WorldWideScience

Sample records for computer-assisted mammographic imaging

  1. Computer-assisted diagnosis of mammographic masses using an information-theoretic image retrieval scheme with BIRADs-based relevance feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourassi, Georgia D.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach for computer-assisted diagnosis of masses detected in screening mammograms. The system follows an information theoretic retrieval scheme with a BIRADS-based relevance feedback (RF) algorithm. Initially, a knowledge databank of 365 mammographic regions of interest (ROIs) was created. They were all 512x512 pixel ROIs extracted from DDSM mammograms digitized using the Lumisys digitizer. The ROIs were extracted around the known locations of the annotated masses. Specifically, there were 177 ROIs depicting a biopsy-proven malignant mass and 188 ROIs with a benign mass. Subsequently, the CBIR algorithm was implemented using mutual information (MI) as the similarity metric for image retrieval. The CBIR algorithm formed the basis of a knowledge-based CAD system. Given a databank of mammographic masses with known pathology, a query mass was evaluated. Based on their information content, all similar masses in the databank were retrieved. A relevance feedback algorithm based on BIRADS findings was implemented to determine the relevance factor of the retrieved masses. Finally, a decision index was calculated using the query's k best matches. The decision index effectively combined the similarity metric of the retrieved cases and their relevance factor into a prediction regarding the malignancy status of the mass depicted in the query ROI. ROC analysis was to evaluate diagnostic performance. Performance improved dramatically with the incorporation of the relevance feedback algorithm. Overall, the CAD system achieved ROC area index AZ= 0.86+/-0.02 for the diagnosis of masses in screening mammograms.

  2. Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers...

  3. A Computer Aided Detection system for mammographic images implemented on a GRID infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Bottigli, U; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Fauci, F; Forni, G; Golosio, B; Indovina, P L; Lauria, A; Magro, R; Masala, G L; Oliva, P R; Palmiero, R; Raso, G; Retico, A; Stefanini, A; Stumbo, S; Tangaro, S; Torres, E L

    2003-01-01

    The use of an automatic system for the analysis of mammographic images has proven to be very useful to radiologists in the investigation of breast cancer, especially in the framework of mammographic-screening programs. A breast neoplasia is often marked by the presence of microcalcification clusters and massive lesions in the mammogram: hence the need for tools able to recognize such lesions at an early stage. In the framework of the GPCALMA (GRID Platform for Computer Assisted Library for MAmmography) project, the co-working of italian physicists and radiologists built a large distributed database of digitized mammographic images (about 5500 images corresponding to 1650 patients) and developed a CAD (Computer Aided Detection) system, able to make an automatic search of massive lesions and microcalcification clusters. The CAD is implemented in the GPCALMA integrated station, which can be used also for digitization, as archive and to perform statistical analyses. Some GPCALMA integrated stations have already b...

  4. Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers...... and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry......, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image...

  5. Analysis of 193 Mammographic phantom images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Eun Kyung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Kim, Young Ah; Oh, Ki Keun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sun Yang [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ., Pochon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyuk Joo; Cha, Seung Hwan [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate the actual state of quality control in Korea through analysis of mammographic phantom images obtained from a multicenter, and to determine the proper exposure conditions required in order to obtain satisfactory phantom images. Between April and June, 2002, 193 phantom images were referred to the Korea Food and Drug Administration for evaluation. Two radiologists recorded the number of fibers, specks and masses they contained, and the 'pass' criteria were as follows: checked number of fibers: four or more; specks, three or more; masses, three or more (a total of ten or more features). Images in which optical density was over 1.2 were classified as satisfactory. In addition, changes in the success ratio, and difference between the two groups (i.e. 'pass' and 'fail', with regard to exposure conditions and optical density) were evaluated. Among the 193 images, 116 (60.1%) passed and 77 (39.9%) failed. Among those which passed, 73/100 (73%) involved to use of a grid, 80/117 (68.3%) were obtained within the optimal kVp range, 50/111 (45.0%) involved the use of optimal mAs, and 79/112 (70.5%) were obtained within the optimal range of optical density. Among those which failed, the corresponding figures were 17/52 (32.6%), 33/66 (50.0%), 31/69 (44.9%), and 35/65 (53.8%), There were statistically significant differences between the pass and fail rates, and with regard to kVp, optical density, and the use of a grid, but with regard to mAs, statistical differences were not significant. If only phantom images with an optical density of over 1.2 [as per the rule of the Mammographic Quality Standard Act (MQSA)] was included, the success rate would fall from 60.1% to 43.0%. The pass rate for mammographic phantom images was 60.1%. If such images are to be satisfactory, they should be obtained within the optimal range of optical density, using optimal kVp and a grid.

  6. Breast image pre-processing for mammographic tissue segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenda; Hogg, Peter; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R E; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-12-01

    During mammographic image acquisition, a compression paddle is used to even the breast thickness in order to obtain optimal image quality. Clinical observation has indicated that some mammograms may exhibit abrupt intensity change and low visibility of tissue structures in the breast peripheral areas. Such appearance discrepancies can affect image interpretation and may not be desirable for computer aided mammography, leading to incorrect diagnosis and/or detection which can have a negative impact on sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography. This paper describes a novel mammographic image pre-processing method to improve image quality for analysis. An image selection process is incorporated to better target problematic images. The processed images show improved mammographic appearances not only in the breast periphery but also across the mammograms. Mammographic segmentation and risk/density classification were performed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative evaluation. When using the processed images, the results indicated more anatomically correct segmentation in tissue specific areas, and subsequently better classification accuracies were achieved. Visual assessments were conducted in a clinical environment to determine the quality of the processed images and the resultant segmentation. The developed method has shown promising results. It is expected to be useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment.

  7. Computer-assisted tree taxonomy by automated image recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwels, E.J.; Zeeuw, P.M.de; Ranguelova, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm that performs image-based queries within the domain of tree taxonomy. As such, it serves as an example relevant to many other potential applications within the field of biodiversity and photo-identification. Unsupervised matching results are produced through a chain of comput

  8. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  9. Personalized, relevance-based Multimodal Robotic Imaging and augmented reality for Computer Assisted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab, Nassir; Fellow, Miccai; Hennersperger, Christoph; Frisch, Benjamin; Fürst, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, many researchers in medical image computing and computer assisted interventions across the world focused on the development of the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH), aiming at changing the practice of medicine from classification and treatment of diseases to that of modeling and treating patients. These projects resulted in major advancements in segmentation, registration, morphological, physiological and biomechanical modeling based on state of art medical imaging as well as other sensory data. However, a major issue which has not yet come into the focus is personalizing intra-operative imaging, allowing for optimal treatment. In this paper, we discuss the personalization of imaging and visualization process with particular focus on satisfying the challenging requirements of computer assisted interventions. We discuss such requirements and review a series of scientific contributions made by our research team to tackle some of these major challenges. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Towards an automatic tool for resolution evaluation of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, J. E. E. [FUMEC, Av. Alfonso Pena 3880, CEP 30130-009 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: juliae@fumec.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Medical images are important for diagnosis purposes as they are related to patients medical history and pathology. Breast cancer represents a leading cause of death among women worldwide, and its early detection is the most effective method of reducing mortality. In a way to identify small structures with low density differences, a high image quality is required with the use of low doses of radiation. The analysis of the quality of the obtained image from a mammogram is performed from an image of a simulated breast and this is a fundamental key point for a program of quality control of mammography equipment s. In a control program of mammographic equipment s, besides the analysis of the quality of mammographic images, each element of the chain which composes the formation of the image is also analyzed: X-rays equipment s, radiographic films, and operating conditions. This control allows that an effective and efficient exam can be provided to the population and is within the standards of quality required for the early detection of breast cancer. However, according to the State Program of Quality Control in Mammography of Minas Gerais, Brazil, only 40% of the mammographies have provided a simulated image with a minimum level of quality, thus reinforcing the need for monitoring the images. The reduction of the morbidity and mortality indexes, with optimization and assurance of access to diagnosis and breast cancer treatment in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, may be the result of a mammographic exam which has a final image with good quality and which automatic evaluation is not subjective. The reason is that one has to consider the hypothesis that humans are subjective when performing the image analysis and that the evaluation of the image can be executed by a computer with objectivity. In 2007, in order to maintain the standard quality needed to mammography, the State Health Secretariat of Minas Gerais, Brazil, established a Program of Monthly Monitoring the

  11. Imagery-37: a virtual lab for computer assisted education on digital image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Montenegro Joo, Javier; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Imagery is a Virtual Lab for computer-assisted traning on Digital Image Processing(DIP), currently including 37 modules. Thhis software allows the user in the effects on real images; it may be used in the classroom, in the laboratory or at home. Imagery not only operates on images included by its creator(the author of this report), but also on those provided by the user. Some supporting theory is incluyed in Imagery, which may be used as a complement to specialized textbooks or classes. Im...

  12. Image-based computer-assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohigashi, Satoru; Nakamae, Koji; Fujioka, Hiromu

    2005-04-01

    We develop the image based computer assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) that consists of the balance control system simulator, the 3D eye movement simulator, and the extraction method of nystagmus response directly from an eye movement image sequence. In the system, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated by searching the database for record matching with the nystagmus response for the observed eye image sequence of the patient with BPPV. The database includes the nystagmus responses for simulated eye movement sequences. The eye movement velocity is obtained by using the balance control system simulator that allows us to simulate BPPV under various conditions such as canalithiasis, cupulolithiasis, number of otoconia, otoconium size, and so on. Then the eye movement image sequence is displayed on the CRT by the 3D eye movement simulator. The nystagmus responses are extracted from the image sequence by the proposed method and are stored in the database. In order to enhance the diagnosis accuracy, the nystagmus response for a newly simulated sequence is matched with that for the observed sequence. From the matched simulation conditions, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated. We apply our image based computer assisted diagnosis system to two real eye movement image sequences for patients with BPPV to show its validity.

  13. CT-MR image data fusion for computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at; Peloschek, Philipp; Schmook, Maria Theresa; Krestan, Christian Robert [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hauff, Wolfgang [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Matula, Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Czerny, Christian [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors, and to present, particularly, CT and MR image data fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors. Materials and methods: In this retrospective case series, 10 patients with orbital tumors and associated complaints underwent MDCT and MRI of the orbit. MDCT was performed at high resolution, with a bone window level setting in the axial plane. MRI was performed with an axial 3D T1-weighted (w) gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequence, in addition to a standard MRI protocol. First, MDCT and MR images were used to diagnose tumorous lesions compared to histology as a standard of reference. Then, the image data sets from CT and 3D T1-w GE sequences were merged on a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images that were used for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Furthermore, the clinical preoperative status was compared to the patients' postoperative outcome. Results: Radiological and histological diagnosis, which revealed 7 benign and 3 malignant tumors, were concordant in 7 of 10 cases (70%). The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in the preoperative planning and improved the surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was 1.35 mm. Postoperatively, orbital complaints showed complete regression in 6 cases, were ameliorated notably in 3 cases, and remained unchanged in 1 case. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential for the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors. CT-MR image data fusion is an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure, and can improve surgical results in computer-assisted navigated surgery of

  14. Seventh Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention Conference (MICCAI 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Nielsen, Poul; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Models, Algorithms and Implementation

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Models, Algorithms and Implementation collects the papers from the Seventh Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Nice in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  15. Mammographic images segmentation using texture descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, Angelica A; Mello, Carlos A B; Santos, Wellington P; Cavalcanti, George D C

    2009-01-01

    Tissue classification in mammography can help the diagnosis of breast cancer by separating healthy tissue from lesions. We present herein the use of three texture descriptors for breast tissue segmentation purposes: the Sum Histogram, the Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Local Binary Pattern (LBP). A modification of the LBP is also proposed for a better distinction of the tissues. In order to segment the image into its tissues, these descriptors are compared using a fidelity index and two clustering algorithms: k-Means and SOM (Self-Organizing Maps).

  16. Automated Quality Assurance Applied to Mammographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Davis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality control in mammography is based upon subjective interpretation of the image quality of a test phantom. In order to suppress subjectivity due to the human observer, automated computer analysis of the Leeds TOR(MAM test phantom is investigated. Texture analysis via grey-level co-occurrence matrices is used to detect structures in the test object. Scoring of the substructures in the phantom is based on grey-level differences between regions and information from grey-level co-occurrence matrices. The results from scoring groups of particles within the phantom are presented.

