WorldWideScience

Sample records for computing capability user

  1. User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2004-09-14

    This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

  2. Purple Computational Environment With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, B; Shuler, J

    2006-08-21

    Purple is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Purple Computational Environment documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY06 LLNL Level 1 General Availability Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories, but also documents needs of the LLNL and Alliance users working in the unclassified environment. Additionally, the Purple Computational Environment maps the provided capabilities to the Trilab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the General Availability user environment capabilities of the ASC community. Appendix A lists these requirements and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met for each section of this document. The Purple Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the Tri-lab community.

  3. Unclassified Computing Capability: User Responses to a Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing Questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M; Kissel, L

    2002-01-29

    We are experimenting with a new computing model to be applied to a new computer dedicated to that model. Several LLNL science teams now have computational requirements, evidenced by the mature scientific applications that have been developed over the past five plus years, that far exceed the capability of the institution's computing resources. Thus, there is increased demand for dedicated, powerful parallel computational systems. Computation can, in the coming year, potentially field a capability system that is low cost because it will be based on a model that employs open source software and because it will use PC (IA32-P4) hardware. This incurs significant computer science risk regarding stability and system features but also presents great opportunity. We believe the risks can be managed, but the existence of risk cannot be ignored. In order to justify the budget for this system, we need to make the case that it serves science and, through serving science, serves the institution. That is the point of the meeting and the White Paper that we are proposing to prepare. The questions are listed and the responses received are in this report.

  4. Functional Assessment for Human-Computer Interaction: A Method for Quantifying Physical Functional Capabilities for Information Technology Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kathleen J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of information technology is a vital part of everyday life, but for a person with functional impairments, technology interaction may be difficult at best. Information technology is commonly designed to meet the needs of a theoretical "normal" user. However, there is no such thing as a "normal" user. A user's capabilities will vary over…

  5. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil,Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ballance, Robert [SNL; Haskell, Karen [SNL

    2012-08-09

    Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

  6. Capabilities offered by Heavy User Communities

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, J; Barreiro Megino, F; Campana, S; Girone, M; Santinelli, R

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the capabilities offered by the Heavy User Communities (HUCs) to other communities: This public report illustrates how the functional capabilities being supported by this activity can be re-used by other communities using European Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCIs). Sufficient technical depth is provided for potential adopters of DCI platforms to make an initial assessment of how they could work with the offered technologies.

  7. Capability-based computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  8. User computer system pilot project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimutis, E.C.

    1989-09-06

    The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

  9. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: computation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This report characterizes the computation systems capabilities at Sandia Laboratories. Selected applications of these capabilities are presented to illustrate the extent to which they can be applied in research and development programs. 9 figures.

  10. End-User Statistical Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, C. Ray

    End-user statistical computing is one way to improve the productivity of researchers; it does so by providing them with a statistical computing environment and with guidance on its appropriate use. Critical success factors include: (1) ease of use; (2) software correctness and robustness; (3) compatibility with system resources; (4) training and…

  11. Computer Users Do Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Leach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The so-called “digital gender divide” has encouraged studies attempting to demonstrate the co-production of gender and information technology. Vivian Lagesen has criticized many of these attempts for failing to provide fully symmetrical accounts. Here we describe and analyze beliefs and practices concerning computers, gender, and technology evinced by managers in a network of public sites (Community Access Centers created to provide community access to digital technology in the Canadian province of New Brunswick. From those results, we argue, among other conclusions, that distinguishing more carefully between the gendered uses of new technologies and the gendered forms of attraction associated with them produces a more fully realized and more perfectly symmetric understanding of how gender and communications technologies are co-produced. We show that the concepts of actor-network theory facilitate that analysis, and so interpret the study as supporting and extending Lagesen’s program.

  12. Managing End User Computing for Users with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidelines to assist federal Information Resources Managers in applying computer and related information technology to accommodate users with disabilities. It discusses managing the end user environment, assessing accommodation requirements, and providing end user tools and support. The major portion of the document consists…

  13. Overview of ASC Capability Computing System Governance Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebling, Scott W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-11

    This document contains a description of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program's Capability Computing System Governance Model. Objectives of the Governance Model are to ensure that the capability system resources are allocated on a priority-driven basis according to the Program requirements; and to utilize ASC Capability Systems for the large capability jobs for which they were designed and procured.

  14. Ubiquitous Computing in the Cloud: User Empowerment vs. User Obsequity

    OpenAIRE

    De Filippi, Primavera

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the evolution of the Internet, shifting from a decentralized architecture designed around the end-to-end principle with powerful mainframe/personal computers at each end, to a more centralized network designed according to the mainframe model, with increasingly weaker user's devices that no longer have the ability to run a server nor to process any consistent amount of data or information. The advantages of ubiquitous computing (allowing data to become available from anywh...

  15. Computational capabilities of graph neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarselli, Franco; Gori, Marco; Tsoi, Ah Chung; Hagenbuchner, Markus; Monfardini, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we will consider the approximation properties of a recently introduced neural network model called graph neural network (GNN), which can be used to process-structured data inputs, e.g., acyclic graphs, cyclic graphs, and directed or undirected graphs. This class of neural networks implements a function tau(G,n) is an element of IR(m) that maps a graph G and one of its nodes n onto an m-dimensional Euclidean space. We characterize the functions that can be approximated by GNNs, in probability, up to any prescribed degree of precision. This set contains the maps that satisfy a property called preservation of the unfolding equivalence, and includes most of the practically useful functions on graphs; the only known exception is when the input graph contains particular patterns of symmetries when unfolding equivalence may not be preserved. The result can be considered an extension of the universal approximation property established for the classic feedforward neural networks (FNNs). Some experimental examples are used to show the computational capabilities of the proposed model.

  16. Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Roger B.; Bley, Dagmar; Manez, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Understanding Climate Service Science: Balancing Users' Needs with Providers' Capabilities The overall strategic objective of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI)-Climate is to contribute to highly coordinated knowledge development by not only improving the scientific expertise on climate change risks and adaptation options, but also by connecting that knowledge with decision making. Understanding the nature and scope of those providing climate services and the services being provided and understanding userś needs and requirements is critical to realisation of this strategic objective. The main aim of the JPI-Climate Working Group 2 "Researching and advancing Climate Service Development" is to coordinate knowledge development and transfer to improve the climate (change) services to society and within Europe. In order to avoid duplication of efforts and picking on differences in the quality and nature of information being provided from country to country there is a need for a certain degree of consistency of approaches and quality assurance. The JPI-Climate will bring interaction between the emerging national and European climate services initiatives. Climate services produce strongly science-based client-oriented information. They should be built on a good understanding of the stakeholder needs, and provide easy access to up-to-date information and expertise regarding specific policy or research questions. It is evident from experience that such services need (and are perceived) to be salient, credible and legitimate from the perspective of the intended users and providers of those services, and within the supportive research community. Achieving this aim and developing and delivering the required services necessitates the engagement of the spectrum of users and providers, as well as researchers from the physical, natural, engineering, economics and social sciences - the science underpinning climate services. The JPI-Climate, Module 2 Fast Track Activities (FTAs

  17. End Users Guide to Buying Small Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ralph; And Others

    This buyer's guide for personal computers is the result of two initiatives: to meet the need for a government-wide policy concerning the management of end user computing (EUC); and to condense procedures for EUC acquisition. The guide is for federal government line managers and professionals who are unfamiliar with step-by-step procedures used in…

  18. End-User Computing: A Multifaceted Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Carole A.

    1988-01-01

    Data custodians are described as "owners" of the data and administrative computing staff the data processors. New hardware and software have put the processing tools into the hands of anyone who can afford them. The term "end-user computing" refers to the processing of data in the administrative units. (MLW)

  19. Towards user-oriented control of end-user computing in large organizations

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Neil; Wood-Harper, A. T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper questions the traditional IT view of end-user computing which stifles the development of new systems by users and imposes technical controls on them. It proposes a new user-oriented view of end-user computing which will be of significant use to IT management and explores the dynamic nature of end-user computing using causal maps.

  20. White Paper on Institutional Capability Computing Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissel, L; McCoy, M G; Seager, M K

    2002-01-29

    This paper documents the need for a rapid, order-of-magnitude increase in the computing infrastructure provided to scientists working in the unclassified domains at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This proposed increase could be viewed as a step in a broader strategy linking hardware evolution to applications development that would take LLNL unclassified computational science to a position of distinction, if not preeminence, by 2006. We believe that it is possible for LLNL institutional scientists to gain access late this year to a new system with a capacity roughly 80% to 200% that of the 12-TF/s (twelve trillion floating-point operations per second) ASCI White system for a cost that is an order of magnitude lower than the White system. This platform could be used for first-class science-of-scale computing and for the development of aggressive, strategically chosen applications that can challenge the near PF/s (petaflop/s, a thousand trillion floating-point operations per second) scale systems ASCI is working to bring to the LLNL unclassified environment in 2005. As the distilled scientific requirements data presented in this document indicate, great computational science is being done at LLNL--the breadth of accomplishment is amazing. The computational efforts make it clear what a unique national treasure this Laboratory has become. While the projects cover a wide and varied application space, they share three elements--they represent truly great science, they have broad impact on the Laboratory's major technical programs, and they depend critically on big computers.

  1. Recommended documentation for computer users at ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberger, A.A.

    1992-04-01

    Recommended Documentation for Computer Users at ANL is for all users of the services available from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD). This document will guide you in selecting available documentation that will best fill your particular needs. Chapter 1 explains how to use this document to select documents and how to obtain them from the CTD Document Distribution Counter. Chapter 2 contains a table that categorizes available publications. Chapter 3 gives descriptions of the online DOCUMENT command for CMS, and VAX, and the Sun workstation. DOCUMENT allows you to scan for and order documentation that interests you. Chapter 4 lists publications by subject. Categories I and IX cover publications of a general nature and publications on telecommunications and networks respectively. Categories II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, and X cover publications on specific computer systems. Category XI covers publications on advanced scientific computing at Argonne. Chapter 5 contains abstracts for each publication, all arranged alphabetically. Chapter 6 describes additional publications containing bibliographies and master indexes that the user may find useful. The appendix identifies available computer systems, applications, languages, and libraries.

  2. Reach and get capability in a computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Ann M [Albuquerque, NM; Osbourn, Gordon C [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    A reach and get technique includes invoking a reach command from a reach location within a computing environment. A user can then navigate to an object within the computing environment and invoke a get command on the object. In response to invoking the get command, the computing environment is automatically navigated back to the reach location and the object copied into the reach location.

  3. Computational capabilities of multilayer committee machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neirotti, J P [NCRG, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Franco, L, E-mail: j.p.neirotti@aston.ac.u [Depto. de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Malaga (Spain)

    2010-11-05

    We obtained an analytical expression for the computational complexity of many layered committee machines with a finite number of hidden layers (L < {infinity}) using the generalization complexity measure introduced by Franco et al (2006) IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. 17 578. Although our result is valid in the large-size limit and for an overlap synaptic matrix that is ultrametric, it provides a useful tool for inferring the appropriate architecture a network must have to reproduce an arbitrary realizable Boolean function.

  4. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included. (HLW)

  5. User's guide for the REBUS-3 fuel cycle analysis capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toppel, B.J.

    1983-03-01

    REBUS-3 is a system of programs designed for the fuel-cycle analysis of fast reactors. This new capability is an extension and refinement of the REBUS-3 code system and complies with the standard code practices and interface dataset specifications of the Committee on Computer Code Coordination (CCCC). The new code is hence divorced from the earlier ARC System. In addition, the coding has been designed to enhance code exportability. Major new capabilities not available in the REBUS-2 code system include a search on burn cycle time to achieve a specified value for the multiplication constant at the end of the burn step; a general non-repetitive fuel-management capability including temporary out-of-core fuel storage, loading of fresh fuel, and subsequent retrieval and reloading of fuel; significantly expanded user input checking; expanded output edits; provision of prestored burnup chains to simplify user input; option of fixed-or free-field BCD input formats; and, choice of finite difference, nodal or spatial flux-synthesis neutronics in one-, two-, or three-dimensions.

  6. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  7. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included. (PCS)

  8. Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikawa, D.A.

    1985-06-01

    Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by the user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users are investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.

  9. End user needs for enhanced IAEA Safeguards Information Management Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badalamente, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Deland, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is undertaking a program for strengthening its safeguards on the recognition that safeguards must give assurance not only of the non-diversion of declared material or that declared facilities are not being misused, but also of the absence of any undeclared nuclear activities in States which have signed comprehensive safeguards agreements with the Agency. The IAEA has determined that the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and the creation of confidence in the continuing peaceful use of declared material and facilities is largely dependent on more information being made available to the Agency and on the capability of the Agency to make more effective use of this additional information, as well as existing information.

  10. Dry eye syndrome among computer users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajta, Aurora; Turkoanje, Daniela; Malaescu, Iosif; Marin, Catalin-Nicolae; Koos, Marie-Jeanne; Jelicic, Biljana; Milutinovic, Vuk

    2015-12-01

    Dry eye syndrome is characterized by eye irritation due to changes of the tear film. Symptoms include itching, foreign body sensations, mucous discharge and transitory vision blurring. Less occurring symptoms include photophobia and eye tiredness. Aim of the work was to determine the quality of the tear film and ocular dryness potential risk in persons who spend more than 8 hours using computers and possible correlations between severity of symptoms (dry eyes symptoms anamnesis) and clinical signs assessed by: Schirmer test I, TBUT (Tears break-up time), TFT (Tear ferning test). The results show that subjects using computer have significantly shorter TBUT (less than 5 s for 56 % of subjects and less than 10 s for 37 % of subjects), TFT type II/III in 50 % of subjects and type III 31% of subjects was found when compared to computer non users (TFT type I and II was present in 85,71% of subjects). Visual display terminal use, more than 8 hours daily, has been identified as a significant risk factor for dry eye. It's been advised to all persons who spend substantial time using computers to use artificial tears drops in order to minimize the symptoms of dry eyes syndrome and prevents serious complications.

  11. QUEST Hanford Site Computer Users - What do they do?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITHERSPOON, T.T.

    2000-03-02

    The Fluor Hanford Chief Information Office requested that a computer-user survey be conducted to determine the user's dependence on the computer and its importance to their ability to accomplish their work. Daily use trends and future needs of Hanford Site personal computer (PC) users was also to be defined. A primary objective was to use the data to determine how budgets should be focused toward providing those services that are truly needed by the users.

  12. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report Server User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eileen R.; Villani, James A.; Wingrove, Earl R., III

    1996-01-01

    This report is a user's guide for the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System (ASAC QRS) Report Server. The ASAC QRS is an automated online capability to access selected ASAC models and data repositories. It supports analysis by the aviation community. This system was designed by the Logistics Management Institute for the NASA Ames Research Center. The ASAC QRS Report Server allows users to obtain information stored in the ASAC Data Repositories.

  13. Manage Computer Support Costs through Effective User Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Compagnon, Betty; Leydon, John F.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents the University of New Hampshire's approach to ongoing training of computer users and argues that training is an investment with a large payoff. The article considers factors affecting training success; computer support; academic computing training; and administrative computing training, including developing a user services…

  14. A new paradigm for computer users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstrom, M.C.; Gustafson, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Why is it that mathematical results are useful for centuries, yet computer programs suffer tumultuous changes of technology? Can one write programs that will be useful in fifty years? Extreme efforts to preserve ``dusty deck`` programs have confused the roles and responsibilities of four participants: the end user, application programmer, system software designer, and hardware engineer. Users feel they must know hardware details like word size and megahertz rate--yet are oblivious to error in the output. Application programmers try to guess compiler behavior, often obtaining high performance only by trickery. With new hardware, that old guess is often wrong. The result is ``high-performance code`` that is slower than the original code. The hardware engineer tries to maintain compatibility through many generations, sacrificing performance and hardware affordability to meet presumed needs of the other three participants. We propose that the respective roles and responsibilities be clearly delineated via a three-stage contract between the four participants. The result is a new interaction paradigm that should allow programs to share the longevity of mathematical results and absorb technical advances gracefully.

  15. User's manual for computer program BASEPLOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Curtis L.

    2002-01-01

    The checking and reviewing of daily records of streamflow within the U.S. Geological Survey is traditionally accomplished by hand-plotting and mentally collating tables of data. The process is time consuming, difficult to standardize, and subject to errors in computation, data entry, and logic. In addition, the presentation of flow data on the internet requires more timely and accurate computation of daily flow records. BASEPLOT was developed for checking and review of primary streamflow records within the U.S. Geological Survey. Use of BASEPLOT enables users to (1) provide efficiencies during the record checking and review process, (2) improve quality control, (3) achieve uniformity of checking and review techniques of simple stage-discharge relations, and (4) provide a tool for teaching streamflow computation techniques. The BASEPLOT program produces tables of quality control checks and produces plots of rating curves and discharge measurements; variable shift (V-shift) diagrams; and V-shifts converted to stage-discharge plots, using data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey Automatic Data Processing System database. In addition, the program plots unit-value hydrographs that show unit-value stages, shifts, and datum corrections; input shifts, datum corrections, and effective dates; discharge measurements; effective dates for rating tables; and numeric quality control checks. Checklist/tutorial forms are provided for reviewers to ensure completeness of review and standardize the review process. The program was written for the U.S. Geological Survey SUN computer using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software produced by SAS Institute, Incorporated.

  16. How fibers subserve computing capabilities: similarities between brains and machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, H C; Leiner, A L

    1997-01-01

    Can the principles underlying the design of computers help to explain the cognitive capabilities of the human brain? This chapter shows that these principles can provide insight into the capabilities of the human cerebellum, the internal structure of which bears a remarkable resemblance to the design of a versatile computer. In computers, information processing is accomplished both by the hardware in the system (its circuitry) and by the software (the communication capabilities inherent in its circuitry), which is combination can produce a versatile information-processing system, capable of performing a wide variety of functions, including motor, sensory, cognitive, and linguistic ones. Such versatility of function is achieved by computer hardware in which many modules of similar circuits are organized into parallel processing networks; this structural organization is exemplified in the cerebellum by its longitudinal modules of similar circuits, which are arrayed in parallel zones throughout the structure. On the basis of this known cerebellar "hardware," it is possible to investigate the "software" capabilities inherent in the circuitry of the modules. Each module in the lateral cerebellum seems able to communicate with the cerebral cortex by sending out signals over a segregated bundle of nerve fibers, which is a powerful way of communicating information. We show why this bundling of fibers can enable the cerebellum to communicate with the cerebral cortex (including the prefrontal cortex) at a high level of discourse by using internal languages that are capable of conveying complex information about what to do and when to do it. We propose that such communication activity is reflected in the activation obtained on functional imaging of the cerebro-cerebellar system during the performance by humans of complex motor, sensory, cognitive, linguistic, and affective tasks. Further, we propose a new way of analyzing such cerebro-cerebellar activation, in order to

  17. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  18. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SUPPORT CONTRACT USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    IT Division operates a Distributed Computing Support Service, which offers support to owners and users of all variety of desktops throughout CERN as well as more dedicated services for certain groups, divisions and experiments. It also provides the staff who operate the central and satellite Computing Helpdesks, it supports printers throughout the site and it provides the installation activities of the IT Division PC Service. We have published a questionnaire which seeks to gather your feedback on how the services are seen, how they are progressing and how they can be improved. Please take a few minutes to fill in this questionnaire. Replies will be treated in confidence if desired although you may also request an opportunity to be contacted by CERN's service management directly. Please tell us if you met problems but also if you had a successful conclusion to your request for assistance. You will find the questionnaire at the web site http://wwwinfo/support/survey/desktop-contract There will also be a link ...

  19. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SUPPORT SERVICE USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    IT Division operates a Distributed Computing Support Service, which offers support to owners and users of all variety of desktops throughout CERN as well as more dedicated services for certain groups, divisions and experiments. It also provides the staff who operate the central and satellite Computing Helpdesks, it supports printers throughout the site and it provides the installation activities of the IT Division PC Service. We have published a questionnaire, which seeks to gather your feedback on how the services are seen, how they are progressing and how they can be improved. Please take a few minutes to fill in this questionnaire. Replies will be treated in confidence if desired although you may also request an opportunity to be contacted by CERN's service management directly. Please tell us if you met problems but also if you had a successful conclusion to your request for assistance. You will find the questionnaire at the web site http://wwwinfo/support/survey/desktop-contract There will also be a link...

  20. Perspectives on distributed computing : thirty people, four user types, and the distributed computing user experience.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childers, L.; Liming, L.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-10-15

    This report summarizes the methodology and results of a user perspectives study conducted by the Community Driven Improvement of Globus Software (CDIGS) project. The purpose of the study was to document the work-related goals and challenges facing today's scientific technology users, to record their perspectives on Globus software and the distributed-computing ecosystem, and to provide recommendations to the Globus community based on the observations. Globus is a set of open source software components intended to provide a framework for collaborative computational science activities. Rather than attempting to characterize all users or potential users of Globus software, our strategy has been to speak in detail with a small group of individuals in the scientific community whose work appears to be the kind that could benefit from Globus software, learn as much as possible about their work goals and the challenges they face, and describe what we found. The result is a set of statements about specific individuals experiences. We do not claim that these are representative of a potential user community, but we do claim to have found commonalities and differences among the interviewees that may be reflected in the user community as a whole. We present these as a series of hypotheses that can be tested by subsequent studies, and we offer recommendations to Globus developers based on the assumption that these hypotheses are representative. Specifically, we conducted interviews with thirty technology users in the scientific community. We included both people who have used Globus software and those who have not. We made a point of including individuals who represent a variety of roles in scientific projects, for example, scientists, software developers, engineers, and infrastructure providers. The following material is included in this report: (1) A summary of the reported work-related goals, significant issues, and points of satisfaction with the use of Globus software

  1. Pattern Of Refractive Errors Among Computer Users In A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Refractive error is a common cause of ocular morbidity. Computer use is associated with eye strain which may be due to refractive errors. Objective: To ascertain the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among computer users. Method: A cross-sectional survey of 560 computer users in Enugu urban, ...

  2. Environments for online maritime simulators with cloud computing capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, Gabriel; Raicu, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the cloud computing environments, network principles and methods for graphical development in realistic naval simulation, naval robotics and virtual interactions. The aim of this approach is to achieve a good simulation quality in large networked environments using open source solutions designed for educational purposes. Realistic rendering of maritime environments requires near real-time frameworks with enhanced computing capabilities during distance interactions. E-Navigation concepts coupled with the last achievements in virtual and augmented reality will enhance the overall experience leading to new developments and innovations. We have to deal with a multiprocessing situation using advanced technologies and distributed applications using remote ship scenario and automation of ship operations.

  3. Definition and Measurement of End User Computing Sophistication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blili, Samir; And Others

    1996-01-01

    To conceptualize and measure end user computing sophistication, a three-dimensional characterization of application, usage, and end user sophistication is proposed. A preliminary operationalization using 9 variables was tested with 505 users in 5 Canadian enterprises and found to be globally reliable. Contains five tables and an appendix which…

  4. User Interface Improvements in Computer-Assisted Instruction, the Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies user interface problems as they relate to computer-assisted instruction (CAI); reviews the learning theories and instructional theories related to CAI user interface; and presents potential CAI user interface improvements for research and development based on learning and instructional theory. Focuses on screen design improvements.…

  5. Mac OS X Snow Leopard for Power Users Advanced Capabilities and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Granneman, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Mac OS X Snow Leopard for Power Users: Advanced Capabilities and Techniques is for Mac OS X users who want to go beyond the obvious, the standard, and the easy. If want to dig deeper into Mac OS X and maximize your skills and productivity using the world's slickest and most elegant operating system, then this is the book for you. Written by Scott Granneman, an experienced teacher, developer, and consultant, Mac OS X for Power Users helps you push Mac OS X to the max, unveiling advanced techniques and options that you may have not known even existed. Create custom workflows and apps with Automa

  6. Pattern of Ocular Diseases among Computer users in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the pattern of ocular disorders among computer users in Enugu. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of computer users was conducted in Enugu metropolis between August and December 2000. 560 subjects were selected by simple random sampling method. Examination methods include use of ...

  7. Organizational Strategies for End-User Computing Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmun, Robert R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Effective support for end users of computers has been an important issue in higher education from the first applications of general purpose mainframe computers through minicomputers, microcomputers, and supercomputers. The development of end user support is reviewed and organizational models are examined. (Author/MLW)

  8. Managing End User Computing in the Federal Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report presents an initial approach developed by the General Services Administration for the management of end user computing in federal government agencies. Defined as technology used directly by individuals in need of information products, end user computing represents a new field encompassing such technologies as word processing, personal…

  9. Toward clinical end-user computing: programmable order protocols for efficient human computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H; Kwak, Y S; Noh, Y S; Yang, M O; Kim, D J

    1998-01-01

    We have developed and implemented an efficient method of managing routine patient care information as a programmable group order protocol. The purpose of protocol is to minimize a labor-intensive manual computer interaction by grouping clinically related routine orders as a single entity, thus to greatly speed up the time taken for manual entry such as keyboard stroke and/or mouse clicking. User programmability is added to facilitate insertion, deletion and update of order items to be a locally independent operation. A sequence of menu screen is also programmable when a change of standard operation is needed. Department specific order protocols are classified into four categories to improve user convenience. The degree of efficiency is measured by a number of key strokes and entry time. In most cases the time to enter order protocol with correction is found to take less than one minute with less than five key strokes. The method of order protocol entry clearly demonstrates end-user computing capability so that department specific requirements are resolved without resorting to computer department personnel. Flexibility of managing individual physician specific protocols is also beneficial enough to enhance the morale toward a hospital information system currently in use.

  10. MPC Related Computational Capabilities of ARMv7A Processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frison, Gianluca; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2015-01-01

    are powerful enough to solve the complex optimization problems arising in MPC in real-time, while keeping the traditional low-cost and low-power consumption. This makes these processors ideal candidates for use in embedded MPC. In this paper, we investigate the floating-point capabilities of Cortex A7, A9...... and A15 and show how to exploit the unique features of each processor to obtain the best performance, in the context of a novel implementation method for the linear-algebra routines used in MPC solvers. This method adapts high-performance computing techniques to the needs of embedded MPC. In particular...

  11. Security for small computer systems a practical guide for users

    CERN Document Server

    Saddington, Tricia

    1988-01-01

    Security for Small Computer Systems: A Practical Guide for Users is a guidebook for security concerns for small computers. The book provides security advice for the end-users of small computers in different aspects of computing security. Chapter 1 discusses the security and threats, and Chapter 2 covers the physical aspect of computer security. The text also talks about the protection of data, and then deals with the defenses against fraud. Survival planning and risk assessment are also encompassed. The last chapter tackles security management from an organizational perspective. The bo

  12. 2005 White Paper on Institutional Capability Computing Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, B; McCoy, M; Seager, M

    2006-01-20

    This paper documents the need for a significant increase in the computing infrastructure provided to scientists working in the unclassified domains at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This need could be viewed as the next step in a broad strategy outlined in the January 2002 White Paper (UCRL-ID-147449) that bears essentially the same name as this document. Therein we wrote: 'This proposed increase could be viewed as a step in a broader strategy linking hardware evolution to applications development that would take LLNL unclassified computational science to a position of distinction if not preeminence by 2006.' This position of distinction has certainly been achieved. This paper provides a strategy for sustaining this success but will diverge from its 2002 predecessor in that it will: (1) Amplify the scientific and external success LLNL has enjoyed because of the investments made in 2002 (MCR, 11 TF) and 2004 (Thunder, 23 TF). (2) Describe in detail the nature of additional investments that are important to meet both the institutional objectives of advanced capability for breakthrough science and the scientists clearly stated request for adequate capacity and more rapid access to moderate-sized resources. (3) Put these requirements in the context of an overall strategy for simulation science and external collaboration. While our strategy for Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing (M&IC) has worked well, three challenges must be addressed to assure and enhance our position. The first is that while we now have over 50 important classified and unclassified simulation codes available for use by our computational scientists, we find ourselves coping with high demand for access and long queue wait times. This point was driven home in the 2005 Institutional Computing Executive Group (ICEG) 'Report Card' to the Deputy Director for Science and Technology (DDST) Office and Computation Directorate management. The second challenge is

  13. Predictive Capability Maturity Model for computational modeling and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2007-10-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a new model that can be used to assess the level of maturity of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) efforts. The development of the model is based on both the authors experience and their analysis of similar investigations in the past. The perspective taken in this report is one of judging the usefulness of a predictive capability that relies on the numerical solution to partial differential equations to better inform and improve decision making. The review of past investigations, such as the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model Integration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Department of Defense Technology Readiness Levels, indicates that a more restricted, more interpretable method is needed to assess the maturity of an M&S effort. The PCMM addresses six contributing elements to M&S: (1) representation and geometric fidelity, (2) physics and material model fidelity, (3) code verification, (4) solution verification, (5) model validation, and (6) uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis. For each of these elements, attributes are identified that characterize four increasing levels of maturity. Importantly, the PCMM is a structured method for assessing the maturity of an M&S effort that is directed toward an engineering application of interest. The PCMM does not assess whether the M&S effort, the accuracy of the predictions, or the performance of the engineering system satisfies or does not satisfy specified application requirements.

  14. A REVIEW ON USER INTERFACE DESIGN PRINCIPLES TO INCREASE SOFTWARE USABILITY FOR USERS WITH LESS COMPUTER LITERACY

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Darejeh; Dalbir Singh

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review on how software usability could be increased for users with less computer literacy. The literature was reviewed to extract user interface design principles by identifying the similar problems of this group of users. There are different groups of users with less computer literacy. However, based on the literature three groups of them need special attention from software designers. The first group is elderly users, as users with lack of computer background. The se...

  15. Managing the Risks Associated with End-User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Maryam; Weiss, Ira R.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies organizational risks of end-user computing (EUC) associated with different stages of the end-user applications life cycle (analysis, design, implementation). Generic controls are identified that address each of the risks enumerated in a manner that allows EUC management to select those most appropriate to their EUC environment. (5…

  16. A Tool for Measuring and Analyzing End User Computing Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Paul H.; Nelson, R. Ryan

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need for a method to measure computer user abilities, and presents an instrument that identifies individuals' technical, modeling, and applications skills. An evaluation of the instrument in terms of validity and reliability is reported, and applications in user education research are suggested. (12 references) (CLB)

  17. Towards a Framework for Distributed User Modelling for Ubiquitous Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus; Lorenz, Andreas; Zimmermann, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Specht, M., Lorenz, A., & Zimmermann, A. (2005). Towards a Framework for Distributed User Modelling for Ubiquitous Computing In P. Dolog, & JI. Vassileva, 1st Workshop on Decentralized, Agent Based and Social Approaches to User Modelling (DASUM2005), pp. 80-85, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

  18. Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Disorders among computer Users in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Ghanbary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Along with widespread use of computers, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs have become the most prevalent ergonomic problems in computer users. With evaluating musculoskeletal disorders among Computer Users can intervent a action to reduce musculoskeletal disorders carried out. The aim of the present study was to Assessment of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Computer Users in Isfahan University with Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA method and Nordic questionnaire. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 96 computer users in Isfahan university. The data were analyzed using correlation and line regression by test spss 20. and descriptive statistics and Anova test. Data collection tool was Nordic questionnaire and Rapid Office Strain Assessment method checklist. The results of Nordic questionnaire showed that prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in computer users were in the shoulder (62.1%, neck (54.9% and back (53.1% respectively more than in other parts of the body. Based on the level of risk of ROSA were 19 individuals in an area of low risk, 50 individual area of notification and 27 individual in the area hazard and need for ergonomics interventions. Musculoskeletal disorders prevalence were in women more than men. Also Anova test showed that there is a direct and significant correlation between age and work experience with a final score ROSA (p<0.001. The study result showed that the prevalence of MSDs among computer users of Isfahan universities is pretty high and must ergonomic interventions such as computer workstation redesign, users educate about ergonomic principles computer with work, reduced working hours in computers with work, and elbows should be kept close to the body with the angle between 90 and 120 degrees to reduce musculoskeletal disorders carried out.

  19. TRACE Computer Model User’s Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-12

    McLean, Virginia 22102 12 October 1979 Topical Report for Period March 1978-February 1979 CONTRACT No. DNA 001-78-C-0175 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...INTRCPT) See comment 60. 65. JAMMER TURNED OFF (100- JAMON ) This comment is printed when a jamming unit turns off his jamming equipment. This will...occur at the time specified by the user in the inter- active jamming order. 66. JAMMER TURNED ON (100- JAMON ) This comment is printed when a jamming unit

  20. User-Oriented Computer-Aided Hydraulic System Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARt P63 A - - o_ • • - • -. ° ...- -. -..-- - ---.-. Q~ %. i0 Report No. FPRC 83-A-Fl USER-ORIENTED COMPUTER-AIDED HYDRAULIC SYSTEM...computer aided design user oriented system simulation power flow modeling problem oriented language transient state steady state valves * FORTRAN PL/I pumps...a problem oriented language for use with the developed program, and the models of commonly used hydraulic valves, pumps, motors, and cylinders are

  1. Multiple-User, Multitasking, Virtual-Memory Computer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.; Stang, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Computer system designed and programmed to serve multiple users in research laboratory. Provides for computer control and monitoring of laboratory instruments, acquisition and anlaysis of data from those instruments, and interaction with users via remote terminals. System provides fast access to shared central processing units and associated large (from megabytes to gigabytes) memories. Underlying concept of system also applicable to monitoring and control of industrial processes.

  2. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in CASA cannot accurately predict 'fertility' that will be obtained with a semen sample or subject. However, when carefully validated, current CASA systems provide information important for quality assurance of semen planned for marketing, and for the understanding of the diversity of sperm responses to changes in the microenvironment in research. The four take-home messages from this review are: (1) animal species, extender or medium, specimen chamber, intensity of illumination, imaging hardware and software, instrument settings, technician, etc., all affect accuracy and precision of output values; (2) semen production facilities probably do not need a substantially different CASA system whereas biology laboratories would benefit from systems capable of imaging and tracking sperm in deep chambers for a flexible period of time; (3) software should enable grouping of individual sperm based on one or more attributes so outputs reflect subpopulations or clusters of similar sperm with unique

  3. Modeling User Behavior in Computer Learning Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantei, Marilyn M.

    Model building techniques from Artifical Intelligence and Information-Processing Psychology are applied to human-computer interface tasks to evaluate existing interfaces and suggest new and better ones. The model is in the form of an augmented transition network (ATN) grammar which is built by applying grammar induction heuristics on a sequential…

  4. Journey to End-User Computing--Aspirations and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Wayne W.

    1988-01-01

    The experiences of Seattle Pacific University as it changed from closed-shop to end-user computing are described. Once departments got over the initial shock of servicing the many nitty-gritty job requests formerly handled within computer services, they began to like the new system. (MLW)

  5. The Impact of User Interface on Young Children's Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugnali, Alex; Sullivan, Amanda; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: Over the past few years, new approaches to introducing young children to computational thinking have grown in popularity. This paper examines the role that user interfaces have on children's mastery of computational thinking concepts and positive interpersonal behaviors. Background: There is a growing pressure to begin teaching…

  6. Psychological Dimensions of User-Computer Interfaces. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionini, Gary

    This digest highlights several psychological dimensions of user-computer interfaces. First, the psychological theory behind interface design and the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) are discussed. Two psychological models, the information processing model of cognition and the mental model--both of which contribute to interface design--are…

  7. Integrating user studies into computer graphics-related courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, B S; Dias, P; Silva, S; Ferreira, C; Madeira, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents computer graphics. Computer graphics and visualization are essentially about producing images for a target audience, be it the millions watching a new CG-animated movie or the small group of researchers trying to gain insight into the large amount of numerical data resulting from a scientific experiment. To ascertain the final images' effectiveness for their intended audience or the designed visualizations' accuracy and expressiveness, formal user studies are often essential. In human-computer interaction (HCI), such user studies play a similar fundamental role in evaluating the usability and applicability of interaction methods and metaphors for the various devices and software systems we use.

  8. Presto 4.20 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-06-01

    This is an addendum to the Presto 4.20 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Presto. Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Presto that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Presto User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  9. Sierra/SolidMechanics 4.22 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This is an addendum to the Sierra/SolidMechanics 4.22 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Sierra/SolidMechanics (Sierra/SM). Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Sierra/SM that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Sierra/SolidMechanics User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  10. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gervasio Varela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC and Ambient Intelligence (AmI systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  11. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A; Duro, Richard

    2016-07-07

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  12. End of paper registration forms for new computer users

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    As of 3rd December 2007 it will be possible for new users to sign the Computer Centre User Registration Form electronically. As before, new users will still need to go to their computing group administrator, who will make the electronic request for account creation using CRA and give the new user his or her initial password. The difference is that the requested accounts will be created and usable almost immediately. Users will then have 3 days within which they must go to the web page http://cern.ch/cernaccount and click on ‘New User’. They will be required to follow a short computer security awareness training course, read the CERN Computing Rules and then confirm that they accept the rules. If this is not completed within 3 days all their computer accounts will be blocked and they will have to contact the Helpdesk to unblock their accounts and get a second chance to complete the registration. During the introductory phase the existing paper forms will also be accepted ...

  13. The Development of New User Research Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science: Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Baer, Donald R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gephart, Roy E.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-10-31

    On August 1, and 2, 2006, 104 scientists representing 40 institutions including 24 Universities and 5 National Laboratories gathered at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a National scientific user facility, to outline important science challenges for the next decade and identify major capabilities needed to pursue advanced research in the environmental molecular sciences. EMSL’s four science themes served as the framework for the workshop. The four science themes are 1) Biological Interactions and Interfaces, 2) Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Surface Science, 3) Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, and 4) Science of Interfacial Phenomena.

  14. An integrated user-oriented laboratory for verification of digital flight control systems: Features and capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, P.; Doane, D.; Saito, J.

    1982-01-01

    A Digital Flight Control Systems Verification Laboratory (DFCSVL) has been established at NASA Ames Research Center. This report describes the major elements of the laboratory, the research activities that can be supported in the area of verification and validation of digital flight control systems (DFCS), and the operating scenarios within which these activities can be carried out. The DFCSVL consists of a palletized dual-dual flight-control system linked to a dedicated PDP-11/60 processor. Major software support programs are hosted in a remotely located UNIVAC 1100 accessible from the PDP-11/60 through a modem link. Important features of the DFCSVL include extensive hardware and software fault insertion capabilities, a real-time closed loop environment to exercise the DFCS, an integrated set of software verification tools, and a user-oriented interface to all the resources and capabilities.

  15. Predicting user movements in heterogeneous indoor environments by reservoir computing

    OpenAIRE

    Bacciu, Davide; Barsocchi, Paolo; Chessa, Stefano; Gallicchio, Claudio; Micheli, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Anticipating user localization by making accurate predictions on its indoor movement patterns is a fundamental challenge for achieving higher degrees of personalization and reactivity in smart-home environments. We propose an approach to real-time movement forecasting founding on the efficient Reservoir Computing paradigm, predicting user movements based on streams of Received Signal Strengths collected by wireless motes distributed in the home environment. The ability of the system to genera...

  16. Capability-based Cryptographic Data Access Control in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Chittaranjan Hota; Sunil Sanka; Muttukrishnan Rajarajan; Nair, Srijith K.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing has emerged as a popular model in computing world to support processing large volumetric data using clusters of commodity computers. It is the latest effort in delivering computing resources as a service. It is used to describe both a platform and a type of application. A cloud computing platform dynamically provisions, configures, and deprovisions servers as needed. Cloud computing also describes applications that are extended to be accessible through the Internet. Data se...

  17. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2014 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-05-11

    This report provides an overview of the development of the NISAC CGE economic modeling capability since 2012. This capability enhances NISAC's economic modeling and analysis capabilities to answer a broader set of questions than possible with previous economic analysis capability. In particular, CGE modeling captures how the different sectors of the economy, for example, households, businesses, government, etc., interact to allocate resources in an economy and this approach captures these interactions when it is used to estimate the economic impacts of the kinds of events NISAC often analyzes.

  18. BPACK -- A computer model package for boiler reburning/co-firing performance evaluations. User`s manual, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.T.; Li, B.; Payne, R.

