D non-contrast computed tomography compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredgart, Maise Høigaard; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard for assessment of left atrial (LA) volume. We assessed the feasibility of evaluating LA volume using 3D non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). Furthermore, since manual tracing of LA volume is time consuming, we...... evaluated the accuracy of the LA area using 2D NCCT imaging for LA volume assessment. Methods: MRI and NCCT imaging were performed in 69 patients before and one year after aortic valve replacement. In 3D MRI and 3D NCCT, each slice was manually traced, excluding the pulmonary veins and atrial appendage...

  14. Computed Tomography Image Origin Identification Based on Original Sensor Pattern Noise and 3-D Image Reconstruction Algorithm Footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuping; Bouslimi, Dalel; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Coatrieux, Gouenou

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we focus on the "blind" identification of the computed tomography (CT) scanner that has produced a CT image. To do so, we propose a set of noise features derived from the image chain acquisition and which can be used as CT-scanner footprint. Basically, we propose two approaches. The first one aims at identifying a CT scanner based on an original sensor pattern noise (OSPN) that is intrinsic to the X-ray detectors. The second one identifies an acquisition system based on the way this noise is modified by its three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction algorithm. As these reconstruction algorithms are manufacturer dependent and kept secret, our features are used as input to train a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier to discriminate acquisition systems. Experiments conducted on images issued from 15 different CT-scanner models of 4 distinct manufacturers demonstrate that our system identifies the origin of one CT image with a detection rate of at least 94% and that it achieves better performance than sensor pattern noise (SPN) based strategy proposed for general public camera devices.

  15. ANCIENT SHIPYARD ON TURKEY’S DANA ISLAND: ITS 3D MODELLING WITH PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Denker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Although a small island 2 km off the southern coast of Turkey, Dana Island offers a rich history which is likely to shed light upon the Dark Ages. Starting from 2015 our archaeological team discovered through continuing coastal and underwater excavations 274 shipsheds/slipways there. This discovery places Dana Island among the biggest shipyards of antiquity. The slipways varied in dimensions suitable for vessels of different sizes from small boats to large warships. Historical sources suggest that the name of the island may stem from Yadnana, Yadana or Adana which was mentioned in an Assyrian tablet of the 8th century BC, as an island in the vicinity of Cyprus. Archaeological evidence exists that shows Dana Island had played a significant role in seamanship activities in Levant starting from Neolithic times. A substantial part of the naval campaigns must have involved Dana Island which used be the biggest shipyard/naval base of the Eastern Mediterranean. A 3D model of the island has been made by using photogrammetry and computer graphics methods and simulations were executed to check the hypotheses related to the involvement of Dana Island in the major sea battles of antiquity, such as Sea Battle of Lade in 495 BC.

  16. Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Albert; Curi, Sebastian; Clayton, Kevin; Luciano, David; Klauber, Kameron; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; D'hers, Sebastian; Elman, Noel M

    2014-08-01

    Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) are portable platforms that integrate microfluidics for rapid reconstitution of lyophilized drugs. Rapid reconstitution of lyophilized drugs using standard vials and syringes is an error-prone process. RRPs were designed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to optimize fluidic structures for rapid mixing and integrating physical properties of targeted drugs and diluents. Devices were manufactured using stereo lithography 3D printing for micrometer structural precision and rapid prototyping. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was selected as the initial model drug to test the RRPs as it is unstable in solution. tPA is a thrombolytic drug, stored in lyophilized form, required in emergency settings for which rapid reconstitution is of critical importance. RRP performance and drug stability were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize release kinetics. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed to test for drug activity after the RRPs were exposed to various controlled temperature conditions. Experimental results showed that RRPs provided effective reconstitution of tPA that strongly correlated with CFD results. Simulation and experimental results show that release kinetics can be adjusted by tuning the device structural dimensions and diluent drug physical parameters. The design of RRPs can be tailored for a number of applications by taking into account physical parameters of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), excipients, and diluents. RRPs are portable platforms that can be utilized for reconstitution of emergency drugs in time-critical therapies.

  17. Microcirculation in the murine liver: a computational fluid dynamic model based on 3D reconstruction from in vivo microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Monica; Bianchi, Elena; Capitani, Giada; Li Piani, Irene; Ganzer, Lucia; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo; Dubini, Gabriele

    2017-10-03

    The liver is organized in hexagonal functional units - termed lobules - characterized by a rather peculiar blood microcirculation, due to the presence of a tangled network of capillaries - termed sinusoids. A better understanding of the hemodynamics that governs liver microcirculation is relevant to clinical and biological studies aimed at improving our management of liver diseases and transplantation. Herein, we built a CFD model of a 3D sinusoidal network, based on in vivo images of a physiological mouse liver obtained with a 2-photon microscope. The CFD model was developed with Fluent 16.0 (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA), particular care was taken in imposing the correct boundary conditions representing a physiological state. To account for the remaining branches of the sinusoids, a lumped parameter model was used to prescribe the correct pressure at each outlet. The effect of an adhered cell on local hemodynamics is also investigated for different occlusion degrees. The model here proposed accurately reproduces the fluid dynamics in a portion of the sinusoidal network in mouse liver. Mean velocities and mass flow rates are in agreement with literature values from in vivo measurements. Our approach provides details on local phenomena, hardly described by other computational studies, either focused on the macroscopic hepatic vasculature or based on homogeneous porous medium model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbert A. McClay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  19. Computational methods and implementation of the 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Ahnert, C.

    1995-01-01

    New computational methods have been developed in our 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction. They improve the accuracy and efficiency of the coupled neutronic-thermalhydraulic solution and extend its scope to provide, mainly, the calculation of: the fission reaction rates at the incore mini-detectors; the responses at the excore detectors (power range); the temperatures at the thermocouple locations; and the in-vessel distribution of the loop cold-leg inlet coolant conditions in the reflector and core channels, and to the hot-leg outlets per loop. The functional capabilities implemented in the extended SIMTRAN code for online utilization include: online surveillance, incore-excore calibration, evaluation of peak power factors and thermal margins, nominal update and cycle follow, prediction of maneuvers and diagnosis of fast transients and oscillations. The new code has been installed at the Vandellos-II PWR unit in Spain, since the startup of its cycle 7 in mid-June, 1994. The computational implementation has been performed on HP-700 workstations under the HP-UX Unix system, including the machine-man interfaces for online acquisition of measured data and interactive graphical utilization, in C and X11. The agreement of the simulated results with the measured data, during the startup tests and first months of actual operation, is well within the accuracy requirements. The performance and usefulness shown during the testing and demo phase, to be extended along this cycle, has proved that SIMTRAN and the man-machine graphic user interface have the qualities for a fast, accurate, user friendly, reliable, detailed and comprehensive online core surveillance and prediction

  20. 3D Surgical Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive ...

  1. Coronary computed tomography angiography with 320-row detector and using the AIDR-3D: initial experience; Angiotomografia computadorizada de coronarias com tomografo com 320 fileiras de detectores e utilizando o AIDR-3D: experiencia inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasdelli Neto, Roberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Bianco, Danilo Perussi; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Szarf, Gilberto; Teles, Gustavo Borges da Silva; Shoji, Hamilton; Santana Netto, Pedro Vieira; Passos, Rodrigo Bastos Duarte; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Ishikawa, Walther Yoshiharu; Lima, Joao Paulo Bacellar Costa; Rocha, Marcelo Assis; Marcos, Vinicius Neves; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao, E-mail: roberto.neto@einstein.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Failla, Bruna Bonaventura [Universidade Metodista de Sao Paulo, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) is a powerful non-invasive imaging method to evaluate coronary artery disease. Nowadays, coronary CTA estimated effective radiation dose can be dramatically reduced using state-of-the-art scanners, such as 320-row detector CT (320-CT), without changing coronary CTA diagnostic accuracy. To optimize and further reduce the radiation dose, new iterative reconstruction algorithms were released recently by several CT manufacturers, and now they are used routinely in coronary CTA. This paper presents our first experience using coronary CTA with 320-CT and the Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). In addition, we describe the current indications for coronary CTA in our practice as well as the acquisition standard protocols and protocols related to CT application for radiation dose reduction. In conclusion, coronary CTA radiation dose can be dramatically reduced following the 'as low as reasonable achievable' principle by combination of exam indication and well-documented technics for radiation dose reduction, such as beta blockers, low-kV, and also the newest iterative dose reduction software as AIDR-3D. (author)

  2. A data management system to enable urgent natural disaster computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Siew Hoon; Kranzlmüller, Dieter; Frank, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Civil protection, in particular natural disaster management, is very important to most nations and civilians in the world. When disasters like flash floods, earthquakes and tsunamis are expected or have taken place, it is of utmost importance to make timely decisions for managing the affected areas and reduce casualties. Computer simulations can generate information and provide predictions to facilitate this decision making process. Getting the data to the required resources is a critical requirement to enable the timely computation of the predictions. An urgent data management system to support natural disaster computing is thus necessary to effectively carry out data activities within a stipulated deadline. Since the trigger of a natural disaster is usually unpredictable, it is not always possible to prepare required resources well in advance. As such, an urgent data management system for natural disaster computing has to be able to work with any type of resources. Additional requirements include the need to manage deadlines and huge volume of data, fault tolerance, reliable, flexibility to changes, ease of usage, etc. The proposed data management platform includes a service manager to provide a uniform and extensible interface for the supported data protocols, a configuration manager to check and retrieve configurations of available resources, a scheduler manager to ensure that the deadlines can be met, a fault tolerance manager to increase the reliability of the platform and a data manager to initiate and perform the data activities. These managers will enable the selection of the most appropriate resource, transfer protocol, etc. such that the hard deadline of an urgent computation can be met for a particular urgent activity, e.g. data staging or computation. We associated 2 types of deadlines [2] with an urgent computing system. Soft-hard deadline: Missing a soft-firm deadline will render the computation less useful resulting in a cost that can have severe

  3. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  4. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; Loon, Mark van [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building,Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-28

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N=2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N=2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-’t Hooft loops in the 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory. In the presence of a mass parameter for the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  5. A 3d-3d appetizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T[L(p,1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p,1). In particular, for p=1, we show how the familiar S{sup 3} partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p,1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p,1)] on the squashed three-sphere S{sub b}{sup 3}. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G{sub ℂ} complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  6. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  7. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Sun Yi; Denis, Kathleen; Hassan, Bassam; Li Limin; Pauwels, Ruben; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  8. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512 3 to 8192 3 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H t (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections

  9. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikrishnan Parameswaran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process.

