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Sample records for computerised clinical decision

  1. [A computerised clinical decision-support system for the management of depression in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; Comín, Eva; Cavero, Myriam; Pérez, Víctor; Molina, Cristina; Palao, Diego

    Despite its clinical relevance and its importance as a public health problem, there are major gaps in the management of depression. Evidence-based clinical guidelines are useful to improve processes and clinical outcomes. In order to make their implementation easier these guidelines have been transformed into computerised clinical decision support systems. In this article, a description is presented on the basics and characteristics of a new computerised clinical guideline for the management of major depression, developed in the public health system in Catalonia. This tool helps the clinician to establish reliable and accurate diagnoses of depression, to choose the best treatment a priori according to the disease and the patient characteristics. It also emphasises the importance of systematic monitoring to assess the clinical course, and to adjust therapeutic interventions to the patient's needs at all times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Advancing beyond the system: telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning using a computerised decision support system for patients with COPD - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barken, Tina Lien; Thygesen, Elin; Söderhamn, Ulrika

    2017-12-28

    Telemedicine is changing traditional nursing care, and entails nurses performing advanced and complex care within a new clinical environment, and monitoring patients at a distance. Telemedicine practice requires complex disease management, advocating that the nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes are supported. Computerised decision support systems are being used increasingly to assist reasoning and decision-making in different situations. However, little research has focused on the clinical reasoning of nurses using a computerised decision support system in a telemedicine setting. Therefore, the objective of the study is to explore the process of telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning when using a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The factors influencing the reasoning and decision-making processes were investigated. In this ethnographic study, a combination of data collection methods, including participatory observations, the think-aloud technique, and a focus group interview was employed. Collected data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. When telemedicine nurses used a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with complex, unstable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two categories emerged: "the process of telemedicine nurses' reasoning to assess health change" and "the influence of the telemedicine setting on nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes". An overall theme, termed "advancing beyond the system", represented the connection between the reasoning processes and the telemedicine work and setting, where being familiar with the patient functioned as a foundation for the nurses' clinical reasoning process. In the telemedicine setting, when supported by a computerised decision support system, nurses' reasoning was enabled by the continuous flow of digital clinical data, regular video-mediated contact and shared decision

  4. Computerised clinical decision support systems to improve medication safety in long-term care homes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasinghe, Keshini Madara

    2015-05-12

    Computerised clinical decision support systems (CCDSS) are used to improve the quality of care in various healthcare settings. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CCDSS on improving medication safety in long-term care homes (LTC). Medication safety in older populations is an important health concern as inappropriate medication use can elevate the risk of potentially severe outcomes (ie, adverse drug reactions, ADR). With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the growing ageing population and increasing number of medication-related health issues in LTC, strategies to improve medication safety are essential. Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane Library. Three groups of keywords were combined: those relating to LTC, medication safety and CCDSS. One reviewer undertook screening and quality assessment. Overall findings suggest that CCDSS in LTC improved the quality of prescribing decisions (ie, appropriate medication orders), detected ADR, triggered warning messages (ie, related to central nervous system side effects, drug-associated constipation, renal insufficiency) and reduced injury risk among older adults. CCDSS have received little attention in LTC, as attested by the limited published literature. With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the ageing population and increased workload for health professionals, merely relying on physicians' judgement on medication safety would not be sufficient. CCDSS to improve medication safety and enhance the quality of prescribing decisions are essential. Analysis of review findings indicates that CCDSS are beneficial, effective and have potential to improve medication safety in LTC; however, the use of CCDSS in LTC is scarce. Careful assessment on the impact of CCDSS on medication safety and further modifications to existing CCDSS are recommended for wider acceptance. Due to scant evidence in the current literature, further research on implementation and

  5. Computerised decision support systems for healthcare professionals: an interpretative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Majeed, Azeem; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Computerised decision support systems are designed to support clinicians in making decisions and thereby enhance the quality and safety of care. We aimed to undertake an interpretative review of the empirical evidence on computerised decision support systems, their contexts of use, and summarise evidence on the effectiveness of these tools and insights into how these can be successfully implemented and adopted. We systematically searched the empirical literature to identify systematic literature reviews on computerised decision support applications and their impact on the quality and safety of healthcare delivery over a 13-year period (1997-2010). The databases searched included: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Methodology Register, The Health Technology Assessment Database, and The National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database. To be eligible for inclusion, systematic reviews needed to address computerised decision support systems, and at least one of the following: impact on safety; quality; or organisational, implementation or adoption considerations. Our searches yielded 121 systematic reviews relating to eHealth, of which we identified 41 as investigating computerised decision support systems. These indicated that, whilst there was a lack of investigating potential risks, such tools can result in improvements in practitioner performance in the promotion of preventive care and guideline adherence, particularly if specific information is available in real time and systems are effectively integrated into clinical workflows. However, the evidence regarding impact on patient outcomes was less clear-cut with reviews finding either no, inconsistent or modest benefits. Whilst the potential of clinical decision support systems in improving, in particular, practitioner performance is considerable, such technology may

  6. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1: cluster randomised trial of computerised clinical decision support for paramedics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Anne Snooks

    Full Text Available To evaluate effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of Computerised Clinical Decision Support (CCDS for paramedics attending older people who fall.Cluster trial randomised by paramedic; modelling.13 ambulance stations in two UK emergency ambulance services.42 of 409 eligible paramedics, who attended 779 older patients for a reported fall.Intervention paramedics received CCDS on Tablet computers to guide patient care. Control paramedics provided care as usual. One service had already installed electronic data capture.Effectiveness: patients referred to falls service, patient reported quality of life and satisfaction, processes of care.Further emergency contacts or death within one month.Costs and quality of life. We used findings from published Community Falls Prevention Trial to model cost-effectiveness.17 intervention paramedics used CCDS for 54 (12.4% of 436 participants. They referred 42 (9.6% to falls services, compared with 17 (5.0% of 343 participants seen by 19 control paramedics [Odds ratio (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.72]. No adverse events were related to the intervention. Non-significant differences between groups included: subsequent emergency contacts (34.6% versus 29.1%; OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.72; quality of life (mean SF12 differences: MCS -0.74, 95% CI -2.83 to +1.28; PCS -0.13, 95% CI -1.65 to +1.39 and non-conveyance (42.0% versus 36.7%; OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.52. However ambulance job cycle time was 8.9 minutes longer for intervention patients (95% CI 2.3 to 15.3. Average net cost of implementing CCDS was £208 per patient with existing electronic data capture, and £308 without. Modelling estimated cost per quality-adjusted life-year at £15,000 with existing electronic data capture; and £22,200 without.Intervention paramedics referred twice as many participants to falls services with no difference in safety. CCDS is potentially cost-effective, especially with existing electronic data capture.ISRCTN Register ISRCTN

  7. Computerised decision support systems for healthcare professionals: an interpretative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Cresswell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Computerised decision support systems are designed to support clinicians in making decisions and thereby enhance the quality and safety of care. We aimed to undertake an interpretative review of the empirical evidence on computerised decision support systems, their contexts of use, and summarise evidence on the effectiveness of these tools and insights into how these can be successfully implemented and adopted.Methods We systematically searched the empirical literature to identify systematic literature reviews on computerised decision support applications and their impact on the quality and safety of healthcare delivery over a 13-year period (1997–2010. The databases searched included: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Methodology Register, The Health Technology Assessment Database, and The National Health Service (NHS Economic Evaluation Database. To be eligible for inclusion, systematic reviews needed to address computerised decision support systems, and at least one of the following: impact on safety; quality; or organisational, implementation or adoption considerations.Results Our searches yielded 121 systematic reviews relating to eHealth, of which we identified 41 as investigating computerised decision support systems. These indicated that, whilst there was a lack of investigating potential risks, such tools can result in improvements in practitioner performance in the promotion of preventive care and guideline adherence, particularly if specific information is available in real time and systems are effectively integrated into clinical workflows. However, the evidence regarding impact on patient outcomes was less clear-cut with reviews finding either no, inconsistent or modest benefits.Conclusions Whilst the potential of clinical decision support systems in improving, in particular

  8. The design and implementation of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) as a strategy to improve nursing students' clinical reasoning skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kerry; Dempsey, Jennifer; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Noble, Danielle; Hickey, Noelene; Jeong, Sarah; Hunter, Sharyn; Norton, Carol

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design and testing of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) which was constructed to enable student nurses to "think like a nurse." The ICDSF was based on a model of clinical reasoning. Teaching student nurses to reason clinically is important as poor clinical reasoning skills can lead to "failure-to rescue" of deteriorating patients. The framework of the ICDSF was based on nursing concepts to encourage deep learning and transferability of knowledge. The principles of active student participation, situated cognition to solve problems, authenticity, and cognitive rehearsal were used to develop the ICDSF. The ICDSF was designed in such a way that students moved through it in a step-wise fashion and were required to achieve competency at each step before proceeding to the next. The quality of the ICDSF was evaluated using a questionairre survey, students' written comments and student assessment measures on a pilot and the ICDSF. Overall students were highly satisfied with the clinical scenarios of the ICDSF and believed they were an interesting and useful way to engage in authentic clinical learning. They also believed the ICDSF was useful in developing cognitive skills such as clinical reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making. Some reported issues were the need for good technical support and the lack of face to face contact when using e-learning. Some students also believed the ICDSF was less useful than actual clinical placements. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyborg practices: call-handlers and computerised decision support systems in urgent and emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Catherine; Halford, Susan; Turnbull, Joanne; Prichard, Jane

    2014-06-01

    This article draws on data collected during a 2-year project examining the deployment of a computerised decision support system. This computerised decision support system was designed to be used by non-clinical staff for dealing with calls to emergency (999) and urgent care (out-of-hours) services. One of the promises of computerised decisions support technologies is that they can 'hold' vast amounts of sophisticated clinical knowledge and combine it with decision algorithms to enable standardised decision-making by non-clinical (clerical) staff. This article draws on our ethnographic study of this computerised decision support system in use, and we use our analysis to question the 'automated' vision of decision-making in healthcare call-handling. We show that embodied and experiential (human) expertise remains central and highly salient in this work, and we propose that the deployment of the computerised decision support system creates something new, that this conjunction of computer and human creates a cyborg practice.

  10. MOIRA: a computerised decision support system for the management of radionuclide contaminated freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Brittain, John E.; Hakanson, Lars; Heling, Rudie; Hofman, Dmitry; Monte, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    The radiation dose resulting from contamination of freshwater ecosystems due to the release of radioactive substances into the environment may be reduced by applying suitable countermeasures. Despite their benefits, intervention strategies may have detrimental effects of economic, ecological and social nature. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess, by objective criteria, the global cost-benefit balance of different options. The MOIRA project (A MOdel based computerised system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems) has developed a user-friendly, computerised tool that will allow decision makers to choose optimal intervention strategies for freshwater ecosystems with different contamination scenarios. The aim of the paper is to briefly describe the main components of the MOIRA system and to demonstrate its application using real case based scenarios. (author)

  11. The effectiveness of computerised decision support on antibiotic use in hospitals: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been shown to be an important determinant of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Health information technology (HIT) in the form of Computerised Decision Support (CDS) represents an option for improving antimicrobial prescribing and containing AMR. Objectives To evaluate the evidence for CDS in improving quantitative and qualitative measures of antibiotic prescribing in inpatient hospital settings. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted of articles published from inception to 20th December 2014 using eight electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, HMIC and PsychINFo. An updated systematic literature search was conducted from January 1st 2015 to October 1st 2016 using PUBMED. The search strategy used combinations of the following terms: (electronic prescribing) OR (clinical decision support) AND (antibiotic or antibacterial or antimicrobial) AND (hospital or secondary care or inpatient). Studies were evaluated for quality using a 10-point rating scale. Results Eighty-one studies were identified matching the inclusion criteria. Seven outcome measures were evaluated: adequacy of antibiotic coverage, mortality, volume of antibiotic usage, length of stay, antibiotic cost, compliance with guidelines, antimicrobial resistance, and CDS implementation and uptake. Meta-analysis of pooled outcomes showed CDS significantly improved the adequacy of antibiotic coverage (n = 13; odds ratio [OR], 2.11 [95% CI, 1.67 to 2.66, p ≤ 0.00001]). Also, CDS was associated with marginally lowered mortality (n = 20; OR, 0.85 [CI, 0.75 to 0.96, p = 0.01]). CDS was associated with lower antibiotic utilisation, increased compliance with antibiotic guidelines and reductions in antimicrobial resistance. Conflicting effects of CDS on length of stay, antibiotic costs and system uptake were also noted. Conclusions CDS has the potential to improve the adequacy of antibiotic

  12. The effectiveness of computerised decision support on antibiotic use in hospitals: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Curtis

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been shown to be an important determinant of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Health information technology (HIT in the form of Computerised Decision Support (CDS represents an option for improving antimicrobial prescribing and containing AMR.To evaluate the evidence for CDS in improving quantitative and qualitative measures of antibiotic prescribing in inpatient hospital settings.A systematic literature search was conducted of articles published from inception to 20th December 2014 using eight electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, HMIC and PsychINFo. An updated systematic literature search was conducted from January 1st 2015 to October 1st 2016 using PUBMED. The search strategy used combinations of the following terms: (electronic prescribing OR (clinical decision support AND (antibiotic or antibacterial or antimicrobial AND (hospital or secondary care or inpatient. Studies were evaluated for quality using a 10-point rating scale.Eighty-one studies were identified matching the inclusion criteria. Seven outcome measures were evaluated: adequacy of antibiotic coverage, mortality, volume of antibiotic usage, length of stay, antibiotic cost, compliance with guidelines, antimicrobial resistance, and CDS implementation and uptake. Meta-analysis of pooled outcomes showed CDS significantly improved the adequacy of antibiotic coverage (n = 13; odds ratio [OR], 2.11 [95% CI, 1.67 to 2.66, p ≤ 0.00001]. Also, CDS was associated with marginally lowered mortality (n = 20; OR, 0.85 [CI, 0.75 to 0.96, p = 0.01]. CDS was associated with lower antibiotic utilisation, increased compliance with antibiotic guidelines and reductions in antimicrobial resistance. Conflicting effects of CDS on length of stay, antibiotic costs and system uptake were also noted.CDS has the potential to improve the adequacy of antibiotic coverage and marginally decrease mortality in

  13. Mortality Benefits of Antibiotic Computerised Decision Support System: Modifying Effects of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Angela L. P.; Lye, David C.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic computerised decision support systems (CDSSs) are shown to improve antibiotic prescribing, but evidence of beneficial patient outcomes is limited. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a 1500-bed tertiary-care hospital in Singapore, to evaluate the effectiveness of the hospital’s antibiotic CDSS on patients’ clinical outcomes, and the modification of these effects by patient factors. To account for clustering, we used multilevel logistic regression models. One-quarter of 1886 eligible inpatients received CDSS-recommended antibiotics. Receipt of antibiotics according to CDSS’s recommendations seemed to halve mortality risk of patients (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.10, P = 0.09). Patients aged ≤65 years had greater mortality benefit (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.20-1.00, P = 0.05) than patients that were older than 65 (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.91-1.82, P = 0.16). No effect was observed on incidence of Clostridium difficile (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.34-3.01), and multidrug-resistant organism (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.42-2.71) infections. No increase in infection-related readmission (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.48-2.79) was found in survivors. Receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotics reduced mortality risk in patients aged 65 years or younger and did not increase the risk in older patients. Physicians should be informed of the benefits to increase their acceptance of CDSS recommendations.

  14. System requirements for a computerised patient record information system at a busy primary health care clinic

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    PJ Blignaut

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A prototyping approach was used to determine the essential system requirements of a computerised patient record information system for a typical township primary health care clinic. A pilot clinic was identified and the existing manual system and business processes in this clinic was studied intensively before the first prototype was implemented. Interviews with users, incidental observations and analysis of actual data entered were used as primary techniques to refine the prototype system iteratively until a system with an acceptable data set and adequate functionalities were in place. Several non-functional and user-related requirements were also discovered during the prototyping period.

  15. MOIRA: a computerised decision support system for the restoration of radionuclide contaminated freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Brittain, J.E.; Hakanson, Lars; Heling, Rudie; Hofman, Dmitry; Monte, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    The radiation dose resulting from contamination of freshwater ecosystems due to the release of radioactive substances into the environment may be reduced by applying suitable countermeasures. The options for intervention are wide-ranging and can be broadly grouped into three main categories: chemical, physical and social countermeasures. In some cases, a combination of actions -or even the no action- may be the optimal strategy. Despite their benefits, intervention strategies may have detrimental effects of economic, ecological and social nature. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess, by objective criteria, the global cost-benefit balance of different options. The MOIRA project (A MOdel based computerised system for management support to Identity optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems, European Commission contract FI4P-CT96-0036) has developed a user-friendly, computerised tool that will allow decision makers to choose optimal intervention strategies for freshwater ecosystems with different contamination scenarios. To achieve that goal, the MOIRA software system -apart from a user-friendly interface- incorporates several innovative aspects: - eographical information system (GIS) and databases to get to get the values of the model parameters at different locations in Europe. - redictive ecosystem models for the behaviour of radionuclides (namely Cs-137 and Sr-90) in catchments, lakes and rivers, complemented with models of the effect of the countermeasures on the environmental contamination levels. These models are based on an extensive use of aggregate parameters' that summarise, in single quantities, the effects of a variety of environmental processes. Methods for critical model testing, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have been applied to them getting a high reliability. - cosystem index (EI) to handle the influence chemical remedial measures may have on the structure, reproduction and biomass of key

  16. Improving antibiotic prescribing for adults with community acquired pneumonia: Does a computerised decision support system achieve more than academic detailing alone? – a time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black James F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal method to encourage uptake of clinical guidelines in hospitals is not known. Several strategies have been suggested. This study evaluates the impact of academic detailing and a computerised decision support system (CDSS on clinicians' prescribing behaviour for patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods The management of all patients presenting to the emergency department over three successive time periods was evaluated; the baseline, academic detailing and CDSS periods. The rate of empiric antibiotic prescribing that was concordant with recommendations was studied over time comparing pre and post periods and using an interrupted time series analysis. Results The odds ratio for concordant therapy in the academic detailing period, after adjustment for age, illness severity and suspicion of aspiration, compared with the baseline period was OR = 2.79 [1.88, 4.14], p Conclusion Deployment of a computerised decision support system was associated with an early improvement in antibiotic prescribing practices which was greater than the changes seen with academic detailing. The sustainability of this intervention requires further evaluation.

  17. Clinical effectiveness of online computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy without support for depression in primary care: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, L.E.; Gerhards, S.A.H.; Arntz, A.; Riper, H.; Metsemakers, J.F.M.; Evers, S.M.; Severens, J.L.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (CCBT) might offer a solution to the current undertreatment of depression. AIMS: To determine the clinical effectiveness of online, unsupported CCBT for depression in primary care. METHOD: Three hundred and three people with depression were

  18. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: Design of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental health problem in the general population, associated with a substantial impact on quality of life and societal costs. However, many depressed patients in primary care do not receive the care they need. Reason for this is that pharmacotherapy is only effective in severely depressed patients and psychological treatments in primary care are scarce and costly. A more feasible treatment in primary care might be computerised cognitive behavioural therapy. This can be a self-help computer program based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. Although previous studies suggest that computerised cognitive behavioural therapy is effective, more research is necessary. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to evaluate the (cost- effectiveness of online computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care. Methods/Design In a randomised trial we will compare (a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy with (b treatment as usual by a GP, and (c computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in combination with usual GP care. Three hundred mild to moderately depressed patients (aged 18–65 will be recruited in the general population by means of a large-scale Internet-based screening (N = 200,000. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three treatment groups. Primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is the severity of depression. Other outcomes include psychological distress, social functioning, and dysfunctional beliefs. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective, in which all costs will be related to clinical effectiveness and health-related quality of life. All outcome assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline, two, three, six, nine, and twelve months. Costs are measured on a monthly basis. A time horizon of one year will be used without long-term extrapolation of either costs or quality of life

  19. Substantial reduction of inappropriate tablet splitting with computerised decision support: a prospective intervention study assessing potential benefit and harm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinzler Renate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently ambulatory patients break one in four tablets before ingestion. Roughly 10% of them are not suitable for splitting because they lack score lines or because enteric or modified release coating is destroyed impairing safety and effectiveness of the medication. We assessed impact and safety of computerised decision support on the inappropriate prescription of split tablets. Methods We performed a prospective intervention study in a 1680-bed university hospital. Over a 15-week period we evaluated all electronically composed medication regimens and determined the fraction of tablets and capsules that demanded inappropriate splitting. In a subsequent intervention phase of 15 weeks duration for 10553 oral drugs divisibility characteristics were indicated in the system. In addition, an alert was generated and displayed during the prescription process whenever the entered dosage regimen demanded inappropriate splitting (splitting of capsules, unscored tablets, or scored tablets unsuitable for the intended fragmentation. Results During the baseline period 12.5% of all drugs required splitting and 2.7% of all drugs (257/9545 required inappropriate splitting. During the intervention period the frequency of inappropriate splitting was significantly reduced (1.4% of all drugs (146/10486; p = 0.0008. In response to half of the alerts (69/136 physicians adjusted the medication regimen. In the other half (67/136 no corrections were made although a switch to more suitable drugs (scored tablets, tablets with lower strength, liquid formulation was possible in 82% (55/67. Conclusion This study revealed that computerised decision support can immediately reduce the frequency of inappropriate splitting without introducing new safety hazards.

  20. Computerising documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear power generation industry is faced with public concern and government pressures over safety, efficiency and risk. Operators throughout the industry are addressing these issues with the aid of a new technology - technical document management systems (TDMS). Used for strategic and tactical advantage, the systems enable users to scan, archive, retrieve, store, edit, distribute worldwide and manage the huge volume of documentation (paper drawings, CAD data and film-based information) generated in building, maintaining and ensuring safety in the UK's power plants. The power generation industry has recognized that the management and modification of operation critical information is vital to the safety and efficiency of its power plants. Regulatory pressure from the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) to operate within strict safety margins or lose Site Licences has prompted the need for accurate, up-to-data documentation. A document capture and management retrieval system provides a powerful cost-effective solution, giving rapid access to documentation in a tightly controlled environment. The computerisation of documents and plans is discussed in this article. (Author)

  1. IMPACT OF A COMPUTERISED OUTPATIENT PRESCRIPTION PRINTING SYSTEM (COPPS) ON MELATONIN PRESCRIBING IN A COMMUNITY CHILD HEALTH CLINIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Liz; Skingle, Jum

    2016-09-01

    COPPS is a computerised outpatient prescription printing system for WP10 prescriptions. It aims to improve the quality and safety of service, as patients will be provided with a legible, complete prescription to take to a community pharmacy of their choice. Patients requiring specialist medicines will have their medicines dispensed more promptly by the hospital pharmacy or medicines home care provider. The software ensures prescriptions contain all the required information to allow safe dispensing, reducing frequency of delays. Hospital pharmacy staff have more time to explain their medicines to patients, promoting shared decision making and improved adherence leading to better health outcomes and reduced waste and harm; provide information at the time of prescribing to increase adherence to agreed care pathways and prescribing practice. It facilitates attribution of prescribing, improves governance and is more easily audited and reported; capture the costs of medicines dispensed for out-patients which will be measured using information from the hospital pharmacy computer system and CASPA.The aim of this audit was to evaluate the effect the introduction of COPPS has had on compliance with the UHB formulary, local melatonin pathway and its impact on expenditure for melatonin within the community child health clinic. The pathway states that the starting dose is 2 mg Circadin® tablet or liquid melatonin 1 mg/1 ml if necessary for individual patients. Community Child Health prescribing data shows their highest expenditure is on melatonin. This was therefore chosen to test the impact of COPPS for a pilot study.Six months prescribing data (September 14-March 15) was obtained from COPPS. This was compared to data obtained for WP10's from hospital forms analysis for the same months the previous year (September 13-March 14) RESULTS: A 55% reduction was seen in the prescribing of non-formulary melatonin and a reduction in expenditure on melatonin by 18% or £16

  2. Patient Dashboard: the use of a colour-coded computerised clinical reminder in Whanganui regional general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, John; Nicholson, Rick; Leech, Ken

    2011-12-01

    Clinical reminders have been shown to help general practice achieve an increase in some preventive care items, especially if they identify a patient's eligibility for the target item, prompt clinicians at the right time, provide a fast link to management tools and facilitate clinical recording. WRPHO has introduced the Patient Dashboard clinical reminder and monitored its impact on health targets. This paper reports the impact of a computerised colour-coded clinical reminder on achieving agreed health targets in Whanganui regional practices. Patient Dashboard was developed from previous versions in Auckland and Northland and provided to Whanganui regional practices with Primary Health Organisation (PHO) support. The Dashboard was linked with existing and new clinical management tools which automatically updated clinical records. Data from practices was pooled by Whanganui Regional Primary Health Organisation and target achievement rates reported over 15 months. Over the initial 15 months of Patient Dashboard use, recording of smoking status increased from 74% to 82% and of alcohol use from 15% to 47%. Screening for diabetes increased from 62% to 74%, cardiovascular risk assessment from 20% to 43%, cervical screening from 71% to 79%, and breast screening from 60% to 80%. Patient Dashboard was associated with increased performance indicators both for those targets which were part of a PHO programme and for targets without additional support.

  3. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  4. Computerised decision support systems in order communication for diagnostic, screening or monitoring test ordering: systematic reviews of the effects and cost-effectiveness of systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C; Moxham, T; Wyatt, J C; Kay, J; Anderson, R; Stein, K

    2010-10-01

    Order communication systems (OCS) are computer applications used to enter diagnostic and therapeutic patient care orders and to view test results. Many potential benefits of OCS have been identified including improvements in clinician ordering patterns, optimisation of clinical time, and aiding communication processes between clinicians and different departments. Many OCS now include computerised decision support systems (CDSS), which are information systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. CDSS match individual patient characteristics to a computerised knowledge base, and software algorithms generate patient-specific recommendations. To investigate which CDSS in OCS are in use within the UK and the impact of CDSS in OCS for diagnostic, screening or monitoring test ordering compared to OCS without CDSS. To determine what features of CDSS are associated with clinician or patient acceptance of CDSS in OCS and what is known about the cost-effectiveness of CDSS in diagnostic, screening or monitoring test OCS compared to OCS without CDSS. A generic search to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database, IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) Xplore digital library, NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) and EconLit, searched between 1974 and 2009 with a total of 22,109 titles and abstracts screened for inclusion. CDSS for diagnostic, screening and monitoring test ordering OCS in use in the UK were identified through contact with the 24 manufacturers/suppliers currently contracted by the National Project for Information Technology (NpfIT) to provide either national or specialist decision support. A generic search to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion in the review was

  5. Automation in an addiction treatment research clinic: computerised contingency management, ecological momentary assessment and a protocol workflow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H; Preston, Kenzie L

    2009-01-01

    A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients' treatment needs and to accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with the provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining and querying the data. We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialised applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for the delivery of behavioural interventions, the transactional electronic diary (TED) system for the management of behavioural assessments and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerised workflow automation and guidance of each participant's daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorised staff. ACM and the TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80 patient capacity, having an annual average of 18,000 patient visits and 7300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarise participant safety data for research oversight. When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff and expansions in research methods.

  6. Interface design recommendations for computerised clinical audit and feedback: Hybrid usability evidence from a research-led system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain

    2016-10-01

    Audit and Feedback (A&F) is a widely used quality improvement technique that measures clinicians' clinical performance and reports it back to them. Computerised A&F (e-A&F) system interfaces may consist of four key components: (1) Summaries of clinical performance; (2) Patient lists; (3) Patient-level data; (4) Recommended actions. There is a lack of evidence regarding how to best design e-A&F interfaces; establishing such evidence is key to maximising usability, and in turn improving patient safety. To evaluate the usability of a novel theoretically-informed and research-led e-A&F system for primary care (the Performance Improvement plaN GeneratoR: PINGR). (1) Describe PINGR's design, rationale and theoretical basis; (2) Identify usability issues with PINGR; (3) Understand how these issues may interfere with the cognitive goals of end-users; (4) Translate the issues into recommendations for the user-centred design of e-A&F systems. Eight experienced health system evaluators performed a usability inspection using an innovative hybrid approach consisting of five stages: (1) Development of representative user tasks, Goals, and Actions; (2) Combining Heuristic Evaluation and Cognitive Walkthrough methods into a single protocol to identify usability issues; (3) Consolidation of issues; (4) Severity rating of consolidated issues; (5) Analysis of issues according to usability heuristics, interface components, and Goal-Action structure. A final list of 47 issues were categorised into 8 heuristic themes. The most error-prone heuristics were 'Consistency and standards' (13 usability issues; 28% of the total) and 'Match between system and real world' (n=10, 21%). The recommended actions component of the PINGR interface had the most usability issues (n=21, 45%), followed by patient-level data (n=5, 11%), patient lists (n=4, 9%), and summaries of clinical performance (n=4, 9%). The most error-prone Actions across all user Goals were: (1) Patient selection from a list; (2) Data

  7. A Computerised Business Ethics Expert System -A new approach to improving the ethical quality of business decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Brenner

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Where unethical business decision-making arises from failures of ethical perception, there is an important role for ethical training and decision-making tools. These may help business people to consider all relevant issues when assessing the ethical status of potential decisions. Ethical training programmes give business people a basic understanding of the principles which underlie ethical judgements and equip them with many of the necessary skills for dealing with the ethical dilemmas which they face in their jobs. Similarly, ethical decision-making tools may guide managers through the various ethical considerations which are relevant to business decision-making and help them to develop their ethical-perceptual skills. Furthermore, by establishing and reinforcing good ethical decision-making practices, training programmes and decision-making tools may also reduce the incidence of self-consciously unethical decision-making. A new approach to improving the ethical quality of business decision-making by the use of computerized business ethics expert systems is proposed. These systems have the potential to guide business people through a process of ethical evaluation while simultaneously fulfilling an educational role, thus providing many of the benefits of both training programmes and decision-making tools. While the prospect of a computer system which could simply make ethical judgements for business people is both unrealistic and undesirable, a system which leads human decision-makers through a structured assessment process has the potential for genuine benefits. Keywords: Expert Systems, Ethical Decision Making

  8. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Ministry of’ Defence, Defence Research Information Centre, UK. Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) Report Secufty C"uMiauion tide Onadtiicadon (U. R, Cor S...DRIC T 8485 COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY ( CAT ) F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA, V. TRO1* ISS R 78/4.Rome, 1.5 Mlarch 1978 (from Italian) B Distribution(f...dello Radiazioni ISSN 0390--6477 F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA. V. TROI Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) March 15, 1978). This paper is a review of

  9. Investigating patients' and general practitioners' views of computerised decision support software for the assessment and management of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Wilson

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion Computer decision support programs are becoming more prevalent, but little is known about their usability and acceptability to both health professionals and consumers. The complexities of cardiovascular risk assessment and management can be adequately managed with such programs. As a contemporary report this study contributes to the growing knowledge required for developers of medical software and decision support systems to better understand the needs of endusers.

  10. The impact of a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) on diagnostic decision-making in children and young people with suspected attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: single-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Chris; Hall, Charlotte L; Guo, Boliang; James, Marilyn; Boadu, Janet; Groom, Madeleine J; Brown, Nikki; Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine; Moldavsky, Maria; Valentine, Althea Z; Walker, Gemma M; Daley, David; Sayal, Kapil; Morriss, Richard

    2018-04-26

    Diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) relies on subjective methods which can lead to diagnostic uncertainty and delay. This trial evaluated the impact of providing a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) report on the speed and accuracy of diagnostic decision-making in children with suspected ADHD. Randomised, parallel, single-blind controlled trial in mental health and community paediatric clinics in England. Participants were 6-17 years-old and referred for ADHD diagnostic assessment; all underwent assessment-as-usual, plus QbTest. Participants and their clinician were randomised to either receive the QbTest report immediately (QbOpen group) or the report was withheld (QbBlind group). The primary outcome was number of consultations until a diagnostic decision confirming/excluding ADHD within 6-months from baseline. Health economic cost-effectiveness and cost utility analysis was conducted. Assessing QbTest Utility in ADHD: A Randomised Controlled Trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02209116). One hundred and thirty-two participants were randomised to QbOpen group (123 analysed) and 135 to QbBlind group (127 analysed). Clinicians with access to the QbTest report (QbOpen) were more likely to reach a diagnostic decision about ADHD (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.04-2.01). At 6-months, 76% of those with a QbTest report had received a diagnostic decision, compared with 50% without. QbTest reduced appointment length by 15% (time ratio 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), increased clinicians' confidence in their diagnostic decisions (odds ratio 1.77, 95% CI 1.09-2.89) and doubled the likelihood of excluding ADHD. There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy. Health economic analysis showed a position of strict dominance; however, cost savings were small suggesting that the impact of providing the QbTest report within this trial can best be viewed as 'cost neutral'. QbTest may increase the

  11. Four Principles for User Interface Design of Computerised Clinical Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    emphasises a focus on how users interact with the system, a focus on how information is provided by the system, and four principles of interaction. The four principles for design of user interfaces for CDSS are summarised as four A’s: All in one, At a glance, At hand and Attention. It is recommended that all...... four interaction principles are integrated in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors....

  12. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory contains descriptions of past and present CDS projects across the Federal Government. It includes Federal projects,...

  13. [Cognitive traps and clinical decisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motterlini, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    We are fallible, we have limited computational capabilities, limited access to information, little memory. Moreover, in everyday life, we feel joy, fear, anger, and other emotions that influence our decisions in a little, "calculated" way. Not everyone, however, is also aware that the mistakes we make are often systematic and therefore, in particular circumstances, are foreseeable. Doctors and patients are constantly called upon to make decisions. They need to identify relevant information (for example, the symptoms or outcome of an examination), formulate a judgment (for example a diagnosis), choose an action course among the various possible ones based on one's own preferences (e.g. medication or surgery), so act. The exact size of the medical error is unknown, but probably huge. In fact, the more we investigate and the more we find. Often these mistakes depend on the cognitive process. Any (rational) decision requires, in particular, an assessment of the possible effects of the action it implements; for example how much pleasure or pain it will cause us. In the medical field, too, the principle of informed consent provides that the patient's preferences and values are to guide clinical choices. Yet, not always the preferences that people express before making an experience match with their preferences after living that experience. Some ingenious experiments suggest (in a seemingly paradoxical way) that before a direct experience, people prefer less pain; after that experience they prefer more, but with a better memory.

  14. Patients' Values in Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Pachur, Thorsten; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas

    2017-09-01

    Shared decision-making involves the participation of patient and dental practitioner. Well-informed decision-making requires that both parties understand important concepts that may influence the decision. This fourth article in a series of 4 aims to discuss the importance of patients' values when a clinical decision is made. We report on how to incorporate important concepts for well-informed, shared decision-making. Here, we present patient values as an important issue, in addition to previously established topics such as the risk of bias of a study, cost-effectiveness of treatment approaches, and a comparison of therapeutic benefit with potential side effects. We provide 2 clinical examples and suggestions for a decision tree, based on the available evidence. The information reported in this article may improve the relationship between patient and dental practitioner, resulting in more well-informed clinical decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Legal Considerations in Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Samuel C.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of legal issues in dental clinical decision making looks at the nature and elements of applicable law, especially malpractice, locus of responsibility, and standards of care. Greater use of formal decision analysis in clinical dentistry and better research on diagnosis and treatment are recommended, particularly in light of increasing…

  16. Computerised Decision Support Systems for the management of freshwater radioecological emergencies: assessment of the state-of-the-art with respect to the experiences and needs of end-users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, D.; Monte, L.; Boyer, P.; Brittain, J.; Donchyts, G.; Gallego, E.; Gheorghiu, D.; Hakanson, L.; Heling, R.; Kerekes, A.; Kocsy, G.; Lepicard, S.; Slavik, O.; Slavnicu, D.; Smith, J.; Zheleznyak, M.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the environmental and radiological consequences of a nuclear accident requires the management of a great deal of data and information as well as the use of predictive models. Computerised Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are essential tools for this kind of complex assessment and for assisting experts with a rational decision process. The present work focuses on the assessment of the main features of selected state-of-the-art CDSS for off-site management of freshwater ecosystems contaminated by radionuclides. This study involved both developers and end-users of the assessed CDSS and was based on practical customisation exercises, installation and application of the decision systems. Potential end-users can benefit from the availability of several ready-to-use CDSS that allow one to run different kinds of models aimed at predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems, evaluating doses to humans, assessing the effectiveness of different kinds of environmental management interventions and ranking these interventions, accounting for their social, economic and environmental impacts. As a result of the present assessment, the importance of CDSS 'integration' became apparent: in many circumstances, different CDSS can be used as complementary tools for the decision-making process. The results of this assessment can also be useful for the future development and improvement of the CDSS. - Research highlights: →The present work focuses on the assessment of the main features of selected state-of-the-art CDSS for the off-site management of freshwater ecosystems contaminated by radionuclides. →Potential end-users can benefit from a number of complementary open, freely-available and ready-to-use CDSS based on validated environmental models aimed at predicting the migration of radionuclides in the aquatic environment, evaluating the doses to man, assessing the effectiveness of different environmental feasible restoration strategies and

  17. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2016-01-01

    and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors...

  18. Decision analysis. Clinical art or Clinical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    having helped some clients. Over the past half century, psychotherapy has faced a series of crises concerned with its transformation from an art to a...clinical science . These include validation of the effectiveness of various forms of therapy, validating elements of treatment programs and

  19. Decision Analysis: Engineering Science or Clinical Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT TR 79-2-97 DECISION ANALYSIS: ENGINEERING SCIENCE OR CLINICAL ART ? by Dennis M. Buede Prepared for Defense Advanced Research...APPLICATIONS OF THE ENGINEER- ING SCIENCE AND CLINICAL ART EXTREMES 9 3.1 Applications of the Engineering Science Approach 9 3.1.1 Mexican electrical...DISCUSSION 29 4.1 Engineering Science versus Clinical Art : A Characterization of When Each is Most Attractive 30 4.2 The Implications of the Engineering

  20. Comparisons between written and computerised patient histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, Martien; Westerman, R. Frans; van Bemmel, Jan H.

    1987-01-01

    Patient histories were obtained from 99 patients in three different ways: by a computerised patient interview (patient record), by the usual written interview (medical record), and by the transcribed record, which was a computerised version of the medical record. Patient complaints, diagnostic

  1. Clinical decision making in veterinary practice

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the factors which influence veterinary surgeons’ clinical decision making during routine consultations. Methods The research takes a qualitative approach using video-cued interviews, in which one of the veterinary surgeon’s own consultations is used as the basis of a semi-structured interview exploring decision making in real cases. The research focuses primarily on small animal consultations in first opinion practice, how...

  2. Clinical decision making: how surgeons do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crebbin, Wendy; Beasley, Spencer W; Watters, David A K

    2013-06-01

    Clinical decision making is a core competency of surgical practice. It involves two distinct types of mental process best considered as the ends of a continuum, ranging from intuitive and subconscious to analytical and conscious. In practice, individual decisions are usually reached by a combination of each, according to the complexity of the situation and the experience/expertise of the surgeon. An expert moves effortlessly along this continuum, according to need, able to apply learned rules or algorithms to specific presentations, choosing these as a result of either pattern recognition or analytical thinking. The expert recognizes and responds quickly to any mismatch between what is observed and what was expected, coping with gaps in information and making decisions even where critical data may be uncertain or unknown. Even for experts, the cognitive processes involved are difficult to articulate as they tend to be very complex. However, if surgeons are to assist trainees in developing their decision-making skills, the processes need to be identified and defined, and the competency needs to be measurable. This paper examines the processes of clinical decision making in three contexts: making a decision about how to manage a patient; preparing for an operative procedure; and reviewing progress during an operative procedure. The models represented here are an exploration of the complexity of the processes, designed to assist surgeons understand how expert clinical decision making occurs and to highlight the challenge of teaching these skills to surgical trainees. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  4. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaud, J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and select the best papers published in 2015 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. The aim was to identify a list of candidate best papers from the retrieved papers that were then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the IMIA editorial team was finally conducted to conclude in the best paper selection. Results Among the 974 retrieved papers, the entire review process resulted in the selection of four best papers. One paper reports on a CDSS routinely applied in pediatrics for more than 10 years, relying on adaptations of the Arden Syntax. Another paper assessed the acceptability and feasibility of an important CPOE evaluation tool in hospitals outside the US where it was developed. The third paper is a systematic, qualitative review, concerning usability flaws of medication-related alerting functions, providing an important evidence-based, methodological contribution in the domain of CDSS design and development in general. Lastly, the fourth paper describes a study quantifying the effect of a complex, continuous-care, guideline-based CDSS on the correctness and completeness of clinicians’ decisions. Conclusions While there are notable examples of routinely used decision support systems, this 2015 review on CDSSs and CPOE systems still shows that, despite methodological contributions, theoretical frameworks, and prototype developments, these technologies are not yet widely spread (at least with their full functionalities) in routine clinical practice. Further research, testing, evaluation, and training are still needed for these tools to be adopted in clinical practice and, ultimately, illustrate

  5. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    able to construct a checklist of a clinical and physiologic model and then a computerised decision support system that will perform two functions: the...the provision of nutritional therapy, and assessment of use by nursing and physician staff KEYWORDS Nutrition, severe burn, decision support... clinical testing. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients Proposal Number: 12340011 W81XWH-12-2-0074 PI: Steven E

  6. Prototype models for the MOIRA computerised system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, Luigi [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Hakanson, Lars [Uppsala, Univ. (Sweden). Institute of Earth Sciences; Brittain, John [Oslo, Univ. (Norway). Zoological Museum

    1997-06-01

    The main aim of the present report is to describe selected models and the principles of the Decision Analysis theory that will be applied to develop the model-based computerised system `MOIRA`. A dose model and a model for predicting radiocaesium migration in lakes and the effects of countermeasures to reduce the contamination levels in the components of lacustrine system are described in detail. The principles for developing prototype models for predicting the migration of {sup 90}Sr in lake abiotic and biotic components are discussed. The environmental models described in the report are based on the use of `collective parameters` which due to mutual compensation effects of different phenomena occurring in complex systems, show low variability when the environmental conditions change. Use of such `collective parameters` not only increases the predictive power of the models, but also increases the practical applicability of the model. Among the main results described in the report, the development of an objective hierarchy table for evaluating the effectiveness of a countermeasure when the economic, social and ecological impacts are accounted for, deserves special attention.

  7. Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Paul; Lovat, Terry

    2016-12-01

    This paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives other than their own, and be attuned to the demands of inter-subjectivity. Applicable to clinical practice, we propose and justify a Habermasian approach as one useful means of achieving what can be described as dialogic consensus. The Habermasian approach builds around, first, his discourse theory of morality as universalizable to all and, second, communicative action as a cooperative search for truth. It is a concrete way to ground the discourse which must be held in complex medical decision-making situations, in its actual reality. Considerations about the theoretical underpinnings of the application of dialogic consensus to clinical practice, and potential difficulties, are explored.

  8. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting.

  9. A distributed clinical decision support system architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker H. El-Sappagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an open and distributed clinical decision support system architecture. This technical architecture takes advantage of Electronic Health Record (EHR, data mining techniques, clinical databases, domain expert knowledge bases, available technologies and standards to provide decision-making support for healthcare professionals. The architecture will work extremely well in distributed EHR environments in which each hospital has its own local EHR, and it satisfies the compatibility, interoperability and scalability objectives of an EHR. The system will also have a set of distributed knowledge bases. Each knowledge base will be specialized in a specific domain (i.e., heart disease, and the model achieves cooperation, integration and interoperability between these knowledge bases. Moreover, the model ensures that all knowledge bases are up-to-date by connecting data mining engines to each local knowledge base. These data mining engines continuously mine EHR databases to extract the most recent knowledge, to standardize it and to add it to the knowledge bases. This framework is expected to improve the quality of healthcare, reducing medical errors and guaranteeing the safety of patients by helping clinicians to make correct, accurate, knowledgeable and timely decisions.

  10. Using the Situated Clinical Decision-Making framework to guide analysis of nurses' clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Mary

    2010-11-01

    Nurses' clinical decision-making is a complex process that holds potential to influence the quality of care provided and patient outcomes. The evolution of nurses' decision-making that occurs with experience has been well documented. In addition, literature includes numerous strategies and approaches purported to support development of nurses' clinical decision-making. There has been, however, significantly less attention given to the process of assessing nurses' clinical decision-making and novice clinical educators are often challenged with knowing how to best support nurses and nursing students in developing their clinical decision-making capacity. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making framework is presented for use by clinical educators: it provides a structured approach to analyzing nursing students' and novice nurses' decision-making in clinical nursing practice, assists educators in identifying specific issues within nurses' clinical decision-making, and guides selection of relevant strategies to support development of clinical decision-making. A series of questions is offered as a guide for clinical educators when assessing nurses' clinical decision-making. The discussion presents key considerations related to analysis of various decision-making components, including common sources of challenge and errors that may occur within nurses' clinical decision-making. An exemplar illustrates use of the framework and guiding questions. Implications of this approach for selection of strategies that support development of clinical decision-making are highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TUW @ TREC Clinical Decision Support Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    and the ShARe/CLEF eHealth Evaluation Lab [8,3] running in 2013 and 2014. Here we briefly describe the goals of the first TREC Clinical Decision...Wendy W. Chapman, David Mart́ınez, Guido Zuccon, and João R. M. Palotti. Overview of the share/clef ehealth evalu- ation lab 2014. In Information Access...Zuccon. Overview of the share/clef ehealth evaluation lab 2013. In Information Access Evaluation. Multilinguality, Multimodality, and Visualization

  12. Is computerised CBT really helpful for adult depression?-A meta-analytic re-evaluation of CCBT for adult depression in terms of clinical implementation and methodological validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Mirai; Yamaguchi, Sosei; Hashimoto, Sora; Sado, Mitsuhiro; Furukawa, Toshi A; McCrone, Paul

    2013-04-15

    Depression is a major cause of disability worldwide, and computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) is expected to be a more augmentative and efficient treatment. According to previous meta-analyses of CCBT, there is a need for a meta-analytic revaluation of the short-term effectiveness of this therapy and for an evaluation of its long-term effects, functional improvement and dropout. Five databases were used (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CENTRAL and CiNii). We included all RCTs with proper concealment and blinding of outcome assessment for the clinical effectiveness of CCBT in adults (aged 18 and over) with depression. Using Cohen's method, the standard mean difference (SMD) for the overall pooled effects across the included studies was estimated with a random effect model. The main outcome measure and the relative risk of dropout were included in the meta-analysis. Fourteen trials met the inclusion criteria, and sixteen comparisons from these were used for the largest meta-analysis ever. All research used appropriate random sequence generation and Intention-to-Treat analyses (ITT), and employed self-reported measures as the primary outcome. For the sixteen comparisons (2807 participants) comparing CCBT and control conditions, the pooled SMD was -0.48 [95% IC -0.63 to -0.33], suggesting similar effect to the past reviews. Also, there was no significant clinical effect at long follow-up and no improvement of function found. Furthermore, a significantly higher drop-out rate was found for CCBT than for controls. When including studies without BDI as a rating scale and with only modern imputation as sensitivity analysis, the pooled SMD remained significant despite the reduction from a moderate to a small effect. Significant publication bias was found in a funnel plot and on two tests (Begg's p = 0.09; Egger's p = 0.01). Using a trim and fill analysis, the SMD was -0.32 [95% CI -0.49 to -0.16]. Despite a short-term reduction in depression at post-treatment, the

  13. Saving time with a computerised handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrie, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The DE/CAASE computerised engineering handbook (Desktop Engineering, Mahwah, NJ, USA) is a software tool designed to automate a wide variety of engineering tasks that are typically performed with an engineering handbook and hand calculator. It significantly reduces the time taken to perform these tasks. For example, instead of spending 60 minutes on determining section properties of composite sections in control room panels and other equipment by hand, it might take less than 5 minutes by using the computerised handbook. Similarly, mode shapes and frequencies of simple structures may take less than 10 minutes to calculate, compared with the hours it used to take. (author)

  14. An intragastric trichobezoar: computerised tomographic appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris B

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and distension since two months. The ultrasound examination showed an epigastric mass, which was delineated as a filling defect in the stomach on barium studies. The computerised tomographic scan showed a gastric mass with pockets of air in it, without post-contrast enhancement. This case highlights the characteristic appearance on computerised tomography of a bezoar within the stomach, a feature that is not commonly described in medical literature.