    1992-06-01

    This manual presents and describes a package of computer models uniquely developed for boiler thermal performance and emissions evaluations by the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The model package permits boiler heat transfer, fuels combustion, and pollutant emissions predictions related to a number of practical boiler operations such as fuel-switching, fuels co-firing, and reburning NO{sub x} reductions. The models are adaptable to most boiler/combustor designs and can handle burner fuels in solid, liquid, gaseous, and slurried forms. The models are also capable of performing predictions for combustion applications involving gaseous-fuel reburning, and co-firing of solid/gas, liquid/gas, gas/gas, slurry/gas fuels. The model package is conveniently named as BPACK (Boiler Package) and consists of six computer codes, of which three of them are main computational codes and the other three are input codes. The three main codes are: (a) a two-dimensional furnace heat-transfer and combustion code: (b) a detailed chemical-kinetics code; and (c) a boiler convective passage code. This user`s manual presents the computer model package in two volumes. Volume 1 describes in detail a number of topics which are of general users` interest, including the physical and chemical basis of the models, a complete description of the model applicability, options, input/output, and the default inputs. Volume 2 contains a detailed record of the worked examples to assist users in applying the models, and to illustrate the versatility of the codes.

  19. Computer and video game addiction-a comparison between game users and non-game users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv Malkiel

    2010-09-01

    Computer game addiction is excessive or compulsive use of computer and video games that may interfere with daily life. It is not clear whether video game playing meets diagnostic criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). First objective is to review the literature on computer and video game addiction over the topics of diagnosis, phenomenology, epidemiology, and treatment. Second objective is to describe a brain imaging study measuring dopamine release during computer game playing. Article search of 15 published articles between 2000 and 2009 in Medline and PubMed on computer and video game addiction. Nine abstinent "ecstasy" users and 8 control subjects were scanned at baseline and after performing on a motorbike riding computer game while imaging dopamine release in vivo with [123I] IBZM and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Psycho-physiological mechanisms underlying computer game addiction are mainly stress coping mechanisms, emotional reactions, sensitization, and reward. Computer game playing may lead to long-term changes in the reward circuitry that resemble the effects of substance dependence. The brain imaging study showed that healthy control subjects had reduced dopamine D2 receptor occupancy of 10.5% in the caudate after playing a motorbike riding computer game compared with baseline levels of binding consistent with increased release and binding to its receptors. Ex-chronic "ecstasy" users showed no change in levels of dopamine D2 receptor occupancy after playing this game. This evidence supports the notion that psycho-stimulant users have decreased sensitivity to natural reward. Computer game addicts or gamblers may show reduced dopamine response to stimuli associated with their addiction presumably due to sensitization.

  20. Advanced earth observation spacecraft computer-aided design software: Technical, user and programmer guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, C. E.; Krauze, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    The IDEAS computer of NASA is a tool for interactive preliminary design and analysis of LSS (Large Space System). Nine analysis modules were either modified or created. These modules include the capabilities of automatic model generation, model mass properties calculation, model area calculation, nonkinematic deployment modeling, rigid-body controls analysis, RF performance prediction, subsystem properties definition, and EOS science sensor selection. For each module, a section is provided that contains technical information, user instructions, and programmer documentation.

  1. Using Noninvasive Brain Measurement to Explore the Psychological Effects of Computer Malfunctions on Users during Human-Computer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M. Hirshfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s technologically driven world, there is a need to better understand the ways that common computer malfunctions affect computer users. These malfunctions may have measurable influences on computer user’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses. An experiment was conducted where participants conducted a series of web search tasks while wearing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and galvanic skin response sensors. Two computer malfunctions were introduced during the sessions which had the potential to influence correlates of user trust and suspicion. Surveys were given after each session to measure user’s perceived emotional state, cognitive load, and perceived trust. Results suggest that fNIRS can be used to measure the different cognitive and emotional responses associated with computer malfunctions. These cognitive and emotional changes were correlated with users’ self-report levels of suspicion and trust, and they in turn suggest future work that further explores the capability of fNIRS for the measurement of user experience during human-computer interactions.

  2. Prevalence of Asthenopia among computer users in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of the subjects (96%) had good vision (VA of 6/6- 6/18). Conclusion: Presence of ametropia is related to occurrence of asthenopia. Correction of existing ametropia would contribute to visual comfort of computer (vdt) users. Pre- employment and regular ocular examination should be made accessible to those who ...

  3. NEDLite user's manual: forest inventory for Palm OS handheld computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter D. Knopp; Mark J. Twery

    2006-01-01

    A user's manual for NEDLite, software that enables collection of forest inventory data on Palm OS handheld computers, with the option of transferring data into NED software for analysis and subsequent prescription development. NEDLite software is included. Download the NEDLite software at: http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/burlington/ned

  4. Hospital information systems: measuring end user computing satisfaction (EUCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelidis, Vassilios P; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D

    2012-06-01

    Over the past decade, hospitals in Greece have made significant investments in adopting and implementing new hospital information systems (HISs). Whether these investments will prove beneficial for these organizations depends on the support that will be provided to ensure the effective use of the information systems implemented and also on the satisfaction of its users, which is one of the most important determinants of the success of these systems. Measuring end-user computing satisfaction has a long history within the IS discipline. A number of attempts have been made to evaluate the overall post hoc impact of HIS, focusing on the end-users and more specifically on their satisfaction and the parameters that determine it. The purpose of this paper is to build further upon the existing body of the relevant knowledge by testing past models and suggesting new conceptual perspectives on how end-user computing satisfaction (EUCS) is formed among hospital information system users. All models are empirically tested using data from hospital information system (HIS) users (283). Correlation, explanatory and confirmation factor analysis was performed to test the reliability and validity of the measurement models. The structural equation modeling technique was also used to evaluate the causal models. The empirical results of the study provide support for the EUCS model (incorporating new factors) and enhance the generalizability of the EUCS instrument and its robustness as a valid measure of computing satisfaction and a surrogate for system success in a variety of cultural and linguistic settings. Although the psychometric properties of EUCS appear to be robust across studies and user groups, it should not be considered as the final chapter in the validation and refinement of these scales. Continuing efforts should be made to validate and extend the instrument. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Decision Making Under Uncertainty - Bridging the Gap Between End User Needs and Science Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon-Kidd, D. C.; Kiem, A.; Austin, E. K.

    2012-12-01

    broker' would be to package, translate (both from end user to scientist and scientist to end user) and transform climate information. Importantly communication of uncertainty needs to be improved so that end users are aware of all the caveats and what can realistically be expected from climate science now and in the near future. Overall this study confirmed that there is indeed a 'gap' between end user's needs and science capability, particularly with respect to uncertainty, communication and packaging of climate information. This 'gap' has been a barrier to successful climate change adaptation in the past. While it is unrealistic to think we could ever close the 'gap' completely, based on the recommendations provided in this paper, it may be possible to bridge the 'gap' (or at least improve people's awareness of the 'gap'). Furthermore, the insights gained and recommendations provided from this study, while based on an Australian context, are likely to be applicable to many other regions of the world, grappling with similar issues.

  6. Personal computer wallpaper user segmentation based on Sasang typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Youn

    2015-03-01

    As human-computer interaction (HCI) is becoming a significant part of all human life, the user's emotional satisfaction is an important factor to consider. These changes have been pointed out by several researchers who claim that a user's personality may become the most important factor in the design. The objective of this study is to examine Sasang typology as a user segmentation method in the area of HCI design. To test HCI usage patterns in terms of the user's personality and temperament, this study focuses on personal computer (PC) or lap-top wallpaper settings. One hundred and four Facebook friends completed a QSCC II survey assessing Sasang typology type and sent a captured image of their personal PC or lap-top wallpaper. To classify the computer usage pattern, folder organization and wallpaper setting were investigated. The research showed that So-Yang type organized folders and icons in an orderly manner, whereas So-Eum type did not organize folders and icons at all. With regard to wallpaper settings, So-Yang type used the default wallpaper provided by the PC but So-Eum type used landscape images. Because So-Yang type was reported to be emotionally stable and extrovert, they tended to be highly concerned with online privacy compared with So-Eum type. So-Eum type use a lot of images of landscapes as the background image, which demonstrates So-Eum's low emotional stability, anxiety, and the desire to obtain analogy throughout the computer screen. Also, So-Yang's wallpapers display family or peripheral figures and this is due to the sociability that extrovert So-Yang types possess. By proposing the Sasang typology as a factor in influencing an HCI usage pattern in this study, it can be used to predict the user's HCI experience, or suggest a native design methodology that can actively cope with the user's psychological environment.

  7. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  8. Recommended documentation for computer users at ANL. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberger, A.A.

    1992-04-01

    Recommended Documentation for Computer Users at ANL is for all users of the services available from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD). This document will guide you in selecting available documentation that will best fill your particular needs. Chapter 1 explains how to use this document to select documents and how to obtain them from the CTD Document Distribution Counter. Chapter 2 contains a table that categorizes available publications. Chapter 3 gives descriptions of the online DOCUMENT command for CMS, and VAX, and the Sun workstation. DOCUMENT allows you to scan for and order documentation that interests you. Chapter 4 lists publications by subject. Categories I and IX cover publications of a general nature and publications on telecommunications and networks respectively. Categories II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, and X cover publications on specific computer systems. Category XI covers publications on advanced scientific computing at Argonne. Chapter 5 contains abstracts for each publication, all arranged alphabetically. Chapter 6 describes additional publications containing bibliographies and master indexes that the user may find useful. The appendix identifies available computer systems, applications, languages, and libraries.

  9. On the capabilities and computational costs of neuron models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skocik, Michael J; Long, Lyle N

    2014-08-01

    We review the Hodgkin-Huxley, Izhikevich, and leaky integrate-and-fire neuron models in regular spiking modes solved with the forward Euler, fourth-order Runge-Kutta, and exponential Euler methods and determine the necessary time steps and corresponding computational costs required to make the solutions accurate. We conclude that the leaky integrate-and-fire needs the least number of computations, and that the Hodgkin-Huxley and Izhikevich models are comparable in computational cost.

  10. Validating DOE's Office of Science "capability" computing needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattern, Peter L. (BMV Associates, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Camp, William J.; Leland, Robert W.; Barsis, Edwin Howard (BMV Associates, LLC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-07-01

    A study was undertaken to validate the 'capability' computing needs of DOE's Office of Science. More than seventy members of the community provided information about algorithmic scaling laws, so that the impact of having access to Petascale capability computers could be assessed. We have concluded that the Office of Science community has described credible needs for Petascale capability computing.

  11. Verification, validation, and predictive capability in computational engineering and physics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Hirsch, Charles (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium); Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2003-02-01

    Developers of computer codes, analysts who use the codes, and decision makers who rely on the results of the analyses face a critical question: How should confidence in modeling and simulation be critically assessed? Verification and validation (V&V) of computational simulations are the primary methods for building and quantifying this confidence. Briefly, verification is the assessment of the accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation is the assessment of the accuracy of a computational simulation by comparison with experimental data. In verification, the relationship of the simulation to the real world is not an issue. In validation, the relationship between computation and the real world, i.e., experimental data, is the issue.

  12. COMPUTER SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR ESTIMATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE TRENDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer Support Systems for Estimating Chemical Toxicity: Present Capabilities and Future Trends A wide variety of computer-based artificial intelligence (AI) and decision support systems exist currently to aid in the assessment of toxicity for environmental chemicals. T...

  13. Stretching Capabilities: Children with Disabilities Playing TV and Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterfors, David

    2011-01-01

    Intervention studies show that if children with disabilities play motion-controlled TV and computer games for training purposes their motivation increases and their training becomes more intensive, but why this happens has not been explained. This article addresses this question with the help of ethnographic material from a public project in…

  14. Digital event recorder capable of simple computations and with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An event recorder which can summate and display stored data is described. This instrument can be used to record behavioural events or sequences in the laboratory or the field and produces a punched tape record which may be read by a computer, without need for an interface. Its ability to perform simple calculations for ...

  15. Best Practices for National Cyber Security: Building a National Computer Security Incident Management Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Establishing a national computer security incident management capability can be an important step in managing that risk. In this document, this capability is...referred to as a National Computer Security Incident Response Team (National CSIRT), although the specific organizational form may vary among nations

  16. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2013 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-17

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  17. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  18. Design of an online health-promoting community: negotiating user community needs with public health goals and service capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Joakim; Timpka, Toomas; Angbratt, Marianne; Frank, Linda; Norén, Anna-Maria; Hedin, Lena; Andersen, Emelie; Gursky, Elin A; Gäre, Boel Andersson

    2013-07-04

    An online health-promoting community (OHPC) has the potential to promote health and advance new means of dialogue between public health representatives and the general public. The aim of this study was to examine what aspects of an OHPC that are critical for satisfying the needs of the user community and public health goals and service capabilities. Community-based participatory research methods were used for data collection and analysis, and participatory design principles to develop a case study OHPC for adolescents. Qualitative data from adolescents on health appraisals and perspectives on health information were collected in a Swedish health service region and classified into categories of user health information exchange needs. A composite design rationale for the OHPC was completed by linking the identified user needs, user-derived requirements, and technical and organizational systems solutions. Conflicts between end-user requirements and organizational goals and resources were identified. The most prominent health information needs were associated to food, exercise, and well-being. The assessment of the design rationale document and prototype in light of the regional public health goals and service capabilities showed that compromises were needed to resolve conflicts involving the management of organizational resources and responsibilities. The users wanted to discuss health issues with health experts having little time to set aside to the OHPC and it was unclear who should set the norms for the online discussions. OHPCs can be designed to satisfy both the needs of user communities and public health goals and service capabilities. Compromises are needed to resolve conflicts between users' needs to discuss health issues with domain experts and the management of resources and responsibilities in public health organizations.

  19. Addressing capability computing challenges of high-resolution global climate modelling at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, Valentine; Norman, Matthew; Evans, Katherine; Taylor, Mark; Worley, Patrick; Hack, James; Mayer, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    ,640 equivalent cores. Scientific applications, such as CESM, are also required to demonstrate a "computational readiness capability" to efficiently scale across and utilize 20% of the entire system. The 0,25 deg configuration of the spectral element dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-SE), the atmospheric component of CESM, has been demonstrated to scale efficiently across more than 5,000 nodes (80,000 CPU cores) on Titan. The tracer transport routines of CAM-SE have also been ported to take advantage of the hybrid many-core architecture of Titan using GPUs [see EGU2014-4233], yielding over 2X speedup when transporting over 100 tracers. The high throughput I/O in CESM, based on the Parallel IO Library (PIO), is being further augmented to support even higher resolutions and enhance resiliency. The application performance of the individual runs are archived in a database and routinely analyzed to identify and rectify performance degradation during the course of the experiments. The various resources available at the OLCF now support a scientific workflow to facilitate high-resolution climate modelling. A high-speed center-wide parallel file system, called ATLAS, capable of 1 TB/s, is available on Titan as well as on the clusters used for analysis (Rhea) and visualization (Lens/EVEREST). Long-term archive is facilitated by the HPSS storage system. The Earth System Grid (ESG), featuring search & discovery, is also used to deliver data. The end-to-end workflow allows OLCF users to efficiently share data and publish results in a timely manner.

  20. The effect of ergonomic training and intervention on reducing occupational stress among computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yektaee

    2014-05-01

    Result: According to covariance analysis, ergonomic training and interventions lead to reduction of occupational stress of computer users. .Conclusion: Training computer users and informing them of the ergonomic principals and also providing interventions such as correction of posture, reducing duration of work time, using armrest and footrest would have significant implication in reducing occupational stress among computer users.

  1. [Informational approach to radiology department by end user computing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Katoh, Tsutomu; Murota, Makiko; Kohchi, Hideyuki; Miura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Midori; Ohhiro, Mika

    2009-04-20

    In recent years, due to the advanced computerization of medical institutions, systems such as radiology information system (RIS) and reporting have been used extensively also at radiology departments. However, the introduction of these systems will need a great amount of money, and the systems are not yet introduced in our hospital. On the contrary, thanks to the sophistication and price reduction of personal computers (PCs), there is now found a rapid expansion of end user computing (EUC) in which users of a system actively build and manage the system of their duties. Under these circumstances, in order to assist the duties at low costs, we worked the computerization of duties done at our Radiology Department by using the EUC. Specifically, we used software of general-purpose database to build the system with functions dealing with records on implementing medical examinations and treatments, examination booking and diagnostic imaging report. This system which has been developed according to details of conventional duties and requests from medical personnel makes it possible to alleviate the duties which were done manually.

  2. Localized Ambient Solidity Separation Algorithm Based Computer User Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Tongda; Chai, Yueting; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Most of popular clustering methods typically have some strong assumptions of the dataset. For example, the k-means implicitly assumes that all clusters come from spherical Gaussian distributions which have different means but the same covariance. However, when dealing with datasets that have diverse distribution shapes or high dimensionality, these assumptions might not be valid anymore. In order to overcome this weakness, we proposed a new clustering algorithm named localized ambient solidity separation (LASS) algorithm, using a new isolation criterion called centroid distance. Compared with other density based isolation criteria, our proposed centroid distance isolation criterion addresses the problem caused by high dimensionality and varying density. The experiment on a designed two-dimensional benchmark dataset shows that our proposed LASS algorithm not only inherits the advantage of the original dissimilarity increments clustering method to separate naturally isolated clusters but also can identify the clusters which are adjacent, overlapping, and under background noise. Finally, we compared our LASS algorithm with the dissimilarity increments clustering method on a massive computer user dataset with over two million records that contains demographic and behaviors information. The results show that LASS algorithm works extremely well on this computer user dataset and can gain more knowledge from it. PMID:26221133

  3. Sodium combustion computer code ASSCOPS version 2.0 user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Satoshi; Ohno, Shuji; Seino, Hiroshi; Miyake, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-12-01

    ASSCOPS (Analysis of Simultaneous Sodium Combustion in Pool and Spray) has been developed for analyses of thermal consequences of sodium leak and fire accidents in LMFBRs. This report presents a description of the computational models, input, and output as the user`s manual of ASSCOPS version 2.0. ASSCOPS is an integrated code based on the sodium pool fire code SOFIRE II developed by the Atomics International Division of Rockwell International, and the sodium spray fire code SPRAY developed by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in the U.S. The experimental studies conducted at PNC have been reflected in the ASSCOPS improvement. The users of ASSCOPS need to specify the sodium leak conditions (leak flow rate and temperature, etc.), the cell geometries (volume and structure surface area and thickness, etc.), and the atmospheric initial conditions, such as gas temperature, pressure, and gas composition. ASSCOPS calculates the time histories of atmospheric pressure and temperature changes along with those of the structural temperatures. (author)

  4. Models Of Vehicular Collision: Development And Simulation With Emphasis On Safety III: Computer Code Programmer's Guide And User Manual For Medusa

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, O. M.; Papadopoulos, P.; Lo, G.-j.; Varadi, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a user's manual and a programmer's guide for the computer program MEDUSA. The program is capable of simulating the impacts of several vehicles. It assumes that the collision are elastic, and is consequently applicable for low relative velocity impacts. A theoretical background of the collision detection algorithm is first given, followed by user's manual and programmer's guide.

  5. Understanding and Mastering Dynamics in Computing Grids Processing Moldable Tasks with User-Level Overlay

    CERN Document Server

    Moscicki, Jakub Tomasz

    Scientic communities are using a growing number of distributed systems, from lo- cal batch systems, community-specic services and supercomputers to general-purpose, global grid infrastructures. Increasing the research capabilities for science is the raison d'^etre of such infrastructures which provide access to diversied computational, storage and data resources at large scales. Grids are rather chaotic, highly heterogeneous, de- centralized systems where unpredictable workloads, component failures and variability of execution environments are commonplace. Understanding and mastering the hetero- geneity and dynamics of such distributed systems is prohibitive for end users if they are not supported by appropriate methods and tools. The time cost to learn and use the interfaces and idiosyncrasies of dierent distributed environments is another challenge. Obtaining more reliable application execution times and boosting parallel speedup are important to increase the research capabilities of scientic communities. L...

  6. Promoting the freedom of thought of mental health service users: Nussbaum's capabilities approach meets values-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Mari

    2017-08-09

    This article clarifies how the freedom of thought as a human right can be understood and promoted as a right of mental health service users, especially people with psychotic disorder, by using Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach and Fulford's and Fulford et al 's values-based practice. According to Nussbaum, freedom of thought seems to primarily protect the capability to think, believe and feel. This capability can be promoted in the context of mental health services by values-based practice. The article points out that both Nussbaum's approach and values-based practice recognise that people's values differ. The idea of involving different actors and service users in mental healthcare is also common in both Nussbaum's approach and values-based practice. However, there are also differences in that values-based practice relies on a 'good process' in decision-making, whereas the capabilities approach is oriented towards a 'right outcome'. However, since process and outcome are linked with each other, these two approaches do not necessarily conflict despite this difference. The article suggests that absolute rights are possible within the two approaches. It also recognises that the capabilities approach, values-based practice and human rights approach lean on liberal values and thus can be combined at least in liberal societies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. OPTIMAL WORK-REST SCHEDULE FOR COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Abdelrahman Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common health problems for computer users who work for an extended period. The aim of this study was to identify the best work-rest schedule with the three different work-rest groups: no rest break, mid-rest break, and multiple- rest breaks, which was associated with the least EMG activities of the upper trapezius muscle and would be beneficial for musculoskeletal health. Methods: Forty-five right-handed females complaining of neck discomfort were randomly assigned into three equal groups, Group1 (no rest break they were be engaged in sixty minutes of typing followed by ten minutes break (60-10, group 2 (mid-rest break thirty minutes of typing followed by five minutes break (30-5, and group 3 (multiple rest breaks fifteen minutes of typing followed by 2.5 minutes break (15-2.5. Surface EMG was used to pick up the electrical activity of right and left upper trapezius throughout the computer typing task. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction of normalized RMS (p<0.05 between the three groups for both right and left upper trapezius. Also, our results demonstrated a positive effect of mid and multiple rest breaks regarding reduced muscle activity in the upper trapezius muscle during a computer work. Conclusion: There is a positive effect of mid and multiple rest breaks regarding reduced muscle activity in the upper trapezius muscle throughout a computer work in subjects with neck and shoulder discomfort.

  8. Knowledge-Based User-Computer Interface Design, Prototyping and Evaluation - the Design Pro Advisory System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andriole, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    ...) design, prototyping and evaluation. DesignPro permits designers of user computer interfaces to represent requirements, to build prototypes, and to evaluate their impact -- all via a "workbench" of user accessible functions...

  9. Examining the Security Awareness, Information Privacy, and the Security Behaviors of Home Computer Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Attacks on computer systems continue to be a problem. The majority of the attacks target home computer users. To help mitigate the attacks some companies provide security awareness training to their employees. However, not all people work for a company that provides security awareness training and typically, home computer users do not have the…

  10. A survey of common habits of computer users as indicators of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Hand-washing was observed by only 13.5% of computer users examined. Other unhealthy practices found among computer users included eating (52.1), drinking (56), coughing, .... Washing hands before/after contact with a computer ..... Bacterial contamination of hospital bed-control handsets in a surgical.

  11. Protection from scrotal hyperthermia in laptop computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheynkin, Yefim; Welliver, Robert; Winer, Andrew; Hajimirzaee, Farshid; Ahn, Hongshik; Lee, Kyewon

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate methods of prevention of scrotal hyperthermia in laptop computer (LC) users. Experimental study. University hospital. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers. Right and left scrotal temperature and LC and lap pad temperatures were recorded during three separate 60-minute sessions using a working LC in a laptop position: session 1, sitting with closely approximated legs; session 2, sitting with closely approximated legs with a lap pad below the working LC; and session 3, sitting with legs apart at a 70°angle with a lap pad below the working LC. Scrotal temperature elevation. Scrotal temperature increased significantly regardless of leg position or use of a lap pad. However, it was significantly lower in session 3 (1.41 °C ± 0.66 °C on the left and 1.47 °C ± 0.62 °C on the right) than in session 2 (2.18 °C ± 0.69 °C and 2.06 °C ± 0.72 °C) or session 1 (2.31 °C ± 0.96 °C and 2.56 °C ± 0.91 °C). A scrotal temperature elevation of 1 °C was reached at 11 minutes in session 1, 14 minutes in session 2, and 28 minutes in session 3. Sitting position with closely approximated legs is the major cause of scrotal hyperthermia. Scrotal shielding with a lap pad does not protect from scrotal temperature elevation. Prevention of scrotal hyperthermia in LC users presently is not feasible. However, scrotal hyperthermia may be reduced by a modified sitting position (legs apart) and significantly shorter use of LC. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A strategy for coordination of end-user computing in hospital departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soar, J

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses issues associated with end-user computing and describes an approach for coordination of departmental end-user computing that was implemented at Concord Hospital, Sydney, Australia. There are a number of pressures for end-user computing. These include the inability of IS departments to provide the services that users require, the increasing spread of computing skills and the advent of the microcomputer. The traditional approaches to computing are discussed and the concern over security explained. The potential benefits of greater involvement of users in systems development and support is discussed. Information systems development needs to be a collaborative activity. At Concord Hospital, a number of departments have responsibility for their own local minicomputer and microcomputer based systems. Coordination of this systems effort was seen as important in order to maximize the benefits of end-user computing while seeking to minimize duplication of effort, data or systems, or security risks.

  13. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  14. Drought Predictability and Prediction in a Changing Climate: Assessing Current Predictive Knowledge and Capabilities, User Requirements and Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Drought is fundamentally the result of an extended period of reduced precipitation lasting anywhere from a few weeks to decades and even longer. As such, addressing drought predictability and prediction in a changing climate requires foremost that we make progress on the ability to predict precipitation anomalies on subseasonal and longer time scales. From the perspective of the users of drought forecasts and information, drought is however most directly viewed through its impacts (e.g., on soil moisture, streamflow, crop yields). As such, the question of the predictability of drought must extend to those quantities as well. In order to make progress on these issues, the WCRP drought information group (DIG), with the support of WCRP, the Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences, the La Caixa Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Science Foundation, has organized a workshop to focus on: 1. User requirements for drought prediction information on sub-seasonal to centennial time scales 2. Current understanding of the mechanisms and predictability of drought on sub-seasonal to centennial time scales 3. Current drought prediction/projection capabilities on sub-seasonal to centennial time scales 4. Advancing regional drought prediction capabilities for variables and scales most relevant to user needs on sub-seasonal to centennial time scales. This introductory talk provides an overview of these goals, and outlines the occurrence and mechanisms of drought world-wide.

  15. [Functional capabilities of users of mobility devices after femoral hip fracture. A comparison study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischker, A; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigates the functional skills and capabilities of a sample of 105 patients treated at the Lutheran Geriatric Center Berlin after a hip fracture during a period of two years between 2004 and 2006. Geriatric assessment instruments (Barthel index, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), Timed Up & Go (TUG), Tinetti, grip strength, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)) were implemented to measure the functional capabilities in this prospective study. The subjects were divided into three groups, characterized by the type of mobility device they used: crutches, a four-wheeled walker, or a wheel chair. Furthermore, the data were measured at three test intervals (t(0:): baseline before discharge, t(1): 4 weeks after discharge, t(2): 4 months after discharge). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all pTinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.05, general linear model). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all p Tinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.001, general linear model) A group-specific approach, based on the mobility devices used, allowed for better differentiation of functional capabilities after femoral hip fracture.

  16. On The Computational Capabilities of Physical Systems. Part 2; Relationship With Conventional Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the first of this pair of papers, it was proven that there cannot be a physical computer to which one can properly pose any and all computational tasks concerning the physical universe. It was then further proven that no physical computer C can correctly carry out all computational tasks that can be posed to C. As a particular example, this result means that no physical computer that can, for any physical system external to that computer, take the specification of that external system's state as input and then correctly predict its future state before that future state actually occurs; one cannot build a physical computer that can be assured of correctly "processing information faster than the universe does". These results do not rely on systems that are infinite, and/or non-classical, and/or obey chaotic dynamics. They also hold even if one uses an infinitely fast, infinitely dense computer, with computational powers greater than that of a Turing Machine. This generality is a direct consequence of the fact that a novel definition of computation - "physical computation" - is needed to address the issues considered in these papers, which concern real physical computers. While this novel definition does not fit into the traditional Chomsky hierarchy, the mathematical structure and impossibility results associated with it have parallels in the mathematics of the Chomsky hierarchy. This second paper of the pair presents a preliminary exploration of some of this mathematical structure. Analogues of Chomskian results concerning universal Turing Machines and the Halting theorem are derived, as are results concerning the (im)possibility of certain kinds of error-correcting codes. In addition, an analogue of algorithmic information complexity, "prediction complexity", is elaborated. A task-independent bound is derived on how much the prediction complexity of a computational task can differ for two different reference universal physical computers used to solve that task

  17. Personal computer versus personal computer/mobile device combination users' preclinical laboratory e-learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yamaga, Yoshiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between personal computer (PC)/mobile device combination and PC-only user patterns. We analyzed access frequency and time spent on a complete denture preclinical website in order to maximize website effectiveness. Fourth-year undergraduate students (N=41) in the preclinical complete denture laboratory course were invited to participate in this survey during the final week of the course to track login data. Students accessed video demonstrations and quizzes via our e-learning site/course program, and were instructed to view online demonstrations before classes. When the course concluded, participating students filled out a questionnaire about the program, their opinions, and devices they had used to access the site. Combination user access was significantly more frequent than PC-only during supplementary learning time, indicating that students with mobile devices studied during lunch breaks and before morning classes. Most students had favorable opinions of the e-learning site, but a few combination users commented that some videos were too long and that descriptive answers were difficult on smartphones. These results imply that mobile devices' increased accessibility encouraged learning by enabling more efficient time use between classes. They also suggest that e-learning system improvements should cater to mobile device users by reducing video length and including more short-answer questions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Classified computer configuration control system (C{sup 4}S), revision 3, user`s information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Callaghan, P.B.; Nelson, R.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States); Grambihler, A.J. [Boeing Computer Services Richland, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S) allows security management to track pertinent information concerning classified computer systems in the scope of their control. Information is entered by the level security manager that is closest to the classified computer system. Managers that are further removed from systems can have consolidated information made available to them. C{sup 4}S can be used to generate reports that are as current as the last information that was entered into the database. C{sup 4}S offers data entry, data display, and data reporting. The user interface uses menus, entry forms, the mouse, and Hot Keys. C{sup 4}S provides help windows that are available at any time by pressing the F1 key. C{sup 4}S has help for each menu, data entry form, and general program information. You can browse a help window by pressing the arrows, page up, or page down keys. You control C{sup 4}S with program options selected from pull-down menus. You {open_quotes}select{close_quotes} by moving a highlight bar up and down or across the menu and pressing enter on one of the options. The highlight bar is moved using the arrow keys, mouse, or selection letters. Notice that a letter of each menu option is a different color from the other letters. This is the selection letter for that option. If you press the selection letter, the highlight bar will move to that option. You can also use a mouse to move the highlight bar to the option by moving the mouse pointer to the option and pressing the mouse button. Explanation of menu options or entry fields appear at the bottom of the screen. These explanations should help you use C{sup 4}S. If you need more help, it is available by pressing F1. C{sup 4}S will bring up a help window for the particular option you are working with. The authors of the program are P.B. O`Callaghan, A. J. Grambihler, and R.A. Nelson.

  19. Minerva: User-Centered Science Operations Software Capability for Future Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Matthew; Marquez Jessica J.; Cohen, Tamar; Miller, Matthew J.; Deliz, Ivonne; Hillenius, Steven; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Lee, Yeon Jin; Lees, David; Norheim, Johannes; hide

    2017-01-01

    In June of 2016, the Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains (BASALT) research project conducted its first field deployment, which we call BASALT-1. BASALT-1 consisted of a science-driven field campaign in a volcanic field in Idaho as a simulated human mission to Mars. Scientists and mission operators were provided a suite of ground software tools that we refer to collectively as Minerva to carry out their work. Minerva provides capabilities for traverse planning and route optimization, timeline generation and display, procedure management, execution monitoring, data archiving, visualization, and search. This paper describes the Minerva architecture, constituent components, use cases, and some preliminary findings from the BASALT-1 campaign.

  20. Evaluating User Experience in a Selection Based Brain-Computer Interface Game: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Hakvoort, Gido; Poel, Mannes; Coutinho Anacleto, Junia; Fels, Sidney; Graham, Nicholas; Kapralos, Bill; Saif El-Nasr, Magy; Stanley, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    In human-computer interaction, it is important to offer the users correct modalities for particular tasks and situations. Unless the user has the suitable modality for a task, neither task performance nor user experience can be optimised. The aim of this study is to assess the appropriateness of

  1. Evaluating the influence of perceived organizational learning capability on user acceptance of information technology among operating room nurse staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ching; Lin, Shih-Pin; Yang, Shu-Ling; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Kuang-Yi

    2013-03-01

    Medical institutions are eager to introduce new information technology to improve patient safety and clinical efficiency. However, the acceptance of new information technology by medical personnel plays a key role in its adoption and application. This study aims to investigate whether perceived organizational learning capability (OLC) is associated with user acceptance of information technology among operating room nurse staff. Nurse anesthetists and operating room nurses were recruited in this questionnaire survey. A pilot study was performed to ensure the reliability and validity of the translated questionnaire, which consisted of 14 items from the four dimensions of OLC, and 16 items from the four constructs of user acceptance of information technology, including performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and behavioral intention. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied in the main survey to evaluate the construct validity of the questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothetical relationships between the four dimensions of user acceptance of information technology and the second-ordered OLC. Goodness of fit of the hypothetic model was also assessed. Performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence positively influenced behavioral intention of users of the clinical information system (all p perceived OLC and behavioral intention was not significant (p = 0.87). The fit statistical analysis indicated reasonable model fit to data (root mean square error of approximation = 0.07 and comparative fit index = 0.91). Perceived OLC indirectly affects user behavioral intention through the mediation of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence in the operating room setting. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Personal computer wallpaper user segmentation based on Sasang typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-Youn Lee

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: By proposing the Sasang typology as a factor in influencing an HCI usage pattern in this study, it can be used to predict the user's HCI experience, or suggest a native design methodology that can actively cope with the user's psychological environment.

  3. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program. Part 2: User and programmer documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    User and programmer oriented documentation for the flexible body option of the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program are provided. The user information provides sufficient knowledge of the development and use of the option to enable the engineering user to successfully operate the modified program and understand the results. The programmer's information describes the option structure and logic enabling a programmer to make major revisions to this part of the TOLA computer program.

  4. Evaluating user experience with respect to user expectations in brain-computer interface games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Hakvoort, G.; Poel, Mannes; Müller-Putz, G.R.; Scherer, R.; Billinger, M.; Kreilinger, A.; Kaiser, V.; Neuper, C.

    Evaluating user experience (UX) with respect to previous experiences can provide insight into whether a product can positively aect a user's opinion about a technology. If it can, then we can say that the product provides a positive UX. In this paper we propose a method to assess the UX in BCI

  5. Examining user satisfaction with single sign-on and computer application roaming within emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Patti; Zhang, Xiaoni

    2015-06-01

    In an age where mandatory computer usage within clinical care settings is a non-negotiable term of employment, the amount of applications a provider must access to document care is rapidly increasing. Each application contains an associated username and password. The increasing frequency with which clinicians have to log in and out of different applications is a source of frustration for many healthcare professionals. Healthcare executives see lost productivity. Single sign-on with added computer application roaming capabilities on shared workstations is a viable solution for both the clinician and the organization. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of implementation of single sign-on technology with application roaming on shared workstations. This study focuses on the perception of satisfaction with the implementation of single sign-on technologies within a midsized integrated delivery health network's five emergency departments. We contribute to theory with the following: (1) the development of a construct called facilitated technology interruptions, (2) validation of the construct facilitated technology interruptions, and (3) application of a quantitative method to test the relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction. We surveyed five emergency departments and proposed five hypotheses. We found the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction; the positive relationships between effort expectancy and satisfaction, and effort expectancy and willingness to recommend; and the positive relationship between satisfaction and willingness to recommend. We did not confirm the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and willingness to recommend. We conclude that single sign-on technology increases user satisfaction. Other organizations may use the findings from this study and perform pre-single sign-on versus post-single sign-on evaluations. In practice

  6. Protecting User Privacy for Cloud Computing by Bivariate Polynomial Based Secret Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ching-Nung; Lai, Jia-Bin; Fu, Zhangjie

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is an Internet-based computing. In cloud computing, the service is fully served by the provider. Users need nothing but personal devices and Internet access. Computing services, such as data, storage, software, computing, and application, can be delivered to local devices through Internet. The major security issue of cloud computing is that cloud providers must ensure that their infrastructure is secure, and prevent illegal data accesses from outsiders, other clients, or even ...

  7. NWChem Meeting on Science Driven Petascale Computing and Capability Development at EMSL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, Wibe A.

    2007-02-19

    On January 25, and 26, 2007, an NWChem meeting was held that was attended by 65 scientists from 29 institutions including 22 universities and 5 national laboratories. The goals of the meeting were to look at major scientific challenges that could be addressed by computational modeling in environmental molecular sciences, and to identify the associated capability development needs. In addition, insights were sought into petascale computing developments in computational chemistry. During the meeting common themes were identified that will drive the need for the development of new or improved capabilities in NWChem. Crucial areas of development that the developer's team will be focusing on are (1) modeling of dynamics and kinetics in chemical transformations, (2) modeling of chemistry at interfaces and in the condensed phase, and (3) spanning longer time scales in biological processes modeled with molecular dynamics. Various computational chemistry methodologies were discussed during the meeting, which will provide the basis for the capability developments in the near or long term future of NWChem.

  8. Computer-related assistive technology: satisfaction and experiences among users with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mary; Nieuwenhuijsen, Els R; Epstein, Marcy J

    2008-01-01

    Many people with disabilities use assistive technology devices (ATDs) for computer access. The specific focus of this exploratory study was (a) to assess the experiences, opinions, and satisfaction levels of 24 individuals with disabilities using computer-related ATDs; (b) to investigate their awareness of health risk factors related to computer usage; and (c) to examine the psychosocial impact of computer-related ATDs on users. Data were collected via telephone interviews with 24 individuals with physical disabilities who had experience using one or more ATDs. The Quebec User Evaluation with Assistive Technology instrument was used to evaluate users' satisfaction with ATDs in a number of dimensions, including their physical attributes. The Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale measured the psychosocial impact (i.e., independence, competence, and adequacy) of an ATD on users. Additional questions were posed to gather information about user's opinions and experiences. Training appeared to be an important component for ATD users, many of whom preferred a setting to try out devices rather than group or individual training. Respondents with visual impairments revealed a higher level of adaptability versus those without visual impairments (p = .001). Additional research is needed to develop specific survey items focused on users of computer-related ATDs and the evaluation of the psychosocial impact of ATDs on computer users.

  9. CEASAW: A User-Friendly Computer Environment Analysis for the Sawmill Owner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo Mendoza; William Sprouse; Philip A. Araman; William G. Luppold

    1991-01-01

    Improved spreadsheet software capabilities have brought optimization to users with little or no background in mathematical programming. Better interface capabilities of spreadsheet models now make it possible to combine optimization models with a spreadsheet system. Sawmill production and inventory systems possess many features that make them suitable application...

  10. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

  11. Human Computer Interface Design Criteria. Volume 1. User Interface Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    function may require modification when converted to certain European languages. For example, French and Italian replace the terminal vowel in an article...87 8.3.3 Types of Message Windows ........................................................................... 89 9.  User Support ...112 11.4.5 Support for Printing ...................................................................................... 113

  12. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the Laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled multi-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CPAM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections), as follows. Theme 1: Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the Laboratory. Theme 2: Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution

  13. Brain-Computer Interfaces and User Experience Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Nijboer, Femke; Allison, Brendan Z.; Dunne, Stephen; Leeb, Robert; del R. Millán, José; Nijholt, Antinus

    2012-01-01

    The research on brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) is pushing hard to bring technologies out of the lab, into society and onto the market. The newly developing merge of the field of BCI with human–computer interaction (HCI) is paving the way for new applications such as BCI-controlled games. The

  14. Software for computing plant biomass—BIOPAK users guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Means; Heather A. Hansen; Greg J. Koerper; Paul B Alaback; Mark W. Klopsch

    1994-01-01

    BIOPAK is a menu-driven package of computer programs for IBM-compatible personal computers that calculates the biomass, area, height, length, or volume of plant components (leaves, branches, stem, crown, and roots). The routines were written in FoxPro, Fortran, and C.BIOPAK was created to facilitate linking of a diverse array of vegetation datasets with the...