  10. The role of 3-D imaging and computer-based postprocessing for surgery of the liver and pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenacher, L.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.; Thorn, M.; Vetter, M.; Hassenpflug, P.; Meinzer, H.P.; Knaebel, H.P.; Kraus, T.; Buechler, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging based on navigation and virtual reality planning tools are well-established in the surgical routine in orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. In various procedures, they have achieved a significant clinical relevance and efficacy and have enhanced the discipline's resection capabilities. In abdominal surgery, however, these tools have gained little attraction so far. Even with the advantage of fast and high resolution cross-sectional liver and pancreas imaging, it remains unclear whether 3D planning and interactive planning tools might increase precision and safety of liver and pancreas surgery. The inability to simply transfer the methodology from orthopedic or neurosurgery is mainly a result of intraoperative organ movements and shifting and corresponding technical difficulties in the on-line applicability of presurgical cross sectional imaging data. For the interactive planning of liver surgery, three systems partly exist in daily routine: HepaVision2 (MeVis GmbH, Bremen), LiverLive (Navidez Ltd. Slovenia) and OrgaNicer (German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg). All these systems have realized a half- or full-automatic liver-segmentation procedure to visualize liver segments, vessel trees, resected volumes or critical residual organ volumes, either for preoperative planning or intraoperative visualization. Acquisition of data is mainly based on computed tomography. Three-dimensional navigation for intraoperative surgical guidance with ultrasound is part of the clinical testing. There are only few reports about the transfer of the visualization of the pancreas, probably caused by the difficulties with the segmentation routine due to inflammation or organ-exceeding tumor growth. With this paper, we like to evaluate and demonstrate the present status of software planning tools and pathways for future pre- and intraoperative resection planning in liver and pancreas surgery. (orig.)

  11. Development of microgravity, full body functional reach envelope using 3-D computer graphic models and virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    In microgravity conditions mobility is greatly enhanced and body stability is difficult to achieve. Because of these difficulties, optimum placement and accessibility of objects and controls can be critical to required tasks on board shuttle flights or on the proposed space station. Anthropometric measurement of the maximum reach of occupants of a microgravity environment provide knowledge about maximum functional placement for tasking situations. Calculations for a full body, functional reach envelope for microgravity environments are imperative. To this end, three dimensional computer modeled human figures, providing a method of anthropometric measurement, were used to locate the data points that define the full body, functional reach envelope. Virtual reality technology was utilized to enable an occupant of the microgravity environment to experience movement within the reach envelope while immersed in a simulated microgravity environment.

  12. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich; Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  13. Automatic reconstruction of 3D urban landscape by computing connected regions and assigning them an average altitude from LiDAR point cloud image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshiyuki; Koizumi, Kohei

    2014-10-01

    The demand of 3D city modeling has been increasing in many applications such as urban planing, computer gaming with realistic city environment, car navigation system with showing 3D city map, virtual city tourism inviting future visitors to a virtual city walkthrough and others. We proposed a simple method for reconstructing a 3D urban landscape from airborne LiDAR point cloud data. The automatic reconstruction method of a 3D urban landscape was implemented by the integration of all connected regions, which were extracted and extruded from the altitude mask images. These mask images were generated from the gray scale LiDAR image by the altitude threshold ranges. In this study we demonstrated successfully in the case of Kanazawa city center scene by applying the proposed method to the airborne LiDAR point cloud data.

  14. 4Cin: A computational pipeline for 3D genome modeling and virtual Hi-C analyses from 4C data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai Irastorza-Azcarate

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of 3C-based methods has revealed the importance of the 3D organization of the chromatin for key aspects of genome biology. However, the different caveats of the variants of 3C techniques have limited their scope and the range of scientific fields that could benefit from these approaches. To address these limitations, we present 4Cin, a method to generate 3D models and derive virtual Hi-C (vHi-C heat maps of genomic loci based on 4C-seq or any kind of 4C-seq-like data, such as those derived from NG Capture-C. 3D genome organization is determined by integrative consideration of the spatial distances derived from as few as four 4C-seq experiments. The 3D models obtained from 4C-seq data, together with their associated vHi-C maps, allow the inference of all chromosomal contacts within a given genomic region, facilitating the identification of Topological Associating Domains (TAD boundaries. Thus, 4Cin offers a much cheaper, accessible and versatile alternative to other available techniques while providing a comprehensive 3D topological profiling. By studying TAD modifications in genomic structural variants associated to disease phenotypes and performing cross-species evolutionary comparisons of 3D chromatin structures in a quantitative manner, we demonstrate the broad potential and novel range of applications of our method.

  15. A method for enabling real-time structural deformation in remote handling control system by utilizing offline simulation results and 3D model morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviranta, Sauli; Saarinen, Hannu; Maekinen, Harri; Krassi, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A full scale physical test facility, DTP2 (Divertor Test Platform 2) has been established in Finland for demonstrating and refining the Remote Handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER. The first prototype RH equipment at DTP2 is the Cassette Multifunctional Mover (CMM) equipped with Second Cassette End Effector (SCEE) delivered to DTP2 in October 2008. The purpose is to prove that CMM/SCEE prototype can be used successfully for the 2nd cassette RH operations. At the end of F4E grant 'DTP2 test facility operation and upgrade preparation', the RH operations of the 2nd cassette were successfully demonstrated to the representatives of Fusion For Energy (F4E). Due to its design, the CMM/SCEE robot has relatively large mechanical flexibilities when the robot carries the nine-ton-weighting 2nd Cassette on the 3.6-m long lever. This leads into a poor absolute accuracy and into the situation where the 3D model, which is used in the control system, does not reflect the actual deformed state of the CMM/SCEE robot. To improve the accuracy, the new method has been developed in order to handle the flexibilities within the control system's virtual environment. The effect of the load on the CMM/SCEE has been measured and minimized in the load compensation model, which is implemented in the control system software. The proposed method accounts for the structural deformations of the robot in the control system through the 3D model morphing by utilizing the finite element method (FEM) analysis for morph targets. This resulted in a considerable improvement of the CMM/SCEE absolute accuracy and the adequacy of the 3D model, which is crucially important in the RH applications, where the visual information of the controlled device in the surrounding environment is limited.

  16. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliesiu, Luca [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kos, Filip; Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Pufu, Silviu S. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Simmons-Duffin, David [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Yacoby, Ran [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions 〈ψψψψ〉 in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ×ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C{sub T}. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the Gross-Neveu models at large N. We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  17. Audio-visual perception of 3D cinematography: an fMRI study using condition-based and computation-based analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akitoshi Ogawa

    Full Text Available The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard "condition-based" designs, as well as "computational" methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion. Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround, 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono, 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG. The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life

  18. Audio-visual perception of 3D cinematography: an fMRI study using condition-based and computation-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Bordier, Cecile; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard "condition-based" designs, as well as "computational" methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion). Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround), 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono), 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG). The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life-like stimuli.

  19. Evaluation of two 3D virtual computer reconstructions for comparison of cleft lip and palate to normal fetal microanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Constantin A; Weichert, Frank; Geis, Philipp; Helga, Fritsch; Wagner, Mathias

    2006-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate reconstructive surgery requires thorough knowledge of normal and pathological labial, palatal, and velopharyngeal anatomy. This study compared two software algorithms and their 3D virtual anatomical reconstruction because exact 3D micromorphological reconstruction may improve learning, reveal spatial relationships, and provide data for mathematical modeling. Transverse and frontal serial sections of the midface of 18 fetal specimens (11th to 32nd gestational week) were used for two manual segmentation approaches. The first manual segmentation approach used bitmap images and either Windows-based or Mac-based SURFdriver commercial software that allowed manual contour matching, surface generation with average slice thickness, 3D triangulation, and real-time interactive virtual 3D reconstruction viewing. The second manual segmentation approach used tagged image format and platform-independent prototypical SeViSe software developed by one of the authors (F.W.). Distended or compressed structures were dynamically transformed. Registration was automatic but allowed manual correction, such as individual section thickness, surface generation, and interactive virtual 3D real-time viewing. SURFdriver permitted intuitive segmentation, easy manual offset correction, and the reconstruction showed complex spatial relationships in real time. However, frequent software crashes and erroneous landmarks appearing "out of the blue," requiring manual correction, were tedious. Individual section thickness, defined smoothing, and unlimited structure number could not be integrated. The reconstruction remained underdimensioned and not sufficiently accurate for this study's reconstruction problem. SeViSe permitted unlimited structure number, late addition of extra sections, and quantified smoothing and individual slice thickness; however, SeViSe required more elaborate work-up compared to SURFdriver, yet detailed and exact 3D reconstructions were created.

  20. 3-D image-based numerical computations of snow permeability: links to specific surface area, density, and microstructural anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Calonne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We used three-dimensional (3-D images of snow microstructure to carry out numerical estimations of the full tensor of the intrinsic permeability of snow (K. This study was performed on 35 snow samples, spanning a wide range of seasonal snow types. For several snow samples, a significant anisotropy of permeability was detected and is consistent with that observed for the effective thermal conductivity obtained from the same samples. The anisotropy coefficient, defined as the ratio of the vertical over the horizontal components of K, ranges from 0.74 for a sample of decomposing precipitation particles collected in the field to 1.66 for a depth hoar specimen. Because the permeability is related to a characteristic length, we introduced a dimensionless tensor K*=K/res2, where the equivalent sphere radius of ice grains (res is computed from the specific surface area of snow (SSA and the ice density (ρi as follows: res=3/(SSA×ρi. We define K and K* as the average of the diagonal components of K and K*, respectively. The 35 values of K* were fitted to snow density (ρs and provide the following regression: K = (3.0 ± 0.3 res2 exp((−0.0130 ± 0.0003ρs. We noted that the anisotropy of permeability does not affect significantly the proposed equation. This regression curve was applied to several independent datasets from the literature and compared to other existing regression curves or analytical models. The results show that it is probably the best currently available simple relationship linking the average value of permeability, K, to snow density and specific surface area.