  15. Computerised tomography in tuberculous Addison's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.C.; Eason, R.J.; Croxson, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The important contribution computerised tomography played in the diagnosis of tuberculous Addison's disease is described. While conventional radiographic methods of demonstrating this disease are often unhelpful, C.T. is an excellent technique for demonstrating the morphology of normal and abnormal adrenal glands

  16. Amsterdam wrist rules: A clinical decision aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentohami Abdelali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute trauma of the wrist is one of the most frequent reasons for visiting the Emergency Department. These patients are routinely referred for radiological examination. Most X-rays however, do not reveal any fractures. A clinical decision rule determining the need for X-rays in patients with acute wrist trauma may help to percolate and select patients with fractures. Methods/Design This study will be a multi-center observational diagnostic study in which the data will be collected cross-sectionally. The study population will consist of all consecutive adult patients (≥18 years presenting with acute wrist trauma at the Emergency Department in the participating hospitals. This research comprises two components: one study will be conducted to determine which clinical parameters are predictive for the presence of a distal radius fracture in adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department following acute wrist trauma. These clinical parameters are defined by trauma-mechanism, physical examination, and functional testing. This data will be collected in two of the three participating hospitals and will be assessed by using logistic regression modelling to estimate the regression coefficients after which a reduced model will be created by means of a log likelihood ratio test. The accuracy of the model will be estimated by a goodness of fit test and an ROC curve. The final model will be validated internally through bootstrapping and by shrinking it, an adjusted model will be generated. In the second component of this study, the developed prediction model will be validated in a new dataset consisting of a population of patients from the third hospital. If necessary, the model will be calibrated using the data from the validation study. Discussion Wrist trauma is frequently encountered at the Emergency Department. However, to this date, no decision rule regarding this type of trauma has been created. Ideally, radiographs are

  17. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mould, D. R.; D'Haens, G.; Upton, R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug

  18. Future perspectives toward the early definition of a multivariate decision-support scheme employed in clinical decision making for senior citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Gilou, Sotiria; Billis, Antonis; Karagianni, Maria; Bratsas, Charalampos D; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Recent neuroscientific studies focused on the identification of pathological neurophysiological patterns (emotions, geriatric depression, memory impairment and sleep disturbances) through computerised clinical decision-support systems. Almost all these research attempts employed either resting-state condition (e.g. eyes-closed) or event-related potentials extracted during a cognitive task known to be affected by the disease under consideration. This Letter reviews existing data mining techniques and aims to enhance their robustness by proposing a holistic decision framework dealing with comorbidities and early symptoms' identification, while it could be applied in realistic occasions. Multivariate features are elicited and fused in order to be compared with average activities characteristic of each neuropathology group. A proposed model of the specific cognitive function which may be based on previous findings (a priori information) and/or validated by current experimental data should be then formed. So, the proposed scheme facilitates the early identification and prevention of neurodegenerative phenomena. Neurophysiological semantic annotation is hypothesised to enhance the importance of the proposed framework in facilitating the personalised healthcare of the information society and medical informatics research community.

  19. A computerised out-patient medical records programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, P Y; Goh, L G; Ong, R; Wong, P K

    1992-12-01

    Advances in microcomputer hardware and software technology have made computerised outpatient medical records practical. We have developed a programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) system which complements existing paper-based record keeping. The elements of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) System are displayed in two windows within one screen, namely, the SOAP (Subjective information, Objective information, Assessments and Plans) elements in the Reason For Encounter (RFE) window and the problem list with outcomes in the Problem List (PL) window. Context sensitive child windows display details of plans of management in the RFE window and clinical notes in the PL window. The benefits of such innovations to clinical decision making and practice based research and its medico-legal implications are discussed.

  20. Conceptualising a system for quality clinical decision-making in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a feedback mechanism to promote or improve the quality of clinical decisions in nursing, standards for quality clinical decision-making are proposed in an exemplary manner. In addition, a system for quality clinical decisionmaking in nursing capitalises on the heritage of the nursing process. Considering the changes and ...

  1. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system.Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool's output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (χ2 test with Yates' correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool's and the doctor's diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses.Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool's performance for that factor.Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false-negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  2. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system. Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool’s output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (氈2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool’s and the doctor’s diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses. Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool’s performance for that factor. Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  3. Clinical decision regret among critical care nurses: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Scott, Linda D

    2014-01-01

    Decision regret is a negative cognitive emotion associated with experiences of guilt and situations of interpersonal harm. These negative affective responses may contribute to emotional exhaustion in critical care nurses (CCNs), increased staff turnover rates and high medication error rates. Yet, little is known about clinical decision regret among CCNs or the conditions or situations (e.g., feeling sleepy) that may precipitate its occurrence. To examine decision regret among CCNs, with an emphasis on clinical decisions made when nurses were most sleepy. A content analytic approach was used to examine the narrative descriptions of clinical decisions by CCNs when sleepy. Six decision regret themes emerged that represented deviations in practice or performance behaviors that were attributed to fatigued CCNs. While 157 CCNs disclosed a clinical decision they made at work while sleepy, the prevalence may be underestimated and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How to make the best decision. Philosophical aspects of clinical decision theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, H R

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss some of the philosophical implications of the use of decision-analytic techniques. The probabilities of a decision analysis are subjective measures of belief, and it is concluded that clinicians base their subjective beliefs on both recorded observations and theoretical knowledge. The clinical decision maker also evaluates the consequences of his actions, and therefore clinical decision theory transcends medical science. A number of different schools of normative ethics are mentioned to illustrate the complexity of everyday decision making. The philosophical terminology is useful for the analysis of clinical problems, and it is argued that clinical decision making has both a teleological and a deontological component. The results of decision-analytic studies depend on such factors as the wealth of the country, the organization of the health service, and cultural norms.

  5. Decision analysis in the clinical neurosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractDiagnostic and therapeutic choice in neurology can fortunately be made without formal decision support in the majority of cases. in many patients a diagnosis and treatment choice are relatively easy to establish. This study however, concerns the application of a decision support

  6. Heuristics in Managing Complex Clinical Decision Tasks in Experts' Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Roosan; Weir, Charlene; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2014-09-01

    Clinical decision support is a tool to help experts make optimal and efficient decisions. However, little is known about the high level of abstractions in the thinking process for the experts. The objective of the study is to understand how clinicians manage complexity while dealing with complex clinical decision tasks. After approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB), three clinical experts were interviewed the transcripts from these interviews were analyzed. We found five broad categories of strategies by experts for managing complex clinical decision tasks: decision conflict, mental projection, decision trade-offs, managing uncertainty and generating rule of thumb. Complexity is created by decision conflicts, mental projection, limited options and treatment uncertainty. Experts cope with complexity in a variety of ways, including using efficient and fast decision strategies to simplify complex decision tasks, mentally simulating outcomes and focusing on only the most relevant information. Understanding complex decision making processes can help design allocation based on the complexity of task for clinical decision support design.

  7. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Torunn Bjørk; Glenys A. Hamilton

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with d...

  8. Computerised CBT for depressed adolescents: Randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick; Scott, Rebecca; Eshkevari, Ertimiss; Jatta, Fatoumata; Leigh, Eleanor; Harris, Victoria; Robinson, Alex; Abeles, Paul; Proudfoot, Judy; Verduyn, Chrissie; Yule, William

    2015-10-01

    Depression in adolescents is a common and impairing problem. Effective psychological therapies for depression are not accessed by most adolescents. Computerised therapy offers huge potential for improving access to treatment. To test the efficacy of Stressbusters, a Computerised-CBT (C-CBT) programme for depression in young people. Multi-site, schools-based, RCT of C-CBT compared to Waiting List, for young people (N = 112; aged 12-16) with significant symptoms of depression, using multiple-informants (adolescents, parents, teachers), with follow-up at 3 and 6 months. Relative to being on a Waiting List, C-CBT was associated with statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in symptoms of depression and anxiety according to adolescent self-report; and with a trend towards improvements in depression and anxiety according to parent-report. Improvements were maintained at follow-up. Treatment gains were similar for boys and girls across the participating age range. Treatment effect was partially mediated by changes in ruminative thinking. Teachers rated adolescents as having few emotional or behavioural problems, both before and after intervention. C-CBT had no detectable effect on academic attainment. In the month after intervention, young people who received C-CBT had significantly fewer absences from school than those on the Waiting List. C-CBT shows considerable promise for the treatment of mild-moderate depression in adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Pedagogical Reflection Model - an educational perspective on clinical decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voergaard Poulsen, Bettina; Vibholm Persson, Stine; Skriver, Mette

    Clinical decision-making is important in patient-centred nursing, which is known in nursing education and research (1) The Pedagogical Reflection Model (PRM) can provide a framework that supports students’ decision-making in patient-specific situations. PRM is based on the assumption that clinical......) The aims of this study were to explore how nurse students and clinical supervisors use PRM as method to reflect before, during and after PRM guidance in relation to clinical decisions in the first year of clinical practice...... decision-making needs to take into account; 1) clinical experiences, 2) the perspective of the patient, 3) clinical observations and investigations, 4) knowledge about patients experiences of being a patient and ill, 5) medical knowledge about diseases, and 6) the organizational framework (2,3,4)(Figure 1...

  10. Development of a computerised version of the Children's Gambling Task for the evaluation of affective decision-making in Brazilian preschool children Desenvolvimento de uma versão computadorizada da Children's Gambling Task para avaliação da tomada de decisão afetiva em crianças pré-escolares brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mata

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of instruments developed to assess the more purely cognitive executive functions in Brazilian children, few studies have developed instruments for the assessment of the most motivational components of these functions. The primary aim of this study was to develop a computerised version of the Children's Gambling Task (CGT to assess affective decision-making in preschoolers. The present study also aimed to investigate whether this version of the task is sensitive to developmental changes across the preschool period and to examine gender differences in decision-making. We administered the CGT and the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale (CMMS to 137 Brazilian children between the ages of three and five years old. Age differences between three-and four-year-olds, but not between four-and five-year-olds were found. Gender differences were not found. From this preliminary study, the computerised version of the CGT for Brazilian child population proved to be suitable for Brazilian child population.Apesar do grande número de instrumentos desenvolvidos para avaliação das funções executivas mais puramente cognitivas em crianças brasileiras, há poucos estudos que desenvolveram medidas para avaliação dos componentes mais motivacionais dessas funções. O principal objetivo deste estudo foi desenvolver uma versão computadorizada da Children's Gambling Task (CGT para avaliação da tomada de decisão afetiva em crianças pré-escolares. Também se buscou avaliar se a versão desenvolvida é capaz de discriminar grupos etários e examinar as diferenças entre gêneros na tomada de decisão. A versão brasileira da CGT e a Escala de Maturidade Mental Colúmbia foram aplicadas em 137 crianças de três a cinco anos. Observou-se que crianças de quatro e cinco anos obtiveram desempenho superior às de três, entretanto não houve diferença entre o desempenho das crianças de quatro e cinco anos, nem entre meninos e meninas. A partir

  11. Ethical decision making in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, M D

    1989-12-01

    Contemporary nursing ethics education focuses on the use of an analytical model of ethical decision making for both its process and its content. Perhaps this is the case because it bears some resemblance to the nursing process, which is taught in a similar fashion. Thus, a deductivist method of ethical decision making fits within the same general schema of the hypotheticodeductive method of decision making that is taught for nursing diagnosis. Ethics requires that nurses respect persons, inform patients and secure their consent, not inflict harm, preserve the patient's quality of life, prevent harm and remove harmful conditions, do good for patients, and minimize risk to themselves. These are among the norms of obligation that guide ethical analysis and judgment in nursing practice and are the substance of the analytical model of ethical decision making. Nursing's ethics has established high ideals and strong demands for nurses. These are demands which nurses have met and ideals which have often been realized. Whatever the strength of our science, nursing is an inherently moral endeavor and is only as strong as its commitment to its ethical obligations and values. Between the grinding edges of the forces that affect it, nursing must establish its priorities among the aspects of its environment that it attempts to control. Ethics must be chief among those priorities.

  12. Clinical Decision Support: Statistical Hopes and Challenges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2016), s. 30-34 ISSN 1805-8698 Grant - others:Nadační fond na opdporu vědy(CZ) Neuron Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support * data mining * multivariate statistics * psychiatry * information based medicine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  13. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Decision aids for people considering taking part in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Katie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Brehaut, Jamie C; Politi, Mary C; Skea, Zoe

    2015-11-27

    Several interventions have been developed to promote informed consent for participants in clinical trials. However, many of these interventions focus on the content and structure of information (e.g. enhanced information or changes to the presentation format) rather than the process of decision making. Patient decision aids support a decision making process about medical options. Decision aids support the decision process by providing information about available options and their associated outcomes, alongside information that enables patients to consider what value they place on particular outcomes, and provide structured guidance on steps of decision making. They have been shown to be effective for treatment and screening decisions but evidence on their effectiveness in the context of informed consent for clinical trials has not been synthesised. To assess the effectiveness of decision aids for clinical trial informed consent compared to no intervention, standard information (i.e. usual practice) or an alternative intervention on the decision making process. We searched the following databases and to March 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (from 1950); EMBASE (OvidSP) (from 1980); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (from 1806); ASSIA (ProQuest) (from 1987); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/); ClinicalTrials.gov; ISRCTN Register (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). We also searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. We contacted study authors and other experts. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing decision aids in the informed consent process for clinical trials alone, or in conjunction with standard information (such as written or verbal) or alongside alternative interventions (e.g. paper-based versus web-based decision aids). Included trials involved

  15. Clinical decision-making: physicians' preferences and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Martha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision-making has been advocated; however there are relatively few studies on physician preferences for, and experiences of, different styles of clinical decision-making as most research has focused on patient preferences and experiences. The objectives of this study were to determine 1 physician preferences for different styles of clinical decision-making; 2 styles of clinical decision-making physicians perceive themselves as practicing; and 3 the congruence between preferred and perceived style. In addition we sought to determine physician perceptions of the availability of time in visits, and their role in encouraging patients to look for health information. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians. Results 1,050 (53% response rate physicians responded to the survey. Of these, 780 (75% preferred to share decision-making with their patients, 142 (14% preferred paternalism, and 118 (11% preferred consumerism. 87% of physicians perceived themselves as practicing their preferred style. Physicians who preferred their patients to play an active role in decision-making were more likely to report encouraging patients to look for information, and to report having enough time in visits. Conclusion Physicians tend to perceive themselves as practicing their preferred role in clinical decision-making. The direction of the association cannot be inferred from these data; however, we suggest that interventions aimed at promoting shared decision-making need to target physicians as well as patients.

  16. An exploration of clinical decision making in mental health triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Natisha

    2009-08-01

    Mental health (MH) triage is a specialist area of clinical nursing practice that involves complex decision making. The discussion in this article draws on the findings of a Ph.D. study that involved a statewide investigation of the scope of MH triage nursing practice in Victoria, Australia. Although the original Ph.D. study investigated a number of core practices in MH triage, the focus of the discussion in this article is specifically on the findings related to clinical decision making in MH triage, which have not previously been published. The study employed an exploratory descriptive research design that used mixed data collection methods including a survey questionnaire (n = 139) and semistructured interviews (n = 21). The study findings related to decision making revealed a lack of empirically tested evidence-based decision-making frameworks currently in use to support MH triage nursing practice. MH triage clinicians in Australia rely heavily on clinical experience to underpin decision making and have little of knowledge of theoretical models for practice, such as methodologies for rating urgency. A key recommendation arising from the study is the need to develop evidence-based decision-making frameworks such as clinical guidelines to inform and support MH triage clinical decision making.

  17. The impact of simulation sequencing on perceived clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee; Hansen, Jamie; Paquette, Mary; Topp, Robert

    2017-09-01

    An emerging nursing education trend is to utilize simulated learning experiences as a means to optimize competency and decision making skills. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in students' perception of clinical decision making and clinical decision making-related self-confidence and anxiety based on the sequence (order) in which they participated in a block of simulated versus hospital-based learning experiences. A quasi-experimental crossover design was used. Between and within group differences were found relative to self-confidence with the decision making process. When comparing groups, at baseline the simulation followed by hospital group had significantly higher self-confidence scores, however, at 14-weeks both groups were not significantly different. Significant within group differences were found in the simulation followed by hospital group only, demonstrating a significant decrease in clinical decision making related anxiety across the semester. Finally, there were no significant difference in; perceived clinical decision making within or between the groups at the two measurement points. Preliminary findings suggest that simulated learning experiences can be offered with alternating sequences without impacting the process, anxiety or confidence with clinical decision making. This study provides beginning evidence to guide curriculum development and allow flexibility based on student needs and available resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support: A rational approach to dynamic decision-making under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with decision support in the context of clinical oncology. (Dynamic) Bayesian networks are used as a framework for (dynamic) decision-making under uncertainty and applied to a variety of diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment problems in medicine. It is shown that the proposed

  19. Exploring the clinical decision-making used by experienced cardiorespiratory physiotherapists: A mixed method qualitative design of simulation, video recording and think aloud techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Debbie; Roberts, Lisa

    2017-02-01

    The ability of physiotherapists to make clinical decisions is a vital component of being an autonomous practitioner, yet this complex phenomenon has been under-researched in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to explore clinical decision-making (CDM) by experienced physiotherapists in a scenario of a simulated patient experiencing acute deterioration of their respiratory function. The main objective of this observational study was to identify the actions, thoughts, and behaviours used by experienced cardiorespiratory physiotherapists in their clinical decision-making processes. A mixed-methods (qualitative) design employing observation and think-aloud, was adopted using a computerised manikin in a simulated environment. The participants clinically assessed the manikin programmed with the same clinical signs, under standardised conditions in the clinical skills practice suite, which was set up as a ward environment. Experienced cardiorespiratory physiotherapists, recruited from clinical practice within a 50-mile radius of the University(*). Participants were video-recorded throughout the assessment and treatment and asked to verbalise their thought processes using the 'think-aloud' method. The recordings were transcribed verbatim and managed using a Framework approach. Eight cardiorespiratory physiotherapists participated (mean 7years clinical experience, range 3.5-16years. CDM was similar to the collaborative hypothetico-deductive model, five-rights nursing model, reasoning strategies, inductive reasoning and pattern recognition. However, the CDM demonstrated by the physiotherapists was complex, interactive and iterative. Information processing occurred continuously throughout the whole interaction with the patient, and the specific cognitive skills of recognition, matching, discriminating, relating, inferring, synthesising and prediction were identified as being used sequentially. The findings from this study were used to develop a new

  20. Software for computerised analysis of cardiotocographic traces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, M; Bifulco, P; Ruffo, M; Improta, G; Clemente, F; Cesarelli, M

    2016-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of cardiotocography in foetal monitoring, the evaluation of foetal status suffers from a considerable inter and intra-observer variability. In order to overcome the main limitations of visual cardiotocographic assessment, computerised methods to analyse cardiotocographic recordings have been recently developed. In this study, a new software for automated analysis of foetal heart rate is presented. It allows an automatic procedure for measuring the most relevant parameters derivable from cardiotocographic traces. Simulated and real cardiotocographic traces were analysed to test software reliability. In artificial traces, we simulated a set number of events (accelerations, decelerations and contractions) to be recognised. In the case of real signals, instead, results of the computerised analysis were compared with the visual assessment performed by 18 expert clinicians and three performance indexes were computed to gain information about performances of the proposed software. The software showed preliminary performance we judged satisfactory in that the results matched completely the requirements, as proved by tests on artificial signals in which all simulated events were detected from the software. Performance indexes computed in comparison with obstetricians' evaluations are, on the contrary, not so satisfactory; in fact they led to obtain the following values of the statistical parameters: sensitivity equal to 93%, positive predictive value equal to 82% and accuracy equal to 77%. Very probably this arises from the high variability of trace annotation carried out by clinicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely.

  2. Clinical decision support in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412650207

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of preventable patient harm caused by drug use has been shown over and over again. Clinical risk management is a concept to prevent patient harm by risk-reducing strategies. It is a systematic approach including risk detection, assessment, management and evaluation. One of the

  3. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  4. Decision Analysis for Metric Selection on a Clinical Quality Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Rebecca M; Storey, Patricia E; Vitale, Michael; Markan-Aurora, Sumita; Gordon, Randolph; Prevost, Traci Q; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Woeltje, Keith F

    2016-09-01

    Clinical quality scorecards are used by health care institutions to monitor clinical performance and drive quality improvement. Because of the rapid proliferation of quality metrics in health care, BJC HealthCare found it increasingly difficult to select the most impactful scorecard metrics while still monitoring metrics for regulatory purposes. A 7-step measure selection process was implemented incorporating Kepner-Tregoe Decision Analysis, which is a systematic process that considers key criteria that must be satisfied in order to make the best decision. The decision analysis process evaluates what metrics will most appropriately fulfill these criteria, as well as identifies potential risks associated with a particular metric in order to identify threats to its implementation. Using this process, a list of 750 potential metrics was narrowed to 25 that were selected for scorecard inclusion. This decision analysis process created a more transparent, reproducible approach for selecting quality metrics for clinical quality scorecards. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. A web-based clinical decision tool to support treatment decision-making in psychiatry: a pilot focus group study with clinicians, patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, Catherine; Marzano, Lisa; Smith, Katharine; Attenburrow, Mary-Jane; Puntis, Stephen; Zlodre, Jakov; Kelly, Kathleen; Broome, Matthew R; Shaw, Susan; Barrera, Alvaro; Molodynski, Andrew; Reid, Alastair; Geddes, John R; Cipriani, Andrea

    2017-07-21

    Treatment decision tools have been developed in many fields of medicine, including psychiatry, however benefits for patients have not been sustained once the support is withdrawn. We have developed a web-based computerised clinical decision support tool (CDST), which can provide patients and clinicians with continuous, up-to-date, personalised information about the efficacy and tolerability of competing interventions. To test the feasibility and acceptability of the CDST we conducted a focus group study, aimed to explore the views of clinicians, patients and carers. The CDST was developed in Oxford. To tailor treatments at an individual level, the CDST combines the best available evidence from the scientific literature with patient preferences and values, and with patient medical profile to generate personalised clinical recommendations. We conducted three focus groups comprising of three different participant types: consultant psychiatrists, participants with a mental health diagnosis and/or experience of caring for someone with a mental health diagnosis, and primary care practitioners and nurses. Each 1-h focus group started with a short visual demonstration of the CDST. To standardise the discussion during the focus groups, we used the same topic guide that covered themes relating to the acceptability and usability of the CDST. Focus groups were recorded and any identifying participant details were anonymised. Data were analysed thematically and managed using the Framework method and the constant comparative method. The focus groups took place in Oxford between October 2016 and January 2017. Overall 31 participants attended (12 consultants, 11 primary care practitioners and 8 patients or carers). The main themes that emerged related to CDST applications in clinical practice, communication, conflicting priorities, record keeping and data management. CDST was considered a useful clinical decision support, with recognised value in promoting clinician

  6. Grand Challenges in Clinical Decision Support v10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Osheroff, Jerome A.; Middleton, Blackford; Teich, Jonathan M.; Ash, Joan S.; Campbell, Emily; Bates, David W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a pressing need for high-quality, effective means of designing, developing, presenting, implementing, evaluating, and maintaining all types of clinical decision support capabilities for clinicians, patients and consumers. Using an iterative, consensus-building process we identified a rank-ordered list of the top 10 grand challenges in clinical decision support. This list was created to educate and inspire researchers, developers, funders, and policy-makers. The list of challenges in order of importance that they be solved if patients and organizations are to begin realizing the fullest benefits possible of these systems consists of: Improve the human-computer interface; Disseminate best practices in CDS design, development, and implementation; Summarize patient-level information; Prioritize and filter recommendations to the user; Create an architecture for sharing executable CDS modules and services; Combine recommendations for patients with co-morbidities; Prioritize CDS content development and implementation; Create internet-accessible clinical decision support repositories; Use freetext information to drive clinical decision support; Mine large clinical databases to create new CDS. Identification of solutions to these challenges is critical if clinical decision support is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare. PMID:18029232

  7. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    State-of-the-art electronic radiology workflow can provide clinical decision support (CDS) for specialised imaging requests, but there has been limited work on the clinical impact of CDS in PE, particularly in resource-constrained environments. Objective. To determine the impact of an electronic CDS for PE on the efficiency ...

  8. Multitasking in non-computerised and computerised versions of the Breakfast Task in healthy adult aging

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowska, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Older adults demonstrate poor performance on standard executive tests. However, age-related deficits have been found only on a number of more realistic executive tests. The present study investigated age effects in multitasking, requiring a range of executive, as well as non-executive, cognitive functions. Previous study by Craik and Bialystok (2006) showed impaired performance of older adults on a computerised multitasking test, which simulated cooking breakfast. Participants were instructed...

  9. Clinical decision-making by midwives: managing case complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, J; Markham, R

    1997-02-01

    In making clinical judgements, it is argued that midwives use 'shortcuts' or heuristics based on estimated probabilities to simplify the decision-making task. Midwives (n = 30) were given simulated patient assessment situations of high and low complexity and were required to think aloud. Analysis of verbal protocols showed that subjective probability judgements (heuristics) were used more frequently in the high than low complexity case and predominated in the last quarter of the assessment period for the high complexity case. 'Representativeness' was identified more frequently in the high than in the low case, but was the dominant heuristic in both. Reports completed after each simulation suggest that heuristics based on memory for particular conditions affect decisions. It is concluded that midwives use heuristics, derived mainly from their clinical experiences, in an attempt to save cognitive effort and to facilitate reasonably accurate decisions in the decision-making process.

  10. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    OpenAIRE

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis, whether therapeutic action is necessary, and which post-therapeutic trajectory is to be followed. All these bedside decisions are related to each other, and the whole task of clinical patient management ca...

  11. The thinking doctor: clinical decision making in contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Michael; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic errors are responsible for a significant number of adverse events. Logical reasoning and good decision-making skills are key factors in reducing such errors, but little emphasis has traditionally been placed on how these thought processes occur, and how errors could be minimised. In this article, we explore key cognitive ideas that underpin clinical decision making and suggest that by employing some simple strategies, physicians might be better able to understand how they make decisions and how the process might be optimised. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  12. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  13. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care.

  14. The Utility of the Frailty Index in Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatry, K; Peel, N M; Gray, L C; Hubbard, R E

    2018-01-01

    Using clinical vignettes, this study aimed to determine if a measure of patient frailty would impact management decisions made by geriatricians regarding commonly encountered clinical situations. Electronic surveys consisting of three vignettes derived from cases commonly seen in an acute inpatient ward were distributed to geriatricians. Vignettes included patients being considered for intensive care treatment, rehabilitation, or coronary artery bypass surgery. A frailty index was generated through Comprehensive electronic Geriatric Assessment. For each vignette, respondents were asked to make a recommendation for management, based on either a brief or detailed amount of clinical information and to reconsider their decision after the addition of the frailty index. The study suggests that quantification of frailty might aid the clinical judgment now employed daily to proceed with usual care, or to modify it based on the vulnerability of the person to whom it is aimed.

  15. Debating the utility of computerised neurocognitive testing in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    computerised neurocognitive baseline testing in the sports concus- sion context,. 1 ... testing for athletes at this time is scientifically unfounded, financially irresponsible and .... medical management in respect of the sports concussive injury. It.

  16. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aim to present new knowledge about different perspectives of health care professionals’ risk perceptions and clinical decision making. Furthermore, we intend to discuss differences between professional and personal risk perceptions and the impact on decisions in terms of both short...... and long-term outcomes. Background Insight into healthcare professionals’ perception of risk is a cornerstone for understanding their strategies for practising preventive care. The way people perceive risk can be seen as part of a general personality trait influenced by a mixture of individual...... considerations and the specific context. Most research has been focused on understanding of the concepts of risk. However healthcare professionals’ risk perception and personal attitudes also affect their clinical decision-making and risk communication. The differences between health care professionals’ personal...

  17. The relationship between patient data and pooled clinical management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, G I; O'Loughlin, E J; Corcoran, T B; Grant, C

    2013-01-01

    A strong relationship between patient data and preoperative clinical decisions could potentially be used to support clinical decisions in preoperative management. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the relationship between key patient data and pooled clinical opinions on management. In a previous study, panels of anaesthetists compared the quality of computer-assisted patient health assessments with outpatient consultations and made decisions on the need for preoperative tests, no preoperative outpatient assessment, possible postoperative intensive care unit/high dependency unit requirements and aspiration prophylaxis. In the current study, the relationship between patient data and these decisions was examined using binomial logistic regression analysis. Backward stepwise regression was used to identify independent predictors of each decision (at P >0.15), which were then incorporated into a predictive model. The number of factors related to each decision varied: blood picture (four factors), biochemistry (six factors), coagulation studies (three factors), electrocardiography (eight factors), chest X-ray (seven factors), preoperative outpatient assessment (17 factors), intensive care unit requirement (eight factors) and aspiration prophylaxis (one factor). The factor types also varied, but included surgical complexity, age, gender, number of medications or comorbidities, body mass index, hypertension, central nervous system condition, heart disease, sleep apnoea, smoking, persistent pain and stroke. Models based on these relationships usually demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, with receiver operating characteristics in the following areas under curve: blood picture (0.75), biochemistry (0.86), coagulation studies (0.71), electrocardiography (0.90), chest X-ray (0.85), outpatient assessment (0.85), postoperative intensive care unit requirement (0.88) and aspiration prophylaxis (0.85). These initial results suggest modelling of patient

  18. Intraocular pressure asymmetry-Topcon Computerised Tonometer CT-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntim-Amponsah, C T

    1997-01-01

    The Topcon Computerised Tonometer CT-20, a non-contact tonometer (NCT), was used to measure intraocular pressure (IOP) in mmHg in 1,226 subjects above the age of 30 years with no ocular pathology. The mean IOP was 14.41 mmHg and the standard deviation 3.43. The mean IOP far was higher in female (14.60) than male (14.22). This gender difference in the mean IOP was significant; t stat = 2.69, P < 0.5. Right IOP exceeded left IOP and this was highly significant in both male (t stat 4.03) and female (t stat 5.64) p < 0.01. This IOP asymmetry approximates a normal distribution. The mean of the differences (right-left IOP) and standard deviation for all subjects were 0.57 and 2.26 respectively. The range for the differences was- 10 to 10 mmHg. Asymmetry was greater in females than males (t stat = 2.05, p < 0.05). Knowledge of these statistics will help in decisions concerning glaucoma screening with NCT.

  19. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  20. Computerisation of procedures. Lessons learned and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.; Pirus, D.; Nilsen, S.; Bisio, R.; Hulsund, J.-E.; Zhang, W.

    2003-07-01

    The computerisation of the procedures has been investigated for several years. Even though guidelines for such computerisation have been proposed, there is a need to extend and revise these guidelines. In this report, we look at what has been achieved so far, both within the Halden Project as well as within other organisations related to nuclear power plants. These experiences are often related to testing of particular computerised procedure systems either in research laboratories or in nuclear utilities. These activities have accumulated a body of general knowledge on the subject, as documented in other 'lessons learned' reports of the past. This report will extend this accepted body of knowledge. Furthermore, we identify the unresolved problems that need to be further studied to make usable computerised procedures for the future. The report identifies selected qualities that should be reinforced to make computerised procedure systems better. In particular, the integration aspect is emphasised. A flexible integration with the operator tasks and the remaining interfaces of the control room is important. Unless this integration is accomplished, the computerised procedures will not be functional. Another aspect of integration is combination with other systems inclusive those systems that deal with the plant documentation, electronic or paper based. This kind of integration is important to the safe and reliable operation of the plant. Good integration with plant documentation is instrumental in creating reliable QA of the procedures that covers the whole life cycle of the procedure. (Author). 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Clinical decisions for anterior restorations: the concept of restorative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jorge André; Almeida, Paulo Júlio; Fischer, Alex; Phaxay, Somano Luang

    2012-12-01

    The choice of the most appropriate restoration for anterior teeth is often a difficult decision. Numerous clinical and technical factors play an important role in selecting the treatment option that best suits the patient and the restorative team. Experienced clinicians have developed decision processes that are often more complex than may seem. Less experienced professionals may find difficulties making treatment decisions because of the widely varied restorative materials available and often numerous similar products offered by different manufacturers. The authors reviewed available evidence and integrated their clinical experience to select relevant factors that could provide a logical and practical guideline for restorative decisions in anterior teeth. The presented concept of restorative volume is based on structural, optical, and periodontal factors. Each of these factors will influence the short- and long-term behavior of restorations in terms of esthetics, biology, and function. Despite the marked evolution of esthetic restorative techniques and materials, significant limitations still exist, which should be addressed by researchers. The presented guidelines must be regarded as a mere orientation for risk analysis. A comprehensive individual approach should always be the core of restorative esthetic treatments. The complex decision process for anterior esthetic restorations can be clarified by a systematized examination of structural, optical, and periodontal factors. The basis for the proposed thought process is the concept of restorative volume that is a contemporary interpretation of restoration categories and their application. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Constructing diagnostic likelihood: clinical decisions using subjective versus statistical probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, John; Jackson, Ruth

    2017-07-01

    Although physicians are highly trained in the application of evidence-based medicine, and are assumed to make rational decisions, there is evidence that their decision making is prone to biases. One of the biases that has been shown to affect accuracy of judgements is that of representativeness and base-rate neglect, where the saliency of a person's features leads to overestimation of their likelihood of belonging to a group. This results in the substitution of 'subjective' probability for statistical probability. This study examines clinicians' propensity to make estimations of subjective probability when presented with clinical information that is considered typical of a medical condition. The strength of the representativeness bias is tested by presenting choices in textual and graphic form. Understanding of statistical probability is also tested by omitting all clinical information. For the questions that included clinical information, 46.7% and 45.5% of clinicians made judgements of statistical probability, respectively. Where the question omitted clinical information, 79.9% of clinicians made a judgement consistent with statistical probability. There was a statistically significant difference in responses to the questions with and without representativeness information (χ2 (1, n=254)=54.45, pprobability. One of the causes for this representativeness bias may be the way clinical medicine is taught where stereotypic presentations are emphasised in diagnostic decision making. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Continuous quality improvement for the clinical decision unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Sharon E

    2004-01-01

    Clinical decision units (CDUs) are a relatively new and growing area of medicine in which patients undergo rapid evaluation and treatment. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) is important for the establishment and functioning of CDUs. CQI in CDUs has many advantages: better CDU functioning, fulfillment of Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations mandates, greater efficiency/productivity, increased job satisfaction, better performance improvement, data availability, and benchmarking. Key elements include a database with volume indicators, operational policies, clinical practice protocols (diagnosis specific/condition specific), monitors, benchmarks, and clinical pathways. Examples of these important parameters are given. The CQI process should be individualized for each CDU and hospital.

  4. Whole mind and shared mind in clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Ronald Mark

    2013-02-01

    To review the theory, research evidence and ethical implications regarding "whole mind" and "shared mind" in clinical practice in the context of chronic and serious illnesses. Selective critical review of the intersection of classical and naturalistic decision-making theories, cognitive neuroscience, communication research and ethics as they apply to decision-making and autonomy. Decision-making involves analytic thinking as well as affect and intuition ("whole mind") and sharing cognitive and affective schemas of two or more individuals ("shared mind"). Social relationships can help processing of complex information that otherwise would overwhelm individuals' cognitive capacities. Medical decision-making research, teaching and practice should consider both analytic and non-analytic cognitive processes. Further, research should consider that decisions emerge not only from the individual perspectives of patients, their families and clinicians, but also the perspectives that emerge from the interactions among them. Social interactions have the potential to enhance individual autonomy, as well as to promote relational autonomy based on shared frames of reference. Shared mind has the potential to result in wiser decisions, greater autonomy and self-determination; yet, clinicians and patients should be vigilant for the potential of hierarchical relationships to foster coercion or silencing of the patient's voice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex contexts and relationships affect clinical decisions in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Mcquaid, Nancy; Balfour, Louise

    2016-09-01

    Clinical errors tend to be underreported even though examining them can provide important training and professional development opportunities. The group therapy context may be prone to clinician errors because of the added complexity within which therapists work and patients receive treatment. We discuss clinical errors that occurred within a group therapy in which a patient for whom group was not appropriate was admitted to the treatment and then was not removed by the clinicians. This was countertherapeutic for both patient and group. Two clinicians were involved: a clinical supervisor who initially assessed and admitted the patient to the group, and a group therapist. To complicate matters, the group therapy occurred within the context of a clinical research trial. The errors, possible solutions, and recommendations are discussed within Reason's Organizational Accident Model (Reason, 2000). In particular, we discuss clinician errors in the context of countertransference and clinician heuristics, group therapy as a local work condition that complicates clinical decision-making, and the impact of the research context as a latent organizational factor. We also present clinical vignettes from the pregroup preparation, group therapy, and supervision. Group therapists are more likely to avoid errors in clinical decisions if they engage in reflective practice about their internal experiences and about the impact of the context in which they work. Therapists must keep in mind the various levels of group functioning, especially related to the group-as-a-whole (i.e., group composition, cohesion, group climate, and safety) when making complex clinical decisions in order to optimize patient outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Cauda equina syndrome complicating ankylosing spondylitis: use of electromyography and computerised tomography in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A; Dixon, A; Getty, J; Renton, P; Vacher, H

    1981-06-01

    A case of the cauda equina syndrome complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is described. An unusual feature of this case was the relapsing and remitting nature of the condition, but there is sufficient evidence to explain the clinical picture on the basis of a recurrent intraspinal inflammatory process. The clinical and radiological features are similar to those of a further 28 reported in the literature. An electromyogram (EMG) proved important in defining the extent of neurological involvement. Computerised tomography (CT) showed marked laminar erosion and no bony exit foramen encroachment. We believe that the clinical diagnosis of this condition can be adequately confirmed with plain radiology, EMG, and CT scan.

  7. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support Decreases Inappropriate Plasma Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil; Baker, Steven A; Spain, David; Shieh, Lisa; Shepard, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Maggio, Paul; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2017-08-01

    To curtail inappropriate plasma transfusions, we instituted clinical decision support as an alert upon order entry if the patient's recent international normalized ratio (INR) was 1.7 or less. The alert was suppressed for massive transfusion and within operative or apheresis settings. The plasma order was automatically removed upon alert acceptance while clinical exception reasons allowed for continued transfusion. Alert impact was studied comparing a 7-month control period with a 4-month intervention period. Monthly plasma utilization decreased 17.4%, from a mean ± SD of 3.40 ± 0.48 to 2.82 ± 0.6 plasma units per hundred patient days (95% confidence interval [CI] of difference, -0.1 to 1.3). Plasma transfused below an INR of 1.7 or less decreased from 47.6% to 41.6% (P = .0002; odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89). The alert recommendation was accepted 33% of the time while clinical exceptions were chosen in the remaining cases (active bleeding, 31%; other clinical indication, 33%; and apheresis, 2%). Alert acceptance rate varied significantly among different provider specialties. Clinical decision support can help curtail inappropriate plasma use but needs to be part of a comprehensive strategy including audit and feedback for comprehensive, long-term changes. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Evaluating online diagnostic decision support tools for the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Marie; White, David; Potter, Bronwyn; Traill, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Clinical decision support tools available at the point of care are an effective adjunct to support clinicians to make clinical decisions and improve patient outcomes. We developed a methodology and applied it to evaluate commercially available online clinical diagnostic decision support (DDS) tools for use at the point of care. We identified 11 commercially available DDS tools and assessed these against an evaluation instrument that included 6 categories; general information, content, quality control, search, clinical results and other features. We developed diagnostically challenging clinical case scenarios based on real patient experience that were commonly missed by junior medical staff. The evaluation was divided into 2 phases; an initial evaluation of all identified and accessible DDS tools conducted by the Clinical Information Access Portal (CIAP) team and a second phase that further assessed the top 3 tools identified in the initial evaluation phase. An evaluation panel consisting of senior and junior medical clinicians from NSW Health conducted the second phase. Of the eleven tools that were assessed against the evaluation instrument only 4 tools completely met the DDS definition that was adopted for this evaluation and were able to produce a differential diagnosis. From the initial phase of the evaluation 4 DDS tools scored 70% or more (maximum score 96%) for the content category, 8 tools scored 65% or more (maximum 100%) for the quality control category, 5 tools scored 65% or more (maximum 94%) for the search category, and 4 tools score 70% or more (maximum 81%) for the clinical results category. The second phase of the evaluation was focused on assessing diagnostic accuracy for the top 3 tools identified in the initial phase. Best Practice ranked highest overall against the 6 clinical case scenarios used. Overall the differentiating factor between the top 3 DDS tools was determined by diagnostic accuracy ranking, ease of use and the confidence and

  9. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  10. Computerised Genetic Risk Assessment and Decision Support in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Coulson

    2000-09-01

    To address these issues, a new computer application called RAGs (Risk Assessment in Genetics has been designed. The system allows a doctor to create family trees and assess genetic risk of breast cancer. RAGs possesses two features that distinguish it from similar software: (a a user-centred design, which takes into account the requirements of the doctor-patient encounter; (b risk reporting using qualitative evidence for or against an increased risk, which the authors believe to be more useful and accessible than numerical probabilities are. In that the system allows for any genetic risk guideline to be implemented, it can be used with all diseases for which evaluation guidelines exist. The software may be easily modified to cater for the amount of detail required by different specialists.

  11. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  12. Experiential and rational decision making: a survey to determine how emergency physicians make clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Lisa A; Forster, Alan J; Stiell, Ian G; Carr, Laura K; Brehaut, Jamie C; Perry, Jeffrey J; Vaillancourt, Christian; Croskerry, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Dual-process psychological theories argue that clinical decision making is achieved through a combination of experiential (fast and intuitive) and rational (slower and systematic) cognitive processes. To determine whether emergency physicians perceived their clinical decisions in general to be more experiential or rational and how this compared with other physicians. A validated psychometric tool, the Rational Experiential Inventory (REI-40), was sent through postal mail to all emergency physicians registered with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, according to their website in November 2009. Forty statements were ranked on a Likert scale from 1 (Definitely False) to 5 (Definitely True). An initial survey was sent out, followed by reminder cards and a second survey to non-respondents. Analysis included descriptive statistics, Student t tests, analysis of variance and comparison of mean scores with those of cardiologists from New Zealand. The response rate in this study was 46.9% (434/925). The respondents' median age was 41-50 years; they were mostly men (72.6%) and most had more than 10 years of clinical experience (66.8%). The mean REI-40 rational scores were higher than the experiential scores (3.93/5 (SD 0.35) vs 3.33/5 (SD 0.49), prational 3.93/5, mean experiential 3.05/5). The mean experiential scores were significantly higher for female respondents than for male respondents (3.40/5 (SD 0.49) vs 3.30/5 (SD 0.48), p=0.003). Overall, emergency physicians favoured rational decision making rather than experiential decision making; however, female emergency physicians had higher experiential scores than male emergency physicians. This has important implications for future knowledge translation and decision support efforts among emergency physicians.

  13. Clinical decision-making of rural novice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seright, T J

    2011-01-01

    Nurses in rural settings are often the first to assess and interpret the patient's clinical presentations. Therefore, an understanding of how nurses experience decision-making is important in terms of educational preparation, resource allocation to rural areas, institutional cultures, and patient outcomes. Theory development was based on the in-depth investigation of 12 novice nurses practicing in rural critical access hospitals in a north central state. This grounded theory study consisted of face-to-face interviews with 12 registered nurses, nine of whom were observed during their work day. The participants were interviewed a second time, as a method of member checking, and during this interview they reviewed their transcripts, the emerging themes and categories. Directors of nursing from both the research sites and rural hospitals not involved in the study, experienced researchers, and nurse educators facilitated triangulation of the findings. 'Sociocentric rationalizing' emerged as the central phenomenon and referred to the sense of belonging and agency which impacted the decision-making in this small group of novice nurses in rural critical access hospitals. The observed consequences, which were conceptualized during the axial coding process and were derived from observations and interviews of the 12 novice nurses in this study include: (1) gathering information before making a decision included assessment of: the credibility of co-workers, patients' subjective and objective data, and one's own past and current experiences; (2) conferring with co-workers as a direct method of confirming/denying decisions being made was considered more realistic and expedient than policy books and decision trees; (3) rural practicum clinical experiences, along with support after orientation, provide for transition to the rural nurse role; (4) involved directors of nursing served as both models and protectors of novice nurses placed in high accountability positions early in

  14. Detection of left ventricular thrombi by computerised tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.; Sketch, M.H.; Mahoney, P.D.; Lynch, J.D.; Mooss, A.N.; Kenney, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having left ventricular mural thrombi were studied. All had suffered transmural myocardial infarction. Fifteen patients had a ventricular aneurysm. One had had systemic emboli. The mean length of time between the myocardial infarction and the study was 14.8 months, with a range of one month to 79 months. All patients underwent computerised tomography of the heart, M-mode echocardiography (M-mode), and two-dimensional echocardiography (2-D). Eight patients underwent left ventricular cineangiography. Five patients had surgical confirmation. Computerised tomography, two-dimensional, and M-mode echocardiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in 10, eight, and one of the 16 patients, respectively. Left ventricular cineangiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in four out of eight patients. Computerised tomography and left ventricular cineangiography correctly predicted the presence or absence of left ventricular thrombi in all five patients who underwent operation. In the same group, however, two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography failed to predict the presence of thrombi in one and three patients, respectively. Among the 11 patients without surgical confirmation, one, in whom no left ventricular thrombi were shown by M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography, was found to have thrombi on computerised tomography. In another, two-dimensional echocardiography was positive but this finding was not confirmed either by computerised tomography or by left ventricular angiography. (author)

  15. Clinical decision making-a functional medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Joseph E

    2012-09-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care.

  16. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  17. Applying Probabilistic Decision Models to Clinical Trial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade P; Phillips, Mark H

    2018-01-01

    Clinical trial design most often focuses on a single or several related outcomes with corresponding calculations of statistical power. We consider a clinical trial to be a decision problem, often with competing outcomes. Using a current controversy in the treatment of HPV-positive head and neck cancer, we apply several different probabilistic methods to help define the range of outcomes given different possible trial designs. Our model incorporates the uncertainties in the disease process and treatment response and the inhomogeneities in the patient population. Instead of expected utility, we have used a Markov model to calculate quality adjusted life expectancy as a maximization objective. Monte Carlo simulations over realistic ranges of parameters are used to explore different trial scenarios given the possible ranges of parameters. This modeling approach can be used to better inform the initial trial design so that it will more likely achieve clinical relevance.