  17. CT-MR image data fusion for computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors

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    Nemec, Stefan Franz [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at; Donat, Markus Alexander [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mehrain, Sheida [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedrich, Klaus [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Matula, Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, Herwig [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Czerny, Christian [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors and to present, especially, CT and MR image fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with temporal bone tumors underwent MDCT and MRI. MDCT was performed in high-resolution bone window level setting in axial plane. The reconstructed MDCT slice thickness was 0.8 mm. MRI was performed in axial and coronal plane with T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, un-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences, and coronal T1-weighted SE sequences with fat suppression and with 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequences in axial plane. The 3D T1-weighted GE sequence had a slice thickness of 1 mm. Image data sets of CT and 3D T1-weighted GE sequences were merged utilizing a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images. MDCT and MR images were separately used to depict and characterize lesions. The fusion images were utilized for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Results: Tumorous lesions of bone and soft tissue were well delineated and characterized by CT and MR images. The images played a crucial role in the differentiation of benign and malignant pathologies, which consisted of 13 benign and 2 malignant tumors. The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in preoperative planning and improved surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation system was 1.25 mm. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors. CT-MR image data fusion presents an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure and is a

  18. A comparative study of 2 computer-assisted methods of quantifying brightfield microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, George H; Marson, Lorna P

    2013-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry continues to be a powerful tool for the detection of antigens. There are several commercially available software packages that allow image analysis; however, these can be complex, require relatively high level of computer skills, and can be expensive. We compared 2 commonly available software packages, Adobe Photoshop CS6 and ImageJ, in their ability to quantify percentage positive area after picrosirius red (PSR) staining and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. On analysis of DAB-stained B cells in the mouse spleen, with a biotinylated primary rat anti-mouse-B220 antibody, there was no significant difference on converting images from brightfield microscopy to binary images to measure black and white pixels using ImageJ compared with measuring a range of brown pixels with Photoshop (Student t test, P=0.243, correlation r=0.985). When analyzing mouse kidney allografts stained with PSR, Photoshop achieved a greater interquartile range while maintaining a lower 10th percentile value compared with analysis with ImageJ. A lower 10% percentile reflects that Photoshop analysis is better at analyzing tissues with low levels of positive pixels; particularly relevant for control tissues or negative controls, whereas after ImageJ analysis the same images would result in spuriously high levels of positivity. Furthermore comparing the 2 methods by Bland-Altman plot revealed that these 2 methodologies did not agree when measuring images with a higher percentage of positive staining and correlation was poor (r=0.804). We conclude that for computer-assisted analysis of images of DAB-stained tissue there is no difference between using Photoshop or ImageJ. However, for analysis of color images where differentiation into a binary pattern is not easy, such as with PSR, Photoshop is superior at identifying higher levels of positivity while maintaining differentiation of low levels of positive staining.

  19. Statistical Segmentation of Regions of Interest on a Mammographic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Mouloud; Rasigni, Monique; Bourennane, Salah; Juhan, Valerie

    2007-12-01

    This paper deals with segmentation of breast anatomical regions, pectoral muscle, fatty and fibroglandular regions, using a Bayesian approach. This work is a part of a computer aided diagnosis project aiming at evaluating breast cancer risk and its association with characteristics (density, texture, etc.) of regions of interest on digitized mammograms. Novelty in this paper consists in applying and adapting Markov random field for detecting breast anatomical regions on digitized mammograms whereas most of previous works were focused on masses and microcalcifications. The developed method was tested on 50 digitized mammograms of the mini-MIAS database. Computer segmentation is compared to manual one made by a radiologist. A good agreement is obtained on 68% of the mini-MIAS mammographic image database used in this study. Given obtained segmentation results, the proposed method could be considered as a satisfying first approach for segmenting regions of interest in a breast.

  20. Computer-assisted scan protocol and reconstruction (CASPAR)-reduction of image noise and patient dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperl, Jonathan; Beque, Dirk; Claus, Bernhard; De Man, Bruno; Senzig, Bob; Brokate, Martin

    2010-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography is a powerful medical imaging device. It allows high-resolution 3-D visualization of the human body. However, one drawback is the health risk associated with ionizing radiation. Simply downscaling the radiation intensities over the entire scan results in increased quantum noise. This paper proposes the concept of computer-assisted scan protocol and reconstruction. More specifically, we propose a method to compute patient and task-specific intensity profiles that achieve an optimal tradeoff between radiation dose and image quality. Therefore, reasonable image variance and dose metrics are derived. Conventional third-generation systems as well as inverted geometry concepts are considered. Two dose/noise minimization problems are formulated and solved by an efficient algorithm providing optimized milliampere (mA)-profiles. Thorax phantom simulations demonstrate the promising advantage of this technique: in this particular example, the dose is reduced by 53% for third-generation systems and by 86% for an inverted geometry in comparison to a sinusoidal mA-profile at a constant upper noise limit.

  1. CAVASS: a computer-assisted visualization and analysis software system - image processing aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Jayaram K.; Grevera, George J.; Odhner, Dewey; Zhuge, Ying; Souza, Andre; Mishra, Shipra; Iwanaga, Tad

    2007-03-01

    The development of the concepts within 3DVIEWNIX and of the software system 3DVIEWNIX itself dates back to the 1970s. Since then, a series of software packages for Computer Assisted Visualization and Analysis (CAVA) of images came out from our group, 3DVIEWNIX released in 1993, being the most recent, and all were distributed with source code. CAVASS, an open source system, is the latest in this series, and represents the next major incarnation of 3DVIEWNIX. It incorporates four groups of operations: IMAGE PROCESSING (including ROI, interpolation, filtering, segmentation, registration, morphological, and algebraic operations), VISUALIZATION (including slice display, reslicing, MIP, surface rendering, and volume rendering), MANIPULATION (for modifying structures and surgery simulation), ANALYSIS (various ways of extracting quantitative information). CAVASS is designed to work on all platforms. Its key features are: (1) most major CAVA operations incorporated; (2) very efficient algorithms and their highly efficient implementations; (3) parallelized algorithms for computationally intensive operations; (4) parallel implementation via distributed computing on a cluster of PCs; (5) interface to other systems such as CAD/CAM software, ITK, and statistical packages; (6) easy to use GUI. In this paper, we focus on the image processing operations and compare the performance of CAVASS with that of ITK. Our conclusions based on assessing performance by utilizing a regular (6 MB), large (241 MB), and a super (873 MB) 3D image data set are as follows: CAVASS is considerably more efficient than ITK, especially in those operations which are computationally intensive. It can handle considerably larger data sets than ITK. It is easy and ready to use in applications since it provides an easy to use GUI. The users can easily build a cluster from ordinary inexpensive PCs and reap the full power of CAVASS inexpensively compared to expensive multiprocessing systems which are less

  2. Contemporary issues for experimental design in assessment of medical imaging and computer-assist systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert F.; Beiden, Sergey V.; Campbell, Gregory; Metz, Charles E.; Sacks, William M.

    2003-05-01

    The dialog among investigators in academia, industry, NIH, and the FDA has grown in recent years on topics of historic interest to attendees of these SPIE sub-conferences on Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment. Several of the most visible issues in this regard have been the emergence of digital mammography and modalities for computer-assisted detection and diagnosis in breast and lung imaging. These issues appear to be only the "tip of the iceberg" foreshadowing a number of emerging advances in imaging technology. So it is timely to make some general remarks looking back and looking ahead at the landscape (or seascape). The advances have been facilitated and documented in several forums. The major role of the SPIE Medical Imaging Conferences i well-known to all of us. Many of us were also present at the Medical Image Perception Society and co-sponsored by CDRH and NCI in September of 2001 at Airlie House, VA. The workshops and discussions held at that conference addressed some critical contemporary issues related to how society - and in particular industry and FDA - approach the general assessment problem. A great deal of inspiration for these discussions was also drawn from several workshops in recent years sponsored by the Biomedical Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute on these issues, in particular the problem of "The Moving Target" of imaging technology. Another critical phenomenon deserving our attention is the fact that the Fourth National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology was recently held in Bethesda, MD., February 6-7, 2003. These forums are presented by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). They are sponsored by the National Institutes of Health/Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences (NIH/FAES). These forums led to the development of the NCI

  3. Investigating in vitro angiogenesis by computer-assisted image analysis and computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidolin, Diego; Fede, Caterina; Albertin, Giovanna; De Caro, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    In vitro assays that stimulate the formation of capillary-like structures by EC have become increasingly popular, because they allow the study of the EC's intrinsic ability to self-organize to form vascular-like patterns. Here we describe a widely applied protocol involving the use of basement membrane matrix (Matrigel) as a suitable environment to induce an angiogenic phenotype in cultured EC. EC differentiation on basement membrane matrix is a highly specific process, which recapitulates many steps in blood vessel formation and for this reason it is presently considered as a reliable in vitro tool to identify factors with potential antiangiogenic or pro-angiogenic properties. The morphological features of the obtained cell patterns can also be accurately quantified by computer-assisted image analysis and the main steps of such a procedure will be here outlined and discussed. The dynamics of in vitro EC self-organization is a complex biological process, involving a network of interactions between a high number of cells. For this reason, the combined use of in vitro experiments and computational modeling can represent a key approach to unravel how mechanical and chemical signaling by EC coordinates their organization into capillary-like tubes. Thus, a particularly helpful approach to modeling is also briefly described together with examples of its application.

  4. An objective method to measure cell survival by computer-assisted image processing of numeric images of Petri dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biston, Marie-Claude [Equipe d' Accueil no 2941 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Unite IRM, CHU, BP 217, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Corde, Stephanie [Equipe d' Accueil no 2941 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Unite IRM, CHU, BP 217, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Camus, Emmanuel [Samba Technologies, ZIRST 53, chemin du Vieux Chene 38240 Meylan (France); Marti-Battle, Ramon [Samba Technologies, ZIRST 53, chemin du Vieux Chene 38240 Meylan (France); Esteve, Francois [Equipe d' Accueil no 2941 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Unite IRM, CHU, BP 217, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Balosso, Jacques [Equipe d' Accueil no 2941 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Unite IRM, CHU, BP 217, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2003-06-07

    This work establishes an objective method to measure cell clonogenic survival by computer-assisted image processing using images of cell cultures fixed and stained in Petri dishes. The procedure, developed by Samba Technologies, consists of acquiring Petri dish pictures with a desktop scanner and analysing them by computer, using algorithms based on the 'top hat' filter. The results from the automated count for the cell line SQ20B are compared with those found by two observers, before and after normalization of the counting. After normalization, the shape of the survival curves of the 'manual' counting of the Petri dishes shows a good correlation between both observers. The software enables the small visible differences in count between observers to be eliminated. The comparison between the absolute number of colonies shows an increased difference between the two manual scorings that can be as great as 67 colonies, whereas the difference between the two automated counts is never greater than 8 colonies. These results demonstrate that the 'manual' count is inter- and intra-observer variable, whereas the automatic count performs reproducible cell colony counts, thereby minimizing user-generated bias. The large amount of data produced also gives information about cell and colony characteristics. Thus, this computer-assisted method has considerably improved the reliability of our statistical results.

  5. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A. [Radiology Department, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Flowers, Chris I. [Department of Radiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Drukteinis, Jennifer S. [Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  6. Mammographic density descriptors of novel phantom images: effect of clustered lumpy backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Ryan, Elaine

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have been used to evaluate MBD. However as it is impossible to measure the actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident on a mammogram, therefore it is hard to know the true correlation between measured mammographic density and the fibroglandular tissue volume. A phantom system has been developed that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure. Although a previous study has found strong correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and several image descriptors, it is not known if the correlation is still present when a high level of background noise is introduced. The background noise is required to more realistically simulate clinical image appearance. The aim of this study is to investigate if the correlation between percentage density, integrated density, and standard deviation of mean grey value of the whole phantom and simulated glandular tissue mass is affected by background noise being added to the phantom images. For a set of one hundred phantom mammographic images, clustered lumpy backgrounds were synthesised and superimposed onto phantom images. The correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and the image descriptors were calculated. The results showed the correlation is strong and statistically significant for the above three descriptors with r is 0.7597, 0.8208, and 0.7167 respectively. This indicates these descriptors may be used to assess breast fibroglandular tissue content of the breast using mammographic images.

  7. Unsupervised clustering analyses of features extraction for a caries computer-assisted diagnosis using dental fluorescence images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessani, Michel; da Costa, Mardoqueu M.; Lins, Emery C. C. C.; Maciel, Carlos D.

    2014-02-01

    Computer-assisted diagnoses (CAD) are performed by systems with embedded knowledge. These systems work as a second opinion to the physician and use patient data to infer diagnoses for health problems. Caries is the most common oral disease and directly affects both individuals and the society. Here we propose the use of dental fluorescence images as input of a caries computer-assisted diagnosis. We use texture descriptors together with statistical pattern recognition techniques to measure the descriptors performance for the caries classification task. The data set consists of 64 fluorescence images of in vitro healthy and carious teeth including different surfaces and lesions already diagnosed by an expert. The texture feature extraction was performed on fluorescence images using RGB and YCbCr color spaces, which generated 35 different descriptors for each sample. Principal components analysis was performed for the data interpretation and dimensionality reduction. Finally, unsupervised clustering was employed for the analysis of the relation between the output labeling and the diagnosis of the expert. The PCA result showed a high correlation between the extracted features; seven components were sufficient to represent 91.9% of the original feature vectors information. The unsupervised clustering output was compared with the expert classification resulting in an accuracy of 96.88%. The results show the high accuracy of the proposed approach in identifying carious and non-carious teeth. Therefore, the development of a CAD system for caries using such an approach appears to be promising.

  8. A novel phantom system facilitating better descriptors of density within mammographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    High mammographic density is a risk factor for breast cancer. As it is impossible to measure actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident within a mammogram, it is hard to know the correlation between measured mammographic density and the actual fibroglandular tissue volume. The aim of this study is to develop a phantom that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure so that correlations between image feature descriptors and the synthesised glandular structure can be accurately quantified. In this phantom study, ten different weights of fine steel wool were put into gelatine to simulate breast structure. Image feature descriptors are investigated for both the whole phantom image and the simulated density. Descriptors included actual area and percentage area of density, mean pixel intensity for the whole image and dense area, standard deviation of mean intensity, and integrated pixel density which is the production of area and mean intensity. The results show high level correlation between steel-wool weight and percentage density measured on images (r = 0.8421), and the integrated pixel density of dense area (r = 0.8760). The correlation is significant for mean intensity standard deviation for the whole phantom (r = 0.8043). This phantom study may help identify more accurate descriptors of mammographic density, thus facilitating better assessments of fibroglandular tissue appearances.

  9. 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention

    CERN Document Server

    Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The works included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.