  1. GAMBARAN KETEBALAN DAN DENSITAS TULANG KORTIKAL MAKSILA DAN MANDIBULA MANUSIA PAWON DENGAN PENCITRAAN CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisam Rizqullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The science on the existence of maxillary and mandibular cortical bone thickness and density of prehistoric human which had been found from Pawon cave, are  still unidentified by any research, further more if it is compared with those of modern human. The aim of this study was to investigate the Pawon-man’s maxillary and mandibular cortical bone thickness and density by using a 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography imaging. The research method is a descriptive one which was consisted of 3 maxillas and 3 mandibles of Pawon-man as samples. This research was conducted by using Ez Implant software used in 3 dimensional aspects (axial, coronal and sagittal. All aspects were recorded, collected and presented in tabular form. The Pawon-man’s maxilla showed that the average of cortical corpus bone thickness was 1,53 mm with the average of density of 971,98 HU, meanwhile the average of cortical alveolar crest bone thickness was 0,69 mm with the average of density of 750,87 HU. Whereas the Pawon-man’s mandible average cortical corpus bone thickness was 3,43 mm with the average of density  of 1042,26 HU, on the other hand the average cortical alveolar crest bone thickness was 0,89 mm with the average of density of 995,45 HU. The result of the interdental region measurement  showed the highest cortical bone thickness of maxilla was located in the F region (interdental region Molar 1 and Molar 2 with the average thickness of 1,29 mm and the average density of 887,80 HU, whereas in mandible which was located in the E region (interdental region Premolar 2 and Molar 1 with the average thickness of 2,61 mm and the average density of 999,22 HU. The Pawon-man’s mandible has more cortical bone thickness and density compared with those of Pawon-man’s maxilla with highest cortical bone thickness which was located in the posterior region and the cortical bone thickness of Pawon-man’s jaw was higher than modern human’s.

  2. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  3. Computer-assisted anatomical placement of a double-bundle ACL through 3D-fitting of a statistically generated femoral template into individual knee geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, J. W. H.; Wymenga, A. B.; Sati, M.; Bourquin, Y.; Blankevoort, L.; van der Venne, R.; Kooloos, J. G. M.; Staubli, H. U.

    2000-01-01

    Femoral graft placement is an important factor in the success of ACL-reconstruction. Besides improving the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement, Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS) can be used to determine the anatomical Location. This requires a 3D femoral template with the position of the anatomical

  4. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  5. Fast computation of hologram patterns of a 3D object using run-length encoding and novel look-up table methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2009-02-20

    In this paper we propose a new approach for fast generation of computer-generated holograms (CGHs) of a 3D object by using the run-length encoding (RLE) and the novel look-up table (N-LUT) methods. With the RLE method, spatially redundant data of a 3D object are extracted and regrouped into the N-point redundancy map according to the number of the adjacent object points having the same 3D value. Based on this redundancy map, N-point principle fringe patterns (PFPs) are newly calculated by using the 1-point PFP of the N-LUT, and the CGH pattern for the 3D object is generated with these N-point PFPs. In this approach, object points to be involved in calculation of the CGH pattern can be dramatically reduced and, as a result, an increase of computational speed can be obtained. Some experiments with a test 3D object are carried out and the results are compared to those of the conventional methods.

  6. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  7. TRIO a general computer code for reactor 3-D flows analysis. Application to a LMFBR hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnaud, J.P.; Rouzaud, P.

    1985-09-01

    TRIO is a code developed at CEA to investigate general incompressible 2D and 3D viscous flows. Two calculations are presented: the lid driven cubic cavity at Re=400; steady state (velocity and temperature field) of a LMFBR hot plenum, carried out in order to prepare the calculation of a cold shock consecutive to a reactor scram. 8 refs., 26 figs.

  8. 3-D computational model of poly (lactic acid)/halloysite nanocomposites: Predicting elastic properties and stress analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Silva, R. T.; Pasbakhsh, Pooria; Goh, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    of nanotubes with fixed aspect ratio and the proposed alternative real-structure based model takes the experimentally observed variations of HNTs sizes, impurities and aspect ratios into account. The requirements of the 3-D HNTs nanocomposite models have been explored by testing idealized, real structure based...

  9. 3-D Discrete Analytical Ridgelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Helbert , David; Carré , Philippe; Andrès , Éric

    2006-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose an implementation of the 3-D Ridgelet transform: the 3-D discrete analytical Ridgelet transform (3-D DART). This transform uses the Fourier strategy for the computation of the associated 3-D discrete Radon transform. The innovative step is the definition of a discrete 3-D transform with the discrete analytical geometry theory by the construction of 3-D discrete analytical lines in the Fourier domain. We propose two types of 3-D discrete lines:...

  10. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  11. An Improved Computing Method for 3D Mechanical Connectivity Rates Based on a Polyhedral Simulation Model of Discrete Fracture Network in Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchao; Han, Shuai; Zhou, Sibao; Zhang, Ye

    2018-06-01

    Based on a 3D model of a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a rock mass, an improved projective method for computing the 3D mechanical connectivity rate was proposed. The Monte Carlo simulation method, 2D Poisson process and 3D geological modeling technique were integrated into a polyhedral DFN modeling approach, and the simulation results were verified by numerical tests and graphical inspection. Next, the traditional projective approach for calculating the rock mass connectivity rate was improved using the 3D DFN models by (1) using the polyhedral model to replace the Baecher disk model; (2) taking the real cross section of the rock mass, rather than a part of the cross section, as the test plane; and (3) dynamically searching the joint connectivity rates using different dip directions and dip angles at different elevations to calculate the maximum, minimum and average values of the joint connectivity at each elevation. In a case study, the improved method and traditional method were used to compute the mechanical connectivity rate of the slope of a dam abutment. The results of the two methods were further used to compute the cohesive force of the rock masses. Finally, a comparison showed that the cohesive force derived from the traditional method had a higher error, whereas the cohesive force derived from the improved method was consistent with the suggested values. According to the comparison, the effectivity and validity of the improved method were verified indirectly.

  12. Experimental approach for the uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometry dimensional measurements using computed tomography at the mm and sub-mm scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2017-01-01

    The dimensional verification of miniaturized components with 3D complex geometries is particularly challenging. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems......’ traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, an alternative method for the measurement uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometries by using CT is presented. The method is based on the micro-CT system Maximum Permissible Error (MPE) estimation, determined...... experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile...

  13. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  14. Video-assisted breast surgery and 3-dimensional computed tomographic mammary lymphography (2). Sentinel node biopsy with 3D-CT mammary lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Koji

    2010-01-01

    I have studied endoscopic surgery for breast diseases and 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) lymphography for sentinel node (SN) biopsy. In this second in a series of reports, I explain the techniques of 3D-CT lymphography. 3D-CT lymphography can show the detailed lymphatic flow from the breast tumor toward the SNs and the exact local relation between axillary lymph nodes. I have developed this 3D image-processing system to more precisely depict the anatomical structures of the mammary lymphovascular system. This system allows us to systematically collect axillary lymph nodes, including SNs. 3D-CT lymphography was performed to mark SNs on the skin on the day before surgery. Above the tumor and near the areola, 2 ml of Iopamiron 300 was injected subcutaneously. Sixteen-channel multidetector-row helical CT scan images were obtained 1 minute after injection to detect SNs, and after 3 and 5 minutes to observe lymph flow into the venous angle. The scan images were reconstructed to produce 3D images. SN biopsy was performed with the dye-staining method and endoscopy. 3D-CT lymphography accurately showed lymphatic flow from the tumor to SNs. We classified the relationship between the lymph ducts and the drained SNs into 4 patterns. Following up 3 and 5 minutes after injection of the contrast agent, we can follow the lymph ducts beyond the SN into the second and third nodes toward the venous angle with the complex plexus. The figure of the axillary nodes shows 5 beads-like grouped nodes. 3D-CT lymphography can also recognize the metastatic patterns of the enhanced lymph node. These patterns will predict the metastasis before SN biopsy. 3D-CT lymphography can also be used to detect lymph flow from the arm to avoid harming the arm lymph channel during axillary node dissection and SN biopsy. With 3D-CT lymphography, we can more accurately and precisely recognize lymph flow and the positional relations of SN and axillary nodes to surrounding anatomical structures

  15. Development of a stereolithography (STL input and computer numerical control (CNC output algorithm for an entry-level 3-D printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype Stereolithography (STL file format slicing and tool-path generation algorithm, which serves as a data front-end for a Rapid Prototyping (RP entry- level three-dimensional (3-D printer. Used mainly in Additive Manufacturing (AM, 3-D printers are devices that apply plastic, ceramic, and metal, layer by layer, in all three dimensions on a flat surface (X, Y, and Z axis. 3-D printers, unfortunately, cannot print an object without a special algorithm that is required to create the Computer Numerical Control (CNC instructions for printing. An STL algorithm therefore forms a critical component for Layered Manufacturing (LM, also referred to as RP. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm that is capable of processing and slicing an STL file or multiple files, resulting in a tool-path, and finally compiling a CNC file for an entry-level 3- D printer. The prototype algorithm was implemented for an entry-level 3-D printer that utilises the Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM process or Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF process; an AM technology. Following an experimental method, the full data flow path for the prototype algorithm was developed, starting with STL data files, and then processing the STL data file into a G-code file format by slicing the model and creating a tool-path. This layering method is used by most 3-D printers to turn a 2-D object into a 3-D object. The STL algorithm developed in this study presents innovative opportunities for LM, since it allows engineers and architects to transform their ideas easily into a solid model in a fast, simple, and cheap way. This is accomplished by allowing STL models to be sliced rapidly, effectively, and without error, and finally to be processed and prepared into a G-code print file.