  18. Understanding complex clinical reasoning in infectious diseases for improving clinical decision support design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Roosan; Weir, Charlene R; Jones, Makoto; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Samore, Matthew H

    2015-11-30

    Clinical experts' cognitive mechanisms for managing complexity have implications for the design of future innovative healthcare systems. The purpose of the study is to examine the constituents of decision complexity and explore the cognitive strategies clinicians use to control and adapt to their information environment. We used Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) methods to interview 10 Infectious Disease (ID) experts at the University of Utah and Salt Lake City Veterans Administration Medical Center. Participants were asked to recall a complex, critical and vivid antibiotic-prescribing incident using the Critical Decision Method (CDM), a type of Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA). Using the four iterations of the Critical Decision Method, questions were posed to fully explore the incident, focusing in depth on the clinical components underlying the complexity. Probes were included to assess cognitive and decision strategies used by participants. The following three themes emerged as the constituents of decision complexity experienced by the Infectious Diseases experts: 1) the overall clinical picture does not match the pattern, 2) a lack of comprehension of the situation and 3) dealing with social and emotional pressures such as fear and anxiety. All these factors contribute to decision complexity. These factors almost always occurred together, creating unexpected events and uncertainty in clinical reasoning. Five themes emerged in the analyses of how experts deal with the complexity. Expert clinicians frequently used 1) watchful waiting instead of over- prescribing antibiotics, engaged in 2) theory of mind to project and simulate other practitioners' perspectives, reduced very complex cases into simple 3) heuristics, employed 4) anticipatory thinking to plan and re-plan events and consulted with peers to share knowledge, solicit opinions and 5) seek help on patient cases. The cognitive strategies to deal with decision complexity found in this study have important

  19. The SMile Card: a computerised data card for multiple sclerosis patients. SMile Card Scientific Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancardi, G L; Uccelli, M M; Sonnati, M; Comi, G; Milanese, C; De Vincentiis, A; Battaglia, M A

    2000-04-01

    The SMile Card was developed as a means for computerising clinical information for the purpose of transferability, accessibility, standardisation and compilation of a national database of demographic and clinical information about multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In many European countries, centres for MS are organised independently from one another making collaboration, consultation and patient referral complicated. Only the more highly advanced clinical centres, generally located in large urban areas, have had the possibility to utilise technical possibilities for improving the organisation of patient clinical and research information, although independently from other centres. The information system, developed utilising the Visual Basic language for Microsoft Windows 95, stores information via a 'smart card' in a database which is initiated and updated utilising a microprocessor, located at each neurological clinic. The SMile Card, currently being tested in Italy, permits patients to carry with them all relevant medical information without limitations. Neurologists are able to access and update, via the microprocessor, the patient's entire medical history and MS-related information, including the complete neurological examination and laboratory test results. The SMile Card provides MS patients and neurologists with a complete computerised archive of clinical information which is accessible throughout the country. In addition, data from the SMile Card system can be exported to other database programs.

  20. Medical students, clinical preventive services, and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carole W; Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Margaret

    2002-11-01

    Improving access to preventive care requires addressing patient, provider, and systems barriers. Patients often lack knowledge or are skeptical about the importance of prevention. Physicians feel that they have too little time, are not trained to deliver preventive services, and are concerned about the effectiveness of prevention. We have implemented an educational module in the required family practice clerkship (1) to enhance medical student learning about common clinical preventive services and (2) to teach students how to inform and involve patients in shared decision making about those services. Students are asked to examine available evidence-based information for preventive screening services. They are encouraged to look at the recommendations of various organizations and use such resources as reports from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to determine recommendations they want to be knowledgeable about in talking with their patients. For learning shared decision making, students are trained to use a model adapted from Braddock and colleagues(1) to discuss specific screening services and to engage patients in the process of making informed decisions about what is best for their own health. The shared decision making is presented and modeled by faculty, discussed in small groups, and students practice using Web-based cases and simulations. The students are evaluated using formative and summative performance-based assessments as they interact with simulated patients about (1) screening for high blood cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities, (2) screening for colorectal cancer, (3) screening for prostate cancer, and (4) screening for breast cancer. The final student evaluation is a ten-minute, videotaped discussion with a simulated patient about screening for colorectal cancer that is graded against a checklist that focuses primarily on the elements of shared decision making. Our medical students appear quite willing to accept shared decision making as

  1. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Komulainen, Jorma; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2012-01-01

    the use of computer-based clinical decision support (eCDS) in primary care and how different professional groups experience it. Our aim was to describe specific reasons for using or not using eCDS among primary care professionals. METHODS: The setting was a Finnish primary health care organization with 48......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Health information technology, particularly electronic decision support systems, can reduce the existing gap between evidence-based knowledge and health care practice but professionals have to accept and use this information. Evidence is scant on which features influence...... professionals receiving patient-specific guidance at the point of care. Multiple data (focus groups, questionnaire and spontaneous feedback) were analyzed using deductive content analysis and descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The content of the guidance is a significant feature of the primary care professional...

  2. Clinical and genetic correlates of decision making in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Clementi, Maurizio; Collantoni, Enrico; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Decision-making (DM) abilities have been found to be impaired in anorexia nervosa (AN), but few data are available about the characteristics and correlates of this cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to provide data on DM functioning in AN using both veridical and adaptive paradigms. While in veridical DM tasks, the individual's ability to predict a true/false response is measured, adaptive DM is the ability to consider both internal and external demands in order to make a good choice, in the absence of a single true "correct" answer. The participants were 189 women, of whom 91 were eating-disordered patients with a lifetime diagnosis of anorexia nervosa, and 98 were healthy women. All the participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological, and genetic assessment. The cognitive evaluation included a set of neuropsychological tasks and two decision-making tests: The Iowa Gambling Task and the Cognitive Bias Task. Anorexia nervosa patients showed significantly poorer performances on both decision-making tasks than healthy women. The Cognitive Bias Task revealed that anorexia nervosa patients employed significantly more context-independent decision-making strategies, which were independent from diagnostic subtype, handedness, education, and psychopathology. In the whole sample (patients and controls), Cognitive Bias Task performance was independently predicted by lifetime anorexia nervosa diagnosis, body mass index at assessment, and 5-HTTLPR genotype. Patients displayed poor decision-making functioning in both veridical and adaptive situations. The difficulties detected in anorexia nervosa individuals may affect not only the ability to consider the future outcomes of their actions (leading to "myopia for the future"), but also the capacity to update and review one's own mindset according to new environmental stimuli.

  3. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago OLIVEIRA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate theseoccurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  4. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo NOVAIS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate these occurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  5. Clinical decision-making and secondary findings in systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T; Brothers, K B; Erdmann, P; Langanke, M

    2016-05-21

    Systems medicine is the name for an assemblage of scientific strategies and practices that include bioinformatics approaches to human biology (especially systems biology); "big data" statistical analysis; and medical informatics tools. Whereas personalized and precision medicine involve similar analytical methods applied to genomic and medical record data, systems medicine draws on these as well as other sources of data. Given this distinction, the clinical translation of systems medicine poses a number of important ethical and epistemological challenges for researchers working to generate systems medicine knowledge and clinicians working to apply it. This article focuses on three key challenges: First, we will discuss the conflicts in decision-making that can arise when healthcare providers committed to principles of experimental medicine or evidence-based medicine encounter individualized recommendations derived from computer algorithms. We will explore in particular whether controlled experiments, such as comparative effectiveness trials, should mediate the translation of systems medicine, or if instead individualized findings generated through "big data" approaches can be applied directly in clinical decision-making. Second, we will examine the case of the Riyadh Intensive Care Program Mortality Prediction Algorithm, pejoratively referred to as the "death computer," to demonstrate the ethical challenges that can arise when big-data-driven scoring systems are applied in clinical contexts. We argue that the uncritical use of predictive clinical algorithms, including those envisioned for systems medicine, challenge basic understandings of the doctor-patient relationship. Third, we will build on the recent discourse on secondary findings in genomics and imaging to draw attention to the important implications of secondary findings derived from the joint analysis of data from diverse sources, including data recorded by patients in an attempt to realize their

  6. Is it the time to rethink clinical decision-making strategies? From a single clinical outcome evaluation to a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment (CMDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Alberto; Integlia, Davide; Bizzi, Emanuele; Piaggio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    There are plenty of different clinical, organizational and economic parameters to consider in order having a complete assessment of the total impact of a pharmaceutical treatment. In the attempt to follow, a holistic approach aimed to provide an evaluation embracing all clinical parameters in order to choose the best treatments, it is necessary to compare and weight multiple criteria. Therefore, a change is required: we need to move from a decision-making context based on the assessment of one single criteria towards a transparent and systematic framework enabling decision makers to assess all relevant parameters simultaneously in order to choose the best treatment to use. In order to apply the MCDA methodology to clinical decision making the best pharmaceutical treatment (or medical devices) to use to treat a specific pathology, we suggest a specific application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for the purpose, like a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment CMDA. In CMDA, results from both meta-analysis and observational studies are used by a clinical consensus after attributing weights to specific domains and related parameters. The decision will result from a related comparison of all consequences (i.e., efficacy, safety, adherence, administration route) existing behind the choice to use a specific pharmacological treatment. The match will yield a score (in absolute value) that link each parameter with a specific intervention, and then a final score for each treatment. The higher is the final score; the most appropriate is the intervention to treat disease considering all criteria (domain an parameters). The results will allow the physician to evaluate the best clinical treatment for his patients considering at the same time all relevant criteria such as clinical effectiveness for all parameters and administration route. The use of CMDA model will yield a clear and complete indication of the best pharmaceutical treatment to use for patients

  7. Transforming clinical practice guidelines and clinical pathways into fast-and-frugal decision trees to improve clinical care strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hozo, Iztok; Dale, William

    2018-02-27

    Contemporary delivery of health care is inappropriate in many ways, largely due to suboptimal Q5 decision-making. A typical approach to improve practitioners' decision-making is to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPG) by guidelines panels, who are instructed to use their judgments to derive practice recommendations. However, mechanisms for the formulation of guideline judgments remains a "black-box" operation-a process with defined inputs and outputs but without sufficient knowledge of its internal workings. Increased explicitness and transparency in the process can be achieved by implementing CPG as clinical pathways (CPs) (also known as clinical algorithms or flow-charts). However, clinical recommendations thus derived are typically ad hoc and developed by experts in a theory-free environment. As any recommendation can be right (true positive or negative), or wrong (false positive or negative), the lack of theoretical structure precludes the quantitative assessment of the management strategies recommended by CPGs/CPs. To realize the full potential of CPGs/CPs, they need to be placed on more solid theoretical grounds. We believe this potential can be best realized by converting CPGs/CPs within the heuristic theory of decision-making, often implemented as fast-and-frugal (FFT) decision trees. This is possible because FFT heuristic strategy of decision-making can be linked to signal detection theory, evidence accumulation theory, and a threshold model of decision-making, which, in turn, allows quantitative analysis of the accuracy of clinical management strategies. Fast-and-frugal provides a simple and transparent, yet solid and robust, methodological framework connecting decision science to clinical care, a sorely needed missing link between CPGs/CPs and patient outcomes. We therefore advocate that all guidelines panels express their recommendations as CPs, which in turn should be converted into FFTs to guide clinical care. © 2018 John Wiley

  8. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital.

  9. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Robert R; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS.

  10. Implications of caries diagnostic strategies for clinical management decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Vibeke; Hintze, Hanne; Wenzel, Ann

    2012-01-01

    -specificity) were calculated for each diagnostic strategy. RESULTS: Visual-tactile examination provided a true-positive rate of 34.2% and a false-positive rate of 1.5% for the detection of a cavity. The combination of a visual-tactile and a radiographic examination using the lesion in dentin threshold......OBJECTIVES: In clinical practice, a visual-tactile caries examination is frequently supplemented by bitewing radiography. This study evaluated strategies for combining visual-tactile and radiographic caries detection methods and determined their implications for clinical management decisions...... and cavitated lesions while the radiographic examination determined lesion depth. Direct inspection of the surfaces following tooth separation for the presence of cavitated or noncavitated lesions was the validation method. The true-positive rate (i.e. the sensitivity) and the false-positive rate (i.e. 1...

  11. Utilisation of diagnostic computerised tomography imaging and immediate clinical outcomes in older people with stroke before and after introduction of the National Service Framework for older people. A comparative study of hospital-based stroke registry data (1997-2003): Norfolk experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    how the National Service Framework (NSF) for older people in England might be associated with changes in clinically relevant stroke outcome has not been investigated. We looked for changes in computerised tomography (CT) scan rate, inpatient case-fatality rate (CFR), length of acute hospital stay and discharge destination for older people with stroke, compared with their younger counterparts, for a period before, and after, the introduction of the NSF. two periods, 4 years before and 2 years after the publication of the NSF, were selected to compare the above outcomes between three age categories: or = 85 years of age. Annual summary data for these periods were compared for the magnitude of changes in all age categories for all outcomes measured between pre- and post-NSF periods. n = 5,219. Utilisation of CT imaging had increased in all age groups post-NSF, with the most significant improvement in the oldest group. This change was associated with a greater proportion of people who had CT in this age group being discharged home in the post-NSF period. There was no change in the mortality from stroke in any age group during the study. Although the length of acute hospital stay increased, this was associated with a higher percentage of home discharges particularly in > 65-year olds, suggesting better clinical outcome in those who survived. in this single-centre analysis, the post-NSF period appeared to be associated with improvement in outcome in older people with stroke. Continual monitoring using stroke registry data may help to assess whether these effects are sustained in the longer term.

  12. Impact of a Clinical Decision Support System on Pharmacy Clinical Interventions, Documentation Efforts, and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Calloway, Stacy; Akilo, Hameed A.; Bierman, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Health care organizations are turning to electronic clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) to increase quality of patient care and promote a safer environment. A CDSS is a promising approach to the aggregation and use of patient data to identify patients who would most benefit from interventions by pharmacy clinicians. However, there are limited published reports describing the impact of CDSS on clinical pharmacy measures. In February 2011, Good Shepherd Medical Center, a 425-bed acute car...

  13. Computerised sepsis protocol management. Description of an early warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Begoña; Borges, Marcio; Smith, Timothy D; Del Castillo, Alberto; Socias, Antonia; Gutiérrez, Leticia; Nicolás, Jordi; Lladó, Bartolomé; Roche, Jose A; Díaz, Maria P; Lladó, Yolanda

    2018-02-01

    New strategies need to be developed for the early recognition and rapid response for the management of sepsis. To achieve this purpose, the Multidisciplinary Sepsis Team (MST) developed the Computerised Sepsis Protocol Management (PIMIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the convenience of using PIMIS, as well as the activity of the MST. An analysis was performed on the data collected from solicited MST consultations (direct activation of PIMIS by attending physician or telephone request) and unsolicited ones (by referral from the microbiology laboratory or an automatic referral via the hospital vital signs recording software [SIDCV]), as well as the hospital department, source of infection, treatment recommendation, and acceptance of this. Of the 1,581 first consultations, 65.1% were solicited consultations (84.1% activation of PIMIS and 15.9% by telephone). The majority of unsolicited consultations were generated by the microbiology laboratory (95.2%), and 4.8% from the SIDCV. Referral from solicited consultations were generated sooner (5.63days vs 8.47days; P<.001) and came from clinical specialties rather than from the surgical ward (73.0% vs 39.1%; P<.001). A recommendation was made for antimicrobial prescription change in 32% of first consultations. The treating physician accepted 78.1% of recommendations. The high rate of solicited consultations and acceptance of recommended prescription changes suggest that a MST is seen as a helpful resource, and that PIMIS software is perceived to be useful and convenient to use, as it is the main source of referral. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Do Computerised Training Programmes Designed to Improve Working Memory Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Brian J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A critical review of working memory training research during the last 10 years is provided. Particular attention is given to research that has attempted to investigate the efficacy of commercially marketed computerised training programmes such as "Cogmed" and "Jungle Memory". Claimed benefits are questioned on the basis that research methodologies…

  15. Computerised Accounting Software; A Curriculum That Enhances an Accounting Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machera, Robert P.; Machera, Precious C.

    2017-01-01

    There has been an outcry in commerce and industry about students who fail to perform in the accounting department due to lack of "practical accounting skills". It is from this background that the researchers were motivated to investigate the impact of a Computerised Accounting Software Curriculum that enhances an Accounting Programme. At…

  16. Debating the utility of computerised neurocognitive testing in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article was to contribute to an argument regarding the utility of computerised baseline and follow-up neurocognitive testing within the sports concussion arena. Heated debate around this issue via a number of contributions has appeared recently in the journal Current Sports Medicine Reports, with its use ...

  17. Artificial intelligence framework for simulating clinical decision-making: a Markov decision process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Casey C; Hauser, Kris

    2013-01-01

    In the modern healthcare system, rapidly expanding costs/complexity, the growing myriad of treatment options, and exploding information streams that often do not effectively reach the front lines hinder the ability to choose optimal treatment decisions over time. The goal in this paper is to develop a general purpose (non-disease-specific) computational/artificial intelligence (AI) framework to address these challenges. This framework serves two potential functions: (1) a simulation environment for exploring various healthcare policies, payment methodologies, etc., and (2) the basis for clinical artificial intelligence - an AI that can "think like a doctor". This approach combines Markov decision processes and dynamic decision networks to learn from clinical data and develop complex plans via simulation of alternative sequential decision paths while capturing the sometimes conflicting, sometimes synergistic interactions of various components in the healthcare system. It can operate in partially observable environments (in the case of missing observations or data) by maintaining belief states about patient health status and functions as an online agent that plans and re-plans as actions are performed and new observations are obtained. This framework was evaluated using real patient data from an electronic health record. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach; such an AI framework easily outperforms the current treatment-as-usual (TAU) case-rate/fee-for-service models of healthcare. The cost per unit of outcome change (CPUC) was $189 vs. $497 for AI vs. TAU (where lower is considered optimal) - while at the same time the AI approach could obtain a 30-35% increase in patient outcomes. Tweaking certain AI model parameters could further enhance this advantage, obtaining approximately 50% more improvement (outcome change) for roughly half the costs. Given careful design and problem formulation, an AI simulation framework can approximate optimal

  18. Are patient decision aids the best way to improve clinical decision making? Report of the IPDAS Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Nelson, Wendy L; Pignone, Michael; Elwyn, Glyn; Rovner, David R; O'Connor, Annette M; Coulter, Angela; Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Symposium held in 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The symposium featured a debate regarding the proposition that "decision aids are the best way to improve clinical decision making.'' The formal debate addressed the theoretical problem of the appropriate gold standard for an improved decision, efficacy of decision aids, and prospects for implementation. Audience comments and questions focused on both theory and practice: the often unacknowledged roots of decision aids in expected utility theory and the practical problems of limited patient decision aid implementation in health care. The participants' vote on the proposition was approximately half for and half against.

  19. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  20. Clinical implementation of RNA signatures for pharmacogenomic decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Weihua Tang1, Zhiyuan Hu2, Hind Muallem1, Margaret L Gulley1,21Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, NC, USAAbstract: RNA profiling is increasingly used to predict drug response, dose, or toxicity based on analysis of drug pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. Before implementing multiplexed RNA arrays in clinical practice, validation studies are carried out to demonstrate sufficient evidence of analytic and clinical performance, and to establish an assay protocol with quality assurance measures. Pathologists assure quality by selecting input tissue and by interpreting results in the context of the input tissue as well as the technologies that were used and the clinical setting in which the test was ordered. A strength of RNA profiling is the array-based measurement of tens to thousands of RNAs at once, including redundant tests for critical analytes or pathways to promote confidence in test results. Instrument and reagent manufacturers are crucial for supplying reliable components of the test system. Strategies for quality assurance include careful attention to RNA preservation and quality checks at pertinent steps in the assay protocol, beginning with specimen collection and proceeding through the various phases of transport, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and reporting. Specimen quality is checked by probing housekeeping transcripts, while spiked and exogenous controls serve as a check on analytic performance of the test system. Software is required to manipulate abundant array data and present it for interpretation by a laboratory physician who reports results in a manner facilitating therapeutic decision-making. Maintenance of the assay requires periodic documentation of personnel competency and laboratory proficiency. These strategies are shepherding genomic arrays into clinical settings to provide added

  1. Remote clinical decision-making: a clinician's definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mike; Northstone, Kate

    2017-05-12

    Aims Remote clinical decision-making (RCDM), commonly known as 'telephone triage' or 'hear and treat', describes clinicians' non-face-to-face involvement with patient care, and is an established strategy in UK ambulance services for managing increasing demand. However, there is no suitable definition of RCDM that fully explains the roles undertaken by clinicians in 999 hubs, or for its use as an ambulance quality indicator (AQI). The aim of this study, which is part of a larger evaluation of a new RCDM module in higher education, is to determine how clinicians define RCDM. Methods Three participants were asked, during semi-structured interviews, to define RCDM. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Clinicians do not focus on outcomes when defining RCDM, but on the efficacy of the process and the appropriateness of the determined outcome. Conclusion There is no precise description of the role of healthcare professionals in 999 clinical hubs, but there is a need for role clarity, for employees and organisations. The study questions the suitability of the definition of hear and treat as an AQI, as it does not appear to represent fully the various duties undertaken by 999 clinical hub healthcare professionals. More research is needed to consider the definition of RCDM in all its forms.

  2. Peripheral Exophytic Oral Lesions: A Clinical Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of peripheral oral exophytic lesions might be quite challenging. This review article aimed to introduce a decision tree for oral exophytic lesions according to their clinical features. General search engines and specialized databases including PubMed, PubMed Central, Medline Plus, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, Embase, and authenticated textbooks were used to find relevant topics by means of keywords such as “oral soft tissue lesion,” “oral tumor like lesion,” “oral mucosal enlargement,” and “oral exophytic lesion.” Related English-language articles published since 1988 to 2016 in both medical and dental journals were appraised. Upon compilation of data, peripheral oral exophytic lesions were categorized into two major groups according to their surface texture: smooth (mesenchymal or nonsquamous epithelium-originated and rough (squamous epithelium-originated. Lesions with smooth surface were also categorized into three subgroups according to their general frequency: reactive hyperplastic lesions/inflammatory hyperplasia, salivary gland lesions (nonneoplastic and neoplastic, and mesenchymal lesions (benign and malignant neoplasms. In addition, lesions with rough surface were summarized in six more common lesions. In total, 29 entities were organized in the form of a decision tree in order to help clinicians establish a logical diagnosis by a stepwise progression method.

  3. Duplicate laboratory test reduction using a clinical decision support tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, Gary W; Yerian, Lisa M; Wyllie, Robert; Harrison, A Marc; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-05-01

    Duplicate laboratory tests that are unwarranted increase unnecessary phlebotomy, which contributes to iatrogenic anemia, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased health care costs. We employed a clinical decision support tool (CDST) to block unnecessary duplicate test orders during the computerized physician order entry (CPOE) process. We assessed laboratory cost savings after 2 years and searched for untoward patient events associated with this intervention. This CDST blocked 11,790 unnecessary duplicate test orders in these 2 years, which resulted in a cost savings of $183,586. There were no untoward effects reported associated with this intervention. The movement to CPOE affords real-time interaction between the laboratory and the physician through CDSTs that signal duplicate orders. These interactions save health care dollars and should also increase patient satisfaction and well-being.

  4. Optimizing perioperative decision making: improved information for clinical workflow planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Burton, Matthew M; Wiebke, Eric A; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40-70% of hospital revenues and 30-40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction.

  5. A clinical decision-making algorithm for penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Angèle; Autegarden, Elodie; Amsler, Emmanuelle; Gaouar, Hafida; Vial, Amandine; Francès, Camille; Autegarden, Jean-Eric

    2017-12-01

    About 10% of subjects report suspected penicillin allergy, but 85-90% of these patients are not truly allergic and could safely receive beta-lactam antibiotics Objective: To design and validate a clinical decision-making algorithm, based on anamnesis (chronology, severity, and duration of the suspected allergic reactions) and reaching a 100% sensitivity and negative predictive value, to assess allergy risk related to a penicillin prescription in general practise. All patients were included prospectively and explorated based on ENDA/EAACI recommendations. Results of penicillin allergy work-up (gold standard) were compared with results of the algorithm. Allergological work-up diagnosed penicillin hypersensitivity in 41/259 patients (15.8%) [95% CI: 11.5-20.3]. Three of these patients were diagnosed as having immediate-type hypersensitivity to penicillin, but had been misdiagnosed as low risk patients using the clinical algorithm. Thus, the sensitivity and negative predictive value of the algorithm were 92.7% [95% CI: 80.1-98.5] and 96.3% [95% CI: 89.6-99.2], respectively, and the probability that a patient with true penicillin allergy had been misclassified was 3.7% [95% CI: 0.8-10.4]. Although the risk of misclassification is low, we cannot recommend the use of this algorithm in general practice. However, the algorithm can be useful in emergency situations in hospital settings. Key messages True penicillin allergy is considerably lower than alleged penicillin allergy (15.8%; 41 of the 259 patients with suspected penicillin allergy). A clinical algorithm based on the patient's clinical history of the supposed allergic event to penicillin misclassified 3/41 (3.7%) truly allergic patients.

  6. Development of a clinical decision model for thyroid nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhardt John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid nodules represent a common problem brought to medical attention. Four to seven percent of the United States adult population (10–18 million people has a palpable thyroid nodule, however the majority (>95% of thyroid nodules are benign. While, fine needle aspiration remains the most cost effective and accurate diagnostic tool for thyroid nodules in current practice, over 20% of patients undergoing FNA of a thyroid nodule have indeterminate cytology (follicular neoplasm with associated malignancy risk prevalence of 20–30%. These patients require thyroid lobectomy/isthmusectomy purely for the purpose of attaining a definitive diagnosis. Given that the majority (70–80% of these patients have benign surgical pathology, thyroidectomy in these patients is conducted principally with diagnostic intent. Clinical models predictive of malignancy risk are needed to support treatment decisions in patients with thyroid nodules in order to reduce morbidity associated with unnecessary diagnostic surgery. Methods Data were analyzed from a completed prospective cohort trial conducted over a 4-year period involving 216 patients with thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound (US, electrical impedance scanning (EIS and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNA prior to thyroidectomy. A Bayesian model was designed to predict malignancy in thyroid nodules based on multivariate dependence relationships between independent covariates. Ten-fold cross-validation was performed to estimate classifier error wherein the data set was randomized into ten separate and unique train and test sets consisting of a training set (90% of records and a test set (10% of records. A receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC curve of these predictions and area under the curve (AUC were calculated to determine model robustness for predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules. Results Thyroid nodule size, FNA cytology, US and EIS characteristics were highly predictive of

  7. Appreciative inquiry enhances cardiology nurses’ clinical decision making when using a clinical guideline on delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsegaard, Helle; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Rom, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    The current study responds to implementation challenges with translating evidence-based knowledge into practice. We explore how appreciative inquiry can be used in in-house learning sessions for nurses to enhance their knowledge in using a guideline on delirium as part of clinical decision making...... and axial coding drawing on the principles of grounded theory. The study shows that appreciative inquiry was meaningful to cardiology nurses in providing them with knowledge of using a guideline on delirium in clinical decision making, the main reasons being a) data on a current patient were included, b....... Through 18 sessions with 3–12 nurses, an appreciative inquiry approach was used. Specialist nurses from the Heart Centre of Copenhagen and senior lecturers from the Department of Nursing at Metropolitan University College facilitated the sessions. Field notes from the sessions were analysed using open...

  8. SANDS: an architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2007-10-11

    A new architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support) is introduced and its performance evaluated. The architecture provides a method for performing clinical decision support across a network, as in a health information exchange. Using the prototype we demonstrated that, first, a number of useful types of decision support can be carried out using our architecture; and, second, that the architecture exhibits desirable reliability and performance characteristics.

  9. [Cancer screening in clinical practice: the value of shared decision-making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornuz, Jacques; Junod, Noëlle; Pasche, Olivier; Guessous, Idris

    2010-07-14

    Shared decision-making approach to uncertain clinical situations such as cancer screening seems more appropriate than ever. Shared decision making can be defined as an interactive process where physician and patient share all the stages of the decision making process. For patients who wish to be implicated in the management of their health conditions, physicians might express difficulty to do so. Use of patient decision aids appears to improve such process of shared decision making.

  10. ICT-based reforms in local government decision-making in the gram panchayats of Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Thottunkel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial impact of computerisation can be felt in all elements that contribute to decision-making in panchayats in the state of Kerala. However, even though computerisation is bringing about immense improvements compared to traditional administrative practices, but scope still remains for further improvement. Instead of the 'as it is' computerisation that is mostly carried out a process based approach is needed.

  11. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-05-01

    This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional community, and features of clinical practice such as private versus public practice as well as local management policies. This review brings together the different strands of knowledge concerning non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making. This aspect of decision-making may be the biggest obstacle to the reality of practising evidence-based medicine. It needs to be understood in order to develop clinical strategies that will facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine.

  12. Computerised image analysis of biocrystallograms originating from agricultural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens-Otto; Henriksen, Christian B.; Laursen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Procedures are presented for computerised image analysis of iocrystallogram images, originating from biocrystallization investigations of agricultural products. The biocrystallization method is based on the crystallographic phenomenon that when adding biological substances, such as plant extracts...... on up to eight parameters indicated strong relationships, with R2 up to 0.98. It is concluded that the procedures were able to discriminate the seven groups of images, and are applicable for biocrystallization investigations of agricultural products. Perspectives for the application of image analysis...

  13. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hajjaj, FM; Salek, MS; Basra, MKA; Finlay, AY

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional co...

  14. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    OpenAIRE

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy outcomes. Relevance of three clinical decision making support tools available to frontline providers of care in the Greater Accra region is discussed. These are routine maternal health service delivery data populati...

  15. Clinical decision making in restorative dentistry, endodontics, and antibiotic prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of geographic location of graduation (Israel, Eastern Europe, Latin America) on decision making regarding management of dental caries, periapical lesions, and antibiotic prescribing routines. A questionnaire was given to ninety-eight general practitioners regarding demographic and work habits. Photographs of lesions were shown on a screen. Participants reported recommended treatment and whether they would routinely prescribe antibiotics following regular endodontic treatment, retreatment, and impacted third molar surgical extraction in healthy patients. There was a 94 percent (n=92) response rate, of which eighty-five responses were used in the data analysis. Surgical treatment of asymptomatic enamel caries lesions was not recommended by most of the subjects, and surgery was recommended for DEJ caries lesions in low or moderate caries risk patients, both without significant differences between geographic regions of dental school graduation. Israelis had a lower frequency of retreatment in asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post restoration (without crown) compared to Latin Americans and East Europeans. Most of the participants would not retreat asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post and crown. After third molar surgery, 46 percent of participants routinely prescribed antibiotics. Significantly more Latin American graduates prescribed antibiotics following endodontic treatment, retreatment, and third molar extractions (pantibiotics) and overtreatment (caries) among young practitioners reflect failure of undergraduate education in proper use of antibiotics and management of the carious lesions according to the patient's clinical presentation and caries risk assessment rather than routinely undertaking surgical caries treatment.

  16. Factors and outcomes of decision making for cancer clinical trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycki, Barbara A

    2011-09-01

    To describe factors and outcomes related to the decision-making process regarding participation in a cancer clinical trial. Cross-sectional, descriptive. Urban, academic, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the mid-Atlantic United States. 197 patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Mailed survey using one investigator-developed instrument, eight instruments used in published research, and a medical record review. disease context, sociodemographics, hope, quality of life, trust in healthcare system, trust in health professional, preference for research decision control, understanding risks, and information. decision to accept or decline research participation and satisfaction with this decision. All of the factors within the Research Decision Making Model together predicted cancer clinical trial participation and satisfaction with this decision. The most frequently preferred decision-making style for research participation was shared (collaborative) (83%). Multiple factors affect decision making for cancer clinical trial participation and satisfaction with this decision. Shared decision making previously was an unrecognized factor and requires further investigation. Enhancing the process of research decision making may facilitate an increase in cancer clinical trial enrollment rates. Oncology nurses have unique opportunities as educators and researchers to support shared decision making by those who prefer this method for deciding whether to accept or decline cancer clinical trial participation.

  17. Acceptance of clinical decision support surveillance technology in the clinical pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Dan; Ankem, Kalyani; English, Kathleen

    2017-03-01

    There are clinical and economic benefits to incorporating clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) in patient care interventions in the clinical pharmacy setting. However, user dissatisfaction and resistance to HIT can prevent optimal use of such systems, particularly when users employ system workarounds and overrides. The present study applied a modified version of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to evaluate the disposition and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists who perform surveillance to identify potential medication therapy interventions on patients in the hospital setting. A survey of clinical pharmacists (N = 48) was conducted. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to analyze the influence of the UTAUT-related variables on behavioral intention and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists. While behavioral intention did not predict actual use of HIT, facilitating conditions had a direct effect on pharmacists' use of CDSS. Likewise, satisfaction with CDSS was found to have a direct effect on use, with more satisfied users being less inclined to employ workarounds or overrides of the system. Based on the findings, organizational structures that facilitate CDSS use and user satisfaction affect the extent to which pharmacy and health care management maximize use in the clinical pharmacy setting.

  18. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  19. Forms of Knowledge Incorporated in Clinical Decision-making among Newly-Graduated Nurses: A Metasynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri; Elgaard Sørensen, Erik; Grønkjær, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-decision-making is of decisive importance to how evidence-based practice is put into practice. Schools of Nursing have a responsibility to teach and train nursing students to make clinical decisions within a frame of evidence-based practice. Clinical decision-making among nurses has been...... explored from numerous angles using a diversity of methodologies. Existing research has mainly focused on promoting and inhibiting factors for implementation of evidence-based practice and incorporation of research evidence in the clinical-decision. Little attention has been given to the nurses' behavior......, including the knowledge that actually informs the newly graduated nurses’ clinical decision. The aim of the study is to combine and synthesize results from qualitative research. Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnographic approach is used to conduct a metasynthesis of qualitative research that has studied...

  20. Decaying relevance of clinical data towards future decisions in data-driven inpatient clinical order sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2017-06-01

    Determine how varying longitudinal historical training data can impact prediction of future clinical decisions. Estimate the "decay rate" of clinical data source relevance. We trained a clinical order recommender system, analogous to Netflix or Amazon's "Customers who bought A also bought B..." product recommenders, based on a tertiary academic hospital's structured electronic health record data. We used this system to predict future (2013) admission orders based on different subsets of historical training data (2009 through 2012), relative to existing human-authored order sets. Predicting future (2013) inpatient orders is more accurate with models trained on just one month of recent (2012) data than with 12 months of older (2009) data (ROC AUC 0.91 vs. 0.88, precision 27% vs. 22%, recall 52% vs. 43%, all P<10 -10 ). Algorithmically learned models from even the older (2009) data was still more effective than existing human-authored order sets (ROC AUC 0.81, precision 16% recall 35%). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than using only the most recent (2012) data, unless applying a decaying weighting scheme with a "half-life" of data relevance about 4 months. Clinical practice patterns (automatically) learned from electronic health record data can vary substantially across years. Gold standards for clinical decision support are elusive moving targets, reinforcing the need for automated methods that can adapt to evolving information. Prioritizing small amounts of recent data is more effective than using larger amounts of older data towards future clinical predictions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Computerised therapies for anxiety and depression in children and young people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennant, Mary E; Loucas, Christina E; Whittington, Craig; Creswell, Cathy; Fonagy, Peter; Fuggle, Peter; Kelvin, Raphael; Naqvi, Sabrina; Stockton, Sarah; Kendall, Tim

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of children and young people (CYP) experience anxiety and/or depression before adulthood, but treatment is sometimes unavailable or inadequate. Self-help interventions may have a role in augmenting treatment and this work aimed to systematically review the evidence for computerised anxiety and depression interventions in CYP aged 5-25 years old. Databases were searched for randomised controlled trials and 27 studies were identified. For young people (12-25 years) with risk of diagnosed anxiety disorders or depression, computerised CBT (cCBT) had positive effects for symptoms of anxiety (SMD -0.77, 95% CI -1.45 to -0.09, k = 6, N = 220) and depression (SMD -0.62, 95% CI -1.13 to -0.11, k = 7, N = 279). In a general population study of young people, there were small positive effects for anxiety (SMD -0.15, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.03; N = 1273) and depression (SMD -0.15, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.03; N = 1280). There was uncertainty around the effectiveness of cCBT in children (5-11 years). Evidence for other computerised interventions was sparse and inconclusive. Computerised CBT has potential for treating and preventing anxiety and depression in clinical and general populations of young people. Further program development and research is required to extend its use and establish its benefit in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The design, construction and implementation of a computerised trauma registry in a developing South African metropolitan trauma service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Aldous, C; Clarke, D L

    2014-01-01

    The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service formerly lacked a robust computerised trauma registry. This made surgical audit difficult for the purpose of quality of care improvement and development. We aimed to design, construct and implement a computerised trauma registry within our service. Twelve months following its implementation, we sought to examine and report on the quality of the registry. Formal ethical approval to maintain a computerised trauma registry was obtained prior to undertaking any design and development. Appropriate commercial software was sourced to develop this project. The registry was designed as a flat file. A flat file is a plain text or mixed text and binary file which usually contains one record per line or physical record. Thereafter the registry file was launched onto a secure server. This provided the benefits of access security and automated backups. Registry training was provided to clients by the developer. The exercise of data capture was then integrated into the process of service delivery, taking place at the endpoint of patient care (discharge, transfer or death). Twelve months following its implementation, the compliance rates of data entry were measured. The developer of this project managed to design, construct and implement an electronic trauma registry into the service. Twelve months following its implementation the data were extracted and audited to assess the quality. A total of 2640 patient entries were captured onto the registry. Compliance rates were in the order of eighty percent and client satisfaction rates were high. A number of deficits were identified. These included the omission of weekend discharges and underreporting of deaths. The construction and implementation of the computerised trauma registry was the beginning of an endeavour to continue improvements in the quality of care within our service. The registry provided a reliable audit at twelve months post implementation. Deficits and limitations were

  3. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  4. Patients' perceptions of sharing in decisions: a systematic review of interventions to enhance shared decision making in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane; Stacey, Dawn; Ratté, Stéphane; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Graham, Ian D

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making is the process in which a healthcare choice is made jointly by the health professional and the patient. Little is known about what patients view as effective or ineffective strategies to implement shared decision making in routine clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making in routine clinical practice, as seen by patients. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) from their inception to mid-March 2009. We found additional material by reviewing the reference lists of the studies found in the databases; systematic reviews of studies on shared decision making; the proceedings of various editions of the International Shared Decision Making Conference; and the transcripts of the Society for Medical Decision Making's meetings. In our study selection, we included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series analyses in which patients evaluated interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making. The interventions in question consisted of the distribution of printed educational material; educational meetings; audit and feedback; reminders; and patient-mediated initiatives (e.g. patient decision aids). Two reviewers independently screened the studies and extracted data. Statistical analyses considered categorical and continuous process measures. We computed the standardized effect size for each outcome at the 95% confidence interval. The primary outcome of interest was health professionals' adoption of shared decision making as reported by patients in a self-administered questionnaire. Of the 6764 search results, 21 studies reported 35 relevant comparisons. Overall, the quality of the studies ranged from 0% to 83%. Only three of the 21 studies reported a clinically significant effect

  5. The clinical value of brain computerised tomography in a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of neuroimaging modalities in psychiatry has been evaluated in several studies. The vast majority seem to suggest that neuroimaging may be overutilised in psychiatry. There is a significant constraint on availability and cost related to neuroimaging of patients at general state medical facilities.

  6. Ethical issues related to computerised family medical histories in sickle cell disease: Inforare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franrenet, Sandra; Duchange, Nathalie; Galactéros, Fréderic; Quantin, Catherine; Cohen, Olivier; Nzouakou, Ruben; Sudraud, Sophie; Hervé, Christian; Moutel, Grégoire

    2010-10-01

    The Inforare project aims to set up a system for the sharing of clinical and familial data, in order to study how genes are related to the severity of sickle cell disease. While the computerisation of clinical records represents a valuable research goal, an ethical framework is necessary to guarantee patients' protection and their rights in this developing field. Issues relating to patient information during the Inforare study were analysed by the steering committee. Several major concerns were discussed by the committee and formalized in the patients' information letter: educating patients to aid the recruitment of family members, rules of confidentiality and the disclosure of aggregate, individual and unexpected research results. This paper presents the main issues addressed.

  7. Parametric vs. Nonparametric Regression Modelling within Clinical Decision Support

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 21-27 ISSN 1805-8698 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01251S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support systems * decision rules * statistical analysis * nonparametric regression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability

  8. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosky, Laura E.; Burke, Natasha L.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. In stressful situations, decision making processes related to informed consent may be compromised. Given the profound levels of distress that surrogates of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) experience, it is important to understand what factors may be influencing the decision making process beyond the informed consent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of clinician influence and other factors on decision making regarding participation in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Method. Participants were 76 children under sedation in a PICU and their surrogate decision makers. Measures included the Post Decision Clinician Survey, observer checklist, and post-decision interview. Results. Age of the pediatric patient was related to participation decisions in the RCT such that older children were more likely to be enrolled. Mentioning the sponsoring institution was associated with declining to participate in the RCT. Type of health care provider and overt recommendations to participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population. PMID:25161672

  9. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy

  10. Clinical Decision Support to Implement CYP2D6 Drug-Gene Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Pedro J; Parkulo, Mark; Blair, David; Elliott, Michelle; Schultz, Cloann; Sutton, Joseph; Rao, Padma; Bruflat, Jamie; Bleimeyer, Robert; Crooks, John; Gabrielson, Donald; Nicholson, Wayne; Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn; Wix, Kelly; Bielinski, Suzette J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kullo, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The level of CYP2D6 metabolic activity can be predicted by pharmacogenomic testing, and concomitant use of clinical decision support has the potential to prevent adverse effects from those drugs metabolized by this enzyme. Our initial findings after implementation of clinical decision support alerts integrated in the electronic health records suggest high feasibility, but also identify important challenges.

  11. Clinical decision making and mental health service use in people with severe mental illness across Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Cosh, S.; Zentner, N.; Ay, E.; Loos, S.; Slade, Mike; Maj, Mario; Salzano, A.; Berecz, R.; Glaub, T.; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Krogsgaard Bording, M.; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram; Puschner, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore relationships between preferred and experienced clinical decision making with service use, and associated costs, by people with severe mental illness.\\ud Methods: Prospective observational study of mental healthcare in six European countries: Germany, UK, Italy Hungary, Denmark and Switzerland. Patients (N = 588) and treating clinicians (N = 213) reported preferred and experienced decision making at baseline using the Clinical Decision Making Style Scale ...

  12. Factors influencing the clinical decision-making of midwives: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daemers, Darie O A; van Limbeek, Evelien B M; Wijnen, Hennie A A; Nieuwenhuijze, Marianne J; de Vries, Raymond G

    2017-10-06

    Although midwives make clinical decisions that have an impact on the health and well-being of mothers and babies, little is known about how they make those decisions. Wide variation in intrapartum decisions to refer women to obstetrician-led care suggests that midwives' decisions are based on more than the evidence based medicine (EBM) model - i.e. clinical evidence, midwife's expertise, and woman's values - alone. With this study we aimed to explore the factors that influence clinical decision-making of midwives who work independently. We used a qualitative approach, conducting in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 11 Dutch primary care midwives. Data collection took place between May and September 2015. The interviews were semi-structured, using written vignettes to solicit midwives' clinical decision-making processes (Think Aloud method). We performed thematic analysis on the transcripts. We identified five themes that influenced clinical decision-making: the pregnant woman as a whole person, sources of knowledge, the midwife as a whole person, the collaboration between maternity care professionals, and the organisation of care. Regarding the midwife, her decisions were shaped not only by her experience, intuition, and personal circumstances, but also by her attitudes about physiology, woman-centredness, shared decision-making, and collaboration with other professionals. The nature of the local collaboration between maternity care professionals and locally-developed protocols dominated midwives' clinical decision-making. When midwives and obstetricians had different philosophies of care and different practice styles, their collaborative efforts were challenged. Midwives' clinical decision-making is a more varied and complex process than the EBM framework suggests. If midwives are to succeed in their role as promoters and protectors of physiological pregnancy and birth, they need to understand how clinical decisions in a multidisciplinary context are

  13. Enhancing clinical decision making: development of a contiguous definition and conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffen, Jennifer; Corbridge, Susan J; Slimmer, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a term frequently used to describe the fundamental role of the nurse practitioner; however, other terms have been used interchangeably. The purpose of this article is to begin the process of developing a definition and framework of clinical decision making. The developed definition was "Clinical decision making is a contextual, continuous, and evolving process, where data are gathered, interpreted, and evaluated in order to select an evidence-based choice of action." A contiguous framework for clinical decision making specific for nurse practitioners is also proposed. Having a clear and unique understanding of clinical decision making will allow for consistent use of the term, which is relevant given the changing educational requirements for nurse practitioners and broadening scope of practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are:

  15. When to trust our learners? Clinical teachers' perceptions of decision variables in the entrustment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijn, Chantal C M A; Welink, Lisanne S; Bok, Harold G J; Ten Cate, Olle T J

    2018-06-01

    Clinical training programs increasingly use entrustable professional activities (EPAs) as focus of assessment. However, questions remain about which information should ground decisions to trust learners. This qualitative study aimed to identify decision variables in the workplace that clinical teachers find relevant in the elaboration of the entrustment decision processes. The findings can substantiate entrustment decision-making in the clinical workplace. Focus groups were conducted with medical and veterinary clinical teachers, using the structured consensus method of the Nominal Group Technique to generate decision variables. A ranking was made based on a relevance score assigned by the clinical teachers to the different decision variables. Field notes, audio recordings and flip chart lists were analyzed and subsequently translated and, as a form of axial coding, merged into one list, combining the decision variables that were similar in their meaning. A list of 11 and 17 decision variables were acknowledged as relevant by the medical and veterinary teacher groups, respectively. The focus groups yielded 21 unique decision variables that were considered relevant to inform readiness to perform a clinical task on a designated level of supervision. The decision variables consisted of skills, generic qualities, characteristics, previous performance or other information. We were able to group the decision variables into five categories: ability, humility, integrity, reliability and adequate exposure. To entrust a learner to perform a task at a specific level of supervision, a supervisor needs information to support such a judgement. This trust cannot be credited on a single case at a single moment of assessment, but requires different variables and multiple sources of information. This study provides an overview of decision variables giving evidence to justify the multifactorial process of making an entrustment decision.

  16. A Representation for Gaining Insight into Clinical Decision Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimison, Holly B.

    1988-01-01

    For many medical domains uncertainty and patient preferences are important components of decision making. Decision theory is useful as a representation for such medical models in computer decision aids, but the methodology has typically had poor performance in the areas of explanation and user interface. The additional representation of probabilities and utilities as random variables serves to provide a framework for graphical and text insight into complicated decision models. The approach allows for efficient customization of a generic model that describes the general patient population of interest to a patient- specific model. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the expected value of information and sensitivity for each model variable, thus providing a metric for deciding what to emphasize in the graphics and text summary. The computer-generated explanation includes variables that are sensitive with respect to the decision or that deviate significantly from what is typically observed. These techniques serve to keep the assessment and explanation of the patient's decision model concise, allowing the user to focus on the most important aspects for that patient.

  17. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner...... are involved in difficult treatment decisions including participation in clinical trials. The literature indicates that the decision is very often based on little knowledge about the treatment and that many patients who have consented to participate in a clinical trial are not always aware...... that they are participating in a trial. This place great demand on the healthcare providers’ ability to involve and advise patients in the decisions. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the communication when decisions about participation in clinical oncology trial are made and the patients...