  15. Perspectives on User Experience Evaluation of Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Nijboer, Femke; Nijholt, Antinus; Stephanidis, Constantine

    2011-01-01

    The research on brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) is pushing hard to bring technologies out of the lab and into society and onto the market. The nascent merge between the field of BCI and human-computer interaction (HCI) is paving the way for new applications such as BCI-controlled gaming. The

  16. Enrique: A case study of a gifted computer user

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S C

    2000-03-17

    The author has been investigating the affective and intellectual views that gifted children have about computers. These studies have used various methodological approaches in order to develop a broad perspective on the issues involved in this topic. The author has used survey instruments (Sesko, 1998) and interview techniques (Sesko, 1999) to capture both statistical and narrative data. The objective of this study is to explore in depth the interactions that one student has with the machine and its applications. The driver for this and the previous studies was the paucity of research in the area of gifted and talented children and their involvement with what has become the primary intellectual tool of the century (Turkel, 1984). The second reason is that it has been posited that the intellectual characteristics of gifted children should enable those who are interested in computers to achieve a high level of proficiency with either computer applications or programming. Further, the ability to learn things at a young age should allow gifted children who use computers to develop a large variety of computer-based activities. The author has shown evidence to support these ideas in previous work. Finally, as Hausman (1985) claims, facilities with computers should allow these children to create new activities for using computers. The author found no published research to demonstrate whether they do; but still believes the results of this case study strongly support Hausman's contentions.

  17. The Management of End-User Computing Documents: The Urgent Task of Keeping Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Cherackal

    1992-01-01

    Focuses on the management of documentation requirements of information generated because of end user computing. Points out historical trends, proposes patterns for meeting documentation requirements, introduces techniques for facilitating documentation, and discusses recommendations for completion of the documentation task. (JOW)

  18. System and method for controlling power consumption in a computer system based on user satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Dick, Robert P; Chen, Xi; Memik, Gokhan; Dinda, Peter A; Shy, Alex; Ozisikyilmaz, Berkin; Mallik, Arindam; Choudhary, Alok

    2014-04-22

    Systems and methods for controlling power consumption in a computer system. For each of a plurality of interactive applications, the method changes a frequency at which a processor of the computer system runs, receives an indication of user satisfaction, determines a relationship between the changed frequency and the user satisfaction of the interactive application, and stores the determined relationship information. The determined relationship can distinguish between different users and different interactive applications. A frequency may be selected from the discrete frequencies at which the processor of the computer system runs based on the determined relationship information for a particular user and a particular interactive application running on the processor of the computer system. The processor may be adapted to run at the selected frequency.

  19. Good Counsel: A Computer Software-User's Guide to Legal Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas S.; Getman, George J.

    1984-01-01

    Various legal methods, such as copyright, trade secret, and patent law, protect proprietary rights in computer software. Users of this software must respect these rights or face infringement lawsuits. (TE)

  20. Locus of Control and Computer Attitude: The Effect of User Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that was conducted to investigate the relationship between locus of control and user attitude toward computer based information systems (CBIS) used at work. The impact of user involvement is examined, the hypotheses tested are described, and implications for introducing CBIS into organizations are discussed. (14 references) (LRW)

  1. The Utility of Computer Tracking Tools for User-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Geri; Mazur, Joan

    1993-01-01

    Describes tracking tools used by designers and users to evaluate the efficacy of hypermedia systems. Highlights include human-computer interaction research; tracking tools and user-centered design; and three examples from the Interactive Multimedia Group at Cornell University that illustrate uses of various tracking tools. (27 references) (LRW)

  2. Computer systems experiences of users with and without disabilities an evaluation guide for professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Borsci, Simone; Federici, Stefano; Mele, Maria Laura

    2013-01-01

    This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. The book creates an evaluation process that is able to assess the user's satisfaction with a developed system. Presenting a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons, it takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process.

  3. Incidence and risk factors for symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomingas, A; Hagberg, M; Heiden, M; Richter, H; Westergren, K E; Wigaeus Tornqvist, E

    2012-01-01

    Personal computers are used by a majority of the working population in their professions. Little is known about risk-factors for incident symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users. The aim was to study the incidence and risk-factors for symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.This study is a part of a comprehensive prospective follow-up study of factors associated with the incidence of symptoms among professional computer users. 1531 computer users of different professions at 46 companies were invited, whereof 1283 answered a baseline questionnaire (498 men; 785 women) and 1246 at least one of 10 monthly follow-up questionnaires. The computer work-station and equipment were generally of a good standard. The majority used CRT displays.During the follow-up period 329 subjects reported eye symptoms. The overall incidence rate in the whole study group was 0.38 per person-year, 0.23 in the subgroup of subjects who were symptom free at baseline and 1.06 among subjects who reported eye symptoms at baseline. In the bivariate analyses significant associations were found with all explanatory variables, except BMI. The reduced multivariate model showed significant associations with extended computer work, visual discomfort (dose-response), eye symptoms at baseline (higher risk), sex (women=higher risk) and nicotine use.The incidence of eye problems among professional computer users is high and related to both individual and work-related factors.

  4. APPLICATION OF SOCIAL COMPUTING ANALYSIS VIA ATTITUDES OF MEDIA USERS

    OpenAIRE

    Civelek, Turhan

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing and modeling of social platforms and media data is rather developed and still developing today. Social behaviors are analyzed and characterized with social and artificial intelligence, statistical methods, analytical approaches and evolutionary algorithms. Data mining and machine learning are used in the social computing. In this study, social computing included, two surveys used a questionnaire with 43 different questions handed over in random sample to 537 different high school st...

  5. ARTVAL user guide : user guide for the ARTerial eVALuation computational engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This document provides guidance on the use of the ARTVAL (Arterial Evaluation) computational : engine. The engine implements the Quick Estimation Method for Urban Streets (QEM-US) : described in Highway Capacity Manual (HCM2010) as the core computati...

  6. RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.; Neymotin, L.Y.

    1998-03-01

    This document is the User`s Manual for the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) systems transient code RAMONA-4B. The code uses a three-dimensional neutron-kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, nonequilibrium, drift-flux, phase-flow model of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 describes the code`s structure, lists major subroutines, and discusses the computer requirements. Chapter 3 is on code, auxillary codes, and instructions for running RAMONA-4B on Sun SPARC and IBM Workstations. Chapter 4 contains component descriptions and detailed card-by-card input instructions. Chapter 5 provides samples of the tabulated output for the steady-state and transient calculations and discusses the plotting procedures for the steady-state and transient calculations. Three appendices contain important user and programmer information: lists of plot variables (Appendix A) listings of input deck for sample problem (Appendix B), and a description of the plotting program PAD (Appendix C). 24 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Understanding and enhancing user acceptance of computer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, William B.; Morris, Nancy M.

    1986-01-01

    Technology-driven efforts to implement computer technology often encounter problems due to lack of acceptance or begrudging acceptance of the personnel involved. It is argued that individuals' acceptance of automation, in terms of either computerization or computer aiding, is heavily influenced by their perceptions of the impact of the automation on their discretion in performing their jobs. It is suggested that desired levels of discretion reflect needs to feel in control and achieve self-satisfaction in task performance, as well as perceptions of inadequacies of computer technology. Discussion of these factors leads to a structured set of considerations for performing front-end analysis, deciding what to automate, and implementing the resulting changes.

  8. Capabilities of the ATHENA computer code for modeling the SP-100 space reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1985-09-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of an SP-100 space reactor was demonstrated using the ATHENA computer code. The preliminary General Electric SP-100 design was modeled using Athena. The model simulates the fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of this design. Two ATHENA demonstration calculations were performed simulating accident scenarios. A mask for the SP-100 model and an interface with the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) were developed, allowing a graphic display of the calculated results on the NPA. 22 figs.

  9. CASL Dakota Capabilities Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Brian M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Simmons, Chris [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-10

    The Dakota software project serves the mission of Sandia National Laboratories and supports a worldwide user community by delivering state-of-the-art research and robust, usable software for optimization and uncertainty quantification. These capabilities enable advanced exploration and riskinformed prediction with a wide range of computational science and engineering models. Dakota is the verification and validation (V&V) / uncertainty quantification (UQ) software delivery vehicle for CASL, allowing analysts across focus areas to apply these capabilities to myriad nuclear engineering analyses.

  10. A data mining technique for discovering distinct patterns of hand signs: implications in user training and computer interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nong; Li, Xiangyang; Farley, Toni

    2003-01-15

    Hand signs are considered as one of the important ways to enter information into computers for certain tasks. Computers receive sensor data of hand signs for recognition. When using hand signs as computer inputs, we need to (1) train computer users in the sign language so that their hand signs can be easily recognized by computers, and (2) design the computer interface to avoid the use of confusing signs for improving user input performance and user satisfaction. For user training and computer interface design, it is important to have a knowledge of which signs can be easily recognized by computers and which signs are not distinguishable by computers. This paper presents a data mining technique to discover distinct patterns of hand signs from sensor data. Based on these patterns, we derive a group of indistinguishable signs by computers. Such information can in turn assist in user training and computer interface design.

  11. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer-Mediated Firefighter Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtkamp, Joske M.; Toet, Alexander; Bos, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently intense to make the training viable and effective.…

  12. End User Computing at a South African Technikon: Enabling Disadvantaged Students To Meet Employers' Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Cecille

    A two-phase study examined the skills required of competent end-users of computers in the workplace and assessed the computing awareness and technological environment of first-year students entering historically disadvantaged technikons in South Africa. First, a DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) panel of nine representatives of local business and…

  13. Task-relevant sound and user experience in computer-mediated firefighter training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently

  14. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer- Mediated Firefighter Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently

  15. Evaluating biomechanics of user-selected sitting and standing computer workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michael Y; Barbir, Ana; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-11-01

    A standing computer workstation has now become a popular modern work place intervention to reduce sedentary behavior at work. However, user's interaction related to a standing computer workstation and its differences with a sitting workstation need to be understood to assist in developing recommendations for use and set up. The study compared the differences in upper extremity posture and muscle activity between user-selected sitting and standing workstation setups. Twenty participants (10 females, 10 males) volunteered for the study. 3-D posture, surface electromyography, and user-reported discomfort were measured while completing simulated tasks with each participant's self-selected workstation setups. Sitting computer workstation associated with more non-neutral shoulder postures and greater shoulder muscle activity, while standing computer workstation induced greater wrist adduction angle and greater extensor carpi radialis muscle activity. Sitting computer workstation also associated with greater shoulder abduction postural variation (90th-10th percentile) while standing computer workstation associated with greater variation for should rotation and wrist extension. Users reported similar overall discomfort levels within the first 10 min of work but had more than twice as much discomfort while standing than sitting after 45 min; with most discomfort reported in the low back for standing and shoulder for sitting. These different measures provide understanding in users' different interactions with sitting and standing and by alternating between the two configurations in short bouts may be a way of changing the loading pattern on the upper extremity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Session on High Speed Civil Transport Design Capability Using MDO and High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Joe

    2000-01-01

    Since the inception of CAS in 1992, NASA Langley has been conducting research into applying multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) and high performance computing toward reducing aircraft design cycle time. The focus of this research has been the development of a series of computational frameworks and associated applications that increased in capability, complexity, and performance over time. The culmination of this effort is an automated high-fidelity analysis capability for a high speed civil transport (HSCT) vehicle installed on a network of heterogeneous computers with a computational framework built using Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and Java. The main focus of the research in the early years was the development of the Framework for Interdisciplinary Design Optimization (FIDO) and associated HSCT applications. While the FIDO effort was eventually halted, work continued on HSCT applications of ever increasing complexity. The current application, HSCT4.0, employs high fidelity CFD and FEM analysis codes. For each analysis cycle, the vehicle geometry and computational grids are updated using new values for design variables. Processes for aeroelastic trim, loads convergence, displacement transfer, stress and buckling, and performance have been developed. In all, a total of 70 processes are integrated in the analysis framework. Many of the key processes include automatic differentiation capabilities to provide sensitivity information that can be used in optimization. A software engineering process was developed to manage this large project. Defining the interactions among 70 processes turned out to be an enormous, but essential, task. A formal requirements document was prepared that defined data flow among processes and subprocesses. A design document was then developed that translated the requirements into actual software design. A validation program was defined and implemented to ensure that codes integrated into the framework produced the same

  17. User`s manual for FLUFIX/MOD2: A computer program for fluid-solids hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Folga, S.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes FLUFIX/MOD2, a computer program that was developed as a two-dimensional analytical tool, based on a two-fluid hydrodynamic model, for application to fluid-flow simulation in fluid-solids systems and replaces the Interim User`s Manual for FLUFIX/MOD1. The field equations that constitute the two-fluid model used in FLUFIX/MOD2 and the constitutive relationships required to close this system of equations, as well as the finite-difference equations that approximate these equations and their solution procedure, are presented and discussed. The global structure of FLUFIX/MOD2 that implements this solution procedure is discussed. The input data for FLUFIX/MOD2 are given, and a sample problem for a fluidized bed is described.

  18. Expanded serial communication capability for the transport systems research vehicle laptop computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Wesley C.

    1991-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center included installation of a number of Grid 1500 series laptop computers. Each unit is a 80386-based IBM PC clone. RS-232 data busses are needed for TSRV flight research programs, and it has been advantageous to extend the application of the Grids in this area. Use was made of the expansion features of the Grid internal bus to add a user programmable serial communication channel. Software to allow use of the Grid bus expansion has been written and placed in a Turbo C library for incorporation into applications programs in a transparent manner via function calls. Port setup; interrupt-driven, two-way data transfer; and software flow control are built into the library functions.

  19. Factors Which Related with Eye Fatique (Astenopia) of Computer User at Samsat Office Palembang

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi, Yulyana Kusuma; Sitorus, Rico Januar; Hamzah Hasyim, Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    Background : The over use of computer will increase risk in eye health (astenopia). The risk factors astenopia are The over use of computer, inadequate lighting intensity increase of age, and frequent of breaks not regularly. Method : The research uses cross sectional design held to 30 computer users in SAMSAT office Palembang. The aim of this research is to know about factors which related with eye fatique. This research uses Questionnaire Luxmeter and reaction timer instruments Result : ...

  20. Are Free Cloud Services Productive? A Performance Study on End User Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indika Perera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of Cloud based services,today’s computing has gained a new paradigm shift towardsglobal, massive scale computing platforms, available for bothmacro and micro computing requirements. Although, there havebeen quite a few large scale Grid computing facilities forcommercial and research computing purposes, Cloud computingservices have extended their services to the individual end userswith limited computing requirements. This paper is focused onhow Cloud services impact on individual end users’ computingneeds in the perspective of system performance productivity.The paper covers the Cloud computing conceptual models withpresent services available. Importantly, the experiment is basedon free Cloud services dedicated for individual end users withlimited computing requirements, to evaluate the computingproductivity. The research results clearly indicate productivitybottlenecks on average computing users’ usage experiences, withCloud services; which open an appealing dialogue forresearchers to be indecisive on what they believe on Cloudservice benefits, and the way it should be used.

  1. The Effect of Ergonomic Principles Education on Musculoskeletal Disorders among Computer Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Yektaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the education ergonomic principles on musculoskeletal disorders among computer users at Rasht welfare organization in 2011. Materials & Methods: This semi-experimental study, 283 female computer users whom had musculoskeletal disorders randomly assigned into two groups. The case group were educated practically and theoretically about ergonomic issues for three months and ergonomic interventions were carried out for this group. Body map questionnaire was used for estimation of musculoskeletal disorders level and statistical analysis was performed using kolmogorov-smirnov and covariate test. Results: The results of the present study showed that the highest prevalence rate of musculoskeletal disorders were reported in right knee (27.91%, neck region (27.20% , lumbar and right shoulder (24.14%, left knee (25.79%, back (23.67%. The results of this research showed that there was homogeneity of variance and the meaning of the F covariance at the level of P&le0.05 revealed that the education of ergonomic principles leads to a reduction of Musculoskeletal Disorders among computer users. Conclusion: Education of ergonomic principles for the computer users and ergonomic interventions like correction of postures, reducing of work duration , armrest, foot rest, and cushion strengthening exercise and regulating of work station application have a significant effect on the decreasing musculoskeletal disorders prevalence among computer users.

  2. Determining the frequency of dry eye in computer users and comparing with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the frequency of dry eye in computer users and to compare them with control group. METHODS: This study was a case control research conducted in 2015 in the city of Birjand. Sample size of study was estimated to be 304 subjects(152 subjects in each group, computer user group and control group. Non-randomized method of sampling was used in both groups. Schirmer test was used to evaluate dry eye of subjects. Then, subjects completed questionnaire. This questionnaire was developed based on objectives and reviewing the literature. After collecting the data, they were entered to SPSS Software and they were analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher's test at the alpha level of 0.05.RESULTS: In total, 304 subjects(152 subjects in each groupwere included in the study. Frequency of dry eyes in the control group was 3.3%(5 subjectsand it was 61.8% in computer users group(94 subjects. Significant difference was observed between two groups in this regard(Pn=12, and it was 34.2% in computer users group(n=52, which significant difference was observed between two groups in this regard(PP=0.8. The mean working hour with computer per day in patients with dry eye was 6.65±3.52h, while it was 1.62±2.54h in healthy group(T=13.25, PCONCLUSION: This study showed a significant relationship between using computer and dry eye and ocular symptoms. Thus, it is necessary that officials need to pay particular attention to working hours with computer by employees. They should also develop appropriate plans to divide the working hours with computer among computer users. However, due to various confounding factors, it is recommended that these factors to be controlled in future studies.

  3. User-customized brain computer interfaces using Bayesian optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Hossein; Ward, Rabab K; Bashashati, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The brain characteristics of different people are not the same. Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) should thus be customized for each individual person. In motor-imagery based synchronous BCIs, a number of parameters (referred to as hyper-parameters) including the EEG frequency bands, the channels and the time intervals from which the features are extracted should be pre-determined based on each subject's brain characteristics. To determine the hyper-parameter values, previous work has relied on manual or semi-automatic methods that are not applicable to high-dimensional search spaces. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, scalable and computationally inexpensive algorithm that uses Bayesian optimization to tune these hyper-parameters. We then build different classifiers trained on the sets of hyper-parameter values proposed by the Bayesian optimization. A final classifier aggregates the results of the different classifiers. We have applied our method to 21 subjects from three BCI competition datasets. We have conducted rigorous statistical tests, and have shown the positive impact of hyper-parameter optimization in improving the accuracy of BCIs. Furthermore, We have compared our results to those reported in the literature. Unlike the best reported results in the literature, which are based on more sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and rely on prestudies to determine the hyper-parameter values, our method has the advantage of being fully automated, uses less sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and yields similar or superior results compared to the best performing designs in the literature.

  4. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  5. A computational system for aerodynamic design and analysis of supersonic aircraft. Part 2: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.; Coleman, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs was developed for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations. The system uses linearized theory methods for the calculation of surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts in combination with linearized theory for calculation of aerodynamic force coefficients. Interactive graphics are optional at the user's request. This user's manual contains a description of the system, an explanation of its usage, the input definition, and example output.

  6. Computer code for controller partitioning with IFPC application: A user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Phillip H.; Yarkhan, Asim

    1994-01-01

    A user's manual for the computer code for partitioning a centralized controller into decentralized subcontrollers with applicability to Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control (IFPC) is presented. Partitioning of a centralized controller into two subcontrollers is described and the algorithm on which the code is based is discussed. The algorithm uses parameter optimization of a cost function which is described. The major data structures and functions are described. Specific instructions are given. The user is led through an example of an IFCP application.

  7. Mining Emerging Patterns for Recognizing Activities of Multiple Users in Pervasive Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wu, Zhanqing; Wang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and recognizing human activities from sensor readings is an important task in pervasive computing. Existing work on activity recognition mainly focuses on recognizing activities for a single user in a smart home environment. However, in real life, there are often multiple inhabitants...... activity models, and propose an Emerging Pattern based Multi-user Activity Recognizer (epMAR) to recognize both single-user and multiuser activities. We conduct our empirical studies by collecting real-world activity traces done by two volunteers over a period of two weeks in a smart home environment...... sensor readings in a home environment, and propose a novel pattern mining approach to recognize both single-user and multi-user activities in a unified solution. We exploit Emerging Pattern – a type of knowledge pattern that describes significant changes between classes of data – for constructing our...

  8. Building a computer-aided design capability using a standard time share operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes how an integrated system of engineering computer programs can be built using a standard commercially available operating system. The discussion opens with an outline of the auxiliary functions that an operating system can perform for a team of engineers involved in a large and complex task. An example of a specific integrated system is provided to explain how the standard operating system features can be used to organize the programs into a simple and inexpensive but effective system. Applications to an aircraft structural design study are discussed to illustrate the use of an integrated system as a flexible and efficient engineering tool. The discussion concludes with an engineer's assessment of an operating system's capabilities and desirable improvements.

  9. Computational Performance of Ultra-High-Resolution Capability in the Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Mirin, Arthur A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Craig, Anthony [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Jacob, Robert L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Mickelson, Sheri A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2012-01-01

    With the fourth release of the Community Climate System Model, the ability to perform ultra-high resolution climate simulations is now possible, enabling eddy-resolving ocean and sea ice models to be coupled to a finite-volume atmosphere model for a range of atmospheric resolutions. This capability was made possible by enabling the model to use large scale parallelism, which required a significant refactoring of the software infrastructure. We describe the scalability of two ultra-high-resolution coupled configurations on leadership class computing platforms. We demonstrate the ability to utilize over 30,000 processor cores on a Cray XT5 system and over 60,000 cores on an IBM Blue Gene/P system to obtain climatologically relevant simulation rates for these configurations.

  10. Static security based available transfer capability (ATC computation for real-time power markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah Chintham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In power system deregulation, the Independent System Operator (ISO has the responsibility to control the power transactions and avoid overloading of the transmission lines beyond their thermal limits. To achieve this, the ISO has to update in real-time periodically Available Transfer Capability (ATC index for enabling market participants to reserve the transmission service. In this paper Static Security based ATC has been computed for real-time applications using three artificial intelligent methods viz.: i Back Propagation Algorithm (BPA; ii Radial Basis Function (RBF Neural network; and iii Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS. These three different intelligent methods are tested on IEEE 24-bus Reliability Test System (RTS and 75-bus practical System for the base case and critical line outage cases for different transactions. The results are compared with the conventional full AC Load Flow method for different transactions.

  11. An Australian Perspective On The Challenges For Computer And Network Security For Novice End-Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patryk Szewczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is common for end-users to have difficulty in using computer or network security appropriately and thus have often been ridiculed when misinterpreting instructions or procedures. This discussion paper details the outcomes of research undertaken over the past six years on why security is overly complex for end-users. The results indicate that multiple issues may render end-users vulnerable to security threats and that there is no single solution to address these problems. Studies on a small group of senior citizens has shown that educational seminars can be beneficial in ensuring that simple security aspects are understood and used appropriately.

  12. Fault Injection and Monitoring Capability for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Computation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Yates, Amy M.; Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2010-01-01

    The Configurable Fault-Injection and Monitoring System (CFIMS) is intended for the experimental characterization of effects caused by a variety of adverse conditions on a distributed computation system running flight control applications. A product of research collaboration between NASA Langley Research Center and Old Dominion University, the CFIMS is the main research tool for generating actual fault response data with which to develop and validate analytical performance models and design methodologies for the mitigation of fault effects in distributed flight control systems. Rather than a fixed design solution, the CFIMS is a flexible system that enables the systematic exploration of the problem space and can be adapted to meet the evolving needs of the research. The CFIMS has the capabilities of system-under-test (SUT) functional stimulus generation, fault injection and state monitoring, all of which are supported by a configuration capability for setting up the system as desired for a particular experiment. This report summarizes the work accomplished so far in the development of the CFIMS concept and documents the first design realization.

  13. Investigating User Interfaces of Non-Iranian Digital Libraries based on Social Bookmarking Capabilities and Characteristics to Use by Iranian Digital Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Naseri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current study aims to investigate the status of user interfaces of non-Iranian digital libraries’ based on social bookmarking capabilities and characteristics to use by Iranian digital libraries. This research studies the characteristics and capabilities of top digital libraries’ user interfaces in the world based on social bookmarking used by library users. This capability facilitates producing, identifying, organizing, and sharing contents using tags. Survey method was used with descriptive-analytical approach in this study. Populations include non-Iranian digital libraries interfaces. Top ten digital libraries’ interfaces were selected as the sample. A researcher-made checklist prepared based on literature review and investigating four distinguished websites (Library Thing, Delicious, Amazon, and Google Book. Faced validity evaluated by 10 experts’ viewpoints, then reliability calculated 0.87.Findings of this study are important because of two reasons: first, it provides a comprehensive and an unambiguous vision for recognizing user interfaces’ basic capabilities and characteristics based on social bookmarking. Second, it can provide a base for designing digital libraries in Iran. The results showed that the majority of digital libraries around the world had not used web 2.0 characteristics such as producing, identifying, organizing, and sharing contents except two digital libraries (Google Books, and Ibiblio.

  14. User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1979-02-01

    PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

  15. MELCOR computer code manuals: Primer and user`s guides, Version 1.8.3 September 1994. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users` Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  16. Right Size Determining the Staff Necessary to Sustain Simulation and Computing Capabilities for Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkel, Daniel J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meisner, Robert [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-09-10

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign, herein referred to as the ASC Program, is a core element of the science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), which enables assessment, certification, and maintenance of the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile without the need to resume nuclear testing. The use of advanced parallel computing has transitioned from proof-of-principle to become a critical element for assessing and certifying the stockpile. As the initiative phase of the ASC Program came to an end in the mid-2000s, the National Nuclear Security Administration redirected resources to other urgent priorities, and resulting staff reductions in ASC occurred without the benefit of analysis of the impact on modern stockpile stewardship that is dependent on these new simulation capabilities. Consequently, in mid-2008 the ASC Program management commissioned a study to estimate the essential size and balance needed to sustain advanced simulation as a core component of stockpile stewardship. The ASC Program requires a minimum base staff size of 930 (which includes the number of staff necessary to maintain critical technical disciplines as well as to execute required programmatic tasks) to sustain its essential ongoing role in stockpile stewardship.

  17. Randomized Trial of Desktop Humidifier for Dry Eye Relief in Computer Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Chan, Evon; Ea, Linda; Kam, Clifford; Lu, Yvonne; Misra, Stuti L; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-11-01

    Dry eye is a frequently reported problem among computer users. Low relative humidity environments are recognized to exacerbate signs and symptoms of dry eye, yet are common in offices of computer operators. Desktop USB-powered humidifiers are available commercially, but their efficacy for dry eye relief has not been established. This study aims to evaluate the potential for a desktop USB-powered humidifier to improve tear-film parameters, ocular surface characteristics, and subjective comfort of computer users. Forty-four computer users were enrolled in a prospective, masked, randomized crossover study. On separate days, participants were randomized to 1 hour of continuous computer use, with and without exposure to a desktop humidifier. Lipid-layer grade, noninvasive tear-film breakup time, and tear meniscus height were measured before and after computer use. Following the 1-hour period, participants reported whether ocular comfort was greater, equal, or lesser than that at baseline. The desktop humidifier effected a relative difference in humidity between the two environments of +5.4 ± 5.0% (P .05). However, a relative increase in the median noninvasive tear-film breakup time of +4.0 seconds was observed in the humidified environment (P computer use.Trial registration no: ACTRN12617000326392.

  18. Examining the Relationship between Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Discomfort among Computer Users in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerian, Sa; Subramaniam, Id

    2011-01-01

    With computers rapidly carving a niche in virtually every nook and crevice of today's fast-paced society, musculoskeletal disorders are becoming more prevalent among computer users, which comprise a wide spectrum of the Malaysian population, including office workers. While extant literature depicts extensive research on musculoskeletal disorders in general, the five dimensions of psychosocial work factors (job demands, job contentment, job control, computer-related problems and social interaction) attributed to work-related musculoskeletal disorders have been neglected. This study examines the aforementioned elements in detail, pertaining to their relationship with musculoskeletal disorders, focusing in particular, on 120 office workers at Malaysian public sector organizations, whose jobs require intensive computer usage. Research was conducted between March and July 2009 in public service organizations in Malaysia. This study was conducted via a survey utilizing self-complete questionnaires and diary. The relationship between psychosocial work factors and musculoskeletal discomfort was ascertained through regression analyses, which revealed that some factors were more important than others were. The results indicate a significant relationship among psychosocial work factors and musculoskeletal discomfort among computer users. Several of these factors such as job control, computer-related problem and social interaction of psychosocial work factors are found to be more important than others in musculoskeletal discomfort. With computer usage on the rise among users, the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort could lead to unnecessary disabilities, hence, the vital need for greater attention to be given on this aspect in the work place, to alleviate to some extent, potential problems in future.

  19. Risk factors, incidence and persistence of symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomingas, A; Hagberg, M; Heiden, M; Richter, H; Westergren, K E; Tornqvist, E Wigaeus

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms from the eyes are common among computer users. Knowledge is scarce about these problems, however. The aim was to study risk-factors, incidence and persistence of eye-symptoms among professionally active computer users. This was a questionnaire based prospective study where 1283 males and females from different professions and companies answered a baseline questionnaire about individual factors and working conditions, e.g. duration of daily computer work, comfort of screen work, psychosocial factors. Subjects were at baseline and 10 follow-ups asked about the number of days with eye-symptoms during the preceding month. The incidence-rate of symptoms persisting minimum three days was 0.38/person-year. A multivariate Hazard-ratio model showed significant associations with extended continuous computer work, tasks with high demands on eye-hand coordination, low level of control, visual discomfort, female sex and nicotine use. Eye-symptoms at baseline was a strong risk factor for new symptoms. The incidence of eye-symptoms among professional computer users is high and related to both individual and work-related factors. The organization of computer work should secure frequent breaks from near-work at the computer screen. The severity of vision-related problems could in field studies be quantified by asking for the persistence of symptoms.

  20. Are Heavy Users of Computer Games and Social Media More Computer Literate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents spend a substantial part of their leisure time with playing games and using social media such as Facebook. The present paper examines the link between adolescents' computer and Internet activities and computer literacy (defined as the ability to work with a computer efficiently). A cross-sectional study with N = 200 adolescents, aged…

  1. Fundamental Evaluation of Adaptation and Human Capabilities in a Condition Using a System to Give a User an Artificial Oculomotor Function to Control Directions of Both Eyes Independently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Mizuno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate flexible adaptation of visual system, we developed a system to provide a user an artificial oculomotor function to control directions of both eyes. The system named “Virtual Chameleon” consists of two CCD cameras independently controlled and a head-mounted display. The user can control each tracking directions of two cameras with sensors set to both hands so that the user can get independent arbitrary view fields for both eyes. We performed fundamental experiments to evaluate capability to evaluate adaptation to use of Virtual Chameleon and effects on the user's capabilities. Eleven healthy volunteers with normal and corrected-to-normal vision participated in the experiments. The experiments were tests to find out each position of targets put in both side of a subject. In the experiments, a condition using Virtual Chameleon and a condition without it was adopted. We obtained accuracy rates and time intervals to find out target positions as experimental results. The experiments showed all of volunteers became able to actively control independent visual axes and correctly understood two different views by using Virtual Chameleon, even though two independent view fields yielded binocular rivalry to volunteers and binocular rivalry reduced human capabilities compared to cases without Virtual Chameleon.

  2. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers' Touch-Interface User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users' shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the…

  3. Presenting collocates in a dictionary of computing and the Internet according to user needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick; L'Homme, Marie-Claude; Jousse, Anne-Laure

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for organizing and presenting collocations in a specialized dictionary of computing and the Internet. This work is undertaken in order to meet a specific user need, i.e. that of searching for a collocate (or a short list of collocates) that expresses a specific...

  4. PROACT user's guide: how to use the pallet recovery opportunity analysis computer tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Bradley Hager; A.L. Hammett; Philip A. Araman

    2003-01-01

    Pallet recovery projects are environmentally responsible and offer promising business opportunities. The Pallet Recovery Opportunity Analysis Computer Tool (PROACT) assesses the operational and financial feasibility of potential pallet recovery projects. The use of project specific information supplied by the user increases the accuracy and the validity of the...

  5. A feasible strategy of promoting nursing informatics by End User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, I Ching; Chang, Polun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experiences in promoting NI training and professorship using the strategy of End User Computing in Taiwan. An interview-based survey was made to better understand the pros and cons of this strategy from three successful projects. The results appear promising and cost-effective.

  6. A Feasible Strategy of Promoting Nursing Informatics by End User Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, I-Ching; Chang, Polun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experiences in promoting NI training and professorship using the strategy of End User Computing in Taiwan. An interview-based survey was made to better understand the pros and cons of this strategy from three successful projects. The results appear promising and cost-effective.

  7. Cross-Cultural Teamwork in End User Computing: A Theoretical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Regina F.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a theoretical model explaining how cultural influences may affect the open, dynamic system of a cross-cultural, end-user computing team. Discusses the relationship between cross-cultural factors and various parts of the model such as: input variables, the system itself, outputs, and implications for the management of such teams. (JKP)

  8. End-user satisfaction of a patient education tool manual versus computer-generated tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronni, C; Welebob, E

    1996-01-01

    This article reports a nonexperimental comparative study of end-user satisfaction before and after implementation of a vendor supplied computerized system (Micromedex, Inc) for providing up-to-date patient instructions regarding diseases, injuries, procedures, and medications. The purpose of this research was to measure the satisfaction of nurses who directly interact with a specific patient educational software application and to compare user satisfaction with manual versus computer generated materials. A computing satisfaction questionnaire that uses a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being the lowest) was used to measure end-user computing satisfaction in five constructs: content, accuracy, format, ease of use, and timeliness. Summary statistics were used to calculate mean ratings for each of the questionnaire's 12 items and for each of the five constructs. Mean differences between the ratings before and after implementation of the five constructs were significant by paired t test. Total user satisfaction improved with the computerized system, and the computer generated materials were given a higher rating than were the manual materials. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. A Graphical User-Interface Development Tool for Intelligent Computer- Assisted Instruction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Assisted Instruction Systems by Francius Suwono Lieutenant Colonel, Indonesian AirForce B. S Aeronautics, Indonesian Air Force Academy, 1969 Submitted in...MORA 81] Moran, T P. , The Command Language Grammar : A representation for the user inerface of interactive computer systems, International Journal

  10. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  11. A Computational Model of the SC Multisensory Neurons: Integrative Capabilities, Maturation, and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Cuppini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Different cortical and subcortical structures present neurons able to integrate stimuli of different sensory modalities. Among the others, one of the most investigated integrative regions is the Superior Colliculus (SC, a midbrain structure whose aim is to guide attentive behaviour and motor responses toward external events. Despite the large amount of experimental data in the literature, the neural mechanisms underlying the SC response are not completely understood. Moreover, recent data indicate that multisensory integration ability is the result of maturation after birth, depending on sensory experience. Mathematical models and computer simulations can be of value to investigate and clarify these phenomena. In the last few years, several models have been implemented to shed light on these mechanisms and to gain a deeper comprehension of the SC capabilities. Here, a neural network model (Cuppini et al., 2010 is extensively discussed. The model considers visual-auditory interaction, and is able to reproduce and explain the main physiological features of multisensory integration in SC neurons, and their acquisition during postnatal life. To reproduce a neonatal condition, the model assumes that during early life: 1 cortical-SC synapses are present but not active; 2 in this phase, responses are driven by non-cortical inputs with very large receptive fields (RFs and little spatial tuning; 3 a slight spatial preference for the visual inputs is present. Sensory experience is modeled by a “training phase” in which the network is repeatedly exposed to modality-specific and cross-modal stimuli at different locations. As results, Cortical-SC synapses are crafted during this period thanks to the Hebbian rules of potentiation and depression, RFs are reduced in size, and neurons exhibit integrative capabilities to cross-modal stimuli, such as multisensory enhancement, inverse effectiveness, and multisensory depression. The utility of the modelling

  12. Acceptance of Cloud Services in Face-to-Face Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: A Comparison between Single-User Mode and Multi-User Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Sui; Huang, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Face-to-face computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) was used extensively to facilitate learning in classrooms. Cloud services not only allow a single user to edit a document, but they also enable multiple users to simultaneously edit a shared document. However, few researchers have compared student acceptance of such services in…

  13. What Do IT-People Know About the (Nordic) History of Computers and User Interfaces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2009-01-01

    :  This paper reports a preliminary, empirical exploration of what IT-people know about the history of computers and user interfaces.  The principal motivation for the study is that the younger generations such as students in IT seem to know very little about these topics.  The study employed...... and researchers seems heavily based on personal experience so that the researchers know much more about the earlier days of computing and interfaces.  Thirdly, there is a tendency amongst the students to conceptualize the history of computers in interface features and concepts.  Hence, the interface seems...... to become the designation or even the icon for the computer.  In other words, one of the key focal points in the area of human-computer interaction: to make the computer as such invisible seems to have been successful...

  14. Developing Materials Processing to Performance Modeling Capabilities and the Need for Exascale Computing Architectures (and Beyond)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schraad, Mark William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics and Engineering Models; Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Advanced Simulation and Computing

    2016-09-06

    Additive Manufacturing techniques are presenting the Department of Energy and the NNSA Laboratories with new opportunities to consider novel component production and repair processes, and to manufacture materials with tailored response and optimized performance characteristics. Additive Manufacturing technologies already are being applied to primary NNSA mission areas, including Nuclear Weapons. These mission areas are adapting to these new manufacturing methods, because of potential advantages, such as smaller manufacturing footprints, reduced needs for specialized tooling, an ability to embed sensing, novel part repair options, an ability to accommodate complex geometries, and lighter weight materials. To realize the full potential of Additive Manufacturing as a game-changing technology for the NNSA’s national security missions; however, significant progress must be made in several key technical areas. In addition to advances in engineering design, process optimization and automation, and accelerated feedstock design and manufacture, significant progress must be made in modeling and simulation. First and foremost, a more mature understanding of the process-structure-property-performance relationships must be developed. Because Additive Manufacturing processes change the nature of a material’s structure below the engineering scale, new models are required to predict materials response across the spectrum of relevant length scales, from the atomistic to the continuum. New diagnostics will be required to characterize materials response across these scales. And not just models, but advanced algorithms, next-generation codes, and advanced computer architectures will be required to complement the associated modeling activities. Based on preliminary work in each of these areas, a strong argument for the need for Exascale computing architectures can be made, if a legitimate predictive capability is to be developed.

  15. OPMILL - MICRO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT FOR CNC MILLING MACHINES THREE AXIS EQUATION PLOTTING CAPABILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    OPMILL is a computer operating system for a Kearney and Trecker milling machine that provides a fast and easy way to program machine part manufacture with an IBM compatible PC. The program gives the machinist an "equation plotter" feature which plots any set of equations that define axis moves (up to three axes simultaneously) and converts those equations to a machine milling program that will move a cutter along a defined path. Other supported functions include: drill with peck, bolt circle, tap, mill arc, quarter circle, circle, circle 2 pass, frame, frame 2 pass, rotary frame, pocket, loop and repeat, and copy blocks. The system includes a tool manager that can handle up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts tool length for each tool. It will display all tool information and stop the milling machine at the appropriate time. Information for the program is entered via a series of menus and compiled to the Kearney and Trecker format. The program can then be loaded into the milling machine, the tool path graphically displayed, and tool change information or the program in Kearney and Trecker format viewed. The program has a complete file handling utility that allows the user to load the program into memory from the hard disk, save the program to the disk with comments, view directories, merge a program on the disk with one in memory, save a portion of a program in memory, and change directories. OPMILL was developed on an IBM PS/2 running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of RAM. OPMILL was written for an IBM PC or compatible 8088 or 80286 machine connected via an RS-232 port to a Kearney and Trecker Data Mill 700/C Control milling machine. It requires a "D:" drive (fixed-disk or virtual), a browse or text display utility, and an EGA or better display. Users wishing to modify and recompile the source code will also need Turbo BASIC, Turbo C, and Crescent Software's QuickPak for Turbo BASIC. IBM PC and IBM PS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Turbo

  16. AITRAC: Augmented Interactive Transient Radiation Analysis by Computer. User's information manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    AITRAC is a program designed for on-line, interactive, DC, and transient analysis of electronic circuits. The program solves linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations which characterize the mathematical models used to predict circuit response. The program features 100 external node--200 branch capability; conversional, free-format input language; built-in junction, FET, MOS, and switch models; sparse matrix algorithm with extended-precision H matrix and T vector calculations, for fast and accurate execution; linear transconductances: beta, GM, MU, ZM; accurate and fast radiation effects analysis; special interface for user-defined equations; selective control of multiple outputs; graphical outputs in wide and narrow formats; and on-line parameter modification capability. The user describes the problem by entering the circuit topology and part parameters. The program then automatically generates and solves the circuit equations, providing the user with printed or plotted output. The circuit topology and/or part values may then be changed by the user, and a new analysis, requested. Circuit descriptions may be saved on disk files for storage and later use. The program contains built-in standard models for resistors, voltage and current sources, capacitors, inductors including mutual couplings, switches, junction diodes and transistors, FETS, and MOS devices. Nonstandard models may be constructed from standard models or by using the special equations interface. Time functions may be described by straight-line segments or by sine, damped sine, and exponential functions. 42 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  17. Fragment-based docking: development of the CHARMMing Web user interface as a platform for computer-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevzner, Yuri; Frugier, Emilie; Schalk, Vinushka; Caflisch, Amedeo; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-09-22

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser. One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing's capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of "re-dockings" with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing's docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening.