  10. Political leaders and the media. Can we measure political leadership images in newspapers using computer-assisted content analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaldering, Loes; Vliegenthart, Rens

    Despite the large amount of research into both media coverage of politics as well as political leadership, surprisingly little research has been devoted to the ways political leaders are discussed in the media. This paper studies whether computer-aided content analysis can be applied in examining political leadership images in Dutch newspaper articles. It, firstly, provides a conceptualization of political leader character traits that integrates different perspectives in the literature. Moreover, this paper measures twelve political leadership images in media coverage, based on a large-scale computer-assisted content analysis of Dutch media coverage (including almost 150.000 newspaper articles), and systematically tests the quality of the employed measurement instrument by assessing the relationship between the images, the variance in the measurement, the over-time development of images for two party leaders and by comparing the computer results with manual coding. We conclude that the computerized content analysis provides a valid measurement for the leadership images in Dutch newspapers. Moreover, we find that the dimensions political craftsmanship, vigorousness, integrity, communicative performances and consistency are regularly applied in discussing party leaders, but that portrayal of party leaders in terms of responsiveness is almost completely absent in Dutch newspapers.

  11. BREAST DENSITY EVALUATION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ASSESSMENT BY A RADIOLOGIST AND THE COMPUTER-ASSISTED THRESHOLD TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Baytchev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, mammographic density (MD of the breast has been assessed by a radiologist visually. This subjective evaluation requires significant experience to distinguish the relative proportions of the fibrous connective tissue and adipose tissue in the mammary gland correctly. The aim of this study is to compare the capabilities of the different methods (visual and computer-assisted for assessing mammographic density. Our sample in this study consists of 66 patients with digital mammography. The mammographic density has been evaluated using the four-grade scale of the American College of Radiology (ACR; visually, visually using an analog scale and semi-automated using UTHSCSA Image Tool 3.0, Image J and Adobe Photoshop CS6 software. The average mammographic density calculated using the different methods is as follows: 34.8% (from 10% to 70%; 32.1% (from 10% to 60%; 23% (from 0% to 70.9%; 22.7% (from 2.5% to 78.1% and 22.5% (from 1.5% to 72.4%. There is a strong correlation between the results obtained visually and those calculated using a computer-assisted measurement (p< 0.0001. A strong correlation was found also between the results acquired using the different semi-automated programs (p< 0.0001. Precise measurement of mammographic density is of great importance for the mammographic screening and evaluation of breast cancer risk. The semi-automated methods, used for this purpose are objective, accessible and reproducible tools and have some advantages over the subjective visual assessment.

  12. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  13. Computer-assisted scheme for automated determination of imaging planes in cervical spinal cord MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumaki, Masaki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Sekiya, Masaru; Kazama, Kiyoko

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a computerized scheme to assist MRI operators in accurate and rapid determination of sagittal sections for MRI exam of cervical spinal cord. The algorithm of the proposed scheme consisted of 6 steps: (1) extraction of a cervical vertebra containing spinal cord from an axial localizer image; (2) extraction of spinal cord with sagittal image from the extracted vertebra; (3) selection of a series of coronal localizer images corresponding to various, involved portions of the extracted spinal cord with sagittal image; (4) generation of a composite coronal-plane image from the obtained coronal images; (5) extraction of spinal cord from the obtained composite image; (6) determination of oblique sagittal sections from the detected location and gradient of the extracted spinal cord. Cervical spine images obtained from 25 healthy volunteers were used for the study. A perceptual evaluation was performed by five experienced MRI operators. Good agreement between the automated and manual determinations was achieved. By use of the proposed scheme, average execution time was reduced from 39 seconds/case to 1 second/case. The results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can assist MRI operators in performing cervical spinal cord MRI exam accurately and rapidly.

  14. Developing understanding of image formation by lenses through collaborative learning mediated by multimedia computer-assisted learning programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ping-Kee

    2004-10-01

    This article reports the use of a computer-based collaborative learning instruction designed to help students develop understanding of image formation by lenses. The study aims to investigate how students, working in dyads and mediated by multimedia computer-assisted learning (CAL) programs, construct shared knowledge and understanding. The subjects were a class of 36 Secondary 4 (Year 10) students working in dyads throughout the instruction. The instruction comprised three stages (namely, pre-test, computer-based activity, and posttest), during which students' within-dyad interactions were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Three months after the instruction, some selected students were interviewed individually. The pre-test result showed that many students held the 'holistic conceptualizations' of image formation (rather than the physicists' point-to-point mapping model), which they applied to give alternative answer/explanations to the questions in the test. The post-test and interviews showed that overall, students improved their understanding of image formation although the improvement ranged widely. The rich qualitative data of peer interactions show that students experienced conflicts and co-construction that fostered their intensive engagement with tasks and with each other. The data also show the mediating role of the CAL programs and the teacher that helped students develop understanding.

  15. Computational anatomy based on whole body imaging basic principles of computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Masutani, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with computational anatomy, an emerging discipline recognized in medical science as a derivative of conventional anatomy. It is also a completely new research area on the boundaries of several sciences and technologies, such as medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics. Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging highlights the underlying principles, basic theories, and fundamental techniques in computational anatomy, which are derived from conventional anatomy, medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics, in addition to various examples of applications in clinical data. The book will cover topics on the basics and applications of the new discipline. Drawing from areas in multidisciplinary fields, it provides comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to computational anatomy. As well,Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging serves as a valuable resource for researchers including graduate students in the field and a connection with ...

  16. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  17. Investigation into diagnostic agreement using automated computer-assisted histopathology pattern recognition image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Webster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which histopathology pattern recognition image analysis (PRIA agrees with microscopic assessment has not been established. Thus, a commercial PRIA platform was evaluated in two applications using whole-slide images. Substantial agreement, lacking significant constant or proportional errors, between PRIA and manual morphometric image segmentation was obtained for pulmonary metastatic cancer areas (Passing/Bablok regression. Bland-Altman analysis indicated heteroscedastic measurements and tendency toward increasing variance with increasing tumor burden, but no significant trend in mean bias. The average between-methods percent tumor content difference was -0.64. Analysis of between-methods measurement differences relative to the percent tumor magnitude revealed that method disagreement had an impact primarily in the smallest measurements (tumor burden 0.988, indicating high reproducibility for both methods, yet PRIA reproducibility was superior (C.V.: PRIA = 7.4, manual = 17.1. Evaluation of PRIA on morphologically complex teratomas led to diagnostic agreement with pathologist assessments of pluripotency on subsets of teratomas. Accommodation of the diversity of teratoma histologic features frequently resulted in detrimental trade-offs, increasing PRIA error elsewhere in images. PRIA error was nonrandom and influenced by variations in histomorphology. File-size limitations encountered while training algorithms and consequences of spectral image processing dominance contributed to diagnostic inaccuracies experienced for some teratomas. PRIA appeared better suited for tissues with limited phenotypic diversity. Technical improvements may enhance diagnostic agreement, and consistent pathologist input will benefit further development and application of PRIA.

  18. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway.

  19. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  20. Photoelectronic radiology 1983; X-ray imaging with the computer-assisted technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalaqui, Jean; Sylvestre, Jacques; Robillard, Pierre; Dussault, Robert

    The development of the discipline of radiology has continued to progress from initial images depicting the structure of organs, to the exploration of dynamic and physiologic phenomena, improvements in the power of X-ray generators and with the refinement of non-toxic contrast media. Until the early part of the 1970s, radiology consisted in extrapolations from a two-dimensional image of a three-dimensional organ, and advances in diagnostic quality related chiefly to improvements in spatial resolution of the flat image. With the advent of cross-sectional imaging using computer reconstruction the emphasis has shifted to contrast resolution, to the acquisition of "pure" images in the XY plane and to an area-related approach in diagnosis, rather than to the traditional organ-oriented method. This new trend has only been made possible because of the influence of recent developments in the digital and electronics industry. This history of diagnostic radiology up to 1972 is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the major areas of interaction between X-rays and the computer, as represented by the major leading edge technologies that have already received broad acceptance by the health care profession.

  1. Computer-assisted bone age assessment: image preprocessing and epiphyseal/metaphyseal ROI extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietka, E; Gertych, A; Pospiech, S; Cao, F; Huang, H K; Gilsanz, V

    2001-08-01

    Clinical assessment of skeletal maturity is based on a visual comparison of a left-hand wrist radiograph with atlas patterns. Using a new digital hand atlas an image analysis methodology is being developed. To assist radiologists in bone age estimation. The analysis starts with a preprocessing function yielding epiphyseal/metaphyseal regions of interest (EMROIs). Then, these regions are subjected to a feature extraction function. Accuracy has been measured independently at three stages of the image analysis: detection of phalangeal tip, extraction of the EMROIs, and location of diameters and lower edge of the EMROIs. Extracted features describe the stage of skeletal development more objectively than visual comparison.

  2. Agreement between a computer-assisted tool and radiologists to classify lesions in breast elastography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcomini, Karem D.; Fleury, Eduardo F. C.; Oliveira, Vilmar M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Schiabel, Homero; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2017-03-01

    Breast elastography is a new sonographic technique that provides additional information to evaluate tissue stiffness. However, interpreting breast elastography images can vary depending on the radiologist. In order to provide quantitative and less subjective data regarding the stiffness of a lesion, we developed a tool to measure the amount of hard area in a lesion from the 2D image. The database consisted of 78 patients with 83 breast lesions (31 malignant and 52 benign). Two radiologists and one resident manually drew the contour of the lesions in B-mode ultrasound images and the contour was mapped in the elastography image. By using the system proposed, the radiologists obtained a very good diagnostic agreement among themselves (kappa = 0.86), achieving the same sensitivity and specificity (80.7 and 88.5, respectively), and an AUC of 0.883 for Radiologist 1 and 0.892 for Radiologist 2. The Resident had less interobserver agreement, as well as lower specificity and AUC, which may be related to less experience. Furthermore, the radiologists had an agreement with the tool used in the automatic method higher than 90%. Thus, the method developed was useful in aiding the diagnosis of breast lesions in strain elastography, minimizing its subjectivity.

  3. Computer-assisted orthognathic surgery: waferless maxillary positioning, versatility, and accuracy of an image-guided visualisation display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Max J; Mischkowski, Robert A; Dreiseidler, Timo; Thamm, Oliver C; Rothamel, Daniel; Zöller, Joachim E

    2013-12-01

    There may well be a shift towards 3-dimensional orthognathic surgery when virtual surgical planning can be applied clinically. We present a computer-assisted protocol that uses surgical navigation supplemented by an interactive image-guided visualisation display (IGVD) to transfer virtual maxillary planning precisely. The aim of this study was to analyse its accuracy and versatility in vivo. The protocol consists of maxillofacial imaging, diagnosis, planning of virtual treatment, and intraoperative surgical transfer using an IGV display. The advantage of the interactive IGV display is that the virtually planned maxilla and its real position can be completely superimposed during operation through a video graphics array (VGA) camera, thereby augmenting the surgeon's 3-dimensional perception. Sixteen adult class III patients were treated with by bimaxillary osteotomy. Seven hard tissue variables were chosen to compare (ΔT1-T0) the virtual maxillary planning (T0) with the postoperative result (T1) using 3-dimensional cephalometry. Clinically acceptable precision for the surgical planning transfer of the maxilla (orthognathic planning.

  4. Computer-assisted cytologic diagnosis in pancreatic FNA: An application of neural networks to image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni-Boroujeni, Amir; Yousefi, Elham; Somma, Jonathan

    2017-09-08

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy is an accurate method for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. However, a significant number of cases still pose a diagnostic challenge. The authors have attempted to design a computer model to aid in the diagnosis of these biopsies. Images were captured of cell clusters on ThinPrep slides from 75 pancreatic FNA cases (20 malignant, 24 benign, and 31 atypical). A K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment the cell clusters into separable regions of interest before extracting features similar to those used for cytomorphologic assessment. A multilayer perceptron neural network (MNN) was trained and then tested for its ability to distinguish benign from malignant cases. A total of 277 images of cell clusters were obtained. K-means clustering identified 68,301 possible regions of interest overall. Features such as contour, perimeter, and area were found to be significantly different between malignant and benign images (P <.05). The MNN was 100% accurate for benign and malignant categories. The model's predictions from the atypical data set were 77% accurate. The results of the current study demonstrate that computer models can be used successfully to distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic cytology. The fact that the model can categorize atypical cases into benign or malignant with 77% accuracy highlights the great potential of this technology. Although further study is warranted to validate its clinical applications in pancreatic and perhaps other areas of cytology as well, the potential for improved patient outcomes using MNN for image analysis in pathology is significant. Cancer Cytopathol 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Computer assisted detection and analysis of tall cell variant papillary thyroid carcinoma in histological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Baloch, Zubair; Kim, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    The number of new cases of thyroid cancer are dramatically increasing as incidences of this cancer have more than doubled since the early 1970s. Tall cell variant (TCV-PTC) papillary thyroid carcinoma is one type of thyroid cancer that is more aggressive and usually associated with higher local recurrence and distant metastasis. This variant can be identified through visual characteristics of cells in histological images. Thus, we created a fully automatic algorithm that is able to segment cells using a multi-stage approach. Our method learns the statistical characteristics of nuclei and cells during the segmentation process and utilizes this information for a more accurate result. Furthermore, we are able to analyze the detected regions and extract characteristic cell data that can be used to assist in clinical diagnosis.

  6. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  7. Quantifying fish swimming behavior in response to acute exposure of aqueous copper using computer assisted video and digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, Robin D.; Puglis, Holly J.; Little, Edward E.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors.