  18. Clinical decision making of experienced and novice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, N; Bar-Tal, Y; Cohen-Mansfield, J

    1996-10-01

    Decision making is an important daily nursing activity. Given contradictory past findings concerning the ease of use cognitive schema for reaching decisions among experts and novices, we chose to examine consistency of information as a parameter that may clarify the process of decision making. Ninety-two experienced nurses and 65 nursing students rated their decisional difficulty and levels of certainty in reaching a diagnosis for two scenarios: one including consistent information and one providing information that was partly inconsistent with the given diagnosis. For the consistent information, students showed more difficulty and less certainty in the given diagnosis than the experienced nurses. The inconsistent scenario was perceived as more difficult by nurses in comparison to students. The cognitive processes responsible for these results are discussed.

  19. Fuzzy logic in clinical practice decision support systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Jim; Beliakov, Gleb; van der Zwaag, B.J.

    Computerized clinical guidelines can provide significant benefits to health outcomes and costs, however, their effective implementation presents significant problems. Vagueness and ambiguity inherent in natural (textual) clinical guidelines is not readily amenable to formulating automated alerts or

  20. Computerised analysis of facial emotion expression in eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Problems with social-emotional processing are known to be an important contributor to the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). Diminished facial communication of emotion has been frequently reported in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN). Less is known about facial expressivity in bulimia nervosa (BN) and in people who have recovered from AN (RecAN). This study aimed to pilot the use of computerised facial expression analysis software to investigate emotion expression across the ED spectrum and recovery in a large sample of participants. Method 297 participants with AN, BN, RecAN, and healthy controls were recruited. Participants watched film clips designed to elicit happy or sad emotions, and facial expressions were then analysed using FaceReader. Results The finding mirrored those from previous work showing that healthy control and RecAN participants expressed significantly more positive emotions during the positive clip compared to the AN group. There were no differences in emotion expression during the sad film clip. Discussion These findings support the use of computerised methods to analyse emotion expression in EDs. The findings also demonstrate that reduced positive emotion expression is likely to be associated with the acute stage of AN illness, with individuals with BN showing an intermediate profile. PMID:28575109

  1. Computerised analysis of facial emotion expression in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppanen, Jenni; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Davies, Helen; Lang, Katie; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Problems with social-emotional processing are known to be an important contributor to the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). Diminished facial communication of emotion has been frequently reported in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN). Less is known about facial expressivity in bulimia nervosa (BN) and in people who have recovered from AN (RecAN). This study aimed to pilot the use of computerised facial expression analysis software to investigate emotion expression across the ED spectrum and recovery in a large sample of participants. 297 participants with AN, BN, RecAN, and healthy controls were recruited. Participants watched film clips designed to elicit happy or sad emotions, and facial expressions were then analysed using FaceReader. The finding mirrored those from previous work showing that healthy control and RecAN participants expressed significantly more positive emotions during the positive clip compared to the AN group. There were no differences in emotion expression during the sad film clip. These findings support the use of computerised methods to analyse emotion expression in EDs. The findings also demonstrate that reduced positive emotion expression is likely to be associated with the acute stage of AN illness, with individuals with BN showing an intermediate profile.

  2. Clinical decision making in dermatology: observation of consultations and the patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex process and might be influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Little is known about this process in dermatology. The aim of this study was to explore the different types of management decisions made in dermatology and to identify factors influencing those decisions from observation of consultations and interviews with the patients. 61 patient consultations were observed by a physician with experience in dermatology. The patients were interviewed immediately after each consultation. Consultations and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and their content analysed using thematic content analysis. The most common management decisions made during the consultations included: follow-up, carrying out laboratory investigation, starting new topical treatment, renewal of systemic treatment, renewal of topical treatment, discharging patients and starting new systemic treatment. Common influences on those decisions included: clinical factors such as ineffectiveness of previous therapy, adherence to prescribing guidelines, side-effects of medications, previous experience with the treatment, deterioration or improvement in the skin condition, and chronicity of skin condition. Non-clinical factors included: patient's quality of life, patient's friends or relatives, patient's time commitment, travel or transportation difficulties, treatment-related costs, availability of consultant, and availability of treatment. The study has shown that patients are aware that management decisions in dermatology are influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Education programmes should be developed to improve the quality of decision making. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  4. Barriers and opportunities for shared decision making in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitmaker-Warnaar, T.J.; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is promoted as tool for improving quality and responsiveness of care, while lowering overall costs. The underlying idea of SDM is well-conceptualised and a wide range of experiments in the Netherlands and abroad have been executed over the last couple of years. However,

  5. Risk assessment and clinical decision making for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroy, Paul C; Caron, Sarah E; Sherman, Bonnie J; Heeren, Timothy C; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-10-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) related to test preference has been advocated as a potentially effective strategy for increasing adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, yet primary care providers (PCPs) are often reluctant to comply with patient preferences if they differ from their own. Risk stratification advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) provides a rational strategy for reconciling these differences. To assess the importance of risk stratification in PCP decision making related to test preference for average-risk patients and receptivity to use of an electronic risk assessment tool for ACN to facilitate SDM. Mixed methods, including qualitative key informant interviews and a cross-sectional survey. PCPs at an urban, academic safety-net institution. Screening preferences, factors influencing patient recommendations and receptivity to use of a risk stratification tool. Nine PCPs participated in interviews and 57 completed the survey. Despite an overwhelming preference for colonoscopy by 95% of respondents, patient risk (67%) and patient preferences (63%) were more influential in their decision making than patient comorbidities (31%; P decision making, yet few providers considered risk factors other than age for average-risk patients. Providers were receptive to the use of a risk assessment tool for ACN when recommending an appropriate screening test for select patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis,

  7. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Luke V; Oberg, Ryan; Starren, Justin B

    2011-04-10

    Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology

  8. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  9. Clinical factors and the decision to transfuse chronic dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Cynthia B; Shreay, Sanatan; Gitlin, Matthew; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cell transfusion was previously the principle therapy for anemia in CKD but became less prevalent after the introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. This study used adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis to identify preferences and predictors of transfusion decision-making in CKD. A computerized adaptive choice-based conjoint survey was administered between June and August of 2012 to nephrologists, internists, and hospitalists listed in the American Medical Association Masterfile. The survey quantified the relative importance of 10 patient attributes, including hemoglobin levels, age, occult blood in stool, severity of illness, eligibility for transplant, iron indices, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, cardiovascular disease, and functional status. Triggers of transfusions in common dialysis scenarios were studied, and based on adaptive choice-based conjoint-derived preferences, relative importance by performing multivariable regression to identify predictors of transfusion preferences was assessed. A total of 350 providers completed the survey (n=305 nephrologists; mean age=46 years; 21% women). Of 10 attributes assessed, absolute hemoglobin level was the most important driver of transfusions, accounting for 29% of decision-making, followed by functional status (16%) and cardiovascular comorbidities (12%); 92% of providers transfused when hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dl, independent of other factors. In multivariable regression, Veterans Administration providers were more likely to transfuse at 8.0 g/dl (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 18.4). Although transplant eligibility explained only 5% of decision-making, nephrologists were five times more likely to value it as important compared with non-nephrologists (odds ratio, 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 11.1). Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis was useful in predicting influences on transfusion decisions. Hemoglobin level, functional status, and cardiovascular comorbidities

  10. [Clinical decision making and critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2006-10-01

    The daily routine requires complex thinking processes of nurses, but clinical decision making and critical thinking are underestimated in nursing. A great demand for educational measures in clinical judgement related with the diagnostic process was found in nurses. The German literature hardly describes nursing diagnoses as clinical judgements about human reactions on health problems / life processes. Critical thinking is described as an intellectual, disciplined process of active conceptualisation, application and synthesis of information. It is gained through observation, experience, reflection and communication and leads thinking and action. Critical thinking influences the aspects of clinical decision making a) diagnostic judgement, b) therapeutic reasoning and c) ethical decision making. Human reactions are complex processes and in their course, human behavior is interpreted in the focus of health. Therefore, more attention should be given to the nursing diagnostic process. This article presents the theoretical framework of the paper "Clinical decision making: Fostering critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process through case studies".

  11. User-centered design to improve clinical decision support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Julian; Chuang, Emmeline; Goldzweig, Caroline; Cain, Cindy L; Sugar, Catherine; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated the ability of user-centered design to make clinical decision support systems more effective and easier to use. However, studies of user-centered design have rarely examined more than a handful of sites at a time, and have frequently neglected the implementation climate and organizational resources that influence clinical decision support. The inclusion of such factors was identified by a systematic review as "the most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations." (1) Identify the prevalence of four user-centered design practices at United States Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics and assess the perceived utility of clinical decision support at those clinics; (2) Evaluate the association between those user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support. We analyzed clinic-level survey data collected in 2006-2007 from 170 VA primary care clinics. We examined four user-centered design practices: 1) pilot testing, 2) provider satisfaction assessment, 3) formal usability assessment, and 4) analysis of impact on performance improvement. We used a regression model to evaluate the association between user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support, while accounting for other important factors at those clinics, including implementation climate, available resources, and structural characteristics. We also examined associations separately at community-based clinics and at hospital-based clinics. User-centered design practices for clinical decision support varied across clinics: 74% conducted pilot testing, 62% conducted provider satisfaction assessment, 36% conducted a formal usability assessment, and 79% conducted an analysis of impact on performance improvement. Overall perceived utility of clinical decision support was high, with a mean rating of 4.17 (±.67) out of 5 on a composite measure. "Analysis of impact on performance

  12. Clinical data warehousing for evidence based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, Lekha; Sahama, Tony; Stapleton, Peta

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of heterogeneous health data silos pose a big challenge when exploring for information to allow for evidence based decision making and ensuring quality outcomes. In this paper, we present a proof of concept for adopting data warehousing technology to aggregate and analyse disparate health data in order to understand the impact various lifestyle factors on obesity. We present a practical model for data warehousing with detailed explanation which can be adopted similarly for studying various other health issues.

  13. Ontology-based clinical decision support system applied on diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mukabunani, Alphonsine

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis Information- and communication technology IKT590 - University of Agder 2017 Medical diagnosis is a multi-step process which is complex as it requires the consideration of many factors. Additionally, the accuracy of diagnosis varies depending on the skill and knowledge a physician has in the medical field. Using ICT solution, the physicians can be assisted so that they can make an accurate decision. Many applications have been developed to enhance physician performance and i...

  14. Strategies to facilitate shared decision-making about pediatric oncology clinical trial enrollment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; Signorelli, Christina; Cohn, Richard J; Patenaude, Andrea; Foster, Claire; Pettit, Tristan; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to identify the strategies that have been recommended in the literature to facilitate shared decision-making regarding enrolment in pediatric oncology clinical trials. We searched seven databases for peer-reviewed literature, published 1990-2017. Of 924 articles identified, 17 studies were eligible for the review. We assessed study quality using the 'Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool'. We coded the results and discussions of papers line-by-line using nVivo software. We categorized strategies thematically. Five main themes emerged: 1) decision-making as a process, 2) individuality of the process; 3) information provision, 4) the role of communication, or 5) decision and psychosocial support. Families should have adequate time to make a decision. HCPs should elicit parents' and patients' preferences for level of information and decision involvement. Information should be clear and provided in multiple modalities. Articles also recommended providing training for healthcare professionals and access to psychosocial support for families. High quality, individually-tailored information, open communication and psychosocial support appear vital in supporting decision-making regarding enrollment in clinical trials. These data will usefully inform future decision-making interventions/tools to support families making clinical trial decisions. A solid evidence-base for effective strategies which facilitate shared decision-making is needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. mHealth for Clinical Decision-Making in Sub-Saharan Africa : A Scoping Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adepoju, Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade; Albersen, Bregje Joanna Antonia; De Brouwere, Vincent; van Roosmalen, Jos; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a bid to deliver quality health services in resource-poor settings, mobile health (mHealth) is increasingly being adopted. The role of mHealth in facilitating evidence-based clinical decision-making through data collection, decision algorithms, and evidence-based guidelines, for

  16. Complexity perspectives on clinical decision making in an intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bock, Ben A.; Willems, Dick L.; Weinstein, Henry C.

    2017-01-01

    How to clarify the implications of complexity thinking for decision making in the intensive care unit (ICU)? Retrospective qualitative empirical research. Practitioners in an ICU were interviewed on how their decisions were made regarding a particular patient in a difficult, clinical situation.

  17. Disciplined Decision Making in an Interdisciplinary Environment: Some Implications for Clinical Applications of Statistical Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantula, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical applications of statistical process control (SPC) in human service organizations are considered. SPC is seen as providing a standard set of criteria that serves as a common interface for data-based decision making, which may bring decision making under the control of established contingencies rather than the immediate contingencies of…

  18. Towards patient-centered colorectal cancer surgery : focus on risks, decisions and clinical auditing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Heleen Simone

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore several aspects of both clinical decision making and quality assessment in colorectal cancer surgery. Part one focusses on benefits and risks of treatment options, preoperative information provision and Shared Decision Making (SDM); part two investigates changes

  19. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  20. Artificial Intelligence Framework for Simulating Clinical Decision-Making: A Markov Decision Process Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Casey C.; Hauser, Kris

    2013-01-01

    In the modern healthcare system, rapidly expanding costs/complexity, the growing myriad of treatment options, and exploding information streams that often do not effectively reach the front lines hinder the ability to choose optimal treatment decisions over time. The goal in this paper is to develop a general purpose (non-disease-specific) computational/artificial intelligence (AI) framework to address these challenges. This serves two potential functions: 1) a simulation environment for expl...

  1. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: Methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczynski Nancy L; Haynes R Brian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this...

  2. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emergency unit were positive for PE. ... technology. ... 1 Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and ... Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  3. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. Methods A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed,...

  4. Preferred information sources for clinical decision making: critical care nurses' perceptions of information accessibility and usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrea P; West, Sandra H; Aitken, Leanne M

    2011-12-01

    Variability in clinical practice may result from the use of diverse information sources to guide clinical decisions. In routine clinical practice, nurses privilege information from colleagues over more formal information sources. It is not clear whether similar information-seeking behaviour is exhibited when critical care nurses make decisions about a specific clinical practice, where extensive practice variability exists alongside a developing research base. This study explored the preferred sources of information intensive care nurses used and their perceptions of the accessibility and usefulness of this information for making decisions in clinically uncertain situations specific to enteral feeding practice. An instrumental case study design, incorporating concurrent verbal protocols, Q methodology and focus groups, was used to determine intensive care nurses' perspectives of information use in the resolution of clinical uncertainty. A preference for information from colleagues to support clinical decisions was observed. People as information sources were considered most useful and most accessible in the clinical setting. Text and electronic information sources were seen as less accessible, mainly because of the time required to access the information within the documents. When faced with clinical uncertainty, obtaining information from colleagues allows information to be quickly accessed and applied within the context of a specific clinical presentation. Seeking information from others also provides opportunities for shared decision-making and potential validation of clinical judgment, although differing views may exacerbate clinical uncertainty. The social exchange of clinical information may meet the needs of nurses working in a complex, time-pressured environment but the extent of the evidence base for information passed through verbal communication is unclear. The perceived usefulness and accessibility of information is premised on the ease of use and access

  5. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilitation. An interactive teaching module consisting of didactic lectures on clinical decision-making and a computer-assisted case-based treatment planning software was developed Its impact on cognitive knowledge gain in clinical decision-making was evaluated using an assessment involving problem-based multiple choice questions and paper-based case scenarios. Mean test scores were: Pretest (17 ± 1), posttest 1 (21 ± 2) and posttest 2 (43 ± 3). Comparison of mean scores was done with one-way ANOVA test. There was overall significant difference in between mean scores at all the three points (P posttest 1 > pretest. Blended teaching methods employing didactic lectures on the clinical decision-making as well as computer assisted case-based learning can be used to improve quality of clinical decision-making in prosthodontic rehabilitation for dental graduates.

  6. Accuracy of intuition in clinical decision-making among novice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amanda; Zulkosky, Kristen; White, Krista; Pretz, Jean

    2017-05-01

    To assess the reliance on intuitive and analytical approaches during clinical decision-making among novice clinicians and whether that reliance is associated with accurate decision-making. Nurse educators and managers tend to emphasize analysis over intuition during clinical decision-making though nurses typically report some reliance on intuition in their practice. We hypothesized that under certain conditions, reliance on intuition would support accurate decision-making, even among novices. This study utilized an experimental design with clinical complication (familiar vs. novel) and decision phase (cue acquisition, diagnosis and action) as within-subjects' factors, and simulation role (observer, family, auxiliary nurse and primary nurse) as between-subjects' factor. We examined clinical decision-making accuracy among final semester pre-licensure nursing students in a simulation experience. Students recorded their reasoning about emerging clinical complications with their patient during two distinct points in the simulation; one point involved a familiar complication and the other a relatively novel complication. All data were collected during Spring 2015. Although most participants relied more heavily on analysis than on intuition, use of intuition during the familiar complication was associated with more accurate decision-making, particularly in guiding attention to relevant cues. With the novel complication, use of intuition appeared to hamper decision-making, particularly for those in an observer role. Novice clinicians should be supported by educators and nurse managers to note when their intuitions are likely to be valid. Our findings emphasize the integrated nature of intuition and analysis in clinical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Computerised respiratory sounds can differentiate smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana; Sen, Ipek; Kahya, Yasemin P; Afreixo, Vera; Marques, Alda

    2017-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is often associated with the development of several respiratory diseases however, if diagnosed early, the changes in the lung tissue caused by smoking may be reversible. Computerised respiratory sounds have shown to be sensitive to detect changes within the lung tissue before any other measure, however it is unknown if it is able to detect changes in the lungs of healthy smokers. This study investigated the differences between computerised respiratory sounds of healthy smokers and non-smokers. Healthy smokers and non-smokers were recruited from a university campus. Respiratory sounds were recorded simultaneously at 6 chest locations (right and left anterior, lateral and posterior) using air-coupled electret microphones. Airflow (1.0-1.5 l/s) was recorded with a pneumotachograph. Breathing phases were detected using airflow signals and respiratory sounds with validated algorithms. Forty-four participants were enrolled: 18 smokers (mean age 26.2, SD = 7 years; mean FEV 1 % predicted 104.7, SD = 9) and 26 non-smokers (mean age 25.9, SD = 3.7 years; mean FEV 1 % predicted 96.8, SD = 20.2). Smokers presented significantly higher frequency at maximum sound intensity during inspiration [(M = 117, SD = 16.2 Hz vs. M = 106.4, SD = 21.6 Hz; t(43) = -2.62, p = 0.0081, d z  = 0.55)], lower expiratory sound intensities (maximum intensity: [(M = 48.2, SD = 3.8 dB vs. M = 50.9, SD = 3.2 dB; t(43) = 2.68, p = 0.001, d z  = -0.78)]; mean intensity: [(M = 31.2, SD = 3.6 dB vs. M = 33.7,SD = 3 dB; t(43) = 2.42, p = 0.001, d z  = 0.75)] and higher number of inspiratory crackles (median [interquartile range] 2.2 [1.7-3.7] vs. 1.5 [1.2-2.2], p = 0.081, U = 110, r = -0.41) than non-smokers. Significant differences between computerised respiratory sounds of smokers and non-smokers have been found. Changes in respiratory sounds are often the earliest sign of disease. Thus, computerised respiratory sounds

  8. Construction Of A Computerised Information-Processing Test Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann M. Schepers

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of the study was to construct a computerised information-processing test battery to measure choice reaction time for up to and including six bits of information, to measure discrimination reaction time with regard to colour patterns and form patterns, to measure rate of information processing with regard to perceptual stimuli and conceptual reasoning, and to develop a suitable scoring system for the respective tests. The battery of tests was applied to 58 pilots. Opsomming Die hoofdoel van die studie was om ‘n gerekenariseerde inligtingverwerkingstoets-battery te konstrueer om keusereaksietyd tot en met ses bis inligting te meet, om diskriminasie-reaksietyd ten opsigte van kleurpatrone en vormpatrone te meet, om tempo van inligtingverwerking ten opsigte van perseptuele stimuli en konseptuele redenering te meet en om ‘n gepaste nasienstelsel vir die onderskeie toetse te ontwikkel. Die battery toetse is op 58 vlieëniers toegepas

  9. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... materials remain limited to mostly developed countries. There is need to adopt measures to further facilitate dissemination of current information of effective health to care providers and policymakers in resource-poor countries. This review is aimed at re-enforcing the need for applying best-evidence into clinical practice

  10. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed.

  11. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Boyle, Scott N; Brinner, Kristin M; Osheroff, Jerome A

    2009-10-08

    Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures), and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In addition, to represent meaningful benefits to personalized

  12. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  13. Effects of reflection on clinical decision-making of intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razieh, Shahrokhi; Somayeh, Ghafari; Fariba, Haghani

    2018-07-01

    Nurses are one of the most influential factors in overcoming the main challenges faced by health systems throughout the world. Every health system should, hence, empower nurses in clinical judgment and decision-making skills. This study evaluated the effects of implementing Tanner's reflection method on clinical decision-making of nurses working in an intensive care unit (ICU). This study used an experimental, pretest, posttest design. The setting was the intensive care unit of Amin Hospital Isfahan, Iran. The convenience sample included 60 nurses working in the ICU of Amin Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). This clinical trial was performed on 60 nurses working in the ICU of Amin Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). The nurses were selected by census sampling and randomly allocated to either the case or the control group. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing demographic characteristics and the clinical decision-making scale developed by Laurie and Salantera (NDMI-14). The questionnaire was completed before and one week after the intervention. The data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the level and mean scores of clinical decision-making before the intervention (P = 0.786). Based on the results of independent t-test, the mean score of clinical decision-making one week after the intervention was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.009; t = -2.69). The results of Mann Whitney test showed that one week after the intervention, the nurses' level of clinical decision-making in the case group rose to the next level (P = 0.001). Reflection could improve the clinical decision-making of ICU nurses. It is, thus, recommended to incorporate this method into the nursing curriculum and care practices. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Pilot study of a point-of-use decision support tool for cancer clinical trials eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, P P; Weisburd, M; Overhage, J M; Sledge, G; Tierney, W M

    1999-01-01

    Many adults with cancer are not enrolled in clinical trials because caregivers do not have the time to match the patient's clinical findings with varying eligibility criteria associated with multiple trials for which the patient might be eligible. The authors developed a point-of-use portable decision support tool (DS-TRIEL) to automate this matching process. The support tool consists of a hand-held computer with a programmable relational database. A two-level hierarchic decision framework was used for the identification of eligible subjects for two open breast cancer clinical trials. The hand-held computer also provides protocol consent forms and schemas to further help the busy oncologist. This decision support tool and the decision framework on which it is based could be used for multiple trials and different cancer sites.

  15. Exploring the use of Option Grid™ patient decision aids in a sample of clinics in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalia, Peter; Elwyn, Glyn; Barr, Paul; Song, Julia; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Lesniak, Monika; Mullin, Sarah; Kurek, Krzysztof; Bushell, Matt; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2018-05-29

    Research on the implementation of patient decision aids to facilitate shared decision making in clinical settings has steadily increased across Western countries. A study which implements decision aids and measures their impact on shared decision making has yet to be conducted in the Eastern part of Europe. To study the use of Option Grid TM patient decision aids in a sample of Grupa LUX MED clinics in Warsaw, Poland, and measure their impact on shared decision making. We conducted a pre-post interventional study. Following a three-month period of usual care, clinicians from three Grupa LUX MED clinics received a one-hour training session on how to use three Option Grid TM decision aids and were provided with copies for use for four months. Throughout the study, all eligible patients were asked to complete the three-item CollaboRATE patient-reported measure of shared decision making after their clinical encounter. CollaboRATE enables patients to assess the efforts clinicians make to: (i) inform them about their health issues; (ii) listen to 'what matters most'; (iii) integrate their treatment preference in future plans. A Hierarchical Logistic Regression model was performed to understand which variables had an effect on CollaboRATE. 2,048 patients participated in the baseline phase; 1,889 patients participated in the intervention phase. Five of the thirteen study clinicians had a statistically significant increase in their CollaboRATE scores (pOption Grid TM helped some clinicians practice shared decision making as reflected in CollaboRATE scores, but most clinicians did not have a significant increase in their scores. Our study indicates that the effect of these interventions may be dependent on clinic contexts and clinician engagement. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  17. Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Debra; Barkway, Patricia; Curren, David; Oster, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patient's health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients.

  18. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, Jobke; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  20. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, M.J.; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    Background Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  1. An Application for Mobile Devices Focused on Clinical Decision Support: Diabetes Mellitus Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Lucas Felipe; Rigo, Sandro José; Cazella, Silvio César; Ben, Angela Jornada

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision-making is performed by health professionals and it is currently connected to the need for manual query for these professionals for clinical guidelines, which are generally formed by large text files, which makes this process very slow and laborious. The development of

  2. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  3. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Understanding the acceptability of e-mental health--attitudes and expectations towards computerised self-help treatments for mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiat, Peter; Goldstone, Philip; Tarrier, Nicholas

    2014-04-11

    E-mental health and m-mental health include the use of technology in the prevention, treatment and aftercare of mental health problems. With the economical pressure on mental health services increasing, e-mental health and m-mental health could bridge treatment gaps, reduce waiting times for patients and deliver interventions at lower costs. However, despite the existence of numerous effective interventions, the transition of computerised interventions into care is slow. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acceptability of e-mental health and m-mental health in the general population. An advisory group of service users identified dimensions that potentially influence an individual's decision to engage with a particular treatment for mental health problems. A large sample (N = 490) recruited through email, flyers and social media was asked to rate the acceptability of different treatment options for mental health problems on these domains. Results were analysed using repeated measures MANOVA. Participants rated the perceived helpfulness of an intervention, the ability to motivate users, intervention credibility, and immediate access without waiting time as most important dimensions with regard to engaging with a treatment for mental health problems. Participants expected face-to-face therapy to meet their needs on most of these dimensions. Computerised treatments and smartphone applications for mental health were reported to not meet participants' expectations on most domains. However, these interventions scored higher than face-to-face treatments on domains associated with the convenience of access. Overall, participants reported a very low likelihood of using computerised treatments for mental health in the future. Individuals in this study expressed negative views about computerised self-help intervention and low likelihood of use in the future. To improve the implementation and uptake, policy makers need to improve the public perception of such

  5. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting.

  6. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (pdecision-making.

  7. The Melbourne East Monash General Practice Database (MAGNET: Using data from computerised medical records to create a platform for primary care and health services research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Mazza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Melbourne East MonAsh GeNeral PracticE DaTabase (MAGNET research platform was launched in 2013 to provide a unique data source for primary care and health services research in Australia.  MAGNET contains information from the computerised records of 50 participating general practices and includes data from the computerised medical records of more than 1,100,000 patients.  The data extracted is patient-level episodic information and includes a variety of fields related to patient demographics and historical clinical information, along with the characteristics of the participating general practices.  While there are limitations to the data that is currently available, the MAGNET research platform continues to investigate other avenues for improving the breadth and quality of data, with the aim of providing a more comprehensive picture of primary care in Australia

  8. The Melbourne East Monash General Practice Database (MAGNET): Using data from computerised medical records to create a platform for primary care and health services research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Danielle; Pearce, Christopher; Turner, Lyle Robert; De Leon-Santiago, Maria; McLeod, Adam; Ferriggi, Jason; Shearer, Marianne

    2016-07-04

    The Melbourne East MonAsh GeNeral PracticE DaTabase (MAGNET) research platform was launched in 2013 to provide a unique data source for primary care and health services research in Australia.  MAGNET contains information from the computerised records of 50 participating general practices and includes data from the computerised medical records of more than 1,100,000 patients.  The data extracted is patient-level episodic information and includes a variety of fields related to patient demographics and historical clinical information, along with the characteristics of the participating general practices.  While there are limitations to the data that is currently available, the MAGNET research platform continues to investigate other avenues for improving the breadth and quality of data, with the aim of providing a more comprehensive picture of primary care in Australia.

  9. Principles for the development and implementation of the moira computerised system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Brittain, J E [Oslo Univ. (Norway). LFI Zoological Museum

    1999-12-31

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the patterns of the MOIRA project (a model based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The project aims to describe and analyse computerised methodologies for the identification of the countermeasures in fresh water systems contaminated by radioactive substances. The structure of the MOIRA software and the criteria for the objective evaluation of the ecological impact of the countermeasures applied to lakes (defined by the `Lake Ecosystem Index`, which is used in the Multi attribute Decision Analysis process developed for MOIRA) are described in detail. A preliminary classification of the countermeasures in relation to their potential effectiveness and feasibility and a classification of the main European species of fishes of radioecological importance are presented. The described methodologies have been applied to the Norwegian lake Heimdalsvatn to demonstrate the feasibility of the MOIRA system. Two further articles in the report describe the principles for the development of a model for predicting the radionuclide migration from urban areas to fresh water systems and the migration of radionuclides in rivers. [Italiano] Lo scopo del presente rapporto, composto da articoli preparati dai ricercatori che partecipano al progetto MOIRA (A MODEL BASED COMPUTERISED SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT SUPPORT TO IDENTIFY OPTIMAL REMEDIAL STRATEGIES FOR RESTORING RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINATED AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS AND DRAINAGE AREAS), e` la descrizione e l`analisi delle metodologie computerizzate che consentono l`identificazione di contromisure atte a ridurre i livelli di contaminazione radioattiva di sistemi acquatici continentali. In particolare vengono descritte la struttura del software MOIRA e i criteri per una valutazione oggettiva dell`impatto ecologico delle contromisure applicate a sistem,i lacustri

  10. Principles for the development and implementation of the moira computerised system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Brittain, J.E. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). LFI Zoological Museum

    1998-12-31

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the patterns of the MOIRA project (a model based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The project aims to describe and analyse computerised methodologies for the identification of the countermeasures in fresh water systems contaminated by radioactive substances. The structure of the MOIRA software and the criteria for the objective evaluation of the ecological impact of the countermeasures applied to lakes (defined by the `Lake Ecosystem Index`, which is used in the Multi attribute Decision Analysis process developed for MOIRA) are described in detail. A preliminary classification of the countermeasures in relation to their potential effectiveness and feasibility and a classification of the main European species of fishes of radioecological importance are presented. The described methodologies have been applied to the Norwegian lake Heimdalsvatn to demonstrate the feasibility of the MOIRA system. Two further articles in the report describe the principles for the development of a model for predicting the radionuclide migration from urban areas to fresh water systems and the migration of radionuclides in rivers. [Italiano] Lo scopo del presente rapporto, composto da articoli preparati dai ricercatori che partecipano al progetto MOIRA (A MODEL BASED COMPUTERISED SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT SUPPORT TO IDENTIFY OPTIMAL REMEDIAL STRATEGIES FOR RESTORING RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINATED AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS AND DRAINAGE AREAS), e` la descrizione e l`analisi delle metodologie computerizzate che consentono l`identificazione di contromisure atte a ridurre i livelli di contaminazione radioattiva di sistemi acquatici continentali. In particolare vengono descritte la struttura del software MOIRA e i criteri per una valutazione oggettiva dell`impatto ecologico delle contromisure applicate a sistem,i lacustri

  11. Human Cognitive Limitations. Broad, Consistent, Clinical Application of Physiological Principles Will Require Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alan H

    2018-02-01

    Our education system seems to fail to enable clinicians to broadly understand core physiological principles. The emphasis on reductionist science, including "omics" branches of research, has likely contributed to this decrease in understanding. Consequently, clinicians cannot be expected to consistently make clinical decisions linked to best physiological evidence. This is a large-scale problem with multiple determinants, within an even larger clinical decision problem: the failure of clinicians to consistently link their decisions to best evidence. Clinicians, like all human decision-makers, suffer from significant cognitive limitations. Detailed context-sensitive computer protocols can generate personalized medicine instructions that are well matched to individual patient needs over time and can partially resolve this problem.

  12. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  13. Shared decision making in mental health: the importance for current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguera-Lara, Victoria; Dowsey, Michelle M; Ride, Jemimah; Kinder, Skye; Castle, David

    2017-12-01

    We reviewed the literature on shared decision making (regarding treatments in psychiatry), with a view to informing our understanding of the decision making process and the barriers that exist in clinical practice. Narrative review of published English-language articles. After culling, 18 relevant articles were included. Themes identified included models of psychiatric care, benefits for patients, and barriers. There is a paucity of published studies specifically related to antipsychotic medications. Shared decision making is a central part of the recovery paradigm and is of increasing importance in mental health service delivery. The field needs to better understand the basis on which decisions are reached regarding psychiatric treatments. Discrete choice experiments might be useful to inform the development of tools to assist shared decision making in psychiatry.

  14. Do educational interventions improve nurses' clinical decision making and judgement? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carl; Stapley, Sally

    2011-07-01

    Despite the growing popularity of decision making in nursing curricula, the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve nursing judgement and decision making is unknown. We sought to synthesise and summarise the comparative evidence for educational interventions to improve nursing judgements and clinical decisions. A systematic review. Electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, OpenSIGLE conference proceedings and hand searching nursing journals. Studies published since 1960, reporting any educational intervention that aimed to improve nurses' clinical judgements or decision making were included. Studies were assessed for relevance and quality. Data extracted included study design; educational setting; the nature of participants; whether the study was concerned with the clinical application of skills or the application of theory; the type of decision targeted by the intervention (e.g. diagnostic reasoning) and whether the evaluation of the intervention focused on efficacy or effectiveness. A narrative approach to study synthesis was used due to heterogeneity in interventions, study samples, outcomes and settings and incomplete reporting of effect sizes. From 5262 initial citations 24 studies were included in the review. A variety of educational approaches were reported. Study quality and content reporting was generally poor. Pedagogical theories were widely used but use of decision theory (with the exception of subjective expected utility theory implicit in decision analysis) was rare. The effectiveness and efficacy of interventions was mixed. Educational interventions to improve nurses' judgements and decisions are complex and the evidence from comparative studies does little to reduce the uncertainty about 'what works'. Nurse educators need to pay attention to decision, as well as pedagogical, theory in the design of interventions. Study design and

  15. A social-technological epistemology of clinical decision-making as mediated by imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Sophie; Carusi, Annamaria; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2017-10-01

    In recent years there has been growing attention to the epistemology of clinical decision-making, but most studies have taken the individual physicians as the central object of analysis. In this paper we argue that knowing in current medical practice has an inherently social character and that imaging plays a mediating role in these practices. We have analyzed clinical decision-making within a medical expert team involved in diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), a rare disease requiring multidisciplinary team involvement in diagnosis and management. Within our field study, we conducted observations, interviews, video tasks, and a panel discussion. Decision-making in the PH clinic involves combining evidence from heterogeneous sources into a cohesive framing of a patient, in which interpretations of the different sources can be made consistent with each other. Because pieces of evidence are generated by people with different expertise and interpretation and adjustments take place in interaction between different experts, we argue that this process is socially distributed. Multidisciplinary team meetings are an important place where information is shared, discussed, interpreted, and adjusted, allowing for a collective way of seeing and a shared language to be developed. We demonstrate this with an example of image processing in the PH service, an instance in which knowledge is distributed over multiple people who play a crucial role in generating an evaluation of right heart function. Finally, we argue that images fulfill a mediating role in distributed knowing in 3 ways: first, as enablers or tools in acquiring information; second, as communication facilitators; and third, as pervasively framing the epistemic domain. With this study of clinical decision-making in diagnosis and treatment of PH, we have shown that clinical decision-making is highly social and mediated by technologies. The epistemology of clinical decision-making needs

  16. GELLO: an object-oriented query and expression language for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Margarita; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Boxwala, Aziz A; Greenes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    GELLO is a purpose-specific, object-oriented (OO) query and expression language. GELLO is the result of a concerted effort of the Decision Systems Group (DSG) working with the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee (CDSTC) to provide the HL7 community with a common format for data encoding and manipulation. GELLO will soon be submitted for ballot to the HL7 CDSTC for consideration as a standard.

  17. Clinical Decision Making and Mental Health Service Use Among Persons With Severe Mental Illness Across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Suzanne; Zenter, Nadja; Ay, Esra-Sultan; Loos, Sabine; Slade, Mike; De Rosa, Corrado; Luciano, Mario; Berecz, Roland; Glaub, Theodora; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Krogsgaard Bording, Malene; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram; Puschner, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The study explored relationships between preferences for and experiences of clinical decision making (CDM) with service use among persons with severe mental illness. Data from a prospective observational study in six European countries were examined. Associations of baseline staff-rated (N=213) and patient-rated (N=588) preferred and experienced decision making with service use were examined at baseline by using binomial regressions and at 12-month follow-up by using multilevel models. A preference by patients and staff for active patient involvement in decision making, rather than shared or passive decision making, was associated with longer hospital admissions and higher costs at baseline and with increases in admissions over 12 months (p=.043). Low patient-rated satisfaction with an experienced clinical decision was also related to increased costs over the study period (p=.005). A preference for shared decision making may reduce health care costs by reducing inpatient admissions. Patient satisfaction with decisions was a predictor of costs, and clinicians should maximize patient satisfaction with CDM.

  18. Clinical decision making on the use of physical restraint in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical restraint is a common nursing intervention in intensive care units and nurses often use it to ensure patients' safety and to prevent unexpected accidents. However, existing literature indicated that the use of physical restraint is a complex one because of inadequate rationales, the negative physical and emotional effects on patients, but the lack of perceived alternatives. This paper is aimed to interpret the clinical decision-making theories related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units in order to facilitate our understanding on the use of physical restraint and to evaluate the quality of decisions made by nurses. By reviewing the literature, intuition and heuristics are the main decision-making strategies related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units because the rapid and reflexive nature of intuition and heuristics allow nurses to have a rapid response to urgent and emergent cases. However, it is problematic if nurses simply count their decision-making on experience rather than incorporate research evidence into clinical practice because of inadequate evidence to support the use of physical restraint. Besides that, such a rapid response may lead nurses to make decisions without adequate assessment and thinking and therefore biases and errors may be generated. Therefore, despite the importance of intuition and heuristics in decision-making in acute settings on the use of physical restraint, it is recommended that nurses should incorporate research evidence with their experience to make decisions and adequate assessment before implementing physical restraint is also necessary.

  19. A pilot study of distributed knowledge management and clinical decision support in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Simonaitis, Linas; Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Schaeffer, Molly; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-09-01

    Implement and perform pilot testing of web-based clinical decision support services using a novel framework for creating and managing clinical knowledge in a distributed fashion using the cloud. The pilot sought to (1) develop and test connectivity to an external clinical decision support (CDS) service, (2) assess the exchange of data to and knowledge from the external CDS service, and (3) capture lessons to guide expansion to more practice sites and users. The Clinical Decision Support Consortium created a repository of shared CDS knowledge for managing hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease in a community cloud hosted by Partners HealthCare. A limited data set for primary care patients at a separate health system was securely transmitted to a CDS rules engine hosted in the cloud. Preventive care reminders triggered by the limited data set were returned for display to clinician end users for review and display. During a pilot study, we (1) monitored connectivity and system performance, (2) studied the exchange of data and decision support reminders between the two health systems, and (3) captured lessons. During the six month pilot study, there were 1339 patient encounters in which information was successfully exchanged. Preventive care reminders were displayed during 57% of patient visits, most often reminding physicians to monitor blood pressure for hypertensive patients (29%) and order eye exams for patients with diabetes (28%). Lessons learned were grouped into five themes: performance, governance, semantic interoperability, ongoing adjustments, and usability. Remote, asynchronous cloud-based decision support performed reasonably well, although issues concerning governance, semantic interoperability, and usability remain key challenges for successful adoption and use of cloud-based CDS that will require collaboration between biomedical informatics and computer science disciplines. Decision support in the cloud is feasible and may be a reasonable

  20. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources in clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Wiechula, Rick

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses' use in clinical decision-making and why and how they are used. BACKGROUND: In spite of an increased educational focus on skills and competencies within evidence based practice newly graduated nurses' ability to use...... approaches to strengthen the knowledgebase used in clinical decision-making. DESIGN AND METHODS: Ethnographic study using participant-observation and individual semi-structured interviews of nine Danish newly graduated nurses in medical and surgical hospital settings. RESULTS: Newly graduates use...... in clinical decision-making. If newly graduates are to be supported in an articulate and reflective use of a variety of sources, they have to be allocated to experienced nurses who model a reflective, articulate and balanced use of knowledge sources. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  1. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR, and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The

  2. Improving Breast Cancer Surgical Treatment Decision Making: The iCanDecide Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Sarah T; Li, Yun; An, Lawrence C; Resnicow, Kenneth; Janz, Nancy K; Sabel, Michael S; Ward, Kevin C; Fagerlin, Angela; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma; Hofer, Timothy P; Katz, Steven J

    2018-03-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine the effect of iCanDecide, an interactive and tailored breast cancer treatment decision tool, on the rate of high-quality patient decisions-both informed and values concordant-regarding locoregional breast cancer treatment and on patient appraisal of decision making. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial of newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer making locoregional treatment decisions. From 22 surgical practices, 537 patients were recruited and randomly assigned online to the iCanDecide interactive and tailored Web site (intervention) or the iCanDecide static Web site (control). Participants completed a baseline survey and were mailed a follow-up survey 4 to 5 weeks after enrollment to assess the primary outcome of a high-quality decision, which consisted of two components, high knowledge and values-concordant treatment, and secondary outcomes (decision preparation, deliberation, and subjective decision quality). Results Patients in the intervention arm had higher odds of making a high-quality decision than did those in the control arm (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.92; P = .0004), which was driven primarily by differences in the rates of high knowledge between groups. The majority of patients in both arms made values-concordant treatment decisions (78.6% in the intervention arm and 81.4% in the control arm). More patients in the intervention arm had high decision preparation (estimate, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.34; P = .027), but there were no significant differences in the other decision appraisal outcomes. The effect of the intervention was similar for women who were leaning strongly toward a treatment option at enrollment compared with those who were not. Conclusion The tailored and interactive iCanDecide Web site, which focused on knowledge building and values clarification, positively affected high-quality decisions largely by improving knowledge compared with static online

  3. Clinical decision-making: predictors of patient participation in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Ehrenberg, Anna; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2008-11-01

    To investigate predictors of patients' preferences for participation in clinical decision-making in inpatient nursing care. Patient participation in decision-making in nursing care is regarded as a prerequisite for good clinical practice regarding the person's autonomy and integrity. A cross-sectional survey of 428 persons, newly discharged from inpatient care. The survey was conducted using the Control Preference Scale. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for testing the association of patient characteristics with preferences for participation. Patients, in general, preferred adopting a passive role. However, predictors for adopting an active participatory role were the patient's gender (odds ratio = 1.8), education (odds ratio = 2.2), living condition (odds ratio = 1.8) and occupational status (odds ratio = 2.0). A probability of 53% was estimated, which female senior citizens with at least a high school degree and who lived alone would prefer an active role in clinical decision-making. At the same time, a working cohabiting male with less than a high school degree had a probability of 8% for active participation in clinical decision making in nursing care. Patient preferences for participation differed considerably and are best elicited by assessment of the individual patient. Relevance to clinical practice. The nurses have a professional responsibility to act in such a way that patients can participate and make decisions according to their own values from an informed position. Access to knowledge of patients'basic assumptions and preferences for participation is of great value for nurses in the care process. There is a need for nurses to use structured methods and tools for eliciting individual patient preferences regarding participation in clinical decision-making.

  4. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin G. Mark

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT, may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods: Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age >40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results: One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6-100.0]. Conclusion: Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease.

  5. Big Data as a Driver for Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Learning Health Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Dagliati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Big data technologies are nowadays providing health care with powerful instruments to gather and analyze large volumes of heterogeneous data collected for different purposes, including clinical care, administration, and research. This makes possible to design IT infrastructures that favor the implementation of the so-called “Learning Healthcare System Cycle,” where healthcare practice and research are part of a unique and synergic process. In this paper we highlight how “Big Data enabled” integrated data collections may support clinical decision-making together with biomedical research. Two effective implementations are reported, concerning decision support in Diabetes and in Inherited Arrhythmogenic Diseases.

  6. Potential Impact on Clinical Decision Making via a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of men with prostate cancer is fraught with uncertainty as physicians and patients balance efficacy with potential toxicity and diminished quality of life. Utilization of genomics as a prognostic biomarker has improved the informed decision-making process by enabling more rationale treatment choices. Recently investigations have begun to determine whether genomic information from tumor transcriptome data can be used to impact clinical decision-making beyond prognosis. Here we discuss the potential of genomics to alter management of a patient who presented with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. We suggest that this information help selecting patients for advanced imaging, chemotherapies, or clinical trial.

  7. Managed care and clinical decision-making in child and adolescent behavioral health: provider perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Garcia, Christine I; Hansell, Stephen; Rosato, Mark G; Minsky, Shula

    2003-03-01

    This study investigated how managed care affects clinical decision-making in a behavioral health care system. Providers serving children and adolescents under both managed and unmanaged care (n = 28) were interviewed about their awareness of differences between the benefit arrangements, how benefits affect clinical decision-making, outcomes and quality of care; and satisfaction with care. Quantitative and qualitative findings indicated that providers saw both advantages and disadvantages to managed care. Although most providers recognized the advantages of managed care in increasing efficiency, many were concerned that administrative pressures associated with managed care compromise service quality.

  8. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS).

  9. Computerized clinical decision support systems for chronic disease management: a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanov, Pavel S; Misra, Shikha; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Garg, Amit X; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Mackay, Jean A; Weise-Kelly, Lorraine; Navarro, Tamara; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2011-08-03

    The use of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) may improve chronic disease management, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, ongoing disease and treatment monitoring, and patient behavior modification. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve the processes of chronic care (such as diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease) and associated patient outcomes (such as effects on biomarkers and clinical exacerbations). We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews database, Inspec, and reference lists for potentially eligible articles published up to January 2010. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the use of CCDSSs to usual practice or non-CCDSS controls. Trials were eligible if at least one component of the CCDSS was designed to support chronic disease management. We considered studies 'positive' if they showed a statistically significant improvement in at least 50% of relevant outcomes. Of 55 included trials, 87% (n = 48) measured system impact on the process of care and 52% (n = 25) of those demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Sixty-five percent (36/55) of trials measured impact on, typically, non-major (surrogate) patient outcomes, and 31% (n = 11) of those demonstrated benefits. Factors of interest to decision makers, such as cost, user satisfaction, system interface and feature sets, unique design and deployment characteristics, and effects on user workflow were rarely investigated or reported. A small majority (just over half) of CCDSSs improved care processes in chronic disease management and some improved patient health. Policy makers, healthcare administrators, and practitioners should be aware that the evidence of CCDSS effectiveness is limited, especially with respect to the small number and size of studies measuring patient outcomes.