  18. Assessing mouse alternatives to access to computer: a case study of a user with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousada, Thais; Pareira, Javier; Groba, Betania; Nieto, Laura; Pazos, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the process of assessment of three assistive devices to meet the needs of a woman with cerebral palsy (CP) in order to provide her with computer access and use. The user has quadriplegic CP, with anarthria, using a syllabic keyboard. Devices were evaluated through a three-step approach: (a) use of a questionnaire to preselect potential assistive technologies, (b) use of an eTAO tool to determine the effectiveness of each devised, and (c) a conducting semi-structured interview to obtain qualitative data. Touch screen, joystick, and trackball were the preselected devices. The best device that met the user's needs and priorities was joystick. The finding was corroborated by both the eTAO tool and the semi-structured interview. Computers are a basic form of social participation. It is important to consider the special needs and priorities of users and to try different devices when undertaking a device-selection process. Environmental and personal factors have to be considered, as well. This leads to a need to evaluate new tools in order to provide the appropriate support. The eTAO could be a suitable instrument for this purpose. Additional research is also needed to understand how to better match devices with different user populations and how to comprehensively evaluate emerging technologies relative to users with disabilities.

  19. Eye-gaze determination of user intent at the computer interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, J.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering; Schryver, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Determination of user intent at the computer interface through eye-gaze monitoring can significantly aid applications for the disabled, as well as telerobotics and process control interfaces. Whereas current eye-gaze control applications are limited to object selection and x/y gazepoint tracking, a methodology was developed here to discriminate a more abstract interface operation: zooming-in or out. This methodology first collects samples of eve-gaze location looking at controlled stimuli, at 30 Hz, just prior to a user`s decision to zoom. The sample is broken into data frames, or temporal snapshots. Within a data frame, all spatial samples are connected into a minimum spanning tree, then clustered, according to user defined parameters. Each cluster is mapped to one in the prior data frame, and statistics are computed from each cluster. These characteristics include cluster size, position, and pupil size. A multiple discriminant analysis uses these statistics both within and between data frames to formulate optimal rules for assigning the observations into zooming, zoom-out, or no zoom conditions. The statistical procedure effectively generates heuristics for future assignments, based upon these variables. Future work will enhance the accuracy and precision of the modeling technique, and will empirically test users in controlled experiments.

  20. Study on User Authority Management for Safe Data Protection in Cloud Computing Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In cloud computing environments, user data are encrypted using numerous distributed servers before storing such data. Global Internet service companies, such as Google and Yahoo, recognized the importance of Internet service platforms and conducted self-research and development to create and utilize large cluster-based cloud computing platform technology based on low-priced commercial nodes. As diverse data services become possible in distributed computing environments, high-capacity distributed management is emerging as a major issue. Meanwhile, because of the diverse forms of using high-capacity data, security vulnerability and privacy invasion by malicious attackers or internal users can occur. As such, when various sensitive data are stored in cloud servers and used from there, the problem of data spill might occur because of external attackers or the poor management of internal users. Data can be managed through encryption to prevent such problems. However, existing simple encryption methods involve problems associated with the management of access to data stored in cloud environments. Therefore, in the present paper, a technique for data access management by user authority, based on Attribute-Based Encryption (ABE and secret distribution techniques, is proposed.

  1. Musculoskeletal Problems Associated with University Students Computer Users: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhadani PB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have examined the prevalence and correlates of musculoskeletal problems among university students, scanty information exists in South African context. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, causes and consequences of musculoskeletal problems among University of Venda students’ computer users. This cross-sectional study involved 694 university students at the University of Venda. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on the sociodemographic characteristics, problems associated with computer users, and causes of musculoskeletal problems associated with computer users. The majority (84.6% of the participants use computer for internet, wording processing (20.3%, and games (18.7%. The students reported neck pain when using computer (52.3%; shoulder (47.0%, finger (45.0%, lower back (43.1%, general body pain (42.9%, elbow (36.2%, wrist (33.7%, hip and foot (29.1% and knee (26.2%. Reported causes of musculoskeletal pains associated with computer usage were: sitting position, low chair, a lot of time spent on computer, uncomfortable laboratory chairs, and stressfulness. Eye problems (51.9%, muscle cramp (344.0%, headache (45.3%, blurred vision (38.0%, feeling of illness (39.9% and missed lectures (29.1% were consequences of musculoskeletal problems linked to computer use. The majority of students reported having mild pain (43.7%, moderate (24.2%, and severe (8.4% pains. Years of computer use were significantly associated with neck, shoulder and wrist pain. Using computer for internet was significantly associated with neck pain (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.93; games: neck (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.85 and hip/foot (OR=0.60; CI 95% 0.40-0.92, programming for elbow (OR= 1.78; CI 95% 1.10-2.94 and wrist (OR=2.25; CI 95% 1.36-3.73, while word processing was significantly associated with lower back (OR=1.45; CI 95% 1.03-2.04. Undergraduate study had a significant association with elbow pain (OR=2

  2. Torta: Extending Applications' Capability to Select Heterogeneous Computing Resources Adaptively to the PC Usage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horikawa, Tetsuro; Nakazawa, Jin; Takashio, Kazunori; Tokuda, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Spread of GPU-accelerated applications on PCs can cause serious degradation of the user experience such as frame dropping on the video playback, due to applications' resource competition on the same...

  3. Torta: Extending Applications' Capability to Select Heterogeneous Computing Resources Adaptively to the PC Usage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horikawa, Tetsuro; Nakazawa, Jin; Takashio, Kazunori; Tokuda, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Spread of GPU-accelerated applications on PCs can cause serious degradation of the user experience such as frame dropping on the video playback, due to applications' resource competition on the same...

  4. Users as designers: how people cope with poor HCI design in computer-based medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradovich, J H; Woods, D D

    1996-12-01

    In this paper we examine how users interact with a computer-based infusion device adapted for terbutaline infusion to treat preterm labor in women experiencing high-risk pregnancies. This study examines (a) the human-computer interaction (HCI) deficiencies in the device as related to this context of use, (b) how the device characteristics increase the potential for error, and (c) the tailoring strategies developed by users to insulate themselves from failure. Interviews with nurses and tests of the behavior of the infusion device in different conditions identified several classic HCI deficiencies: complex and arbitrary sequences of operation, mode errors caused by poor differentiation of multiple operating modes intended for different contexts, ambiguous alarms, getting lost in multiple displays, and poor feedback on device state and behavior.

  5. On the control of brain-computer interfaces by users with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Daly I.; Billinger M.; Laparra-Hernandez J.; Aloise F.; Garcia M.L.; Faller J.; Scherer R.; Muller-Putz G.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as a potential assistive device for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) to assist with their communication needs. However, it is unclear how well-suited BCIs are to individuals with CP. Therefore, this study aims to investigate to what extent these users are able to gain control of BCIs FP7 Framework EU Research Project ABC 287774 Daly, I.; Billinger, M.; Laparra Hernandez, J.; Aloise, F.; Lloria Garcia, M.; Faller, J.; Scherer, R.....

  6. Work related perceived stress and muscle activity during standardized computer work among female computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsman, P; Thorn, S; Søgaard, K

    2009-01-01

    and trapezius muscle activity and rest during standardized simulated computer work, and provide partial empirical support for the hypothesized pathway of stress induced muscle activity in the association between an adverse psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulder.......The current study investigated the associations between work-related perceived stress and surface electromyographic (sEMG) parameters (muscle activity and muscle rest) during standardized simulated computer work (typing, editing, precision, and Stroop tasks). It was part of the European case...

  7. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  8. User interfaces for computational science: A domain specific language for OOMMF embedded in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Marijan; Pepper, Ryan A.; Fangohr, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations are used widely across the engineering and science disciplines, including in the research and development of magnetic devices using computational micromagnetics. In this work, we identify and review different approaches to configuring simulation runs: (i) the re-compilation of source code, (ii) the use of configuration files, (iii) the graphical user interface, and (iv) embedding the simulation specification in an existing programming language to express the computational problem. We identify the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches and discuss their implications on effectiveness and reproducibility of computational studies and results. Following on from this, we design and describe a domain specific language for micromagnetics that is embedded in the Python language, and allows users to define the micromagnetic simulations they want to carry out in a flexible way. We have implemented this micromagnetic simulation description language together with a computational backend that executes the simulation task using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We illustrate the use of this Python interface for OOMMF by solving the micromagnetic standard problem 4. All the code is publicly available and is open source.

  9. User participation in the development of the human/computer interface for control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Richard; Quick-Campbell, Marlene; Creegan, James; Dutilly, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Technological advances coupled with the requirements to reduce operations staffing costs led to the demand for efficient, technologically-sophisticated mission operations control centers. The control center under development for the earth observing system (EOS) is considered. The users are involved in the development of a control center in order to ensure that it is cost-efficient and flexible. A number of measures were implemented in the EOS program in order to encourage user involvement in the area of human-computer interface development. The following user participation exercises carried out in relation to the system analysis and design are described: the shadow participation of the programmers during a day of operations; the flight operations personnel interviews; and the analysis of the flight operations team tasks. The user participation in the interface prototype development, the prototype evaluation, and the system implementation are reported on. The involvement of the users early in the development process enables the requirements to be better understood and the cost to be reduced.

  10. User-centered design in brain-computer interfaces-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Martijn; Riccio, Angela; Risetti, Monica; Dähne, Sven; Ramsay, Andrew; Williamson, John; Mattia, Donatella; Tangermann, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The array of available brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigms has continued to grow, and so has the corresponding set of machine learning methods which are at the core of BCI systems. The latter have evolved to provide more robust data analysis solutions, and as a consequence the proportion of healthy BCI users who can use a BCI successfully is growing. With this development the chances have increased that the needs and abilities of specific patients, the end-users, can be covered by an existing BCI approach. However, most end-users who have experienced the use of a BCI system at all have encountered a single paradigm only. This paradigm is typically the one that is being tested in the study that the end-user happens to be enrolled in, along with other end-users. Though this corresponds to the preferred study arrangement for basic research, it does not ensure that the end-user experiences a working BCI. In this study, a different approach was taken; that of a user-centered design. It is the prevailing process in traditional assistive technology. Given an individual user with a particular clinical profile, several available BCI approaches are tested and - if necessary - adapted to him/her until a suitable BCI system is found. Described is the case of a 48-year-old woman who suffered from an ischemic brain stem stroke, leading to a severe motor- and communication deficit. She was enrolled in studies with two different BCI systems before a suitable system was found. The first was an auditory event-related potential (ERP) paradigm and the second a visual ERP paradigm, both of which are established in literature. The auditory paradigm did not work successfully, despite favorable preconditions. The visual paradigm worked flawlessly, as found over several sessions. This discrepancy in performance can possibly be explained by the user's clinical deficit in several key neuropsychological indicators, such as attention and working memory. While the auditory paradigm relies

  11. The DoD's High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Ensuing the National Earth Systems Prediction Capability Becomes Operational

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Defense's (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) provides high performance computing to address the most significant challenges in computational resources, software application support and nationwide research and engineering networks. Today, the HPCMP has a critical role in ensuring the National Earth System Prediction Capability (N-ESPC) achieves initial operational status in 2019. A 2015 study commissioned by the HPCMP found that N-ESPC computational requirements will exceed interconnect bandwidth capacity due to the additional load from data assimilation and passing connecting data between ensemble codes. Memory bandwidth and I/O bandwidth will continue to be significant bottlenecks for the Navy's Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) scalability - by far the major driver of computing resource requirements in the N-ESPC. The study also found that few of the N-ESPC model developers have detailed plans to ensure their respective codes scale through 2024. Three HPCMP initiatives are designed to directly address and support these issues: Productivity Enhancement, Technology, Transfer and Training (PETTT), the HPCMP Applications Software Initiative (HASI), and Frontier Projects. PETTT supports code conversion by providing assistance, expertise and training in scalable and high-end computing architectures. HASI addresses the continuing need for modern application software that executes effectively and efficiently on next-generation high-performance computers. Frontier Projects enable research and development that could not be achieved using typical HPCMP resources by providing multi-disciplinary teams access to exceptional amounts of high performance computing resources. Finally, the Navy's DoD Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) currently operates a 6 Petabyte system, of which Naval Oceanography receives 15% of operational computational system use, or approximately 1 Petabyte of the processing capability. The DSRC will

  12. Science gateways for distributed computing infrastructures development framework and exploitation by scientific user communities

    CERN Document Server

    Kacsuk, Péter

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the science gateway building technology developed in the SCI-BUS European project and its adoption and customization method, by which user communities, such as biologists, chemists, and astrophysicists, can build customized, domain-specific science gateways. Many aspects of the core technology are explained in detail, including its workflow capability, job submission mechanism to various grids and clouds, and its data transfer mechanisms among several distributed infrastructures. The book will be useful for scientific researchers and IT professionals engaged in the develop

  13. Evaluating a Swedish Airborne Combat Capability using Computer Supported Morphological Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ritchey, Tom; Kaunitz, Carin

    2005-01-01

    .... This article outlines the fundamentals of the morphological approach and describes its use in a study carried out by the Swedish Army Command concerning the development of an airborne combat capability...

  14. A study of the very high order natural user language (with AI capabilities) for the NASA space station common module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, E. N.

    1986-01-01

    The requirements are identified for a very high order natural language to be used by crew members on board the Space Station. The hardware facilities, databases, realtime processes, and software support are discussed. The operations and capabilities that will be required in both normal (routine) and abnormal (nonroutine) situations are evaluated. A structure and syntax for an interface (front-end) language to satisfy the above requirements are recommended.

  15. The Impact of User Interface on Young Children’s Computational Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Sullivan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Over the past few years, new approaches to introducing young children to computational thinking have grown in popularity. This paper examines the role that user interfaces have on children’s mastery of computational thinking concepts and positive interpersonal behaviors. Background: There is a growing pressure to begin teaching computational thinking at a young age. This study explores the affordances of two very different programming interfaces for teaching computational thinking: a graphical coding application on the iPad (ScratchJr and tangible programmable robotics kit (KIBO. Methodology\t: This study used a mixed-method approach to explore the learning experiences that young children have with tangible and graphical coding interfaces. A sample of children ages four to seven (N = 28 participated. Findings: Results suggest that type of user interface does have an impact on children’s learning, but is only one of many factors that affect positive academic and socio-emotional experiences. Tangible and graphical interfaces each have qualities that foster different types of learning

  16. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Storing files in a parallel computing system based on user-specified parser function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Manzanares, Adam; Torres, Aaron

    2014-10-21

    Techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system based on a user-specified parser function. A plurality of files generated by a distributed application in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining a parser from the distributed application for processing the plurality of files prior to storage; and storing one or more of the plurality of files in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system based on the processing by the parser. The plurality of files comprise one or more of a plurality of complete files and a plurality of sub-files. The parser can optionally store only those files that satisfy one or more semantic requirements of the parser. The parser can also extract metadata from one or more of the files and the extracted metadata can be stored with one or more of the plurality of files and used for searching for files.

  18. Prevalence of ocular symptoms and signs among professional computer users in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Dehghani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to detect the prevalence of ocular symptoms and signs in professional video display users (VDUs and non-users in Isfahan.
    • METHODS: This is a cross-sectional descriptive case-control study. The VDUs group was selected from among employees working with computer and the control group was selected from among employees not working with computer. Fifty seven VDUs (34 male & 23 female with mean age of 30.7 ± 6.8 and 56 employees in the control group (25 male & 31 female, mean age of 27.6 ± 7.2 were evaluated. Complete ocular examination was done for both groups.
    • RESULTS: Among VDUs, 45 cases (79% had burning eyes and tearing, 38 cases (66% had dry eye, 37 cases (65% had asthenopia, and 47 cases (82.5% had musculoskeletal pain but these values for the control group were 24 (42.8%, 18 (32.2%, 22(39.3% and 15 (26.8% respectively and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.037, p = 0.023, p = 0.044, p = 0.013. Schirmer's test was positive in 22 VDUs (38.5% vs. 6 (10.7% of control group (p = 0.012. There was heterophoria in 19 VDUs (33.3% vs. 3 controls (5.4% (p = 0.032.
    • CONCLUSION: Eye burning and tearing, dry eye, asthenopia and musculoskeletal problems were obviously more common in VDUs. Considering the extensive use of computers at home and work, a plan is required to detect dangers and provide appropriate solutions.
    • KEY WORDS: Video Display Terminal, Video Display Users, Computer Vision Syndrome, Dry Eye, Schirmer test, Asthenopia.

  19. Proficiency Testing for Bacterial Whole Genome Sequencing: An End-User Survey of Current Capabilities, Requirements and Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran-Gilad, Jacob; Sintchenko, Vitali; Karlsmose Pedersen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    by Working Group 4 among GMI members in order to ascertain NGS end-use requirements and attitudes towards NGS PT. The survey identified the high professional diversity of laboratories engaged in NGS-based public health projects and the wide range of capabilities within institutions, at a notable range...... of costs. The priority pathogens reported by respondents reflected the key drivers for NGS use (high burden disease and ‘high profile’ pathogens). The performance of and participation in PT was perceived as important by most respondents. The wide range of sequencing and bioinformatics practices reported...

  20. Proficiency testing for bacterial whole genome sequencing: an end-user survey of current capabilities, requirements and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran-Gilad, Jacob; Sintchenko, Vitali; Karlsmose Pedersen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Group 4 among GMI members in order to ascertain NGS end-use requirements and attitudes towards NGS PT. The survey identified the high professional diversity of laboratories engaged in NGS-based public health projects and the wide range of capabilities within institutions, at a notable range of costs....... The priority pathogens reported by respondents reflected the key drivers for NGS use (high burden disease and 'high profile' pathogens). The performance of and participation in PT was perceived as important by most respondents. The wide range of sequencing and bioinformatics practices reported by end...

  1. Dynamic Capabilities for Managing Emerging Technologies : Organizational and Managerial Antecedents of Effective Adoption of Cloud Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Khanagha (Saeed)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The advancement of information and communication technologies has brought a digital age, where massive computing power, high speed and ubiquitous access to internet and more recently Cloud Computing Technology are expected to transform a wide range of organizations,

  2. Using risk factors, myoelectric signal, and finger tremor to distinguish computer users with and without musculoskeletal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yao-Jen; Cho, Chiung-Yu

    2008-09-01

    Most of previous studies use questionnaire to assess risk factors for cumulative trauma disorders of the upper extremity (CTDUE) for computer workers. Few studies combine both physical examination and questionnaire to assess musculoskeletal symptoms. Fifteen symptomatic and 15 non-symptomatic computer users were recruited. Both of them were asked to perform a repetitive tapping task (200 taps/min) as the fatigue task. Tremor of the index finger and surface electromyography (EMG) of the flexor digitorum superficial (FDS) were collected prior and after the tapping task. Muscle strength and range of motion for right wrist were collected before the tapping task. All subjects were asked to fill out the questionnaire about risk factors of CTDUE. Female users in the symptomatic group had weaker wrist extensor strength than those in the non-symptomatic group (P computer, and mouse position were better factors to classify computer users into the symptomatic group compared to other factors obtained from questionnaire and physical exam. Besides, symptomatic computer users seem to have longer experience of computer use than non-symptomatic users. After the fatigue task, the symptomatic users decreased their muscle strength to a larger extent than the non-symptomatic users.

  3. Reliability of a computer and Internet survey (Computer User Profile) used by adults with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilov, Andrea M; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma

    2015-01-01

    To determine test-re-test reliability of the 'Computer User Profile' (CUP) in people with and without TBI. The CUP was administered on two occasions to people with and without TBI. The CUP investigated the nature and frequency of participants' computer and Internet use. Intra-class correlation coefficients and kappa coefficients were conducted to measure reliability of individual CUP items. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize content of responses. Sixteen adults with TBI and 40 adults without TBI were included in the study. All participants were reliable in reporting demographic information, frequency of social communication and leisure activities and computer/Internet habits and usage. Adults with TBI were reliable in 77% of their responses to survey items. Adults without TBI were reliable in 88% of their responses to survey items. The CUP was practical and valuable in capturing information about social, leisure, communication and computer/Internet habits of people with and without TBI. Adults without TBI scored more items with satisfactory reliability overall in their surveys. Future studies may include larger samples and could also include an exploration of how people with/without TBI use other digital communication technologies. This may provide further information on determining technology readiness for people with TBI in therapy programmes.

  4. Users manual for CAFE-3D : a computational fluid dynamics fire code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Imane; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Alion Science and Technology, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-01

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code has been developed to model all relevant fire physics for predicting the thermal response of massive objects engulfed in large fires. It provides realistic fire thermal boundary conditions for use in design of radioactive material packages and in risk-based transportation studies. The CAFE code can be coupled to commercial finite-element codes such as MSC PATRAN/THERMAL and ANSYS. This coupled system of codes can be used to determine the internal thermal response of finite element models of packages to a range of fire environments. This document is a user manual describing how to use the three-dimensional version of CAFE, as well as a description of CAFE input and output parameters. Since this is a user manual, only a brief theoretical description of the equations and physical models is included.

  5. A content validity approach to creating an end-user computer skill assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Gibbs

    Full Text Available Practical assessment instruments are commonly used in the workplace and educational environments to assess a person\\'s level of digital literacy and end-user computer skill. However, it is often difficult to find statistical evidence of the actual validity of instruments being used. To ensure that the correct factors are being assessed for a particular purpose it is necessary to undertake some type of psychometric testing, and the first step is to study the content relevance of the measure. The purpose of this paper is to report on the rigorous judgment-quantification process using panels of experts in order to establish inter-rater reliability and agreement in the development of end-user instruments developed to measure workplace skills using spreadsheet and word-processing applications.

  6. Characterizing Data Discovery and End-User Computing Needs in Clinical Translational Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilana, Parmit K; Fishman, Elishema; Geraghty, Estella M; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Wolf, Fredric M; Anderson, Nick R

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the results of a qualitative case-study seeking to characterize data discovery needs and barriers of principal investigators and research support staff in clinical translational science. Several implications for designing and implementing translational research systems have emerged through the authors' analysis. The results also illustrate the benefits of forming early partnerships with scientists to better understand their workflow processes and end-user computing practices in accessing data for research. The authors use this user-centered, iterative development approach to guide the implementation and extension of i2b2, a system they have adapted to support cross-institutional aggregate anonymized clinical data querying. With ongoing evaluation, the goal is to maximize the utility and extension of this system and develop an interface that appropriately fits the swiftly evolving needs of clinical translational scientists.

  7. The Problem of Compatibility and Interoperability of Satellite Navigation Systems in Computation of User's Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Actually (June 2011) more than 60 operational GPS and GLONASS (Satellite Navigation Systems - SNS), EGNOS, MSAS and WAAS (Satellite Based Augmentation Systems - SBAS) satellites are in orbits transmitting a variety of signals on multiple frequencies. All these satellite signals and different services designed for the users must be compatible and open signals and services should also be interoperable to the maximum extent possible. Interoperability definition addresses signal, system time and geodetic reference frame considerations. The part of compatibility and interoperability of all these systems and additionally several systems under construction as Compass, Galileo, GAGAN, SDCM or QZSS in computation user's position is presented in this paper. Three parameters - signal in space, system time and coordinate reference frame were taken into account in particular.

  8. Liquid rocket combustion computer model with distributed energy release. DER computer program documentation and user's guide, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing rocket engine performance was developed. The program is concerned with the formation, distribution, flow, and combustion of liquid sprays and combustion product gases in conventional rocket combustion chambers. The capabilities of the program to determine the combustion characteristics of the rocket engine are described. Sample data code sheets show the correct sequence and formats for variable values and include notes concerning options to bypass the input of certain data. A seperate list defines the variables and indicates their required dimensions.

  9. Neural correlates of user-initiated motor success and failure - A brain-computer interface perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazmir, Boris; Reiner, Miriam

    2016-11-02

    Any motor action is, by nature, potentially accompanied by human errors. In order to facilitate development of error-tailored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) correction systems, we focused on internal, human-initiated errors, and investigated EEG correlates of user outcome successes and errors during a continuous 3D virtual tennis game against a computer player. We used a multisensory, 3D, highly immersive environment. Missing and repelling the tennis ball were considered, as 'error' (miss) and 'success' (repel). Unlike most previous studies, where the environment "encouraged" the participant to perform a mistake, here errors happened naturally, resulting from motor-perceptual-cognitive processes of incorrect estimation of the ball kinematics, and can be regarded as user internal, self-initiated errors. Results show distinct and well-defined Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), embedded in the ongoing EEG, that differ across conditions by waveforms, scalp signal distribution maps, source estimation results (sLORETA) and time-frequency patterns, establishing a series of typical features that allow valid discrimination between user internal outcome success and error. The significant delay in latency between positive peaks of error- and success-related ERPs, suggests a cross-talk between top-down and bottom-up processing, represented by an outcome recognition process, in the context of the game world. Success-related ERPs had a central scalp distribution, while error-related ERPs were centro-parietal. The unique characteristics and sharp differences between EEG correlates of error/success provide the crucial components for an improved BCI system. The features of the EEG waveform can be used to detect user action outcome, to be fed into the BCI correction system. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of yoga on self-rated visual discomfort in computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deginal Rajendra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Dry eye' appears to be the main contributor to the symptoms of computer vision syndrome. Regular breaks and the use of artificial tears or certain eye drops are some of the options to reduce visual discomfort. A combination of yoga practices have been shown to reduce visual strain in persons with progressive myopia. The present randomized controlled trial was planned to evaluate the effect of a combination of yoga practices on self-rated symptoms of visual discomfort in professional computer users in Bangalore. Methods Two hundred and ninety one professional computer users were randomly assigned to two groups, yoga (YG, n = 146 and wait list control (WL, n = 145. Both groups were assessed at baseline and after sixty days for self-rated visual discomfort using a standard questionnaire. During these 60 days the YG group practiced an hour of yoga daily for five days in a week and the WL group did their usual recreational activities also for an hour daily for the same duration. At 60 days there were 62 in the YG group and 55 in the WL group. Results While the scores for visual discomfort of both groups were comparable at baseline, after 60 days there was a significantly decreased score in the YG group, whereas the WL group showed significantly increased scores. Conclusion The results suggest that the yoga practice appeared to reduce visual discomfort, while the group who had no yoga intervention (WL showed an increase in discomfort at the end of sixty days.

  11. Lightweight Tactical Client: A Capability-Based Approach to Command Post Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD -E403 719 Technical Report ARWSE-TR-15015 LIGHTWEIGHT TACTICAL CLIENT: A CAPABILITY-BASED APPROACH...distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Weapons and Software Engineering Center Picatinny Arsenal...thin client leverages architecture designed for server -side data and business logic processing. This processing requires a persistent network

  12. Protecting the patient by promoting end-user competence in health informatics systems-moves towards a generic health computer user "driving license".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Michael

    2004-03-18

    The effectiveness and quality of health informatics systems' support to healthcare delivery are largely determined by two factors-the suitability of the system installed, and the competence of the users. However, the profile of users of large-scale clinical health systems is significantly different from the profile of end-users in other enterprises such as the finance sector, insurance, travel or retail sales. Work with a mental health provider in Ireland, who was introducing a customized electronic patient record (EPR) system, identified the strong legal and ethical importance of adequately skills for the health professionals and others, who would be the system users. The experience identified the need for a clear and comprehensive generic user qualification at a basic but robust level. The European computer driving license (ECDL) has gained wide recognition as a basic generic qualification for users of computer systems. However, health systems and data have a series of characteristics that differentiate them from other data systems. The logical conclusion was the recognition of a need for an additional domain-specific qualification-an "ECDL Health Supplement". Development of this is now being progressed.

  13. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial

  14. ISAAC - A Case of Highly-Reusable, Highly-Capable Computing and Control Platform for Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yutao; Le, Charles; Zheng, Jason; Nguyen, Kayla; Bekker, Dmitriy

    2009-01-01

    ISAAC is a highly capable, highly reusable, modular, and integrated FPGA-based common instrument control and computing platform for a wide range of instrument needs as defined in the Earth Science National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey Report. This paper presents its motivation, technical approach, and the infrastructure elements. It also describes the first prototype, ISAAC I, and its application in the design of SMAP L-band radar digital filter.

  15. Tactile and bone-conduction auditory brain computer interface for vision and hearing impaired users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M; Mori, Hiromu

    2015-04-15

    The paper presents a report on the recently developed BCI alternative for users suffering from impaired vision (lack of focus or eye-movements) or from the so-called "ear-blocking-syndrome" (limited hearing). We report on our recent studies of the extents to which vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the head of a user can serve as a platform for a brain computer interface (BCI) paradigm. In the proposed tactile and bone-conduction auditory BCI novel multiple head positions are used to evoke combined somatosensory and auditory (via the bone conduction effect) P300 brain responses, in order to define a multimodal tactile and bone-conduction auditory brain computer interface (tbcaBCI). In order to further remove EEG interferences and to improve P300 response classification synchrosqueezing transform (SST) is applied. SST outperforms the classical time-frequency analysis methods of the non-linear and non-stationary signals such as EEG. The proposed method is also computationally more effective comparing to the empirical mode decomposition. The SST filtering allows for online EEG preprocessing application which is essential in the case of BCI. Experimental results with healthy BCI-naive users performing online tbcaBCI, validate the paradigm, while the feasibility of the concept is illuminated through information transfer rate case studies. We present a comparison of the proposed SST-based preprocessing method, combined with a logistic regression (LR) classifier, together with classical preprocessing and LDA-based classification BCI techniques. The proposed tbcaBCI paradigm together with data-driven preprocessing methods are a step forward in robust BCI applications research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Parallel high-performance grid computing: capabilities and opportunities of a novel demanding service and business class allowing highest resource efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepper, Nick; Ettig, Ramona; Dickmann, Frank; Stehr, Rene; Grosveld, Frank G; Wedemann, Gero; Knoch, Tobias A

    2010-01-01

    Especially in the life-science and the health-care sectors the huge IT requirements are imminent due to the large and complex systems to be analysed and simulated. Grid infrastructures play here a rapidly increasing role for research, diagnostics, and treatment, since they provide the necessary large-scale resources efficiently. Whereas grids were first used for huge number crunching of trivially parallelizable problems, increasingly parallel high-performance computing is required. Here, we show for the prime example of molecular dynamic simulations how the presence of large grid clusters including very fast network interconnects within grid infrastructures allows now parallel high-performance grid computing efficiently and thus combines the benefits of dedicated super-computing centres and grid infrastructures. The demands for this service class are the highest since the user group has very heterogeneous requirements: i) two to many thousands of CPUs, ii) different memory architectures, iii) huge storage capabilities, and iv) fast communication via network interconnects, are all needed in different combinations and must be considered in a highly dedicated manner to reach highest performance efficiency. Beyond, advanced and dedicated i) interaction with users, ii) the management of jobs, iii) accounting, and iv) billing, not only combines classic with parallel high-performance grid usage, but more importantly is also able to increase the efficiency of IT resource providers. Consequently, the mere "yes-we-can" becomes a huge opportunity like e.g. the life-science and health-care sectors as well as grid infrastructures by reaching higher level of resource efficiency.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to home computer and internet use among urban novice computer users of low socioeconomic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Emily Z; Bennett, Gary G; Viswanath, K

    2007-10-22

    Despite the increasing penetration of the Internet and amount of online health information, there are significant barriers that limit its widespread adoption as a source of health information. One is the "digital divide," with people of higher socioeconomic position (SEP) demonstrating greater access and usage compared to those from lower SEP groups. However, as the access gap narrows over time and more people use the Internet, a shift in research needs to occur to explore how one might improve Internet use as well as website design for a range of audiences. This is particularly important in the case of novice users who may not have the technical skills, experience, or social connections that could help them search for health information using the Internet. The focus of our research is to investigate the challenges in the implementation of a project to improve health information seeking among low SEP groups. The goal of the project is not to promote health information seeking as much as to understand the barriers and facilitators to computer and Internet use, beyond access, among members of lower SEP groups in an urban setting. The purpose was to qualitatively describe participants' self-identified barriers and facilitators to computer and Internet use during a 1-year pilot study as well as the challenges encountered by the research team in the delivery of the intervention. Between August and November 2005, 12 low-SEP urban individuals with no or limited computer and Internet experience were recruited through a snowball sampling. Each participant received a free computer system, broadband Internet access, monthly computer training courses, and technical support for 1 year as the intervention condition. Upon completion of the study, participants were offered the opportunity to complete an in-depth semistructured interview. Interviews were approximately 1 hour in length and were conducted by the project director. The interviews were held in the participants' homes

  18. Exploiting metadata, ontologies and semantics to design/enhance new end-user experiences for adaptive pervasive computing environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Soylu, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Systems and Pervasive Computing change the face of computing and redefine the way people interact with the technology. Pioneers pursue a vision that technology is seamlessly situated in people’s life and adapts itself to the characteristics, requirements, and needs of the users and the environment without any distraction at the user side. Adaptive Systems research mostly focuses on individual applications that can alter their interface, behavior, presentation etc. mainly with respect...

  19. DESIGNING OF COMPUTER AIDED AND USER INTERACTIVE CNC PART PROGRAMME FOR A MILLING MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali DÖNERTAŞ

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a user–interactive computer programme generating CNC part programme according to dialog method has been developed. The design of programme has been prepared like a CAM programme structure. The part programme was established by required parameters asking to the user with a specific order. Subsequently, this parameters are used to create M and G codes, and these codes are showed at a different page on the screen. In addition, these code pages can be stored with "txt" format. This program includes basic processes and the programme design has been prepared for milling machine working according to Fanuc system. The computer programme was written by using Delphi 6 programming language.

  20. Tingling/numbness in the hands of computer users: neurophysiological findings from the NUDATA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, E.; Brandt, L. P.; Ellemann, K.

    2004-01-01

    of work with mouse, keyboard, and computer. RESULTS: Seven of the 20 cases (35%) had elevated vibration thresholds, compared with 3 of the 20 controls (15%); this difference was not statistically significant (chi2=2.13, P=0.14). Compared with controls, cases had increased perception threshold for all......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether tingling/numbness of the hands and fingers among computer users is associated with elevated vibration threshold as a sign of early nerve compression. METHODS: Within the Danish NUDATA study, vibratory sensory testing with monitoring of the digital vibration...... frequencies, but the difference was statistically significant for only 2 out of 14 measurements. Comparison between left and right hand threshold values within the case group did not show any significant difference at any frequency. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that tingling/numbness of the hands...

  1. Training leads to increased auditory brain-computer interface performance of end-users with motor impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S; Käthner, I; Kübler, A

    2016-02-01

    Auditory brain-computer interfaces are an assistive technology that can restore communication for motor impaired end-users. Such non-visual brain-computer interface paradigms are of particular importance for end-users that may lose or have lost gaze control. We attempted to show that motor impaired end-users can learn to control an auditory speller on the basis of event-related potentials. Five end-users with motor impairments, two of whom with additional visual impairments, participated in five sessions. We applied a newly developed auditory brain-computer interface paradigm with natural sounds and directional cues. Three of five end-users learned to select symbols using this method. Averaged over all five end-users the information transfer rate increased by more than 1800% from the first session (0.17 bits/min) to the last session (3.08 bits/min). The two best end-users achieved information transfer rates of 5.78 bits/min and accuracies of 92%. Our results show that an auditory BCI with a combination of natural sounds and directional cues, can be controlled by end-users with motor impairment. Training improves the performance of end-users to the level of healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time end-users with motor impairments controlled an auditory brain-computer interface speller with such high accuracy and information transfer rates. Further, our results demonstrate that operating a BCI with event-related potentials benefits from training and specifically end-users may require more than one session to develop their full potential. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cross-vendor evaluation of key user-defined clinical decision support capabilities: a scenario-based assessment of certified electronic health records with guidelines for future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-09-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) is essential for delivery of high-quality, cost-effective, and safe healthcare. The authors sought to evaluate the CDS capabilities across electronic health record (EHR) systems. We evaluated the CDS implementation capabilities of 8 Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Authorized Certification Body (ONC-ACB)-certified EHRs. Within each EHR, the authors attempted to implement 3 user-defined rules that utilized the various data and logic elements expected of typical EHRs and that represented clinically important evidenced-based care. The rules were: 1) if a patient has amiodarone on his or her active medication list and does not have a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) result recorded in the last 12 months, suggest ordering a TSH; 2) if a patient has a hemoglobin A1c result >7% and does not have diabetes on his or her problem list, suggest adding diabetes to the problem list; and 3) if a patient has coronary artery disease on his or her problem list and does not have aspirin on the active medication list, suggest ordering aspirin. Most evaluated EHRs lacked some CDS capabilities; 5 EHRs were able to implement all 3 rules, and the remaining 3 EHRs were unable to implement any of the rules. One of these did not allow users to customize CDS rules at all. The most frequently found shortcomings included the inability to use laboratory test results in rules, limit rules by time, use advanced Boolean logic, perform actions from the alert interface, and adequately test rules. Significant improvements in the EHR certification and implementation procedures are necessary. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Computer-aided fit testing: an approach for examining the user/equipment interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corner, Brian D.; Beecher, Robert M.; Paquette, Steven

    1997-03-01

    Developments in laser digitizing technology now make it possible to capture very accurate 3D images of the surface of the human body in less than 20 seconds. Applications for the images range from animation of movie characters to the design and visualization of clothing and individual equipment (CIE). In this paper we focus on modeling the user/equipment interface. Defining the relative geometry between user and equipment provides a better understanding of equipment performance, and can make the design cycle more efficient. Computer-aided fit testing (CAFT) is the application of graphical and statistical techniques to visualize and quantify the human/equipment interface in virtual space. In short, CAFT looks to measure the relative geometry between a user and his or her equipment. The design cycle changes with the introducing CAFT; now some evaluation may be done in the CAD environment prior to prototyping. CAFT may be applied in two general ways: (1) to aid in the creation of new equipment designs and (2) to evaluate current designs for compliance to performance specifications. We demonstrate the application of CAFT with two examples. First, we show how a prototype helmet may be evaluated for fit, and second we demonstrate how CAFT may be used to measure body armor coverage.

  4. Wusor II: A Computer Aided Instruction Program with Student Modelling Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    Model. In some cases, this degrading of the Student Know l edge Moda l w i l l cause the Student Learning Model to deci de that the player does not...260, Psychology and Education Series , Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences , August , 1975. - Bork , AM., “Effective Computer

  5. Qualitative analysis of end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, I-Ching; Chang, Polun; Wang, Tsen-Yung

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan. In February 2004, an 8-day NI technology training campaign was held in Taipei for 60 clinical nurses. Excel VBA was used as the tool to teach the clinical nurses, who had never written any programs, but were very interested in informatics. Three projects were determined after detailed discussion and evaluation of clinical needs and technical feasibility between the nurses and the technical support team, which was composed of one experienced informatics professor and one clinical NI assistant. A qualitative analysis was used to interview the three pairs of programming clinical nurses and their direct supervisors with a structured but open questionnaire. Representative concepts were categorized from the data until all were categorized. The concepts were organized under three categories: the purposes, the benefits and the challenges of system development. According to this study, end user computing strategy with Excel VBA was successful so far.

  6. Affective Assessment of a Computer User through the Processing of the Pupil Diameter Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Barreto, Armando; Adjouadi, Malek

    This study proposes to achieve the affective assessment of a computer user through the processing of the pupil diameter (PD) signal. An adaptive interference canceller (AIC) system using the H∞ time-varying (HITV) adaptive algorithm was developed to minimize the impact of the PLR (pupil size changes caused by light intensity variations) on the measured pupil diameter signal. The modified pupil diameter (MPD) signal, obtained from the AIC, was expected to reflect primarily the pupillary affective responses (PAR) of the subject. Additional manipulations of the AIC output resulted in a Processed MPD (PMPD) signal, from which a classification feature, “PMPDmean”, was extracted. This feature was used to train and test a support vector machine (SVM), for the identification of “stress” states in the subject, achieving an accuracy rate of 77.78%. The advantages of affective recognition through the PD signal were verified by comparatively investigating the classification of “stress” and “relaxation” states through features derived from the simultaneously recorded galvanic skin response (GSR) and blood volume pulse (BVP) signals, with and without the PD feature. Encouraging results in affective assessment based on pupil diameter monitoring were obtained in spite of intermittent illumination increases purposely introduced during the experiments. Therefore, these results confirmed the possibility of using PD monitoring to evaluate the evolving affective states of a computer user.