  8. LEGO bricks used as chemotactic chambers: evaluation by a computer-assisted image analysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarà, A; Chimenti, M

    2004-01-01

    One of the main techniques used to explore neutrophil motility, employs micropore filters in chemotactic chambers. Many new models have been proposed, in order to perform multiple microassays in a rapid, inexpensive and reproducible way. In this work, LEGO bricks have been used as chemotactic chambers in the evaluation of neutrophil random motility and chemotaxis and compared with conventional Boyden chambers in a "time-response" experiment. Neutrophil motility throughout the filters was evaluated by means of an image-processing workstation, in which a dedicated algorithm recognizes and counts the cells in several fields and focal planes throughout the whole filter; correlates counts and depth values; performs a statistical analysis of data; calculates the true value of neutrophil migration; determines the distribution of cells; and displays the migration pattern. By this method, we found that the distances travelled by the cells in conventional chambers and in LEGO bricks were perfectly identical, both in random migration and under chemotactic conditions. Moreover, no interference with the physiological behaviour of neutrophils was detectable. In fact, the kinetics of migration was identical both in random migration (characterized by a gaussian pattern) and in chemotaxis (characterized by a typical stimulation peak, previously identified by our workstation). In conclusion, LEGO bricks are extremely precise devices. They are simple to use and allow the use of small amounts of chemoattractant solution and cell suspension, supplying by itself a triplicate test. LEGO bricks are inexpensive, fast and suitable for current diagnostic activity or for research investigations in every laboratory.

  9. A novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari-Sarraf, H.; Gleason, S.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hudson, K.T.; Hubner, K.F. [Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This is a work-in-progress report of a research endeavor that deals with the design and development of a novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of mammographic images. With the initial emphasis being on the analysis of microcalcifications, the proposed approach defines a synergistic paradigm that utilizes new methodologies together with previously developed techniques. The new paradigm is intended to promote a higher degree of accuracy in CAD of mammograms with an increased overall throughput. The process of accomplishing these goals is initiated by the fractal encoding of the input image, which gives rise to the generation of focus-of-attention regions (FARs), that is, regions that contain anomalies. The primary thrust of this work is to demonstrate that by considering FARs, rather than the entire input image, the performances of the ensuing processes (i.e., segmentation, feature extraction, and classification) are enhanced in terms of accuracy and speed. After presenting the proposed approach to CAD of mammographic images, the paper describes the generation of FARs. Furthermore, an experimental study is included that demonstrates the impact of this front-end procedure on the process of microcalcification segmentation. Specifically, the experimentation reveals a dramatic decrease (increase) in the amount of input data (throughput), as well as a reduction in the number of false detections.

  10. Comparison of image quality between mammography dedicated monitor and UHD 4K monitor, using standard mammographic phantom: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Cha, Soon Joo; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, You Sung; Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Inje Unveristy Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Using standard mammographic phantom images, we compared the image quality obtained between a mammography dedicated 5 megapixel monitor (5M) and a UHD 4K (4K) monitor with digital imaging and communications in medicine display, to investigate the possibility of clinical application of 4K monitors. Three different exposures (autoexposure, overexposure and underexposure) images of mammographic phantom were obtained, and six radiologists independently evaluated the images in 5M and 4K without image modulation, by scoring of fibers, groups of specks and masses within the phantom image. The mean score of each object on both monitors was independently analyzed, using t-test and interobserver reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of SPSS. The overall mean scores of fiber, group of specks, and mass in 5M were 4.25, 3.92, and 3.28 respectively, and scores obtained in 4K monitor were 3.81, 3.58, and 3.14, respectively. No statistical difference was seen in scores of fiber and mass between the two monitors at all exposure conditions, but the score of group of specks in 4K was statistically lower in the overall (p = 0.0492) and in underexposure conditions (p = 0.012). The ICC for interobserver reliability was excellent (0.874). Our study suggests that since the mammographic phantom images are appropriate with no significant difference in image quality observed between the two monitors, the 4K monitor could be used for clinical studies. Since this is a small preliminary study using phantom images, the result may differ in actual mammographic images, and subsequent investigation with clinical mammographic images is required.

  11. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; pBIRADS for GE and Hologic systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; pBIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  12. Association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer: an assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Leader, Joseph K.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We recently investigated a new mammographic image feature based risk factor to predict near-term breast cancer risk after a woman has a negative mammographic screening. We hypothesized that unlike the conventional epidemiology-based long-term (or lifetime) risk factors, the mammographic image feature based risk factor value will increase as the time lag between the negative and positive mammography screening decreases. The purpose of this study is to test this hypothesis. From a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database with 1278 cases, we collected all available sequential FFDM examinations for each case including the "current" and 1 to 3 most recently "prior" examinations. All "prior" examinations were interpreted negative, and "current" ones were either malignant or recalled negative/benign. We computed 92 global mammographic texture and density based features, and included three clinical risk factors (woman's age, family history and subjective breast density BIRADS ratings). On this initial feature set, we applied a fast and accurate Sequential Forward Floating Selection (SFFS) feature selection algorithm to reduce feature dimensionality. The features computed on both mammographic views were individually/ separately trained using two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. The classification scores of the two ANNs were then merged with a sequential ANN. The results show that the maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.59, 7.98, and 15.77 for using the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st "prior" FFDM examinations, respectively, which demonstrates a higher association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer in the near-term after a negative screening.

  13. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  14. The region-of-interest size impacts on Ki67 quantification by computer-assisted image analysis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christgen, Matthias; von Ahsen, Sabrina; Christgen, Henriette; Länger, Florian; Kreipe, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic decision-making in breast cancer depends on histopathologic biomarkers and is influenced by the Ki67 proliferation index. Computer-assisted image analysis (CAIA) promises to improve Ki67 quantification. Several commercial applications have been developed for semiautomated CAIA-based Ki67 quantification, many of which rely on measurements in user-defined regions of interest (ROIs). Because of intratumoral proliferative heterogeneity, definition of the ROI is an important step in the analytical procedure. This study explores the ROI size impacts on Ki67 quantification. Whole-slide sections of 100 breast cancers were immunostained with the anti-Ki67 antibody 30-9 and were analyzed on the iScan Coreo digital pathology platform using a Food and Drug Administration-cleared Ki67 quantification software version v5.3 (Virtuoso; Ventana, Tucson, TX). For each case, the Ki67 labeling index (LI) was determined in multiple ROIs of gradually increasing size centered around a high-proliferation area. The spatial Ki67 decline was modeled with nonlinear regression. Depending on the ROI size, the median Ki67 LI varied between 55% and 15%. The proportion of tumors classified as Ki67 low according to the St Gallen 2013/2015 cutoff increased from 2% to 56%, as the ROI size increased from 50 to 10,000 cells captured. The interrater reliability of conventional Ki67 assessment versus CAIA-based Ki67 quantification was also dependent on the ROI size and varied between slight and almost perfect agreement (Cohen κ = 0.06-0.85). In conclusion, the ROI size is a critically important parameter for semiautomated Ki67 quantification by CAIA. Ki67 LIs determined on platforms like iScan Coreo/Virtuoso require an ROI size adjustment, for which we offer a downloadable data transformation tool.

  15. Transfer of students' learning about X-rays and computer-assisted tomography from physics to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Spartak A.

    In this study we explored students' transfer of learning in the X-ray medical imaging context, including the X-ray-based computer-assisted tomography (or CAT). For this purpose we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. The investigation was a part of a bigger research effort to design teaching-learning materials for pre-medical students who are completing their algebra-based physics course. Our students brought to the discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models, although often not internally consistent or coherent. Based on our research on pre-med students' models of X-rays we designed a hands-on lab using semi-transparent Lego bricks to model CAT scans. Without "surgery" (i.e. without intrusion into the Lego "body") students determined the shape of an object, which was built out of opaque and translucent Lego bricks and hidden from view. A source of light and a detector were provided upon request. Using a learning cycle format, we introduced CAT scans after students successfully have completed this task. By comparing students' ideas before and after teaching interview with the groups of 2 or 3 participants, we have investigated transfer of learning from basic physics and everyday experience to a complex medical technology and how their peer interactions trigger and facilitate this process. During the last phase of our research we also introduced a CAT-scan simulation problem into our teaching interview routine and compared students' perception of this simulation and their perception of the hands-on activity.

  16. Developing a visual sensitive image features based CAD scheme to assist classification of mammographic masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Qiu, Yuchen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes of mammograms have been previously developed and tested. However, due to using "black-box" approaches with a large number of complicated features, radiologists have lower confidence to accept or consider CAD-cued results. In order to help solve this issue, this study aims to develop and evaluate a new CAD scheme that uses visual sensitive image features to classify between malignant and benign mammographic masses. A dataset of 301 masses detected on both craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateraloblique (MLO) view images was retrospectively assembled. Among them, 152 were malignant and 149 were benign. An iterative region-growing algorithm was applied to the special Gaussian-kernel filtered images to segment mass regions. Total 13 Image features were computed to mimic 5 categories of visually sensitive features that are commonly used by radiologists in classifying suspicious mammographic masses namely, mass size, shape factor, contrast, homogeneity and spiculation. We then selected one optimal feature in each of 5 feature categories by using a student t-test, and applied two logistic regression classifiers using either CC or MLO view images to distinguish between malignant and benign masses. Last, a fusion method of combining two classification scores was applied and tested. By applying a 10-fold cross-validation method, the area under receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.806+/-0.025. This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a "visual-aid" interface, CAD results are much more easily explainable to the observers and may increase their confidence to consider CAD-cued results.

  17. Evaluation of the Wider system, a new computer-assisted image-processing device for bacterial identification and susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantón, R; Pérez-Vázquez, M; Oliver, A; Sánchez Del Saz, B; Gutiérrez, M O; Martínez-Ferrer, M; Baquero, F

    2000-04-01

    The Wider system is a newly developed computer-assisted image-processing device for both bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. It has been adapted to be able to read and interpret commercial MicroScan panels. Two hundred forty-four fresh consecutive clinical isolates (138 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae, 25 nonfermentative gram-negative rods [NFGNRs], and 81 gram-positive cocci) were tested. In addition, 100 enterobacterial strains with known beta-lactam resistance mechanisms (22 strains with chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase, 8 strains with chromosomal class A beta-lactamase, 21 broad-spectrum and IRT beta-lactamase-producing strains, 41 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains, and 8 permeability mutants) were tested. API galleries and National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) microdilution methods were used as reference methods. The Wider system correctly identified 97.5% of the clinical isolates at the species level. Overall essential agreement (+/-1 log(2) dilution for 3,719 organism-antimicrobial drug combinations) was 95.6% (isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae, 96.6%; NFGNRs, 88.0%; gram-positive cocci, 95.6%). The lowest essential agreement was observed with Enterobacteriaceae versus imipenem (84.0%), NFGNR versus piperacillin (88.0%) and cefepime (88.0%), and gram-positive isolates versus penicillin (80.4%). The category error rate (NCCLS criteria) was 4.2% (2.0% very major errors, 0.6% major errors, and 1. 5% minor errors). Essential agreement and interpretive error rates for eight beta-lactam antibiotics against isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae with known beta-lactam resistance mechanisms were 94.8 and 5.4%, respectively. Interestingly, the very major error rate was only 0.8%. Minor errors (3.6%) were mainly observed with amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefepime against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing isolates. The Wider system is a new reliable tool which applies the

  18. Implications Of Computer Assisted Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Heinz U.

    1989-10-01

    Within the field of radiology, assistance with computer and communication systems may be applied to generation, storing, transmission, viewing, analyzing and interpreting of images. As a result, digital image management and communication systems will be applied at various levels in the health care system. Four groups of people are somehow involved or affected by this process. These are, first of all, the patients and the medical personnel, but also the scientific-engineering community and the group of professions involved with financing and/or administering these systems. Each group approaches computer assisted radiology from a particular point of view. The paper outlines some aspects as regards the different perceptions of these groups, which need to be clarified in order to successfully realise computer assisted radiology.

  19. Development and evaluation of an algorithm for the computer-assisted segmentation of the human hypothalamus on 7-Tesla magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Stephanie; Schönknecht, Peter; Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures.

  20. Development and evaluation of an algorithm for the computer-assisted segmentation of the human hypothalamus on 7-Tesla magnetic resonance images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schindler

    Full Text Available Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC and Dice's coefficient (DC. The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8 and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2. There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures.

  1. Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Computer-Assisted Segmentation of the Human Hypothalamus on 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E.; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures. PMID:23935821

  2. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes Villar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods: Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results: Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%, films development (72.7%, film response (72.7%, low contrast fine detail (92.2%, tumor mass visualization (76.5%, absence of image artifacts (94.1%, mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%. On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8% and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%. Conclusion: The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval.

  3. Computing mammographic density from a multiple regression model constructed with image-acquisition parameters from a full-field digital mammographic unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lee-Jane W [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-1109 (United States); Nishino, Thomas K [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0709 (United States); Khamapirad, Tuenchit [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0709 (United States); Grady, James J [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-1109 (United States); Jr, Morton H Leonard [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0709 (United States); Brunder, Donald G [Department of Academic Computing/Academic Resources, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-1035 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    Breast density (the percentage of fibroglandular tissue in the breast) has been suggested to be a useful surrogate marker for breast cancer risk. It is conventionally measured using screen-film mammographic images by a labor-intensive histogram segmentation method (HSM). We have adapted and modified the HSM for measuring breast density from raw digital mammograms acquired by full-field digital mammography. Multiple regression model analyses showed that many of the instrument parameters for acquiring the screening mammograms (e.g. breast compression thickness, radiological thickness, radiation dose, compression force, etc) and image pixel intensity statistics of the imaged breasts were strong predictors of the observed threshold values (model R{sup 2} = 0.93) and %-density (R{sup 2} = 0.84). The intra-class correlation coefficient of the %-density for duplicate images was estimated to be 0.80, using the regression model-derived threshold values, and 0.94 if estimated directly from the parameter estimates of the %-density prediction regression model. Therefore, with additional research, these mathematical models could be used to compute breast density objectively, automatically bypassing the HSM step, and could greatly facilitate breast cancer research studies.