  10. Postnatal Psychosocial Assessment and Clinical Decision-Making, a Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Deborah; Fowler, Cathrine

    2018-05-18

    The aim of this study is to describe experienced child and family health nurses' clinical decision-making during a postnatal psychosocial assessment. Maternal emotional wellbeing in the postnatal year optimises parenting and promotes infant development. Psychosocial assessment potentially enables early intervention and reduces the risk of a mental disorder occurring during this time of change. Assessment accuracy, and the interventions used are determined by the standard of nursing decision-making. A qualitative methodology was employed to explore decision-making behaviour when conducting a postnatal psychosocial assessment. This study was conducted in an Australian early parenting organisation. Twelve experienced child and family health nurses were interviewed. A detailed description of a postnatal psychosocial assessment process was obtained using a critical incident technique. Template analysis was used to determine the information domains the nurses accessed, and content analysis was used to determine the nurses' thinking strategies, to make clinical decisions from this assessment. The nurses described 24 domains of information and used 17 thinking strategies, in a variety of combinations. The four information domains most commonly used were parenting, assessment tools, women-determined issues and sleep. The seven thinking strategies most commonly used were searching for information, forming relationships between the information, recognising a pattern, drawing a conclusion, setting priorities, providing explanations for the information and judging the value of the information. The variety and complexity of the clinical decision-making involved in postnatal psychosocial assessment confirms that the nurses use information appropriately and within their scope of nursing practice. The standard of clinical decision-making determines the results of the assessment and the optimal access to care. Knowledge of the information domains and the decision-making strategies

  11. What is a “good” treatment decision?: Decisional control, knowledge, treatment decision-making, and quality of life in men with clinically localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Biddle, Caitlin; Underwood, Willie; Nelson, Christian J.; Homish, D. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We explored whether active patient involvement in decision making and greater patient knowledge are associated with better treatment decision making experiences and better quality of life (QOL) among men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Localized prostate cancer treatment decision-making is an advantageous model for studying patient treatment decision-making dynamics as there are multiple treatment options and a lack of empirical evidence to recommend one over the other; consequently, it is recommended that patients be fully involved in making the decision. Methods Men with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer (N=1529) completed measures of decisional control, prostate cancer knowledge, and their decision-making experience (decisional conflict, and decision-making satisfaction and difficulty) shortly after they made their treatment decision. Prostate cancer-specific QOL was assessed 6-months after treatment. Results More active involvement in decision making and greater knowledge were associated with lower decisional conflict and higher decision-making satisfaction, but greater decision-making difficulty. An interaction between decisional control and knowledge revealed that greater knowledge was only associated with greater difficulty for men actively involved in making the decision (67% of sample). Greater knowledge, but not decisional control predicted better QOL 6-months post-treatment. Conclusion Although men who are actively involved in decision making and more knowledgeable may make more informed decisions, they could benefit from decisional support (e.g., decision-making aids, emotional support from providers, strategies for reducing emotional distress) to make the process easier. Men who were more knowledgeable about prostate cancer and treatment side effects at the time they made their treatment decision may have appraised their QOL as higher because they had realistic expectations about side effects. PMID:26957566

  12. Ethically-based clinical decision-making in physical therapy: process and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Elspeth; Geddes, E Lynne; Larin, Hélène

    2005-01-01

    The identification and consideration of relevant ethical issues in clinical decision-making, and the education of health care professionals (HCPs) in these skills are key factors in providing quality health care. This qualitative study explores the way in which physical therapists (PTs) integrate ethical issues into clinical practice decisions and identifies ethical themes used by PTs. A purposive sample of eight PTs was asked to describe a recent ethically-based clinical decision. Transcribed interviews were coded and themes identified related to the following categories: 1) the integration of ethical issues in the clinical decision-making process, 2) patient welfare, 3) professional ethos of the PT, and 4) health care economics and business practices. Participants readily described clinical situations involving ethical issues but rarely identified specific conflicting ethical issues in their description. Ethical dilemmas were more frequently resolved when there were fewer emotional sequelae associated with the dilemma, and the PT had a clear understanding of professional ethos, valued patient autonomy, and explored a variety of alternative actions before implementing one. HCP students need to develop a clear professional ethos and an increased understanding of the economic factors that will present ethical issues in practice.

  13. Many faces of rationality: Implications of the great rationality debate for clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Elqayam, Shira

    2017-10-01

    Given that more than 30% of healthcare costs are wasted on inappropriate care, suboptimal care is increasingly connected to the quality of medical decisions. It has been argued that personal decisions are the leading cause of death, and 80% of healthcare expenditures result from physicians' decisions. Therefore, improving healthcare necessitates improving medical decisions, ie, making decisions (more) rational. Drawing on writings from The Great Rationality Debate from the fields of philosophy, economics, and psychology, we identify core ingredients of rationality commonly encountered across various theoretical models. Rationality is typically classified under umbrella of normative (addressing the question how people "should" or "ought to" make their decisions) and descriptive theories of decision-making (which portray how people actually make their decisions). Normative theories of rational thought of relevance to medicine include epistemic theories that direct practice of evidence-based medicine and expected utility theory, which provides the basis for widely used clinical decision analyses. Descriptive theories of rationality of direct relevance to medical decision-making include bounded rationality, argumentative theory of reasoning, adaptive rationality, dual processing model of rationality, regret-based rationality, pragmatic/substantive rationality, and meta-rationality. For the first time, we provide a review of wide range of theories and models of rationality. We showed that what is "rational" behaviour under one rationality theory may be irrational under the other theory. We also showed that context is of paramount importance to rationality and that no one model of rationality can possibly fit all contexts. We suggest that in context-poor situations, such as policy decision-making, normative theories based on expected utility informed by best research evidence may provide the optimal approach to medical decision-making, whereas in the context

  14. Deepening the quality of clinical reasoning and decision-making in rural hospital nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, M G; Grigg, L; Dersch, S

    2014-01-01

    Rural acute care nursing requires an extensive breadth and depth of knowledge as well as the ability to quickly reason through problems in order to make sound clinical decisions. This reasoning often occurs within an environment that has minimal medical or ancillary support. Registered nurses (RN) new to rural nursing, and employers, have raised concerns about patient safety while new nurses make the transition into rural practice. In addition, feeling unprepared for the rigors of rural hospital nursing practice is a central issue influencing RN recruitment and retention. Understanding how rural RNs reason is a key element for identifying professional development needs and may support recruitment and retention of skilled rural nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore how rural RNs reason through clinical problems as well as to assess the quality of such reasoning. This study used a non-traditional approach for data collection. Fifteen rural acute care nurses with varying years of experience working in southern Alberta, Canada, were observed while they provided care to patients of varying acuity within a simulated rural setting. Following the simulation, semi-structured interviews were conducted using a substantive approach to critical thinking. Findings revealed that the ability to engage in deep clinical reasoning varied considerably among participants despite being given the same information under the same circumstances. Furthermore, the number of years of experience did not seem to be directly linked to the ability to engage in sound clinical reasoning. Novice nurses, however, did rely heavily on others in their decision making in order to ensure they were making the right decision. Hence, their relationships with other staff members influenced their ability to engage in clinical reasoning and decision making. In situations where the patient's condition was deteriorating quickly, regardless of years of experience, all of the participants depended on

  15. Enhancing decision making about participation in cancer clinical trials: development of a question prompt list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard F.; Shuk, Elyse; Leighl, Natasha; Butow, Phyllis; Ostroff, Jamie; Edgerson, Shawna; Tattersall, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Slow accrual to cancer clinical trials impedes the progress of effective new cancer treatments. Poor physician–patient communication has been identified as a key contributor to low trial accrual. Question prompt lists (QPLs) have demonstrated a significant promise in facilitating communication in general, surgical, and palliative oncology settings. These simple patient interventions have not been tested in the oncology clinical trial setting. We aimed to develop a targeted QPL for clinical trials (QPL-CT). Method Lung, breast, and prostate cancer patients who either had (trial experienced) or had not (trial naive) participated in a clinical trial were invited to join focus groups to help develop and explore the acceptability of a QPL-CT. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. A research team, including a qualitative data expert, analyzed these data to explore patients’ decision-making processes and views about the utility of the QPL-CT prompt to aid in trial decision making. Results Decision making was influenced by the outcome of patients’ comparative assessment of perceived risks versus benefits of a trial, and the level of trust patients had in their doctors’ recommendation about the trial. Severity of a patient’s disease influenced trial decision making only for trial-naive patients. Conclusion Although patients were likely to prefer a paternalistic decision-making style, they expressed valuation of the QPL as an aid to decision making. QPL-CT utility extended beyond the actual consultation to include roles both before and after the clinical trial discussion. PMID:20593202

  16. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrave, C; Deegan, T; Gibbs, A; Poulsen, M; Moores, M; Harden, F; Mengersen, K

    2014-01-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  17. Variation in clinical decision-making for induction of labour: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippita, Tanya A; Porter, Maree; Seeho, Sean K; Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L

    2017-09-22

    Unexplained variation in induction of labour (IOL) rates exist between hospitals, even after accounting for casemix and hospital differences. We aimed to explore factors that influence clinical decision-making for IOL that may be contributing to the variation in IOL rates between hospitals. We undertook a qualitative study involving semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews with obstetricians and midwives. Using purposive sampling, participants known to have diverse opinions on IOL were selected from ten Australian maternity hospitals (based on differences in hospital IOL rate, size, location and case-mix complexities). Transcripts were indexed, coded, and analysed using the Framework Approach to identify main themes and subthemes. Forty-five participants were interviewed (21 midwives, 24 obstetric medical staff). Variations in decision-making for IOL were based on the obstetrician's perception of medical risk in the pregnancy (influenced by the obstetrician's personality and knowledge), their care relationship with the woman, how they involved the woman in decision-making, and resource availability. The role of a 'gatekeeper' in the procedural aspects of arranging an IOL also influenced decision-making. There was wide variation in the clinical decision-making practices of obstetricians and less accountability for decision-making in hospitals with a high IOL rate, with the converse occurring in hospitals with low IOL rates. Improved communication, standardised risk assessment and accountability for IOL offer potential for reducing variation in hospital IOL rates.

  18. Incorporating uncertainty regarding applicability of evidence from meta-analyses into clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriston, Levente; Meister, Ramona

    2014-03-01

    Judging applicability (relevance) of meta-analytical findings to particular clinical decision-making situations remains challenging. We aimed to describe an evidence synthesis method that accounts for possible uncertainty regarding applicability of the evidence. We conceptualized uncertainty regarding applicability of the meta-analytical estimates to a decision-making situation as the result of uncertainty regarding applicability of the findings of the trials that were included in the meta-analysis. This trial-level applicability uncertainty can be directly assessed by the decision maker and allows for the definition of trial inclusion probabilities, which can be used to perform a probabilistic meta-analysis with unequal probability resampling of trials (adaptive meta-analysis). A case study with several fictitious decision-making scenarios was performed to demonstrate the method in practice. We present options to elicit trial inclusion probabilities and perform the calculations. The result of an adaptive meta-analysis is a frequency distribution of the estimated parameters from traditional meta-analysis that provides individually tailored information according to the specific needs and uncertainty of the decision maker. The proposed method offers a direct and formalized combination of research evidence with individual clinical expertise and may aid clinicians in specific decision-making situations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, C.; Moores, M.; Deegan, T.; Gibbs, A.; Poulsen, M.; Harden, F.; Mengersen, K.

    2014-03-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  20. Science and intuition: do both have a place in clinical decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Helen

    Intuition is widely used in clinical decision making yet its use is underestimated compared to scientific decision-making methods. Information processing is used within scientific decision making and is methodical and analytical, whereas intuition relies more on a practitioner's perception. Intuition is an unconscious process and may be referred to as a 'sixth sense', 'hunch' or 'gut feeling'. It is not underpinned by valid and reliable measures. Expert health professionals use a rapid, automatic process to recognise familiar problems instantly. Intuition could therefore involve pattern recognition, where experts draw on experiences, so could be perceived as a cognitive skill rather than a perception or knowing without knowing how. The NHS places great importance on evidence-based practice but intuition is seemingly becoming an acceptable way of thinking and knowing in clinical decision making. Recognising nursing as an art allows intuition to be used and the environment or situation to be interpreted to help inform decision making. Intuition can be used in conjunction with evidence-based practice and to achieve good outcomes and deserves to be acknowledged within clinical practice.

  1. Developing an Interactive Data Visualization Tool to Assess the Impact of Decision Support on Clinical Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Timothy C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Monaghan, Dayna; Gaskin, Cree M

    2018-05-18

    Due to mandates from recent legislation, clinical decision support (CDS) software is being adopted by radiology practices across the country. This software provides imaging study decision support for referring providers at the point of order entry. CDS systems produce a large volume of data, providing opportunities for research and quality improvement. In order to better visualize and analyze trends in this data, an interactive data visualization dashboard was created using a commercially available data visualization platform. Following the integration of a commercially available clinical decision support product into the electronic health record, a dashboard was created using a commercially available data visualization platform (Tableau, Seattle, WA). Data generated by the CDS were exported from the data warehouse, where they were stored, into the platform. This allowed for real-time visualization of the data generated by the decision support software. The creation of the dashboard allowed the output from the CDS platform to be more easily analyzed and facilitated hypothesis generation. Integrating data visualization tools into clinical decision support tools allows for easier data analysis and can streamline research and quality improvement efforts.

  2. A system dynamics model of clinical decision thresholds for the detection of developmental-behavioral disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Christopher Sheldrick

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical decision-making has been conceptualized as a sequence of two separate processes: assessment of patients’ functioning and application of a decision threshold to determine whether the evidence is sufficient to justify a given decision. A range of factors, including use of evidence-based screening instruments, has the potential to influence either or both processes. However, implementation studies seldom specify or assess the mechanism by which screening is hypothesized to influence clinical decision-making, thus limiting their ability to address unexpected findings regarding clinicians’ behavior. Building on prior theory and empirical evidence, we created a system dynamics (SD model of how physicians’ clinical decisions are influenced by their assessments of patients and by factors that may influence decision thresholds, such as knowledge of past patient outcomes. Using developmental-behavioral disorders as a case example, we then explore how referral decisions may be influenced by changes in context. Specifically, we compare predictions from the SD model to published implementation trials of evidence-based screening to understand physicians’ management of positive screening results and changes in referral rates. We also conduct virtual experiments regarding the influence of a variety of interventions that may influence physicians’ thresholds, including improved access to co-located mental health care and improved feedback systems regarding patient outcomes. Results Results of the SD model were consistent with recent implementation trials. For example, the SD model suggests that if screening improves physicians’ accuracy of assessment without also influencing decision thresholds, then a significant proportion of children with positive screens will not be referred and the effect of screening implementation on referral rates will be modest—results that are consistent with a large proportion of published

  3. Clinical decision making in cancer care: a review of current and future roles of patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Ottersen, Trygve

    2018-05-09

    Patient age is among the most controversial patient characteristics in clinical decision making. In personalized cancer medicine it is important to understand how individual characteristics do affect practice and how to appropriately incorporate such factors into decision making. Some argue that using age in decision making is unethical, and how patient age should guide cancer care is unsettled. This article provides an overview of the use of age in clinical decision making and discusses how age can be relevant in the context of personalized medicine. We conducted a scoping review, searching Pubmed for English references published between 1985 and May 2017. References concerning cancer, with patients above the age of 18 and that discussed age in relation to diagnostic or treatment decisions were included. References that were non-medical or concerning patients below the age of 18, and references that were case reports, ongoing studies or opinion pieces were excluded. Additional references were collected through snowballing and from selected reports, guidelines and articles. Three hundred and forty-seven relevant references were identified. Patient age can have many and diverse roles in clinical decision making: Contextual roles linked to access (age influences how fast patients are referred to specialized care) and incidence (association between increasing age and increasing incidence rates for cancer); patient-relevant roles linked to physiology (age-related changes in drug metabolism) and comorbidity (association between increasing age and increasing number of comorbidities); and roles related to interventions, such as treatment (older patients receive substandard care) and outcome (survival varies by age). Patient age is integrated into cancer care decision making in a range of ways that makes it difficult to claim age-neutrality. Acknowledging this and being more transparent about the use of age in decision making are likely to promote better clinical decisions

  4. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: Nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible....... The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative...... analysis. We identified two interpretive repertoires: 'clinical judgement' which was used to describe the different grounds for making judgements; and 'decision-making' which was used to describe organisational circumstances influencing decision-making. Jamous and Peloille's theory proved useful...

  5. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  6. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-12-15

    Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsychINFO, and CINAHL (EBSCO) was conducted to identify empirical studies of clinician populations. Search terms were focused to identify studies reporting clinician emotion OR clinician emotional intelligence OR emotional competence AND clinical decision making OR clinical reasoning. Twenty three papers were retained for synthesis. These represented empirical work from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches and comprised work with a focus on experienced emotion and on skills associated with emotional intelligence. The studies examined nurses (10), physicians (7), occupational therapists (1), physiotherapists (1), mixed clinician samples (3), and unspecified infectious disease experts (1). We identified two main themes in the context of clinical decision making: the subjective experience of emotion; and, the application of emotion and cognition in CDM. Sub-themes under the subjective experience of emotion were: emotional response to contextual pressures; emotional responses to others; and, intentional exclusion of emotion from CDM. Under the application of emotion and cognition in CDM, sub-themes were: compassionate emotional labour - responsiveness to patient emotion within CDM; interdisciplinary tension regarding the significance and meaning of emotion in CDM; and, emotion and moral judgement. Clinicians' experienced emotions can and do affect clinical decision making, although acknowledgement of that is far from universal. Importantly, this occurs in the in the absence of a

  7. Evaluating a Clinical Decision Support Interface for End-of-Life Nurse Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Keenan, Gail M; Lopez, Karen D; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are tools that assist healthcare personnel in the decision-making process for patient care. Although CDSSs have been successfully deployed in the clinical setting to assist physicians, few CDSS have been targeted at professional nurses, the largest group of health providers. We present our experience in designing and testing a CDSS interface embedded within a nurse care planning and documentation tool. We developed four prototypes based on different CDSS feature designs, and tested them in simulated end-of-life patient handoff sessions with a group of 40 nurse clinicians. We show how our prototypes directed nurses towards an optimal care decision that was rarely performed in unassisted practice. We also discuss the effect of CDSS layout and interface navigation in a nurse's acceptance of suggested actions. These findings provide insights into effective nursing CDSS design that are generalizable to care scenarios different than end-of-life.

  8. Clinical use of patient decision-making aids for stone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Amy H; Streeper, Necole M; Best, Sara L; Penniston, Kristina L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-08-01

    Patient decision-making aids (PDMAs) help patients make informed healthcare decisions and improve patient satisfaction. The utility of PDMAs for patients considering treatments for urolithiasis has not yet been published. We report our experience using PDMAs developed at our institution in the outpatient clinical setting in patients considering a variety of treatment options for stones. Patients with radiographically confirmed urolithiasis were given PDMAs regarding treatment options for their stone(s) based on their clinical profile. We assessed patients' satisfaction, involvedness, and feeling of making a more informed decision with utilization of the PDMAs using a Likert Scale Questionnaire. Information was also collected regarding previous stone passage, history and type of surgical intervention for urolithiasis, and level of education. Patients (n = 43; 18 males, 23 females and two unknown) 53 +/- 14years old were included. Patients reported that they understood the advantages and disadvantages outlined in the PDMAs (97%), that the PDMAs helped them make a more informed decision (83%) and felt more involved in the decision making process (88%). Patients reported that the aids were presented in a balanced manner and used up-to-date scientific information (100%, 84% respectively). Finally, a majority of the patients prefer an expert's opinion when making a treatment decision (98%) with 73% of patients preferring to form their own opinion based on available information. Previous stone surgery was associated with patients feeling more involved with the decision making process (p = 0.0465). PDMAs have a promising role in shared decision-making in the setting of treatment options for nephrolithiasis.

  9. Towards meaningful medication-related clinical decision support: recommendations for an initial implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phansalkar, S; Wright, A; Kuperman, G J; Vaida, A J; Bobb, A M; Jenders, R A; Payne, T H; Halamka, J; Bloomrosen, M; Bates, D W

    2011-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) can improve safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, especially when implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) applications. Medication-related decision support logic forms a large component of the CDS logic in any CPOE system. However, organizations wishing to implement CDS must either purchase the computable clinical content or develop it themselves. Content provided by vendors does not always meet local expectations. Most organizations lack the resources to customize the clinical content and the expertise to implement it effectively. In this paper, we describe the recommendations of a national expert panel on two basic medication-related CDS areas, specifically, drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking and duplicate therapy checking. The goals of this study were to define a starter set of medication-related alerts that healthcare organizations can implement in their clinical information systems. We also draw on the experiences of diverse institutions to highlight the realities of implementing medication decision support. These findings represent the experiences of institutions with a long history in the domain of medication decision support, and the hope is that this guidance may improve the feasibility and efficiency CDS adoption across healthcare settings.

  10. Doing the right things and doing things right : inpatient drug surveillance assisted by clinical decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Suijkerbuijk, Bas O.; Nannan Panday, Prashant V.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    Increased budget constraints and a continuous focus on improved quality require an efficient inpatient drug surveillance process. We describe a hospital-wide drug surveillance strategy consisting of a multidisciplinary evaluation of drug surveillance activities and using clinical decision support to

  11. A decision support system for medical mobile devices based on clinical guidelines for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazella, Silvio César; Feyh, Rafael; Ben, Angela Jornada

    2014-01-01

    The decision making process conducted by health professionals is strongly linked to the consultations of clinical guidelines, generally available in large text files, making the access to the information very laborious and time consuming. The health area is very fertile for the emergence of

  12. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  13. Competencies in nursing students for organized forms of clinical moral deliberation and decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Bart Cusveller; Jeanette den Uil-Westerlaken

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor-prepared nurses are expected to be competent in moral deliberation and decision-making (MDD) in clinical practice. It is unclear, however, how this competence develops in nursing students. This study explores the development of nursing students’ competence for participating in organized

  14. The interaction of patient race, provider bias, and clinical ambiguity on pain management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Adam T; Hollingshead, Nicole A; Ashburn-Nardo, Leslie; Kroenke, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Although racial disparities in pain care are widely reported, much remains to be known about the role of provider and contextual factors. We used computer-simulated patients to examine the influence of patient race, provider racial bias, and clinical ambiguity on pain decisions. One hundred twenty-nine medical residents/fellows made assessment (pain intensity) and treatment (opioid and nonopioid analgesics) decisions for 12 virtual patients with acute pain. Race (black/white) and clinical ambiguity (high/low) were manipulated across vignettes. Participants completed the Implicit Association Test and feeling thermometers, which assess implicit and explicit racial biases, respectively. Individual- and group-level analyses indicated that race and ambiguity had an interactive effect on providers' decisions, such that decisions varied as a function of ambiguity for white but not for black patients. Individual differences across providers were observed for the effect of race and ambiguity on decisions; however, providers' implicit and explicit biases did not account for this variability. These data highlight the complexity of racial disparities and suggest that differences in care between white and black patients are, in part, attributable to the nature (ie, ambiguity) of the clinical scenario. The current study suggests that interventions to reduce disparities should differentially target patient, provider, and contextual factors. This study examined the unique and collective influence of patient race, provider racial bias, and clinical ambiguity on providers' pain management decisions. These results could inform the development of interventions aimed at reducing disparities and improving pain care. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy for adults with intellectual disability: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Patricia; Jackman, Catherine; Coyle, David; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-08-01

    Background Despite the evidence base for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in the general population, it has not yet been adapted for use with adults who have an intellectual disability. Aims To evaluate the utility of a CBT computer game for adults who have an intellectual disability. Method A 2 × 3 (group × time) randomised controlled trial design was used. Fifty-two adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability and anxiety or depression were randomly allocated to two groups: computerised CBT (cCBT) or psychiatric treatment as usual (TAU), and assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Forty-nine participants were included in the final analysis. Results A significant group × time interaction was observed on the primary outcome measure of anxiety (Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability), favouring cCBT over TAU, but not on the primary outcome measure of depression (Glasgow Depression Scale for people with a Learning Disability). A medium effect size for anxiety symptoms was observed at post-treatment and a large effect size was observed after follow-up. Reliability of Change Indices indicated that the intervention produced clinically significant change in the cCBT group in comparison with TAU. Conclusions As the first application of cCBT for adults with intellectual disability, this intervention appears to be a useful treatment option to reduce anxiety symptoms in this population. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  16. The computerised procedure system COPMA and its user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogsaeter, M.; Larsen, J.; Nilsen, S.; Oewre, F.

    1990-01-01

    At the OECD Halden Reactor Project, the COPMA system has been developed in order to investigate whether procedures can be executed more safety and efficiently if they are computerised, i.e. if the operator uses a CRT-based system instead of written manuals. Procedures are entered in a procedure data base using PED, a procedure editor. Each procedure is given a textual as well as a graphical representation. For the textual representation, the language PROLA is used, a language which has been designed for simple procedure specification. The COPMA online system lets the operator execute procedures that are stored in the procedure data base. The operator interface is a screen divided into non-overlapping windows each serving a different purpose. All commands to the system are given by moving a mouse device around and clicking buttons on top of the mouse. A procedure consists of steps, each step containing a number of instructions. The operator works on one activity at a time, an activity to be seen as a procedure instance. A graph shows the overall procedure (or activity) structure in a window and activity execution is traced in the graph. Another windows shows the instructions of the step currently being executed. The operator steps through the activity by selecting whether and how to execute the listed instructions. COPMA can maintain the status of several activities in parallel, so that the operator can easily switch between different activities. COPMA is linked to a PWR nuclear simulator over Ethernet using the TCP/IP protocol. This gives a number of advantages as compared to conventional written procedures, especially the fact that COPMA can help collect data from the procedure data base automatically

  17. A computerised automatic pellet inspection unit for FBTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, M.S.; Mahule, K.N.; Ghosh, J.K.; Venkatesh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Physical inspection and certification of nuclear reactor fuel element components is an activity demanding utmost imagination and skill in devising accurate measuring systems. There is also need for remote handling, automation, rapid processing and inspection data print out when dealing with reactor fuel material. This report deals with an automatic computerised fuel pellet inspection system that has been developed in Radiometallurgy Division, B.A.R.C. to carry out dimensional and weight measurements on fuel pellets for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam near Madras. The system consists of several subsystems each developed especially for a specific purpose and as such items are not available off the shelf from manufacturers in India. If a general approach is adopted towards the report, there are many innovations and ideas that can be used in the automatic inspection of a variety of products in industry. As the system is fairly involved the report does not attempt to deal with detailed description of the equipment. The function of the system is to accept a certain quantity of fuel pellets in a bowl feeder, separate the pellets rejected owing to their exceeding dimensional and weight limits and form columns of accepted pellets. Dimensional and weight limits can be set as required and all inspection data are presented in a printed format. The system processes pellets at the rate of 15 per minute. The entire system can be run by operators with no special skills. The unit is currently in use for the inspection of mixed carbide fuel pellets for FBTR. (author)

  18. Enhancing nurse and physician collaboration in clinical decision making through high-fidelity interdisciplinary simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Pamela M; Dozois, Eric J; Holubar, Stefan D; Wrobleski, Diane M; Dube, Joyce A Overman; Klipfel, Janee M; Arnold, Jacqueline J

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether interdisciplinary simulation team training can positively affect registered nurse and/or physician perceptions of collaboration in clinical decision making. Between March 1 and April 21, 2009, a convenience sample of volunteer nurses and physicians was recruited to undergo simulation training consisting of a team response to 3 clinical scenarios. Participants completed the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions (CSACD) survey before training and at 2 weeks and 2 months after training. Differences in CSACD summary scores between the time points were assessed with paired t tests. Twenty-eight health care professionals (19 nurses, 9 physicians) underwent simulation training. Nurses were of similar age to physicians (27.3 vs 34.5 years; p = .82), were more likely to be women (95.0% vs 12.5%; p nurses and physicians (p = .04) and that both medical and nursing concerns influence the decision-making process (p = .02). Pretest CSACD analysis revealed that most participants were dissatisfied with the decision-making process. The CSACD summary score showed significant improvement from baseline to 2 weeks (4.2 to 5.1; p nurses and physicians and enhanced the patient care decision-making process.

  19. Uninformed Clinical Decisions Resulting From Lack of Adherence Assessment in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C.; Wu, Yelena P.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between non-adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and clinical decision-making in a cohort of 112 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy. AED adherence was monitored using electronic monitoring over the first six months of therapy. The primary outcome measure was rate of uninformed clinical decisions as defined by number of participants with AED dosage or drug changes to address continued seizures who demonstrated non-adherence prior to the seizure. Among the 52 (47%) participants who had an AED change for continued seizures, 30 (27% of the overall cohort) had imperfect medication adherence prior to their seizures. A quarter of children with new onset epilepsy had uninformed medication changes because adherence was not rigorously assessed in clinical practice. Results highlight the importance of routinely assessing medication adherence in this population. PMID:23159375

  20. Workshop on using natural language processing applications for enhancing clinical decision making: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vinay M; Rodgers, Mary; Conroy, Richard; Luo, James; Zhou, Ruixia; Seto, Belinda

    2014-02-01

    In April 2012, the National Institutes of Health organized a two-day workshop entitled 'Natural Language Processing: State of the Art, Future Directions and Applications for Enhancing Clinical Decision-Making' (NLP-CDS). This report is a summary of the discussions during the second day of the workshop. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants emphasized the need for unstructured clinical notes to be included in the decision making workflow and the need for individualized longitudinal data tracking. The workshop also discussed the need to: (1) combine evidence-based literature and patient records with machine-learning and prediction models; (2) provide trusted and reproducible clinical advice; (3) prioritize evidence and test results; and (4) engage healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. The overall consensus of the NLP-CDS workshop was that there are promising opportunities for NLP and CDS to deliver cognitive support for healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients.

  1. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reward-related decision making in older adults: relationship to clinical presentation of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Amanda R; Alexopoulos, George S; Yuen, Genevieve S; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning-Dixon, Faith M

    2014-11-01

    Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression; and (2) to examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to older, healthy subjects, depressed, older patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, older patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 older, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy, whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the Iowa Gambling Task. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared with non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Claudia C; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Armour, Carol L

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds) and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk-benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  4. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia C. Dobler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI, focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk–benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  5. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Helen W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS. Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1 provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2 involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective; allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating

  6. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Helen W; Davis, Paul K; Bell, Douglas S

    2012-08-17

    Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The article provides examples of

  7. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J; Fox, Zachary E; Giuse, Dario A; Williams, Annette M; Kou, Qing-Hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems.

  8. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J.; Fox, Zachary E.; Giuse, Dario A.; Williams, Annette M.; Kou, Qing-hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems. PMID:28269846

  9. The use of emotional intelligence capabilities in clinical reasoning and decision-making: A qualitative, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Kozlowski, Desirée; Whitehair, Leeann

    2018-02-01

    To explore clinical nurses' experiences of using emotional intelligence capabilities during clinical reasoning and decision-making. There has been little research exploring whether, or how, nurses employ emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical reasoning and decision-making. Qualitative phase of a larger mixed-methods study. Semistructured qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of registered nurses (n = 12) following EI training and coaching. Constructivist thematic analysis was employed to analyse the narrative transcripts. Three themes emerged: the sensibility to engage EI capabilities in clinical contexts, motivation to actively engage with emotions in clinical decision-making and incorporating emotional and technical perspectives in decision-making. Continuing to separate cognition and emotion in research, theorising and scholarship on clinical reasoning is counterproductive. Understanding more about nurses' use of EI has the potential to improve the calibre of decisions, and the safety and quality of care delivered. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Identifying design considerations for a shared decision aid for use at the point of outpatient clinical care: An ethnographic study at an inner city clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Negin; Perez Figueroa, Rafael E; Uhler, Lauren M; Chiou, Erin; Perchonok, Jennifer E; Montague, Enid

    2013-03-06

    Computerized decision aids could facilitate shared decision-making at the point of outpatient clinical care. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a computerized shared decision aid would be feasible to implement in an inner-city clinic by evaluating the current practices in shared decision-making, clinicians' use of computers, patient and clinicians' attitudes and beliefs toward computerized decision aids, and the influence of time on shared decision-making. Qualitative data analysis of observations and semi-structured interviews with patients and clinicians at an inner-city outpatient clinic. The findings provided an exploratory look at the prevalence of shared decision-making and attitudes about health information technology and decision aids. A prominent barrier to clinicians engaging in shared decision-making was a lack of perceived patient understanding of medical information. Some patients preferred their clinicians make recommendations for them rather than engage in formal shared decision-making. Health information technology was an integral part of the clinic visit and welcomed by most clinicians and patients. Some patients expressed the desire to engage with health information technology such as viewing their medical information on the computer screen with their clinicians. All participants were receptive to the idea of a decision aid integrated within the clinic visit although some clinicians were concerned about the accuracy of prognostic estimates for complex medical problems. We identified several important considerations for the design and implementation of a computerized decision aid including opportunities to: bridge clinician-patient communication about medical information while taking into account individual patients' decision-making preferences, complement expert clinician judgment with prognostic estimates, take advantage of patient waiting times, and make tasks involved during the clinic visit more efficient. These findings

  11. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  12. Development of a clinical decision support system for diabetes care: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livvi Li Wei Sim

    Full Text Available Management of complex chronic diseases such as diabetes requires the assimilation and interpretation of multiple laboratory test results. Traditional electronic health records tend to display laboratory results in a piecemeal and segregated fashion. This makes the assembly and interpretation of results related to diabetes care challenging. We developed a diabetes-specific clinical decision support system (Diabetes Dashboard interface for displaying glycemic, lipid and renal function results, in an integrated form with decision support capabilities, based on local clinical practice guidelines. The clinical decision support system included a dashboard feature that graphically summarized all relevant laboratory results and displayed them in a color-coded system that allowed quick interpretation of the metabolic control of the patients. An alert module informs the user of tests that are due for repeat testing. An interactive graph module was also developed for better visual appreciation of the trends of the laboratory results of the patient. In a pilot study involving case scenarios administered via an electronic questionnaire, the Diabetes Dashboard, compared to the existing laboratory reporting interface, significantly improved the identification of abnormal laboratory results, of the long-term trend of the laboratory tests and of tests due for repeat testing. However, the Diabetes Dashboard did not significantly improve the identification of patients requiring treatment adjustment or the amount of time spent on each case scenario. In conclusion, we have developed and shown that the use of the Diabetes Dashboard, which incorporates several decision support features, can improve the management of diabetes. It is anticipated that this dashboard will be most helpful when deployed in an outpatient setting, where physicians can quickly make clinical decisions based on summarized information and be alerted to pertinent areas of care that require

  13. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Légaré

    Full Text Available Knowledge translation (KT interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties.We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing.We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153 published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC and Consumers and Communication.We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%. Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1 and educational outreach (n = 1. Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15, communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7, personalized risk communication (n = 3 and mobile phone messaging (n = 1. Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective.More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  14. Automated Modular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Decision Support System (MIROR): An Application in Pediatric Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Meeus, Emma M; Manias, Karen; Foster, Katharine; Peet, Andrew

    2018-05-02

    Advances in magnetic resonance imaging and the introduction of clinical decision support systems has underlined the need for an analysis tool to extract and analyze relevant information from magnetic resonance imaging data to aid decision making, prevent errors, and enhance health care. The aim of this study was to design and develop a modular medical image region of interest analysis tool and repository (MIROR) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation, and representation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The clinical decision support system was developed and evaluated for diffusion-weighted imaging of body tumors in children (cohort of 48 children, with 37 malignant and 11 benign tumors). Mevislab software and Python have been used for the development of MIROR. Regions of interests were drawn around benign and malignant body tumors on different diffusion parametric maps, and extracted information was used to discriminate the malignant tumors from benign tumors. Using MIROR, the various histogram parameters derived for each tumor case when compared with the information in the repository provided additional information for tumor characterization and facilitated the discrimination between benign and malignant tumors. Clinical decision support system cross-validation showed high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating between these tumor groups using histogram parameters. MIROR, as a diagnostic tool and repository, allowed the interpretation and analysis of magnetic resonance imaging images to be more accessible and comprehensive for clinicians. It aims to increase clinicians' skillset by introducing newer techniques and up-to-date findings to their repertoire and make information from previous cases available to aid decision making. The modular-based format of the tool allows integration of analyses that are not readily available clinically and streamlines the future developments. ©Niloufar Zarinabad, Emma M Meeus, Karen Manias

  15. A comparison of scoring models for computerised mental health screening for federal prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael S; Wamboldt, Ashley D; O'Connor, Shannon L; Fortier, Julie; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2013-02-01

    There are high rates of mental disorder in correctional environments, so effective mental health screening is needed. Implementation of the computerised mental health screen of the Correctional Service of Canada has led to improved identification of offenders with mental health needs but with high rates of false positives. The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of an iterative classification tree (ICT) approach to mental health screening compared with a simple binary approach using cut-off scores on screening tools. A total of 504 consecutive admissions to federal prison completed the screen and were also interviewed by a mental health professional. Relationships between screening results and more extended assessment and clinical team discussion were tested. The ICT was more parsimonious in identifying probable 'cases' than standard binary screening. ICT was also highly accurate at detecting mental health needs (AUC=0.87, 95% CI 0.84-0.90). The model identified 118 (23.4%) offenders as likely to need further assessment or treatment, 87% of whom were confirmed cases at clinical interview. Of the 244 (48.4%) offenders who were screened out, only 9% were clinically assessed as requiring further assessment or treatment. Standard binary screening was characterised by more false positives and a comparable false negative rate. The use of ICTs to interpret screening data on the mental health of prisoners needs further evaluation in independent samples in Canada and elsewhere. This first evaluation of the application of such an approach offers the prospect of more effective and efficient use of the scarce resource of mental health services in prisons. Although not required, the use of computers can increase the ease of implementing an ICT model. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Clinical intuition in the nursing process and decision-making-A mixed-studies review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin-Johansson, Christina; Palmqvist, Rebecca; Rönnberg, Linda

    2017-12-01

    To review what is characteristic of registered nurses' intuition in clinical settings, in relationships and in the nursing process. Intuition is a controversial concept and nurses believe that there are difficulties in how they should explain their nursing actions or decisions based on intuition. Much of the evidence from the body of research indicates that nurses value their intuition in a variety of clinical settings. More information on how nurses integrate intuition as a core element in daily clinical work would contribute to an improved understanding on how they go about this. Intuition deserves a place in evidence-based activities, where intuition is an important component associated with the nursing process. An integrative review strengthened with a mixed-studies review. Literature searches were conducted in the databases CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO, and literature published 1985-2016 were included. The findings in the studies were analysed with content analysis, and the synthesis process entailed a reasoning between the authors. After a quality assessment, 16 studies were included. The analysis and synthesis resulted in three categories. The characteristics of intuition in the nurse's daily clinical activities include application, assertiveness and experiences; in the relationships with patients' intuition include unique connections, mental and bodily responses, and personal qualities; and in the nursing process include support and guidance, component and clues in decision-making, and validating decisions. Intuition is more than simply a "gut feeling," and it is a process based on knowledge and care experience and has a place beside research-based evidence. Nurses integrate both analysis and synthesis of intuition alongside objective data when making decisions. They should rely on their intuition and use this knowledge in clinical practice as a support in decision-making, which increases the quality and safety of patient care. We find that intuition plays a

  17. Clinical decision support systems in child and adolescent psychiatry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koposov, Roman; Fossum, Sturla; Frodl, Thomas; Nytrø, Øystein; Leventhal, Bennett; Sourander, Andre; Quaglini, Silvana; Molteni, Massimo; de la Iglesia Vayá, María; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Barbarini, Nicola; Milham, Michael Peter; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Skokauskas, Norbert

    2017-11-01

    Psychiatric disorders are amongst the most prevalent and impairing conditions in childhood and adolescence. Unfortunately, it is well known that general practitioners (GPs) and other frontline health providers (i.e., child protection workers, public health nurses, and pediatricians) are not adequately trained to address these ubiquitous problems (Braddick et al. Child and Adolescent mental health in Europe: infrastructures, policy and programmes, European Communities, 2009; Levav et al. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 13:395-401, 2004). Advances in technology may offer a solution to this problem with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) that are designed to help professionals make sound clinical decisions in real time. This paper offers a systematic review of currently available CDSS for child and adolescent mental health disorders prepared according to the PRISMA-Protocols (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols). Applying strict eligibility criteria, the identified studies (n = 5048) were screened. Ten studies, describing eight original clinical decision support systems for child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, fulfilled inclusion criteria. Based on this systematic review, there appears to be a need for a new, readily available CDSS for child neuropsychiatric disorder which promotes evidence-based, best practices, while enabling consideration of national variation in practices by leveraging data-reuse to generate predictions regarding treatment outcome, addressing a broader cluster of clinical disorders, and targeting frontline practice environments.

  18. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time.

  19. Clinical Decision Making in the Management of Patients With Cervicogenic Dizziness: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Francis C; Mathew, Sherin; Littmann, Andrew E; MacDonald, Cameron W

    2017-11-01

    Study Design Case series. Background Although growing recognition of cervicogenic dizziness (CGD) is emerging, there is still no gold standard for the diagnosis of CGD. The purpose of this case series is to describe the clinical decision making utilized in the management of 7 patients presenting with CGD. Case Description Patients presenting with neck pain and accompanying subjective symptoms, including dizziness, unsteadiness, light-headedness, and visual disturbance, were selected. Clinical evidence of a temporal relationship between neck pain and dizziness, with or without sensorimotor disturbances, was assessed. Clinical decision making followed a 4-step process, informed by the current available best evidence. Outcome measures included the numeric rating scale for dizziness and neck pain, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and global rating of change. Outcomes Seven patients (mean age, 57 years; range, 31-86 years; 7 female) completed physical therapy management at an average of 13 sessions (range, 8-30 sessions) over a mean of 7 weeks. Clinically meaningful improvements were observed in the numeric rating scale for dizziness (mean difference, 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.0, 7.5), neck pain (mean difference, 5.4; 95% CI: 3.8, 7.1), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (mean difference, 32.6; 95% CI: 12.9, 52.2) at discontinuation. Patients also demonstrated overall satisfaction via the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (mean difference, 9) and global rating of change (mean, +6). Discussion This case series describes the physical therapist decision making, management, and outcomes in patients with CGD. Further investigation is warranted to develop a valid clinical decision-making guideline to inform management of patients with CGD. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(11):874-884. Epub 9 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7425.

  20. The potential value on medication safety of a clinical decision support system in intensive care patients with renal insufficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, P.J.; Grouls, R.J.E.; Roos, A.N.; Bindels, A.J.G.H.; Clercq, de P.A.; Wessels-Basten, S.J.W.; Ackerman, E.W.; Korsten, H.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are defined as electronic or non-electronic systems designed to aid in clinical decision making, using characteristics of individual patients to generate patient-specific assessments or recommendations that are then presented to clinicians for consideration

  1. Molecular and protein markers for clinical decision making in breast cancer: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, Nadia; Sotlar, Karl; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Doisneau-Sixou, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    In early breast cancer (eBC), established clinicopathological factors are not sufficient for clinical decision making particularly regarding adjuvant chemotherapy since substantial over- or undertreatment may occur. Thus, novel protein- and molecular markers have been put forward as decision aids. Since these potential prognosis and/or predictive tests differ substantially regarding their methodology, analytical and clinical validation, this review attempts to summarize the essential facts for clinicians. This review focuses on those markers which are the most advanced so far in their development towards routine clinical application, i.e. two protein markers (i.e. uPA/PAI-1 and IHC4) and six molecular multigene tests (i.e. Mammaprint®, Oncotype DX®, PAM50, Endopredict®, the 97-gene genomic grade, and 76 gene Rotterdam signatures). Next to methodological aspects, we summarized the clinical evidences, in particular the main prospective clinical trials which have already been fully recruited (i.e. MINDACT, TAILORx, WSG PLAN B) or are still ongoing (i.e. RxPONDER/SWOG S1007, WSG-ADAPT). Last but not least, this review points out the key elements for clinicians to select one test among the wide panel of proposed assays, for a specific population of patients in term of level of evidence, analytical and clinical validity as well as cost effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Studying the effect of clinical uncertainty on physicians' decision-making using ILIAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J D; Jay, S J; Weng, H C; Anderson, M M

    1995-01-01

    The influence of uncertainty on physicians' practice behavior is not well understood. In this research, ILIAD, a diagnostic expert system, has been used to study physicians' responses to uncertainty and how their responses affected clinical performance. The simulation mode of ILIAD was used to standardize the presentation and scoring of two cases to 46 residents in emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice and transitional medicine at Methodist Hospital of Indiana. A questionnaire was used to collect additional data on how physicians respond to clinical uncertainty. A structural equation model was developed, estimated, and tested. The results indicate that stress that physicians experience in dealing with clinical uncertainty has a negative effect on their clinical performance. Moreover, the way that physicians respond to uncertainty has positive and negative effects on their performance. Open discussions with patients about clinical decisions and the use of practice guidelines improves performance. However, when the physician's clinical decisions are influenced by patient demands or their peers, their performance scores decline.

  3. Mapping clinical outcomes expectations to treatment decisions: an application to vestibular schwannoma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Steven W; Aranda, Derick; Driscoll, Colin L W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2010-02-01

    Complex medical decision making obligates tradeoff assessments among treatment outcomes expectations, but an accessible tool to perform the necessary analysis is conspicuously absent. We aimed to demonstrate methodology and feasibility of adapting conjoint analysis for mapping clinical outcomes expectations to treatment decisions in vestibular schwannoma (VS) management. Prospective. Tertiary medical center and US-based otologists/neurotologists. Treatment preference profiles among VS stakeholders-61 younger and 74 older prospective patients, 61 observation patients, and 60 surgeons-were assessed for the synthetic VS case scenario of a 10-mm tumor in association with useful hearing and normal facial function. Treatment attribute utility. Conjoint analysis attribute levels were set in accordance to the results of a meta-analysis. Forty-five case series were disaggregated to formulate microsurgery facial nerve and hearing preservation outcomes expectations models. Attribute utilities were computed and mapped to the realistic treatment choices of translabyrinthine craniotomy, middle fossa craniotomy, and gamma knife radiosurgery. Among the treatment attributes of likelihoods of causing deafness, temporary facial weakness for 2 months, and incurable cancer within 20 years, and recovery time, permanent deafness was less important to tumor surgeons, and temporary facial weakness was more important to tumor surgeons and observation patients (Wilcoxon rank-sum, p knife radiosurgery. Mapping clinical outcomes expectations to treatment decisions for a synthetic clinical scenario revealed inhomogeneous drivers of choice selection among study cohorts. Medical decision engines that analyze personal preferences of outcomes expectations for VS and many other diseases may be developed to promote shared decision making among health care stakeholders and transparency in the informed consent process.

  4. Factors influencing a nurse's decision to question medication administration in a neonatal clinical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydon, Laurene; Hauck, Yvonne; Zimmer, Margo; Murdoch, Jamee

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence nurse's decisions to question concerning aspects of medication administration within the context of a neonatal clinical care unit. Medication error in the neonatal setting can be high with this particularly vulnerable population. As the care giver responsible for medication administration, nurses are deemed accountable for most errors. However, they are recognised as the forefront of prevention. Minimal evidence is available around reasoning, decision making and questioning around medication administration. Therefore, this study focuses upon addressing the gap in knowledge around what nurses believe influences their decision to question. A critical incident design was employed where nurses were asked to describe clinical incidents around their decision to question a medication issue. Nurses were recruited from a neonatal clinical care unit and participated in an individual digitally recorded interview. One hundred and three nurses participated between December 2013-August 2014. Use of the constant comparative method revealed commonalities within transcripts. Thirty-six categories were grouped into three major themes: 'Working environment', 'Doing the right thing' and 'Knowledge about medications'. Findings highlight factors that influence nurses' decision to question issues around medication administration. Nurses feel it is their responsibility to do the right thing and speak up for their vulnerable patients to enhance patient safety. Negative dimensions within the themes will inform planning of educational strategies to improve patient safety, whereas positive dimensions must be reinforced within the multidisciplinary team. The working environment must support nurses to question and ultimately provide safe patient care. Clear and up to date policies, formal and informal education, role modelling by senior nurses, effective use of communication skills and a team approach can facilitate nurses to

  5. Clinical decision support systems in hospital care using ubiquitous devices: Current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Moqeem, Aasia A; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Supporting clinicians in decision making using advanced technologies has been an active research area in biomedical engineering during the past years. Among a wide range of ubiquitous systems, smartphone applications have been increasingly developed in healthcare settings to help clinicians as well as patients. Today, many smartphone applications, from basic data analysis to advanced patient monitoring, are available to clinicians and patients. Such applications are now increasingly integrating into healthcare for clinical decision support, and therefore, concerns around accuracy, stability, and dependency of these applications are rising. In addition, lack of attention to the clinicians' acceptability, as well as the low impact on the medical professionals' decision making, are posing more serious issues on the acceptability of smartphone applications. This article reviews smartphone-based decision support applications, focusing on hospital care settings and their overall impact of these applications on the wider clinical workflow. Additionally, key challenges and barriers of the current ubiquitous device-based healthcare applications are identified. Finally, this article addresses current challenges, future directions, and the adoption of mobile healthcare applications.