  7. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryger Ann I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. Methods Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low frequency (2 Hz percutaneous electrical stimulation. Twitch forces were measured before, immediately after and 15 minutes into recovery of an extensor isometric wrist extension for ten minutes at 15 % Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC. Results The average MVC wrist extension force and baseline stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17–37 versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20. This difference in twitch force response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. Conclusion Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive response to exposure without any pathophysiological significance, or represents a part of a causal pathway leading to pain.

  8. Inferring population history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach to approximate Bayesian computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Santos, Filipe; Beaumont, Mark A.; Robert, Christian P.; Marin, Jean-Michel; Balding, David J.; Guillemaud, Thomas; Estoup, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Genetic data obtained on population samples convey information about their evolutionary history. Inference methods can extract part of this information but they require sophisticated statistical techniques that have been made available to the biologist community (through computer programs) only for simple and standard situations typically involving a small number of samples. We propose here a computer program (DIY ABC) for inference based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), in which scenarios can be customized by the user to fit many complex situations involving any number of populations and samples. Such scenarios involve any combination of population divergences, admixtures and population size changes. DIY ABC can be used to compare competing scenarios, estimate parameters for one or more scenarios and compute bias and precision measures for a given scenario and known values of parameters (the current version applies to unlinked microsatellite data). This article describes key methods used in the program and provides its main features. The analysis of one simulated and one real dataset, both with complex evolutionary scenarios, illustrates the main possibilities of DIY ABC. Availability: The software DIY ABC is freely available at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc. Contact: j.cornuet@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are also available at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc PMID:18842597

  9. On the control of brain-computer interfaces by users with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Billinger, Martin; Laparra-Hernández, José; Aloise, Fabio; García, Mariano Lloria; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as a potential assistive device for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) to assist with their communication needs. However, it is unclear how well-suited BCIs are to individuals with CP. Therefore, this study aims to investigate to what extent these users are able to gain control of BCIs. This study is conducted with 14 individuals with CP attempting to control two standard online BCIs (1) based upon sensorimotor rhythm modulations, and (2) based upon steady state visual evoked potentials. Of the 14 users, 8 are able to use one or other of the BCIs, online, with a statistically significant level of accuracy, without prior training. Classification results are driven by neurophysiological activity and not seen to correlate with occurrences of artifacts. However, many of these users' accuracies, while statistically significant, would require either more training or more advanced methods before practical BCI control would be possible. The results indicate that BCIs may be controlled by individuals with CP but that many issues need to be overcome before practical application use may be achieved. This is the first study to assess the ability of a large group of different individuals with CP to gain control of an online BCI system. The results indicate that six users could control a sensorimotor rhythm BCI and three a steady state visual evoked potential BCI at statistically significant levels of accuracy (SMR accuracies; mean ± STD, 0.821 ± 0.116, SSVEP accuracies; 0.422 ± 0.069). Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    by funding provided by the Na- tional Science Foundation under NSF Project CMMI - 0840442 and through TARDEC grant W911NF-11- D-0001-0048. M...Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1989. [13] HEYN, T. Simulation of Tracked Vehicles on Granular Terrain Leveraging GPU Comput- ing. M.S. thesis ...Dy- namics on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Cards. M.S. thesis , Department of Me- chanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin– Madison, http

  11. A user`s guide to LUGSAN 1.1: A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, W.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1994-07-01

    LUGSAN (LUG and Sway brace ANalysis) is a analysis and database computer program designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads from aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85 and the maneuver calculation code, MILGEN, with an INGRES database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the operation of the LUGSAN application program, including function description, layout examples, and sample sessions. This report is intended to be a user`s manual for version 1.1 of LUGSAN operating on the VAX/VMS system. The report is not intended to be a programmer or developer`s manual.

  12. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrut, Dan; Mazhar, Hammad; Melanz, Daniel; Lamb, David; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Letherwood, Michael; Jain, Abhinandan; Quadrelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the physics-based simulation of light tracked vehicles operating on rough deformable terrain. The focus is on small autonomous vehicles, which weigh less than 100 lb and move on deformable and rough terrain that is feature rich and no longer representable using a continuum approach. A scenario of interest is, for instance, the simulation of a reconnaissance mission for a high mobility lightweight robot where objects such as a boulder or a ditch that could otherwise be considered small for a truck or tank, become major obstacles that can impede the mobility of the light autonomous vehicle and negatively impact the success of its mission. Analyzing and gauging the mobility and performance of these light vehicles is accomplished through a modeling and simulation capability called Chrono::Engine. Chrono::Engine relies on parallel execution on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards.

  13. Department of Defense Use of Commercial Cloud Computing Capabilities and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    models (Infrastructure as a Service ( IaaS ), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS)), and four deployment models (Public...NIST defines three main models for cloud computing: IaaS , PaaS, and SaaS. These models help differentiate the implementation responsibilities that fall...of their client’s networks. These specialized XaaS models are constantly emerging and therefore do not have standardized definitions as do IaaS , PaaS

  14. Factors affecting adoption behavior for Tablet device among computer users in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafique Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile computing represents a need of this decade. Mobile computing is possible with a tablet device, for which there is no clear-cut definition. It is partly because mobile computation field is still an emerging field. Tablet industry is still in its infancy stage and therefore, standards have yet to be defined. Given the limitations, however, a tablet device can be defined as a computing device smaller and slower than a laptop, however larger, and faster than a palm type device. In this research work, factors affecting adoption behavior for tablet device among computer users have been studied. An integral part of the study was to compare effect of the income level on adoption behavior. In this regard, two samples of private and public university students were studied. A modified technology acceptance model (TAM has been used. Two variables were added to TAM model based on Pakistan’s demographics. A questionnaire was used to collect data. 1000 questionnaires were distributed from which we received 972; twenty two questionnaires were having major missing values so they were separated from analysis. Twenty five respondents were found outliers during data screening; by this sample used in this study is 925. Results were analyzed using linear regression which showed only perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness affected attitude to adopt tablet device. These results were found to be consistent for both private and public universities. Facilitation conditions and price perception play an insignificant role. The results confirmed perceived usefulness and ease of use are the only important factors affecting adoption behavior for tablet device.

  15. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  16. A computational framework to advance hydrometeorological prediction capabilities in cold regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. P.; Kavetski, D.; Slater, A. G.; Lundquist, J. D.; Wood, A. W.; Gochis, D. J.; Gutmann, E. D.; Rasmussen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Many different modeling groups recognize the need for new computational frameworks for use as both (i) a model development tool to evaluate competing process representations; and (ii) a predictive tool to reliably represent model uncertainty. Here we describe a computational framework to explore different approaches for modeling the hydrology and thermodynamics of snow and partially frozen soils. The framework has two main features: it has a "numerically agile" structural core to support evaluating the impact of different numerical approximations (e.g., vertical discretization, linearizations, etc.), and it has the modularity to support experimenting with different constitutive functions and boundary conditions. The broad flexibility of the framework facilitates constructing multiple equally plausible model realizations - these realizations can be used either as ensembles to represent model uncertainty, or examined in a systematic way to isolate the impact of individual model components on model predictions and hence facilitate a controlled approach to hypothesis testing. Application of the framework in different snow environments emphasizes the impact of (and interactions among) different modeling decisions. The approaches used to parameterize turbulent heat fluxes, parameters controlling the storage of liquid water in the snowpack, and the lower boundary conditions for hydrology were especially important in the case studies examined. More generally, results show that the impacts of differences in model structure are often overwhelmed by uncertainty in a-priori estimates of model parameters, and suggest that careful specification of probability distributions of model parameters can be used to represent model uncertainty.

  17. Computable General Equilibrium Model Fiscal Year 2013 Capability Development Report - April 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC); Rivera, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC)

    2014-04-01

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  18. Real-time hybrid simulation of structures equipped with viscoelastic-plastic dampers using a user-programmable computational platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jack Wen Wei; Ashasi-Sorkhabi, Ali; Mercan, Oya; Christopoulos, Constantin

    2017-10-01

    A user-programmable computational/control platform was developed at the University of Toronto that offers real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS) capabilities. The platform was verified previously using several linear physical substructures. The study presented in this paper is focused on further validating the RTHS platform using a nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic damper that has displacement, frequency and temperature-dependent properties. The validation study includes damper component characterization tests, as well as RTHS of a series of single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems equipped with viscoelastic-plastic dampers that represent different structural designs. From the component characterization tests, it was found that for a wide range of excitation frequencies and friction slip loads, the tracking errors are comparable to the errors in RTHS of linear spring systems. The hybrid SDOF results are compared to an independently validated thermalmechanical viscoelastic model to further validate the ability for the platform to test nonlinear systems. After the validation, as an application study, nonlinear SDOF hybrid tests were used to develop performance spectra to predict the response of structures equipped with damping systems that are more challenging to model analytically. The use of the experimental performance spectra is illustrated by comparing the predicted response to the hybrid test response of 2DOF systems equipped with viscoelastic-plastic dampers.

  19. The reliability and internal consistency of an Internet-capable computer program for measuring utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenert, L A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and internal consistency of measurements of utilities performed with a computer program (iMPACT2) designed for Internet surveys and Internet patient decision-support systems. We implemented the Internet Multimedia Preference Assessor Construction Tool, version 2 (iMPACT2) program using the combination of a web server, HTML files, and a web-accessible database. The program randomized subjects, screened their responses for missing data and failures of internal consistency, assisted patients with resolving certain inconsistencies, and, upon a subject's completion of the protocol, provided a report of results to the research assistant administering the program. To validate the iMPACT2 program, we recruited 60 healthy community volunteers and elicited preferences in a research-lab setting using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the standard gamble (SG) for subject's current health and three hypothetical states. For purposes of comparison, we also administered a Short Form-12 (SF-12) health-assessment questionnaire. Subjects used the computer software on two occasions separated by 2-4 weeks of time. Visual analog scale and standard gamble ratings for subjects' current health were reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.82 and 0.84 (two outliers excluded -0.60 without exclusions), respectively) were comparable with the reliability of the Physical and Mental Component scales of the SF-12 (ICCs of 0.84 and 0.75, respectively). Subjects could easily discriminate between hypothetical states (D scores 0.74 for SG and 0.90 for VAS), and 94% had a completely internally consistent ordering of preference ratings for states. iMPACT2 produces measurements of standard gamble utilities that are reliable and have a high degree of internal consistency. Procedures for assessment of utilities developed for desktop computer programs can be translated to software designed for the Internet, facilitating the use of

  20. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 3: SRB water impact loads computer program, user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This user's manual describes the FORTRAN IV computer program developed to compute the total vertical load, normal concentrated pressure loads, and the center of pressure of typical SRB water impact slapdown pressure distributions specified in the baseline configuration. The program prepares the concentrated pressure load information in punched card format suitable for input to the STAGS computer program. In addition, the program prepares for STAGS input the inertia reacting loads to the slapdown pressure distributions.

  1. UIMX: A User Interface Management System For Scientific Computing With X Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, Michael

    1989-09-01

    Applications with iconic user interfaces, (for example, interfaces with pulldown menus, radio buttons, and scroll bars), such as those found on Apple's Macintosh computer and the IBM PC under Microsoft's Presentation Manager, have become very popular, and for good reason. They are much easier to use than applications with traditional keyboard-oriented interfaces, so training costs are much lower and just about anyone can use them. They are standardized between applications, so once you learn one application you are well along the way to learning another. The use of one reinforces the common elements between applications of the interface, and, as a result, you remember how to use them longer. Finally, for the developer, their support costs can be much lower because of their ease of use.

  2. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, GF; Johnson, PW; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. METHODS: Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm...... and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low...... stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17-37) versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20). This difference in twitch force...

  3. Experiment on a novel user input for computer interface utilizing tongue input for the severely disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kencana, Andy Prima; Heng, John

    2008-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel passive tongue control and tracking device. The device is intended to be used by the severely disabled or quadriplegic person. The main focus of this device when compared to the other existing tongue tracking devices is that the sensor employed is passive which means it requires no powered electrical sensor to be inserted into the user's mouth and hence no trailing wires. This haptic interface device employs the use of inductive sensors to track the position of the user's tongue. The device is able perform two main PC functions that of the keyboard and mouse function. The results show that this device allows the severely disabled person to have some control in his environment, such as to turn on and off or control daily electrical devices or appliances; or to be used as a viable PC Human Computer Interface (HCI) by tongue control. The operating principle and set-up of such a novel passive tongue HCI has been established with successful laboratory trials and experiments. Further clinical trials will be required to test out the device on disabled persons before it is ready for future commercial development.

  4. NSRD-15:Computational Capability to Substantiate DOE-HDBK-3010 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Brien, Christopher John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zepper, Ethan T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Busch, Robert D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Skinner, Corey M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Safety basis analysts throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex rely heavily on the information provided in the DOE Handbook, DOE-HDBK-3010, Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to determine radionuclide source terms from postulated accident scenarios. In calculating source terms, analysts tend to use the DOE Handbook’s bounding values on airborne release fractions (ARFs) and respirable fractions (RFs) for various categories of insults (representing potential accident release categories). This is typically due to both time constraints and the avoidance of regulatory critique. Unfortunately, these bounding ARFs/RFs represent extremely conservative values. Moreover, they were derived from very limited small-scale bench/laboratory experiments and/or from engineered judgment. Thus, the basis for the data may not be representative of the actual unique accident conditions and configurations being evaluated. The goal of this research is to develop a more accurate and defensible method to determine bounding values for the DOE Handbook using state-of-art multi-physics-based computer codes.

  5. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Mikhail [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Niita, Koji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  6. NSRD-11: Computational Capability to Substantiate DOE-HDBK-3010 Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gelbard, Fred [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pierce, Flint [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voskuilen, Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zepper, Ethan T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Juan, Pierre-Alexandre [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Le, San [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilkey, Lindsay Noelle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Safety basis analysts throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex rely heavily on the information provided in the DOE Handbook, DOE - HDBK - 3010, Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to determine radionuclide source terms. In calculating source terms, analysts tend to use the DOE Handbook's bounding values on airborne release fractions (ARFs) and respirable fractions (RFs) for various categories of insults (representing potential accident release categories). This is typically due to both time constraints and the avoidance of regulatory critique. Unfortunately, these bounding ARFs/RFs represent extremely conservative values. Moreover, they were derived from very limited small-scale bench/laboratory experiments and/or from engineered judgment. Thus, the basis for the data may not be representative of the actual unique accident conditions and configurations being evaluated. The goal of this research is to develop a more accurate and defensible method to determine bounding values for the DOE Handbook using state-of-art multi-physics-based computer codes. This enables us to better understand the fundamental physics and phenomena associated with the types of accidents in the handbook. In this year, this research included improvements of the high-fidelity codes to model particle resuspension and multi-component evaporation for fire scenarios. We also began to model ceramic fragmentation experiments, and to reanalyze the liquid fire and powder release experiments that were done last year. The results show that the added physics better describes the fragmentation phenomena. Thus, this work provides a low-cost method to establish physics-justified safety bounds by taking into account specific geometries and conditions that may not have been previously measured and/or are too costly to perform.

  7. NSRD-06. Computational Capability to Substantiate DOE-HDBK-3010 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, David L.Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Alexander L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Safety basis analysts throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex rely heavily on the information provided in the DOE Hand book, DOE-HDBK-3010, Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Resp irable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities , to determine source terms. In calcula ting source terms, analysts tend to use the DOE Handbook's bounding values on airbor ne release fractions (ARFs) and respirable fractions (RFs) for various cat egories of insults (representing potential accident release categories). This is typica lly due to both time constraints and the avoidance of regulatory critique. Unfort unately, these bounding ARFs/RFs represent extremely conservative values. Moreover, th ey were derived from very limited small- scale table-top and bench/labo ratory experiments and/or fr om engineered judgment. Thus the basis for the data may not be re presentative to the actual unique accident conditions and configura tions being evaluated. The goal of this res earch is to develop a more ac curate method to identify bounding values for the DOE Handbook using the st ate-of-art multi-physics-based high performance computer codes. This enable s us to better understand the fundamental physics and phenomena associated with the ty pes of accidents for the data described in it. This research has examined two of the DOE Handbook's liquid fire experiments to substantiate the airborne release frac tion data. We found th at additional physical phenomena (i.e., resuspension) need to be included to derive bounding values. For the specific cases of solid powder under pre ssurized condition and mechanical insult conditions the codes demonstrated that we can simulate the phenomena. This work thus provides a low-cost method to establis h physics-justified sa fety bounds by taking into account specific geometri es and conditions that may not have been previously measured and/or are too costly to do so.

  8. Validation of a computer case definition for sudden cardiac death in opioid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Vivian K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To facilitate the use of automated databases for studies of sudden cardiac death, we previously developed a computerized case definition that had a positive predictive value between 86% and 88%. However, the definition has not been specifically validated for prescription opioid users, for whom out-of-hospital overdose deaths may be difficult to distinguish from sudden cardiac death. Findings We assembled a cohort of persons 30-74 years of age prescribed propoxyphene or hydrocodone who had no life-threatening non-cardiovascular illness, diagnosed drug abuse, residence in a nursing home in the past year, or hospital stay within the past 30 days. Medical records were sought for a sample of 140 cohort deaths within 30 days of a prescription fill meeting the computer case definition. Of the 140 sampled deaths, 81 were adjudicated; 73 (90% were sudden cardiac deaths. Two deaths had possible opioid overdose; after removing these two the positive predictive value was 88%. Conclusions These findings are consistent with our previous validation studies and suggest the computer case definition of sudden cardiac death is a useful tool for pharmacoepidemiologic studies of opioid analgesics.

  9. Feature rich, but user-friendly: Speech pathologists' preferences for computer-based aphasia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, Megan A; Hill, Anne J; Finch, Emma

    2016-08-01

    High-intensity language therapy has been shown to provide greater outcomes for people with aphasia (PWA). Unfortunately, a number of issues including the ageing population and a lack of rurally-based clinicians prevent high-intensity interventions. Computer-based therapies are a potential solution to the issues of intensity and accessibility; however, this service delivery model is not commonly used. A possible reason behind the poor uptake is that current computer-based aphasia therapy (CBAT) programs may not meet the needs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs). This study investigated the preferences of SLPs with regard to the features desired in their ideal CBAT program. Phenomenological research methodology was used to explore the preferences of 10 SLPs. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. Desired features were grouped into five themes: therapy activities, stimuli, cues, access and progress data. A range of sub-themes were also identified. The wide range of desirable features found in this study may reflect the extent to which current CBAT programs are considered to be useful, but perhaps do not meet the needs of users. The study's findings provide useful information for future CBAT developers to create programs with high clinician usability.

  10. RECON: a computer program for analyzing repository economics. Documentation and user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, L.L.; Cole, B.M.; McNair, G.W.; Schutz, M.E.

    1983-05-01

    From 1981 through 1983 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been developing a computer model named RECON to calculate repository costs from parametric data input. The objective of the program has been to develop the capability to evalute the effect on costs of changes in repository design parameters and operating scenario assumptions. This report documents the development of the model through March of 1983. Included in the report are: (1) descriptions of model development and the underlying equations, assumptions and definitions; (2) descriptions of data input either using card images or an interactive data input program; and (3) detailed listings of the program and definitions of program variables. Cost estimates generated using the model have been verified against independent estimates and good agreement has been obtained.

  11. User's manual for THPLOT, A FORTRAN 77 Computer program for time history plotting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A general purpose FORTRAN 77 computer program (THPLOT) for plotting time histories using Calcomp pen plotters is described. The program is designed to read a time history data file and to generate time history plots for selected time intervals and/or selected data channels. The capabilities of the program are described. The card input required to define the plotting operation is described and examples of card input and the resulting plotted output are given. The examples are followed by a description of the printed output, including both normal output and error messages. Lastly, implementation of the program is described. A complete listing of the program with reference maps produced by the CDC FTN 5.0 compiler is included.

  12. [The application of end user computing (EUC) for detection of lipoprotein lipase gene abnormality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Kobori, K; Kondo, A; Yonekawa, O; Kanno, T

    1999-08-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an enzyme digesting lipoprotein triglyceride (TG) in peripheral blood vessels. Most patients with LPL deficiency show very high plasma TG and low HDL-C. To establish an effective computer-based screening system to identify individuals with genetic LPL disorders, we selected 50 subjects whose plasma TG was over 350mg/dl and HDL-C was lower than 35mg/dl from patients at Hamamatsu University Hospital. We applied End User Computing (EUC) of our laboratory system to select high risk subjects with LPL gene abnormalities. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from LPL gene exons 2-9 were screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), direct DNA sequence analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We found a novel missense mutation (1223C-->G, S323C) in LPL gene exon 7 from three subjects. By PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis and restriction digestion, the three subjects were found to be heterozygous. In addition, we identified two other common mutations in Japanese employing the RFLP method. One was the 1595C-->G (S447X) in exon 9 from six subjects, two homozygous and four heterozygous individuals. The other was a mutation of intron 3 (C-->T transition) from four heterozygous subjects. Using EUC screening method, we detected genetic LPL abnormalities more easily. The frequency of the LPL gene mutation in the 50 high-risk subjects was 26%, and was estimated to be one out of 2,000 patients at our clinic. Using the EUC system to screen for LPL mutations was established to be an effective computer-based screening system to identify individuals with genetic abnormalities.

  13. BPO crude oil analysis data base user`s guide: Methods, publications, computer access correlations, uses, availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellers, C.; Fox, B.; Paulz, J.

    1996-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  14. Conference report: 18th conference on computer-assisted qualitative data analysis (CAQD) 2016: MAXQDA user conference

    OpenAIRE

    Galan-Diaz, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    During the first week of March 2016, 120 researchers from 12 different countries, including Syria, Japan, the USA and Turkey, met in Berlin (Germany) to learn more about their computer-assisted qualitative data analysis skills. The 18th Conference on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQD) offered several workshops, a research methods poster session, and the opportunity to share and discuss best practice between attendees, trainers and speakers (informally and through the user foru...

  15. Assessing the Role of User Computer Self-Efficacy, Cybersecurity Countermeasures Awareness, and Cybersecurity Skills toward Computer Misuse Intention at Government Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities are causing substantial financial losses for governments and organizations all over the world. Cybersecurity criminals are stealing more than one billion dollars from banks every year by exploiting vulnerabilities caused by bank users' computer misuse. Cybersecurity breaches are threatening the common…

  16. Meeting and Working on an Electronic Social Space: Behavioural Considerations and Implications for Cross-Cultural End User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sajda

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of behavior on an electronic social space (electronic bulletin boards) revealed complex linages in which a few types of behaviors occurred most frequently. Interpretation indicates that cross-cultural implications for end-user computing involve practical considerations relating to three types of adaptation: technological, work, and…

  17. Effects of a feedback signal in a computer mouse on movement behaviour, muscle load, productivity, comfort and user friendliness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E.M. de; Kraker, H. de; Bongers, P.M.; Lingen, P. van

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of a tactile feedback signal in a computer mouse on reduction of hovering behaviour and consequently on changes in muscle load, productivity, comfort and user friendliness, a comparative, experimental study with repeated measures was conducted. Fifteen subjects performed five

  18. PREDICTING ATTENUATION OF VIRUSES DURING PERCOLATION IN SOILS: 2. USER'S GUIDE TO THE VIRULO 1.0 COMPUTER MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the EPA document Predicting Attenuation of Viruses During Percolation in Soils 1. Probabilistic Model the conceptual, theoretical, and mathematical foundations for a predictive screening model were presented. In this current volume we present a User's Guide for the computer mo...

  19. The Sidebar Computer Program, a seismic-shaking intensity meter: users' manual and software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R.

    2003-01-01

    The SideBar computer program provides a visual display of seismic shaking intensity as recorded at one specific seismograph. This software allows a user to tap into the seismic data recorded on that specific seismograph and to display the overall level of shaking at the single location where that seismograph resides (usually the same place the user is). From this shaking level, SideBar also estimates the potential for damage nearby. SideBar cannot tell you the “Richter magnitude” of the earthquake (see box), only how hard the ground shook locally and this estimate of how much damage is likely in the neighborhood. This combination of local effects is called the “seismic intensity”. SideBar runs on a standard desktop or laptop PC, and is intended for the media, schools, emergency responders, and any other group hosting a seismograph and who want to know immediately after an earthquake the levels of shaking measured by that instrument. These local values can be used to inform the public and help initiate appropriate local emergency response activities in the minutes between the earthquake and availability of the broader coverage provided by the USGS over the Web, notably by ShakeMap. For example, for instruments installed in schools, the level of shaking and likely damage at the school could immediately be Web broadcast and parents could quickly determine the likely safety of their children—their biggest postearthquake concern. Also, in the event of a Web outage, SideBar may be a continuing primary source of local emergency response information for some additional minutes. Specifically, SideBar interprets the peak level of acceleration (that is, the force of shaking, as a percentage of the force of gravity) as well as the peak velocity, or highest speed, at which the ground moves. Using these two basic measurements, SideBar computes what is called Instrumental Intensity—a close approximation of the Modified Mercalli Intensity scale, or “MMI” (using the

  20. A User-Developed 3-D Hand Gesture Set for Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anna; Wachs, Juan P; Park, Kunwoo; Rempel, David

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a lexicon for 3-D hand gestures for common human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks by considering usability and effort ratings. Recent technologies create an opportunity for developing a free-form 3-D hand gesture lexicon for HCI. Subjects (N = 30) with prior experience using 2-D gestures on touch screens performed 3-D gestures of their choice for 34 common HCI tasks and rated their gestures on preference, match, ease, and effort. Videos of the 1,300 generated gestures were analyzed for gesture popularity, order, and response times. Gesture hand postures were rated by the authors on biomechanical risk and fatigue. A final task gesture set is proposed based primarily on subjective ratings and hand posture risk. The different dimensions used for evaluating task gestures were not highly correlated and, therefore, measured different properties of the task-gesture match. A method is proposed for generating a user-developed 3-D gesture lexicon for common HCIs that involves subjective ratings and a posture risk rating for minimizing arm and hand fatigue. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  1. Spectral Transfer Learning using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Roy Waytowich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technologies to fields such as medicine, industry and recreation. However, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter- individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this paper, we present an unsupervised transfer method (spectral transfer using information geometry, STIG, which ranks and combines unlabeled predictions from an ensemble of information geometry classifiers built on data from individual training subjects. The STIG method is validated in both offline and real-time feedback analysis during a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP. For detection of single-trial, event-related potentials (ERPs, the proposed method can significantly outperform existing calibration-free techniques as well as outperform traditional within-subject calibration techniques when limited data is available. This method demonstrates that unsupervised transfer learning for single-trial detection in ERP-based BCIs can be achieved without the requirement of costly training data, representing a step-forward in the overall goal of achieving a practical user-independent BCI system.

  2. Improving computer security for authentication of users: influence of proactive password restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Robert W; Lien, Mei-Ching; Vu, Kim-Phuong L; Schultz, E Eugene; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2002-05-01

    Entering a username-password combination is a widely used procedure for identification and authentication in computer systems. However, it is a notoriously weak method, in that the passwords adopted by many users are easy to crack. In an attempt to improve security, proactive password checking may be used, in which passwords must meet several criteria to be more resistant to cracking. In two experiments, we examined the influence of proactive password restrictions on the time that it took to generate an acceptable password and to use it subsequently to long in. The required length was a minimum of five characters in Experiment 1 and eight characters in Experiment 2. In both experiments, one condition had only the length restriction, and the other had additional restrictions. The additional restrictions greatly increased the time it took to generate the password but had only a small effect on the time it took to use it subsequently to long in. For the five-character passwords, 75% were cracked when no other restrictions were imposed, and this was reduced to 33% with the additional restrictions. For the eight-character passwords, 17% were cracked with no other restrictions, and 12.5% with restrictions. The results indicate that increasing the minimum character length reduces crackability and increases security, regardless of whether additional restrictions are imposed.

  3. User`s guide for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), Version 2.0 software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horak, K.E.; Evanko, D.A. [Excel Tactical Staffing, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (hosts). Traditional training techniques include lectures, table-top inspections, and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT is used for training both inspectors and hosts to conduct a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The training covers the entire sequence of events in the challenge inspection regime, from initial notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities. The primary emphasis of the training tool is on conducting the inspection itself, and in particular, implementing the concept of managed access. (Managed access is a technique used to assure the inspectors that the facility is in compliance with the CWC, while at the same time protecting sensitive information unrelated to the CWC.) Information for all of the activities is located in the electronic {open_quotes}Exercise Manual.{close_quotes} In addition, interactive menus are used to negotiate access to each room and to alternate information during the simulated inspection. ACE-IT also demonstrates how various inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information.

  4. Production Support Flight Control Computers: Research Capability for F/A-18 Aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John F.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is working with the United States Navy to complete ground testing and initiate flight testing of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers. The Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) can give any fleet F/A-18 airplane an in-flight, pilot-selectable research control law capability. NASA DFRC can efficiently flight test the PSFCC for the following four reasons: (1) Six F/A-18 chase aircraft are available which could be used with the PSFCC; (2) An F/A-18 processor-in-the-loop simulation exists for validation testing; (3) The expertise has been developed in programming the research processor in the PSFCC; and (4) A well-defined process has been established for clearing flight control research projects for flight. This report presents a functional description of the PSFCC. Descriptions of the NASA DFRC facilities, PSFCC verification and validation process, and planned PSFCC projects are also provided.

  5. Individual and work-related risk factors for musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional study among Estonian computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oha, Kristel; Animägi, Liina; Pääsuke, Mati; Coggon, David; Merisalu, Eda

    2014-05-28

    Occupational use of computers has increased rapidly over recent decades, and has been linked with various musculoskeletal disorders, which are now the most commonly diagnosed occupational diseases in Estonia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) by anatomical region during the past 12 months and to investigate its association with personal characteristics and work-related risk factors among Estonian office workers using computers. In a cross-sectional survey, the questionnaires were sent to the 415 computer users. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire from 202 computer users at two universities in Estonia. The questionnaire asked about MSP at different anatomical sites, and potential individual and work related risk factors. Associations with risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. Most respondents (77%) reported MSP in at least one anatomical region during the past 12 months. Most prevalent was pain in the neck (51%), followed by low back pain (42%), wrist/hand pain (35%) and shoulder pain (30%). Older age, right-handedness, not currently smoking, emotional exhaustion, belief that musculoskeletal problems are commonly caused by work, and low job security were the statistically significant risk factors for MSP in different anatomical sites. A high prevalence of MSP in the neck, low back, wrist/arm and shoulder was observed among Estonian computer users. Psychosocial risk factors were broadly consistent with those reported from elsewhere. While computer users should be aware of ergonomic techniques that can make their work easier and more comfortable, presenting computer use as a serious health hazard may modify health beliefs in a way that is unhelpful.

  6. Mapping the User Experience: Development of a Validated Instrument from the Plans and Scripts of the Computer Community of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Lehane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A plethora of surveys for assessing computer use for usability or technology acceptance exist today. This article discusses the Systems Acceptance Indicator, a validated survey instrument for assessing the user experience from a cognitive–ergonomic perspective. The action research discussed in this paper utilized grounded theory analysis to establish the data-driven emergent theoretical constructs that provided the system acceptance categories (criteria for the survey. These data-driven emergent theoretical constructs were the basis for the proposed theoretical abstraction hierarchy of the survey criteria. Principle component analysis of the survey data produced an abstraction hierarchy identical to the theoretical model. This result confirmed the alignment of the human–computer interaction theoretical constructs with the data-driven emergent theory. The intent behind the human–computer interaction theoretical rationale for the emergent abstraction hierarchy was to provide a consistent and repeatable interpretation of the user response to the survey.

  7. Ketidakpastian Tugas Sebagai Variabel Moderator Terhadap Hubungan antara Pemanfaatan Teknologi Informasi dan Kepuasan Pengguna pada End User Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retnaningtyas Widuri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to test influence from diversity and the extent of utilization of information technology on the end user computing satisfactions. Also, this research examine interaction between task uncertainty and dimension of utilization (diversity and the extent information technology on the end-user computing satisfaction. This research responder are administrative personel in faculty and program pascasarjana levels using information system in executing the duty. This research take sampel as much 65 sampel. Analysis used int this research is multiple regression to examine correlation between dimension of utilization with end-user computing satisfaction. While to examine the effect interaction between dimension of utilization and task uncertainty with end-user computing satisfaction used moderated regression analysis. The result of analysis indicate that diversity information technology are influece on the end-user computing satisfaction, interaction between diversity of utilization information technology and task uncertainty are influence on the end-user computing satisfaction. Although, extent of utilization information technology and interaction between extent of utilization information technology with task uncertainty are not significant influence on the end-user satisfaction. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui: 1 pengaruh dari diversitas pemanfaatan dan luas pemanfaatan teknologi informasi terhadap kepuasan pemakai akhir komputer dan 2 pengaruh interaksi antara ketidakpastian tugas dengan dimensi pemanfaatan teknologi informasi (diversitas dan luas pemanfaatan terhadap kepuasan pemakai akhir komputer. Responden penelitian ini adalah tenaga administrasi tingkat fakultas dan program. pascasarjana yang menggunakan sistem informasi dalam melaksanakan tugasnya. Penelitian ini menggunakan regresi berganda untuk menguji hubungan antara dimensi pemanfaatan dengan kepuasan pemakai akhir komputer. Untuk

  8. Pengukuran End-User Computing Satisfaction Atas Penggunaan Sistem Informasi Akademik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boy Suzanto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Academic information system is very dependent on the components in generating information systems that fit their needs. The gap that occurs in the use of academic information system on the behavior of users of information systems will result in optimal intention to use by the user. Hence the need for in-depth measurement of academic information system that has been running against the attitude of academic information system users to improve the behavior of users of information systems is the goal of this study. Exploratory research methods using the number of respondents as many as 124 students. Data were analyzed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM, component based Partial Least Squares (PLS. The results showed that the influence of academic information system on the attitudes of users by 0.57 or 57% and influence the attitude of academic information system users to conduct on the intention to use of academic information systems at 0.50 or 50%.

  9. Risk Issues in Developing Novel User Interfaces for Human-Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Klinker, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. All rights are reserved. When new user interfaces or information visualization schemes are developed for complex information processing systems, it is not readily clear how much they do, in fact, support and improve users\\' understanding and use of such systems. Is a new interface better than an older one? In what respect, and in which situations? To provide answers to such questions, user testing schemes are employed. This chapter reports on a range of risks pertaining to the design and implementation of user interfaces in general, and to newly emerging interfaces (3-dimensionally, immersive, mobile) in particular.

  10. Bridging Social and Semantic Computing - Design and Evaluation of User Interfaces for Hybrid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostandjiev, Svetlin Alex I.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the Web brought new interesting problems to computer scientists that we loosely classify in the fields of social and semantic computing. Social computing is related to two major paradigms: computations carried out by a large amount of people in a collective intelligence fashion (i.e. wikis), and performing computations on social…

  11. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system.

  12. An 18-month follow-up study on vibrotactile sense, muscle strength and symptoms in computer users with and without symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marianne; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to explore whether symptoms, sensory perception and muscle strength among computer users with and without symptoms in forearm or hand had changed after 18 months. Methods: Twenty-six out of 30 females, experienced computer users, from a baseline study participated in the f...

  13. Exploratory Mixed-Method Study of End-User Computing within an Information Technology Infrastructure Library U.S. Army Service Delivery Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Sancho J., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical studies have been conducted on what is known as end-user computing from as early as the 1980s to present-day IT employees. There have been many studies on using quantitative instruments by Cotterman and Kumar (1989) and Rockart and Flannery (1983). Qualitative studies on end-user computing classifications have been conducted by…

  14. A Usability Study of Users' Perceptions toward a Multimedia Computer-Assisted Learning Tool for Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J.; Terrell, Mark A.; Fleming, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This usability study evaluated users' perceptions of a multimedia prototype for a new e-learning tool: Anatomy of the Central Nervous System: A Multimedia Course. Usability testing is a collection of formative evaluation methods that inform the developmental design of e-learning tools to maximize user acceptance, satisfaction, and adoption.…

  15. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems.

  16. Clinical signs and physical function in neck and upper extremities among elderly female computer users: the NEW study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Kadefors, R; Hansen, K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present the prevalence of clinical signs and symptoms among female computer users above 45 years, both in a group with self-reported neck/shoulder trouble (NS cases) and in a group without such trouble (NS controls). The hypothesis was that computer users with self......-reported neck/shoulder trouble have more clinical findings than those not reporting trouble, and that a corresponding pattern holds true for physical function. In total 42 and 61 questionnaire-defined NS cases and NS controls participated and went through a clinical examination of the neck and upper extremities......%) and cervicalgia (17%) were the most frequent diagnoses among NS cases, and were significantly more frequent among NS cases than NS controls. A total of 60% of the subjects with reported trouble had one or several of the diagnoses located in the neck/shoulder. Physical function of the shoulder was lower...

  17. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T.J.

    1992-09-14

    EQ3NR is an aqueous solution speciation-solubility modeling code. It is part of the EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling. It computes the thermodynamic state of an aqueous solution by determining the distribution of chemical species, including simple ions, ion pairs, and complexes, using standard state thermodynamic data and various equations which describe the thermodynamic activity coefficients of these species. The input to the code describes the aqueous solution in terms of analytical data, including total (analytical) concentrations of dissolved components and such other parameters as the pH, pHCl, Eh, pe, and oxygen fugacity. The input may also include a desired electrical balancing adjustment and various constraints which impose equilibrium with special pure minerals, solid solution end-member components (of specified mole fractions), and gases (of specified fugacities). The code evaluates the degree of disequilibrium in terms of the saturation index (SI = 1og Q/K) and the thermodynamic affinity (A = {minus}2.303 RT log Q/K) for various reactions, such as mineral dissolution or oxidation-reduction in the aqueous solution itself. Individual values of Eh, pe, oxygen fugacity, and Ah (redox affinity) are computed for aqueous redox couples. Equilibrium fugacities are computed for gas species. The code is highly flexible in dealing with various parameters as either model inputs or outputs. The user can specify modification or substitution of equilibrium constants at run time by using options on the input file.

  18. EQ6, a computer program for reaction path modeling of aqueous geochemical systems: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T.J.; Daveler, S.A.

    1992-10-09

    EQ6 is a FORTRAN computer program in the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery, 1979). It calculates reaction paths (chemical evolution) in reacting water-rock and water-rock-waste systems. Speciation in aqueous solution is an integral part of these calculations. EQ6 computes models of titration processes (including fluid mixing), irreversible reaction in closed systems, irreversible reaction in some simple kinds of open systems, and heating or cooling processes, as well as solve ``single-point`` thermodynamic equilibrium problems. A reaction path calculation normally involves a sequence of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Chemical evolution is driven by a set of irreversible reactions (i.e., reactions out of equilibrium) and/or changes in temperature and/or pressure. These irreversible reactions usually represent the dissolution or precipitation of minerals or other solids. The code computes the appearance and disappearance of phases in solubility equilibrium with the water. It finds the identities of these phases automatically. The user may specify which potential phases are allowed to form and which are not. There is an option to fix the fugacities of specified gas species, simulating contact with a large external reservoir. Rate laws for irreversible reactions may be either relative rates or actual rates. If any actual rates are used, the calculation has a time frame. Several forms for actual rate laws are programmed into the code. EQ6 is presently able to model both mineral dissolution and growth kinetics.