  16. Neutron detection and characterization for non-proliferation applications using 3D computer optical memories [Use of 3D optical computer memory for radiation detectors/dosimeters. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Gary W.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated 3-dimensional optical random access memory (3D-ORAM) materials for detection and characterization of charged particles of neutrons by detecting tracks left by the recoil charged particles produced by the neutrons. We have characterized the response of these materials to protons, alpha particles and carbon-12 nuclei as a functions of dose and energy. We have observed individual tracks using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We are investigating the use of neural net analysis to characterize energetic neutron fields from their track structure in these materials

  17. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mory, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.mory@philips.com [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo [Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk [Philips Research, Röntgenstrasse 24–26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, 12605 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Rit, Simon [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laënnec, F-69373 Lyon (France); Peyrin, Françoise [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); X-ray Imaging Group, European Synchrotron, Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron (France)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  18. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection

  19. Autoblocking dose-limiting normal structures within a radiation treatment field: 3-D computer optimization of 'unconventional' field arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Brian A.; Cullip, Timothy J.; Rosenman, Julian G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate that one can obtain a homogeneous dose distribution within a specified gross tumor volume (GTV) while severely limiting the dose to a structure surrounded by that tumor volume. We present three clinical examples below. Materials and Methods: Using planning CT scans from previously treated patients, we designed variety of radiation treatment plans in which the dose-critical normal structure was blocked, even if it meant blocking some of the tumor. To deal with the resulting dose inhomogeneities within the tumor, we introduced 3D compensation. Examples presented here include (1) blocking the spinal cord segment while treating an entire vertebral body, (2) blocking both kidneys while treating the entire peritoneal cavity, and (3) blocking one parotid gland while treating the oropharynx in its entirety along with regional nodes. A series of multiple planar and non-coplanar beam templates with automatic anatomic blocking and field shaping were designed for each scenario. Three-dimensional compensators were designed that gave the most homogeneous dose-distribution for the GTV. For each beam, rays were cast from the beam source through a 2D compensator grid and out through the tumor. The average tumor dose along each ray was then used to adjust the compensator thickness over successive iterations to achieve a uniform average dose. DVH calculations for the GTV, normal structures, and the 'auto-blocked' structure were made and used for inter-plan comparisons. Results: These optimized treatment plans successfully decreased dose to the dose-limiting structure while at the same time preserving or even improving the dose distribution to the tumor volume as compared to traditional treatment plans. Conclusion: The use of 3D compensation allows one to obtain dose distributions that are, theoretically, at least, far superior to those in common clinical use. Sensible beam templates, auto-blocking, auto-field shaping, and 3D compensators form a

  20. 3D non-destructive fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) with a CdTe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Yeon; Lee, Won Ho; Kim, Young Hak [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In our research, the material was exposed to an X-ray and not only the conventional transmission image but also 3D images based on the information of characteristic X-ray detected by a 2D CdTe planar detector array were reconstructed. Since atoms have their own characteristic X-ray energy, our system was able to discriminate materials of even a same density if the materials were composed of different atomic numbers. We applied FXCT to distinguish various unknown materials with similar densities. The materials with similar densities were clearly distinguished in the 3D reconstructed images based on the information of the detected characteristic X-ray, while they were not discriminated from each other in the images based on the information of the detected transmission X-ray. In the fused images consisting of 3D transmitted and characteristic X-ray images, all of the positions, densities and atomic numbers of materials enclosed in plastic phantom or pipe were clearly identified by analyzing energy, position and amount of detected radiation.

  1. Human in vitro 3D co-culture model to engineer vascularized bone-mimicking tissues combining computational tools and statistical experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Arrigoni, Chiara; Talò, Giuseppe; Zamai, Moreno; Zagra, Luigi; Caiolfa, Valeria; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functional, vascularized tissues is a key challenge for both tissue engineering applications and the development of advanced in vitro models analyzing interactions among circulating cells, endothelium and organ-specific microenvironments. Since vascularization is a complex process guided by multiple synergic factors, it is critical to analyze the specific role that different experimental parameters play in the generation of physiological tissues. Our goals were to design a novel meso-scale model bridging the gap between microfluidic and macro-scale studies, and high-throughput screen the effects of multiple variables on the vascularization of bone-mimicking tissues. We investigated the influence of endothelial cell (EC) density (3-5 Mcells/ml), cell ratio among ECs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteo-differentiated MSCs (1:1:0, 10:1:0, 10:1:1), culture medium (endothelial, endothelial + angiopoietin-1, 1:1 endothelial/osteo), hydrogel type (100%fibrin, 60%fibrin+40%collagen), tissue geometry (2 × 2 × 2, 2 × 2 × 5 mm(3)). We optimized the geometry and oxygen gradient inside hydrogels through computational simulations and we analyzed microvascular network features including total network length/area and vascular branch number/length. Particularly, we employed the "Design of Experiment" statistical approach to identify key differences among experimental conditions. We combined the generation of 3D functional tissue units with the fine control over the local microenvironment (e.g. oxygen gradients), and developed an effective strategy to enable the high-throughput screening of multiple experimental parameters. Our approach allowed to identify synergic correlations among critical parameters driving microvascular network development within a bone-mimicking environment and could be translated to any vascularized tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Ziad

    2006-12-01

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  3. A boundary integral method for numerical computation of radar cross section of 3D targets using hybrid BEM/FEM with edge elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodig, H.

    2017-11-01

    This contribution presents the boundary integral formulation for numerical computation of time-harmonic radar cross section for 3D targets. Method relies on hybrid edge element BEM/FEM to compute near field edge element coefficients that are associated with near electric and magnetic fields at the boundary of the computational domain. Special boundary integral formulation is presented that computes radar cross section directly from these edge element coefficients. Consequently, there is no need for near-to-far field transformation (NTFFT) which is common step in RCS computations. By the end of the paper it is demonstrated that the formulation yields accurate results for canonical models such as spheres, cubes, cones and pyramids. Method has demonstrated accuracy even in the case of dielectrically coated PEC sphere at interior resonance frequency which is common problem for computational electromagnetic codes.

  4. DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES OF 3D-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY WITH INTRALESIONAL APPLICATION OF CONTRAST MATERIAL IN A CASE OF VERY LARGE RADICULAR MAXILLARY CYST - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Gavazova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis of odontogenic cysts despite their benign nature is a critical and challenging problem. Aim: The aim of this article is to demonstrate a different diagnostic approach in case of very large odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: This study was executed on one male patient aged of 38 using 3D computed tomography and contrast material inside the lesion. Differential diagnosis made by the residents was compared to the histopathological examination as the gold standard for identifying the nature of the cysts. Results: This diagnostic approach using 3D computed tomography combined with contrast material injected inside the lesion shows the real borders of the cyst of the maxilla and helps oral surgeon in planning the volume of the surgical intervention. Conclusion: Precise diagnose ensure the possibility of doing the optimal surgical intervention- a precondition for best wound healing.

  5. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  6. Comparison of hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms between MR fluid dynamics using 3D cine phase-contrast MRI and MR-based computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Haruo; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Alley, Marcus T.; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J.; Namba, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to compare hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms of MR fluid dynamics (MRFD) using 3D cine PC MR imaging (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and MR-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 4D-Flow was performed for five intracranial aneurysms by a 1.5 T MR scanner. 3D TOF MR angiography was performed for geometric information. The blood flow in the aneurysms was modeled using CFD simulation based on the finite element method. We used MR angiographic data as the vascular models and MR flow information as boundary conditions in CFD. 3D velocity vector fields, 3D streamlines, shearing velocity maps, wall shear stress (WSS) distribution maps and oscillatory shear index (OSI) distribution maps were obtained by MRFD and CFD and were compared. There was a moderate to high degree of correlation in 3D velocity vector fields and a low to moderate degree of correlation in WSS of aneurysms between MRFD and CFD using regression analysis. The patterns of 3D streamlines were similar between MRFD and CFD. The small and rotating shearing velocities and higher OSI were observed at the top of the spiral flow in the aneurysms. The pattern and location of shearing velocity in MRFD and CFD were similar. The location of high oscillatory shear index obtained by MRFD was near to that obtained by CFD. MRFD and CFD of intracranial aneurysms correlated fairly well. (orig.)

  7. Development of a locally mass flux conservative computer code for calculating 3-D viscous flow in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, L.

    1982-01-01

    The VANS successive approximation numerical method was extended to the computation of three dimensional, viscous, transonic flows in turbomachines. A cross-sectional computer code, which conserves mass flux at each point of the cross-sectional surface of computation was developed. In the VANS numerical method, the cross-sectional computation follows a blade-to-blade calculation. Numerical calculations were made for an axial annular turbine cascade and a transonic, centrifugal impeller with splitter vanes. The subsonic turbine cascade computation was generated in blade-to-blade surface to evaluate the accuracy of the blade-to-blade mode of marching. Calculated blade pressures at the hub, mid, and tip radii of the cascade agreed with corresponding measurements. The transonic impeller computation was conducted to test the newly developed locally mass flux conservative cross-sectional computer code. Both blade-to-blade and cross sectional modes of calculation were implemented for this problem. A triplet point shock structure was computed in the inducer region of the impeller. In addition, time-averaged shroud static pressures generally agreed with measured shroud pressures. It is concluded that the blade-to-blade computation produces a useful engineering flow field in regions of subsonic relative flow; and cross-sectional computation, with a locally mass flux conservative continuity equation, is required to compute the shock waves in regions of supersonic relative flow.

  8. Thoracoscopic anatomical lung segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation without tumour markings for non-palpable and non-visualized small lung nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirohisa; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun; Hamada, Akira; Watarai, Hikaru; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-09-01

    Although wedge resection can be curative for small lung tumours, tumour marking is sometimes required for resection of non-palpable or visually undetectable lung nodules as a method for identification of tumours. Tumour marking sometimes fails and occasionally causes serious complications. We have performed many thoracoscopic segmentectomies using 3D computed tomography simulation for undetectable small lung tumours without any tumour markings. The aim of this study was to investigate whether thoracoscopic segmentectomy planned with 3D computed tomography simulation could precisely remove non-palpable and visually undetectable tumours. Between January 2012 and March 2016, 58 patients underwent thoracoscopic segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation for non-palpable, visually undetectable tumours. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 35, 14 and 9 patients underwent segmentectomy, subsegmentectomy and segmentectomy combined with adjacent subsegmentectomy, respectively. All tumours were correctly resected without tumour marking. The median tumour size and distance from the visceral pleura was 14 ± 5.2 mm (range 5-27 mm) and 11.6 mm (range 1-38.8 mm), respectively. Median values related to the procedures were operative time, 176 min (range 83-370 min); blood loss, 43 ml (range 0-419 ml); duration of chest tube placement, 1 day (range 1-8 days); and postoperative hospital stay, 5 days (range 3-12 days). Two cases were converted to open thoracotomy due to bleeding. Three cases required pleurodesis for pleural fistula. No recurrences occurred during the mean follow-up period of 44.4 months (range 5-53 months). Thoracoscopic segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation was feasible and could be performed to resect undetectable tumours with no tumour markings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Utility of 3D Reconstruction of 2D Liver Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Images as a Surgical Planning Tool for Residents in Liver Resection Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Caitlin T; MacDonald, Andrew; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Jalink, Diederick; Zevin, Boris; Fichtinger, Gabor; Nanji, Sulaiman