  6. Decision making and senior management: the implementation of change projects covering clinical management in SUS hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José Márcio da Cunha; Gomes, Romeu

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyses the decision making process for senior management in public hospitals that are a part of the National Health Service in Brazil (hereafter SUS) in relation to projects aimed at changing clinical management. The methodological design of this study is qualitative in nature taking a hermeneutics-dialectics perspective in terms of results. Hospital directors noted that clinical management projects changed the state of hospitals through: improving their organizations, mobilizing their staff in order to increase a sense of order and systemizing actions and available resources. Technical rationality was the principal basis used in the decision making process for managers. Due to the reality of many hospitals having fragmented organizations, this fact impeded the use of aspects related to rationality, such as economic and financial factors in the decision making process. The incremental model and general politics also play a role in this area. We concluded that the decision making process embraces a large array of factors including rational aspects such as the use of management techniques and the ability to analyze, interpret and summarize. It also incorporates subjective elements such as how to select values and dealing with people's working experiences. We recognized that management problems are wide in scope, ambiguous, complex and do not come with a lot of structure in practice.

  7. Multimorbidity, service organization and clinical decision making in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Peter; Macdonald, Wendy; Harkness, Elaine; Gask, Linda; Kendrick, Tony; Valderas, Jose M; Dickens, Chris; Blakeman, Tom; Sibbald, Bonnie

    2011-10-01

    Primary care professionals often manage patients with multiple long-term health conditions, but managing multimorbidity is challenging given time and resource constraints and interactions between conditions. To explore GP and nurse perceptions of multimorbidity and the influence on service organization and clinical decision making. A qualitative interview study with primary care professionals in practices in Greater Manchester, U.K. Interviews were conducted with 15 GPs and 10 practice nurses. Primary care professionals identified tensions between delivering care to meet quality targets and fulfilling the patient's agenda, tensions which are exacerbated in multimorbidity. They were aware of the inconvenience suffered by patients through attendance at multiple clinic appointments when care was structured around individual conditions. They reported difficulties managing patients with multimorbidity in limited consultation time, which led to adoption of an 'additive-sequential' decision-making model which dealt with problems in priority order until consultation resources were exhausted, when further management was deferred. Other challenges included the need for patients to co-ordinate their care, the difficulties of self-management support in multimorbidity and problems of making sense of the relationships between physical and mental health. Doctor and nurse accounts included limited consideration of multimorbidity in terms of the interactions between conditions or synergies between management of different conditions. Primary care professionals identify a number of challenges in care for multimorbidity and adopt a particular model of decision making to deliver care for multiple individual conditions. However, they did not describe specific decision making around managing multimorbidity per se.

  8. Ethnic bias and clinical decision-making among New Zealand medical students: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ricci; Cormack, Donna; Stanley, James; Curtis, Elana; Jones, Rhys; Lacey, Cameron

    2018-01-23

    Health professional racial/ethnic bias may impact on clinical decision-making and contribute to subsequent ethnic health inequities. However, limited research has been undertaken among medical students. This paper presents findings from the Bias and Decision-Making in Medicine (BDMM) study, which sought to examine ethnic bias (Māori (indigenous peoples) compared with New Zealand European) among medical students and associations with clinical decision-making. All final year New Zealand (NZ) medical students in 2014 and 2015 (n = 888) were invited to participate in a cross-sectional online study. Key components included: two chronic disease vignettes (cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression) with randomized patient ethnicity (Māori or NZ European) and questions on patient management; implicit bias measures (an ethnicity preference Implicit Association Test (IAT) and an ethnicity and compliant patient IAT); and, explicit ethnic bias questions. Associations between ethnic bias and clinical decision-making responses to vignettes were tested using linear regression. Three hundred and two students participated (34% response rate). Implicit and explicit ethnic bias favoring NZ Europeans was apparent among medical students. In the CVD vignette, no significant differences in clinical decision-making by patient ethnicity were observed. There were also no differential associations by patient ethnicity between any measures of ethnic bias (implicit or explicit) and patient management responses in the CVD vignette. In the depression vignette, some differences in the ranking of recommended treatment options were observed by patient ethnicity and explicit preference for NZ Europeans was associated with increased reporting that NZ European patients would benefit from treatment but not Māori (slope difference 0.34, 95% CI 0.08, 0.60; p = 0.011), although this was the only significant finding in these analyses. NZ medical students demonstrated ethnic bias, although

  9. Unconscious race and social class bias among acute care surgical clinicians and clinical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Significant health inequities persist among minority and socially disadvantaged patients. Better understanding of how unconscious biases affect clinical decision making may help to illuminate clinicians' roles in propagating disparities. To determine whether clinicians' unconscious race and/or social class biases correlate with patient management decisions. We conducted a web-based survey among 230 physicians from surgery and related specialties at an academic, level I trauma center from December 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. We administered clinical vignettes, each with 3 management questions. Eight vignettes assessed the relationship between unconscious bias and clinical decision making. We performed ordered logistic regression analysis on the Implicit Association Test (IAT) scores and used multivariable analysis to determine whether implicit bias was associated with the vignette responses. Differential response times (D scores) on the IAT as a surrogate for unconscious bias. Patient management vignettes varied by patient race or social class. Resulting D scores were calculated for each management decision. In total, 215 clinicians were included and consisted of 74 attending surgeons, 32 fellows, 86 residents, 19 interns, and 4 physicians with an undetermined level of education. Specialties included surgery (32.1%), anesthesia (18.1%), emergency medicine (18.1%), orthopedics (7.9%), otolaryngology (7.0%), neurosurgery (7.0%), critical care (6.0%), and urology (2.8%); 1.9% did not report a departmental affiliation. Implicit race and social class biases were present in most respondents. Among all clinicians, mean IAT D scores for race and social class were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.48) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78), respectively. Race and class scores were similar across departments (general surgery, orthopedics, urology, etc), race, or age. Women demonstrated less bias concerning race (mean IAT D score, 0.39 [95% CI, 0.29-0.49]) and social class (mean IAT D score

  10. The anatomy of clinical decision-making in multidisciplinary cancer meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Tayana; Petrides, Konstantinos V.; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Sarkar, Somita; Arora, Sonal; Shah, Sujay; Darzi, Ara; Green, James S. A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the UK, treatment recommendations for patients with cancer are routinely made by multidisciplinary teams in weekly meetings. However, their performance is variable. The aim of this study was to explore the underlying structure of multidisciplinary decision-making process, and examine how it relates to team ability to reach a decision. This is a cross-sectional observational study consisting of 1045 patient reviews across 4 multidisciplinary cancer teams from teaching and community hospitals in London, UK, from 2010 to 2014. Meetings were chaired by surgeons. We used a validated observational instrument (Metric for the Observation of Decision-making in Cancer Multidisciplinary Meetings) consisting of 13 items to assess the decision-making process of each patient discussion. Rated on a 5-point scale, the items measured quality of presented patient information, and contributions to review by individual disciplines. A dichotomous outcome (yes/no) measured team ability to reach a decision. Ratings were submitted to Exploratory Factor Analysis and regression analysis. The exploratory factor analysis produced 4 factors, labeled “Holistic and Clinical inputs” (patient views, psychosocial aspects, patient history, comorbidities, oncologists’, nurses’, and surgeons’ inputs), “Radiology” (radiology results, radiologists’ inputs), “Pathology” (pathology results, pathologists’ inputs), and “Meeting Management” (meeting chairs’ and coordinators’ inputs). A negative cross-loading was observed from surgeons’ input on the fourth factor with a follow-up analysis showing negative correlation (r = −0.19, P < 0.001). In logistic regression, all 4 factors predicted team ability to reach a decision (P < 0.001). Hawthorne effect is the main limitation of the study. The decision-making process in cancer meetings is driven by 4 underlying factors representing the complete patient profile and contributions to case review by all core

  11. Clinical decision making for a tooth with apical periodontitis: the patients' preferred level of participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Dao, Thuan; Ungar, Wendy J; Chaudry, Faiza; Figueiredo, Rafael; Krahn, Murray; Friedman, Shimon

    2014-06-01

    To effectively engage patients in clinical decisions regarding the management of teeth with apical periodontitis (AP), there is a need to explore patients' perspectives on the decision-making process. This study surveyed patients for their preferred level of participation in making treatment decisions for a tooth with AP. Data were collected through a mail-out survey of 800 University of Toronto Faculty of Dentistry patients, complemented by a convenience sample of 200 patients from 10 community practices. The Control Preferences Scale was used to evaluate the patients' preferences for active, collaborative, or passive participation in treatment decisions for a tooth with AP. Using bivariate and logistic regression analyses, the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations was applied to the Control Preferences Scale questions to understand the influential factors (P ≤ .05). Among 434 of 1,000 respondents, 44%, 40%, and 16% preferred an active, collaborative, and passive participation, respectively. Logistic regression showed a significant association (P ≤ .025) between participants' higher education and preference for active participation compared with a collaborative role. Also, immigrant status was significantly associated with preference for passive participation (P = .025). The majority of patients valued an active or collaborative participation in deciding treatment for a tooth with AP. This pattern implied a preference for a patient-centered practice mode that emphasizes patient autonomy in decision making. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical Device Integrated Vital Signs Monitoring Application with Real-Time Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqeem, Aasia; Baig, Mirza; Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This research involves the design and development of a novel Android smartphone application for real-time vital signs monitoring and decision support. The proposed application integrates market available, wireless and Bluetooth connected medical devices for collecting vital signs. The medical device data collected by the app includes heart rate, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograph (ECG). The collated data is streamed/displayed on the smartphone in real-time. This application was designed by adopting six screens approach (6S) mobile development framework and focused on user-centered approach and considered clinicians-as-a-user. The clinical engagement, consultations, feedback and usability of the application in the everyday practices were considered critical from the initial phase of the design and development. Furthermore, the proposed application is capable to deliver rich clinical decision support in real-time using the integrated medical device data.

  13. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy.

  14. The utility of observational studies in clinical decision making: lessons learned from statin trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, JoAnne M; Mendys, Phillip M; Liu, Larry Z; Simpson, Ross J

    2010-05-01

    Contemporary clinical decision making is well supported by a wide variety of information sources, including clinical practice guidelines, position papers, and insights from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Much of our fundamental understanding of cardiovascular risk factors is based on multiple observations from major epidemiologic studies, such as The Seven Country Studies and the US-based Framingham Heart Study. These studies provided the framework for the development of clinical practice guidelines, including the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel series. The objective of this article is to highlight the value of observational studies as a complement to clinical trial data for clinical decision making in real-world practice. Although RCTs are still the benchmark for assessing clinical efficacy and safety of a specific therapeutic approach, they may be of limited utility to practitioners who must then adapt the lessons learned from the trial into the patient care environment. The use of well-structured observational studies can improve our understanding of the translation of clinical trials into clinical practice, as demonstrated here with the example of statins. Although such studies have their own limitations, improved techniques for design and analysis have reduced the impact of bias and confounders. The introduction of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines has provided more uniformity for such studies. When used together with RCTs, observational studies can enhance our understanding of effectiveness and utility in real-world clinical practice. In the examples of statin observational studies, the results suggest that relative effectiveness of different statins and potential impact of switching statins should be carefully considered in treating individual patients by practicing physicians.

  15. Development of traditional Chinese medicine clinical data warehouse for medical knowledge discovery and decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuezhong; Chen, Shibo; Liu, Baoyan; Zhang, Runsun; Wang, Yinghui; Li, Ping; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Zhuye; Yan, Xiufeng

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a scientific discipline, which develops the related theories from the long-term clinical practices. The large-scale clinical data are the core empirical knowledge source for TCM research. This paper introduces a clinical data warehouse (CDW) system, which incorporates the structured electronic medical record (SEMR) data for medical knowledge discovery and TCM clinical decision support (CDS). We have developed the clinical reference information model (RIM) and physical data model to manage the various information entities and their relationships in TCM clinical data. An extraction-transformation-loading (ETL) tool is implemented to integrate and normalize the clinical data from different operational data sources. The CDW includes online analytical processing (OLAP) and complex network analysis (CNA) components to explore the various clinical relationships. Furthermore, the data mining and CNA methods are used to discover the valuable clinical knowledge from the data. The CDW has integrated 20,000 TCM inpatient data and 20,000 outpatient data, which contains manifestations (e.g. symptoms, physical examinations and laboratory test results), diagnoses and prescriptions as the main information components. We propose a practical solution to accomplish the large-scale clinical data integration and preprocessing tasks. Meanwhile, we have developed over 400 OLAP reports to enable the multidimensional analysis of clinical data and the case-based CDS. We have successfully conducted several interesting data mining applications. Particularly, we use various classification methods, namely support vector machine, decision tree and Bayesian network, to discover the knowledge of syndrome differentiation. Furthermore, we have applied association rule and CNA to extract the useful acupuncture point and herb combination patterns from the clinical prescriptions. A CDW system consisting of TCM clinical RIM, ETL, OLAP and data mining as the core

  16. Access to augmentative and alternative communication: new technologies and clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fager, Susan; Bardach, Lisa; Russell, Susanne; Higginbotham, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Children with severe physical impairments require a variety of access options to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and computer technology. Access technologies have continued to develop, allowing children with severe motor control impairments greater independence and access to communication. This article will highlight new advances in access technology, including eye and head tracking, scanning, and access to mainstream technology, as well as discuss future advances. Considerations for clinical decision-making and implementation of these technologies will be presented along with case illustrations.

  17. A Serious Game for Teaching Nursing Students Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hege Mari; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann; Slettebø, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and pilot-test a serious game for teaching nursing students clinical reasoning and decision-making skills in caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A video-based serious game prototype was developed. A purposeful sample of six participants tested and evaluated the prototype. Usability issues were identified regarding functionality and user-computer interface. However, overall the serious game was perceived to be useful, usable and likable to use.

  18. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia C. Dobler; Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich; Carol L. Armour

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explain...

  19. EHRs Connect Research and Practice: Where Predictive Modeling, Artificial Intelligence, and Clinical Decision Support Intersect

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Casey; Doub, Tom; Selove, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Electronic health records (EHRs) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the challenge is turning that data into useful information. Furthermore, EHRs are increasingly likely to include data relating to patient outcomes, functionality such as clinical decision support, and genetic information as well, and, as such, can be seen as repositories of increasingly valuable information about patients' health conditions and responses to treatment over time. ...

  20. Designing a Clinical Framework to Guide Gross Motor Intervention Decisions for Infants and Young Children with Hypotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; O'Donnell, Maureen; Lam, Joyce; Story, Maureen; Wickenheiser, Diane; Xu, Kaishou; Jin, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice frameworks are a valuable component of clinical education, promoting informed clinical decision making based on the best available evidence and/or clinical experience. They encourage standardized intervention approaches and evaluation of practice. Based on an international project to support the development of an enhanced service…

  1. Clinical decision-making: heuristics and cognitive biases for the ophthalmologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ahsen; Oestreicher, James

    Diagnostic errors have a significant impact on health care outcomes and patient care. The underlying causes and development of diagnostic error are complex with flaws in health care systems, as well as human error, playing a role. Cognitive biases and a failure of decision-making shortcuts (heuristics) are human factors that can compromise the diagnostic process. We describe these mechanisms, their role with the clinician, and provide clinical scenarios to highlight the various points at which biases may emerge. We discuss strategies to modify the development and influence of these processes and the vulnerability of heuristics to provide insight and improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, J; Geissbuhler, A; Sheshelidze, D; Miller, R

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A test environment has been developed which uses Netscape to display forms; the production environment displays forms using an embedded browser.

  3. Can a patient smart card improve decision making in a clinical setting?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, J; Papillon, M J; Lavoie, G; Durant, P; Fortin, J P

    1995-01-01

    In the health field, clinical information is the raw material for the clinician delivering health services. Therefore, the clinical information available to the physician is often incomplete or even non¿existent upon consultation. Furthermore, the reconstruction of the medical history, which is the most important source of data for the clinician to establish a diagnosis and initiate a treatment, suffers from many constraints. The smart card, like the one used in Quebec's project, could ease the physician's decision-making by allowing fast access to accurate and pertinent data. The smart card is a major asset in the present health system.

  4. Trail Blazing or Jam Session? Towards a new Concept of Clinical Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Risør, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Manuscript. Published version available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13648470.2016.1239695 Clinical decision-making (CDM) is key in learning to be a doctor as the defining activity in their clinical work. CDM is often portrayed in the literature as similar to ‘trail blazing’; the doctor as the core agent, clearing away obstacles on the path towards diagnosis and treatment. However, in a fieldwork of young doctors in Denmark, it was difficult connect their practice to this image....

  5. Mock Pages Are a Valid Construct for Assessment of Clinical Decision Making and Interprofessional Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Margaret L; Schwind, Cathy J; Markwell, Stephen J; Minter, Rebecca M

    2017-01-01

    Answering pages from nurses about patients in need of immediate attention is one of the most difficult challenges a resident faces during their first days as a physician. A Mock Page program has been developed and adopted into a national surgical resident preparatory curriculum to prepare senior medical students for this important skill. The purpose of this study is to assess standardized mock page cases as a valid construct to assess clinical decision making and interprofessional communication skills. Mock page cases (n = 16) were administered to 213 senior medical students from 12 medical schools participating in a national surgical resident preparatory curriculum in 2013 and 2014. Clinical decision making and interprofessional communication were measured by case-specific assessments evaluating these skills which have undergone rigorous standard-setting to determine pass/fail cut points. Students' performance improved in general for both communication and clinical decision making over the 4-week course. Cases have been identified that seem to be best suited for differentiating high- from low-performing students. Chest pain, pulmonary embolus, and mental status change cases posed the greatest difficulty for student learners. Simulated mock pages demonstrate an innovative technique for training students in both effective interprofessional communication and management of common postoperative conditions they will encounter as new surgical interns.

  6. The potential of predictive analytics to provide clinical decision support in depression treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C

    2018-01-01

    To review progress developing clinical decision support tools for personalized treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Over the years, a variety of individual indicators ranging from biomarkers to clinical observations and self-report scales have been used to predict various aspects of differential MDD treatment response. Most of this work focused on predicting remission either with antidepressant medications versus psychotherapy, some antidepressant medications versus others, some psychotherapies versus others, and combination therapies versus monotherapies. However, to date, none of the individual predictors in these studies has been strong enough to guide optimal treatment selection for most patients. Interest consequently turned to decision support tools made up of multiple predictors, but the development of such tools has been hampered by small study sample sizes. Design recommendations are made here for future studies to address this problem. Recommendations include using large prospective observational studies followed by pragmatic trials rather than smaller, expensive controlled treatment trials for preliminary development of decision support tools; basing these tools on comprehensive batteries of inexpensive self-report and clinical predictors (e.g., self-administered performance-based neurocognitive tests) versus expensive biomarkers; and reserving biomarker assessments for targeted studies of patients not well classified by inexpensive predictor batteries.

  7. PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Judy; Schneider, Susan; Horvath, Monica; Hammond, Julia; Jackson, Jason; Ginsberg, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

  8. Privacy-preserving clinical decision support system using Gaussian kernel-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahulamathavan, Yogachandran; Veluru, Suresh; Phan, Raphael C-W; Chambers, Jonathon A; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan

    2014-01-01

    A clinical decision support system forms a critical capability to link health observations with health knowledge to influence choices by clinicians for improved healthcare. Recent trends toward remote outsourcing can be exploited to provide efficient and accurate clinical decision support in healthcare. In this scenario, clinicians can use the health knowledge located in remote servers via the Internet to diagnose their patients. However, the fact that these servers are third party and therefore potentially not fully trusted raises possible privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a novel privacy-preserving protocol for a clinical decision support system where the patients' data always remain in an encrypted form during the diagnosis process. Hence, the server involved in the diagnosis process is not able to learn any extra knowledge about the patient's data and results. Our experimental results on popular medical datasets from UCI-database demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed protocol is up to 97.21% and the privacy of patient data is not compromised.

  9. A First Step towards a Clinical Decision Support System for Post-traumatic Stress Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sisi; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Wang, Xuya; Fenyö, David; Shalev, Arieh Y

    2016-01-01

    PTSD is distressful and debilitating, following a non-remitting course in about 10% to 20% of trauma survivors. Numerous risk indicators of PTSD have been identified, but individual level prediction remains elusive. As an effort to bridge the gap between scientific discovery and practical application, we designed and implemented a clinical decision support pipeline to provide clinically relevant recommendation for trauma survivors. To meet the specific challenge of early prediction, this work uses data obtained within ten days of a traumatic event. The pipeline creates personalized predictive model for each individual, and computes quality metrics for each predictive model. Clinical recommendations are made based on both the prediction of the model and its quality, thus avoiding making potentially detrimental recommendations based on insufficient information or suboptimal model. The current pipeline outperforms the acute stress disorder, a commonly used clinical risk factor for PTSD development, both in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support

  11. A Qualitative Study of the Influences on Clinical Academic Physicians' Postdoctoral Career Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica F; Barratt, Helen; Rees, Geraint; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-01-23

    To describe the influences on clinical academic physicians' postdoctoral career decision-making. Thirty-five doctoral trainee physicians from University College London took part in semi-structured interviews in 2015 and 2016. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their career to-date, their experiences undertaking a PhD, and their career plans post-PhD. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to generate, review, and define themes from the transcripts. Emerging differences and similarities in participants' reasons for pursuing a PhD were then grouped to produce typologies to explore how their experiences influenced their career decision-making. Participants described four key reasons for undertaking a PhD, which formed the basis of the four typologies identified. These reasons included: to pursue a clinical academic career; to complete an extensive period of research to understand whether a clinical academic career was the desired path forward; to improve clinical career prospects; and to take a break from clinical training. These findings highlight the need to target efforts at retaining clinical academic physicians according to their reasons for pursuing a PhD and their subsequent experiences with the process. Those responsible for overseeing clinical training must be well-informed of the long-term benefits of training academically-qualified physicians. In light of current political uncertainty, universities, hospitals, and external agencies alike must increase their efforts to inspire and assuage early-career clinical academic physicians' fears regarding their academic future.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  12. Barriers and decisions when answering clinical questions at the point of care: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Sorensen, Kristi J; Wilkinson, John M; Berger, Richard A

    2013-11-25

    Answering clinical questions affects patient-care decisions and is important to continuous professional development. The process of point-of-care learning is incompletely understood. To understand what barriers and enabling factors influence physician point-of-care learning and what decisions physicians face during this process. Focus groups with grounded theory analysis. Focus group discussions were transcribed and then analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify barriers, enabling factors, and key decisions related to physician information-seeking activities. Academic medical center and outlying community sites. Purposive sample of 50 primary care and subspecialist internal medicine and family medicine physicians, interviewed in 11 focus groups. Insufficient time was the main barrier to point-of-care learning. Other barriers included the patient comorbidities and contexts, the volume of available information, not knowing which resource to search, doubt that the search would yield an answer, difficulty remembering questions for later study, and inconvenient access to computers. Key decisions were whether to search (reasons to search included infrequently seen conditions, practice updates, complex questions, and patient education), when to search (before, during, or after the clinical encounter), where to search (with the patient present or in a separate room), what type of resource to use (colleague or computer), what specific resource to use (influenced first by efficiency and second by credibility), and when to stop. Participants noted that key features of efficiency (completeness, brevity, and searchability) are often in conflict. Physicians perceive that insufficient time is the greatest barrier to point-of-care learning, and efficiency is the most important determinant in selecting an information source. Designing knowledge resources and systems to target key decisions may improve learning and patient care.

  13. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-10-01

    Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible profession for reasons including history, gender and a traditional subservience to medicine. This paper reports on a focus group study of UK nurses participating in post-qualifying professional development in 2008. Three groups of nurses in different specialist areas comprised a total of 26 participants. The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative analysis. We identified two interpretive repertoires: 'clinical judgement' which was used to describe the different grounds for making judgements; and 'decision-making' which was used to describe organisational circumstances influencing decision-making. Jamous and Peloille's theory proved useful for interpreting instances where the nurses collectively withdrew from the potential dangers of too extreme claims for technicality or indeterminacy in their work. However, their theory did not explain the full range of accounts of decision-making that were given. Taken at face value, the accounts from the participants depict nurses as sometimes practising in indirect ways in order to have influence in the clinical and bureaucratic setting. However, a focus on language use and in particular, interpretive repertoires, has enabled us to suggest that despite an overall picture of severely limited autonomy, nurses in the groups reproduced stories of the successful accomplishment of moral and influential action. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2015-09-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from December 2011 to November 2012, issues of decision-making on embryo transfer, fetal reduction, and mode of delivery were identified. Interviews were carried out with doctors in eighteen ART clinics, agents from four agencies, and fourteen surrogates. In aiming to fulfil the commissioning parents' demands, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded.

  15. Virtual clinics in glaucoma care: face-to-face versus remote decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan; Puertas, Renata; Kotecha, Aachal; Foster, Paul J; Barton, Keith

    2017-07-01

    To examine the agreement in clinical decisions of glaucoma status made in a virtual glaucoma clinic with those made during a face-to-face consultation. A trained nurse and technicians entered data prospectively for 204 patients into a proforma. A subsequent face-to-face clinical assessment was completed by either a glaucoma consultant or fellow. Proformas were reviewed remotely by one of two additional glaucoma consultants, and 12 months later, by the clinicians who had undertaken the original clinical examination. The interobserver and intraobserver decision-making agreements of virtual assessment versus standard care were calculated. We identified adverse disagreement between face-to-face and virtual review in 7/204 (3.4%, 95% CI 0.9% to 5.9%) patients, where virtual review failed to predict a need to accelerated follow-up identified in face-to-face review. Misclassification events were rare, occurring in 1.9% (95% CI 0.3% to 3.8%) of assessments. Interobserver κ (95% CI) showed only fair agreement (0.24 (0.04 to 0.43)); this improved to moderate agreement when only consultant decisions were compared against each other (κ=0.41 (0.16 to 0.65)). The intraobserver agreement κ (95% CI) for the consultant was 0.274 (0.073 to 0.476), and that for the fellow was 0.264 (0.031 to 0.497). The low rate of adverse misclassification, combined with the slowly progressive nature of most glaucoma, and the fact that patients will all be regularly reassessed, suggests that virtual clinics offer a safe, logistically viable option for selected patients with glaucoma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Analysis of Nursing Clinical Decision Support Requests and Strategic Plan in a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kimberly; Bavuso, Karen; Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Goldsmith, Denise; Fairbanks, Amanda; Gesner, Emily; Lagor, Charles; Collins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To understand requests for nursing Clinical Decision Support (CDS) interventions at a large integrated health system undergoing vendor-based EHR implementation. In addition, to establish a process to guide both short-term implementation and long-term strategic goals to meet nursing CDS needs. We conducted an environmental scan to understand current state of nursing CDS over three months. The environmental scan consisted of a literature review and an analysis of CDS requests received from across our health system. We identified existing high priority CDS and paper-based tools used in nursing practice at our health system that guide decision-making. A total of 46 nursing CDS requests were received. Fifty-six percent (n=26) were specific to a clinical specialty; 22 percent (n=10) were focused on facilitating clinical consults in the inpatient setting. "Risk Assessments/Risk Reduction/Promotion of Healthy Habits" (n=23) was the most requested High Priority Category received for nursing CDS. A continuum of types of nursing CDS needs emerged using the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Conceptual Framework: 1) facilitating data capture, 2) meeting information needs, 3) guiding knowledge-based decision making, and 4) exposing analytics for wisdom-based clinical interpretation by the nurse. Identifying and prioritizing paper-based tools that can be modified into electronic CDS is a challenge. CDS strategy is an evolving process that relies on close collaboration and engagement with clinical sites for short-term implementation and should be incorporated into a long-term strategic plan that can be optimized and achieved overtime. The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Conceptual Framework in conjunction with the High Priority Categories established may be a useful tool to guide a strategic approach for meeting short-term nursing CDS needs and aligning with the organizational strategic plan.

  17. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Doerr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management.

  18. Optimised performance of industrial high resolution computerised tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maangaard, M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is to acquire knowledge of the investigated sample. Digital x-ray imaging techniques such as radiography or computerised tomography (CT) produce images of the interior of a sample. The obtained image quality determines the possibility of detecting sample related features, e.g. details and flaws. This thesis presents a method of optimising the performance of industrial X-ray equipment for the imaging task at issue in order to obtain images with high quality. CT produces maps of the X-ray linear attenuation of the sample's interior. CT can produce two dimensional cross-section images or three-dimensional images with volumetric information on the investigated sample. The image contrast and noise depend on both the investigated sample and the equipment and settings used (X-ray tube potential, X-ray filtration, exposure time, etc.). Hence, it is vital to find the optimal equipment settings in order to obtain images of high quality. To be able to mathematically optimise the image quality, it is necessary to have a model of the X-ray imaging system together with an appropriate measure of image quality. The optimisation is performed with a developed model for an X-ray image-intensifier-based radiography system. The model predicts the mean value and variance of the measured signal level in the collected radiographic images. The traditionally used measure of physical image quality is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To calculate the signal-to-noise ratio, a well-defined detail (flaw) is required. It was found that maximising the SNR leads to ambiguities, the optimised settings found by maximising the SNR were dependent on the material in the detail. When CT is performed on irregular shaped samples containing density and compositional variations, it is difficult to define which SNR to use for optimisation. This difficulty is solved by the measures of physical image quality proposed here, the ratios geometry

  19. Computerized clinical decision support systems for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise-Kelly Lorraine

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some drugs have a narrow therapeutic range and require monitoring and dose adjustments to optimize their efficacy and safety. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs may improve the net benefit of these drugs. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve processes of care or patient outcomes for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. Studies from our previous review were included, and new studies were sought until January 2010 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, and Inspec databases. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of a CCDSS on process of care or patient outcomes were selected by pairs of independent reviewers. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were identified, assessing the effect of a CCDSS on management of vitamin K antagonists (14, insulin (6, theophylline/aminophylline (4, aminoglycosides (3, digoxin (2, lidocaine (1, or as part of a multifaceted approach (3. Cluster randomization was rarely used (18% and CCDSSs were usually stand-alone systems (76% primarily used by physicians (85%. Overall, 18 of 30 studies (60% showed an improvement in the process of care and 4 of 19 (21% an improvement in patient outcomes. All evaluable studies assessing insulin dosing for glycaemic control showed an improvement. In meta-analysis, CCDSSs for vitamin K antagonist dosing significantly improved time in therapeutic range. Conclusions CCDSSs have potential for improving process of care for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, specifically insulin and vitamin K antagonist dosing. However, studies were small and generally of modest quality, and effects on patient outcomes were uncertain, with no convincing

  20. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making.

  1. Genetic Stratification in Myeloid Diseases: From Risk Assessment to Clinical Decision Support Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishai Ofran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aberrations have become a dominant factor in the stratification of myeloid malignancies. Cytogenetic and a few mutation studies are the backbone of risk assessment models of myeloid malignancies which are a major consideration in clinical decisions, especially patient assignment for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and the growing capabilities of mass sequencing may add new roles for the clinical usage of genetic data. A few recently identified mutations recognized to be associated with specific diseases or clinical scenarios may soon become part of the diagnostic criteria of such conditions. Mutational studies may also advance our capabilities for a more efficient patient selection process, assigning the most effective therapy at the best timing for each patient. The clinical utility of genetic data is anticipated to advance further with the adoption of deep sequencing and next-generation sequencing techniques. We herein suggest some future potential applications of sequential genetic data to identify pending deteriorations at time points which are the best for aggressive interventions such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Genetics is moving from being mostly a prognostic factor to becoming a multitasking decision support tool for hematologists. Physicians must pay attention to advances in molecular hematology as it will soon be accessible and influential for most of our patients.

  2. Clinical reasoning and population health: decision making for an emerging paradigm of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Richardson, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Chronic conditions now provide the major disease and disability burden facing humanity. This development has necessitated a reorientation in the practice skills of health care professions away from hospital-based inpatient and outpatient care toward community-based management of patients with chronic conditions. Part of this reorientation toward community-based management of chronic conditions involves practitioners' understanding and adoption of a concept of population health management based on appropriate theoretical models of health care. Drawing on recent studies of expertise in physiotherapy, this article proposes a clinical reasoning and decision-making framework to meet these challenges. The challenge of population and community-based management of chronic conditions also provides an opportunity for physiotherapists to further clarify a professional epistemology of practice that embraces the kinds of knowledge and clinical reasoning processes used in physiotherapy practice. Three case studies related to the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain in different populations are used to exemplify the range of epistemological perspectives that underpin community-based practice. They illustrate the link between conceptualizations of practice problems and knowledge sources that are used as a basis for clinical reasoning and decision making as practitioners are increasingly required to move between the clinic and the community.

  3. Radiographer's impact on improving clinical decision-making, patient care and patient diagnosis: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Daniel; Egan, Ingrid; Baird, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study attempts to quantify the benefits of a documented radiographic clinical history through the use of the clinical history template form designed by Egan and Baird. Six radiographers completed the clinical history template for 40 patients and four radiologists included the recorded information as part of their reporting process. A focus discussion group was held between the radiographers to ascertain the level of satisfaction and benefits encountered with the use of the template form. A questionnaire was designed for the radiologists to complete regarding the usefulness of the template form with respect to the radiological reporting process. Results/Discussion: 15 cases for which the form was used demonstrated a direct benefit in respect to improved radiographic clinical decision-making. Radiographers agreed the template form aided the establishment of a stronger radiographer-patient relationship during the radiographic examination. Two radiologists agreed the form aided in establishing a radiological diagnosis and suggested the form be implemented as part of the standard departmental protocol. Despite the small sample size, there is evidence the form aided radiographic decision-making and assisted in the establishment of an accurate radiological diagnosis. The overall consensus amongst radiographers was that it enhanced radiographer-patient communication and improved the level of patient care. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  4. Trail Blazing or Jam Session? Towards a New Concept of Clinical Decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    Clinical decision-making (CDM) is key in learning to be a doctor as the defining activity in their clinical work. CDM is often portrayed in the literature as similar to 'trail blazing'; the doctor as the core agent, clearing away obstacles on the path towards diagnosis and treatment. However, in a fieldwork of young doctors in Denmark, it was difficult connect their practice to this image. This paper presents the exploration of this discrepancy in the heart of medical practice and how an alternative image emerged; that of a 'jam session'. The exploration is represented as a case-based hypothesis-testing: first, a theoretically and empirically informed hypothesis (H0) of how doctors perform CDM is developed. In H0, CDM is a stepwise process of reasoning about clinical data, often influenced by outside contextual factors. Then, H0 is tested against a case from ethnographic fieldwork with doctors going through internship. Although the case is chosen for characteristics that make it 'most likely' to verify the hypothesis, verification proves difficult. The case challenges preconceptions in CDM literature about chronology, context, objectivity, cognition, agency, and practice. The young doctor is found not to make decisions, but rather to participate in CDM; an activity akin to the dynamics found in a jam session. Their participation circles in and through four concurrent interrelated constructions that suggest a new conceptualization of CDM; a starting point for a deeper understanding of actual practice in a changing clinical environment.

  5. Making reasonable decisions: a qualitative study of medical decision making in the care of patients with a clinically significant haemoglobin disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Helen J; Kerridge, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Therapies utilized in patients with clinically significant haemoglobin disorders appear to vary between clinicians and units. This study aimed to investigate the processes of evidence implementation and medical decision making in the care of such patients in NSW, Australia. Using semi-structured interviews, 11 haematologists discussed their medical decision-making processes with particular attention paid to the use of published evidence. Transcripts were thematically analysed by a single investigator on a line-by-line basis. Decision making surrounding the care of patients with significant haemoglobin disorders varied and was deeply contextual. Three main determinants of clinical decision making were identified - factors relating to the patient and to their illness, factors specific to the clinician and the institution in which they were practising and factors related to the notion of evidence and to utility and role of evidence-based medicine in clinical practice. Clinicians pay considerable attention to medical decision making and evidence incorporation and attempt to tailor these to particular patient contexts. However, the patient context is often inferred and when discordant with the clinician's own contexture can lead to discomfort with decision recommendations. Clinicians strive to improve comfort through the use of experience and trustworthy evidence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Using decision analysis to assess comparative clinical efficacy of surgical treatment of unstable ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, James D

    2013-11-01

    The development of a robust treatment algorithm for ankle fractures based on well-established stability criteria has been shown to be prognostic with respect to treatment and outcomes. In parallel with the development of improved understanding of the biomechanical rationale of ankle fracture treatment has been an increased emphasis on assessing the effectiveness of medical and surgical interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of using decision analysis in the assessment of the cost effectiveness of operative treatment of ankle fractures based on the existing clinical data in the literature. Using the data obtained from a previous structured review of the ankle fracture literature, decision analysis trees were constructed using standard software. The decision nodes for the trees were based on ankle fracture stability criteria previously published. The outcomes were assessed by calculated Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) assigned to achieving normal ankle function, developing posttraumatic arthritis, or sustaining a postoperative infection. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken by varying the patient's age, incidence of arthritis, and incidence or infection. Decision analysis trees captured the essential aspects of clinical decision making in ankle fracture treatment in a clinically useful manner. In general, stable fractures yielded better outcomes with nonoperative treatment, whereas unstable fractures had better outcomes with surgery. These were consistent results over a wide range of postoperative infection rates. Varying the age of the patient did not qualitatively change the results. Between the ages of 30 and 80 years, surgery yielded higher expected QALYs than nonoperative care for unstable fractures, and generated lower QALYs than nonoperative care for stable fractures. Using local cost estimates for operative and nonoperative treatment, the incremental cost of surgery for unstable fractures was less than $40,000 per QALY (the

  7. Targeted computerised tomography scanning of the ankle syndesmosis with low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Rahul [Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend (United Kingdom); Rath, Narendra [Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport (United Kingdom); Paringe, Vishal; Hemmadi, Sandeep; Thomas, Rhys; Lyons, Kath [University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    To devise a new protocol for targeted CT scanning of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis with minimal radiation exposure to patients. We also aimed to correlate the reduction of the syndesmosis as seen on CT scans with the functional outcome of patients. Prospective study. Forty adults undergoing surgical stabilisation of an acute distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury were recruited. A targeted five-cut computerised tomography scan protocol was developed. The radiation exposure to the patient with this protocol was only 0.002 mSv. Scans were performed 12 weeks after surgery. The contralateral ankle of every patient was used as a control to determine the accuracy of the reduction of the syndesmosis for that individual patient. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores were obtained at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. After considering the exclusions, 36 patients formed the study group. A wide variation was observed in the anatomy of the normal syndesmosis. If we considered a difference of more than 2 mm between the normal and injured syndesmosis relationship as significant, 15 (41.6 %) of our patients had a significant difference between the injured and normal sides. AOFAS scores were available for 13 of these patients and were good to excellent in 11(84.6 %). Our study describes a reliable new CT scanning technique for the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis using only five cuts and a low-radiation-dose protocol. Clinical correlation of the findings on the scan with functional outcomes suggests that routine post-operative CT of the syndesmosis is probably not justified. (orig.)

  8. Targeted computerised tomography scanning of the ankle syndesmosis with low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotwal, Rahul; Rath, Narendra; Paringe, Vishal; Hemmadi, Sandeep; Thomas, Rhys; Lyons, Kath

    2016-01-01

    To devise a new protocol for targeted CT scanning of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis with minimal radiation exposure to patients. We also aimed to correlate the reduction of the syndesmosis as seen on CT scans with the functional outcome of patients. Prospective study. Forty adults undergoing surgical stabilisation of an acute distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury were recruited. A targeted five-cut computerised tomography scan protocol was developed. The radiation exposure to the patient with this protocol was only 0.002 mSv. Scans were performed 12 weeks after surgery. The contralateral ankle of every patient was used as a control to determine the accuracy of the reduction of the syndesmosis for that individual patient. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores were obtained at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. After considering the exclusions, 36 patients formed the study group. A wide variation was observed in the anatomy of the normal syndesmosis. If we considered a difference of more than 2 mm between the normal and injured syndesmosis relationship as significant, 15 (41.6 %) of our patients had a significant difference between the injured and normal sides. AOFAS scores were available for 13 of these patients and were good to excellent in 11(84.6 %). Our study describes a reliable new CT scanning technique for the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis using only five cuts and a low-radiation-dose protocol. Clinical correlation of the findings on the scan with functional outcomes suggests that routine post-operative CT of the syndesmosis is probably not justified. (orig.)

  9. Ethnicity Recording in Primary Care Computerised Medical Record Systems: An Ontological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayd Tippu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Ethnicity recording within primary care computerised medical record (CMR systems is suboptimal, exacerbated by tangled taxonomies within current coding systems. Objective To develop a method for extending ethnicity identification using routinely collected data. Methods We used an ontological method to maximise the reliability and prevalence of ethnicity information in the Royal College of General Practitioner’s Research and Surveillance database. Clinical codes were either directly mapped to ethnicity group or utilised as proxy markers (such as language spoken from which ethnicity could be inferred. We compared the performance of our method with the recording rates that would be identified by code lists utilised by the UK pay for the performance system, with the help of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF. Results Data from 2,059,453 patients across 110 practices were included. The overall categorisable ethnicity using QOF codes was 36.26% (95% confidence interval (CI: 36.20%–36.33%. This rose to 48.57% (CI:48.50%–48.64% using the described ethnicity mapping process. Mapping increased across all ethnic groups. The largest increase was seen in the white ethnicity category (30.61%; CI: 30.55%–30.67% to 40.24%; CI: 40.17%–40.30%. The highest relative increase was in the ethnic group categorised as the other (0.04%; CI: 0.03%–0.04% to 0.92%; CI: 0.91%–0.93%. Conclusions This mapping method substantially increases the prevalence of known ethnicity in CMR data and may aid future epidemiological research based on routine data.

  10. General practitioners' decision to refer patients to dietitians: insight into the clinical reasoning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Sylvia E M; Cant, Robyn P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project was to describe general practitioners' (GPs') decision-making process for reducing nutrition risk in cardiac patients through referring a patient to a dietitian. The setting was primary care practices in Victoria. The method we employed was mixed methods research: in Study 1, 30 GPs were interviewed. Recorded interviews were transcribed and narratives analysed thematically. Study 2 involved a survey of statewide random sample of GPs. Frequencies and analyses of variance were used to explore the impact of demographic variables on decisions to refer. We found that the referral decision involved four elements: (i) synthesising management information; (ii) forecasting outcomes; (iii) planning management; and (iv) actioning referrals. GPs applied cognitive and collaborative strategies to develop a treatment plan. In Study 2, doctors (248 GPs, 30%) concurred with identified barriers/enabling factors for patients' referral. There was no association between GPs' sex, age or hours worked per week and referral factors. We conclude that a GP's judgment to offer a dietetic referral to an adult patient is a four element reasoning process. Attention to how these elements interact may assist clinical decision making. Apart from the sole use of prescribed medications/surgical procedures for cardiac care, patients offered a dietetic referral were those who were considered able to commit to dietary change and who were willing to attend a dietetic consultation. Improvements in provision of patients' nutrition intervention information to GPs are needed. Further investigation is justified to determine how to resolve this practice gap.

  11. Patient Perceptions of Illness Identity in Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Dailey, Phokeng M; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Rhodes, Nancy D; Krieger, Janice L

    2018-08-01

    When patients are diagnosed with cancer, they begin to negotiate their illness identity in relation to their past and future selves, their relationships, and their group memberships. Thus, how patients view their cancer in relation to their other identities may affect how and why they make particular decisions about treatment options. Using the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI), the current study explores: (1) how and why illness identity is framed across identity layers in relation to one particular cancer treatment: participation in a cancer clinical trial (CT); and (2) how and why patients experience identity conflicts while making their treatment decisions. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were analyzed for 46 cancer patients who were offered a CT. Results of a grounded theory analysis indicated that patients expressed separate identity frames (e.g., personal, relational, and communal), aligned identity frames (e.g., personal and communal), and identity conflicts (e.g., personal-personal). This study theoretically shows how and why patient illness identity relates to cancer treatment decision-making as well as how and why patients relate (and conflict) with the cancer communal identity frame. Practical implications include how healthcare providers and family members can support patient decision-making through awareness of and accommodating to identity shifts.

  12. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  13. Computerised Attention Training for Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hannah E.; Gray, Kylie M.; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience heightened attention difficulties which have been linked to poorer cognitive, academic and social outcomes. Although, increasing research has focused on the potential of computerised cognitive training in reducing attention problems, limited studies have…

  14. Effectiveness of a Computerised Working Memory Training in Adolescents with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Klugkist, I.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special education. Method: A total of 95 adolescents with…

  15. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  16. Sample preparation and scanning protocol for computerised analysis of root length and diameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Koutstaal, B.P.

    2000-01-01

    Root length and diameter distribution are important characteristics to be considered when describing and comparing root systems. Root length and root-diameter distribution may be obtained in two ways: by microscopical measurements, which are laborious, or by computerised analysis, which is fast but

  17. Effectiveness of a computerised working memory training in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, M.J.; van Luit, J.E.H.; van der Molen, M.W.; Klugkist, I.; Jongmans, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special

  18. "Suffering" in palliative sedation: Conceptual Analysis and Implications for Decision-Making in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzaro, Claudia; Schildmann, Jan

    2018-04-21

    Palliative sedation is an increasingly used and, simultaneously, challenging practice at the end of life. Many controversies associated with this therapy are rooted in implicit differences regarding the understanding of "suffering" as prerequisite for palliative sedation. The aim of this paper is to inform the current debates by a conceptual analysis of two different philosophical accounts of suffering, (1) the subjective and holistic concept and (2) the objective and gradual concept and by a clinical-ethical analysis of the implications of each account for decisions about palliative sedation. We will show that while the subjective and holistic account of suffering fits well with the holistic approach of palliative care, there are considerable challenges to justify limits to requests for palliative sedation. By contrast, the objective and gradual account fits well with the need for an objective basis for clinical decisions in the context of palliative sedation, but runs the risk of falling short when considering the individual and subjective experience of suffering at the end of life. We will conclude with a plea for the necessity of further combined conceptual and empirical research to develop a sound and feasible understanding of suffering which can contribute to consistent decision-making about palliative sedation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Personalised Care Plan Management Utilizing Guideline-Driven Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Sarigul, Bunyamin; Lilja, Mikael; Chen, Rong; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2018-01-01

    Older age is associated with an increased accumulation of multiple chronic conditions. The clinical management of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions is very complex, disconnected and time-consuming with the traditional care settings. Integrated care is a means to address the growing demand for improved patient experience and health outcomes of multimorbid and long-term care patients. Care planning is a prevalent approach of integrated care, where the aim is to deliver more personalized and targeted care creating shared care plans by clearly articulating the role of each provider and patient in the care process. In this paper, we present a method and corresponding implementation of a semi-automatic care plan management tool, integrated with clinical decision support services which can seamlessly access and assess the electronic health records (EHRs) of the patient in comparison with evidence based clinical guidelines to suggest personalized recommendations for goals and interventions to be added to the individualized care plans.