  19. Understanding work-related upper extremity disorders: clinical findings in 485 computer users, musicians, and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarelli, E F; Hsu, Y P

    2001-03-01

    Four hundred eighty five patients whose chief complaints were work related pain and other symptoms received a comprehensive upper-body clinical evaluation to determine the extent of their illness. The group had a mean age of 38.5 years. Sixty-three percent of patients were females. Seventy percent were computer users, 28% were musicians, and 2% were others engaged in repetitive work. The time between the onset of symptoms and our initial visit ranged from 2 weeks to over 17 years. A majority sought care within 30 months with the greatest number of them seeking care before 12 months. Fifty nine percent of subjects were still working when seen despite increasing pain and symptoms such as weakness, numbness, tingling, and stiffness. Following a history, a physical assessment utilizing commonly employed clinical tests were performed including evaluation of joint range of motion, hyperlaxity, muscle tenderness, pain, strength, and imbalance. Neurologic tests included Tinel's sign performed in wrist, elbow, tricipital sulcus, and neck and tests for thoracic out syndrome (TOS). Specific tests such as Finkelstein's test for deQuervain's tenosynovitis, Phalen's test for carpal tunnel syndrome and grip strengths were included in the examination protocol. Significant findings included postural misalignment with protracted shoulders (78%), head forward position (71%), neurogenic TOS (70%), cervical radiculopathy (0.03%), evidence of sympathetic dysfunction (20%), and complex regional pain syndrome (RSD) (0.6%). Hyperlaxity of fingers and elbows was found in over 50%, carpal tunnel syndrome in 8%, radial tunnel syndrome in 7%, cubital tunnel in 64%, shoulder impingement in 13%, medial epicondylitis in 60%, lateral epicondylitis in 33%, and peripheral muscle weakness in 70%. We conclude that despite initial presentation distally, work-related upper-extremity disorders are a diffuse neuromuscular illness with significant proximal upper-body findings that affect distal function

  20. User documentation for KINSOL, a nonlinear solver for sequential and parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A. G., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    KINSOL is a general purpose nonlinear system solver callable from either C or Fortran programs It is based on NKSOL [3], but is written in ANSI-standard C rather than Fortran77 Its most notable feature is that it uses Krylov Inexact Newton techniques in the system`s approximate solution, thus sharing significant modules previously written within CASC at LLNL to support CVODE[6, 7]/PVODE[9, 5] It also requires almost no matrix storage for solving the Newton equations as compared to direct methods The name KINSOL is derived from those techniques Krylov Inexact Newton SOLver The package was arranged so that selecting one of two forms of a single module in the compilation process will allow the entire package to be created in either sequential (serial) or parallel form The parallel version of KINSOL uses MPI (Message-Passing Interface) [8] and an appropriately revised version of the vector module NVECTOR, as mentioned above, to achieve parallelism and portability KINSOL in parallel form is intended for the SPMD (Single Program Multiple Data) model with distributed memory, in which all vectors are identically distributed across processors In particular, the vector module NVECTOR is designed to help the user assign a contiguous segment of a given vector to each of the processors for parallel computation Several primitives were added to NVECTOR as originally written for PVODE to implement KINSOL KINSOL has been run on a Cray-T3D, an eight- processor DEC ALPHA and a cluster of workstations It is currently being used in a simulation of tokamak edge plasmas and in groundwater two-phase flow studies at LLNL The remainder of this paper is organized as follows Section 2 sets the mathematical notation and summarizes the basic methods Section 3 summarizes the organization of the KINSOL solver, while Section 4 summarizes its usage Section 5 describes a preconditioner module, Section 6 describes a set of Fortran/C interfaces, Section 7 describes an example problem, and Section 8

  1. User-programmer dialogue: Guidelines for designing menus and help files for interactive computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    This document is a set of guidelines to aid a programmer in making the various decisions necessary for a clear user-programmer dialogue. Its goal is to promote an effective and efficient transfer of information between programmer and user. These guidelines are divided into four sections: (1) Format, (2) Sequence, (3) Audience, and (4) Aim. Format, in terms of this study, means the spatial and structural presentation of information. Sequence deals with the procedural aspects of multiple panel displays. This section looks at the issues of timelines of presentation, modularization of information, and patterns of user behavior. Audience looks at the relationship among programmer, user, and message. It covers the issues of analyzing the audience's knowledge, attitudes, and needs, anticipating the audience's inferences, and identifying textual ambiguities. The programmer's aim or intention shows up in everything from tone to format. Aim considers the programmer's purpose.

  2. Computer-based guidelines for concrete pavements : HIPERPAV III : user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This user manual provides guidance on how to use the new High PERformance PAVing (HIPERPAV) III software program for the analysis of early-age Portland cement concrete pavement (PCCP) behavior. HIPERPAV III includes several improvements over prev...

  3. NASA Enterprise Managed Cloud Computing (EMCC): Delivering an Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for NASA use of Commercial Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, Ames supported the NASA CIO in delivering an initial operating capability for Agency use of commercial cloud computing. This presentation provides an overview of the project, the services approach followed, and the major components of the capability that was delivered. The presentation is being given at the request of Amazon Web Services to a contingent representing the Brazilian Federal Government and Defense Organization that is interested in the use of Amazon Web Services (AWS). NASA is currently a customer of AWS and delivered the Initial Operating Capability using AWS as its first commercial cloud provider. The IOC, however, designed to also support other cloud providers in the future.

  4. Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

    2009-05-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

  5. A usability study of users' perceptions toward a multimedia computer-assisted learning tool for neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J; Terrell, Mark A; Fleming, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This usability study evaluated users' perceptions of a multimedia prototype for a new e-learning tool: Anatomy of the Central Nervous System: A Multimedia Course. Usability testing is a collection of formative evaluation methods that inform the developmental design of e-learning tools to maximize user acceptance, satisfaction, and adoption. Sixty-two study participants piloted the prototype and completed a usability questionnaire designed to measure two usability properties: program need and program applicability. Statistical analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the multimedia prototype was well designed and highly usable, it was perceived as: (1) highly needed across a spectrum of educational contexts, (2) highly applicable in supporting the pedagogical processes of teaching and learning neuroanatomy, and (3) was highly usable by all types of users. Three independent variables represented user differences: level of expertise (faculty vs. student), age, and gender. Analysis of the results supports the research hypotheses that the prototype was designed well for different types of users in various educational contexts and for supporting the pedagogy of neuroanatomy. In addition, the results suggest that the multimedia program will be most useful as a neuroanatomy review tool for health-professions students preparing for licensing or board exams. This study demonstrates the importance of integrating quality properties of usability with principles of human learning during the instructional design process for multimedia products.

  6. Position of document holder and work related risk factors for neck pain among computer users: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambusam, S; Baharudin, O; Roslizawati, N; Leonard, J

    2015-01-01

    Document holder is used as a remedy to address occupational neck pain among computer users. An understanding on the effects of the document holder along with other work related risk factors while working in computer workstation requires attention. A comprehensive knowledge on the optimal location of the document holder in computer use and associated work related factors that may contribute to neck pain reviewed in this article. A literature search has been conducted over the past 14 years based on the published articles from January 1990 to January 2014 in both Science Direct and PubMed databases. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords for search were neck muscle OR head posture OR muscle tension' OR muscle activity OR work related disorders OR neck pain AND/OR document location OR document holder OR source document OR copy screen holder.Document holder placed lateral to the screen was most preferred to reduce neck discomfort among occupational typists. Document without a holder was placed flat on the surface is least preferred. The head posture and muscle activity increases when the document is placed flat on the surface compared to when placed on the document holder. Work related factors such as static posture, repetitive movement, prolong sitting and awkward positions were the risk factors for chronic neck pain. This review highlights the optimal location for document holder for computer users to reduce neck pain. Together, the importance of work related risk factors for to neck pain on occupational typist is emphasized for the clinical management.

  7. User's manual for the generalized computer program system. Open-channel flow and sedimentation, TABS-2. Main text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, W. A.; McAnally, W. H., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    TABS-2 is a generalized numerical modeling system for open-channel flows, sedimentation, and constituent transport. It consists of more than 40 computer programs to perform modeling and related tasks. The major modeling components--RMA-2V, STUDH, and RMA-4--calculate two-dimensional, depth-averaged flows, sedimentation, and dispersive transport, respectively. The other programs in the system perform digitizing, mesh generation, data management, graphical display, output analysis, and model interfacing tasks. Utilities include file management and automatic generation of computer job control instructions. TABS-2 has been applied to a variety of waterways, including rivers, estuaries, bays, and marshes. It is designed for use by engineers and scientists who may not have a rigorous computer background. Use of the various components is described in Appendices A-O. The bound version of the report does not include the appendices. A looseleaf form with Appendices A-O is distributed to system users.

  8. Using Qualitative Methods to Create a Home Health Web Application User Interface for Patients with Low Computer Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Rosa R; Cooper, Emily; Wysocki, Andrea; Gravenstein, Stefan; Clark, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Despite the investment in public reporting for a number of healthcare settings, evidence indicates that consumers do not routinely use available data to select providers. This suggests that existing reports do not adequately incorporate recommendations for consumer-facing reports or web applications. Healthcentric Advisors and Brown University undertook a multi-phased approach to create a consumer-facing home health web application in Rhode Island. This included reviewing the evidence base review to identify design recommendations and then creating a paper prototype and wireframe. We performed qualitative research to iteratively test our proposed user interface with two user groups, home health consumers and hospital case managers, refining our design to create the final web application. To test our prototype, we conducted two focus groups, with a total of 13 consumers, and 28 case manager interviews. Both user groups responded favorably to the prototype, with the majority commenting that they felt this type of tool would be useful. Case managers suggested revisions to ensure the application conformed to laws requiring Medicare patients to have the freedom to choose among providers and could be incorporated into hospital workflow. After incorporating changes and creating the wireframe, we conducted usability testing interviews with 14 home health consumers and six hospital case managers. We found that consumers needed prompting to navigate through the wireframe; they demonstrated confusion through both their words and body language. As a result, we modified the web application's sequence, navigation, and function to provide additional instructions and prompts. Although we designed our web application for low literacy and low health literacy, using recommendations from the evidence base, we overestimated the extent to which older adults were familiar with using computers. Some of our key learnings and recommendations run counter to general web design principles

  9. Asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface to control a virtual environment: initial tests on end users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, Fabio; Schettini, Francesca; Aricò, Pietro; Salinari, Serenella; Guger, Christoph; Rinsma, Johanna; Aiello, Marco; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2011-10-01

    Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system was recently validated with the participation of healthy young volunteers for environmental control. In this study, the asynchronous P300-based BCI for the interaction with a virtual home environment was tested with the participation of potential end-users (clients of a Frisian home care organization) with limited autonomy due to ageing and/or motor disabilities. System testing revealed that the minimum number of stimulation sequences needed to achieve correct classification had a higher intra-subject variability in potential end-users with respect to what was previously observed in young controls. Here we show that the asynchronous modality performed significantly better as compared to the synchronous mode in continuously adapting its speed to the users' state. Furthermore, the asynchronous system modality confirmed its reliability in avoiding misclassifications and false positives, as previously shown in young healthy subjects. The asynchronous modality may contribute to filling the usability gap between BCI systems and traditional input devices, representing an important step towards their use in the activities of daily living.

  10. A Review of Brain-Computer Interface Games and an Opinion Survey from Researchers, Developers and Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyu Ahn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology for healthy users has attracted considerable interest, and BCI games are especially popular. This study reviews the current status of, and describes future directions, in the field of BCI games. To this end, we conducted a literature search and found that BCI control paradigms using electroencephalographic signals (motor imagery, P300, steady state visual evoked potential and passive approach reading mental state have been the primary focus of research. We also conducted a survey of nearly three hundred participants that included researchers, game developers and users around the world. From this survey, we found that all three groups (researchers, developers and users agreed on the significant influence and applicability of BCI and BCI games, and they all selected prostheses, rehabilitation and games as the most promising BCI applications. User and developer groups tended to give low priority to passive BCI and the whole head sensor array. Developers gave higher priorities to “the easiness of playing” and the “development platform” as important elements for BCI games and the market. Based on our assessment, we discuss the critical point at which BCI games will be able to progress from their current stage to widespread marketing to consumers. In conclusion, we propose three critical elements important for expansion of the BCI game market: standards, gameplay and appropriate integration.

  11. A review of brain-computer interface games and an opinion survey from researchers, developers and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minkyu; Lee, Mijin; Choi, Jinyoung; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-08-11

    In recent years, research on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology for healthy users has attracted considerable interest, and BCI games are especially popular. This study reviews the current status of, and describes future directions, in the field of BCI games. To this end, we conducted a literature search and found that BCI control paradigms using electroencephalographic signals (motor imagery, P300, steady state visual evoked potential and passive approach reading mental state) have been the primary focus of research. We also conducted a survey of nearly three hundred participants that included researchers, game developers and users around the world. From this survey, we found that all three groups (researchers, developers and users) agreed on the significant influence and applicability of BCI and BCI games, and they all selected prostheses, rehabilitation and games as the most promising BCI applications. User and developer groups tended to give low priority to passive BCI and the whole head sensor array. Developers gave higher priorities to "the easiness of playing" and the "development platform" as important elements for BCI games and the market. Based on our assessment, we discuss the critical point at which BCI games will be able to progress from their current stage to widespread marketing to consumers. In conclusion, we propose three critical elements important for expansion of the BCI game market: standards, gameplay and appropriate integration.

  12. The relationship between psychosocial work factors, work stress and computer-related musculoskeletal discomforts among computer users in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerian, Seyed Abolfazl; Subramaniam, Indra Devi

    2009-01-01

    Increasing numbers of workers use computer for work. So, especially among office workers, there is a high risk of musculoskeletal discomforts. This study examined the associations among 3 factors, psychosocial work factors, work stress and musculoskeletal discomforts. These associations were examined via a questionnaire survey on 30 office workers (at a university in Malaysia), whose jobs required an extensive use of computers. The questionnaire was distributed and collected daily for 20 days. While the results indicated a significant relationship among psychosocial work factors, work stress and musculoskeletal discomfort, 3 psychosocial work factors were found to be more important than others in both work stress and musculoskeletal discomfort: job demands, negative social interaction and computer-related problems. To further develop study design, it is necessary to investigate industrial and other workers who have experienced musculoskeletal discomforts and work stress.

  13. TRANSFORMING RURAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ZIMBABWE THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: LIVED EXPERIENCES OF STUDENT COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomba Clifford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A technological divide exists in Zimbabwe between urban and rural schools that puts rural based students at a disadvantage. In Zimbabwe, the government, through the president donated computers to most rural schools in a bid to bridge the digital divide between rural and urban schools. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of Advanced Level students using computers at two rural boarding Catholic High Schools in Zimbabwe. The study was guided by two research questions: (1 How do Advanced level students in the rural areas use computers at their school? and (2 What is the experience of using computers for Advanced Level students in the rural areas of Zimbabwe? By performing this study, it was possible to understand from the students’ experiences whether computer usage was for educational learning or not. The results of the phenomenological study showed that students’ experiences can be broadly classified into five themes, namely worthwhile (interesting experience, accessibility issues, teachers’ monopoly, research and social use, and Internet availability. The participants proposed teachers use computers, but not monopolize computer usage. The solution to the computer shortage may be solved by having donors and government help in the acquisitioning of more computers.

  14. Implementation of an emergency department computer system: design features that users value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batley, Nicholas J; Osman, Hibah O; Kazzi, Amin A; Musallam, Khaled M

    2011-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) can potentially improve the efficiency and effectiveness of patient care, especially in the emergency department (ED) setting. Multiple barriers to implementation of EMR have been described. One important barrier is physician resistance. The "ED Dashboard" is an EMR developed in a busy tertiary care hospital ED. Its implementation was exceptionally smooth and successful. We set out to examine the design features used in the development of the system and assess which of these features played an important role in the successful implementation of the ED Dashboard. An anonymous survey of users of the ED Dashboard was conducted in January and February 2009 to evaluate their perceptions of the degree of success of the implementation and the importance of the design features used in that success. Results were analyzed using SPSS software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Of the 188 end-users approached, 175 (93%) completed the survey. Despite minimal training in the use of the system, 163 (93%) perceived the system as easy or extremely easy to use. Users agreed that the design features employed were important contributors to the system's success. Being alerted when new test results were ready, the use of "most common" lists, and the use of color were features that were considered valuable to users. Success of a medical information system in a busy ED is, in part, dependent on careful attention to subtle details of system design. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding Usefulness in Human-Computer Interaction to Enhance User Experience Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Craig Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The concept of usefulness has implicitly played a pivotal role in evaluation research, but the meaning of usefulness has changed over time from system reliability to user performance and learnability/ease of use for non-experts. Despite massive technical and social changes, usability remains the "gold standard" for system evaluation.…

  16. Understanding and mastering dynamics in computing grids: processing moldable tasks with user-level overlay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mościcki, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of scientific users witness every day inherent instabilities and bottlenecks of large-scale task processing systems: lost or incomplete jobs and hard-to-predict completion times. They are struggling to resubmit failed jobs and get consistent results. And it is always difficult to catch up

  17. User’s Guide for the SAS (Stand-Off Attack Simulation) Computer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-15

    After data base files nave * At beens lrit !alizel, this 4ueStion IS aaan aSKed an6 St that Point the * user *111 enter the startinct an-’ endino... Ocean Systems Center General Research Corp ATTN: Research Library ATTN: P. Lowry ATTN: H. Schroeder Naval Postgraduate School ATTN: Code 1424, Library

  18. Gestalt Computing and the Study of Content-Oriented User Behavior on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandari, Roja

    2013-01-01

    Elementary actions online establish an individual's existence on the web and her/his orientation toward different issues. In this sense, actions truly define a user in spaces like online forums and communities and the aggregate of elementary actions shape the atmosphere of these online spaces. This observation, coupled with the unprecedented scale…

  19. Closing the Gap between Methodologists and End-Users: R as a Computational Back-End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron C. Wallace

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The R environment provides a natural platform for developing new statistical methods due to the mathematical expressiveness of the language, the large number of existing libraries, and the active developer community. One drawback to R, however, is the learning curve; programming is a deterrent to non-technical users, who typically prefer graphical user interfaces (GUIs to command line environments. Thus, while statisticians develop new methods in R, practitioners are often behind in terms of the statistical techniques they use as they rely on GUI applications. Meta-analysis is an instructive example; cutting-edge meta-analysis methods are often ignored by the overwhelming majority of practitioners, in part because they have no easy way of applying them. This paper proposes a strategy to close the gap between the statistical state-of-the-science and what is applied in practice. We present open-source meta-analysis software that uses R as the underlying statistical engine, and Python for the GUI. We present a framework that allows methodologists to implement new methods in R that are then automatically integrated into the GUI for use by end-users, so long as the programmer conforms to our interface. Such an approach allows an intuitive interface for non-technical users while leveraging the latest advanced statistical methods implemented by methodologists.

  20. End-User Service Computing: Spreadsheets as a Service Composition Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Obrenovic; D. Gasevic

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we show how spreadsheets, an end-user development paradigm proven to be highly productive and simple to learn and use, can be used for complex service compositions. We identify the requirements for spreadsheet-based service composition, and present our framework that

  1. Collaborative Systems and Multi-user Interfaces: Computer-based Tools for Cooperative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-31

    a sug gestion that the item at the link tail should be presented before the it em at the link head. This may well be accompanied by verbal...database. Cognoter is an attempt to circumvent the usual t um-taking by allowing users to act simultaneously. Participants at persona l workstations

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  3. Mind the Sheep! User Experience Evaluation & Brain-Computer Interface Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) infers our actions (e.g. a movement), intentions (e.g. preparation for a movement) and psychological states (e.g. emotion, attention) by interpreting our brain signals. It uses the inferences it makes to manipulate a computer. Although BCIs have long been used

  4. A survey of common habits of computer users as indicators of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hygiene has been recognized as an infection control strategy and the extent of the problems of environmental contamination largely depends on personal hygiene. With the development of several computer applications in recent times, the uses of computer systems have greatly expanded. And with the previous history of ...

  5. International Computer and Information Literacy Study: ICILS 2013 User Guide for the International Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Michael, Ed.; Carstens, Ralph, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) 2013, conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), studied how students in different countries develop the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, dispositions, and skills that comprise computer and information literacy (CIL). The aim…

  6. User transparent data and task parallel multimedia computing with Pyxis-DT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kessel, T.P.; van Werkhoven, B.; Drost, N.; Maassen, J.; Bal, H.E.; Seinstra, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    The research area of Multimedia Content Analysis (MMCA) considers all aspects of the automated extraction of knowledge from multimedia archives and data streams. To satisfy the increasing computational demands of emerging MMCA problems, there is an urgent need to apply High Performance Computing

  7. Ergonomics standards and guidelines for computer workstation design and the impact on users' health - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, E H C; White, P; Lai, C W K

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of global ergonomics standards and guidelines for design of computer workstations, with particular focus on their inconsistency and associated health risk impact. Overall, considerable disagreements were found in the design specifications of computer workstations globally, particularly in relation to the results from previous ergonomics research and the outcomes from current ergonomics standards and guidelines. To cope with the rapid advancement in computer technology, this article provides justifications and suggestions for modifications in the current ergonomics standards and guidelines for the design of computer workstations. Practitioner Summary: A research gap exists in ergonomics standards and guidelines for computer workstations. We explore the validity and generalisability of ergonomics recommendations by comparing previous ergonomics research through to recommendations and outcomes from current ergonomics standards and guidelines.

  8. Effects of using a device for self-measurement of cervical ROM on neck pain of computer user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using a device for the self-measurement of cervical range of motion on neck pain experienced by a computer user. [Subject] A 39-year-old male subject with neck pain caused by working on a computer was selected for the study. [Methods] The instrument was developed for the study, and that the instrument is used to self-measure cervical range of movement. The subject was trained in self-measurement procedures and a self-exercise program for two months, and pain was controlled through self-assessment and a program. The pressure pain threshold for the upper trapezius muscle, and cervical ranges of motion were measured prior to and after the 2-month period of pain control. [Results] At the conclusion of self-measurement and the self-exercise program, the pressure pain threshold was higher than the initial pressure pain threshold, and all cervical ranges of motion increased compared to the initial cervical ranges of motion. [Conclusion] This result shows that the self-management device for cervical ROM is an effective tool for pain management for computer users with cervical pain.

  9. Flowing Hot or Cold: User-Friendly Computational Models of Terrestrial and Planetary Lava Channels and Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary volcanism has redefined what is considered volcanism. "Magma" now may be considered to be anything from the molten rock familiar at terrestrial volcanoes to cryovolcanic ammonia-water mixes erupted on an outer solar system moon. However, even with unfamiliar compositions and source mechanisms, we find familiar landforms such as volcanic channels, lakes, flows, and domes and thus a multitude of possibilities for modeling. As on Earth, these landforms lend themselves to analysis for estimating storage, eruption and/or flow rates. This has potential pitfalls, as extension of the simplified analytic models we often use for terrestrial features into unfamiliar parameter space might yield misleading results. Our most commonly used tools for estimating flow and cooling have tended to lag significantly behind state-of-the-art; the easiest methods to use are neither realistic or accurate, but the more realistic and accurate computational methods are not simple to use. Since the latter computational tools tend to be both expensive and require a significant learning curve, there is a need for a user-friendly approach that still takes advantage of their accuracy. One method is use of the computational package for generation of a server-based tool that allows less computationally inclined users to get accurate results over their range of input parameters for a given problem geometry. A second method is to use the computational package for the generation of a polynomial empirical solution for each class of flow geometry that can be fairly easily solved by anyone with a spreadsheet. In this study, we demonstrate both approaches for several channel flow and lava lake geometries with terrestrial and extraterrestrial examples and compare their results. Specifically, we model cooling rectangular channel flow with a yield strength material, with applications to Mauna Loa, Kilauea, Venus, and Mars. This approach also shows promise with model applications to lava lakes, magma

  10. Towards user-friendly spelling with an auditory brain-computer interface: the CharStreamer paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Höhne

    Full Text Available Realizing the decoding of brain signals into control commands, brain-computer interfaces (BCI aim to establish an alternative communication pathway for locked-in patients. In contrast to most visual BCI approaches which use event-related potentials (ERP of the electroencephalogram, auditory BCI systems are challenged with ERP responses, which are less class-discriminant between attended and unattended stimuli. Furthermore, these auditory approaches have more complex interfaces which imposes a substantial workload on their users. Aiming for a maximally user-friendly spelling interface, this study introduces a novel auditory paradigm: "CharStreamer". The speller can be used with an instruction as simple as "please attend to what you want to spell". The stimuli of CharStreamer comprise 30 spoken sounds of letters and actions. As each of them is represented by the sound of itself and not by an artificial substitute, it can be selected in a one-step procedure. The mental mapping effort (sound stimuli to actions is thus minimized. Usability is further accounted for by an alphabetical stimulus presentation: contrary to random presentation orders, the user can foresee the presentation time of the target letter sound. Healthy, normal hearing users (n = 10 of the CharStreamer paradigm displayed ERP responses that systematically differed between target and non-target sounds. Class-discriminant features, however, varied individually from the typical N1-P2 complex and P3 ERP components found in control conditions with random sequences. To fully exploit the sequential presentation structure of CharStreamer, novel data analysis approaches and classification methods were introduced. The results of online spelling tests showed that a competitive spelling speed can be achieved with CharStreamer. With respect to user rating, it clearly outperforms a control setup with random presentation sequences.

  11. Towards User-Friendly Spelling with an Auditory Brain-Computer Interface: The CharStreamer Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Johannes; Tangermann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Realizing the decoding of brain signals into control commands, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) aim to establish an alternative communication pathway for locked-in patients. In contrast to most visual BCI approaches which use event-related potentials (ERP) of the electroencephalogram, auditory BCI systems are challenged with ERP responses, which are less class-discriminant between attended and unattended stimuli. Furthermore, these auditory approaches have more complex interfaces which imposes a substantial workload on their users. Aiming for a maximally user-friendly spelling interface, this study introduces a novel auditory paradigm: “CharStreamer”. The speller can be used with an instruction as simple as “please attend to what you want to spell”. The stimuli of CharStreamer comprise 30 spoken sounds of letters and actions. As each of them is represented by the sound of itself and not by an artificial substitute, it can be selected in a one-step procedure. The mental mapping effort (sound stimuli to actions) is thus minimized. Usability is further accounted for by an alphabetical stimulus presentation: contrary to random presentation orders, the user can foresee the presentation time of the target letter sound. Healthy, normal hearing users (n = 10) of the CharStreamer paradigm displayed ERP responses that systematically differed between target and non-target sounds. Class-discriminant features, however, varied individually from the typical N1-P2 complex and P3 ERP components found in control conditions with random sequences. To fully exploit the sequential presentation structure of CharStreamer, novel data analysis approaches and classification methods were introduced. The results of online spelling tests showed that a competitive spelling speed can be achieved with CharStreamer. With respect to user rating, it clearly outperforms a control setup with random presentation sequences. PMID:24886978

  12. User Centered System Design: Papers for the CHI � Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    the users. Our current research ectavres focus on both empirical and theoretical developments We have built a working sys- tem (Noteped) to explore in...to explore questions concerning bow to manipulate, save and retrieve contexts. In addition, we are developing the concept of a workspace as an...UtNM is a very large and powerful operating system The goal of the project is twofold: to develop a coceptual comprising over 700 commands. Them

  13. Scaling Task Management in Space and Time: Reducing User Overhead in Ubiquitous-Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    limitation of this approach is that it does not easily scale to large numbers of tasks over extended periods. Busy users may intermittently touch on...RETSINA framework, with applications in domains such as financial portfolio management, ecommerce and military logistics [88]; and more recently Carnegie...complex tasks. Examples can be found in the workflow modeling of business processes, and in some agent-based systems, where the description of the

  14. Computer users' risk factors for developing shoulder, elbow and back symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Søgaard, Karen; Strøyer, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This prospective study concentrated on determining factors of computer work that predict musculoskeletal symptoms in the shoulder, elbow, and low-back regions. METHODS: A questionnaire on ergonomics, work pauses, work techniques, and psychosocial and work factors was delivered to 5033......, and previous symptoms was a significant predictor for symptoms in all regions. Computer worktime and psychosocial dimensions were not significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Influence on work pauses, reduction of glare or reflection, and screen height are important factors in the design of future computer...

  15. An empirical study of end user computing strategy in promoting the nursing informatics in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Che-Wei; Hou, I-Ching; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    Nurses today should not just passively use programs set up for them by MIS professionals, they are capable of creating their own applications to help them do their job. We proposed a framework used to develop a spreadsheet training strategy for nurses. Our experimental studies confirm that trained nurses can become spreadsheet application developers.

  16. A User’s Index to CRREL Land Treatment Computer Programs and Data Files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    56 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1. Structure of the ALEXIS file-------------------------------- 3 2. Structure of the BROOKH sub- UFO ...and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755, for a nominal fee to cover the cost of reproduction . 2. CRREL COMPUTER INSTALLATION The CRREL

  17. A survey of common habits of computer users as indicators of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    internet centers by earlier investigators, who have demonstrated that computer use in schools aids effective teaching and improves students' learning capa- bilities, enhances competent treatment of patients in hospitals, and ...

  18. Urbancontext: A Management Model For Pervasive Environments In User-Oriented Urban Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia L. Zuniga-Canon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, urban computing has gained a lot of interest for guiding the evolution of citiesinto intelligent environments. These environments are appropriated for individuals’ inter-actions changing in their behaviors. These changes require new approaches that allow theunderstanding of how urban computing systems should be modeled.In this work we present UrbanContext, a new model for designing of urban computingplatforms that applies the theory of roles to manage the individual’s context in urban envi-ronments. The theory of roles helps to understand the individual’s behavior within a socialenvironment, allowing to model urban computing systems able to adapt to individuals statesand their needs.UrbanContext collects data in urban atmospheres and classifies individuals’ behaviorsaccording to their change of roles, to optimize social interaction and offer secure services.Likewise, UrbanContext serves as a generic model to provide interoperability, and to facilitatethe design, implementation and expansion of urban computing systems.

  19. Medical and biological and ergonomic aspects of security of personal computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н.Б. Римар-Щербина

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this review article having experiment of decrease of the bad electromagnetic fields influence on the personnel computers customers organism is summed with the help of technical equipment.

  20. Effects of an active ergonomics training program on risk exposure, worker beliefs, and symptoms in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brenda L; DeJoy, David M; Olejnik, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an active ergonomics training (AET) program in computer users. Two constructs from the social-cognitive theory were adopted to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the proximal markers of behavior change. Eighty-seven symptomatic and asymptomatic employees who worked at a computer for a minimum of 10 hours per week took part in a prospective randomized controlled study. Subjects participated in a six-hour training intervention at their workplace. Key elements of the AET intervention were skill development in workstation analysis, active participation, and implementation of multiple prevention strategies. After receiving AET, risk factor exposure was significantly reduced for participants at higher risk [F(1,82) = 6.42, p post-intervention than the control group with pain. Results from this study provide evidence that participative training in workstation ergonomics can improve work postures, work practices, risk factor exposure, and pain.

  1. Conference Report: 18th Conference on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQD 2016: MAXQDA User Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Galan-Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the first week of March 2016, 120 researchers from 12 different countries, including Syria, Japan, the USA and Turkey, met in Berlin (Germany to learn more about their computer-assisted qualitative data analysis skills. The 18th Conference on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQD offered several workshops, a research methods poster session, and the opportunity to share and discuss best practice between attendees, trainers and speakers (informally and through the user forum. The conference also hosted three seminal keynote speakers in two presentations: John CRESWELL, and Udo KUCKARTZ and Stefan RÄDIKER, who shared, respectively, the state of the art of mixed methods and the ways that software can support these approaches. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs170146

  2. User's guide for a personal computer model of turbulence at a wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.R.; Powell, D.C.; Gower, G.L.

    1989-08-01

    This document is primarily (1) a user's guide for the personal computer (PC) version of the code for the PNL computational model of the rotationally sampled wind speed (RODASIM11) and (2) a brief guide to the growing literature on the subject of rotationally sampled turbulence, from which the model is derived. The model generates values of turbulence experienced by single points fixed in the rotating frame of reference of an arbitrary wind turbine blade. The character of the turbulence depends on the specification of mean wind speed, the variance of turbulence, the crosswind and along-wind integral scales of turbulence, mean wind shear, and the hub height, radius, and angular speed of rotation of any point at which wind fluctuation is to be calculated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  4. The Environmental Impacts of a Desktop Computer: Influence of Choice of Functional Unit, System Boundary and User Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovska, J.; Šteina, Māra; Valters, K.; Bažbauers, G.

    2009-01-01

    The pollution prevention during the design phase of products and processes in environmental policy gains its importance over the other, more historically known principle - pollution reduction in the end-of-pipe. This approach requires prediction of potential environmental impacts to be avoided or reduced and a prioritisation of the most efficient areas for action. Currently the most appropriate method for this purpose is life cycle assessment (LCA)- a method for accounting and attributing all environmental impacts which arise during the life time of a product, starting with the production of raw materials and ending with the disposal, or recycling of the wasted product at the end of life. The LCA, however, can be misleading if the performers of the study disregard gaps of information and the limitations of the chosen methodology. During the study we researched the environmental impact of desktop computers, using a simplified LCA method - Indicators' 99, and by developing various scenarios (changing service life, user behaviour, energy supply etc). The study demonstrates that actions for improvements lie in very different areas. The study also concludes that the approach of defining functional unit must be sufficiently flexible in order to avoid discounting areas of potential actions. Therefore, with regard to computers we agree with other authors using the functional unit "one computer" but suggest not to bind this to service life or usage time, but to develop several scenarios varying these parameters. The study also demonstrates the importance of a systemic approach when assessing complex product systems - as more complex the system is, the more broad the scope for potential actions. We conclude that, regarding computers, which belong to energy using and material- intensive products, the measures to reduce environmental impacts lie not only with the producer and user of the particular product, but also with the whole national energy supply and waste management

  5. Development traumatic brain injury computer user interface for disaster area in Indonesia supported by emergency broadband access network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiono, Agung Budi; Suwa, Hirohiko; Ohta, Toshizumi; Arifin, Muh Zafrullah; Kitamura, Yohei; Yoshida, Kazunari; Merdika, Daduk; Qiantori, Andri; Iskandar

    2012-12-01

    Disasters bring consequences of negative impacts on the environment and human life. One of the common cause of critical condition is traumatic brain injury (TBI), namely, epidural (EDH) and subdural hematoma (SDH), due to downfall hard things during earthquake. We proposed and analyzed the user response, namely neurosurgeon, general doctor/surgeon and nurse when they interacted with TBI computer interface. The communication systems was supported by TBI web based applications using emergency broadband access network with tethered balloon and simulated in the field trial to evaluate the coverage area. The interface consisted of demography data and multi tabs for anamnesis, treatment, follow up and teleconference interfaces. The interface allows neurosurgeon, surgeon/general doctors and nurses to entry the EDH and SDH patient's data during referring them on the emergency simulation and evaluated based on time needs and their understanding. The average time needed was obtained after simulated by Lenovo T500 notebook using mouse; 8-10 min for neurosurgeons, 12-15 min for surgeons/general doctors and 15-19 min for nurses. By using Think Pad X201 Tablet, the time needed for entry data was 5-7 min for neurosurgeon, 7-10 min for surgeons/general doctors and 12-16 min for nurses. We observed that the time difference was depending on the computer type and user literacy qualification as well as their understanding on traumatic brain injury, particularly for the nurses. In conclusion, there are five data classification for simply TBI GUI, namely, 1) demography, 2) specific anamnesis for EDH and SDH, 3) treatment action and medicine of TBI, 4) follow up data display and 5) teleneurosurgery for streaming video consultation. The type of computer, particularly tablet PC was more convenient and faster for entry data, compare to that computer mouse touched pad. Emergency broadband access network using tethered balloon is possible to be employed to cover the communications systems in

  6. Graphical Visualization of Human Exploration Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Erica M.; Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale C.; Simon, Matthew A.; Williams, Phillip A.; Barsoum, Christopher; Cowan, Tyler; Larman, Kevin T.; Hay, Jason; Burg, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NASA's pioneering space strategy will require advanced capabilities to expand the boundaries of human exploration on the Journey to Mars (J2M). The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) architecture serves as a framework to identify critical capabilities that need to be developed and tested in order to enable a range of human exploration destinations and missions. Agency-wide System Maturation Teams (SMT) are responsible for the maturation of these critical exploration capabilities and help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the EMC-identified capabilities. Systems Capability Organization Reporting Engine boards (SCOREboards) were developed to integrate the SMT data sets into cohesive human exploration capability stories that can be used to promote dialog and communicate NASA's exploration investments. Each SCOREboard provides a graphical visualization of SMT capability development needs that enable exploration missions, and presents a comprehensive overview of data that outlines a roadmap of system maturation needs critical for the J2M. SCOREboards are generated by a computer program that extracts data from a main repository, sorts the data based on a tiered data reduction structure, and then plots the data according to specified user inputs. The ability to sort and plot varying data categories provides the flexibility to present specific SCOREboard capability roadmaps based on customer requests. This paper presents the development of the SCOREboard computer program and shows multiple complementary, yet different datasets through a unified format designed to facilitate comparison between datasets. Example SCOREboard capability roadmaps are presented followed by a discussion of how the roadmaps are used to: 1) communicate capability developments and readiness of systems for future missions, and 2) influence the definition of NASA's human exploration investment portfolio through capability-driven processes. The paper concludes with a description

  7. Ergonomic risk factors and physical discomfort in laptop-computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors for discomfort in laptop users. Subjective feeling, load level, intensity and frequency of discomfort were examined. The study included 186 subjects. In the first phase participants completed a questionnaire about the subjective feeling of discomfort and specifics of laptop usage, while in the second phase 10 participants were observed while working on a laptop. Upper body postures were assessed with the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA technique. Nearly one fifth of respondents showed a higher incidence of discomfort. Majority of subjects reported wrong sitting posture and unusual body postures as main factors that increase discomfort after laptop usage. After using a laptop, discomfort increases primarily in the neck, with risk factors being working for several hours continuously, in the environments with no fixed area for device placement and without using the external devices. In most positions neck extension/ flexion was noticed as a result of the specific device design. Discomfort is increased in the back, although somewhat less than in the neck. Risk factors are amplified while working continuously for several hours, working for more than five hours and in postures like sitting on the bench and without external devices. Discomfort also increases in hand wrist, in users who mostly sit on fixed surfaces. The RULA observation has shown that the risk is the greatest in the following positions: when laptop is used while sitting on the floor, lying down, and with the device on the lap. The findings have important implications for improving laptop users' wellbeing in contemporary work environment.

  8. A computer program with graphical user interface to plot the multigroup cross sections of WIMS-D library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, T.K. E-mail: tktr@roltanet.com; Ganesan, S. E-mail: tktr@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Jagannathan, V. E-mail: vjagan@magnum.barc.ernet.invjagan@bom5.vsnl.net.in; Karthikeyan, R. E-mail: rkarthi@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2002-09-01

    As a result of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme entitled 'Final Stage of the WIMS Library Update Project', new and updated WIMS-D libraries based upon ENDF/B-VI.5, JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2 have become available. A project to prepare an exhaustive handbook of WIMS-D cross sections from old and new libraries has been taken up by the authors. As part of this project, we have developed a computer program XnWlup with user-friendly graphical interface to help the users of WIMS-D library to enable quick visualization of the plots of the energy dependence of the multigroup cross sections of any nuclide of interest. This software enables the user to generate and view the histogram of 69 multi-group cross sections as a function of neutron energy under Microsoft Windows environment. This software is designed using Microsoft Visual C++ and Microsoft Foundation Classes Library. The current features of the software, on-line help manual and future plans for further development are described in this paper.

  9. Modeling Goal-Directed User Exploration in Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    and use. A more contemporary example is the World-Wide-Web (WWW or Web), where users may be skilled in general website navigation, but lack prior...Hornof (2008) began to investigate the effect of semantic grouping on visual search by using meaningful group and text labels (e.g. “ jewelry ”, “anklet...as AutoCWW also used the same, the TASA corpus may no longer be suitable for more contemporary tasks. Imagine using CogTool-Explorer to model a

  10. Markov Chain Computation for Homogeneous and Non-homogeneous Data: MARCH 1.1 Users Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Berchtold

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available MARCH is a free software for the computation of different types of Markovian models including homogeneous Markov Chains, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs and Double Chain Markov Models (DCMMs. The main characteristic of this software is the implementation of a powerful optimization method for HMMs and DCMMs combining a genetic algorithm with the standard Baum-Welch procedure. MARCH is distributed as a set of Matlab functions running under Matlab 5 or higher on any computing platform. A PC Windows version running independently from Matlab is also available.

  11. FORTRAN Automated Code Evaluation System (faces) system documentation, version 2, mod 0. [error detection codes/user manuals (computer programs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A system is presented which processes FORTRAN based software systems to surface potential problems before they become execution malfunctions. The system complements the diagnostic capabilities of compilers, loaders, and execution monitors rather than duplicating these functions. Also, it emphasizes frequent sources of FORTRAN problems which require inordinate manual effort to identify. The principle value of the system is extracting small sections of unusual code from the bulk of normal sequences. Code structures likely to cause immediate or future problems are brought to the user's attention. These messages stimulate timely corrective action of solid errors and promote identification of 'tricky' code. Corrective action may require recoding or simply extending software documentation to explain the unusual technique.