  4. Computing mammographic density from a multiple regression model constructed with image-acquisition parameters from a full-field digital mammographic unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lee-Jane W.; Nishino, Thomas K.; Khamapirad, Tuenchit; Grady, James J.; Leonard, Morton H., Jr.; Brunder, Donald G.

    2007-08-01

    Breast density (the percentage of fibroglandular tissue in the breast) has been suggested to be a useful surrogate marker for breast cancer risk. It is conventionally measured using screen-film mammographic images by a labor-intensive histogram segmentation method (HSM). We have adapted and modified the HSM for measuring breast density from raw digital mammograms acquired by full-field digital mammography. Multiple regression model analyses showed that many of the instrument parameters for acquiring the screening mammograms (e.g. breast compression thickness, radiological thickness, radiation dose, compression force, etc) and image pixel intensity statistics of the imaged breasts were strong predictors of the observed threshold values (model R2 = 0.93) and %-density (R2 = 0.84). The intra-class correlation coefficient of the %-density for duplicate images was estimated to be 0.80, using the regression model-derived threshold values, and 0.94 if estimated directly from the parameter estimates of the %-density prediction regression model. Therefore, with additional research, these mathematical models could be used to compute breast density objectively, automatically bypassing the HSM step, and could greatly facilitate breast cancer research studies.

  5. Similarity of Fibroglandular Breast Tissue Content Measured from Magnetic Resonance and Mammographic Images and by a Mathematical Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Nayeem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with high breast density (BD have a 4- to 6-fold greater risk for breast cancer than women with low BD. We found that BD can be easily computed from a mathematical algorithm using routine mammographic imaging data or by a curve-fitting algorithm using fat and nonfat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data. These BD measures in a strictly defined group of premenopausal women providing both mammographic and breast MRI images were predicted as well by the same set of strong predictor variables as were measures from a published laborious histogram segmentation method and a full field digital mammographic unit in multivariate regression models. We also found that the number of completed pregnancies, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, and progesterone were more strongly associated with amounts of glandular tissue than adipose tissue, while fat body mass, alanine aminotransferase, and insulin like growth factor-II appear to be more associated with the amount of breast adipose tissue. Our results show that methods of breast imaging and modalities for estimating the amount of glandular tissue have no effects on the strength of these predictors of BD. Thus, the more convenient mathematical algorithm and the safer MRI protocols may facilitate prospective measurements of BD.

  6. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-06-15

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  7. Optimizing quality of digital mammographic imaging using Taguchi analysis with an ACR accreditation phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Yuan; Pan, Lung-Fa; Chiang, Fu-Tsai; Yeh, Da-Ming; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2016-07-03

    This work demonstrated the improvement of the visualization of lesions by modulating the factors of an X-ray mammography imaging system using Taguchi analysis. Optimal combinations of X-ray operating factors in each group of level combination were determined using the Taguchi method, in which all factors were organized into only 18 groups, yielding analytical results with the same confidence as if each factor had been examined independently. The 4 considered operating factors of the X-ray machine were (1) anode material (target), (2) kVp, (3) mAs and (4) field of view (FOV). Each of these factors had 2 or 3 levels. Therefore, 54 (2×3×3×3 = 54) combinations were generated. The optimal settings were Rh as the target, 28 kVp, 80 mAs and 19×23 cm(2) FOV. The grade of exposed mammographic phantom image increased from the automatic exposure control (AEC) setting 70.92 to 72.00 under the optimal setting, meeting the minimum standard (70.00) set by Taiwan's Department of Health. The average glandular dose (AGD) of the exposed phantom, 0.182 cGy, was lower than that, 0.203 cGy, under the AEC setting. The Taguchi method was extremely promising for the design of imaging protocols in clinical diagnosis.

  8. Breast-Specific γ-Imaging for the Detection of Mammographically Occult Breast Cancer in Women at Increased Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Rachel F; Ruda, Rachel C; Yang, Jialu L; Coffey, Caitrín M; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A

    2016-05-01

    Breast-specific γ-imaging (BSGI) is a physiologic imaging modality that can detect subcentimeter and mammographically occult breast cancer, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the incremental increase in breast cancer detection when BSGI is used as an adjunct to mammography in women at increased risk for breast cancer. All patients undergoing BSGI from April 2010 through January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Eligible patients were identified as women at increased risk for breast cancer and whose most recent mammogram was benign. Examinations exhibiting focally increased radiotracer uptake were considered positive. Incremental increase in cancer detection was calculated as the percentage of mammographically occult BSGI-detected breast cancer and the number of mammographically occult breast cancers detected per 1,000 women screened. Included in this study were 849 patients in whom 14 BSGI examinations detected mammographically occult breast cancer. Patients ranged in age from 26 to 83 y, with a mean age of 57 y. Eleven of 14 cancers were detected in women with dense breasts. The addition of BSGI to the annual breast screen of asymptomatic women at increased risk for breast cancer yields 16.5 cancers per 1,000 women screened. When high-risk lesions and cancers were combined, BSGI detected 33.0 high-risk lesions and cancers per 1,000 women screened. BSGI is a reliable adjunct modality to screening mammography that increases breast cancer detection by 1.7% (14/849) in women at increased risk for breast cancer, comparable to results reported for breast MRI. BSGI is beneficial in breast cancer detection in women at increased risk, particularly in those with dense breasts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Computer Assisted Cytologic Assessment,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-27

    Exfoliative Cytology in Oral Cancer Detection. Oral Surg 17. 327-330. TABLE I CATEGORIZATION ACCORDING TO NUCLEAR:CYTOPLASMIC RATIOS CLASS I CLASS II CLASS III... CYTOLOGIC ASSESSMENT Manuscript for Publication 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Bryant, Michael L...CLASSIFICATION OF TH4IS PAGM(37,.n D~a Enterod) d, SF myvqN~ A SF’ .xt COMPUTER ASSISTED CYTOLOGIC ASSESSMENT BRYANT, MICHAEL L. HOLLINGER, JEFFREY 0

  10. Computer assisted myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamakawa, Y.; Miyauchi, T.; Ogawa, T.; Saito, Y. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Spinal computed tomography was carried out after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide. This technique can clearly visualize the spinal subarachnoid space and structures contained in this space, and is an accurate and satisfactory modality for detecting spinal cord and various spinal lesions. In the cases with syringomyelia, the reflux of metrizamide into the syrinx was most marked several hours following intrathecal introduction of metrizamide. Computer assisted myelography with metrizamide is essential in the diagnosis of communicating sylingomyelia. It will demonstrate intraspinal extention and the total geography of the spinal cord tumor. Authors present their technique and results with representative cases of various spinal lesions.

  11. Mammographic, sonographic and MR imaging features of invasive micropapillary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharif, Shaza; Daghistani, Razan; Kamberoğlu, Elif Aşik; Omeroglu, Atilla; Meterissian, Sarkis; Mesurolle, Benoît, E-mail: benoit.mesurolle@muhc.mcgill.ca

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Describe mammographic, sonographic and MRI findings of invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the breast. Materials and methods: Review of the pathology database identified 43 patients (mean age, 59.3 years) with the diagnosis of breast IMPC. Three patients had no available imaging studies. Mammograms (40), breast ultrasounds (33) and MRIs (8) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus following the BI-RADS Lexicon. Clinical, histopathologic features, as well as hormone status were recorded. Results: Twenty patients presented with palpable abnormality (20/40, 50%). Thirty-five patients had an abnormal mammogram (87.5%, 35/40) showing 39 lesions, 29 corresponding to masses (29/39, 74.4%), 11 associated with microcalcifications and two associated with architectural distortion. Sonography identified 41 masses (in 33 patients) displaying an irregular shape (30/41, 73.2%), appearing hypoechoic (39/41, 95%), with spiculated or angular margins (26/41, 63.4%), non-parallel orientation (26/41, 63.4%) and combined acoustic posterior pattern (18/41, 44%). MRI identified 13 lesions (in eight patients), 12 as masses (12/13, 92.3%) with irregular or spiculated margins (12/12, 100%), eight displaying an irregular or lobulated shape (8/12, 66.7%), six with homogeneous internal enhancement (6/12, 50%) and eight with type 3 enhancement curve (8/12, 61.5%). Associated non-mass like enhancement was noted in two patients. Twenty-nine patients had associated lymphovascular invasion (29/40, 72.5%) and axillary lymph node metastases were present in 22 of the 39 patients (22/39, 56%). Conclusion: Invasive ductal carcinoma with IMPC features display imaging findings highly suspicious of malignant lesions. They are associated with high lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastases rates.

  12. COMPUTER-ASSISTED ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORIN-CIPRIAN TEIUŞAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available What is computer-assisted accounting? Where is the place and what is the role of the computer in the financial-accounting activity? What is the position and importance of the computer in the accountant’s activity? All these are questions that require scientific research in order to find the answers. The paper approaches the issue of the support granted to the accountant to organize and manage the accounting activity by the computer. Starting from the notions of accounting and computer, the concept of computer-assisted accounting is introduced, it has a general character and it refers to the accounting performed with the help of the computer or using the computer to automate the procedures performed by the person who is doing the accounting activity; this is a concept used to define the computer applications of the accounting activity. The arguments regarding the use of the computer to assist accounting targets the accounting informatization, the automating of the financial-accounting activities and the endowment with modern technology of the contemporary accounting.

  13. Feature extraction using convolutional neural network for classifying breast density in mammographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Ricardo L.; Carneiro, Pedro C.; Patrocinio, Ana C.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women in most countries. The high levels of mortality relate mostly to late diagnosis and to the direct proportionally relationship between breast density and breast cancer development. Therefore, the correct assessment of breast density is important to provide better screening for higher risk patients. However, in modern digital mammography the discrimination among breast densities is highly complex due to increased contrast and visual information for all densities. Thus, a computational system for classifying breast density might be a useful tool for aiding medical staff. Several machine-learning algorithms are already capable of classifying small number of classes with good accuracy. However, machinelearning algorithms main constraint relates to the set of features extracted and used for classification. Although well-known feature extraction techniques might provide a good set of features, it is a complex task to select an initial set during design of a classifier. Thus, we propose feature extraction using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for classifying breast density by a usual machine-learning classifier. We used 307 mammographic images downsampled to 260x200 pixels to train a CNN and extract features from a deep layer. After training, the activation of 8 neurons from a deep fully connected layer are extracted and used as features. Then, these features are feedforward to a single hidden layer neural network that is cross-validated using 10-folds to classify among four classes of breast density. The global accuracy of this method is 98.4%, presenting only 1.6% of misclassification. However, the small set of samples and memory constraints required the reuse of data in both CNN and MLP-NN, therefore overfitting might have influenced the results even though we cross-validated the network. Thus, although we presented a promising method for extracting features and classifying breast density, a greater database is

  14. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  15. GPCALMA, a mammographic CAD in a GRID connection

    CERN Document Server

    Bottigli, U; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Fauci, F; Golosio, B; Lauria, A; Torres, E L; Magro, R; Masala, G L; Oliva, P R; Palmiero, R; Raso, G; Retico, A; Stumbo, S; Tangaro, S

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of this work is the development of an automatic system which could be useful for radiologists in the investigation of breast cancer. A breast neoplasia is often marked by the presence of microcalcifications and massive lesions in the mammogram: hence the need for tools able to recognize such lesions at an early stage. GPCALMA (Grid Platform Computer Assisted Library for MAmmography), a collaboration among italian physicists and radiologists, has built a large distributed database of digitized mammographic images (at this moment about 5500 images corresponding to 1650 patients). This collaboration has developed a CAD (Computer Aided Detection) system which, installed in an integrated station, can also be used for digitization, as archive and to perform statistical analysis. With a GRID configuration it would be possible for the clinicians tele- and co-working in new and innovative groupings ('virtual organisations') and, using the whole database, by the GPCALMA tools several analysis can be performed. ...

  16. Computer Assisted Audit Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Iancu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available From the modern point of view, audit takes intoaccount especially the information systems representingmainly the examination performed by a professional asregards the manner for developing an activity by means ofcomparing it to the quality criteria specific to this activity.Having as reference point this very general definition ofauditing, it must be emphasized that the best known segmentof auditing is the financial audit that had a parallel evolutionto the accountancy one.The present day phase of developing the financial audithas as main trait the internationalization of the accountantprofessional. World wide there are multinational companiesthat offer services in the financial auditing, taxing andconsultancy domain. The auditors, natural persons and auditcompanies, take part at the works of the national andinternational authorities for setting out norms in theaccountancy and auditing domain.The computer assisted audit techniques can be classified inseveral manners according to the approaches used by theauditor. The most well-known techniques are comprised inthe following categories: testing data techniques, integratedtest, parallel simulation, revising the program logics,programs developed upon request, generalized auditsoftware, utility programs and expert systems.

  17. Computer assisted audit techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Danić

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to point to the possibilities of more efficient auditing. In the encirclement of more and more intensive use of computer techniques that help to CAAT all the aims and the volume of auditing do not change when the audit is done in the computer-informatics environment. The computer assisted audit technique (CAATs can improve the efficiency and productivity of audit procedures. In the computerized information system, the CAATs are the ways in which an auditor can use computer to gather or as help in gathering auditing evidence. There are more reasons why the auditors apply computer techniques that help in auditing. Most often, they do it to achieve improvement of auditing efficiency when the data volume is large. It depends on several factors whether the auditors will apply the computer techniques that help auditing and to what degree respectively. If they do it, the most important are the computer knowledge, professional skill, experience of auditors, and availability of computer technique, and adequacy of computer supports, infeasibility of hand tests, efficiency and time limit. Through several examples from practice, we showed the possibilities of ACL as one of the CAAT tools.