  20. Interim analysis: A rational approach of decision making in clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amal; Chakraborty, Bhaswat S

    2016-01-01

    Interim analysis of especially sizeable trials keeps the decision process free of conflict of interest while considering cost, resources, and meaningfulness of the project. Whenever necessary, such interim analysis can also call for potential termination or appropriate modification in sample size, study design, and even an early declaration of success. Given the extraordinary size and complexity today, this rational approach helps to analyze and predict the outcomes of a clinical trial that incorporate what is learned during the course of a study or a clinical development program. Such approach can also fill the gap by directing the resources toward relevant and optimized clinical trials between unmet medical needs and interventions being tested currently rather than fulfilling only business and profit goals.

  1. Interim analysis: A rational approach of decision making in clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interim analysis of especially sizeable trials keeps the decision process free of conflict of interest while considering cost, resources, and meaningfulness of the project. Whenever necessary, such interim analysis can also call for potential termination or appropriate modification in sample size, study design, and even an early declaration of success. Given the extraordinary size and complexity today, this rational approach helps to analyze and predict the outcomes of a clinical trial that incorporate what is learned during the course of a study or a clinical development program. Such approach can also fill the gap by directing the resources toward relevant and optimized clinical trials between unmet medical needs and interventions being tested currently rather than fulfilling only business and profit goals.

  2. Sharing clinical decisions for multimorbidity case management using social network and open-source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Alicia; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Leal, Sandra; Parra, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Social networks applied through Web 2.0 tools have gained importance in health domain, because they produce improvements on the communication and coordination capabilities among health professionals. This is highly relevant for multimorbidity patients care because there is a large number of health professionals in charge of patient care, and this requires to obtain clinical consensus in their decisions. Our objective is to develop a tool for collaborative work among health professionals for multimorbidity patient care. We describe the architecture to incorporate decision support functionalities in a social network tool to enable the adoption of shared decisions among health professionals from different care levels. As part of the first stage of the project, this paper describes the results obtained in a pilot study about acceptance and use of the social network component in our healthcare setting. At Virgen del Rocío University Hospital we have designed and developed the Shared Care Platform (SCP) to provide support in the continuity of care for multimorbidity patients. The SCP has two consecutively developed components: social network component, called Clinical Wall, and Clinical Decision Support (CDS) system. The Clinical Wall contains a record where health professionals are able to debate and define shared decisions. We conducted a pilot study to assess the use and acceptance of the SCP by healthcare professionals through questionnaire based on the theory of the Technology Acceptance Model. In March 2012 we released and deployed the SCP, but only with the social network component. The pilot project lasted 6 months in the hospital and 2 primary care centers. From March to September 2012 we created 16 records in the Clinical Wall, all with a high priority. A total of 10 professionals took part in the exchange of messages: 3 internists and 7 general practitioners generated 33 messages. 12 of the 16 record (75%) were answered by the destination health professionals

  3. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical decision support improves quality of telephone triage documentation--an analysis of triage documentation before and after computerized clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Frederick; Richards, Debra D; Bremseth, Kimberly A; Lee, Mary R; Cox, Debra L; Varkey, Prathibha; Stroebel, Robert J

    2014-03-20

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to be effective in improving medical safety and quality but there is little information on how telephone triage benefits from CDS. The aim of our study was to compare triage documentation quality associated with the use of a clinical decision support tool, ExpertRN©. We examined 50 triage documents before and after a CDS tool was used in nursing triage. To control for the effects of CDS training we had an additional control group of triage documents created by nurses who were trained in the CDS tool, but who did not use it in selected notes. The CDS intervention cohort of triage notes was compared to both the pre-CDS notes and the CDS trained (but not using CDS) cohort. Cohorts were compared using the documentation standards of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN). We also compared triage note content (documentation of associated positive and negative features relating to the symptoms, self-care instructions, and warning signs to watch for), and documentation defects pertinent to triage safety. Three of five AAACN documentation standards were significantly improved with CDS. There was a mean of 36.7 symptom features documented in triage notes for the CDS group but only 10.7 symptom features in the pre-CDS cohort (p < 0.0001) and 10.2 for the cohort that was CDS-trained but not using CDS (p < 0.0001). The difference between the mean of 10.2 symptom features documented in the pre-CDS and the mean of 10.7 symptom features documented in the CDS-trained but not using was not statistically significant (p = 0.68). CDS significantly improves triage note documentation quality. CDS-aided triage notes had significantly more information about symptoms, warning signs and self-care. The changes in triage documentation appeared to be the result of the CDS alone and not due to any CDS training that came with the CDS intervention. Although this study shows that CDS can improve documentation, further study is needed

  5. The Research of Clinical Decision Support System Based on Three-Layer Knowledge Base Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicheng Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many clinical decision support systems, a two-layer knowledge base model (disease-symptom of rule reasoning is used. This model often does not express knowledge very well since it simply infers disease from the presence of certain symptoms. In this study, we propose a three-layer knowledge base model (disease-symptom-property to utilize more useful information in inference. The system iteratively calculates the probability of patients who may suffer from diseases based on a multisymptom naive Bayes algorithm, in which the specificity of these disease symptoms is weighted by the estimation of the degree of contribution to diagnose the disease. It significantly reduces the dependencies between attributes to apply the naive Bayes algorithm more properly. Then, the online learning process for parameter optimization of the inference engine was completed. At last, our decision support system utilizing the three-layer model was formally evaluated by two experienced doctors. By comparisons between prediction results and clinical results, our system can provide effective clinical recommendations to doctors. Moreover, we found that the three-layer model can improve the accuracy of predictions compared with the two-layer model. In light of some of the limitations of this study, we also identify and discuss several areas that need continued improvement.

  6. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs, Software Engineers (SEs, and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR systems, testing, and reporting.

  7. Critical care nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists interface patterns with computer-based decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Scott

    2007-11-01

    The purposes of this review are to examine the types of clinical decision support systems in use and to identify patterns of how critical care advanced practice nurses (APNs) have integrated these systems into their nursing care patient management practices. The decision-making process itself is analyzed with a focus on how automated systems attempt to capture and reflect human decisional processes in critical care nursing, including how systems actually organize and process information to create outcome estimations based on patient clinical indicators and prognosis logarithms. Characteristics of APN clinicians and implications of these characteristics on decision system use, based on the body of decision system user research, are introduced. A review of the Medline, Ovid, CINAHL, and PubMed literature databases was conducted using "clinical decision support systems,"computerized clinical decision making," and "APNs"; an examination of components of several major clinical decision systems was also undertaken. Use patterns among APNs and other clinicians appear to vary; there is a need for original research to examine how APNs actually use these systems in their practices in critical care settings. Because APNs are increasingly responsible for admission to, and transfer from, critical care settings, more understanding is needed on how they interact with this technology and how they see automated decision systems impacting their practices. APNs who practice in critical care settings vary significantly in how they use the clinical decision systems that are in operation in their practice settings. These APNs must have an understanding of their use patterns with these systems and should critically assess whether their patient care decision making is affected by the technology.

  8. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Jacques Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM, defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research team on the implementation of SDM in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. Methods Participants include researchers from Canada, US, UK, and Netherlands, representing medicine, nursing, psychology, community health and epidemiology. In order to develop a collaborative research network that takes advantage of the expertise of the team members, the following research activities are planned: 1 establish networking and on-going communication through internet-based forum, conference calls, and a bi-weekly e-bulletin; 2 hold a two-day workshop with two key experts (one in theoretical underpinnings of behavioral change, and a second in dyadic data analysis, and invite all investigators to present their views on the challenges related to the implementation of SDM in clinical practices; 3 conduct a secondary analyses of existing dyadic datasets to ensure that discussion among team members is grounded in empirical data; 4 build capacity with involvement of graduate students in the workshop and online forum; and 5 elaborate a position paper and an international multi-site study protocol. Discussion This study protocol aims to inform researchers, educators, and clinicians interested in improving their understanding of effective strategies to implement shared decision-making in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective.

  9. Emergency nurses' knowledge, attitude and clinical decision making skills about pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucuzal, Meral; Doğan, Runida

    2015-04-01

    Pain is the most common reason that patients come to the emergency department. Emergency nurses have an indispensable role in the management of this pain. The aim of this study was to examine emergency nurses' knowledge, attitude and clinical decision-making skills about pain. This descriptive study was conducted in a state and a university hospital between September and October 2012 in Malatya, Turkey. Of 98 nurses working in the emergency departments of these two hospitals, 57 returned the questionnaires. The response rate was 58%. Data were collected using the Demographic Information Questionnaire, Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire about Pain and Clinical Decision Making Survey. Frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation were used to evaluate data. 75.4% of participant nurses knew that patients' own statement about their pain was the most reliable indicator during pain assessment. Almost half of the nurses believed that patients should be encouraged to endure the pain as much as possible before resorting to a pain relief method. The results also indicate that most of nurses think that a sleeping patient does not have any pain and pain relief should be postponed as it can influence the diagnosis negatively. It is determined that the pain scale was not used frequently. Only 35.1% of nurses reported keeping records of pain. Despite all the recommendations of substantial past research the results of this study indicate that emergency nurses continue to demonstrate inadequate knowledge, clinical decision-making skills and negative attitudes about pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A diagnosis-based clinical decision rule for spinal pain part 2: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal pain is a common and often disabling problem. The research on various treatments for spinal pain has, for the most part, suggested that while several interventions have demonstrated mild to moderate short-term benefit, no single treatment has a major impact on either pain or disability. There is great need for more accurate diagnosis in patients with spinal pain. In a previous paper, the theoretical model of a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule was presented. The approach is designed to provide the clinician with a strategy for arriving at a specific working diagnosis from which treatment decisions can be made. It is based on three questions of diagnosis. In the current paper, the literature on the reliability and validity of the assessment procedures that are included in the diagnosis-based clinical decision rule is presented. Methods The databases of Medline, Cinahl, Embase and MANTIS were searched for studies that evaluated the reliability and validity of clinic-based diagnostic procedures for patients with spinal pain that have relevance for questions 2 (which investigates characteristics of the pain source and 3 (which investigates perpetuating factors of the pain experience. In addition, the reference list of identified papers and authors' libraries were searched. Results A total of 1769 articles were retrieved, of which 138 were deemed relevant. Fifty-one studies related to reliability and 76 related to validity. One study evaluated both reliability and validity. Conclusion Regarding some aspects of the DBCDR, there are a number of studies that allow the clinician to have a reasonable degree of confidence in his or her findings. This is particularly true for centralization signs, neurodynamic signs and psychological perpetuating factors. There are other aspects of the DBCDR in which a lesser degree of confidence is warranted, and in which further research is needed.

  11. Automatic Decision Support for Clinical Diagnostic Literature Using Link Analysis in a Weighted Keyword Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuqing; Sun, Ying; Soergel, Dagobert

    2017-12-23

    We present a novel approach to recommending articles from the medical literature that support clinical diagnostic decision-making, giving detailed descriptions of the associated ideas and principles. The specific goal is to retrieve biomedical articles that help answer questions of a specified type about a particular case. Based on the filtered keywords, MeSH(Medical Subject Headings) lexicon and the automatically extracted acronyms, the relationship between keywords and articles was built. The paper gives a detailed description of the process of by which keywords were measured and relevant articles identified based on link analysis in a weighted keywords network. Some important challenges identified in this study include the extraction of diagnosis-related keywords and a collection of valid sentences based on the keyword co-occurrence analysis and existing descriptions of symptoms. All data were taken from medical articles provided in the TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) clinical decision support track 2015. Ten standard topics and one demonstration topic were tested. In each case, a maximum of five articles with the highest relevance were returned. The total user satisfaction of 3.98 was 33% higher than average. The results also suggested that the smaller the number of results, the higher the average satisfaction. However, a few shortcomings were also revealed since medical literature recommendation for clinical diagnostic decision support is so complex a topic that it cannot be fully addressed through the semantic information carried solely by keywords in existing descriptions of symptoms. Nevertheless, the fact that these articles are actually relevant will no doubt inspire future research.

  12. Exploring a Laboratory Model of Pharmacogenetics as Applied to Clinical Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Kisor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate a pilot of a laboratory model for relating pharmacogenetics to clinical decision making. Case Study: This pilot was undertaken and evaluated to help determine if a pharmacogenetics laboratory should be included in the core Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. The placement of the laboratory exercise in the curriculum was determined by identifying the point in the curriculum where the students had been introduced to the chemistry of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA as well as instructed on the chemistry of genetic variation. The laboratory included cytochrome P450 2C19 genotyping relative to the *2 variant. Twenty-four students served as the pilot group. Students provided buccal swabs as the source of DNA. Students stabilized the samples and were then provided instructions related to sample preparation, polymerase chain reaction, and gel electrophoresis. The results were reported as images of gels. Students used a reference gel image to compare their results to. Students then applied a dosing algorithm to make a "clinical decision" relative to clopidogrel use. Students were offered a post laboratory survey regarding attitudes toward the laboratory. Twenty-four students completed the laboratory with genotyping results being provided for 22 students (91.7%. Sixteen students were wild-type (*1/*1, while six students were heterozygous (*1/*2. Twenty-three students (96% completed the post laboratory survey. All 23 agreed (6, 26.1% or strongly agreed (17, 73.9% that the laboratory "had relevance and value in the pharmacy curriculum" Conclusion: The post pilot study survey exploring a laboratory model for pharmacogenetics related to clinical decision making indicated that such a laboratory would be viewed positively by students. This model may be adopted by colleges to expand pharmacogenetics education.   Type: Case Study

  13. Automatic identification of high impact articles in PubMed to support clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiantao; Morid, Mohammad Amin; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Luo, Gang; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2017-09-01

    The practice of evidence-based medicine involves integrating the latest best available evidence into patient care decisions. Yet, critical barriers exist for clinicians' retrieval of evidence that is relevant for a particular patient from primary sources such as randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. To help address those barriers, we investigated machine learning algorithms that find clinical studies with high clinical impact from PubMed®. Our machine learning algorithms use a variety of features including bibliometric features (e.g., citation count), social media attention, journal impact factors, and citation metadata. The algorithms were developed and evaluated with a gold standard composed of 502 high impact clinical studies that are referenced in 11 clinical evidence-based guidelines on the treatment of various diseases. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) our high impact classifier outperforms a state-of-the-art classifier based on citation metadata and citation terms, and PubMed's® relevance sort algorithm; and (2) the performance of our high impact classifier does not decrease significantly after removing proprietary features such as citation count. The mean top 20 precision of our high impact classifier was 34% versus 11% for the state-of-the-art classifier and 4% for PubMed's® relevance sort (p=0.009); and the performance of our high impact classifier did not decrease significantly after removing proprietary features (mean top 20 precision=34% vs. 36%; p=0.085). The high impact classifier, using features such as bibliometrics, social media attention and MEDLINE® metadata, outperformed previous approaches and is a promising alternative to identifying high impact studies for clinical decision support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  15. Integrating complex business processes for knowledge-driven clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McGregor, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents in detail the component of the Complex Business Process for Stream Processing framework that is responsible for integrating complex business processes to enable knowledge-driven Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) recommendations. CDSSs aid the clinician in supporting the care of patients by providing accurate data analysis and evidence-based recommendations. However, the incorporation of a dynamic knowledge-management system that supports the definition and enactment of complex business processes and real-time data streams has not been researched. In this paper we discuss the process web service as an innovative method of providing contextual information to a real-time data stream processing CDSS.

  16. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify and inventory clinical decision support (CDS) tools for helping front-line staff select interventions for patients with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods We used Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review framework which progresses through five stages: (1) identifying...... the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses...

  17. How do small groups make decisions? : A theoretical framework to inform the implementation and study of clinical competency committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Saad; Cristancho, Sayra; Padgett, Jessica; Lingard, Lorelei

    2017-06-01

    In the competency-based medical education (CBME) approach, clinical competency committees are responsible for making decisions about trainees' competence. However, we currently lack a theoretical model for group decision-making to inform this emerging assessment phenomenon. This paper proposes an organizing framework to study and guide the decision-making processes of clinical competency committees.This is an explanatory, non-exhaustive review, tailored to identify relevant theoretical and evidence-based papers related to small group decision-making. The search was conducted using Google Scholar, Web of Science, MEDLINE, ERIC, and PsycINFO for relevant literature. Using a thematic analysis, two researchers (SC & JP) met four times between April-June 2016 to consolidate the literature included in this review.Three theoretical orientations towards group decision-making emerged from the review: schema, constructivist, and social influence. Schema orientations focus on how groups use algorithms for decision-making. Constructivist orientations focus on how groups construct their shared understanding. Social influence orientations focus on how individual members influence the group's perspective on a decision. Moderators of decision-making relevant to all orientations include: guidelines, stressors, authority, and leadership.Clinical competency committees are the mechanisms by which groups of clinicians will be in charge of interpreting multiple assessment data points and coming to a shared decision about trainee competence. The way in which these committees make decisions can have huge implications for trainee progression and, ultimately, patient care. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build the science of how such group decision-making works in practice. This synthesis suggests a preliminary organizing framework that can be used in the implementation and study of clinical competency committees.

  18. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, R Brian; Wilczynski, Nancy L

    2010-02-05

    Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this research was to form a partnership of healthcare providers, managers, and researchers to review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of computerized decision support for six clinical application areas: primary preventive care, therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, drug prescribing, chronic disease management, diagnostic test ordering and interpretation, and acute care management; and to identify study characteristics that predict benefit. The review was undertaken by the Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, and Brant Local Health Integration Network, and pertinent healthcare service teams. Following agreement on information needs and interests with decision-makers, our earlier systematic review was updated by searching Medline, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, and Inspec, and reviewing reference lists through 6 January 2010. Data extraction items were expanded according to input from decision-makers. Authors of primary studies were contacted to confirm data and to provide additional information. Eligible trials were organized according to clinical area of application. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on practitioner performance or patient outcomes of patient care provided with a computerized clinical decision support system compared with patient care without such a system. Data will be summarized using descriptive summary measures, including proportions

  19. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: Methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this research was to form a partnership of healthcare providers, managers, and researchers to review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of computerized decision support for six clinical application areas: primary preventive care, therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, drug prescribing, chronic disease management, diagnostic test ordering and interpretation, and acute care management; and to identify study characteristics that predict benefit. Methods The review was undertaken by the Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, and Brant Local Health Integration Network, and pertinent healthcare service teams. Following agreement on information needs and interests with decision-makers, our earlier systematic review was updated by searching Medline, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, and Inspec, and reviewing reference lists through 6 January 2010. Data extraction items were expanded according to input from decision-makers. Authors of primary studies were contacted to confirm data and to provide additional information. Eligible trials were organized according to clinical area of application. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on practitioner performance or patient outcomes of patient care provided with a computerized clinical decision support system compared with patient care without such a system. Results Data will be summarized

  20. Studying abroad: Exploring factors influencing nursing students' decisions to apply for clinical placements in international settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent-Wilkinson, Arlene; Dietrich Leurer, Marie; Luimes, Janet; Ferguson, Linda; Murray, Lee

    2015-08-01

    For over 15 years the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan has facilitated study abroad clinical placements in a number of countries to enhance student learning. Nursing students often find their study abroad experience to be a defining moment in their educational program, and in their personal and professional growth. The main objective of this research was to explore factors influencing nursing students' decisions to study abroad. A descriptive longitudinal design study was conducted using an online survey. The Study Abroad Survey was distributed to all undergraduate and graduate nursing students, in all years of all programs, at all sites of the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan in Saskatchewan, Canada. A total of 1058 nursing students registered in the 2013-2014 academic year were surveyed. The data were collected using an online survey administered by Campus Labs™ (2014). Students indicated that their interest in study abroad international experiences was high (84%), with many perceived benefits, but barriers to participation were also high for these students. Financial barriers topped the list (71%), followed by family responsibilities (30%) and job obligations (23%). The research highlights the factors behind student decision making related to international placements, and provides the basis for improvements to the College of Nursing's International Study Abroad Program (ISAP). Previous travel and international service learning, resulting in increased perceived value of a study abroad experience may prove to be the more significant factor influencing decision making, rather than financial barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Decision-Making in the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Focus on Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Samalin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify clinician characteristics associated with higher prescription rates of long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics, as well as the sources that influence medical decision-making regarding the treatment of schizophrenia. We surveyed 202 psychiatrists during six regional French conferences (Bordeaux, Lyon, Marseille, Nice, Paris, and Strasbourg. Data on the characteristics of practice, prescription rates of antipsychotic, and information sources about their clinical decisions were collected. Most psychiatrists used second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs, and preferentially an oral formulation, in the treatment of schizophrenia. LAI SGAs were prescribed to 30.4% of schizophrenic patients. The duration and type of practice did not influence the class or formulation of antipsychotics used. The clinicians following the higher percentage of schizophrenic patients were associated with a higher use of LAI antipsychotics and a lower use of oral SGAs. Personal experience, government regulatory approval, and guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia were the three main contributing factors guiding clinicians’ decision-making regarding the treatment of schizophrenia. The more clinicians follow schizophrenic patients, the more they use LAI antipsychotics. The development of specialized programs with top specialists should lead to better use of LAI antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  2. [The effects of case-based learning using video on clinical decision making and learning motivation in undergraduate nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Si-Ra

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of case-base learning (CBL) using video on clinical decision-making and learning motivation. This research was conducted between June 2009 and April 2010 as a nonequivalent control group non-synchronized design. The study population was 44 third year nursing students who enrolled in a college of nursing, A University in Korea. The nursing students were divided into the CBL and the control group. The intervention was the CBL with three cases using video. The controls attended a traditional live lecture on the same topics. With questionnaires objective clinical decision-making, subjective clinical decision-making, and learning motivation were measured before the intervention, and 10 weeks after the intervention. Significant group differences were observed in clinical decision-making and learning motivation. The post-test scores of clinical decision-making in the CBL group were statistically higher than the control group. Learning motivation was also significantly higher in the CBL group than in the control group. These results indicate that CBL using video is effective in enhancing clinical decision-making and motivating students to learn by encouraging self-directed learning and creating more interest and curiosity in learning.

  3. Factors that influence parental decisions to participate in clinical research: consenters vs nonconsenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Shaikh, Nader; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Kearney, Diana H; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kienholz, Michelle L; Wang, Li; Bunker, Clareann H; Keren, Ron; Carpenter, Myra A; Greenfield, Saul P; Pohl, Hans G; Mathews, Ranjiv; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Chesney, Russell W

    2013-06-01

    A child's health, positive perceptions of the research team and consent process, and altruistic motives play significant roles in the decision-making process for parents who consent for their child to enroll in clinical research. This study identified that nonconsenting parents were better educated, had private insurance, showed lower levels of altruism, and less understanding of study design. To determine the factors associated with parental consent for their child's participation in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Cross-sectional survey conducted from July 2008 to May 2011. The survey was an ancillary study to the Randomized Intervention for Children with VesicoUreteral Reflux Study. Seven children's hospitals participating in a randomized trial evaluating management of children with vesicoureteral reflux. Parents asked to provide consent for their child's participation in the randomized trial were invited to complete an anonymous online survey about factors influencing their decision. A total of 120 of the 271 (44%) invited completed the survey; 58 of 125 (46%) who had provided consent and 62 of 144 (43%) who had declined consent completed the survey. A 60-question survey examining child, parent, and study characteristics; parental perception of the study; understanding of the design; external influences; and decision-making process. RESULTS Having graduated from college and private health insurance were associated with a lower likelihood of providing consent. Parents who perceived the trial as having a low degree of risk, resulting in greater benefit to their child and other children, causing little interference with standard care, or exhibiting potential for enhanced care, or who perceived the researcher as professional were significantly more likely to consent to participate. Higher levels of understanding of the randomization process, blinding, and right to withdraw were significantly positively associated with consent to participate. CONCLUSIONS AND

  4. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology.

  5. Reasoning, evidence, and clinical decision-making: The great debate moves forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Michael; Bluhm, Robyn; Buetow, Stephen; Borgerson, Kirstin; Fuller, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    When the editorial to the first philosophy thematic edition of this journal was published in 2010, critical questioning of underlying assumptions, regarding such crucial issues as clinical decision making, practical reasoning, and the nature of evidence in health care, was still derided by some prominent contributors to the literature on medical practice. Things have changed dramatically. Far from being derided or dismissed as a distraction from practical concerns, the discussion of such fundamental questions, and their implications for matters of practical import, is currently the preoccupation of some of the most influential and insightful contributors to the on-going evidence-based medicine debate. Discussions focus on practical wisdom, evidence, and value and the relationship between rationality and context. In the debate about clinical practice, we are going to have to be more explicit and rigorous in future in developing and defending our views about what is valuable in human life. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Enhancing Worker Health Through Clinical Decision Support (CDS): An Introduction to a Compilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filios, Margaret S; Storey, Eileen; Baron, Sherry; Luensman, Genevieve B; Shiffman, Richard N

    2017-11-01

    This article outlines an approach to developing clinical decision support (CDS) for conditions related to work and health. When incorporated in electronic health records, such CDS will assist primary care providers (PCPs) care for working patients. Three groups of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) identified relevant clinical practice guidelines, best practices, and reviewed published literature concerning work-related asthma, return-to-work, and management of diabetes at work. SMEs developed one recommendation per topic that could be supported by electronic CDS. Reviews with PCPs, staff, and health information system implementers in five primary care settings confirmed that the approach was important and operationally sound. This compendium is intended to stimulate a dialogue between occupational health specialists and PCPs that will enhance the use of work information about patients in the primary care setting.

  7. Usability Testing of a Complex Clinical Decision Support Tool in the Emergency Department: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Anne; McCullagh, Lauren; Khan, Sundas; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-09-10

    As the electronic health record (EHR) becomes the preferred documentation tool across medical practices, health care organizations are pushing for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to help bring clinical decision support (CDS) tools to the forefront of patient-physician interactions. A CDSS is integrated into the EHR and allows physicians to easily utilize CDS tools. However, often CDSS are integrated into the EHR without an initial phase of usability testing, resulting in poor adoption rates. Usability testing is important because it evaluates a CDSS by testing it on actual users. This paper outlines the usability phase of a study, which will test the impact of integration of the Wells CDSS for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis into a large urban emergency department, where workflow is often chaotic and high stakes decisions are frequently made. We hypothesize that conducting usability testing prior to integration of the Wells score into an emergency room EHR will result in increased adoption rates by physicians. The objective of the study was to conduct usability testing for the integration of the Wells clinical prediction rule into a tertiary care center's emergency department EHR. We conducted usability testing of a CDS tool in the emergency department EHR. The CDS tool consisted of the Wells rule for PE in the form of a calculator and was triggered off computed tomography (CT) orders or patients' chief complaint. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Queens, New York. There were seven residents that were recruited and participated in two phases of usability testing. The usability testing employed a "think aloud" method and "near-live" clinical simulation, where care providers interacted with standardized patients enacting a clinical scenario. Both phases were audiotaped, video-taped, and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Phase I: Data from the "think-aloud" phase of the study showed an overall positive outlook on

  8. Integrating usability testing and think-aloud protocol analysis with "near-live" clinical simulations in evaluating clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alice C; Kannry, Joseph L; Kushniruk, Andre; Chrimes, Dillon; McGinn, Thomas G; Edonyabo, Daniel; Mann, Devin M

    2012-11-01

    Usability evaluations can improve the usability and workflow integration of clinical decision support (CDS). Traditional usability testing using scripted scenarios with think-aloud protocol analysis provide a useful but incomplete assessment of how new CDS tools interact with users and clinical workflow. "Near-live" clinical simulations are a newer usability evaluation tool that more closely mimics clinical workflow and that allows for a complementary evaluation of CDS usability as well as impact on workflow. This study employed two phases of testing a new CDS tool that embedded clinical prediction rules (an evidence-based medicine tool) into primary care workflow within a commercial electronic health record. Phase I applied usability testing involving "think-aloud" protocol analysis of 8 primary care providers encountering several scripted clinical scenarios. Phase II used "near-live" clinical simulations of 8 providers interacting with video clips of standardized trained patient actors enacting the clinical scenario. In both phases, all sessions were audiotaped and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Transcripts were coded using qualitative analysis methods. In Phase I, the impact of the CDS on navigation and workflow were associated with the largest volume of negative comments (accounting for over 90% of user raised issues) while the overall usability and the content of the CDS were associated with the most positive comments. However, usability had a positive-to-negative comment ratio of only 0.93 reflecting mixed perceptions about the usability of the CDS. In Phase II, the duration of encounters with simulated patients was approximately 12 min with 71% of the clinical prediction rules being activated after half of the visit had already elapsed. Upon activation, providers accepted the CDS tool pathway 82% of times offered and completed all of its elements in 53% of all simulation cases. Only 12.2% of encounter time was spent using the

  9. A mathematical model for interpretable clinical decision support with applications in gynecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya M C A Van Belle

    Full Text Available Over time, methods for the development of clinical decision support (CDS systems have evolved from interpretable and easy-to-use scoring systems to very complex and non-interpretable mathematical models. In order to accomplish effective decision support, CDS systems should provide information on how the model arrives at a certain decision. To address the issue of incompatibility between performance, interpretability and applicability of CDS systems, this paper proposes an innovative model structure, automatically leading to interpretable and easily applicable models. The resulting models can be used to guide clinicians when deciding upon the appropriate treatment, estimating patient-specific risks and to improve communication with patients.We propose the interval coded scoring (ICS system, which imposes that the effect of each variable on the estimated risk is constant within consecutive intervals. The number and position of the intervals are automatically obtained by solving an optimization problem, which additionally performs variable selection. The resulting model can be visualised by means of appealing scoring tables and color bars. ICS models can be used within software packages, in smartphone applications, or on paper, which is particularly useful for bedside medicine and home-monitoring. The ICS approach is illustrated on two gynecological problems: diagnosis of malignancy of ovarian tumors using a dataset containing 3,511 patients, and prediction of first trimester viability of pregnancies using a dataset of 1,435 women. Comparison of the performance of the ICS approach with a range of prediction models proposed in the literature illustrates the ability of ICS to combine optimal performance with the interpretability of simple scoring systems.The ICS approach can improve patient-clinician communication and will provide additional insights in the importance and influence of available variables. Future challenges include extensions of the

  10. On the use of computerised decision aids : an investigation into the expert system as persuasive communicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Jacob Jan

    2006-01-01

    The results of this study show that an expert system is a persuasive message source and that users tend to follow the advice of an expert system without critically examining it. Accordingly, users will probably not notice when an expert system gives incorrect advice. These facts comprise a serious

  11. Assessment of the sunk-cost effect in clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Jennifer A; Blumenthal-Barby, J S

    2012-07-01

    Despite the current push toward the practice of evidence-based medicine and comparative effectiveness research, clinicians' decisions may be influenced not only by evidence, but also by cognitive biases. A cognitive bias describes a tendency to make systematic errors in certain circumstances based on cognitive factors rather than evidence. Though health care providers have been shown in several studies to be susceptible to a variety of types of cognitive biases, research on the role of the sunk-cost bias in clinical decision-making is extremely limited. The sunk-cost bias is the tendency to pursue a course of action, even after it has proved to be suboptimal, because resources have been invested in that course of action. This study explores whether health care providers' medical treatment recommendations are affected by prior investments in a course of treatment. Specifically, we surveyed 389 health care providers in a large urban medical center in the United States during August 2009. We asked participants to make a treatment recommendation based on one of four hypothetical clinical scenarios that varied in the source and type of prior investment described. By comparing recommendations across scenarios, we found that providers did not demonstrate a sunk-cost effect; rather, they demonstrated a significant tendency to over-compensate for the effect. In addition, we found that more than one in ten health care providers recommended continuation of an ineffective treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are clinical decisions in endodontics influenced by the patient's fee-paying status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, I; Gilbert, D; Asimakopoulou, K

    2015-12-01

    We explored whether the fee status of a UK patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontics. In a randomised-controlled vignette study describing either an 'NHS-funded', 'Privately-funded' or undisclosed fee-status patient, we examined the importance vocational trainer dentists placed on a series of factors normally considered when deciding whether to offer patients endodontic treatment as opposed to extracting the tooth. N = 119 experienced (M years post qualification = 20.01) dentists participated. Having read a vignette describing a hypothetical patient who could potentially be treated either endodontically or through an extraction, dentists rated a series of factors they would normally consider (for example, poor oral hygiene, the rest of their mouth is unfilled and caries-free), before recommending either endodontic treatment or an extraction. The patient's funding status had no influence on these dentists' clinical decision-making when considering endodontic treatment as an option (p >0.05) with the exception of a single item relating to infrequent attendance where the NHS patient was more likely than the 'undisclosed-fee' patient, to be offered extractions (F (2, 116) 3.43, p endodontic treatment by experienced dentists.

  13. [Clinical decision making: Fostering critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process through case studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Staub, Maria; Stuker-Studer, Ursula

    2006-10-01

    Case studies, based on actual patients' situations, provide a method of clinical decision making to foster critical thinking in nurses. This paper describes the method and process of group case studies applied in continuous education settings. This method bases on Balints' case supervision and was further developed and combined with the nursing diagnostic process. A case study contains different phases: Pre-phase, selection phase, case delineation and case work. The case provider narratively tells the situation of a patient. This allows the group to analyze and cluster signs and symptoms, to state nursing diagnoses and to derive nursing interventions. Results of the case study are validated by applying the theoretical background and critical appraisal of the case provider. Learning effects of the case studies were evaluated by means of qualitative questionnaires and analyzed according to Mayring. Findings revealed the following categories: a) Patients' problems are perceived in a patient centred way, accurate nursing diagnoses are stated and effective nursing interventions implemented. b) Professional nursing tasks are more purposefully perceived and named more precise. c) Professional nursing relationship, communication and respectful behaviour with patients were perceived in differentiated ways. The theoretical framework is described in the paper "Clinical decision making and critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process". (Müller-Staub, 2006).

  14. A point-of-care chemistry test for reduction of turnaround and clinical decision time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eui Jung; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Kim, Seong Chun; Cho, Jin Seong; Lee, Seung Chul; Park, Ju Ok; Cha, Won Chul

    2011-06-01

    Our study compared clinical decision time between patients managed with a point-of-care chemistry test (POCT) and patients managed with the traditional central laboratory test (CLT). This was a randomized controlled multicenter trial in the emergency departments (EDs) of 5 academic teaching hospitals. We randomly assigned patients to POCT or CLT stratified by the Emergency Severity Index. A POCT chemistry analyzer (Piccolo; Abaxis, Inc, Union City, Calif), which is able to test liver panel, renal panel, pancreas enzymes, lipid panel, electrolytes, and blood gases, was set up in each ED. Primary and secondary end point was turnaround time and door-to-clinical-decision time. The total 2323 patients were randomly assigned to the POCT group (n = 1167) or to the CLT group (n = 1156). All of the basic characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. The turnaround time (median, interquartile range [IQR]) of the POCT group was shorter than that of the CLT group (14, 12-19 versus 55, 45-69 minutes; P CLT group (46, 33-61 versus 86, 68-107 minutes; P CLT group (P CLT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrative review of clinical decision support for registered nurses in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn Lopez, Karen; Gephart, Sheila M; Raszewski, Rebecca; Sousa, Vanessa; Shehorn, Lauren E; Abraham, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    To report on the state of the science of clinical decision support (CDS) for hospital bedside nurses. We performed an integrative review of qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed original research studies using a structured search of PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Applied Health Literature (CINAHL), Scopus, Web of Science, and IEEE Xplore (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library). We included articles that reported on CDS targeting bedside nurses and excluded in stages based on rules for titles, abstracts, and full articles. We extracted research design and methods, CDS purpose, electronic health record integration, usability, and process and patient outcomes. Our search yielded 3157 articles. After removing duplicates and applying exclusion rules, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies were single-site, descriptive or qualitative (43%) or quasi-experimental (36%). There was only 1 randomized controlled trial. The purpose of most CDS was to support diagnostic decision-making (36%), guideline adherence (32%), medication management (29%), and situational awareness (25%). All the studies that included process outcomes (7) and usability outcomes (4) and also had analytic procedures to detect changes in outcomes demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Three of 4 studies that included patient outcomes and also had analytic procedures to detect change showed statistically significant improvements. No negative effects of CDS were found on process, usability, or patient outcomes. Clinical support systems targeting bedside nurses have positive effects on outcomes and hold promise for improving care quality; however, this research is lagging behind studies of CDS targeting medical decision-making in both volume and level of evidence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  16. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Welch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequence (WGS information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR. A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1 each component of the architecture; (2 the interaction of the components; and (3 how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  17. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-04

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  18. Clinical Decision Support: a 25 Year Retrospective and a 25 Year Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B; Sittig, D F; Wright, A

    2016-08-02

    The objective of this review is to summarize the state of the art of clinical decision support (CDS) circa 1990, review progress in the 25 year interval from that time, and provide a vision of what CDS might look like 25 years hence, or circa 2040. Informal review of the medical literature with iterative review and discussion among the authors to arrive at six axes (data, knowledge, inference, architecture and technology, implementation and integration, and users) to frame the review and discussion of selected barriers and facilitators to the effective use of CDS. In each of the six axes, significant progress has been made. Key advances in structuring and encoding standardized data with an increased availability of data, development of knowledge bases for CDS, and improvement of capabilities to share knowledge artifacts, explosion of methods analyzing and inferring from clinical data, evolution of information technologies and architectures to facilitate the broad application of CDS, improvement of methods to implement CDS and integrate CDS into the clinical workflow, and increasing sophistication of the end-user, all have played a role in improving the effective use of CDS in healthcare delivery. CDS has evolved dramatically over the past 25 years and will likely evolve just as dramatically or more so over the next 25 years. Increasingly, the clinical encounter between a clinician and a patient will be supported by a wide variety of cognitive aides to support diagnosis, treatment, care-coordination, surveillance and prevention, and health maintenance or wellness.

  19. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    , and logistical concerns. Ensuring data security and protection of patient rights while simultaneously facilitating standardization is paramount to maintaining public support. The capabilities of supercomputing need to be applied strategically. A standardized, methodological implementation must be applied to developed artificial intelligence systems with the ability to integrate data and information into clinically relevant knowledge. Ultimately, the integration of bioinformatics and clinical data in a clinical decision support system promises precision medicine and cost effective and personalized patient care.

  20. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs. PMID:21816958

  1. Design and implementation of a decision support system for breast cancer treatment based on clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skevofilakas, M.T.; Nikita, K.S.; Templaleksis, P.H.; Birbas, K.N.; Kaklamanos, I.G.; Bonatsos, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is the clinical practice that uses medical data and proof in order to make efficient clinical decisions. Information technology (IT) can play a crucial role in exploiting the huge size of raw medical data involved. In an attempt to improve clinical efficacy, health care society nowadays also utilizes a new assistant, clinical guidelines. Our research concerns the medical domain of the breast cancer disease. Our research's focus is twofold; our primary goal is to ensure consistency in clinical practice by importing clinical guidelines in an IT driven decision support system (DSS). Furthermore, we seek to improve visualization of disease specific, clinical data, providing for it's faster and more efficient use. (orig.)

  2. Exploring a Laboratory Model of Pharmacogenetics as Applied to Clinical Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Smith, PharmD Candidate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate a pilot of a laboratory model for relating pharmacogenetics to clinical decision making. Case Study: This pilot was undertaken and evaluated to help determine if a pharmacogenetics laboratory should be included in the core Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. The placement of the laboratory exercise in the curriculum was determined by identifying the point in the curriculum where the students had been introduced to the chemistry of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA as well as instructed on the chemistry of genetic variation. The laboratory included cytochrome P450 2C19 genotyping relative to the *2 variant. Twenty-four students served as the pilot group. Students provided buccal swabs as the source of DNA. Students stabilized the samples and were then provided instructions related to sample preparation, polymerase chain reaction, and gel electrophoresis. The results were reported as images of gels. Students used a reference gel image to compare their results to. Students then applied a dosing algorithm to make a “clinical decision” relative to clopidogrel use. Students were offered a post laboratory survey regarding attitudes toward the laboratory. Twenty-four students completed the laboratory with genotyping results being provided for 22 students (91.7%. Sixteen students were wild-type (*1/*1, while six students were heterozygous (*1/*2. Twenty-three students (96% completed the post laboratory survey. All 23 agreed (6, 26.1% or strongly agreed (17, 73.9% that the laboratory “had relevance and value in the pharmacy curriculum”. Conclusion: The post pilot study survey exploring a laboratory model for pharmacogenetics related to clinical decision making indicated that such a laboratory would be viewed positively by students. This model may be adopted by colleges to expand pharmacogenetics education.

  3. mHealth for Clinical Decision-Making in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade; Albersen, Bregje Joanna Antonia; De Brouwere, Vincent; van Roosmalen, Jos; Zweekhorst, Marjolein

    2017-03-23

    In a bid to deliver quality health services in resource-poor settings, mobile health (mHealth) is increasingly being adopted. The role of mHealth in facilitating evidence-based clinical decision-making through data collection, decision algorithms, and evidence-based guidelines, for example, is established in resource-rich settings. However, the extent to which mobile clinical decision support systems (mCDSS) have been adopted specifically in resource-poor settings such as Africa and the lessons learned about their use in such settings are yet to be established. The aim of this study was to synthesize evidence on the use of mHealth for point-of-care decision support and improved quality of care by health care workers in Africa. A scoping review of 4 peer-reviewed and 1 grey literature databases was conducted. No date limits were applied, but only articles in English language were selected. Using pre-established criteria, 2 reviewers screened articles and extracted data. Articles were analyzed using Microsoft Excel and MAXQDA. We retained 22 articles representing 11 different studies in 7 sub-Saharan African countries. Interventions were mainly in the domain of maternal health and ranged from simple text messaging (short message service, SMS) to complex multicomponent interventions. Although health workers are generally supportive of mCDSS and perceive them as useful, concerns about increased workload and altered workflow hinder sustainability. Facilitators and barriers to use of mCDSS include technical and infrastructural support, ownership, health system challenges, and training. The use of mCDSS in sub-Saharan Africa is an indication of progress in mHealth, although their effect on quality of service delivery is yet to be fully explored. Lessons learned are useful for informing future research, policy, and practice for technologically supported health care delivery, especially in resource-poor settings. ©Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade Adepoju, Bregje Joanna Antonia

  4. Physicians' perception of alternative displays of clinical research evidence for clinical decision support - A study with case vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slager, Stacey L; Weir, Charlene R; Kim, Heejun; Mostafa, Javed; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2017-07-01

    To design alternate information displays that present summaries of clinical trial results to clinicians to support decision-making; and to compare the displays according to efficacy and acceptability. A 6-between (information display presentation order) by 3-within (display type) factorial design. Two alternate displays were designed based on Information Foraging theory: a narrative summary that reduces the content to a few sentences; and a table format that structures the display according to the PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) framework. The designs were compared with the summary display format available in PubMed. Physicians were asked to review five clinical studies retrieved for a case vignette; and were presented with the three display formats. Participants were asked to rate their experience with each of the information displays according to a Likert scale questionnaire. Twenty physicians completed the study. Overall, participants rated the table display more highly than either the text summary or PubMed's summary format (5.9vs. 5.4vs. 3.9 on a scale between 1 [strongly disagree] and 7 [strongly agree]). Usefulness ratings of seven pieces of information, i.e. patient population, patient age range, sample size, study arm, primary outcome, results of primary outcome, and conclusion, were high (average across all items=4.71 on a 1 to 5 scale, with 1=not at all useful and 5=very useful). Study arm, primary outcome, and conclusion scored the highest (4.9, 4.85, and 4.85 respectively). Participants suggested additional details such as rate of adverse effects. The table format reduced physicians' perceived cognitive effort when quickly reviewing clinical trial information and was more favorably received by physicians than the narrative summary or PubMed's summary format display. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The computerised accountancy system (MYDAS) for irradiated components in RNL's Mayfair Laboratory at Culcheth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, R.G.; Baker, A.R.

    1985-09-01

    The computerised Mayfair Accountancy System (MYDAS) has been developed to account for irradiated components in the Mayfair Laboratory at Culcheth and supersedes a card-index system. The computerised system greatly improves the availability of the data held and it ensures, by means of extensive data validation programs, that the data accurately represent the current inventory of irradiated components in the Laboratory. The system has been implemented on the Risley ICL 2966 main-frame computer and uses an IDMS database to store the data. The computer is accessed through the facilities of the Transaction Processing Management System (TPMS) providing rapid and secure access to the database from several visual display units and printers simultaneously. (author)

  6. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Slosky

    2014-01-01

    participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population.

  7. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime...

  8. "Think aloud" and "Near live" usability testing of two complex clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Safiya; Mishuris, Rebecca; O'Connell, Alexander; Feldstein, David; Hess, Rachel; Smith, Paul; McCullagh, Lauren; McGinn, Thomas; Mann, Devin

    2017-10-01

    Low provider adoption continues to be a significant barrier to realizing the potential of clinical decision support. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing were conducted on two clinical decision support tools. Each was composed of an alert, a clinical prediction rule which estimated risk of either group A Streptococcus pharyngitis or pneumonia and an automatic order set based on risk. The objective of this study was to further understanding of the facilitators of usability and to evaluate the types of additional information gained from proceeding to "Near Live" testing after completing "Think Aloud". This was a qualitative observational study conducted at a large academic health care system with 12 primary care providers. During "Think Aloud" testing, participants were provided with written clinical scenarios and asked to verbalize their thought process while interacting with the tool. During "Near Live" testing participants interacted with a mock patient. Morae usability software was used to record full screen capture and audio during every session. Participant comments were placed into coding categories and analyzed for generalizable themes. Themes were compared across usability methods. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing generated similar themes under the coding categories visibility, workflow, content, understand-ability and navigation. However, they generated significantly different themes under the coding categories usability, practical usefulness and medical usefulness. During both types of testing participants found the tool easier to use when important text was distinct in its appearance, alerts were passive and appropriately timed, content was up to date, language was clear and simple, and each component of the tool included obvious indicators of next steps. Participant comments reflected higher expectations for usability and usefulness during "Near Live" testing. For example, visit aids, such as automatically generated order sets

  9. [Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine? Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M

    2013-08-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than evidence generated by traditional randomized clinical trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on CER is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  10. Decision-making models in the analysis of portal films: a clinical pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, A.; Johansen, J.; Hamilton, C.; Bydder, S.A.; Hawkins, J.; Roff, M.; Denham, J.; Kron, T.