    A fundamental aspect of surgical planning in liver resections is the identification of key vessel tributaries to preserve healthy liver tissue while fully resecting the tumor(s). Current surgical planning relies primarily on the surgeon's ability to mentally reconstruct 2D computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images into 3D and plan resection margins. This creates significant cognitive load, especially for trainees, as it relies on image interpretation, anatomical and surgical knowledge, experience, and spatial sense. The purpose of this study is to determine if 3D reconstruction of preoperative CT/MR images will assist resident-level trainees in making appropriate operative plans for liver resection surgery. Ten preoperative patient CT/MR images were selected. Images were case-matched, 5 to 2D planning and 5 to 3D planning. Images from the 3D group were segmented to create interactive digital models that the resident can manipulate to view the tumor(s) in relation to landmark hepatic structures. Residents were asked to evaluate the images and devise a surgical resection plan for each image. The resident alternated between 2D and 3D planning, in a randomly generated order. The primary outcome was the accuracy of resident's plan compared to expert opinion. Time to devise each surgical plan was the secondary outcome. Residents completed a prestudy and poststudy questionnaire regarding their experience with liver surgery and the 3D planning software. Senior level surgical residents from the Queen's University General Surgery residency program were recruited to participate. A total of 14 residents participated in the study. The median correct response rate was 2 of 5 (40%; range: 0-4) for the 2D group, and 3 of 5 (60%; range: 1-5) for the 3D group (p surgery planning increases accuracy of resident surgical planning and decreases amount of time required. 3D reconstruction would be a useful model for improving trainee understanding of liver anatomy and surgical

  10. Development of an organ-specific insert phantom generated using a 3D printer for investigations of cardiac computed tomography protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kamarul A; McEntee, Mark F; Reed, Warren; Kench, Peter L

    2018-04-30

    An ideal organ-specific insert phantom should be able to simulate the anatomical features with appropriate appearances in the resultant computed tomography (CT) images. This study investigated a 3D printing technology to develop a novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom derived from volumetric CT image datasets of anthropomorphic chest phantom. Cardiac insert volumes were segmented from CT image datasets, derived from an anthropomorphic chest phantom of Lungman N-01 (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). These segmented datasets were converted to a virtual 3D-isosurface of heart-shaped shell, while two other removable inserts were included using computer-aided design (CAD) software program. This newly designed cardiac insert phantom was later printed by using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) process via a Creatbot DM Plus 3D printer. Then, several selected filling materials, such as contrast media, oil, water and jelly, were loaded into designated spaces in the 3D-printed phantom. The 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was positioned within the anthropomorphic chest phantom and 30 repeated CT acquisitions performed using a multi-detector scanner at 120-kVp tube potential. Attenuation (Hounsfield Unit, HU) values were measured and compared to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. The output of the 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was a solid acrylic plastic material, which was strong, light in weight and cost-effective. HU values of the filling materials were comparable to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. A novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom for anthropomorphic chest phantom was developed using volumetric CT image datasets with a 3D printer. Hence, this suggested the printing methodology could be applied to generate other phantoms for CT imaging studies. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical

  11. Using cloud computing technologies in IP-video surveillance systems with the function of 3d-object modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigalov Kirill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the integration of cloud technology functions into 3D IP video surveil-lance systems in order to conduct further video Analytics, incoming real-time data, as well as stored video materials on the server in the «cloud». The main attention is devoted to «cloud technologies» usage optimizing the process of recognition of the desired object by increasing the criteria of flexibility and scalability of the system. Transferring image load from the client to the cloud server, to the virtual part of the system. The development of the issues considered in the article in terms of data analysis, which will significantly improve the effectiveness of the implementation of special tasks facing special units.

  12. NASA-VOF3D: A three-dimensional computer program for incompressible flows with free surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, M. D.; Mjolsness, R. C.; Stein, L. R.

    1987-07-01

    Presented is the NASA-VOF3D three-dimensional, transient, free-surface hydrodynamics program. This three-dimensional extension of NASA-VOF2D will, in principle, permit treatment in full three-dimensional generality of the wide variety of applications that could be treated by NASA-VOF2D only within the two-dimensional idealization. In particular, it, like NASA-VOF2D, is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low g environment. The code is presently restricted to cylindrical geometry. The code is based on the fractional volume-of-fluid method and allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion. It also has a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. This report provides a brief discussion of the numerical method, a code listing, and some sample problems.

  13. Sectional depiction of the pelvic floor by CT, MR imaging and sheet plastination: computer-aided correlation and 3D model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany); Schiemann, T. [Inst. for Mathematics and Computer Science in Medicine, University of Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Nicolas, V. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    The structures of the pelvic floor are clinically important but difficult to assess. To facilitate the understanding of the complicated pelvic floor anatomy on sectional images obtained by CT and MR imaging, and to make the representation more vivid, a computer-aided 3D model was created from a male and a female torso to develop a teaching tool. A male and a female cadaver torso were investigated by means of CT, MR imaging, and serial-section sheet plastination. A 3D reconstruction of the pelvic floor and adjacent structures was performed by fusion of CT and MR imaging data sets with sheet plastination sections. Corresponding sections from all three methods could be compared and visualized in their 3D context. Sheet plastination allows distinction of connective tissue, muscles, and pelvic organs down to a microscopic level. In combination with CT, MR imaging, and sheet plastination a 3D model of the pelvic floor offers a better understanding of the complex pelvic anatomy. This knowledge may be applied in the diagnostic imaging of urinary incontinence or prolapse and prior to prostate surgery. (orig.)

  14. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Feasible voltage-tap based quench detection in a Ag/Bi-2212 coil enabled by fast 3D normal zone propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Tengming; Ye, Liyang; Li, Pei

    2016-01-01

    For this study, small insert solenoids have been built using a commercial Ag/Bi-2212 multifilamentary round wire, insulated with a new thin TiO 2 – polymer coating insulation (thickness in ~20 μm versus ~100 μm for a commonly used mullite braided sleeve insulation), and characterized in background magnetic field up to 14 T at 4.2 K to explore the high-field performance and quench detection of Bi-2212 magnets. The coil has no visible leakage and no electrical shorts after reaction, and it carries 280 A/mm -2 in a background field 14 T and generates an additional 1.7 T. A notable result is that, despite normal zones propagate slowly along the conductor, the hot spot temperature upon detection increases only from 40 K to 60 K when the resistive quench detection voltage threshold increases from 0.1 V to 1 V for all operating current density investigated, showing that quench detection using voltage taps is feasible for this coil. This is in a strong contrast to a coil we previously built to the same specifications but from wires insulated with the mullite braided sleeve insulation, for which the hot spot temperature upon detection increases from ~80 K to ~140 K while increasing from the detection voltage threshold from 0.1 V to 1 V, and thus for which quench detection using voltage taps presents significant risks, consistent with the common belief that the effectiveness of quench detection using voltage taps for superconducting magnets built using high temperature superconductors is seriously compromised by their slow normal zone propagation. This striking difference is ascribed to the fast transverse quench propagation enabled by thin insulation and improved thermal coupling between conductor turns. Finally, this work demonstrates that quench detection for high-temperature superconducting magnets highly depends on the design and construction of the coils such as insulation materials used and this dependence should be factored into the overall magnet design

  16. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  17. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  18. ROOFN3D: DEEP LEARNING TRAINING DATA FOR 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wichmann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning methods have gained in importance through the latest development of artificial intelligence and computer hardware. Particularly approaches based on deep learning have shown that they are able to provide state-of-the-art results for various tasks. However, the direct application of deep learning methods to improve the results of 3D building reconstruction is often not possible due, for example, to the lack of suitable training data. To address this issue, we present RoofN3D which provides a new 3D point cloud training dataset that can be used to train machine learning models for different tasks in the context of 3D building reconstruction. It can be used, among others, to train semantic segmentation networks or to learn the structure of buildings and the geometric model construction. Further details about RoofN3D and the developed data preparation framework, which enables the automatic derivation of training data, are described in this paper. Furthermore, we provide an overview of other available 3D point cloud training data and approaches from current literature in which solutions for the application of deep learning to unstructured and not gridded 3D point cloud data are presented.

  19. 3D computation of the shape of etched tracks in CR-39 for oblique particle incidence and comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Hermsdorf, D.; Reichelt, U.; Starke, S.; Wang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Computation of the shape of etch pits needs to know the varying track etch rate along the particle trajectories. Experiments with alpha particles and 7 Li ions entering CR-39 detectors under different angles showed that this function is not affected by the inclination of the particle trajectory with respect to the normal on the detector surface. Track formation for oblique particle incidence can, therefore, be simulated using the track etch rates determined for perpendicular incidence. 3D computation of the track shape was performed applying a model recently described in literature. A special program has been written for computing the x,y,z coordinates of points on the etch pit walls. In addition, the etch pit profiles in sagittal sections as well as the contours of the etch pit openings on the detector surface have been determined experimentally. Computed and experimental results were in good agreement confirming the applicability of the 3D computational model in combination with the functions for the depth-dependent track etch rates determined experimentally

  20. Reconstruction of a Severely Atrophied Alveolar Ridge by Computer-Aided Gingival Simulation and 3D-Printed Surgical Guide: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Seok; Lee, Mi-Ran; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Lee, Ui-Lyong

    Dental implants positioned in severely atrophied anterior maxillae require esthetic or functional compromises. This case report describes the rehabilitation of a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with a three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) surgical guide. A 50-year-old woman had a severely atrophied anterior maxilla with unfavorably positioned dental implants. Functional and esthetic prosthodontic restoration was difficult to achieve. An anterior segmental osteotomy was planned to reposition the dental implants. A 3D surgical guide was designed for precise relocation of the segment. The surgical guide firmly grasped the impression copings of the dental implants, minimizing surgical errors. Three-dimensional gingival simulation was used preoperatively to estimate the appropriate position of the gingiva. Rigid fixation to the surrounding bone allowed immobilization of the implant-bone segment. Satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes were attained 6 months after surgery. Finally, a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with unfavorably positioned dental implants was recovered with minimal esthetic and functional deterioration using gingival simulation and a 3D CAD/CAM surgical guide.