  12. Teaching End-User Applications with Computer-Based Training: Theory and an Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Brent J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the current literature and describes a study of computer-based training (CBT) effectiveness for teaching microcomputer software in a college-level business class. Students were divided into an experimental class (using CBT) and a control group (using traditional lectures). Results indicated experimental students perform as well as control…

  13. User-Friendly, Syntax Directed Input to a Computer Aided Design System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    language. One was havi.ng the designer enter subrcutirenJformaticn using the algorithmic language, with an edircr then translating the input to CSD/Ada...nr erence on ¢camut_.s an Commu=ti-.-p. 74. Manwariag, 1. L., "A Compute= A.ded Aproach tc the Design of Digita I System Conrliers Using

  14. Computed Ontology-based Situation Awareness of Multi-User Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitrianie, S.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed a framework of human-computer interaction that offers recognition of various communication modalities including speech, lip movement, facial expression, handwriting/drawing, gesture, text and visual symbols. The framework allows the rapid construction of a

  15. Computer Assisted Medical Diagnosis (CAMD) System. Version 1.0. User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    JOHN SSN 123-45-6789 Diseases on File <Complaint > APPENDL1X iT!rS~ A <Sym NONS ECIAICABDOMINAL PAIN sist> -VA RENAL COLIC AGE PERFORATED DUODENAL ... ULCERA CHOLECYSTITIS SMALL BOWEL OBSTRUCTION PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE MESENTERIC ADENITIS DIVERTICULITIS V <S;e > < View > <Cancel> Computer Assisted Medical

  16. User-Computer Interfaces for Scientific Communication: the Concept of Habitable Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchanau, A.V.

    Developments in computer technology have changed the way we communicate in general and in science in particular. These developments enable the increase in the effectiveness and efficiency of the communication. The actual increase will depend also on the fit between technology and people who are

  17. Human-Computer Interaction for BCI Games: Usability and User Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Reuderink, B.; van de Laar, B.L.A.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Mühl, C.; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Sourin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) come with a lot of issues, such as delays, bad recognition, long training times, and cumbersome hardware. Gamers are a large potential target group for this new interaction modality, but why would healthy subjects want to use it? BCI provides a combination of

  18. Atherosclerotic plaque burden in cocaine users with acute chest pain : Analysis by coronary computed tomography angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebersberger, Ullrich; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Bamberg, Fabian; Tricarico, Francesco; Apfaltrer, Paul; Blanke, Philipp; Schindler, Andreas; Makowski, Marcus R.; Headden, Gary F.; Leber, Alexander W.; Hoffmann, Ellen; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    Chest pain associated with cocaine use represents an increasing problem in the emergency department (ED). Cocaine use has been linked to the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We used coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) to evaluate the prevalence,

  19. Detection of User Independent Single Trial ERPs in Brain Computer Interfaces: An Adaptive Spatial Filtering Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leza, Cristina; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2017-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to communicate with the external world. The main challenges to address are speed, accuracy and adaptability. Here, a novel algorithm for P300 based BCI spelling system is presented, specifically suited for single-trial detection of Event...

  20. The Influence Of Quality Services And The Human Resources Development To User Satisfaction For Accounting Computer Study At Local Government Officials Depok West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asyari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The benefit that is felt directly by the customer in using a computer accounting program into an expectation of users to a product produced by an accounting information system . the existence of accounting system will provide convenience in processing accounting data into an output of financial statements . investors and the public will be easy to read and profit earnings results thanks to sales of computer usage accounting . This study intends to seek clarity from the influence of quality of services and human resource development of the accounting computer user satisfaction . object of research is the environment of local government officials Depok West Java . The results showed that the effect on the service user satisfaction . And development of employees a significant effect on user satisfaction

  1. Capability Paternalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, R.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    A capability approach prescribes paternalist government actions to the extent that it requires the promotion of specific functionings, instead of the corresponding capabilities. Capability theorists have argued that their theories do not have much of these paternalist implications, since promoting

  2. The TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) computer code user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the confinement and transport of plasma in a magnetic mirror device, including tandem mirror configurations. Mirror plasmas may be modeled in a system which includes an applied magnetic field and/or a self-consistent or applied electrostatic potential. The PIC code TESS is similar to the PIC code DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) which is designed to study plasma transport to and interaction with a solid surface. The codes TESS and DIPSI are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. The DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) computer code user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the interaction of plasma with a solid surface, such as a limiter or divertor plate in a tokamak fusion device. Plasma confinement and transport may be studied in a system which includes an applied magnetic field (oriented normal to the solid surface) and/or a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The PIC code DIPSI is an offshoot of the PIC code TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) which was developed to study plasma confinement in mirror devices. The codes DIPSI and TESS are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Capability of the People’s Republic of China to Conduct Cyber Warfare and Computer Network Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-09

    capabilities or profile of virtually all organized cybercriminal enterprises and is difficult at best without some type of state-sponsorship. The type...of information often targeted for exfiltration has no inherent monetary value to cybercriminals like credit card numbers or bank account information...latitude for cybercriminal activities. The amendment also added a section criminalizing the creation and dissemination of malicious software.78

  5. The Identification, Implementation, and Evaluation of Critical User Interface Design Features of Computer-Assisted Instruction Programs in Mathematics for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, You-Jin; Woo, Honguk

    2010-01-01

    Critical user interface design features of computer-assisted instruction programs in mathematics for students with learning disabilities and corresponding implementation guidelines were identified in this study. Based on the identified features and guidelines, a multimedia computer-assisted instruction program, "Math Explorer", which delivers…

  6. Computational Intelligence for User and Data Classification in Hospital Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadian, Masoud; Hatzinakos, Dimitrios; Spachos, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Part 3: Second International Workshop on Computational Intelligence in Software Engineering (CISE 2012); International audience; Lives are saved by utilization and application of the latest technologies in hospitals around the world to improve patient treatments and well being. Secure, accurate, near real time data acquisition and analysis of patient data and the ability to update such data will reduce cost and improve the quality of patient’s care. This paper considers a wireless framework b...

  7. User Identification Roadmap towards 2020 : A study of personal identification challenges for ubiquitous computing world

    OpenAIRE

    Pour, Shiva. Abdi Farzaneh

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is about Personal Identification challenges towards Ubiquitous Computing world as targeted in 2020. The study starts by defining the problems that how diversity of tools for personal identification as an always-foreground activity is problematic in order to become a pervasive interaction. The thesis is divided into three parts. Part one is introduction, background and related works. Part two will describe the empirical study—Triangulation— that is supported by qualitative and quan...

  8. Computer games for user engagement in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) monitoring and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Craven, Michael P.; Groom, Madeleine J.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer games and psychological tests for symptom monitoring and therapy in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are explored and reviewed. Three foci for research studies are identified: task (human performance) focus; educational focus; medical/clinical focus. \\ud \\ud It is found that game designs in the literature include a variety of tests of cognition mostly dependent on attention and executive functions (inhibitory motor control, working memory, interference...

  9. The convergence of robotics, vision, and computer graphics for user interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerback, J.M.; Thompson, W.B.; Shirley, P.

    1999-11-01

    Mechanical interfaces to virtual environments and the creation of virtual environments represent important and relatively new application areas for robotics. The creation of immersive interfaces will require codevelopment of visual displays that complement mechanical stimuli with appropriate visual cues, ultimately determined from human psychophysics. Advances in interactive rendering and geometric modeling form computer graphics will play a key role. Examples are drawn from haptic and locomotion interface projects.

  10. User’s Guide: Computer Program for Three-Dimensional Analysis of Building Systems (CTABS80).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    computer program TABS (1,2,3) was the direct " feedback " from the profession in the use of these programs. The first of these programs, FRMSTC, is a static...II. ~ gil a gilt eig gggg go gte *,0 glee 10 eeC ’MO * eel a 10 III. * il - C a iii - - egg’ a *. - let 4 0 a gill tel 4 C - - tie 10 lii

  11. Trapezius muscle rest time during standardised computer work--a comparison of female computer users with and without self-reported neck/shoulder complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, S; Søgaard, K; Kallenberg, L A C; Sandsjö, L; Sjøgaard, G; Hermens, H J; Kadefors, R; Forsman, M

    2007-08-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in the shoulder/neck area are a common and increasing problem among European computer workers, especially women. Long-term low-level workloads with low degree of muscle rest are a potential risk factor for developing WMSDs. The purpose of the present study of female computer users (age 45-65 years) in Denmark and Sweden was to investigate if subjects with self-reported neck/shoulder complaints (cases, N=35) show less trapezius muscle relative rest time (RRT) than controls (N=44) when performing standardised short-term computer work tasks in controlled laboratory conditions. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally from the upper trapezius muscles during a type, edit, precision and colour word stress task. Besides RRT, 10th percentile RMS values were calculated. On the average, 15 of the cases and 18 of the controls showed analysable EMG files per task. For the colour word stress task, the results showed lower RRT values and higher 10th percentile RMS amplitude levels among cases compared to controls. No such signs could be found for the other tasks performed. The present results indicate an increased motor response to a psychological stressor among subjects with self-reported neck/shoulder complaints.

  12. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the two-dimensional or axisymmetric, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 2 is the User's Guide, and describes the program's general features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  13. PACER -- A fast running computer code for the calculation of short-term containment/confinement loads following coolant boundary failure. Volume 2: User information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1997-06-01

    A fast running and simple computer code has been developed to calculate pressure loadings inside light water reactor containments/confinements under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. PACER was originally developed to calculate containment/confinement pressure and temperature time histories for loss-of-coolant accidents in Soviet-designed VVER reactors and is relevant to the activities of the US International Nuclear Safety Center. The code employs a multicompartment representation of the containment volume and is focused upon application to early time containment phenomena during and immediately following blowdown. PACER has been developed for FORTRAN 77 and earlier versions of FORTRAN. The code has been successfully compiled and executed on SUN SPARC and Hewlett-Packard HP-735 workstations provided that appropriate compiler options are specified. The code incorporates both capabilities built around a hardwired default generic VVER-440 Model V230 design as well as fairly general user-defined input. However, array dimensions are hardwired and must be changed by modifying the source code if the number of compartments/cells differs from the default number of nine. Detailed input instructions are provided as well as a description of outputs. Input files and selected output are presented for two sample problems run on both HP-735 and SUN SPARC workstations.

  14. Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vang, Leng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Prescott, Steven R [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared of information documents, software tools and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. A new cloud-based environment would be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available of Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report reviews development of a Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities (CAC) as a web portal for PRA tools.

  15. A user-friendly SSVEP-based brain-computer interface using a time-domain classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, An; Sullivan, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a user-friendly steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system. Single-channel EEG is recorded using a low-noise dry electrode. Compared to traditional gel-based multi-sensor EEG systems, a dry sensor proves to be more convenient, comfortable and cost effective. A hardware system was built that displays four LED light panels flashing at different frequencies and synchronizes with EEG acquisition. The visual stimuli have been carefully designed such that potential risk to photosensitive people is minimized. We describe a novel stimulus-locked inter-trace correlation (SLIC) method for SSVEP classification using EEG time-locked to stimulus onsets. We studied how the performance of the algorithm is affected by different selection of parameters. Using the SLIC method, the average light detection rate is 75.8% with very low error rates (an 8.4% false positive rate and a 1.3% misclassification rate). Compared to a traditional frequency-domain-based method, the SLIC method is more robust (resulting in less annoyance to the users) and is also suitable for irregular stimulus patterns.

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  17. Design and Integration of a Driving Simulator With Eye-Tracking Capabilities in the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-09

    analog output board with 24 digital I/O (Measurement Computing Corporation [MCC], Norton, MA), which can control swaying , heaving, surging , pitching...allow for various driver heights. The ECCI Trackstar 6000 GT steering is fully ball-bearing suspended and free from friction. The fluid damped ...steering system allows force and velocity of wheel movement to respond at a minute level. The damping effect does not limit subtle corrections of

  18. Soft, curved electrode systems capable of integration on the auricle as a persistent brain–computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, James J. S.; Lee, Dong Sup; Lee, Jung Woo; Lee, Woosik; Kwon, Ohjin; Won, Phillip; Jung, Sung-Young; Cheng, Huanyu; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Akce, Abdullah; Umunna, Stephen; Na, Ilyoun; Kwon, Yong Ho; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Liu, ZhuangJian; Paik, Ungyu; Huang, Yonggang; Bretl, Timothy; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in electrodes for noninvasive recording of electroencephalograms expand opportunities collecting such data for diagnosis of neurological disorders and brain–computer interfaces. Existing technologies, however, cannot be used effectively in continuous, uninterrupted modes for more than a few days due to irritation and irreversible degradation in the electrical and mechanical properties of the skin interface. Here we introduce a soft, foldable collection of electrodes in open, fractal mesh geometries that can mount directly and chronically on the complex surface topology of the auricle and the mastoid, to provide high-fidelity and long-term capture of electroencephalograms in ways that avoid any significant thermal, electrical, or mechanical loading of the skin. Experimental and computational studies establish the fundamental aspects of the bending and stretching mechanics that enable this type of intimate integration on the highly irregular and textured surfaces of the auricle. Cell level tests and thermal imaging studies establish the biocompatibility and wearability of such systems, with examples of high-quality measurements over periods of 2 wk with devices that remain mounted throughout daily activities including vigorous exercise, swimming, sleeping, and bathing. Demonstrations include a text speller with a steady-state visually evoked potential-based brain–computer interface and elicitation of an event-related potential (P300 wave). PMID:25775550

  19. Soft, curved electrode systems capable of integration on the auricle as a persistent brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, James J S; Lee, Dong Sup; Lee, Jung Woo; Lee, Woosik; Kwon, Ohjin; Won, Phillip; Jung, Sung-Young; Cheng, Huanyu; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Akce, Abdullah; Umunna, Stephen; Na, Ilyoun; Kwon, Yong Ho; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Liu, ZhuangJian; Paik, Ungyu; Huang, Yonggang; Bretl, Timothy; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A

    2015-03-31

    Recent advances in electrodes for noninvasive recording of electroencephalograms expand opportunities collecting such data for diagnosis of neurological disorders and brain-computer interfaces. Existing technologies, however, cannot be used effectively in continuous, uninterrupted modes for more than a few days due to irritation and irreversible degradation in the electrical and mechanical properties of the skin interface. Here we introduce a soft, foldable collection of electrodes in open, fractal mesh geometries that can mount directly and chronically on the complex surface topology of the auricle and the mastoid, to provide high-fidelity and long-term capture of electroencephalograms in ways that avoid any significant thermal, electrical, or mechanical loading of the skin. Experimental and computational studies establish the fundamental aspects of the bending and stretching mechanics that enable this type of intimate integration on the highly irregular and textured surfaces of the auricle. Cell level tests and thermal imaging studies establish the biocompatibility and wearability of such systems, with examples of high-quality measurements over periods of 2 wk with devices that remain mounted throughout daily activities including vigorous exercise, swimming, sleeping, and bathing. Demonstrations include a text speller with a steady-state visually evoked potential-based brain-computer interface and elicitation of an event-related potential (P300 wave).

  20. Computer users' risk factors for developing shoulder, elbow and back symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Søgaard, Karen; Strøyer, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    to be afflicted than men in all regions. In the full-fit multivariate logistic regression analysis, little influence on the timing of a rest pause and being disturbed by glare or reflection were significant predictors of shoulder symptoms, screen below eye height was a significant predictor for elbow symptoms......OBJECTIVES: This prospective study concentrated on determining factors of computer work that predict musculoskeletal symptoms in the shoulder, elbow, and low-back regions. METHODS: A questionnaire on ergonomics, work pauses, work techniques, and psychosocial and work factors was delivered to 5033...... frequency below 8 days within the last 12 months or intensity score below 4 within the last 3 months). RESULTS: In the follow-up, 10%, 18%, and 23% had symptoms more often in the elbow, shoulder, and low back, respectively, and 14%, 20%, and 22% had more intense symptoms. Women were more likely...

  1. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD`s Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases & Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  2. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD's Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  3. The association between computer literacy and training on clinical productivity and user satisfaction in using the electronic medical record in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasmary, May; El Metwally, Ashraf; Househ, Mowafa

    2014-08-01

    The association of computer literacy, training on clinical productivity and satisfaction of a recently implemented Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system in Prince Sultan Medical Military City ((PSMMC)) was investigated. The scope of this study was to explore the association between age, occupation and computer literacy and clinical productivity and users' satisfaction of the newly implemented EMR at PSMMC as well as the association of user satisfaction with age and position. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all doctors and nurses working in Alwazarat Family and Community Center (a Health center in PSMMC). A convenience sample size of 112 healthcare providers (65 Nurses and 47 physicians) completed the questionnaire. A combination of correlation, One Way ANOVA and t-tests were used to answer the research questions. Participants had high levels of self-reported literacy on computers and satisfaction of the system. Both levels were higher among physicians than among nurses. A moderate but significant (at p computer literacy and users' satisfaction towards the system (R = 0.343). Age was weakly, but significantly (at p computer literacy skills were more satisfied with using the EMR than users with low computer literacy skills.

  4. User manual for GEOCOST: a computer model for geothermal cost analysis. Volume 2. Binary cycle version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Walter, R.A.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1976-03-01

    A computer model called GEOCOST has been developed to simulate the production of electricity from geothermal resources and calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. GEOCOST combines resource characteristics, power recovery technology, tax rates, and financial factors into one systematic model and provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate their impacts on the cost of geothermal power. Both the geothermal reservoir and power plant are simulated to model the complete energy production system. In the version of GEOCOST in this report, geothermal fluid is supplied from wells distributed throughout a hydrothermal reservoir through insulated pipelines to a binary power plant. The power plant is simulated using a binary fluid cycle in which the geothermal fluid is passed through a series of heat exchangers. The thermodynamic state points in basic subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles are calculated for a variety of working fluids. Working fluids which are now in the model include isobutane, n-butane, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-113, R-114, and ammonia. Thermodynamic properties of the working fluids at the state points are calculated using empirical equations of state. The Starling equation of state is used for hydrocarbons and the Martin-Hou equation of state is used for fluorocarbons and ammonia. Physical properties of working fluids at the state points are calculated.

  5. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building...

  6. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This User's Guide describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  7. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the User's Guide, and describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  8. Concept for Inclusion of Analytical and Computational Capability in Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) for Measurement of Neutron Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Marshall Clint; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers are working on many fronts to make possible high-speed, automated classification and quantification of constituent materials in numerous environments. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a system for rocket engine flowfields/plumes. The Optical Plume Anomaly Detector (OPAD) system was designed to utilize emission and absorption spectroscopy for monitoring molecular and atomic particulates in gas plasma. An accompanying suite of tools and analytical package designed to utilize information collected by OPAD is known as the Engine Diagnostic Filtering System (EDiFiS). The current combination of these systems identifies atomic and molecular species and quantifies mass loss rates in H2/O2 rocket plumes. Capabilities for real-time processing are being advanced on several fronts, including an effort to hardware encode components of the EDiFiS for health monitoring and management. This paper addresses the OPAD with its tool suites, and discusses what is considered a natural progression: a concept for taking OPAD to the next logical level of high energy physics, incorporating fermion and boson particle analyses in measurement of neutron flux.

  9. RECON: a computer program for analyzing repository economics. Documentation and user's manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, L.L.; Schutz, M.E.; Luksic, A.T.

    1985-07-01

    From 1981 through 1984 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been developing a computer model named RECON to calculate repository costs from parametric data input. The objective of the program has been to develop the capability to evaluate the effect on costs of changes in repository design parameters and operating scenario assumptions. This report documents the development of the model through September of 1984. Included in the report are: (1) descriptions of model development and the underlying equations, assumptions and definitions; (2) descriptions of data input using either card images or an interactive data input program; and (3) detailed listings of the program and definitions of program variables. Cost estimates generated using the model have been verified against independent estimates and good agreement has been obtained. 2 refs.

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  11. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... tested in library contexts and the aim of this article is to identify the main approaches and to discuss their perspectives, including their strenghts and weaknesses in, especially, public library contexts. The purpose is also to prsent and discuss the results of a recent - 2014 - Danish library user...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  12. User's manual for computer code SOLTES-1 (simulator of large thermal energy systems). [For CDC 6600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewell, M.E.; Grandjean, N.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Edenburn, M.W.

    1978-09-01

    SOLTES simulates the steady-state response of thermal energy systems to time-varying data such as weather and loads. Thermal energy system models of both simple and complex systems can easily be modularly constructed from a library of routines. These routines mathematically model solar collectors, pumps, switches, thermal energy storage, thermal boilers, auxiliary boilers, heat exchangers, extraction turbines, extraction turbine/generators, condensers, regenerative heaters, air conditioners, heating and cooling of buildings, process vapor, etc.; SOLTES also allows user-supplied routines. The analyst need only specify fluid names to obtain readout of property data for heat-transfer fluids and constants that characterize power-cycle working fluids from a fluid property data bank. A load management capability allows SOLTES to simulate total energy systems that simultaneously follow heat and power loads and demands. Generalized energy accounting is available, and values for system performance parameters may be automatically determined by SOLTES. Because of its modularity and flexibility, SOLTES can be used to simulate a wide variety of thermal energy systems such as solar power/total energy, fossil fuel power plants/total energy, nuclear power plants/total energy, solar energy heating and cooling, geothermal energy, and solar hot water heaters.

  13. Comparison of computing capability and information system abilities of state hospitals owned by Ministry of Labor and Social Security and Ministry of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengilimoğlu, Dilaver; Celik, Yusuf; Ulgü, Mahir

    2006-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to give an idea to the readers about how big and important the computing and information problems that hospital managers as well as policy makers will face with after collecting the Ministry of Labor and Social Security (MoLSS) and Ministry of Health (MoH) hospitals under single structure in Turkey by comparing the current level of computing capability of hospitals owned by two ministries. The data used in this study were obtained from 729 hospitals that belong to both ministries by using a data collection tool. The results indicate that there have been considerable differences among the hospitals owned by the two ministries in terms of human resources and information systems. The hospital managers and decision makers making their decisions based on the data produced by current hospital information system (HIS) would more likely face very important difficulties after merging MoH and MoLSS hospitals in Turkey. It is also possible to claim that the level and adequacy of computing abilities and devices do not allow the managers of public hospitals to use computer technology effectively in their information management practices. Lack of technical information, undeveloped information culture, inappropriate management styles, and being inexperienced are the main reasons of why HIS does not run properly and effectively in Turkish hospitals.

  14. mGrid: a load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-03-15

    Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel) execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else). Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web-based infrastructure of mGrid allows for it to be easily extensible over

  15. mGrid: A load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. Results mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else. Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Conclusion Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web

  16. Current Capabilities at SNL for the Integration of Small Modular Reactors onto Smart Microgrids Using Sandia's Smart Microgrid Technology High Performance Computing and Advanced Manufacturing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Smart grids are a crucial component for enabling the nation’s future energy needs, as part of a modernization effort led by the Department of Energy. Smart grids and smart microgrids are being considered in niche applications, and as part of a comprehensive energy strategy to help manage the nation’s growing energy demands, for critical infrastructures, military installations, small rural communities, and large populations with limited water supplies. As part of a far-reaching strategic initiative, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) presents herein a unique, three-pronged approach to integrate small modular reactors (SMRs) into microgrids, with the goal of providing economically-competitive, reliable, and secure energy to meet the nation’s needs. SNL’s triad methodology involves an innovative blend of smart microgrid technology, high performance computing (HPC), and advanced manufacturing (AM). In this report, Sandia’s current capabilities in those areas are summarized, as well as paths forward that will enable DOE to achieve its energy goals. In the area of smart grid/microgrid technology, Sandia’s current computational capabilities can model the entire grid, including temporal aspects and cyber security issues. Our tools include system development, integration, testing and evaluation, monitoring, and sustainment.

  17. TORO II: A finite element computer program for nonlinear quasi-static problems in electromagnetics: Part 2, User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartling, D.K.

    1996-05-01

    User instructions are given for the finite element, electromagnetics program, TORO II. The theoretical background and numerical methods used in the program are documented in SAND95-2472. The present document also describes a number of example problems that have been analyzed with the code and provides sample input files for typical simulations. 20 refs., 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Roche, Kenneth J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  20. Living with Computers. Young Danes' Uses of and Thoughts on the Uses of Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    1998-01-01

    Young Danes, computers,users, super users, non users, computer access, unge danskere, computere,brugere,superbrugere,ikke-brugere......Young Danes, computers,users, super users, non users, computer access, unge danskere, computere,brugere,superbrugere,ikke-brugere...

  1. Computer-aided DSM-IV-diagnostics – acceptance, use and perceived usefulness in relation to users' learning styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lars G; Fors, Uno GH

    2005-01-01

    Background CDSS (computerized decision support system) for medical diagnostics have been studied for long. This study was undertaken to investigate how different preferences of Learning Styles (LS) of psychiatrists might affect acceptance, use and perceived usefulness of a CDSS for diagnostics in psychiatry. Methods 49 psychiatrists (specialists and non-specialists) from 3 different clinics volunteered to participate in this study and to use the CDSS to diagnose a paper-based case (based on a real patient). LS, attitudes to CDSS and complementary data were obtained via questionnaires and interviews. To facilitate the study, a special version of the CDSS was created, which automatically could log interaction details. Results The LS preferences (according to Kolb) of the 49 physicians turned out as follows: 37% were Assimilating, 31% Converging, 27% Accommodating and 6% Diverging. The CDSS under study seemed to favor psychiatrists with abstract conceptualization information perceiving mode (Assimilating and Converging learning styles). A correlation between learning styles preferences and computer skill was found. Positive attitude to computer-aided diagnostics and learning styles preferences was also found to correlate. Using the CDSS, the specialists produced only 1 correct diagnosis and the non-specialists 2 correct diagnoses (median values) as compared to the three predetermined correct diagnoses of the actual case. Only 10% had all three diagnoses correct, 41 % two correct, 47 % one correct and 2 % had no correct diagnose at all. Conclusion Our results indicate that the use of CDSS does not guarantee correct diagnosis and that LS might influence the results. Future research should focus on the possibility to create systems open to individuals with different LS preferences and possibility to create CDSS adapted to the level of expertise of the user. PMID:15638940

  2. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 2: User's guide to computer EMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description and user's guide of the computer program developed to simulate the dynamics of an electromechanical actuator for aerospace applications are presented. The effects of the stator phase currents on the permanent magnets of the rotor are examined. The voltage and current waveforms present in the power conditioner network during the motoring, regenerative braking, and plugging modes of operation are presented and discussed.

  3. The influence of Positional Release Therapy on the myofascial trigger points of the upper trapezius muscle in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Kojidi, M; Okhovatian, F; Rahimi, A; Baghban, A A; Azimi, H

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of Positional Release Therapy (PRT) in computer users via latent trigger points (LTrPs) of the upper trapezius muscle. Twenty-eight women with the upper trapezius MTrPs participated in this study. Subjects were randomly classified into two groups (14 in each group): the subjects in the Group 1 received PRT in shortened position while those in the group 2 received sham control in the neutral position of the upper trapezius muscle. They received three therapy sessions every other day for one week. The local pain intensity and Pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured via Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and algometry, respectively, before interventions and repeated 5 min after the first and third treatment sessions in each group. One-way ANOVA was used for data analysis. After treatment, between groups comparison revealed that for PPT and VAS, there were significant differences between the two groups (VAS and PPT; P < 0.05). Both groups (PRT and sham control) showed alleviation of pain and increase in PPT during three sessions of therapy although PRT showed to be more effective in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE TECHNIQUE OF ANALYSIS OF SOFTWARE OF ON-BOARD COMPUTERS OF AIR VESSEL TO ABSENCE OF UNDECLARED CAPABILITIES BY SIGNATURE-HEURISTIC WAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Ivanovich Petrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of civil aviation aircraft onboard computers data safety. Infor- mation security undeclared capabilities stand for technical equipment or software possibilities, which are not mentioned in the documentation. Documentation and tests content requirements are imposed during the software certification. Documentation requirements include documents composition and content of control (specification, description and program code, the source code. Test requirements include: static analysis of program codes (including the compliance of the sources with their loading modules monitoring; dynamic analysis of source code (including implementation of routes monitor- ing. Currently, there are no complex measures for checking onboard computer software. There are no rules and regulations that can allow controlling foreign production aircraft software, and the actual receiving of software is difficult. Consequently, the author suggests developing the basics of aviation rules and regulations, which allow to analyze the programs of CA aircraft onboard computers. If there are no software source codes the two approaches of code analysis are used: a structural static and dy- namic analysis of the source code; signature-heuristic analysis of potentially dangerous operations. Static analysis determines the behavior of the program by reading the program code (without running the program which is represented in the assembler language - disassembly listing. Program tracing is performed by the dynamic analysis. The analysis of aircraft software ability to detect undeclared capa- bilities using the interactive disassembler was considered in this article.

  5. User Behavior Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Juston Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    User Behaviour Analytics is the tracking, collecting and assessing of user data and activities. The goal is to detect misuse of user credentials by developing models for the normal behaviour of user credentials within a computer network and detect outliers with respect to their baseline.

  6. Franklin: User Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  7. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological

  8. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... group of computers connected to the Internet in a cloud-like boundary (Box 1)). In essence computing is transitioning from an era of users owning computers to one in which users do not own computers but have access to computing hardware and software maintained by providers. Users access the ...

  9. DORMAN computer program (study 2.5). Volume 2: User's guide and programmer's guide. [development of data bank for computerized information storage of NASA programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, S. T., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The DORMAN program was developed to create and modify a data bank containing data decks which serve as input to the DORCA Computer Program. Via a remote terminal a user can access the bank, extract any data deck, modify that deck, output the modified deck to be input to the DORCA program, and save the modified deck in the data bank. This computer program is an assist in the utilization of the DORCA program. The program is dimensionless and operates almost entirely in integer mode. The program was developed on the CDC 6400/7600 complex for implementation on a UNIVAC 1108 computer.

  10. User's manual for GEOTEMP, a computer code for predicting downhole wellbore and soil temperatures in geothermal wells. Appendix to Part I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, G.R.

    1980-03-01

    GEOTEMP is a computer code that calculates downhole temperatures in and surrounding a well. Temperatures are computed as a function of time in a flowing stream, in the wellbore, and in the soil. Flowing options available in the model include the following: injection/production, forward/reverse circulation, and drilling. This manual describes how to input data to the code and what results are printed out, provides six examples of both input and output, and supplies a listing of the code. The user's manual is an appendix to the Part I report Development of Computer Code and Acquisition of Field Temperature Data.

  11. Brain Computer Interfaces on Track to Home: Results of the Evaluation at Disabled End-Users's Homes and Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip eMiralles

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The BackHome system is a multi-functional BCI system, the final outcome of a User Centred Design approach, whose ambition is to move BCI systems from laboratories into the home of people in need for their independent home use. The paper presents the results of testing and evaluation of the BackHome system with end-users at their own homes. Results show moderate to good acceptance from end-users, caregivers and therapists; which reported promising usability levels, good user satisfaction and levels of control in the use of services and home support based on remote monitoring tools.

  12. Music and natural sounds in an auditory steady-state response based brain-computer interface to increase user acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jeong; Baek, Hyun Jae; Hong, Seunghyeok; Chang, Min Hye; Lee, Jeong Su; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-05-01

    Patients with total locked-in syndrome are conscious; however, they cannot express themselves because most of their voluntary muscles are paralyzed, and many of these patients have lost their eyesight. To improve the quality of life of these patients, there is an increasing need for communication-supporting technologies that leverage the remaining senses of the patient along with physiological signals. The auditory steady-state response (ASSR) is an electro-physiologic response to auditory stimulation that is amplitude-modulated by a specific frequency. By leveraging the phenomenon whereby ASSR is modulated by mind concentration, a brain-computer interface paradigm was proposed to classify the selective attention of the patient. In this paper, we propose an auditory stimulation method to minimize auditory stress by replacing the monotone carrier with familiar music and natural sounds for an ergonomic system. Piano and violin instrumentals were employed in the music sessions; the sounds of water streaming and cicadas singing were used in the natural sound sessions. Six healthy subjects participated in the experiment. Electroencephalograms were recorded using four electrodes (Cz, Oz, T7 and T8). Seven sessions were performed using different stimuli. The spectral power at 38 and 42Hz and their ratio for each electrode were extracted as features. Linear discriminant analysis was utilized to classify the selections for each subject. In offline analysis, the average classification accuracies with a modulation index of 1.0 were 89.67% and 87.67% using music and natural sounds, respectively. In online experiments, the average classification accuracies were 88.3% and 80.0% using music and natural sounds, respectively. Using the proposed method, we obtained significantly higher user-acceptance scores, while maintaining a high average classification accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. User involvement competence for radical innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettl, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    One important market related capability for firms which seek to develop radical innovations is the competence to involve the 'right' users at the 'right' time in the 'right' form. While former studies have identified a rather passive role of users in the radical innovation process, this paper...... focuses on the involvement of such users that are in the position to play an active role as inventors and (co)-developers. A multiple case study analysis was conducted in the field of medical technology. Five radical innovation projects within four firms were selected including medical robots and computer......-assisted navigation systems. The case study analysis reveals that firms who closely interact with specific users benefit significantly for their radical innovation work. These users have a high motivation toward new solutions, are open to new technologies, possess diverse competencies, and are embedded into a very...

  14. Combining Design Patterns and Elements of Social Computing for the Design of User Centered Online Help Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckner, Markus; Schworm, Silke; Wolff, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Many current (online) help systems fail because users refuse to use them or, even if they do so, they do not perceive them as helpful. There is an obvious gap between the intentions of the help content authors and the achievement of objectives concerning the perceived usefulness by help users. Problems may be divided into psychological and…

  15. A Web-based Multi-user Interactive Visualization System For Large-Scale Computing Using Google Web Toolkit Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R. M.; McLane, J. C.; Yuen, D. A.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have created a web-based, interactive system for multi-user collaborative visualization of large data sets (on the order of terabytes) that allows users in geographically disparate locations to simultaneous and collectively visualize large data sets over the Internet. By leveraging asynchronous java and XML (AJAX) web development paradigms via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide remote, web-based users a web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota that provides high resolution visualizations to the order of 15 million pixels by Megan Damon. In the current version of our software, we have implemented a new, highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology to provide a rich collaborative environment and a smooth end-user experience. Furthermore, the web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web- and javascript-enabled cell phones. New features in the current version include: the ability for (1) users to launch multiple visualizations, (2) a user to invite one or more other users to view their visualization in real-time (multiple observers), (3) users to delegate control aspects of the visualization to others (multiple controllers) , and (4) engage in collaborative chat and instant messaging with other users within the user interface of the web application. We will explain choices made regarding implementation, overall system architecture and method of operation, and the benefits of an extensible, modular design. We will also discuss future goals, features, and our plans for increasing scalability of the system which includes a discussion of the benefits potentially afforded us by a migration of server-side components to the Google Application Engine (http://code.google.com/appengine/).

  16. Trajectory analysis and optimization system (TAOS) user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salguero, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    The Trajectory Analysis and Optimization System (TAOS) is software that simulates point--mass trajectories for multiple vehicles. It expands upon the capabilities of the Trajectory Simulation and Analysis program (TAP) developed previously at Sandia National Laboratories. TAOS is designed to be a comprehensive analysis tool capable of analyzing nearly any type of three degree-of-freedom, point-mass trajectory. Trajectories are broken into segments, and within each segment, guidance rules provided by the user control how the trajectory is computed. Parametric optimization provides a powerful method for satisfying mission-planning constraints. Althrough TAOS is not interactive, its input and output files have been designed for ease of use. When compared to TAP, the capability to analyze trajectories for more than one vehicle is the primary enhancement, although numerous other small improvements have been made. This report documents the methods used in TAOS as well as the input and output file formats.

  17. Evolution of user analysis on the grid in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218990; The ATLAS collaboration; Dewhurst, Alastair

    2016-01-01

    More than one thousand physicists analyse data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through 150 computing facilities around the world. Efficient distributed analysis requires optimal resource usage and the interplay of several factors: robust grid and software infrastructures, and system capability to adapt to different workloads. The continuous automatic validation of grid sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters have been proven to provide a solid distributed analysis system for ATLAS users. Typical user workflows on the grid, and their associated metrics, are discussed. Measurements of user job performance and typical requirements are also shown.

  18. Evolution of user analysis on the grid in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, A.; Legger, F.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    More than one thousand physicists analyse data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through 150 computing facilities around the world. Efficient distributed analysis requires optimal resource usage and the interplay of several factors: robust grid and software infrastructures, and system capability to adapt to different workloads. The continuous automatic validation of grid sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters have been proven to provide a solid distributed analysis system for ATLAS users. Typical user workflows on the grid, and their associated metrics, are discussed. Measurements of user job performance and typical requirements are also shown.

  19. CASKS (Computer Analysis of Storage casKS): A microcomputer based analysis system for storage cask design review. User`s manual to Version 1b (including program reference)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.F.; Gerhard, M.A.; Trummer, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.; Mok, G.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    CASKS (Computer Analysis of Storage casKS) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for evaluating safety analysis reports on spent-fuel storage casks. The bulk of the complete program and this user`s manual are based upon the SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) program previously developed at LLNL. A number of enhancements and improvements were added to the original SCANS program to meet requirements unique to storage casks. CASKS is an easy-to-use system that calculates global response of storage casks to impact loads, pressure loads and thermal conditions. This provides reviewers with a tool for an independent check on analyses submitted by licensees. CASKS is based on microcomputers compatible with the IBM-PC family of computers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, cask analysis programs, and output display programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests.

  20. A qualitative study adopting a user-centered approach to design and validate a brain computer interface for cognitive rehabilitation for people with brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Armstrong, Elaine; Thomson, Eileen; Vargiu, Eloisa; Solà, Marc; Dauwalder, Stefan; Miralles, Felip; Daly Lynn, Jean

    2017-07-14

    Cognitive rehabilitation is established as a core intervention within rehabilitation programs following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Digitally enabled assistive technologies offer opportunities for clinicians to increase remote access to rehabilitation supporting transition into home. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems can harness the residual abilities of individuals with limited function to gain control over computers through their brain waves. This paper presents an online cognitive rehabilitation application developed with therapists, to work remotely with people who have TBI, who will use BCI at home to engage in the therapy. A qualitative research study was completed with people who are community dwellers post brain injury (end users), and a cohort of therapists involved in cognitive rehabilitation. A user-centered approach over three phases in the development, design and feasibility testing of this cognitive rehabilitation application included two tasks (Find-a-Category and a Memory Card task). The therapist could remotely prescribe activity with different levels of difficulty. The service user had a home interface which would present the therapy activities. This novel work was achieved by an international consortium of academics, business partners and service users.

  1. QMRPACK user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, R.W. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  2. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions and Applications II. Users Manual and Program Description. 2; Users Manual and Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This users manual is the second part of a two-part report describing the NASA Lewis CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications) program. The program obtains chemical equilibrium compositions of complex mixtures with applications to several types of problems. The topics presented in this manual are: (1) details for preparing input data sets; (2) a description of output tables for various types of problems; (3) the overall modular organization of the program with information on how to make modifications; (4) a description of the function of each subroutine; (5) error messages and their significance; and (6) a number of examples that illustrate various types of problems handled by CEA and that cover many of the options available in both input and output. Seven appendixes give information on the thermodynamic and thermal transport data used in CEA; some information on common variables used in or generated by the equilibrium module; and output tables for 14 example problems. The CEA program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77. CEA should work on any system with sufficient storage. There are about 6300 lines in the source code, which uses about 225 kilobytes of memory. The compiled program takes about 975 kilobytes.

  3. Sandia QIS Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad set of capabilities in quantum information science (QIS), including elements of quantum computing, quantum communications, and quantum sensing. The Sandia QIS program is built atop unique DOE investments at the laboratories, including the MESA microelectronics fabrication facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) facilities (joint with LANL), the Ion Beam Laboratory, and ASC High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Sandia has invested $75 M of LDRD funding over 12 years to develop unique, differentiating capabilities that leverage these DOE infrastructure investments.

  4. TRAC-P1: an advanced best estimate computer program for PWR LOCA analysis. I. Methods, models, user information, and programming details

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to provide an advanced ''best estimate'' predictive capability for the analysis of postulated accidents in light water reactors (LWRs). TRAC-Pl provides this analysis capability for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and for a wide variety of thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. It features a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and associated internals; two-phase nonequilibrium hydrodynamics models; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The TRAC-Pl User's Manual is composed of two separate volumes. Volume I gives a description of the thermal-hydraulic models and numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information is also provided. Volume II presents the results of the developmental verification calculations.