  18. CARS 2008: Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-06-15

    The proceedings contain contributions to the following topics: digital imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, cardiac and vascular imaging, computer assisted radiation therapy, image processing and display, minimal invasive spinal surgery, computer assisted treatment of the prostate, the interventional radiology suite of the future, interventional oncology, computer assisted neurosurgery, computer assisted head and neck and ENT surgery, cardiovascular surgery, computer assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics, instrumentation and navigation, surgical modelling, simulation and education, endoscopy and related techniques, workflow and new concepts in surgery, research training group 1126: intelligent surgery, digital operating room, image distribution and integration strategies, regional PACS and telemedicine, PACS - beyond radiology and E-learning, workflow and standardization, breast CAD, thoracic CAD, abdominal CAD, brain CAD, orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and airways, imaging and treating temporomandibular joint conditions, maxillofacial cone beam CT, craniomaxillofacial image fusion and CBCT incidental findings, image guided craniomaxillofacial procedures, imaging as a biomarker for therapy response, computer aided diagnosis. The Poster sessions cover the topics computer aided surgery, Euro PACS meeting, computer assisted radiology, computer aided diagnosis and computer assisted radiology and surgery.

  19. Otimização de imagens mamográficas Optimization of mammographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rodrigues de Pina

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho tem como objetivo a otimização de imagens mamográficas, com consideráveis reduções de doses. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Neste estudo o feixe de raios-X foi calibrado para cada tensão (kVp, de modo a determinar a melhor combinação de kVp e mAs que irá proporcionar uma densidade ótica (DO em torno de 1.0 acima da base mais véu do filme utilizado. RESULTADOS: Serão discutidas questões sobre os métodos empregados para a seleção de parâmetros de exposição do feixe de raios-X, seleção da melhor imagem utilizando o método de avaliação gradativa visual, comparações entre as doses e carga do tubo (kVp × mAs proporcionadas pelas técnicas determinadas neste estudo e pelas utilizadas na rotina clínica do Serviço de Diagnóstico por Imagem do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu. Neste estudo foram obtidas imagens radiográficas de mama de excelente qualidade, com redução de dose e carga de tubo, respectivamente, de 36,8% e 46,2%, quando comparadas com a técnica utilizada pela rotina clínica da instituição. CONCLUSÃO: Esta pesquisa vem contribuir com a otimização da relação risco-benefício para o paciente e custo-benefício para a instituição.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is the optimization of mammographic images with a considerable radiation dose reduction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the present study the X-ray beam was calibrated for each tension (kVp, aiming at determining the best combination between kVp and mAs, resulting in optical densities of about 1.0 above the base-plus-fog density. RESULTS: This study will bring into question the methods for X-ray beam calibration, the choice of the best image by means of visual grading analysis, comparisons between doses and tube load (kVp × mAs delivered by the techniques described in this study and by those adopted in the clinical routine at Service of Diagnostic Imaging of Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu Clinics

  20. Body hair counts during hair length reduction procedures: a comparative study between Computer Assisted Image Analysis after Manual Processing (CAIAMP) and Trichoscan(™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, D J J

    2015-08-01

    To compare two measurement methods for body hair. Calibration of computer assisted image analysis after manual processing (CAIAMP) showed variation hair and skin' were taken before hair dye, after hair dye or after hair length reduction without hair extraction or destruction. Data in the same targets were compared with Trichoscan(™) quoted for 'unambiguous evaluation of the hair growth after shaving'. CAIAMP detected a total of 337 hair and showed no statistically significant differences with the three procedures confirming 'good natural contrast between hair and skin' and that reduction methods did not affect hair counts. While CAIAMP found a mean number of 19 thick hair (≥30 μm) before dye, 18 after dye and 20 after hair reduction, Trichoscan(™) found in the same sites respectively 44, 73 and 61. Trichoscan(™) generated counts differed statistically significantly from CAIAMP-data. Automated analyses were considered un-specifically influenced by hair medulla and natural or artificial skin background. Quality control including all steps of human intervention and measurement technology are mandatory for body hair measurements during experimental or clinical trials on body hair grooming, shaving or removal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. BREAST DENSITY EVALUATION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ASSESSMENT BY A RADIOLOGIST AND THE COMPUTER-ASSISTED THRESHOLD TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, mammographic density (MD) of the breast has been assessed by a radiologist visually. This subjective evaluation requires significant experience to distinguish the relative proportions of the fibrous connective tissue and adipose tissue in the mammary gland correctly. The aim of this study is to compare the capabilities of the different methods (visual and computer-assisted) for assessing mammographic density. Our sample in this study consists of 66 patients with digital m...

  2. Computer-assisted framework for machine-learning-based delineation of GTV regions on datasets of planning CT and PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Koujiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Jin, Ze; Yabu-Uchi, Hidetake; Kuwazuru, Jumpei; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Honda, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed a computer-assisted framework for machine-learning-based delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) following an optimum contour selection (OCS) method. The key idea of the proposed framework was to feed image features around GTV contours (determined based on the knowledge of radiation oncologists) into a machine-learning classifier during the training step, after which the classifier produces the 'degree of GTV' for each voxel in the testing step. Initial GTV regions were extracted using a support vector machine (SVM) that learned the image features inside and outside each tumor region (determined by radiation oncologists). The leave-one-out-by-patient test was employed for training and testing the steps of the proposed framework. The final GTV regions were determined using the OCS method that can be used to select a global optimum object contour based on multiple active delineations with a LSM around the GTV. The efficacy of the proposed framework was evaluated in 14 lung cancer cases [solid: 6, ground-glass opacity (GGO): 4, mixed GGO: 4] using the 3D Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which denotes the degree of region similarity between the GTVs contoured by radiation oncologists and those determined using the proposed framework. The proposed framework achieved an average DSC of 0.777 for 14 cases, whereas the OCS-based framework produced an average DSC of 0.507. The average DSCs for GGO and mixed GGO were 0.763 and 0.701, respectively, obtained by the proposed framework. The proposed framework can be employed as a tool to assist radiation oncologists in delineating various GTV regions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. Computer-assisted framework for machine-learning–based delineation of GTV regions on datasets of planning CT and PET/CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Koujiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Jin, Ze; Yabu-uchi, Hidetake; Kuwazuru, Jumpei; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Honda, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed a computer-assisted framework for machine-learning–based delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) following an optimum contour selection (OCS) method. The key idea of the proposed framework was to feed image features around GTV contours (determined based on the knowledge of radiation oncologists) into a machine-learning classifier during the training step, after which the classifier produces the ‘degree of GTV’ for each voxel in the testing step. Initial GTV regions were extracted using a support vector machine (SVM) that learned the image features inside and outside each tumor region (determined by radiation oncologists). The leave-one-out-by-patient test was employed for training and testing the steps of the proposed framework. The final GTV regions were determined using the OCS method that can be used to select a global optimum object contour based on multiple active delineations with a LSM around the GTV. The efficacy of the proposed framework was evaluated in 14 lung cancer cases [solid: 6, ground-glass opacity (GGO): 4, mixed GGO: 4] using the 3D Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which denotes the degree of region similarity between the GTVs contoured by radiation oncologists and those determined using the proposed framework. The proposed framework achieved an average DSC of 0.777 for 14 cases, whereas the OCS-based framework produced an average DSC of 0.507. The average DSCs for GGO and mixed GGO were 0.763 and 0.701, respectively, obtained by the proposed framework. The proposed framework can be employed as a tool to assist radiation oncologists in delineating various GTV regions. PMID:27609193

  4. Heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer: mammographic, US, and MR imaging features according to androgen receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Song, Sung Eun; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Park, In-Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-16

    Our aim was to determine whether triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) with and without androgen receptor (AR) expression have distinguishing imaging features on mammography, breast ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. AR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in 125 patients with TNBC from a consecutive series of 1,086 operable invasive breast cancers. Two experienced radiologists blinded to clinicopathological findings reviewed all imaging studies in consensus using the BI-RADS lexicon. The imaging and pathological features of 33 AR-positive TNBCs were compared with those of 92 AR-negative TNBCs. The presence of mammographic calcifications with or without a mass (p < 0.001), non-mass enhancement on MR imaging (p < 0.001), and masses with irregular shape or spiculated margins on US (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and MR imaging (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001) were significantly associated with AR-positive TNBC. Compared with AR-negative TNBC, AR-positive TNBC was more likely to have a ductal carcinoma in situ component (59.8 % vs. 90.9 %, p = 0.001) and low Ki-67 expression (30.4 % vs. 51.5 %, p = 0.030). AR-positive and AR-negative TNBCs have different imaging features, and certain imaging findings can be useful to predict AR status in TNBC. (orig.)

  5. Breast nodules detection in images of ultrasonographic and mammographic simulators; Deteccao de nodulos mamarios em imagens de simuladores ultrassonografico e mamografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcomini, Karem D.; Schiabel, Homero, E-mail: karem.dm@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica

    2013-08-15

    Due to the high incidence rate of breast cancer in women, many procedures have been developed to assist in the diagnosis and early detection. Mammography and ultrasonography stand out as the main breast imaging techniques. In this context, the schemes of computer-aided diagnosis have provided to the specialist a more accurate and reliable second opinion by minimizing the visual subjectivity inter-observer. Thus, we propose the application of an automated method of segmentation, through the neural network SOM, to provide accurate information regarding the border of the lesion. The tests were employed in 100 mammographic images and 70 sonographic, both cases obtained by simulation. In order to verify the accuracy of the boundaries demarcated by the automatic detector, quantitative measurements were extracted to compare these images with the manually delineated by an experienced radiologist. The proposed technique presented high accuracy and sensitivity, and low error rate in correctly representing the mammographic and sonographic findings. (author)

  6. Development of a 2D silicon strip detector system for mammographic imaging using particle physics technology

    CERN Document Server

    Royle, G J; Speller, R D; Hall, G; Iles, G; Raymond, M; Corrin, E; Stelt, P F; Manthos, N; Triantis, F A

    2002-01-01

    2D silicon strip sensors using particle physics readout technology have been evaluated as mammographic detectors. Two different versions of the APV series of front-end electronics were used that provided different noise levels. The sensors were evaluated using a typical mammography X-ray spectrum. The spatial resolution was evaluated using line pair test patterns and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using the Edge Response Function. Low contrast performance was measured using the TOR(MAX) test object. Limiting spatial resolution of 52 mu m was obtained and an MTF value of 0.1 at 16 lp/mm. The low contrast performance was estimated from 250, 500 mu m and 6 mm diameter objects and was found to be 11.5%, 7% and better than 3.8%, respectively.

  7. The role of mammographic calcification in the neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer imaging evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-jie; Chen, Canming; Gu, Yajia; Di, Genhong; Wu, Jiong; Liu, Guangyu; Shao, ZhiMin

    2014-01-01

    Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR) positive tumors (74.3% versus 64.6%) and HER2 positive tumors (51.3% versus 33.4%, p = 0.004) and a similar pathologic complete response (pCR) rate compared to patients without calcifications (35.4% versus 29.8%). After NACT, the range of calcification decreased in 40% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 52.5%; the calcification density decreased in 15% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 77.5%; none of these change patterns were related to tumor response rate. No significant correlation was observed between the calcification appearance (morphology, distribution, range, diameter or density) and tumor subtypes or pCR rates. Among patients with malignant calcifications, 54 showed calcifications alone, 40 occurred with an architectural distortion (AD) and 93 with a mass. Calcifications were observed inside the tumor in 44% of patients and outside in 56%, with similar pCR rates and patterns of change. Calcification appearance did not clearly change after NACT, and calcification patterns were not related to pCR rate, suggesting that mammogram may not accurate to evaluate tumor response changes. Microcalcifications visible after NACT is essential for determining the extent of excision, patients with calcifications that occurred outside of the mass still had the opportunity for breast conservation.

  8. The role of mammographic calcification in the neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer imaging evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-jie Li

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. METHODS: 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. RESULTS: Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR positive tumors (74.3% versus 64.6% and HER2 positive tumors (51.3% versus 33.4%, p = 0.004 and a similar pathologic complete response (pCR rate compared to patients without calcifications (35.4% versus 29.8%. After NACT, the range of calcification decreased in 40% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 52.5%; the calcification density decreased in 15% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 77.5%; none of these change patterns were related to tumor response rate. No significant correlation was observed between the calcification appearance (morphology, distribution, range, diameter or density and tumor subtypes or pCR rates. Among patients with malignant calcifications, 54 showed calcifications alone, 40 occurred with an architectural distortion (AD and 93 with a mass. Calcifications were observed inside the tumor in 44% of patients and outside in 56%, with similar pCR rates and patterns of change. CONCLUSIONS: Calcification appearance did not clearly change after NACT, and calcification patterns were not related to pCR rate, suggesting that mammogram may not accurate to evaluate tumor response changes. Microcalcifications visible after NACT is essential for determining the extent of excision, patients with calcifications that occurred outside of the mass still had the opportunity for breast conservation.