  1. Analysis of natural convection heat transfer with crust formation in the molten metal pool using CONV-2 and 3D computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R. J.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Choi, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical studies have been performed on natural convection heat transfer with crust formation in a molten metal pool to validate and evaluate experimental data using the CONV-2 and 3D computer codes. Two types of steady state tests, a low and high geometric aspect ratio case in the molten metal pool, were performed to investigate crust thickness as a function of boundary conditions. The CONV-2 and 3D computer codes were developed under the OECD/NEA RASPLAV project to simulate two- and three-dimensional natural convection heat transfer with crust formation, respectively. The Rayleigh-Benard flow patterns in the molten metal pool contribute to the temperature distribution, which affects non-uniform crust formation. The CONV-2D results on crust thickness are a little higher than the experimental data because of heat loss during the test. In comparison of the CONV-3D results with the CONV-2D results on crust thickness, the three-dimensional results are higher than the two-dimensional results, because of three dimensional natural convection flow and wall effect

  2. 2D-3D radiograph to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration for C-arm image-guided robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen Pei; Otake, Yoshito; Azizian, Mahdi; Wagner, Oliver J; Sorger, Jonathan M; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-08-01

    C-arm radiographs are commonly used for intraoperative image guidance in surgical interventions. Fluoroscopy is a cost-effective real-time modality, although image quality can vary greatly depending on the target anatomy. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are sometimes available, so 2D-3D registration is needed for intra-procedural guidance. C-arm radiographs were registered to CBCT scans and used for 3D localization of peritumor fiducials during a minimally invasive thoracic intervention with a da Vinci Si robot. Intensity-based 2D-3D registration of intraoperative radiographs to CBCT was performed. The feasible range of X-ray projections achievable by a C-arm positioned around a da Vinci Si surgical robot, configured for robotic wedge resection, was determined using phantom models. Experiments were conducted on synthetic phantoms and animals imaged with an OEC 9600 and a Siemens Artis zeego, representing the spectrum of different C-arm systems currently available for clinical use. The image guidance workflow was feasible using either an optically tracked OEC 9600 or a Siemens Artis zeego C-arm, resulting in an angular difference of Δθ:∼ 30°. The two C-arm systems provided TRE mean ≤ 2.5 mm and TRE mean ≤ 2.0 mm, respectively (i.e., comparable to standard clinical intraoperative navigation systems). C-arm 3D localization from dual 2D-3D registered radiographs was feasible and applicable for intraoperative image guidance during da Vinci robotic thoracic interventions using the proposed workflow. Tissue deformation and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation of this system.

  3. Microfocal X-ray computed tomography post-processing operations for optimizing reconstruction volumes of stented arteries during 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladisa, John F; Olson, Lars E; Ropella, Kristina M; Molthen, Robert C; Haworth, Steven T; Kersten, Judy R; Warltier, David C; Pagel, Paul S

    2005-08-01

    Restenosis caused by neointimal hyperplasia (NH) remains an important clinical problem after stent implantation. Restenosis varies with stent geometry, and idealized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have indicated that geometric properties of the implanted stent may differentially influence NH. However, 3D studies capturing the in vivo flow domain within stented vessels have not been conducted at a resolution sufficient to detect subtle alterations in vascular geometry caused by the stent and the subsequent temporal development of NH. We present the details and limitations of a series of post-processing operations used in conjunction with microfocal X-ray CT imaging and reconstruction to generate geometrically accurate flow domains within the localized region of a stent several weeks after implantation. Microfocal X-ray CT reconstruction volumes were subjected to an automated program to perform arterial thresholding, spatial orientation, and surface smoothing of stented and unstented rabbit iliac arteries several weeks after antegrade implantation. A transfer function was obtained for the current post-processing methodology containing reconstructed 16 mm stents implanted into rabbit iliac arteries for up to 21 days after implantation and resolved at circumferential and axial resolutions of 32 and 50 microm, respectively. The results indicate that the techniques presented are sufficient to resolve distributions of WSS with 80% accuracy in segments containing 16 surface perturbations over a 16 mm stented region. These methods will be used to test the hypothesis that reductions in normalized wall shear stress (WSS) and increases in the spatial disparity of WSS immediately after stent implantation may spatially correlate with the temporal development of NH within the stented region.

  4. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol [Tennessee Technological University; Caldwell, Blake A [ORNL; Hicks, Susan Elaine [ORNL; Koch, Scott M [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Pelfrey, Daniel S [ORNL; Pogge, James R [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [Tennessee Technological University; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Sorrillo, Lawrence [ORNL

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution

  5. 3D-QSPR Method of Computational Technique Applied on Red Reactive Dyes by Using CoMFA Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Perveen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fiber is a tremendous natural resource that has broad application in various productions including the textile industry. The dyes, which are commonly used for cellulose printing, are “reactive dyes” because of their high wet fastness and brilliant colors. The interaction of various dyes with the cellulose fiber depends upon the physiochemical properties that are governed by specific features of the dye molecule. The binding pattern of the reactive dye with cellulose fiber is called the ligand-receptor concept. In the current study, the three dimensional quantitative structure property relationship (3D-QSPR technique was applied to understand the red reactive dyes interactions with the cellulose by the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA method. This method was successfully utilized to predict a reliable model. The predicted model gives satisfactory statistical results and in the light of these, it was further analyzed. Additionally, the graphical outcomes (contour maps help us to understand the modification pattern and to correlate the structural changes with respect to the absorptivity. Furthermore, the final selected model has potential to assist in understanding the charachteristics of the external test set. The study could be helpful to design new reactive dyes with better affinity and selectivity for the cellulose fiber.

  6. 3D-QSPR method of computational technique applied on red reactive dyes by using CoMFA strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Uzma; Rashid, Sitara; Ali, S Ishrat; Parveen, Rasheeda; Zaheer-Ul-Haq; Ambreen, Nida; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Perveen, Shahnaz; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose fiber is a tremendous natural resource that has broad application in various productions including the textile industry. The dyes, which are commonly used for cellulose printing, are "reactive dyes" because of their high wet fastness and brilliant colors. The interaction of various dyes with the cellulose fiber depends upon the physiochemical properties that are governed by specific features of the dye molecule. The binding pattern of the reactive dye with cellulose fiber is called the ligand-receptor concept. In the current study, the three dimensional quantitative structure property relationship (3D-QSPR) technique was applied to understand the red reactive dyes interactions with the cellulose by the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) method. This method was successfully utilized to predict a reliable model. The predicted model gives satisfactory statistical results and in the light of these, it was further analyzed. Additionally, the graphical outcomes (contour maps) help us to understand the modification pattern and to correlate the structural changes with respect to the absorptivity. Furthermore, the final selected model has potential to assist in understanding the characteristics of the external test set. The study could be helpful to design new reactive dyes with better affinity and selectivity for the cellulose fiber.

  7. The role of computer-aided 3D surgery and stereolithographic modelling for vector orientation in premaxillary and trans-sinusoidal maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Altan; Basa, Selçuk

    2009-06-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is a challenging procedure when it is performed with internal submerged distractors due to obligation of setting accurate distraction vectors. Five patients with severe maxillary retrognathy were planned with Mimics 10.01 CMF and Simplant 10.01 software. Distraction vectors and rods of distractors were arranged in 3D environment and on STL models. All patients were operated under general anaesthesia and complete Le Fort I downfracture was performed. All distractions were performed according to orientated vectors. All patients achieved stable occlusion and satisfactory aesthetic outcome at the end of the treatment period. Preoperative bending of internal maxillary distractors prevents significant loss of operation time. 3D computer-aided surgical simulation and model surgery provide accurate orientation of distraction vectors for premaxillary and internal trans-sinusoidal maxillary distraction. Combination of virtual surgical simulation and stereolithographic models surgery can be validated as an effective method of preoperative planning for complicated maxillofacial surgery cases.

  8. 3D reconstruction of emergency cranial computed tomography scans as a tool in clinical forensic radiology after survived blunt head trauma--report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, M; Gehl, A; Püschel, K; Turk, E E

    2011-04-15

    When requested to evaluate surviving victims of blunt head trauma the forensic expert has to draw mainly on medical documentation from the time of hospital admission. In many cases these consist of written clinical records, radiographs and in some cases photographic documentation of the injuries. We report two cases of survived severe blunt head trauma where CT images, which had primarily been obtained for clinical diagnostic purposes, were used for forensic assessment. 3D reconstructions of the clinical CT-images yielded valuable information regarding the sequence, number and direction of the impacts to the head, their gross morphology and the inflicting weapon. We conclude that computed tomography and related imaging methods, along with their 3D reconstruction capabilities, provide a useful tool to approach questions in clinical forensic casework. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The advantage of the three dimensional computed tomographic (3 D-CT for ensuring accurate bone incision in sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional and aesthetic dysgnathia surgery requires accurate pre-surgical planning, including the surgical technique to be used related with the difference of anatomical structures amongst individuals. Programs that simulate the surgery become increasingly important. This can be mediated by using a surgical model, conventional x-rays as panoramic, cephalometric projections and another sophisticated method such as a three dimensional computed tomography (3 D-CT. A patient who had undergone double jaw surgeries with difficult anatomical landmarks was presented. In this case the mandible foramens were seen highly relatively related to the sigmoid notches. Therefore, ensuring the bone incisions in sagittal split was presumed to be difficult. A 3D-CT was made and considered to be very helpful in supporting the pre-operative diagnostic.

  10. Computer-Aided Designing and Manufacturing of Lingual Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Using 2D/3D Registration Software and Rapid Prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Yong; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Ki-Beom; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim Sunny, Seong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The availability of 3D dental model scanning technology, combined with the ability to register CBCT data with digital models, has enabled the fabrication of orthognathic surgical CAD/CAM designed splints, customized brackets, and indirect bonding systems. In this study, custom lingual orthodontic appliances were virtually designed by merging 3D model images with lateral and posterior-anterior cephalograms. By exporting design information to 3D CAD software, we have produced a stereolithographic prototype and converted it into a cobalt-chrome alloy appliance as a way of combining traditional prosthetic investment and cast techniques. While the bonding procedure of the appliance could be reinforced, CAD technology simplified the fabrication process by eliminating the soldering phase. This report describes CAD/CAM fabrication of the complex anteroposterior lingual bonded retraction appliance for intrusive retraction of the maxillary anterior dentition. Furthermore, the CAD/CAM method eliminates the extra step of determining the lever arm on the lateral cephalograms and subsequent design modifications on the study model.