    2000-01-01

    Portal films continue to play an important role in the verification of radiotherapy treatment. There is still some discussion, however, as to what action should be taken after a port film has shown a radiation field deviation from the prescribed volume. It was the aim of the present pilot study to investigate the performance of three decision-making models ('Amsterdam', 'Quebec' and 'Newcastle') and an expert panel basing their decision on intuition rather than formal rules after portal film acquisition in a clinical setting. Portal films were acquired on every day during the first week of treatment for five head and neck and five prostate cancer patients (diagnostic phase). If required, the field position was modified according to our normal practice following the recommendation of the expert panel. In order to analyse the results of the models, however, additional port films were taken in the following 3 treatment weeks with the patient moved as required by the different models (intervention phase). The portal films were taken over 4 consecutive days, positioning the patient according to each of the different models on one day each. None of the models diagnosed a field misplacement in the head and neck patients, while the 'Amsterdam' and 'Quebec' models predicted a move in one prostate patient. The 'Newcastle' model, which is based on Hotelling's T 2 statistic, proved to be more sensitive and diagnosed a systematic displacement for three prostate patients. The intervention phase confirmed the diagnosis of the model, even if the three portal films taken with the patient position adjusted as required by the model proved to be insufficient to demonstrate an improvement. The 'Newcastle' model does not rely on assumptions about the random movement of patients and requires five portal films before a decision can be reached. This approach lends itself well to incorporation into electronic portal imaging 'packages', where repeated image acquisitions present no logistical

  11. Implementation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support Application to Augment Local Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian M; Ford, Diana C; Ince, Dilek; Ernst, Erika J; Livorsi, Daniel J; Heintz, Brett H; Masse, Vincent; Brownlee, Michael J; Ford, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Medical applications for mobile devices allow clinicians to leverage microbiological data and standardized guidelines to treat patients with infectious diseases. We report the implementation of a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) application to augment local antimicrobial stewardship. We detail the implementation of our mobile CDS application over 20 months. Application utilization data were collected and evaluated using descriptive statistics to quantify the impact of our implementation. Project initiation focused on engaging key stakeholders, developing a business case, and selecting a mobile platform. The preimplementation phase included content development, creation of a pathway for content approval within the hospital committee structure, engaging clinical leaders, and formatting the first version of the guide. Implementation involved a media campaign, staff education, and integration within the electronic medical record and hospital mobile devices. The postimplementation phase required ongoing quality improvement, revision of outdated content, and repeated staff education. The evaluation phase included a guide utilization analysis, reporting to hospital leadership, and sustainability and innovation planning. The mobile application was downloaded 3056 times and accessed 9259 times during the study period. The companion web viewer was accessed 8214 times. Successful implementation of a customizable mobile CDS tool enabled our team to expand beyond microbiological data to clinical diagnosis, treatment, and antimicrobial stewardship, broadening our influence on antimicrobial prescribing and incorporating utilization data to inspire new quality and safety initiatives. Further studies are needed to assess the impact on antimicrobial utilization, infection control measures, and patient care outcomes.

  12. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  13. Comparing three methods of computerised cognitive training for older adults with subclinical cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Amanda L; Choi, Jimmy; Fiszdon, Joanna M; Wilkins, Kirsten; Kirwin, Paul D; van Dyck, Christopher H; Devanand, Davangere; Bell, Morris D; Rivera Mindt, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer's disease is readily available to the geriatric population. Initial evidence suggests that techniques incorporating motivational strategies to enhance treatment engagement may provide more benefit than computerised training alone. Seventy four adults with subclinical cognitive decline were randomly assigned to computerised cognitive training (CCT), Cognitive Vitality Training (CVT), or an Active Control Group (ACG), and underwent neuropsychological evaluations at baseline and four-month follow-up. Significant differences were found in changes in performance on the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (mMMSE) and measures of verbal learning and memory across treatment groups. Experimental groups showed greater preservation of functioning on the mMMSE than the ACG group, the CVT group performed better than the ACG group on one measure of verbal learning and both measures of verbal memory, and the CCT group performed better than the ACG group on one measure of verbal learning and one measure of verbal memory. There were no significant group differences between the CVT and CCT groups on measures of verbal learning or memory. It was concluded that computerised cognitive training may offer the most benefit when incorporated into a therapeutic milieu rather than administered alone, although both appear superior to more generic forms of cognitive stimulation.

  14. A systematic review of computerised serious educational games about alcohol and other drugs for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Daniel M; Teesson, Maree; Newton, Nicola C

    2014-03-01

    Serious educational games (SEG) have been shown to be effective in educating young people about a range of topics, including languages and maths. This paper identifies the use of computerised SEGs in education about alcohol and other drugs and reviews their impact on the prevention of alcohol and drug use. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, ERIC, Scopus, psychINFO, pubMED and DRUG databases were searched in February 2013. Additional publications were obtained from the reference lists of the relevant papers. Studies were included if they described an evaluation of a computerised SEG that targeted alcohol and/or other drugs and had been trialled with adolescents. Eight SEGs were identified targeting tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, methamphetamine, ecstasy, inhalants, cocaine and opioids. Six reported positive outcomes in terms of increased content knowledge and two reported increased negative attitudes towards the targeted drugs. Only one reported a decrease in the frequency of drug use. This is the first review of the efficacy of computerised SEGs for alcohol and other drugs for adolescents. Results suggest that SEGs can increase content knowledge of alcohol and other drugs. Evidence concerning impacts on negative attitudes and alcohol and drug use is limited, with few studies examining these outcomes. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  15. Surgical and Clinical Decision Making in Isolated Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Krauss, Emily M; Felder, John M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy results in scapular winging and destabilization. In this study, we review the surgical management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy and suggest a surgical technique and treatment algorithm to simplify management. In total, 19 patients who required surgery for an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative demographics, electromyography (EMG), and physical examinations were reviewed. Intraoperative nerve stimulation, surgical decision making, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. In total, 19 patients with an average age of 32 were included in the study. All patients had an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy caused by either an injury (58%), Parsonage-Turner syndrome (32%), or shoulder surgery (10%); 18 patients (95%) underwent preoperative EMG; 10 with evidence of denervation (56%); and 13 patients had motor unit potentials in the serratus anterior (72%). The preoperative EMG did not correlate with intraoperative nerve stimulation in 13 patients (72%) and did correlate in 5 patients (28%); 3 patients had a nerve transfer (3 thoracodorsal to long thoracic at lateral chest, 1 pec to long thoracic at supraclavicular incision). In the 3 patients who had a nerve transfer, there was return of full forward flexion of the shoulder at an average of 2.5 months. A treatment algorithm based on intraoperative nerve stimulation will help guide surgeons in their clinical decision making in patients with isolated long thoracic nerve palsy. Intraoperative nerve stimulation is the gold standard in the management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy.

  16. Clinical decision support system for early detection of prostate cancer from benign hyperplasia of prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderzadeh, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    There has been a growing research interest in the use of intelligent methods in medical informatics studies. Intelligent computer programs were implemented to aid physicians and other medical professionals in making difficult medical decisions. Prostate Neoplasia problems including benign hyperplasia and cancer of prostate are very common and cause significant delay in recovery and often require costly investigations before coming to its diagnosis. The conventional approach to build medical diagnostic system requires the formulation of rules by which the input data can be analyzed. But the formulation of such rules is very difficult with large sets of input data. Realizing the difficulty, a number of quantitative mathematical and statistical models including pattern classification technique such as Artificial neural networks (ANN), rolled based system, discriminate analysis and regression analysis has been applied as an alternative to conventional clinical and medical diagnostic. Among the mathematical and statistical modeling techniques used in medical decision support, Artificial neural networks attract many attentions in recent studies and in the last decade, the use of neural networks has become widely accepted in medical applications. This is manifested by an increasing number of medical devices currently available on the market with embedded AI algorithms, together with an accelerating pace of publication in medical journals, with over 500 academic publications year featuring Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs).

  17. Adapting Cognitive Task Analysis to Investigate Clinical Decision Making and Medication Safety Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Militello, Laura G; Glassman, Peter A; Arthur, Karen J; Zillich, Alan J; Weiner, Michael

    2017-05-03

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) can yield valuable insights into healthcare professionals' cognition and inform system design to promote safe, quality care. Our objective was to adapt CTA-the critical decision method, specifically-to investigate patient safety incidents, overcome barriers to implementing this method, and facilitate more widespread use of cognitive task analysis in healthcare. We adapted CTA to facilitate recruitment of healthcare professionals and developed a data collection tool to capture incidents as they occurred. We also leveraged the electronic health record (EHR) to expand data capture and used EHR-stimulated recall to aid reconstruction of safety incidents. We investigated 3 categories of medication-related incidents: adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug-disease interactions. Healthcare professionals submitted incidents, and a subset of incidents was selected for CTA. We analyzed several outcomes to characterize incident capture and completed CTA interviews. We captured 101 incidents. Eighty incidents (79%) met eligibility criteria. We completed 60 CTA interviews, 20 for each incident category. Capturing incidents before interviews allowed us to shorten the interview duration and reduced reliance on healthcare professionals' recall. Incorporating the EHR into CTA enriched data collection. The adapted CTA technique was successful in capturing specific categories of safety incidents. Our approach may be especially useful for investigating safety incidents that healthcare professionals "fix and forget." Our innovations to CTA are expected to expand the application of this method in healthcare and inform a wide range of studies on clinical decision making and patient safety.

  18. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Change-Point Detection Method for Clinical Decision Support System Rule Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Wright, Adam; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2017-06-01

    A clinical decision support system (CDSS) and its components can malfunction due to various reasons. Monitoring the system and detecting its malfunctions can help one to avoid any potential mistakes and associated costs. In this paper, we investigate the problem of detecting changes in the CDSS operation, in particular its monitoring and alerting subsystem, by monitoring its rule firing counts. The detection should be performed online, that is whenever a new datum arrives, we want to have a score indicating how likely there is a change in the system. We develop a new method based on Seasonal-Trend decomposition and likelihood ratio statistics to detect the changes. Experiments on real and simulated data show that our method has a lower delay in detection compared with existing change-point detection methods.

  20. The Development of a Clinical Decision Support System for the Management of Pediatric Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Alana K; Dyer, Ashley A; Warren, Christopher M; Walkner, Madeline; Smith, Bridget M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2017-06-01

    Pediatricians are often first-line providers for children with food allergy. Food allergy management guidelines have been developed but are cumbersome and confusing, and significant variation exists in pediatricians' management practices. We therefore consolidated the guidelines into 5 key steps for pediatricians caring for patients with food allergy and used rapid-cycle improvement methods to create a clinical decision support system to facilitate the management of food allergy in the primary care setting. This report details the development of the Food Allergy Support Tool (FAST), its pilot testing in 4 primary care pediatric practices, and our ongoing efforts to improve its utility and ease of use. Key themes identified during these processes include the importance of both initial and ongoing provider education as well as the limitations of a tool that must be actively initiated by providers.

  1. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS.

  2. An integrated review of the correlation between critical thinking ability and clinical decision-making in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daphne Sk; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Ong, Swee Leong

    2017-12-01

    To explore whether there is a correlation between critical thinking ability and clinical decision-making among nurses. Critical thinking is currently considered as an essential component of nurses' professional judgement and clinical decision-making. If confirmed, nursing curricula may be revised emphasising on critical thinking with the expectation to improve clinical decision-making and thus better health care. Integrated literature review. The integrative review was carried out after a comprehensive literature search using electronic databases Ovid, EBESCO MEDLINE, EBESCO CINAHL, PROQuest and Internet search engine Google Scholar. Two hundred and 22 articles from January 1980 to end of 2015 were retrieved. All studies evaluating the relationship between critical thinking and clinical decision-making, published in English language with nurses or nursing students as the study population, were included. No qualitative studies were found investigating the relationship between critical thinking and clinical decision-making, while 10 quantitative studies met the inclusion criteria and were further evaluated using the Quality Assessment and Validity Tool. As a result, one study was excluded due to a low-quality score, with the remaining nine accepted for this review. Four of nine studies established a positive relationship between critical thinking and clinical decision-making. Another five studies did not demonstrate a significant correlation. The lack of refinement in studies' design and instrumentation were arguably the main reasons for the inconsistent results. Research studies yielded contradictory results as regard to the relationship between critical thinking and clinical decision-making; therefore, the evidence is not convincing. Future quantitative studies should have representative sample size, use critical thinking measurement tools related to the healthcare sector and evaluate the predisposition of test takers towards their willingness and ability to think

  3. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, M.; Lamers, R.E.D.; Kil, P.J.M.; The, R.; Karssen, K.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; de Vries, M.

    2018-01-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting.

  4. Clinical decision - making review on magnetic attachments versus mechanical attachments in dental prosthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fabiano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Conventional dentures in edentulous patients show some limitations due to the lack of retention, support and stability thus resulting in difficulty to chew. The modern implantology allows to use different implant overdentures and different attachment systems. The selection of the attachment by practitioners is mainly influenced by the clinical experience or technical preferences. Aims The aim of the present review is to provide an adequate background to the clinicians, in order to select the prosthetic attachments according to the current literature. The mechanical attachments have been compared to the magnetic devices, with the aim to guide the decision of the practitioners. Methods Articles topics selection was based on the use of magnetic attachments in dentistry and the comparison between them and mechanical connectors. The databases used were PubMed/MEDLINE, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science. A critical evaluation of the selected paper has been made to choose the ones that matched the inclusion criteria. Results Nowadays, few studies have compared different attachments in a manner useful for clinical decision-making. The main problem limiting long-term durability of magnetic attachments in the oral fluid is the poor corrosion resistance of permanent magnets and the consequent leaching of cytotoxic ions. Conclusion Magnetic attachments in comparison with other attaching systems can be useful in patients with special needs, in patients with limited interocclusal space, or in patients with neuromuscular limitations, thanks to the automatic reseating properties. However, it’s important to highlight that the mechanical attachments still represent the best choice in common conditions requiring dental prostheses.

  5. Computerised tomographic patterns in patients with head injury at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-15

    Apr 15, 2011 ... The clinical severity of head injury is classified based on ... head injury include road traffic accidents (RTA), assaults, ... information in the management of patients with head ... Materials and Methods ... The right cerebral hemisphere was involved in 13 cases .... Nerve palsies – 3rd, 5th, 6th cranial nerves. 3.

  6. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: A pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Bruins, Marjan; Ruijs, G.; Wolfhagen, M.J.H.M.; Bloembergen, Peter; Aarts, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant ...

  7. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, I.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  8. A decision support system for firebase location in a nature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-04-19

    Apr 19, 2017 ... implemented in the form of a computerised decision support system ... seven Department of Water Affairs and Forestry reserves (spanning an area of 118km2), ... and the solution methodology of §4 are then incorporated into a ...

  9. Many faces of rationality: Implications of the great rationality debate for clinical decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Djulbegovic, B.; Elqayam, Shira

    2017-01-01

    open access article Given that more than 30% of healthcare costs are wasted on inappropriate care, suboptimal care is increasingly connected to the quality of medical decisions. It has been argued that personal decisions are the leading cause of death, and 80% of healthcare expenditures result from physicians' decisions. Therefore, improving healthcare necessitates improving medical decisions, ie, making decisions (more) rational. Drawing on writings fromThe Great Rationality Debate from t...

  10. A qualitative study of decision-making on Phase III randomized clinical trial participation in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingersgaard, Marianne Vie; Tulstrup, Morten; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To explore parents' and adolescents' motives for accepting/declining participation in the ALL2008 trials and adolescents' involvement in the decision-making process. BACKGROUND: Children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated on the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology...... the adolescents' decision. There were no differences between motivations of preferences held by parents of children or adolescents, respectively. Decisions were based on subjective values attributed to cure contra toxicity and individual preferences for either standard or experimental treatment. The possibility....... FINDINGS: Adolescents and parents emphasized the importance of adolescents' active participation in decisions regarding enrolment into clinical trials. A majority of adolescents were either final or collaborative decision-makers. Parents stated that in case of disagreement, they would overrule...

  11. Inter-laboratory agreement on embryo classification and clinical decision: Conventional morphological assessment vs. time lapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granados, Luis; Serrano, María; González-Utor, Antonio; Ortíz, Nereyda; Badajoz, Vicente; Olaya, Enrique; Prados, Nicolás; Boada, Montse; Castilla, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine inter-laboratory variability on embryo assessment using time-lapse platform and conventional morphological assessment. This study compares the data obtained from a pilot study of external quality control (EQC) of time lapse, performed in 2014, with the classical EQC of the Spanish Society for the Study of Reproductive Biology (ASEBIR) performed in 2013 and 2014. In total, 24 laboratories (8 using EmbryoScope™, 15 using Primo Vision™ and one with both platforms) took part in the pilot study. The clinics that used EmbryoScope™ analysed 31 embryos and those using Primo Vision™ analysed 35. The classical EQC was implemented by 39 clinics, based on an analysis of 25 embryos per year. Both groups were required to evaluate various qualitative morphological variables (cell fragmentation, the presence of vacuoles, blastomere asymmetry and multinucleation), to classify the embryos in accordance with ASEBIR criteria and to stipulate the clinical decision taken. In the EQC time-lapse pilot study, the groups were asked to determine, as well as the above characteristics, the embryo development times, the number, opposition and size of pronuclei, the direct division of 1 into 3 cells and/or of 3 into 5 cells and false divisions. The degree of agreement was determined by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficients and the coefficient of variation for the quantitative variables and the Gwet index for the qualitative variables. For both EmbryoScope™ and Primo Vision™, two periods of greater inter-laboratory variability were observed in the times of embryo development events. One peak of variability was recorded among the laboratories addressing the first embryo events (extrusion of the second polar body and the appearance of pronuclei); the second peak took place between the times corresponding to the 8-cell and morula stages. In most of the qualitative variables analysed regarding embryo development, there was almost

  12. Inter-laboratory agreement on embryo classification and clinical decision: Conventional morphological assessment vs. time lapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martínez-Granados

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine inter-laboratory variability on embryo assessment using time-lapse platform and conventional morphological assessment. This study compares the data obtained from a pilot study of external quality control (EQC of time lapse, performed in 2014, with the classical EQC of the Spanish Society for the Study of Reproductive Biology (ASEBIR performed in 2013 and 2014. In total, 24 laboratories (8 using EmbryoScope™, 15 using Primo Vision™ and one with both platforms took part in the pilot study. The clinics that used EmbryoScope™ analysed 31 embryos and those using Primo Vision™ analysed 35. The classical EQC was implemented by 39 clinics, based on an analysis of 25 embryos per year. Both groups were required to evaluate various qualitative morphological variables (cell fragmentation, the presence of vacuoles, blastomere asymmetry and multinucleation, to classify the embryos in accordance with ASEBIR criteria and to stipulate the clinical decision taken. In the EQC time-lapse pilot study, the groups were asked to determine, as well as the above characteristics, the embryo development times, the number, opposition and size of pronuclei, the direct division of 1 into 3 cells and/or of 3 into 5 cells and false divisions. The degree of agreement was determined by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficients and the coefficient of variation for the quantitative variables and the Gwet index for the qualitative variables. For both EmbryoScope™ and Primo Vision™, two periods of greater inter-laboratory variability were observed in the times of embryo development events. One peak of variability was recorded among the laboratories addressing the first embryo events (extrusion of the second polar body and the appearance of pronuclei; the second peak took place between the times corresponding to the 8-cell and morula stages. In most of the qualitative variables analysed regarding embryo development, there

  13. Treatment selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer: the role of the patient in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, S; Nuyttens, J J M E; de Mol, M; Aerts, J G J V; Maat, A P W M; Birim, Ö; Bogers, A J J C; Takkenberg, J J M

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role and experience of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient in decision making process concerning treatment selection in the current clinical practice. Stage I-II NSCLC patients (surgery 55 patients, SBRT 29 patients, median age 68) were included in this prospective study and completed a questionnaire that explored: (1) perceived patient knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, (2) experience with current clinical decision making, and (3) the information that the patient reported to have received from their treating physician. This was assessed by multiple-choice, 1-5 Likert Scale, and open questions. The Decisional Conflict Scale was used to assess the decisional conflict. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured with SF-36 questionnaire. In 19% of patients, there was self-reported perceived lack of knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options. Seventy-four percent of patients felt that they were sufficiently involved in decision-making by their physician, and 81% found it important to be involved in decision making. Forty percent experienced decisional conflict, and one-in-five patients to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. Subscores with regard to feeling uninformed and on uncertainty, contributed the most to decisional conflict, as 36% felt uninformed and 17% of patients were not satisfied with their decision. HRQoL was not influenced by patient experience with decision-making or patient preferences for shared decision making. Dutch early-stage NSCLC patients find it important to be involved in treatment decision making. Yet a substantial proportion experiences decisional conflict and feels uninformed. Better patient information and/or involvement in treatment-decision-making is needed in order to improve patient knowledge and hopefully reduce decisional conflict.

  14. Decision-Making Process Related to Participation in Phase I Clinical Trials: A Nonsystematic Review of the Existing Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of other treatment options, patient candidates for participation in phase I clinical trials are considered the most vulnerable, and many ethical concerns have emerged regarding the informed consent process used in the experimental design of such trials. Starting with these considerations, this nonsystematic review is aimed at analyzing the decision-making processes underlying patients' decision about whether to participate (or not) in phase I trials in order to clarify the cognitive and emotional aspects most strongly implicated in this decision. Considering that there is no uniform decision calculus and that many different variables other than the patient-physician relationship (including demographic, clinical, and personal characteristics) may influence patients' preferences for and processing of information, we conclude that patients' informed decision-making can be facilitated by creating a rigorously developed, calibrated, and validated computer tool modeled on each single patient's knowledge, values, and emotional and cognitive decisional skills. Such a tool will also help oncologists to provide tailored medical information that is useful to improve the shared decision-making process, thereby possibly increasing patient participation in clinical trials. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine?- Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Bm, Berman

    2012-10-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of the best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than the evidence generated by traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on comparative effectiveness is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  16. Reducing duplicate testing: a comparison of two clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, Gary W; Keating, Catherine; Stagno, Paul; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Partin, Mary; Tuttle, Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Unnecessary duplicate laboratory testing is common and costly. Systems-based means to avert unnecessary testing should be investigated and employed. We compared the effectiveness and cost savings associated with two clinical decision support tools to stop duplicate testing. The Hard Stop required telephone contact with the laboratory and justification to have the duplicate test performed, whereas the Smart Alert allowed the provider to bypass the alert at the point of order entry without justification. The Hard Stop alert was significantly more effective than the Smart Alert (92.3% vs 42.6%, respectively; P < .0001). The cost savings realized per alert activation was $16.08/alert for the Hard Stop alert vs $3.52/alert for the Smart Alert. Structural and process changes that require laboratory contact and justification for duplicate testing are more effective than interventions that allow providers to bypass alerts without justification at point of computerized physician order entry. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  17. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most.

  18. Nurse supervisors' actions in relation to their decision-making style and ethical approach to clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Ingela; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2003-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the decision-making style and ethical approach of nurse supervisors by focusing on their priorities and interventions in the supervision process. Clinical supervision promotes ethical awareness and behaviour in the nursing profession. A focus group comprised of four clinical nurse supervisors with considerable experience was studied using qualitative hermeneutic content analysis. The essence of the nurse supervisors' decision-making style is deliberations and priorities. The nurse supervisors' willingness, preparedness, knowledge and awareness constitute and form their way of creating a relationship. The nurse supervisors' ethical approach focused on patient situations and ethical principles. The core components of nursing supervision interventions, as demonstrated in supervision sessions, are: guilt, reconciliation, integrity, responsibility, conscience and challenge. The nurse supervisors' interventions involved sharing knowledge and values with the supervisees and recognizing them as nurses and human beings. Nurse supervisors frequently reflected upon the ethical principle of autonomy and the concept and substance of integrity. The nurse supervisors used an ethical approach that focused on caring situations in order to enhance the provision of patient care. They acted as role models, shared nursing knowledge and ethical codes, and focused on patient related situations. This type of decision-making can strengthen the supervisees' professional identity. The clinical nurse supervisors in the study were experienced and used evaluation decisions as their form of clinical decision-making activity. The findings underline the need for further research and greater knowledge in order to improve the understanding of the ethical approach to supervision.

  19. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Meldi Plasseraud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p=0.003 with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher’s exact test p=2.1×10-13 and p=0.04, resp.. The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920.

  20. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Eliminating Health Care Disparities With Mandatory Clinical Decision Support: The Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brandyn D; Haider, Adil H; Streiff, Michael B; Lehmann, Christoph U; Kraus, Peggy S; Hobson, Deborah B; Kraenzlin, Franca S; Zeidan, Amer M; Pronovost, Peter J; Haut, Elliott R

    2015-01-01

    All hospitalized patients should be assessed for venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors and prescribed appropriate prophylaxis. To improve best-practice VTE prophylaxis prescription for all hospitalized patients, we implemented a mandatory computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) tool. The tool requires completion of checklists to evaluate VTE risk factors and contraindications to pharmacological prophylaxis, and then recommends the risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis regimen. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of a quality improvement intervention on race-based and sex-based health care disparities across 2 distinct clinical services. This was a retrospective cohort study of a quality improvement intervention. The study included 1942 hospitalized medical patients and 1599 hospitalized adult trauma patients. In this study, the proportion of patients prescribed risk-appropriate, best-practice VTE prophylaxis was evaluated. Racial disparities existed in prescription of best-practice VTE prophylaxis in the preimplementation period between black and white patients on both the trauma (70.1% vs. 56.6%, P=0.025) and medicine (69.5% vs. 61.7%, P=0.015) services. After implementation of the CCDS tool, compliance improved for all patients, and disparities in best-practice prophylaxis prescription between black and white patients were eliminated on both services: trauma (84.5% vs. 85.5%, P=0.99) and medicine (91.8% vs. 88.0%, P=0.082). Similar findings were noted for sex disparities in the trauma cohort. Despite the fact that risk-appropriate prophylaxis should be prescribed equally to all hospitalized patients regardless of race and sex, practice varied widely before our quality improvement intervention. Our CCDS tool eliminated racial disparities in VTE prophylaxis prescription across 2 distinct clinical services. Health information technology approaches to care standardization are effective to eliminate health care disparities.

  2. Interface, information, interaction: a narrative review of design and functional requirements for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen; Mosby, Danielle; Capan, Muge; Kowalski, Rebecca; Ratwani, Raj; Noaiseh, Yaman; Kraft, Rachel; Schwartz, Sanford; Weintraub, William S; Arnold, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Provider acceptance and associated patient outcomes are widely discussed in the evaluation of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs), but critical design criteria for tools have generally been overlooked. The objective of this work is to inform electronic health record alert optimization and clinical practice workflow by identifying, compiling, and reporting design recommendations for CDSS to support the efficient, effective, and timely delivery of high-quality care. A narrative review was conducted from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society to identify papers that discussed/recommended design features of CDSSs that are associated with the success of these systems. Fourteen papers were included as meeting the criteria and were found to have a total of 42 unique recommendations; 11 were classified as interface features, 10 as information features, and 21 as interaction features. Features are defined and described, providing actionable guidance that can be applied to CDSS development and policy. To our knowledge, no reviews have been completed that discuss/recommend design features of CDSS at this scale, and thus we found that this was important for the body of literature. The recommendations identified in this narrative review will help to optimize design, organization, management, presentation, and utilization of information through presentation, content, and function. The designation of 3 categories (interface, information, and interaction) should be further evaluated to determine the critical importance of the categories. Future work will determine how to prioritize them with limited resources for designers and developers in order to maximize the clinical utility of CDSS. This review will expand the field of knowledge and provide a novel organization structure to identify key recommendations for CDSS.

  3. Clinical Decision-Making Following Disasters: Efficient Identification of PTSD Risk in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Cohen, Joseph R; Adams, Zachary W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Soltis, Kathryn; Amstadter, Ananda B; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to utilize a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) approach in order to improve clinical decision-making for adolescents at risk for the development of psychopathology in the aftermath of a natural disaster. Specifically we assessed theoretically-driven individual, interpersonal, and event-related vulnerability factors to determine which indices were most accurate in forecasting PTSD. Furthermore, we aimed to translate these etiological findings by identifying clinical cut-off recommendations for relevant vulnerability factors. Our study consisted of structured phone-based clinical interviews with 2000 adolescent-parent dyads living within a 5-mile radius of tornados that devastated Joplin, MO, and northern Alabama in Spring 2011. Demographics, tornado incident characteristics, prior trauma, mental health, and family support and conflict were assessed. A subset of youth completed two behavioral assessment tasks online to assess distress tolerance and risk-taking behavior. ROC analyses indicated four variables that significantly improved PTSD diagnostic efficiency: Lifetime depression (AUC = .90), trauma history (AUC = .76), social support (AUC = .70), and family conflict (AUC = .72). Youth were 2-3 times more likely to have PTSD if they had elevated scores on any of these variables. Of note, event-related characteristics (e.g., property damage) were not related to PTSD diagnostic status. The present study adds to the literature by making specific recommendations for empirically-based, efficient disaster-related PTSD assessment for adolescents following a natural disaster. Implications for practice and future trauma-related developmental psychopathology research are discussed.

  4. Measuring Clinical Decision Support Influence on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Susan; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    To measure the effect of clinical decision support (CDS) on oncology nurse evidence-based practice (EBP).
. Longitudinal cluster-randomized design.
. Four distinctly separate oncology clinics associated with an academic medical center.
. The study sample was comprised of randomly selected data elements from the nursing documentation software. The data elements were patient-reported symptoms and the associated nurse interventions. The total sample observations were 600, derived from a baseline, posteducation, and postintervention sample of 200 each (100 in the intervention group and 100 in the control group for each sample).
. The cluster design was used to support randomization of the study intervention at the clinic level rather than the individual participant level to reduce possible diffusion of the study intervention. An elongated data collection cycle (11 weeks) controlled for temporary increases in nurse EBP related to the education or CDS intervention.
. The dependent variable was the nurse evidence-based documentation rate, calculated from the nurse-documented interventions. The independent variable was the CDS added to the nursing documentation software.
. The average EBP rate at baseline for the control and intervention groups was 27%. After education, the average EBP rate increased to 37%, and then decreased to 26% in the postintervention sample. Mixed-model linear statistical analysis revealed no significant interaction of group by sample. The CDS intervention did not result in an increase in nurse EBP.
. EBP education increased nurse EBP documentation rates significantly but only temporarily. Nurses may have used evidence in practice but may not have documented their interventions.
. More research is needed to understand the complex relationship between CDS, nursing practice, and nursing EBP intervention documentation. CDS may have a different effect on nurse EBP, physician EBP, and other medical professional EBP.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of clinical decision support system in improving maternal health care in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Ayindenaba Dalaba

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana.A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider's perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out.Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC in the intervention health centres (before-intervention = 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention = 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value = 0.010. In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention = 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value = 0.305. Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost -effectiveness ratio decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention. Incremental cost -effectiveness ratio (ICER was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS, cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285.Computer -assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether the additional benefit is worth

  6. Utility of bleb imaging with anterior segment optical coherence tomography in clinical decision-making after trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Aung, Tin; Aquino, Maria C; Chew, Paul T K

    2009-08-01

    To determine if imaging of blebs with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) affects clinical decision-making with regard to laser suture lysis (LSL) after trabeculectomy. In this prospective observational case series, we included patients with poorly controlled intraocular pressure (IOP) after standardized trabeculectomy from May to November 2006. One observer assessed IOP, anterior chamber depth and bleb formation, and recorded a decision of whether or not to undertake LSL based on clinical grounds. A second observer masked to clinical data recorded a decision of whether or not to perform LSL based on ASOCT assessment of scleral flap position, presence of a sub-flap space, patency of the internal ostium, and bleb wall thickening. We compared the 2 observers' decisions to determine how ASOCT influenced decision-making. Seven eyes of 7 patients were included. On the basis of clinical examination, LSL was recommended in all 7 (100.0%) cases due to presence of elevated IOP, deep anterior chambers and poorly formed blebs. Using ASOCT, LSL was recommended in 5/7 (71.4%) cases with apposed scleral flaps, absent sub-flap spaces, and absent bleb wall thickening. In 2/7 (28.7%) cases, LSL was not recommended based on ASOCT findings of an elevated scleral flap, a patent sub-flap space, and bleb wall thickening. All 7 patients had good IOP control and formed blebs at a mean of 8.4+/-2.6 months after trabeculectomy, with a mean IOP of 14.3+/-3.2 mm Hg with no medications. This small study suggests that ASOCT imaging may affect decision-making with regard to LSL by providing information not apparent on clinical examination.

  7. Beyond clinical priority: what matters when making operational decisions about emergency surgical queues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Anneke; Wu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Objective This paper describes the perceptions of operating theatre staff in Australia and The Netherlands regarding the influence of logistical or operational reasons that may affect the scheduling of unplanned surgical cases. It is proposed that logistical or operational issues can influence the priority determination of queue position of surgical cases on the emergency waiting list. Methods A questionnaire was developed and conducted in 15 hospitals across The Netherlands and Australia, targeting anaesthetists, managers, nurses and surgeons. Statistical analyses revolved around these four professional groups. Six hypotheses were then developed and tested based on the responses collected from the participants. Results There were significant differences in perceptions of logistics delay factors across different professional groups when patients were waiting for unplanned surgery. There were also significant differences among different groups when setting logistical priority factors for planning and scheduling unplanned cases. The hypotheses tests confirm these differences, and the findings concur with the paradigmatic differences mentioned in the literature. These paradigmatic differences among the four professional groups may explain some of the tensions encountered when making decisions about scheduling emergency surgical queues, and therefore should be taken into consideration for management of operating theatres. Conclusions Queue positions of patients waiting for unplanned surgery, or emergency surgery, are determined by medical clinicians according to clinicians' indication of clinical priority. However, operating theatre managers are important in facilitating smooth operations when planning for emergency surgeries. It is necessary for surgeons to understand the logistical challenges faced by managers when requesting logistical priorities for their operations. What is known about the topic? Tensions exist about the efficient use of operating theatres and

  8. The role of dynamic renal scintigraphy on clinical decision making in hydronephrotic children

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    Seçil Arslansoyu Çamlar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis may be related to an obstructive cause, ureteropelvic/uretero-vesical junction obstruction or nonobstructive [vesicoureteral reflux (VUR]. When an obstructive pathology is considered, dynamic renal scintigraphy may help to predict whether it is a true obstruction or not. In this study, we aimed to determine the contribution of dynamic renal scintigraphy with [99] mTc-MAG-3 to the clinical decision-making for surgery in hydronephrotic children. Files of the patients evaluated by MAG-3 scintigraphy for antenatal (AH/postnatal (PH hydronephrosis between 1992 and 2014 were reviewed. Gender, age, hydronephrosis (HN grade by ultrasound (US, presence of VUR, MAG-3 result (obstructive vs. nonobstructive, ultimate diagnosis, and need for surgery were assessed. Cases with double collecting system and neurogenic bladder were excluded from the study. All of the patients had normal serum creatinine and eGFR. There were a total of 178 patients with 218 hydronephrotic renal units (mean age 34.7 ± 52.7 months; male/ female = 121/57, AH of 62%. MAG-3 was nonobstructive in 134 and obstructive in 84 hydronephrotic renal units. MAG-3 was obstructive in 47 of 121 (39% males and 30 of 57 (53% females (P = 0.058, odds ratio (OR for obstruction was 1.9 for girls. MAG-3 was obstructive in 47 of 135 (35% units with AH and 37 of 83 (45% units with PH (P = 0.137. In 81 units with the society of fetal urology-4 HN by US, MAG-3 was obstructive in 55 (68%, and surgery was required in 52 of 55 (95%. Surgery was required for only two (7% of the remaining 26 units with nonobstructive dilatation (P 16.5 mm was the best cutoff level for predicting obstruction by MAG-3 (sensitivity 75.2%; specificity 71%; OR 3.8. MAG-3 significantly affects clinical decision for surgery in HN. Hydronephrotic girls have more risk in terms of true obstruction. Combining MAG-3 with US improves the discrimination of true obstruction during follow-up.

  9. A Survey on Turkish nursing students' perception of clinical learning environment and its association with academic motivation and clinical decision making.

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    Aktaş, Yeşim Yaman; Karabulut, Neziha

    2016-01-01

    Nursing education is a process that includes theoretical and practical learning and requires the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and skill. Nursing students need a good clinical practice environment in order to apply their knowledge and skills due to the fact that the clinical practice settings play an important role in the nursing profession. This study was carried out in an effort to explore nursing students' perception of the clinical learning environment and its association with academic motivation and clinical decision making. A descriptive survey design was used. This study was conducted in Giresun University in Turkey. Participants were second-, third- and fourth-year undergraduate students (n=222) in the Bachelor of Nursing Science Degree in the academic spring term of 2014-2015. The data was collected using the 'Clinical Learning Environment Scale', the 'Academic Motivation, and the 'The Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale'. Of the respondents in this study, 45% of the students were second class, 30.6% of the students were third class and 24.3% of the students were fourth class. There was a statistically significant positive correlation found between the clinical learning environment and the nursing students' academic motivation (r=0.182, pdecision making (r=0.082, p>.05). One of the prerequisites for the training of qualified students is to provide nursing students with a qualified clinical environment. It was found that nursing students' academic motivation increased as the quality of their clinical learning environment improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

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    Brandon M. Welch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing (WGS is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting.

  11. Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors' Experience.

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    Bahus, Marianne K; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end-of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee (CEC). However, little has been published on doctors' experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors' experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews with fifteen Norwegian physicians who had brought an end-of-life decision case to a CEC. Almost half of the cases involved conflicts with the patients' relatives. In a majority of the cases, there was uncertainty about what would be the ethically preferable solution. Reasons for referring the case to the CEC were to get broader illumination of the case, to get perspective from people outside the team, to get advice, or to get moral backing on a decision already made. A great majority of the clinicians reported an overall positive experience with the CECs' discussions. In cases where there was conflict, the clinicians reported less satisfaction with the CECs' discussions. The study shows that most doctors who have used a CEC in an end-of-life decision find it useful to have ethical and/or legal aspects illuminated, and to have the dilemma scrutinized from a new perspective. A systematic discussion seems to be significant to the clinicians.

  12. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. Methods We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functi...

  13. Depression and Anxiety During Pregnancy: Evaluating the Literature in Support of Clinical Risk-Benefit Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalke, Katharine Baratz; Wenzel, Amy; Kim, Deborah R

    2016-06-01

    Depression and anxiety during pregnancy are common, and patients and providers are faced with complex decisions regarding various treatment modalities. A structured discussion of the risks and benefits of options with the patient and her support team is recommended to facilitate the decision-making process. This clinically focused review, with emphasis on the last 3 years of published study data, evaluates the major risk categories of medication treatments, namely pregnancy loss, physical malformations, growth impairment, behavioral teratogenicity, and neonatal toxicity. Nonpharmacological treatment options, including neuromodulation and psychotherapy, are also briefly reviewed. Specific recommendations, drawn from the literature and the authors' clinical experience, are also offered to help guide the clinician in decision-making.

  14. Design of a Clinical Decision Support System for Fracture Prediction Using Imbalanced Dataset

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    Yung-Fu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1 billion people suffer from chronic respiratory diseases worldwide, accounting for more than 4 million deaths annually. Inhaled corticosteroid is a popular medication for treating chronic respiratory diseases. Its side effects include decreased bone mineral density and osteoporosis. The aims of this study are to investigate the association of inhaled corticosteroids and fracture and to design a clinical support system for fracture prediction. The data of patients aged 20 years and older, who had visited healthcare centers and been prescribed with inhaled corticosteroids within 2002–2010, were retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD. After excluding patients diagnosed with hip fracture or vertebrate fractures before using inhaled corticosteroid, a total of 11645 patients receiving inhaled corticosteroid therapy were included for this study. Among them, 1134 (9.7% were diagnosed with hip fracture or vertebrate fracture. The statistical results showed that demographic information, chronic respiratory diseases and comorbidities, and corticosteroid-related variables (cumulative dose, mean exposed daily dose, follow-up duration, and exposed duration were significantly different between fracture and nonfracture patients. The clinical decision support systems (CDSSs were designed with integrated genetic algorithm (GA and support vector machine (SVM by training and validating the models with balanced training sets obtained by random and cluster-based undersampling methods and testing with the imbalanced NHIRD dataset. Two different objective functions were adopted for obtaining optimal models with best predictive performance. The predictive performance of the CDSSs exhibits a sensitivity of 69.84–77.00% and an AUC of 0.7495–0.7590. It was concluded that long-term use of inhaled corticosteroids may induce osteoporosis and exhibit higher incidence of hip or vertebrate fractures. The accumulated dose of ICS and

  15. Radiation treatment in older patients: a framework for clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Smith, Benjamin D

    2014-08-20

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-06-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application.

  17. Reasons For Physicians Not Adopting Clinical Decision Support Systems: Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairat, Saif; Marc, David; Crosby, William; Al Sanousi, Ali

    2018-04-18

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are an integral component of today's health information technologies. They assist with interpretation, diagnosis, and treatment. A CDSS can be embedded throughout the patient safety continuum providing reminders, recommendations, and alerts to health care providers. Although CDSSs have been shown to reduce medical errors and improve patient outcomes, they have fallen short of their full potential. User acceptance has been identified as one of the potential reasons for this shortfall. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a critical review and task analysis of CDSS research and to develop a new framework for CDSS design in order to achieve user acceptance. A critical review of CDSS papers was conducted with a focus on user acceptance. To gain a greater understanding of the problems associated with CDSS acceptance, we conducted a task analysis to identify and describe the goals, user input, system output, knowledge requirements, and constraints from two different perspectives: the machine (ie, the CDSS engine) and the user (ie, the physician). Favorability of CDSSs was based on user acceptance of clinical guidelines, reminders, alerts, and diagnostic suggestions. We propose two models: (1) the user acceptance and system adaptation design model, which includes optimizing CDSS design based on user needs/expectations, and (2) the input-process-output-engagemodel, which reveals to users the processes that govern CDSS outputs. This research demonstrates that the incorporation of the proposed models will improve user acceptance to support the beneficial effects of CDSSs adoption. Ultimately, if a user does not accept technology, this not only poses a threat to the use of the technology but can also pose a threat to the health and well-being of patients. ©Saif Khairat, David Marc, William Crosby, Ali Al Sanousi. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 18.04.2018.

  18. A fuzzy logic decision support system for assessing clinical nutritional risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Hadianfard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies have indicated a global high prevalence of hospital malnutrition on admission and during hospitalization. Clinical Nutritional Risk Screen (CNRS is a way to identify malnutrition and manage nutritional interventions. Several traditional and non-computer based tools have been suggested for screening nutritional risk levels. The present study was an attempt to employ a computer based fuzzy model decision support system as a nutrition-screening tool for inpatients. Method: This is an applied modeling study. The system architecture was designed based on the fuzzy logic model including input data, inference engine, and output. A clinical nutritionist entered nineteen input variables using a windows-based graphical user interface. The inference engine was involved with knowledge obtained from literature and the construction of ‘IF-THEN’ rules. The output of the system was stratification of patients into four risk levels from ‘No’ to ‘High’ where a number was also allocated to them as a nutritional risk grade. All patients (121 people admitted during implementing the system participated in testing the model. The classification tests were used to measure the CNRS fuzzy model performance. IBM SPSS version 21 was utilized as a tool for data analysis with α = 0.05 as a significance level. Results: Results showed that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision of the fuzzy model performance were 91.67% (±4.92, 76% (±7.6, 88.43% (±5.7, and 93.62% (±4.32, respectively. Instant performance on admission and very low probability of mistake in predicting malnutrition risk level may justify using the model in hospitals. Conclusion: To conclude, the fuzzy model-screening tool is based on multiple nutritional risk factors, having the capability of classifying inpatients into several nutritional risk levels and identifying the level of required nutritional intervention.

  19. The problem-oriented system, problem-knowledge coupling, and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, L L; Zimny, N J

    1989-07-01

    The information tool to aid us in making the clinical decisions discussed in this presentation is called the PKC. Our goal with patients should be to couple the knowledge of the unique patient to the knowledge in the literature and get the best possible match. This approach requires combinatorial versus probabilistic thinking. In the real world, ideal matches are not found. Therefore, it is critical to exhaust the patient's uniqueness first and only then use probabilities to settle further uncertainties. It is an error to teach people how to deal with uncertainty instead of teaching them to clean up a great deal of the uncertainty first. Patients must be involved in this endeavor. In essence, they have a PhD in their own uniqueness, and it is this uniqueness that is very powerful in solving complex problems. This method of patient evaluation and management cannot be used with the unaided mind. It requires new and powerful information tools like the PKC. All information that is relevant to a problem should be included in the coupler. It should encompass differing points of view, and the rationale should be made explicit to clinician and patient alike. When complete, the coupler should represent an interdisciplinary compilation of questions and tests that are expected to be collected every time in the clinic for the type of problem the coupler represents. This method will provide a basis for quality control because the contents of the coupler now have defined what we expect to occur in every patient encounter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Evaluation of a clinical decision support algorithm for patient-specific childhood immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Vivienne J; Grannis, Shaun J; Tu, Wanzhu; Rosenman, Marc B; Downs, Stephen M

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) implementing standard childhood immunization guidelines, using real-world patient data from the Regenstrief Medical Record System (RMRS). Study subjects were age 6-years or younger in 2008 and had visited the pediatric clinic on the campus of Wishard Memorial Hospital. Immunization records were retrieved from the RMRS for 135 randomly selected pediatric patients. We compared vaccine recommendations from the CDSS for both eligible and recommended timelines, based on the child's date of birth and vaccine history, to recommendations from registered nurses who routinely selected vaccines for administration in a busy inner city hospital, using the same date of birth and vaccine history. Aggregated and stratified agreement and Kappa statistics were reported. The reasons for disagreement between suggestions from the CDSS and nurses were also identified. For the 135 children, a total of 1215 vaccination suggestions were generated by nurses and were compared to the recommendations of the CDSS. The overall agreement rates were 81.3% and 90.6% for the eligible and recommended timelines, respectively. The overall Kappa values were 0.63 for the eligible timeline and 0.80 for the recommended timeline. Common reasons for disagreement between the CDSS and nurses were: (1) missed vaccination opportunities by nurses, (2) nurses sometimes suggested a vaccination before the minimal age and minimal waiting interval, (3) nurses usually did not validate patient immunization history, and (4) nurses sometimes gave an extra vaccine dose. Our childhood immunization CDSS can assist providers in delivering accurate childhood vaccinations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary embolism in old age: usefulness of risk stratification in clinical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE is a common disease with a not negligible short-term risk of death, in particular in the elderly. An adequate evaluation of the prognosis in patients with PE may guide decision-making in terms of the intensity of the initial treatment during the acute phase. Patients with shock or persistent hypotension are at high risk of early mortality and may benefit from immediate reperfusion. Several tools are available to define the short-term prognosis of hemodynamically stable patients. The pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI score, and the simplified PESI score are particularly useful for identifying patients at low risk of early complications who might be safely treated at home. The identification of patients who are hemodynamically stable at diagnosis but are at a high risk of early complications is more challenging. Current guidelines recommend a multi-parametric prognostic algorithm based on the clinical status, biomarkers and imaging tests. However an aggressive treatment in hemodynamically stable patients is still controversial.

  2. Using statistical anomaly detection models to find clinical decision support malfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Soumi; McEvoy, Dustin S; Aaron, Skye; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Wright, Adam

    2018-05-11

    Malfunctions in Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems occur due to a multitude of reasons, and often go unnoticed, leading to potentially poor outcomes. Our goal was to identify malfunctions within CDS systems. We evaluated 6 anomaly detection models: (1) Poisson Changepoint Model, (2) Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) Model, (3) Hierarchical Divisive Changepoint (HDC) Model, (4) Bayesian Changepoint Model, (5) Seasonal Hybrid Extreme Studentized Deviate (SHESD) Model, and (6) E-Divisive with Median (EDM) Model and characterized their ability to find known anomalies. We analyzed 4 CDS alerts with known malfunctions from the Longitudinal Medical Record (LMR) and Epic® (Epic Systems Corporation, Madison, WI, USA) at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. The 4 rules recommend lead testing in children, aspirin therapy in patients with coronary artery disease, pneumococcal vaccination in immunocompromised adults and thyroid testing in patients taking amiodarone. Poisson changepoint, ARIMA, HDC, Bayesian changepoint and the SHESD model were able to detect anomalies in an alert for lead screening in children and in an alert for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in immunocompromised adults. EDM was able to detect anomalies in an alert for monitoring thyroid function in patients on amiodarone. Malfunctions/anomalies occur frequently in CDS alert systems. It is important to be able to detect such anomalies promptly. Anomaly detection models are usef