  5. Theoretical background and user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in porous rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, Toshihiko [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hatanaka, Koichiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    In order to document a basic manual about input data, output data, execution of computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in heterogeneous porous rock, we investigated the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport which calculates water flow in three dimension, the path of moving radionuclide, and one dimensional radionuclide migration. In this report, based on above investigation we describe the geostatistical background about simulating heterogeneous permeability field. And we describe construction of files, input and output data, a example of calculating of the programs which simulates heterogeneous permeability field, and calculates groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Therefore, we can document a manual by investigating the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation. And we can model heterogeneous porous rock and analyze groundwater flow and radionuclide transport by utilizing the information from this report. (author)

  6. Capability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  7. ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPABILITIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse entrepreneurship from an action research perspective. What is entrepreneurship about? Which are the fundamental capabilities and processes of entrepreneurship? To answer these questions the article includes a case study of a Danish entrepreneur and his networks...

  8. Icarus: A 2D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for parallel computers. User`s manual - V.3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Plimpton, S.; Johannes, J.; Payne, J.

    1996-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modelled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modelled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates. Surface chemistry is modelled with surface reaction probabilities. The electron number density is either a fixed external generated field or determined using a local charge neutrality assumption. Ion chemistry is modelled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electrostatic fields can either be externally input or internally generated using a Langmuir-Tonks model. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, postprocessing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. The majority of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  9. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers. Volume 2, User`s guide and manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer program is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional conservation of mass. momentum, and energy equations on the tube side, and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer in a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification. it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications.

  10. Development and evaluation of a head-controlled human-computer interface with mouse-like functions for physically disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Bolliger Neto, Raul; Reynaldo, Ana Carolina; Luzo, Maria Cândida de Miranda; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a pointing device controlled by head movement that had the same functions as a conventional mouse and to evaluate the performance of the proposed device when operated by quadriplegic users. Ten individuals with cervical spinal cord injury participated in functional evaluations of the developed pointing device. The device consisted of a video camera, computer software, and a target attached to the front part of a cap, which was placed on the user's head. The software captured images of the target coming from the video camera and processed them with the aim of determining the displacement from the center of the target and correlating this with the movement of the computer cursor. Evaluation of the interaction between each user and the proposed device was carried out using 24 multidirectional tests with two degrees of difficulty. According to the parameters of mean throughput and movement time, no statistically significant differences were observed between the repetitions of the tests for either of the studied levels of difficulty. The developed pointing device adequately emulates the movement functions of the computer cursor. It is easy to use and can be learned quickly when operated by quadriplegic individuals.

  11. User needs elicitation via analytic hierarchy process (AHP). A case study on a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, Leandro; Martin, Jennifer L; Ragozzino, Angela; Vanzanella, Carmela; Scognamiglio, Arturo; Mirarchi, Luciano; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-01-05

    The rigorous elicitation of user needs is a crucial step for both medical device design and purchasing. However, user needs elicitation is often based on qualitative methods whose findings can be difficult to integrate into medical decision-making. This paper describes the application of AHP to elicit user needs for a new CT scanner for use in a public hospital. AHP was used to design a hierarchy of 12 needs for a new CT scanner, grouped into 4 homogenous categories, and to prepare a paper questionnaire to investigate the relative priorities of these. The questionnaire was completed by 5 senior clinicians working in a variety of clinical specialisations and departments in the same Italian public hospital. Although safety and performance were considered the most important issues, user needs changed according to clinical scenario. For elective surgery, the five most important needs were: spatial resolution, processing software, radiation dose, patient monitoring, and contrast medium. For emergency, the top five most important needs were: patient monitoring, radiation dose, contrast medium control, speed run, spatial resolution. AHP effectively supported user need elicitation, helping to develop an analytic and intelligible framework of decision-making. User needs varied according to working scenario (elective versus emergency medicine) more than clinical specialization. This method should be considered by practitioners involved in decisions about new medical technology, whether that be during device design or before deciding whether to allocate budgets for new medical devices according to clinical functions or according to hospital department.

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  13. Capability Extension to the Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD With Applications to the Highly Loaded Fan-Drive Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.

    2011-01-01

    The axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD has been upgraded to include the outlet guide vane (OGV) into its acceptable turbine configurations. The mathematical bases and the techniques used for the code implementation are described and discussed in lengths in this paper. This extended capability is verified and validated with two cases of highly loaded fan-drive turbines, designed and tested in the V/STOL Program of NASA. The first case is a 4 1/2-stage turbine with an average stage loading factor of 4.66, designed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. The second case is a 3 1/2-stage turbine with an average loading factor of 4.0, designed in-house by the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center). Both cases were experimentally tested in the turbine facility located at the Glenn Research Center. The processes conducted in these studies are described in detail in this paper, and the results in comparison with the experimental data are presented and discussed. The comparisons between the AXOD results and the experimental data are in excellent agreement.

  14. A Robust Optimization Based Energy-Aware Virtual Network Function Placement Proposal for Small Cell 5G Networks with Mobile Edge Computing Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bego Blanco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of cloud-enabled 5G radio access networks with network function virtualization capabilities, we focus on the virtual network function placement problem for a multitenant cluster of small cells that provide mobile edge computing services. Under an emerging distributed network architecture and hardware infrastructure, we employ cloud-enabled small cells that integrate microservers for virtualization execution, equipped with additional hardware appliances. We develop an energy-aware placement solution using a robust optimization approach based on service demand uncertainty in order to minimize the power consumption in the system constrained by network service latency requirements and infrastructure terms. Then, we discuss the results of the proposed placement mechanism in 5G scenarios that combine several service flavours and robust protection values. Once the impact of the service flavour and robust protection on the global power consumption of the system is analyzed, numerical results indicate that our proposal succeeds in efficiently placing the virtual network functions that compose the network services in the available hardware infrastructure while fulfilling service constraints.

  15. Expectations of Competency: The Mismatch between Employers' and Graduates' Views of End-User Computing Skills Requirements in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Shirley; Steel, Gary; Kuiper, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The use of computers has become part of everyday life. The high prevalence of computer use appears to lead employers to assume that university graduates will have the good computing skills necessary in many graduate level jobs. This study investigates how well the expectations of employers match the perceptions of near-graduate students about the…

  16. Dynamo: a flexible, user-friendly development tool for subtomogram averaging of cryo-EM data in high-performance computing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Arheit, Marcel; Stahlberg, Henning

    2012-05-01

    Dynamo is a new software package for subtomogram averaging of cryo Electron Tomography (cryo-ET) data with three main goals: first, Dynamo allows user-transparent adaptation to a variety of high-performance computing platforms such as GPUs or CPU clusters. Second, Dynamo implements user-friendliness through GUI interfaces and scripting resources. Third, Dynamo offers user-flexibility through a plugin API. Besides the alignment and averaging procedures, Dynamo includes native tools for visualization and analysis of results and data, as well as support for third party visualization software, such as Chimera UCSF or EMAN2. As a demonstration of these functionalities, we studied bacterial flagellar motors and showed automatically detected classes with absent and present C-rings. Subtomogram averaging is a common task in current cryo-ET pipelines, which requires extensive computational resources and follows a well-established workflow. However, due to the data diversity, many existing packages offer slight variations of the same algorithm to improve results. One of the main purposes behind Dynamo is to provide explicit tools to allow the user the insertion of custom designed procedures - or plugins - to replace or complement the native algorithms in the different steps of the processing pipeline for subtomogram averaging without the burden of handling parallelization. Custom scripts that implement new approaches devised by the user are integrated into the Dynamo data management system, so that they can be controlled by the GUI or the scripting capacities. Dynamo executables do not require licenses for third party commercial software. Sources, executables and documentation are freely distributed on http://www.dynamo-em.org. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. COUPLEFLO: a computer program for coupled creeping viscous flow and conductive-convective heat transfer. Part II. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, P.F.; Dawson, P.R.

    1978-11-01

    COUPLEFLO is a two-dimensional finite element code for plane strain or axisymmetric analyses of thermomechanically coupled systems. It is capable of analyzing the creeping flow of non-Newtonian fluids or the secondary creep of solids. COUPLEFLO solves equations for conductive-convective heat transfer to determine the thermal response of a system. Thermomechanical coupling between the flow field and temperature distribution can exist in terms of temperature dependent material properties, temperature dependent body forces, viscous dissipation, material convection, and changing system geometry. Either transient or steady-state problems can be analyzed in Eulerian or quasi-Lagrangian reference frames. Part I - Theoretical Background contains the governing equation, finite element formulation, and verification of the code capabilities. Part II - User's Manual contains instructions for code use. Currently, COUPLEFLO is available at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque on the 7600, 6600, and NOS systems.

  18. GADRAS-DRF user's manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Mitchell, Dean J; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.; Horne, Steven M; Bradley, Jon David; Eldridge, Bryce Duncan; Amai, Wendy A.

    2013-09-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software-Detector Response Function (GADRAS-DRF) application computes the response of gamma-ray detectors to incoming radiation. This manual provides step-by-step procedures to acquaint new users with the use of the application. The capabilities include characterization of detector response parameters, plotting and viewing measured and computed spectra, and analyzing spectra to identify isotopes or to estimate flux profiles. GADRAS-DRF can compute and provide detector responses quickly and accurately, giving researchers and other users the ability to obtain usable results in a timely manner (a matter of seconds or minutes).

  19. Electrophoresis of tear proteins as a new diagnostic tool for two high risk groups for dry eye: computer users and contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, Andreea

    2011-08-15

    Dry eye is the most prevalent condition seen by the ophthalmologist, in particular in elderly. The identification of new common risk factors (computer use and contact lens wear) extends the disease among the young people. The early diagnosis of dry eye is essential, but difficult, because the biochemical changes in tear film usually occur before any detectable signs. Due its advantages, electrophoresis of tear proteins could be an important tool for diagnosis of tear film impairment in high risk groups for dry eye. The role of tear proteins electrophoresis in early diagnosis of dry eye related to computer use and contact lens wear, as well as the biochemical changes in these high risk groups are presented. This review will summarize the actual data concerning the electrophoretic changes of tear proteins in computer users and contact lens wearers, two common high risk groups for dry eye. Electrophoresis of tear proteins using automated system Hyrys-Hydrasys SEBIA France is an important tool for early diagnosis of tear film alterations and monitoring of therapy. The quantification of many proteins in a single analysis using a small quantity of unconcentrated reflex tears is the main advantage of this technique. Electrophoresis of tear proteins should became a prerequisite, in particular for computer users less than 3 h/day, as well as at prescribing contact lenses.

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  2. User's Guide for SKETCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgley, David R., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program SKETCH is presented on this disk. SKETCH solves a popular problem in computer graphics-the removal of hidden lines from images of solid objects. Examples and illustrations are included in the guide. Also included is the SKETCH program, so a user can incorporate the information into a particular software system.

  3. Asynchronous P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface to Control a Virtual Environment : Initial Tests on End Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aloise, Fabio; Schettini, Francesca; Arico, Pietro; Salinari, Serenella; Guger, Christoph; Rinsma, Johanna; Aiello, Marco; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2011-01-01

    Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous

  4. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menthe, R. W.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  5. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  6. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3

  7. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrnăucă, Cristina; Duque, Rafael; Montaña, José L

    2017-07-20

    A relevant goal in human-computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users' needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous) and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system.

  8. AMPS data management requirements study. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A data simulation is presented for instruments and associated control and display functions required to perform controlled active experiments of the atmosphere. A comprehensive user's guide is given for the data requirements and software developed for the following experiments: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observation of ambient plasmas; (3) ionospheric measurements with a subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustic gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A complete description of each experiment is given.

  9. Vulnerable road users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A group of road users can be defined as ‘vulnerable’ in a number of ways, such as by the amount of protection in traffic (e.g. pedestrians and cyclists) or by the amount of task capability (e.g. the young and the elderly). Vulnerable road users do not usually have a protective 'shell', and also the

  10. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Per; Benveniste, Jerome

    2017-04-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products.
GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information
and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced
computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations,
and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT
Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development
of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for
oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming
on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy,
Oceanography and Solid earth studies.
Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has:
 - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox,
 - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients,
anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies.
 - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  11. Software usage in unsupervised digital doorway computing environments in disadvantaged South African communities: Focusing on youthful users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gush, K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital Doorways provide computing infrastructure in low-income communities in South Africa. The unsupervised DD terminals offer various software applications, from entertainment through educational resources to research material, encouraging...

  12. Tactical Applications (TacApps) User Design Workshop, Analysis and Findings Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Vreeland Rd. Fire Control Systems & Technology Directorate Florham Park, NJ (RDAR-WSF-M) 07932 Picatinny...capable software system for the common operating environment (COE) v3, engineers at the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center...operating environment (COE) v3 Mounted computing environment (MCE) Command Post Computing Environment (CPCE) Workshop User jury

  13. A user's guide to the SUDAN computer program for determining the vibration modes of structural systems. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Jun. 1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Durling, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the SUDAN computer program for analyzing structural systems for their natural modes and frequencies of vibration is described. SUDAN is intended for structures which can be represented as an equivalent system of beam, spring, and rigid-body substructures. User-written constraint equations are used to analytically join the mass and stiffness matrices of the substructures to form the mass and stiffness matrices of the complete structure from which all the frequencies and modes of the system are determined. The SUDAN program can treat the case in which both the mass and stiffness matrices of the coupled system may be singular simultaneously. A general description of the FORTRAN IV program is given, the computer hardware and software specifications are indicated, and the input required by the program is described.

  14. Spelling is just a click away – a user-centered brain-computer interface including auto-calibration and predictive text entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eKaufmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI based on event-related potentials (ERP allow for selection of characters from a visually presented character-matrix and thus provide a communication channel for users with neurodegenerative disease. Although they have been topic of research for more than 20 years and were multiply proven to be a reliable communication method, BCIs are almost exclusively used in experimental settings, handled by qualified experts. This study investigates if ERP-BCIs can be handled independently by laymen without expert interference, which is inevitable for establishing BCIs in end-user’s daily life situations. Furthermore we compared the classic character-by-character text entry against a predictive text entry (PTE that directly incorporates predictive text into the character matrix. N=19 BCI novices handled a user-centred ERP-BCI application on their own without expert interference. The software individually adjusted classifier weights and control parameters in the background, invisible to the user (auto-calibration. All participants were able to operate the software on their own and to twice correctly spell a sentence with the auto-calibrated classifier (once with PTE, once without. Our PTE increased spelling speed and importantly did not reduce accuracy. In sum, this study demonstrates feasibility of auto-calibrating ERP-BCI use, independently by laymen and the strong benefit of integrating predictive text directly into the character-matrix.

  15. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 2: SRB water impact Monte Carlo computer program, user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The HD 220 program was created as part of the space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. The model was generated to investigate the damage to SRB components under water impact loads. The random nature of environmental parameters, such as ocean waves and wind conditions, necessitates estimation of the relative frequency of occurrence for these parameters. The nondeterministic nature of component strengths also lends itself to probabilistic simulation. The Monte Carlo technique allows the simultaneous perturbation of multiple independent parameters and provides outputs describing the probability distribution functions of the dependent parameters. This allows the user to determine the required statistics for each output parameter.

  16. The effect of aging on muscle activation and postural control pattern for young and older computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Li-Ping; Cho, Chiung-Yu

    2012-09-01

    A lot of older adults try to learn to use computers and might use different ways to perform a computer task compared to younger people. Fifteen healthy young and 15 healthy older adults participated in this study and all performed a series of mouse tasks. A three dimensional motion capture system and electromyographic analysis were used to obtain kinematic and kinetic data during performing the computer tasks. Three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on task and time factors was used to analyze all dependent measurements. Older adults had higher RMS of forearm muscles compared to the young adults. The RMS of the finger extensor was highest when performing a dragging task. Compared with young adults, the older adults had greater cranial-cervical angle and neck flexion, but smaller head flexion, shoulder angle, elbow angle and ulnar deviation. Consequently, the older adults might have a greater risk of developing musculoskeletal disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of computer mouse gain and visual demand on mouse clicking performance and muscle activation in a young and elderly group of experienced computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld, Jesper; Jensen, Bente R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the specific effects of motor demand and visual demands on the ability to control motor output in terms of performance and muscle activation. Young and elderly subjects performed multidirectional pointing tasks with the computer mouse. Three levels of mouse gain and th...... was only to a minor degree influenced by mouse gain (and target sizes) indicating that stability of the forearm/hand is of significance during computer mouse control. The study has implications for ergonomists, pointing device manufacturers and software developers....

  18. JASMINE-pro: A computer code for the analysis of propagation process in steam explosions. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanhua; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Maruyama, Yu; Nakamura, Hideo; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-12-01

    A steam explosion is a phenomenon where a high temperature liquid gives its internal energy very rapidly to another low temperature volatile liquid, causing very strong pressure build up due to rapid vaporization of the latter. In the field of light water reactor safety research, steam explosions caused by the contact of molten core and coolant has been recognized as a potential threat which could cause failure of the pressure vessel or the containment vessel during a severe accident. A numerical simulation code JASMINE was developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to evaluate the impact of steam explosions on the integrity of reactor boundaries. JASMINE code consists of two parts, JASMINE-pre and -pro, which handle the premixing and propagation phases in steam explosions, respectively. JASMINE-pro code simulates the thermo-hydrodynamics in the propagation phase of a steam explosion on the basis of the multi-fluid model for multiphase flow. This report, 'User's Manual', gives the usage of JASMINE-pro code as well as the information on the code structures which should be useful for users to understand how the code works. (author)

  19. A Multifunctional Brain-Computer Interface Intended for Home Use: An Evaluation with Healthy Participants and Potential End Users with Dry and Gel-Based Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käthner, Ivo; Halder, Sebastian; Hintermüller, Christoph; Espinosa, Arnau; Guger, Christoph; Miralles, Felip; Vargiu, Eloisa; Dauwalder, Stefan; Rafael-Palou, Xavier; Solà, Marc; Daly, Jean M.; Armstrong, Elaine; Martin, Suzanne; Kübler, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Current brain-computer interface (BCIs) software is often tailored to the needs of scientists and technicians and therefore complex to allow for versatile use. To facilitate home use of BCIs a multifunctional P300 BCI with a graphical user interface intended for non-expert set-up and control was designed and implemented. The system includes applications for spelling, web access, entertainment, artistic expression and environmental control. In addition to new software, it also includes new hardware for the recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The EEG system consists of a small and wireless amplifier attached to a cap that can be equipped with gel-based or dry contact electrodes. The system was systematically evaluated with a healthy sample, and targeted end users of BCI technology, i.e., people with a varying degree of motor impairment tested the BCI in a series of individual case studies. Usability was assessed in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. Feedback of users was gathered with structured questionnaires. Two groups of healthy participants completed an experimental protocol with the gel-based and the dry contact electrodes (N = 10 each). The results demonstrated that all healthy participants gained control over the system and achieved satisfactory to high accuracies with both gel-based and dry electrodes (average error rates of 6 and 13%). Average satisfaction ratings were high, but certain aspects of the system such as the wearing comfort of the dry electrodes and design of the cap, and speed (in both groups) were criticized by some participants. Six potential end users tested the system during supervised sessions. The achieved accuracies varied greatly from no control to high control with accuracies comparable to that of healthy volunteers. Satisfaction ratings of the two end-users that gained control of the system were lower as compared to healthy participants. The advantages and disadvantages of the BCI and its applications

  20. User's manual for atmospheric fluidized bed combustor system economic performance algorithm computer program. [AFBCIBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The computer program calculates several economic and energy terms, given various performance and cost parameters, for a system composed of coal, a coal beneficiation (cleaning) plant, a combustor plant and an associated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plant. The combustor can be either an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) or a conventional pulverized (CP) combustor. The FGD system is a lime-slurry system.

  1. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code. User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User`s Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks.

  2. Implementing interactive computing in an object-oriented environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Udina

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Statistical computing when input/output is driven by a Graphical User Interface is considered. A proposal is made for automatic control of computational flow to ensure that only strictly required computations are actually carried on. The computational flow is modeled by a directed graph for implementation in any object-oriented programming language with symbolic manipulation capabilities. A complete implementation example is presented to compute and display frequency based piecewise linear density estimators such as histograms or frequency polygons.

  3. Desktop Computing Integration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Desktop Computing Integration Project for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of LaRC was designed to help division personnel use personal computing resources to perform job tasks. The three goals of the project were to involve HRMD personnel in desktop computing, link mainframe data to desktop capabilities, and to estimate training needs for the division. The project resulted in increased usage of personal computers by Awards specialists, an increased awareness of LaRC resources to help perform tasks, and personal computer output that was used in presentation of information to center personnel. In addition, the necessary skills for HRMD personal computer users were identified. The Awards Office was chosen for the project because of the consistency of their data requests and the desire of employees in that area to use the personal computer.

  4. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  5. Risk factors for neck and upper extremity disorders among computers users and the effect of interventions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan H Andersen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To summarize systematic reviews that 1 assessed the evidence for causal relationships between computer work and the occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, or 2 reported on intervention studies among computer users/or office workers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched for reviews published between 1999 and 2010. Additional publications were provided by content area experts. The primary author extracted all data using a purpose-built form, while two of the authors evaluated the quality of the reviews using recommended standard criteria from AMSTAR; disagreements were resolved by discussion. The quality of evidence syntheses in the included reviews was assessed qualitatively for each outcome and for the interventions. Altogether, 1,349 review titles were identified, 47 reviews were retrieved for full text relevance assessment, and 17 reviews were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. The degrees of focus and rigorousness of these 17 reviews were highly variable. Three reviews on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome were rated moderate to high quality, 8 reviews on risk factors for UEMSDs ranged from low to moderate/high quality, and 6 reviews on intervention studies were of moderate to high quality. The quality of the evidence for computer use as a risk factor for CTS was insufficient, while the evidence for computer use and UEMSDs was moderate regarding pain complaints and limited for specific musculoskeletal disorders. From the reviews on intervention studies no strong evidence based recommendations could be given. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Computer use is associated with pain complaints, but it is still not very clear if this association is causal. The evidence for specific disorders or diseases is limited. No effective interventions have yet been documented.

  6. Risk Factors for Neck and Upper Extremity Disorders among Computers Users and the Effect of Interventions: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Johan H.; Fallentin, Nils; Thomsen, Jane F.; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    Background To summarize systematic reviews that 1) assessed the evidence for causal relationships between computer work and the occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs), or 2) reported on intervention studies among computer users/or office workers. Methodology/Principal Findings PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched for reviews published between 1999 and 2010. Additional publications were provided by content area experts. The primary author extracted all data using a purpose-built form, while two of the authors evaluated the quality of the reviews using recommended standard criteria from AMSTAR; disagreements were resolved by discussion. The quality of evidence syntheses in the included reviews was assessed qualitatively for each outcome and for the interventions. Altogether, 1,349 review titles were identified, 47 reviews were retrieved for full text relevance assessment, and 17 reviews were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. The degrees of focus and rigorousness of these 17 reviews were highly variable. Three reviews on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome were rated moderate to high quality, 8 reviews on risk factors for UEMSDs ranged from low to moderate/high quality, and 6 reviews on intervention studies were of moderate to high quality. The quality of the evidence for computer use as a risk factor for CTS was insufficient, while the evidence for computer use and UEMSDs was moderate regarding pain complaints and limited for specific musculoskeletal disorders. From the reviews on intervention studies no strong evidence based recommendations could be given. Conclusions/Significance Computer use is associated with pain complaints, but it is still not very clear if this association is causal. The evidence for specific disorders or diseases is limited. No effective interventions have yet been documented. PMID:21589875

  7. Risk factors for neck and upper extremity disorders among computers users and the effect of interventions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Johan H; Fallentin, Nils; Thomsen, Jane F; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2011-05-12

    To summarize systematic reviews that 1) assessed the evidence for causal relationships between computer work and the occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs), or 2) reported on intervention studies among computer users/or office workers. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched for reviews published between 1999 and 2010. Additional publications were provided by content area experts. The primary author extracted all data using a purpose-built form, while two of the authors evaluated the quality of the reviews using recommended standard criteria from AMSTAR; disagreements were resolved by discussion. The quality of evidence syntheses in the included reviews was assessed qualitatively for each outcome and for the interventions. Altogether, 1,349 review titles were identified, 47 reviews were retrieved for full text relevance assessment, and 17 reviews were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. The degrees of focus and rigorousness of these 17 reviews were highly variable. Three reviews on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome were rated moderate to high quality, 8 reviews on risk factors for UEMSDs ranged from low to moderate/high quality, and 6 reviews on intervention studies were of moderate to high quality. The quality of the evidence for computer use as a risk factor for CTS was insufficient, while the evidence for computer use and UEMSDs was moderate regarding pain complaints and limited for specific musculoskeletal disorders. From the reviews on intervention studies no strong evidence based recommendations could be given. Computer use is associated with pain complaints, but it is still not very clear if this association is causal. The evidence for specific disorders or diseases is limited. No effective interventions have yet been documented.

  8. User interface development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggrawal, Bharat

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the development of user interfaces for OS/2 versions of computer codes for the analysis of seals. Current status, new features, work in progress, and future plans are discussed.

  9. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  10. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Users' manual for STARS-2B, 2V, shell theory automated for rotational structures, 2 (buckling, vibrations), digital computer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1973-01-01

    The User's manual for the shell theory automated for rotational structures (STARS) 2B and 2V (buckling, vibrations) is presented. Several features of the program are: (1) arbitrary branching of the shell meridians, (2) arbitrary boundary conditions, (3) minimum input requirements to describe a complex, practical shell of revolution structure, and (4) accurate analysis capability using a minimum number of degrees of freedom.

  11. A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1989-02-01

    This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  12. Improving brain computer interface research through user involvement - The transformative potential of integrating civil society organisations in research projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunuma, Kutoma; Rainey, Stephen; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) often aims to provide solutions for vulnerable populations, such as individuals with diseases, conditions or disabilities that keep them from using traditional interfaces. Such research thereby contributes to the public good. This contribution to the public good corresponds to a broader drive of research and funding policy that focuses on promoting beneficial societal impact. One way of achieving this is to engage with the public. In practical terms this can be done by integrating civil society organisations (CSOs) in research. The open question at the heart of this paper is whether and how such CSO integration can transform the research and contribute to the public good. To answer this question the paper describes five detailed qualitative case studies of research projects including CSOs. The paper finds that transformative impact of CSO integration is possible but by no means assured. It provides recommendations on how transformative impact can be promoted. PMID:28207882

  13. Improving brain computer interface research through user involvement - The transformative potential of integrating civil society organisations in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Bernd Carsten; Wakunuma, Kutoma; Rainey, Stephen; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) often aims to provide solutions for vulnerable populations, such as individuals with diseases, conditions or disabilities that keep them from using traditional interfaces. Such research thereby contributes to the public good. This contribution to the public good corresponds to a broader drive of research and funding policy that focuses on promoting beneficial societal impact. One way of achieving this is to engage with the public. In practical terms this can be done by integrating civil society organisations (CSOs) in research. The open question at the heart of this paper is whether and how such CSO integration can transform the research and contribute to the public good. To answer this question the paper describes five detailed qualitative case studies of research projects including CSOs. The paper finds that transformative impact of CSO integration is possible but by no means assured. It provides recommendations on how transformative impact can be promoted.

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  15. Expressive capabilities of the dialogue language in automated control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubarskiy, Yu.Ya.

    1982-09-01

    Provisions for dialogue communication between operating personnel and a computer are of utmost importance in contemporary industrial automated control systems and in automated systems of dispatcher control. The most advanced dialogue systems are the question-answer systems which enable one to communicate with the computer in a language that is close to the natural professional language of the user. This article describes a method for construction of economical question-answer systems which could be realized with the help of minicomputers, and examination of methods for providing such QAs with the expressive capabilities possessed by a natural language. These capabilities include the ambiguity of meanings of words of the input language (polysemy), some elliptic constructions (surpression), and tropeic forms (different forms of metonymy and metaphors). 9 references.

  16. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  17. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Tîrnăucă

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A relevant goal in human–computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users’ needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system.

  18. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrnăucă, Cristina; Duque, Rafael; Montaña, José L.

    2017-01-01

    A relevant goal in human–computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users’ needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous) and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system. PMID:28726762

  19. DENSJT: statistical shell-model level density computer code description and user's manual. [In FORTRAN for CDC Cyber-70 computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.

    1976-07-01

    The FORTRAN code DENSJT described here is constructed to calculate the appropriate moments and dimensions needed in describing the Gaussian level density for fixed values of the total angular momentum (J) and isobaric spin (T = T/sub 0/). The input for this code is the same as in the usual shell-model codes, namely, the single-particle orbital properties and the antisymmetric two-body matrix elements. To calculate the moments for fixed values of the angular momentum (J) a method described by Ginocchio is used. All of the ''basic inputs'' needed in the reduction formula were derived without any restrictions on the orbitals. The formulas used in DENSJT are described, and the basic inputs are listed in tables. A block flow chart showing the general structure and the specific function of each subroutine is included. All necessary information for the input and output of this code is described. A calculation involving 3 orbitals in the s--d shell took 1 second on a CDC Cyber-70 computer. (RWR)

  20. User's manual of a supporting system for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy. JAERI computational dosimetry system

    CERN Document Server

    Kumada, H

    2002-01-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beam is expected to treat effectively for malignant tumor that is located deeply in the brain. It is indispensable to estimate preliminarily the irradiation dose in the brain of a patient in order to perform the epithermal neutron beam BNCT. Thus, the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can calculate the dose distributions in the brain, has been developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimensional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distribution in the brain by the Monte Carlo code: MCNP, and that displays the dose distribution on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By treating CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to ...

  1. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, B. D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G. A.; Travis, J. R.; Spore, J. W.; Lam, K. L.; Royl, P.; Wilson, T. L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III

  2. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume II. Program implementation. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-09-01

    This portion of the RELAP4/MOD5 User's Manual presents the details of setting up and entering the reactor model to be evaluated. The input card format and arrangement is presented in depth, including not only cards for data but also those for editing and restarting. Problem initalization including pressure distribution and energy balance is discussed. A section entitled ''User Guidelines'' is included to provide modeling recommendations, analysis and verification techniques, and computational difficulty resolution. The section is concluded with a discussion of the computer output form and format.

  3. User 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porras, Jari; Heikkinen, Kari; Kinnula, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The User 2020 vision is of the changing needs and habits of a user in the future digital world. In order to understand the needs of the future users, we need to look at how users and technology have changed during recent years. The different generations of users are products of their own time...... and environment, and each has had its effect on the development of technology. The closer we come to the current generation, the bigger is the effect of technology on the characteristics of that generation. User needs guide the technology and the technology shapes the users. This WWRF Outlook analyses...... this evolutionary process. The basis of this Outlook lies in studies of user generations. Although it’s controversial to do so, users have been divided into generations based on their ability and willingness to use ICT solutions. Whether the users are digital ‘tourists’, ‘immigrants’ or ‘natives’ is mainly...

  4. Hypersonic Experimental and Computational Capability, Improvement and Validation. Volume 2. (l’Hypersonique experimentale et de calcul - capacite, ameliorafion et validation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    and K. Friedrichs . Supersonic Flow and Shock Waves. Springer-Verlag, New York, 1948. A Conical Flow Figure 113: Spherical polar coordinates...flux-split, Gauss -Seidel relaxation nu- merical technique. A five species air model is used (N2, 02, N, O, NO) in the solutions. The computational...Flow Over Spheres", J Fluid Mech 199; 389-405 (1995). 43 Kastell, D., Carl , M., and Eitelberg, G. "Phase Step Holographic Interferometry

  5. User Frustrations as Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weiss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available User frustrations are an excellent source of new product ideas. Starting with this observation, this article describes an approach that entrepreneurs can use to discover business opportunities. Opportunity discovery starts with a problem that the user has, but may not be able to articulate. User-centered design techniques can help elicit those latent needs. The entrepreneur should then try to understand how users are solving their problem today, before proposing a solution that draws on the unique skills and technical capabilities available to the entrepreneur. Finally, an in-depth understanding of the user allows the entrepreneur to hone in on the points of difference and resonance that are the foundation of a strong customer value proposition.

  6. Slycat™ User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossno, Patricia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gittinger, Jaxon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hunt, Warren L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Letter, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Shawn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sielicki, Milosz Aleksander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Slycat™ is a web-based system for performing data analysis and visualization of potentially large quantities of remote, high-dimensional data. Slycat™ specializes in working with ensemble data. An ensemble is a group of related data sets, which typically consists of a set of simulation runs exploring the same problem space. An ensemble can be thought of as a set of samples within a multi-variate domain, where each sample is a vector whose value defines a point in high-dimensional space. To understand and describe the underlying problem being modeled in the simulations, ensemble analysis looks for shared behaviors and common features across the group of runs. Additionally, ensemble analysis tries to quantify differences found in any members that deviate from the rest of the group. The Slycat™ system integrates data management, scalable analysis, and visualization. Results are viewed remotely on a user’s desktop via commodity web clients using a multi-tiered hierarchy of computation and data storage, as shown in Figure 1. Our goal is to operate on data as close to the source as possible, thereby reducing time and storage costs associated with data movement. Consequently, we are working to develop parallel analysis capabilities that operate on High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms, to explore approaches for reducing data size, and to implement strategies for staging computation across the Slycat™ hierarchy. Within Slycat™, data and visual analysis are organized around projects, which are shared by a project team. Project members are explicitly added, each with a designated set of permissions. Although users sign-in to access Slycat™, individual accounts are not maintained. Instead, authentication is used to determine project access. Within projects, Slycat™ models capture analysis results and enable data exploration through various visual representations. Although for scientists each simulation run is a model of real-world phenomena given certain

  7. An auditory multiclass brain-computer interface with natural stimuli: usability evaluation with healthy participants and a motor impaired end user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eSimon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs can serve as muscle independent communication aids. Persons, who are unable to control their eye muscles (e.g. in the completely locked-in state or have severe visual impairments for other reasons, need BCI systems that do not rely on the visual modality. For this reason, BCIs that employ auditory stimuli were suggested. In this study, a multiclass BCI spelling system was implemented that uses animal voices with directional cues to code rows and columns of a letter matrix. To reveal possible training effects with the system, 11 healthy participants performed spelling tasks on two consecutive days. In a second step, the system was tested by a participant with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS in two sessions. In the first session, healthy participants spelled with an average accuracy of 76% (3.29 bits/min that increased to 90% (4.23 bits/min on the second day. Spelling accuracy by the participant with ALS was 20% in the first and 47% in the second session. The results indicate a strong training effect for both the healthy participants and the participant with ALS. While healthy participants reached high accuracies in the first session and second session, accuracies for the participant with ALS were not sufficient for satisfactory communication in both sessions. More training sessions might be needed to improve spelling accuracies. The study demonstrated the feasibility of the auditory BCI with healthy users and stresses the importance of training with auditory multiclass BCIs, especially for potential end-users of BCI with disease.

  8. User Problems in Interactive Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldes, Harold

    1984-01-01

    Describes the mechanics of information exchange between the computer and the user of, e.g., a word processing editor. The importance of user orientation, how it is affected by different types of interfaces, and space aids for orienting users in menu-driven or branching programs that present output in page format are discussed. (MBR)

  9. IT Department User Survey Report

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Pete

    2017-01-01

    The CERN computing user community is very heterogeneous consisting of people having varying backgrounds and working environments. The goal of the project is to better understand the user community in order to help IT-CDA improve its services and user support.

  10. User`s guide to the FFTF Plant Operational Data Management System (B1039)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J.V. Jr.

    1994-07-25

    The FFTF Plant Operational Data Management (PODM) System provides capabilities for storing, managing and retrieving data recorded by FFTF plant computers [the Plant Data System (PDS), in particular]. The PODM system is currently implemented on SUN{sup TM} Workstations{sup (R)}. This guide contains a description of the PODM System, and instructions for using programs available for retrieving and processing FFTF data stored in the data base. Section 2.0 provides a brief overview and the background of the system. The organization and content of the data base are described in more detail in Sections 3.0 and 4.0. Available computer programs are described in sections 5.0 and 6.0 while subroutines that can be called by a user`s FORTRAN program are described in section 7.0.

  11. Future computing needs for Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    The following recommendations are made: (1) Significant additional computing capacity and capability beyond the present procurement should be provided by 1986. A working group with representation from the principal computer user community should be formed to begin immediately to develop the technical specifications. High priority should be assigned to providing a large user memory, software portability and a productive computing environment. (2) A networked system of VAX-equivalent super-mini computers should be established with at least one such computer dedicated to each reasonably large experiment for both online and offline analysis. The laboratory staff responsible for mini computers should be augmented in order to handle the additional work of establishing, maintaining and coordinating this system. (3) The laboratory should move decisively to a more fully interactive environment. (4) A plan for networking both inside and outside the laboratory should be developed over the next year. (5) The laboratory resources devoted to computing, including manpower, should be increased over the next two to five years. A reasonable increase would be 50% over the next two years increasing thereafter to a level of about twice the present one. (6) A standing computer coordinating group, with membership of experts from all the principal computer user constituents of the laboratory, should

  12. Percept User Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kennon, Stephen Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document is the main user guide for the Sierra/Percept capabilities including the mesh_adapt and mesh_transfer tools. Basic capabilities for uniform mesh refinement (UMR) and mesh transfers are discussed. Examples are used to provide illustration. Future versions of this manual will include more advanced features such as geometry and mesh smoothing. Additionally, all the options for the mesh_adapt code will be described in detail. Capabilities for local adaptivity in the context of offline adaptivity will also be included. This page intentionally left blank.

  13. Computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. The second volume describes the computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of the system.

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  15. Appendices to the user's manual for a computer program for the emulation/simulation of a space station environmental control and life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosy, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A user's Manual for the Emulation Simulation Computer Model was published previously. The model consisted of a detailed model (emulation) of a SAWD CO2 removal subsystem which operated with much less detailed (simulation) models of a cabin, crew, and condensing and sensible heat exchangers. The purpose was to explore the utility of such an emulation/simulation combination in the design, development, and test of a piece of ARS hardware - SAWD. Extensions to this original effort are presented. The first extension is an update of the model to reflect changes in the SAWD control logic which resulted from the test. In addition, slight changes were also made to the SAWD model to permit restarting and to improve the iteration technique. The second extension is the development of simulation models for more pieces of air and water processing equipment. Models are presented for: EDC, Molecular Sieve, Bosch, Sabatier, a new condensing heat exchanger, SPE, SFWES, Catalytic Oxidizer, and multifiltration. The third extension is to create two system simulations using these models. The first system presented consists of one air and one water processing system, the second a potential Space Station air revitalization system.

  16. A Practical Guide for Exploiting FBCB2 Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leibrecht, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    ... Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2). The Leader's Primer for Exploiting FBCB2 describes twenty-two major FBCB2 capabilities, the tactical significance of each capability, the digital operator and user tasks involved in employing each...

  17. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  19. WELLOG: computer software system for analyzing and plotting well log data (a user's guide to WELLOG. REV2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, J.W.; Killpack, T.J.; Glenn, W.E.; Nutter, C.

    1980-11-01

    WELLOG is a software system that has been developed to plot digitized well log data in a manner suitable for analysis. Multiple logs can be plotted side by side for correlation analysis, and up to three logs can be plotted on a cross plot. Data entry, editing, and modification functions are also provided by the program. Digitizing is accomplished by a TEKTRONIX 4954 (on-line) digitizing tablet, and plotting is done on a TEKTRONIX 4014 graphics terminal, a STATOS 42 electrostatic plotter, or a CALCOMP pen plotter using a device independent plotting system. This program (WELLOG.REV2) is not as system-dependent as the former version (WELLOG.REV1). The user must supply a program to digitize the data and supply subroutines to interface the program with file manipulation and plotting routines of their system. One major improvement is the use of an on-line digitizing system whereby the program accesses disk files rather than reading the data from tape. In REV2 the merge file has been automated such that the file is initialized automatically upon creation and also delete protected. The randomly spaced data capabilities have been greatly improved allowing the averaging and cross plotting of the data. Routines have been added which allow all of the cross plots excepting the Z-plot to be printed on a line printer. Dresser Atlas' A-K plot has also been added. The program is almost completely self-contained needing only a few interfacing and system subroutines.

  20. Research report: User's manual for computer program AT81y003 SHABERTH. Steady state and transient thermal analysis of a shaft bearing system including ball, cylindrical and tapered roller bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, G. B.; Kleckner, R. J.; Ragen, M. A.; Sheynin, L.

    1981-01-01

    The SHABERTH program is capable of simulating the thermomechanical performance of a load support system consisting of a flexible shaft supported by up to five rolling element bearings. Any combination of ball, cylindrical, and tapered roller bearings can be used to support the shaft. The user can select models in calculating lubricant film thickness and traction forces. The formulation of the cage pocket/rolling element interaction model was revised to improve solution numerical convergence characteristics.