  11. Computer-Aided Designing and Manufacturing of Lingual Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Using 2D/3D Registration Software and Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Yong Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of 3D dental model scanning technology, combined with the ability to register CBCT data with digital models, has enabled the fabrication of orthognathic surgical CAD/CAM designed splints, customized brackets, and indirect bonding systems. In this study, custom lingual orthodontic appliances were virtually designed by merging 3D model images with lateral and posterior-anterior cephalograms. By exporting design information to 3D CAD software, we have produced a stereolithographic prototype and converted it into a cobalt-chrome alloy appliance as a way of combining traditional prosthetic investment and cast techniques. While the bonding procedure of the appliance could be reinforced, CAD technology simplified the fabrication process by eliminating the soldering phase. This report describes CAD/CAM fabrication of the complex anteroposterior lingual bonded retraction appliance for intrusive retraction of the maxillary anterior dentition. Furthermore, the CAD/CAM method eliminates the extra step of determining the lever arm on the lateral cephalograms and subsequent design modifications on the study model.

  12. A study of different approaches for multi-scale sensitivity analysis of the TALL-3D experiment using thermal-hydraulic computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffray, Clotaire; Macian-Juan, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the FP7 European THINS Project, complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant for the Generation IV of nuclear reactors are investigated. KTH (Sweden) built the TALL-3D facility to investigate the transition from forced to natural circulation of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) in a pool connected to a 3-leg primary circuit with two heaters and a heat exchanger. The simulation of such 3D phenomena is a challenging task. GRS (Germany) developed the coupling between the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS CFX and the System Analysis code ATHLET. Such coupled codes combine the advantages of CFD, which allow a fine resolution of 3D phenomena, and of System Analysis codes, which are fast running. TUM (Germany) is responsible for the Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the coupled ATHLET-CFX model in the THINS Project. The influence of modeling uncertainty on simulation results needs to be assessed to characterize and to improve the model and, eventually, to assess its performance against experimental data. TUM has developed a computational framework capable of propagating model input uncertainty through coupled codes. This framework can also be used to apply different approaches for the assessment of the influence of the uncertain input parameters on the model output (Sensitivity Analysis). The work reported in this paper focuses on three methods for the assessment of the sensitivity of the results to the modeling uncertainty. The first method (Morris) allows for the computation of the Elementary Effects resulting from the input parameters. This method is widely used to perform Screening Analysis. The second method (Spearman's rank correlation) relies on regression-based non-parametric measures. This method is suitable if the relation between the input and the output variables is at least monotonic, with the advantage of a low computational cost. The last method (Sobol') computes so-called total effect indices which account for

  13. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  14. Computing energy levels of CH4, CHD3, CH3D, and CH3F with a direct product basis and coordinates based on the methyl subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Gatti, Fabien

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations of ro-vibrational energies of CH4, CHD3, CH3D, and CH3F were made with two different numerical approaches. Both use polyspherical coordinates. The computed energy levels agree, confirming the accuracy of the methods. In the first approach, for all the molecules, the coordinates are defined using three Radau vectors for the CH3 subsystem and a Jacobi vector between the remaining atom and the centre of mass of CH3. Euler angles specifying the orientation of a frame attached to CH3 with respect to a frame attached to the Jacobi vector are used as vibrational coordinates. A direct product potential-optimized discrete variable vibrational basis is used to build a Hamiltonian matrix. Ro-vibrational energies are computed using a re-started Arnoldi eigensolver. In the second approach, the coordinates are the spherical coordinates associated with four Radau vectors or three Radau vectors and a Jacobi vector, and the frame is an Eckart frame. Vibrational basis functions are products of contracted stretch and bend functions, and eigenvalues are computed with the Lanczos algorithm. For CH4, CHD3, and CH3D, we report the first J > 0 energy levels computed on the Wang-Carrington potential energy surface [X.-G. Wang and T. Carrington, J. Chem. Phys. 141(15), 154106 (2014)]. For CH3F, the potential energy surface of Zhao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 204302 (2016)] was used. All the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Computing energy levels of CH4, CHD3, CH3D, and CH3F with a direct product basis and coordinates based on the methyl subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Gatti, Fabien

    2018-02-21

    Quantum mechanical calculations of ro-vibrational energies of CH 4 , CHD 3 , CH 3 D, and CH 3 F were made with two different numerical approaches. Both use polyspherical coordinates. The computed energy levels agree, confirming the accuracy of the methods. In the first approach, for all the molecules, the coordinates are defined using three Radau vectors for the CH 3 subsystem and a Jacobi vector between the remaining atom and the centre of mass of CH 3 . Euler angles specifying the orientation of a frame attached to CH 3 with respect to a frame attached to the Jacobi vector are used as vibrational coordinates. A direct product potential-optimized discrete variable vibrational basis is used to build a Hamiltonian matrix. Ro-vibrational energies are computed using a re-started Arnoldi eigensolver. In the second approach, the coordinates are the spherical coordinates associated with four Radau vectors or three Radau vectors and a Jacobi vector, and the frame is an Eckart frame. Vibrational basis functions are products of contracted stretch and bend functions, and eigenvalues are computed with the Lanczos algorithm. For CH 4 , CHD 3 , and CH 3 D, we report the first J > 0 energy levels computed on the Wang-Carrington potential energy surface [X.-G. Wang and T. Carrington, J. Chem. Phys. 141(15), 154106 (2014)]. For CH 3 F, the potential energy surface of Zhao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 204302 (2016)] was used. All the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Exact computation of the Voronoi Diagram of spheres in 3D, its topology and its geometric invariants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anton, François; Mioc, Darka; Santos, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we are addressing the exact computation of the Delaunay graph (or quasi-triangulation) and the Voronoi diagram of spheres using Wu’s algorithm. Our main contribution is first a methodology for automated derivation of invariants of the Delaunay empty circumcircle predicate for spheres...... and the Voronoi vertex of four spheres, then the application of this methodology to get all geometrical invariants that intervene in this problem and the exact computation of the Delaunay graph and the Voronoi diagram of spheres. To the best of our knowledge, there does not exist a comprehensive treatment...... of the exact computation with geometrical invariants of the Delaunay graph and the Voronoi diagram of spheres. Starting from the system of equations defining the zero-dimensional algebraic set of the problem, we are following Wu’s algorithm to transform the initial system into an equivalent Wu characteristic...

  17. Design, Fabrication and Computational Characterization of a 3D Micro-Valve Built by Multi-Photon Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stratos Galanopoulos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design, modeling and fabrication by multi-photon polymerization of a complex medical fluidic device. The physical dimensions of the built micro-valve prototype are compared to those of its computer-designed model. Important fabrication issues such as achieving high dimensional resolution and ability to control distortion due to shrinkage are presented and discussed. The operational performance of both multi-photon and CAD-created models under steady blood flow conditions was evaluated and compared through computational fluid dynamics analysis.

  18. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules via 3D fast radial transform, scale space representation, and Zernike MIP classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Alessandro; Petkov, Todor Sergueev; Ferri, Gianluca; Masotti, Matteo; Campanini, Renato

    2011-04-01

    The authors presented a novel system for automated nodule detection in lung CT exams. The approach is based on (1) a lung tissue segmentation preprocessing step, composed of histogram thresholding, seeded region growing, and mathematical morphology; (2) a filtering step, whose aim is the preliminary detection of candidate nodules (via 3D fast radial filtering) and estimation of their geometrical features (via scale space analysis); and (3) a false positive reduction (FPR) step, comprising a heuristic FPR, which applies thresholds based on geometrical features, and a supervised FPR, which is based on support vector machines classification, which in turn, is enhanced by a feature extraction algorithm based on maximum intensity projection processing and Zernike moments. The system was validated on 154 chest axial CT exams provided by the lung image database consortium public database. The authors obtained correct detection of 71% of nodules marked by all radiologists, with a false positive rate of 6.5 false positives per patient (FP/patient). A higher specificity of 2.5 FP/patient was reached with a sensitivity of 60%. An independent test on the ANODE09 competition database obtained an overall score of 0.310. The system shows a novel approach to the problem of lung nodule detection in CT scans: It relies on filtering techniques, image transforms, and descriptors rather than region growing and nodule segmentation, and the results are comparable to those of other recent systems in literature and show little dependency on the different types of nodules, which is a good sign of robustness.

  19. Construction of 3D MR image-based computer models of pathologic hearts, augmented with histology and optical fluorescence imaging to characterize action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Mihaela; Sermesant, Maxime; Liu, Garry; Relan, Jatin; Mansi, Tommaso; Soong, Alan; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Truong, Michael V; Fefer, Paul; McVeigh, Elliot R; Delingette, Herve; Dick, Alexander J; Ayache, Nicholas; Wright, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computer models can help us understand and predict the propagation of excitation waves (i.e., action potential, AP) in healthy and pathologic hearts. Our broad aim is to develop accurate 3D MR image-based computer models of electrophysiology in large hearts (translatable to clinical applications) and to validate them experimentally. The specific goals of this paper were to match models with maps of the propagation of optical AP on the epicardial surface using large porcine hearts with scars, estimating several parameters relevant to macroscopic reaction-diffusion electrophysiological models. We used voltage-sensitive dyes to image AP in large porcine hearts with scars (three specimens had chronic myocardial infarct, and three had radiofrequency RF acute scars). We first analyzed the main AP waves' characteristics: duration (APD) and propagation under controlled pacing locations and frequencies as recorded from 2D optical images. We further built 3D MR image-based computer models that have information derived from the optical measures, as well as morphologic MRI data (i.e., myocardial anatomy, fiber directions and scar definition). The scar morphology from MR images was validated against corresponding whole-mount histology. We also compared the measured 3D isochronal maps of depolarization to simulated isochrones (the latter replicating precisely the experimental conditions), performing model customization and 3D volumetric adjustments of the local conductivity. Our results demonstrated that mean APD in the border zone (BZ) of the infarct scars was reduced by ~13% (compared to ~318 ms measured in normal zone, NZ), but APD did not change significantly in the thin BZ of the ablation scars. A generic value for velocity ratio (1:2.7) in healthy myocardial tissue was derived from measured values of transverse and longitudinal conduction velocities relative to fibers direction (22 cm/s and 60 cm/s, respectively). The model customization and 3D volumetric