  9. Computer assisted SCFE osteotomy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapikowski, Pawel [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Control and Information Engineering, Poznan (Poland); Tyrakowski, Marcin; Czubak, Jaroslaw; Czwojdzinski, Adam [Postgraduate Medical Education Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-11-15

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common pediatric orthopedic disorder that requires surgical correction. Preoperative planning of a proximal femoral osteotomy is essential in cases of SCFE. This planning is usually done using 2D radiographs, but 3D data can be acquired with CT and analyzed with 3D visualization software. SCFEanalyzer is a computer program developed for preoperative planning of proximal femoral osteotomy to correct SCFE. Computed tomography scans were performed on human bone specimens: one pelvis and two femoral bones (right and left) and volume data of a patient. The CT data were used to test the abilities of the SCFEanalyzer software, which utilizes 3D virtual models of anatomic structures constructed from CT image data. Separation of anatomical bone structures is done by means of ''cutting'' 3D surface model of the pelvis. The software enables qualitative and quantitative spatial analysis of chosen parameters analogous to those done on the basis of plain radiographs. SCFEanalyzer makes it possible to evaluate the function of the hip joint by calculating the range of motion depending on the shape of bone structures based on oriented bounding box object representation. Pelvic and hip CT scans from a patient with SCFE were subjected to femoral geometry analysis and hip joint function assessment. These were done to plan and simulate osteotomy of the proximal femur. Analogous qualitative and quantitative evaluation after performing the virtual surgery were evaluated to determine the potential treatment effects. The use of computer assistance in preoperative planning enable us to increase objectivity and repeatability, and to compare the results of different types of osteotomy on the proximal femur, and thus to choose the optimal operation in each individual case. (orig.)

  10. Mammographic Breast Density Assessment Using Automated Volumetric Software and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) Categorization by Expert Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; McEntee, Mark F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate agreement on mammographic breast density (MD) assessment between automated volumetric software and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by expert radiologists. Forty cases of left craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique mammograms from 20 women were used. All images had their volumetric density classified using Volpara density grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage. The same images were then classified into BIRADS categories (I-IV) by 20 American Board of Radiology examiners. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement (κ = 0.537; 95% CI = 0.234-0.699) between VDG classification and radiologists' BIRADS density assessment. Interreader agreement using BIRADS also demonstrated moderate agreement (κ = 0.565; 95% CI = 0.519-0.610) ranging from 0.328 to 0.669. Radiologists' average BIRADS was lower than average VDG scores by 0.33, with their mean being 2.13, whereas the mean VDG was 2.48 (U = -3.742; P BIRADS showed a very strong positive correlation (ρ = 0.91; P BIRADS and average volumetric breast density percentage (ρ = 0.94; P BIRADS; interreader variations still exist within BIRADS. Because of the increasing importance of MD measurement in clinical management of patients, widely accepted, reproducible, and accurate measures of MD are required. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computer assisted medical history taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Quaak; A.P.M. Hasman (Arie)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis a study is described which was performed to explore the possibilities of computer-assisted history taking to support patient care. A system was developed by which the patient himself enters his medical data into a computer. The system enables an unexperienced user, i.e.

  12. Computer assisted medical history taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Quaak; A.P.M. Hasman (Arie)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis a study is described which was performed to explore the possibilities of computer-assisted history taking to support patient care. A system was developed by which the patient himself enters his medical data into a computer. The system enables an unexperienced user, i.e. a

  13. A Review of Segmentation of Mammographic Images Based on Breast Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusree Mohan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of fatality in women. Mammogram is the effectual modality for early detection of breast cancer. Increased mammographic breast density is a moderate independent risk factor for breast cancer, Radiologists have estimated breast density using four broad categories (BI-RADS swearing on visual assessment of mammograms. The aim of this paper is to review approaches for segmentation of breast regions in mammograms according to breast density. Studies based on density have been undertaken because of the relationship between breast cancer and density. Breast cancer usually occurs in the fibroglandular area of breast tissue, which appears bright on mammograms and is described as breast density. Most of the studies are focused on the classification methods for glandular tissue detection. Others highlighted on the segmentation methods for fibroglandular tissue, while few researchers performed segmentation of the breast anatomical regions based on density. There have also been works on the segmentation of other specific parts of breast regions such as either detection of nipple position, skin-air interface or pectoral muscles. The problems on the evaluation performance of the segmentation results in relation to ground truth are also discussed in this paper.

  14. Computer Assisted Parallel Program Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Parallel computation is widely employed in scientific researches, engineering activities and product development. Parallel program writing itself is not always a simple task depending on problems solved. Large-scale scientific computing, huge data analyses and precise visualizations, for example, would require parallel computations, and the parallel computing needs the parallelization techniques. In this Chapter a parallel program generation support is discussed, and a computer-assisted parallel program generation system P-NCAS is introduced. Computer assisted problem solving is one of key methods to promote innovations in science and engineering, and contributes to enrich our society and our life toward a programming-free environment in computing science. Problem solving environments (PSE) research activities had started to enhance the programming power in 1970's. The P-NCAS is one of the PSEs; The PSE concept provides an integrated human-friendly computational software and hardware system to solve a target ...

  15. Cyclic changes in endometrial echotexture of cows using a computer-assisted program for the analysis of first- and second-order grey level statistics of B-Mode ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauder, Sandra; Weber, Frank; Kiossis, Evangelos; Bollwein, Heinrich

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the suitability of a computer-assisted echotexture analysis program for analysing first- and second-order grey level statistics of grey levels of B-Mode ultrasound images to examine morphologic changes in the endometrium during oestrous cycle in cows. Four Simmental cows were examined for two consecutive oestrous cycles. Echotexture of the endometrium was assessed by mean grey level (MGL) and homogeneity (HOM) of digitised B-Mode images of the uterine body and both uterine horns. As there were no differences (P>0.05) in MGL and HOM, respectively, between the images of the uterine body and the uterine horns, the mean values of all endometrial images were used for subsequent analyses of MGL and HOM. The factor 'day of oestrous cycle' showed a highly significant (P0.05) in both echotexture parameters were measured between oestrous cycles within cows. MGL was negatively related to HOM (r=-0.66; P0.05) low between Days -3 and -1, significant changes of HOM with maximum levels on Day -2 (P0.05) high between Days 4 and 13 while HOM was consistently (P>0.05) low between Days 2 and 13. From Day -3 to Day -1 (r=0.48; Plevels were correlated with HOM, but not with MGL (P<0.05). The results of this study show that changes in endometrial morphology of cows can be measured using a computer-assisted texture analysis program.

  16. [The history and development of computer assisted orthopaedic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, J-Y

    2006-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) was developed to improve the accuracy of surgical procedures. It has improved dramatically over the last years, being transformed from an experimental, laboratory procedure into a routine procedure theoretically available to every orthopaedic surgeon. The first field of application of computer assistance was neurosurgery. After the application of computer guided spinal surgery, the navigation of total hip and knee joints became available. Currently, several applications for computer assisted surgery are available. At the beginning of navigation, a preoperative CT-scan or several fluoroscopic images were necessary. The imageless systems allow the surgeon to digitize patient anatomy at the beginning of surgery without any preoperative imaging. The future of CAOS remains unknown, but there is no doubt that its importance will grow in the next 10 years, and that this technology will probably modify the conventional practice of orthopaedic surgery.

  17. Effective Rule Based Classifier using Multivariate Filter and Genetic Miner for Mammographic Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirase Fathima Abubacker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammography is an important examination in the early detection of breast abnormalities. Automatic classifications of mammogram images into normal, benign or malignant would help the radiologists in diagnosis of breast cancer cases. This study investigates the effectiveness of using rule-based classifiers with multivariate filter and genetic miner to classify mammogram images. The method discovers association rules with the classes as the consequence and classifies the images based on the Highest Average Confidence of the association rules (HAvC matched for the classes. In the association rules mining stage, Correlation based Feature Selection (CFS plays an enormous significance to reduce the complexity of image mining process is used in this study as a feature selection method and a modified genetic association rule mining technique, the GARM, is used to discover the rules. The method is evaluated on mammogram image dataset with 240 images taken from DDSM. The performance of the method is compared against other classifiers such as SMO; Naïve Bayes and J48. The performance of the proposed method is promising with 88% accuracy and outperforms other classifiers in the context of mammogram image classification.

  18. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  19. Pilot study of quantitative analysis of background enhancement on breast MR images: association with menstrual cycle and mammographic breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaranelo, Anabel M; Carrillo, Maria Claudia; Fleming, Rachel; Jacks, Lindsay M; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Crystal, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    To perform semiautomated quantitative analysis of the background enhancement (BE) in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and to correlate it with mammographic breast density and menstrual cycle. Informed consent was waived after the research ethics board approved this study. Results of 177 consecutive preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) examinations performed from February to December 2009 were reviewed; 147 female patients (median age, 48 years; range, 26-86 years) were included. Ordinal values of BE and breast density were described by two independent readers by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. The BE coefficient (BEC) was calculated thus: (SI2 · 100/SI1) - 100, where SI is signal intensity, SI2 is the SI enhancement measured in the largest anteroposterior dimension in the axial plane 1 minute after the contrast agent injection, and SI1is the SI before contrast agent injection. BEC was used for the quantitative analysis of BE. Menstrual cycle status was based on the last menstrual period. The Wilcoxon rank-sum or Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare quantitative assessment groups. Cohen weighted κ was used to evaluate agreement. Of 147 patients, 68 (46%) were premenopausal and 79 (54%) were postmenopausal. The quantitative BEC was associated with the menstrual status (BEC in premenopausal women, 31.48 ± 20.68 [standard deviation]; BEC in postmenopausal women, 25.65 ± 16.74; P = .02). The percentage of overall BE was higher when the MR imaging was performed in women in the inadequate phase of the cycle (<35 days, not 7-14 days; mean BEC, 35.7) compared with women in the postmenopausal group (P = .001). Premenopausal women had significantly higher BEC when compared with postmenopausal women (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the percentage of BE between breast density groups. Premenopausal women with breast cancer, and specifically women in the inadequate phase of the cycle, presented with

  20. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  1. Innovative Processes in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khaled M. Alhawiti

    2015-01-01

    .... qualitative and quantitative research study aims to address the innovative processes in computer-assisted language learning through surveying the reading level and streamline content of the ESL...

  2. Fusion of contrast-enhanced breast MR and mammographic imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenbruch, Christian P; Marias, Kostas; Armitage, Paul A; Yam, Margaret; Moore, Niall; English, Ruth E; Clarke, Jane; Brady, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Increasing use is being made of Gd-DTPA contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer assessment since it provides 3D functional information via pharmacokinetic interaction between contrast agent and tumour vascularity, and because it is applicable to women of all ages as well as patients with post-operative scarring. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) is complementary to conventional X-ray mammography, since it is a relatively low-resolution functional counterpart of a comparatively high-resolution 2D structural representation. However, despite the additional information provided by MRI, mammography is still an extremely important diagnostic imaging modality, particularly for several common conditions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) where it has been shown that there is a strong correlation between microcalcification clusters and malignancy. Pathological indicators such as calcifications and fine spiculations are not visible in CE-MRI and therefore there is clinical and diagnostic value in fusing the high-resolution structural information available from mammography with the functional data acquired from MRI imaging. This paper presents a novel data fusion technique whereby medial-lateral oblique (MLO) and cranial-caudal (CC) mammograms (2D data) are registered to 3D contrast-enhanced MRI volumes. We utilise a combination of pharmacokinetic modelling, projection geometry, wavelet-based landmark detection and thin-plate spline non-rigid 'warping' to transform the coordinates of regions of interest (ROIs) from the 2D mammograms to the spatial reference frame of the contrast-enhanced MRI volume. Of key importance is the use of a flexible wavelet-based feature extraction technique that enables feature correspondences to be robustly determined between the very different image characteristics of X-ray mammography and MRI. An evaluation of the fusion framework is demonstrated with a series of clinical cases and a total of 14 patient examples.

  3. Patient comfort from the technologist perspective: factors to consider in mammographic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendat CC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Christina C Mendat,1 Dave Mislan,2 Lisa Hession-Kunz2 1Human Factors MD, Charlotte, NC, 2Hologic Inc., Marlborough, MA, USA Abstract: A sample size of 280 certified mammography technologists were surveyed to understand what factors affect patient discomfort during breast imaging. Given mammography technologists’ level of patient involvement, they are uniquely positioned to observe factors that affect patient comfort. The findings suggest that according to technologists, multiple factors, including patient ethnicity, breast density, previous biopsy and lumpectomy experience, as well as psychological factors, impact breast discomfort during mammography. Additionally, with respect to imaging protocols, technologists attributed 80% of moderate-to-extreme discomfort to “length of compression time” (27% and “compression force” (53%. Technologists also attributed “pinching at chest wall” and “hard edges of breast platform” to “very high” discomfort significantly more times (P<0.05 than “coolness and edges of paddle”. These findings confirm some of what has been reported to date and challenge other findings. Given that recent decline in breast cancer mortality has been attributed to improvements in early detection and treatment, approaches to reduce discomfort should be considered in order to promote screening compliance. Although more research is needed, it is apparent that the patient experience of comfort and pain during mammography is an area warranting increased research and solutions. Keywords: mammography, discomfort, pain, density, compliance, breast

  4. Computer assisted optical biopsy for colorectal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Avila, Fernando J.; Saint-Hill-Febles, Yadira; Renner, Janis; Klare, Peter; von Delius, Stefan; Navab, Nassir; Mateus, Diana

    2017-03-01

    We propose a method for computer-assisted optical biopsy for colorectal polyps, with the final goal of assisting the medical expert during the colonoscopy. In particular, we target the problem of automatic classification of polyp images in two classes: adenomatous vs non-adenoma. Our approach is based on recent advancements in convolutional neural networks (CNN) for image representation. In the paper, we describe and compare four different methodologies to address the binary classification task: a baseline with classical features and a Random Forest classifier, two methods based on features obtained from a pre-trained network, and finally, the end-to-end training of a CNN. With the pre-trained network, we show the feasibility of transferring a feature extraction mechanism trained on millions of natural images, to the task of classifying adenomatous polyps. We then demonstrate further performance improvements when training the CNN for our specific classification task. In our study, 776 polyp images were acquired and histologically analyzed after polyp resection. We report a performance increase of the CNN-based approaches with respect to both, the conventional engineered features and to a state-of-the-art method based on videos and 3D shape features.