  20. A 3-D Approach for Teaching and Learning about Surface Water Systems through Computational Thinking, Data Visualization and Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, B.; Morrison, A.; Moore, J. C.; Berkowitz, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding water is central to understanding environmental challenges. Scientists use `big data' and computational models to develop knowledge about the structure and function of complex systems, and to make predictions about changes in climate, weather, hydrology, and ecology. Large environmental systems-related data sets and simulation models are difficult for high school teachers and students to access and make sense of. Comp Hydro, a collaboration across four states and multiple school districts, integrates computational thinking and data-related science practices into water systems instruction to enhance development of scientific model-based reasoning, through curriculum, assessment and teacher professional development. Comp Hydro addresses the need for 1) teaching materials for using data and physical models of hydrological phenomena, 2) building teachers' and students' comfort or familiarity with data analysis and modeling, and 3) infusing the computational knowledge and practices necessary to model and visualize hydrologic processes into instruction. Comp Hydro teams in Baltimore, MD and Fort Collins, CO are integrating teaching about surface water systems into high school courses focusing on flooding (MD) and surface water reservoirs (CO). This interactive session will highlight the successes and challenges of our physical and simulation models in helping teachers and students develop proficiency with computational thinking about surface water. We also will share insights from comparing teacher-led vs. project-led development of curriculum and our simulations.

  1. An iterative approach to dynamic simulation of 3D rigid body motions for real-time interactive computer animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overveld, van C.W.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for approximating the motions of linked 3-dimensional rigid body systems that may be applied in the context of interactive motion specification for computer animation. The method is based on decoupling the ballistic (free) component of the motion of the points that constitute

  2. APPLICATION OF 3D COMPUTER-AIDED TOMOGRAPHY TO THE QUANTIFICATION OF MARINE SEDIMENT COMMUNITIES IN POLLUTION GRADIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) has been demonstrated to be a cost efficient tool for the qualitative and quantitative study of estuarine benthic communities along pollution gradients.Now we have advanced this technology to successfully visualize and discriminate three dimen...

  3. Baculite 3D Modeling: a New Method for Computing Buoyancy, Stability, and Orientation with Implications for Ectocochleate Cephalopod Hydrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, D. J.; Barton, C. C.

    2017-12-01

    Ectocochleate (external) cephalopod shells are comprised of a body chamber which houses the organism's soft parts and the phragmocone which consists of a series of progressively larger chambers (camerae) divided by septa. The phragmocone is used as a passive gas float for buoyancy regulation. The soft body and the mineralized shell are denser than water and are negatively buoyant while the phragmocone is positively buoyant due to some fraction of gas in its chambers. This provides a neutrally buoyant condition when the total mass of the organism is equal to the mass of the displaced water. The static orientation of the organism occurs when the centers of buoyancy and mass are vertically aligned and stability is determined by their degree of separation. Three-dimensional modeling of a specimen of Baculites compressus (which has a straight conical shell) was performed using Autodesk Meshmixer, Netfabb ®, Blender 2.78, and MeshLab. The initial 3D mesh shapefile was created by Autodesk ReCap 360™ photogrammetry software. The specimen requirements for the models include: an external shell (ideally complete, otherwise approximated), a septum showing lower order frilling, and a suture pattern to reconstruct the higher order septal frilling (for complex septa). Volumes and centers of mass/buoyancy were calculated with MeshLab in order to determine neutrality, stability, and orientation. Our method can be used to investigate the influence of morphological features on these hydrostatic properties of ectocochleate cephalopods and also the paleoecological implications of different morphotypes. Baculites compressus, is found to assume relatively stable vertical orientations when the shell is positively or neutrally buoyant. By arbitrarily flooding all chambers, the ammonite becomes negatively buoyant, and the centers of buoyancy and mass virtually coincide. This reduces stability but allows the living ammonite to assume a larger range of orientations, including horizontal

  4. A combined vector potential-scalar potential method for FE computation of 3D magnetic fields in electrical devices with iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential based finite-element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based formulations for computation of three-dimensional magnetostatic fields is introduced. In this method, the curl-component of the magnetic field intensity is computed by a reduced magnetic vector potential. This field intensity forms the basic of a forcing function for a global magnetic scalar potential solution over the entire volume of the region. This method allows one to include iron portions sandwiched in between conductors within partitioned current-carrying subregions. The method is most suited for large-scale global-type 3-D magnetostatic field computations in electrical devices, and in particular rotating electric machinery.

  5. Enabling Grid Computing resources within the KM3NeT computing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippidis Christos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KM3NeT is a future European deep-sea research infrastructure hosting a new generation neutrino detectors that – located at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea – will open a new window on the universe and answer fundamental questions both in particle physics and astrophysics. International collaborative scientific experiments, like KM3NeT, are generating datasets which are increasing exponentially in both complexity and volume, making their analysis, archival, and sharing one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. These experiments, in their majority, adopt computing models consisting of different Tiers with several computing centres and providing a specific set of services for the different steps of data processing such as detector calibration, simulation and data filtering, reconstruction and analysis. The computing requirements are extremely demanding and, usually, span from serial to multi-parallel or GPU-optimized jobs. The collaborative nature of these experiments demands very frequent WAN data transfers and data sharing among individuals and groups. In order to support the aforementioned demanding computing requirements we enabled Grid Computing resources, operated by EGI, within the KM3NeT computing model. In this study we describe our first advances in this field and the method for the KM3NeT users to utilize the EGI computing resources in a simulation-driven use-case.

  6. Coupled X-ray computed tomography and grey level co-occurrence matrices as a method for quantification of mineralogy and texture in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, M. A.; Miller, J. A.; Becker, M.

    2018-02-01

    Texture is one of the most basic descriptors used in the geological sciences. The value derived from textural characterisation extends into engineering applications associated with mining, mineral processing and metal extraction where quantitative textural information is required for models predicting the response of the ore through a particular process. This study extends the well-known 2D grey level co-occurrence matrices methodology into 3D as a method for image analysis of 3D x-ray computed tomography grey scale volumes of drill core. Subsequent interrogation of the information embedded within the grey level occurrence matrices (GLCM) indicates they are sensitive to changes in mineralogy and texture of samples derived from a magmatic nickel sulfide ore. The position of the peaks in the GLCM is an indication of the relative density (specific gravity, SG) of the minerals and when interpreted using a working knowledge of the mineralogy of the ore presented a means to determine the relative abundance of the sulfide minerals (SG > 4), dense silicate minerals (SG > 3), and lighter silicate minerals (SG < 3). The spread of the peaks in the GLCM away from the diagonal is an indication of the degree of grain boundary interaction with wide peaks representing fine grain sizes and narrow peaks representing coarse grain sizes. The method lends itself to application as part of a generic methodology for routine use on large XCT volumes providing quantitative, timely, meaningful and automated information on mineralogy and texture in 3D.

  7. A New Architecture for FUN3D on Modern HPC Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to refactor NASA's FUN3D computation fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation code to enable it to take full advantage of accelerator hardware...

  8. Computation of a voxelized anthropomorphic phantom from Computer Tomography slices and 3D dose distribution calculation utilizing the MCNP5 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2008-01-01

    using the conversion factors extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. As a conclusion, it is remarkable to say that the voxelization over a three-dimensional interpolation technique and its combination with the use of the FMESH tally at the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation in order to produce the 3D dose mapping in radiation treatment assessments throughout an anthropomorphic phantom

  9. 3D computations of flow field in a guide vane blading designed by means of 2D model for a low head hydraulic turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzemianowski, Z; Puzyrewski, R

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the main parameters of the flow field behind the guide vane cascade designed by means of 2D inverse problem and following check by means of 3D commercial program ANSYS/Fluent applied for a direct problem. This approach of using different models reflects the contemporary design procedure for non-standardized turbomachinery stage. Depending on the model, the set of conservation equation to be solved differs, although the physical background remains the same. The example of computations for guide vane cascade for a low head hydraulic turbine is presented.

  10. Evaluation of right ventricular function by coronary computed tomography angiography using a novel automated 3D right ventricle volume segmentation approach: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghard, Philipp; Plank, Fabian; Beyer, Christoph; Müller, Silvana; Dörler, Jakob; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Pölzl, Leo; Pölzl, Gerhard; Klauser, Andrea; Rauch, Stefan; Barbieri, Fabian; Langer, Christian-Ekkehardt; Schgoer, Wilfried; Williamson, Eric E; Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2018-06-04

    To evaluate right ventricle (RV) function by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a novel automated three-dimensional (3D) RV volume segmentation tool in comparison with clinical reference modalities. Twenty-six patients with severe end-stage heart failure [left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF) right heart invasive catheterisation (IC). Automated 3D RV volume segmentation was successful in 26 (100%) patients. Read-out time was 3 min 33 s (range, 1 min 50s-4 min 33s). RV EF by CTA was stronger correlated with right atrial pressure (RAP) by IC (r = -0.595; p = 0.006) but weaker with TAPSE (r = 0.366, p = 0.94). When comparing TAPSE with RAP by IC (r = -0.317, p = 0.231), a weak-to-moderate non-significant inverse correlation was found. Interobserver correlation was high with r = 0.96 (p right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) was 196.9 ± 75.3 and 217.5 ± 76.1 HU, respectively. Measurement of RV function by CTA using a novel 3D volumetric segmentation tool is fast and reliable by applying a dedicated biphasic injection protocol. The RV EF from CTA is a closer surrogate of RAP than TAPSE by TTE. • Evaluation of RV function by cardiac CTA by using a novel 3D volume segmentation tool is fast and reliable. • A biphasic contrast agent injection protocol ensures homogenous RV contrast attenuation. • Cardiac CT is a valuable alternative modality to CMR for the evaluation of RV function.

  11. Computer-assisted 3D reconstruction of the terminal branches of th cerebral arteries. Pt. 2. Middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloger, S.; Gloger, A.; Vogt, H.; Kretschmann, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional anatomical computer model of the terminal branches of the middle cerebral artery, acquired from