  5. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alex C [ORNL; Hitt, Austin N [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  6. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  7. Influence of lifestyle factors on mammographic density in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S Brand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Apart from hormone replacement therapy (HRT, little is known about lifestyle factors that influence breast density. METHODS: We examined the effect of smoking, alcohol and physical activity on mammographic density in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women without breast cancer. Lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire and percentage and area measures of mammographic density were measured using computer-assisted software. General linear models were used to assess the association between lifestyle factors and mammographic density and effect modification by body mass index (BMI and HRT was studied. RESULTS: Overall, alcohol intake was positively associated with percent mammographic density (P trend  = 0.07. This association was modified by HRT use (P interaction  = 0.06: increasing alcohol intake was associated with increasing percent density in current HRT users (P trend  = 0.01 but not in non-current users (P trend  = 0.82. A similar interaction between alcohol and HRT was found for the absolute dense area, with a positive association being present in current HRT users only (P interaction  = 0.04. No differences in mammographic density were observed across categories of smoking and physical activity, neither overall nor in stratified analyses by BMI and HRT use. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing alcohol intake is associated with an increase in mammography density, whereas smoking and physical activity do not seem to influence density. The observed interaction between alcohol and HRT may pose an opportunity for HRT users to lower their mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

  8. Computer-assisted access to the kidney

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, P; Payan, Yohan; Troccaz, J; Chartier-Kastler, E; Richard, F

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to introduce the principles of computer-assisted access to the kidney. The system provides the surgeon with a pre-operative 3D planning on computed tomography (CT) images. After a rigid registration with space-localized ultrasound (US) data, preoperative planning can be transferred to the intra-operative conditions and an intuitive man-machine interface allows the user to perform a puncture. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Both CT and US images of informed normal volunteer were obtained to perform calculation on the accuracy of registration and punctures were carried out on a kidney phantom to measure the precision of the whole of the system. RESULTS: We carried out millimetric registrations on real data and guidance experiments on a kidney phantom showed encouraging results of 4.7 mm between planned and reached targets. We noticed that the most significant error was related to the needle deflection during the puncture. CONCLUSION: Preliminary results are encouraging. Further work w...

  9. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software: Evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software: Evaluation of its Influence in a Language Learning Process. ... Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Computer-Assisted Segmentation of Videocapsule Images Using Alpha-Divergence-Based Active Contour in the Framework of Intestinal Pathologies Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meziou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract through natural orifices is a challenge for endoscopists. Videoendoscopy is currently the “gold standard” technique for diagnosis of different pathologies of the intestinal tract. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE has been developed in the 1990s as an alternative to videoendoscopy to allow direct examination of the gastrointestinal tract without any need for sedation. Nevertheless, the systematic postexamination by the specialist of the 50,000 (for the small bowel to 150,000 images (for the colon of a complete acquisition using WCE remains time-consuming and challenging due to the poor quality of WCE images. In this paper, a semiautomatic segmentation for analysis of WCE images is proposed. Based on active contour segmentation, the proposed method introduces alpha-divergences, a flexible statistical similarity measure that gives a real flexibility to different types of gastrointestinal pathologies. Results of segmentation using the proposed approach are shown on different types of real-case examinations, from (multipolyp(s segmentation, to radiation enteritis delineation.

  11. Computer Assisted Diagnoses for Red Eye (CADRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an expert System (ES named as “CADRE-Computer Assisted Diagnoses for Red Eye. Mostly the remote areas of the population are deprived of the facilities of having experts in eye disease. So it is the need of the day to store the expertise of Eye specialists in computers through using ES technology. This ES is a rule-based Expert System that assists in red-eye diagnosis and treatment. The knowledge acquired from literature review and human experts of the specific domain was used as a base for analysis, diagnosis and recommendations. CADRE evaluates the risk factors of 20 eye diseases and works just like an ophthalmologist, which will be useful for students, doctors and researchers as well as to patients. This expert system (ES was developed through using ESTA, VISUAL BASIC, MS-EXCEL, Seagate Crystal Reports and Image Styler. This ES is not limited to the Red-eye diseases but can be extended to all types of eye-diseases.

  12. 计算机辅助教学在医学影像学见习中的应用%The application of computer assisted teaching in medical imaging clerkship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓军; 丁毅; 翟仁友; 潘振宇; 高堃

    2012-01-01

    Modern medical imaging is a subject that uses grayscale images to reflect the different shapes and functions of tissues and organs.The development of digital technology makes digital images easily,and complete computer assisted teaching( CAI ),which changed from the previous film-teaching methods.In order to ensure medical imaging teaching effect,and to reduce the individual effects by the film teaching,the authors compared 33 students' imaging diagnosis test results using computer assisted in 2007 grade of the capital medical university with film teaching 2002 grade from the same university and found that students' scores slightly higher in former than those of 2002 grade,P > 0.05,with no significant.However,the median of the 2007 student test scores(86) is higher than 2002 students' ( 81 ),the score range became narrow.CAI can ensure students' learning outcomes of medical imaging,and overcome film eroding,film damaging,the mutual restraint of interference between students and other adverse factors from the film teaching.It is the trend of medical imaging teaching.%医学影像学是利用灰阶不同的图像来反映人体组织器官的形态及功能变化.数码技术的发展使图像数字化,从而实现了计算机辅助教学.为了保证医学影像学的教学效果,减少胶片化教学所导致的人为因素对学生学习的影响,我们对首都医科大学2007级七年制临床医学专业33名学生的医学影像学见习实施了计算机辅助教学.教学结束后,我们采用与2002级七年制临床医学专业学生(采用胶片式教学)相同的试卷对这些学生进行测试,对比两个年级学生的考试成绩.结果表明,2007级学生的平均成绩略高于2002级学生的平均成绩,P>0.05,差异无统计学意义;但是,2007级学生考试成绩的中位数(86)较2002级学生考试成绩的中位数(81)提高,而且2007级学生较2002级学生考试成绩全距缩小,标准差缩小.计算机辅助教学能

  13. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung, E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-21

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kV{sub p}, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-μm pixel size, 230.5×339 mm{sup 2} active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one. - Highlights: • A prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is developed. • Compressed-sensing (CS) based reconstruction framework is employed. • We reconstructed high-quality DBT images by using the proposed reconstruction framework.

  14. Computer assisted tutoring in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, N

    1997-02-01

    The computer-based tutoring of visual concepts such as radiological images is a largely unexplored area. A review of the literature highlights limited use of computers as a means of radiological education, with the majority of systems being little more than hypermedia prototypes, on-line teaching files, and passive CD-Roms. Very few of the systems discussed in the research literature draw on the work from cognitive science and educational psychology for tutoring visual concepts. This thesis details and evaluates a method for indexing and retrieving images from large image databases via a cognitively informed graphical representation of visual concepts. This representation is derived using Multiple Correspondence Analysis from a statistical analysis of features present in the images. It is intended that this representation be used to assist in the computer based teaching of any discipline that requires the tutoring of visual concepts. The domain used as a test bed for this research is Magnetic Resonance Imaging in neuroradiology. Tutoring the interpretation of MR scans of the head represents a real practical problem due to the inherent complexity of the brain and variations in tissue contrast within image sequence and disease/pathology. The literature of concept categorisation and representation is critically reviewed to inform the design of a graphical representation of a concept (a pathology in the application domain). A specification for the design of an explicit representation of visual concepts is drawn from this literature review, together with methods of tutoring based around this model. A methodology for producing this representation is described, and implemented in the development of an overview plot for the concept of a disease of the brain, with associated statistical measures derived and operationalised for typicality and similarity of cases within a disease. These measures are precursors to the development of computer based tutoring strategies for image

  15. Computer assisted tutoring in radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffery, N

    1997-01-01

    radiologists using the computer based image browser demonstrated significant differences in how the experts, novices and intermediates interact with the image archive via the overview plot. These findings are consistent with those found in previous novice-expert studies involving chest x-ray interpretation. There were significant differences between the experts and novice/intermediates in terms of their placement of cases within the overview plot with the experts placement of cases closer to the statistical placements. The users reaction to the overview plot were favourable with subjects commenting on its intuitiveness and ease of use. Hence, it is concluded that the overview space could serve as a useful tool in assisting the training of novice and intermediate radiologists providing a vehicle for moving the less experienced subjects towards the experts' conception of a disease. The research offers a methodology for teaching based on the integration of principles from cognitive science and statistics, and as...

  16. Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery: present status and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwok Sui Leung

    2010-01-01

    @@ The principle of navigation surgery was first adopted in neurosurgery where a mechanical rigid frame was used in the stereotactic surgery to locate a deep ganglia and tract in the brain by Clark and Horsley1 in 1906. The planning was based on anatomical atlas of the brain and was not patient specific. The navigation procedure was possible with a rigid mechanical frame to define the trajectory with a rigid instrument holder on a rigid fixation of the operating structure, i.e. the skull. With the advancements in 3-D medical imaging, i.e. CT in 1971,MR imaging in 1973, general stereotaxis was possible and became specific to anatomy of each individual patient.Together with the advancement of computer technology:VAX in 1976, Apple in 1977, IBM personal computer in 1981, computer assisted stereotaxis was possible and in 1985, the term computer assisted surgery (CAS) was proposed by Sohn and Robins.2 With further development of 3-D tracking by NDI with Optotrak 1990, computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) developed and gradually became widely applicable in clinical practice.

  17. Future Prospects for Computer-Assisted Mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-10-26

    The recent rise of ''computer-assisted'' and ''experimental'' mathematics raises intriguing questions as to the future role of computation in mathematics. These results also draw into question the traditional distinctions that have been drawn between formal proof and computationally-assisted proof. This article explores these questions in the context of the growing consensus among computer technologists that Moore's Law is likely to continue unabated for quite some time into the future, producing hardware and software much more powerful than what is available today.

  18. Red mercuric iodide crystals obtained by isothermal solution evaporation: Characterization for mammographic X-ray imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, A.M.F.; Ugucioni, J.C.; Mulato, M.

    2014-02-11

    Millimeter-sized mercury iodide crystals were obtained by the isothermal evaporation technique using dimethylformamide (DMF), diethyl-ether/DMF mixture and THF. Different concentrations (18 mM and 400 mM) and solution temperature (25–80 °C) were used to obtain varied evaporation rates (0.1×10{sup −4}–5000×10{sup −4} ml/h). Different crystal sizes and shapes were obtained by changing solvents, mixture and initial solution volume. According to X-ray diffraction the samples are monocrystalline. The top surface was investigated by SEM. Optical band-gaps above 2 eV were obtained from photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectra indicated band-to-band electronic transitions, and the presence of sub-band gap states. Excitons, structural defects and the presence of impurities are discussed and correlated to the electrical measurements. Crystals obtained using pure DMF as solvent showed better general properties, including under the exposure to mammographic X-ray energy range that led to sensibility of about 25 μC/Rcm{sup 2}.

  19. Vibrations and Waves: Using Computer Assisted Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M. J.; Lewis, D.

    Described is the development of computer assisted learning packages for nonscience major undergraduate students. The equipment needed to run the packages is described as well as the role and value of the packages. Several examples of the kind of computer graphics used in the computing laboratory are illustrated. The problems associated with the…

  20. Computer Assisted Assessment in Elementary Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhineau, Denis; Bronner, Alain; Chaachoua, Hamid; Mezerette, Sophie; Nicaud, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    reviewed article for online journal available : http://mathstore.ac.uk/articles/maths-caa-series/nov2005/; Experiences and points of view from the APLUSIX project about Computer Assisted Assessment in Elementary Algebra (http://mathstore.ac.uk/articles/maths-caa-series/nov2005/)

  1. Introduction: Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailin, Alan; Levin, Lori

    1989-01-01

    Presents an overview of intelligent computer-assisted language instruction (ICALI) research as a type of artificial intelligence research. Outlines the components and kinds of ICALI systems. Examines practical research considerations such as personnel needs for development of ICALI software. (Author/LS)

  2. Computer Assisted Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Niels Willem Luitzen

    2003-01-01

    To create an environment where surgeons receive real-time feedback about their instrument position, computer technologies were integrated in surgical procedures. This type of surgical technology is referred to as Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). CAS offers the possibility to continuously monitor the

  3. A Type of Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruplin, Ferdinand A.; Russell, John R.

    1968-01-01

    The experimental use of computer assisted instruction (CAI) to replace conventional laboratory sessions for first-year German students at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, is described. Materials used in the program are outlined, including hardware, pre-text program, text program, student manual, and diagnostics. Pedagogical…

  4. Computer-Assisted Discovery and Proof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2007-12-10

    With the advent of powerful, widely-available mathematical software, combined with ever-faster computer hardware, we are approaching a day when both the discovery and proof of mathematical facts can be done in a computer-assisted manner. his article presents several specific examples of this new paradigm in action.

  5. Reproductive factors associated with mammographic density: a Korean co-twin control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi; Stone, Jennifer; Lee, Kayoung; Lee, Donghun

    2011-07-01

    To determine the mechanism by which menstrual and reproductive factors are associated with the risk of breast cancer, we examined the relationships between mammographic density and known menstrual and reproductive risk factors for breast cancer. A co-twin control study was conducted with 122 pairs of monozygotic Korean female twins selected from the Healthy Twin study. Mammographic density was measured from digital mammograms using a computer-assisted method. Information on selected menstrual and reproductive factors was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Within-pair differences for each mammographic measure were regressed against within-pair differences for each menstrual and reproductive risk factor with an adjustment for body mass index and other menstrual and reproductive factors. The percent dense area was inversely associated with the age at the first full-term childbirth (FFTB) and the number of live births, although the associations were marginally significant with an adjustment for BMI and other reproductive factors. The non-dense area was positively associated with the age at the FFTB and the number of live births. The absolute dense area was positively associated with the duration of breast feeding. The age at menarche was not associated with any component of the mammographic measures. This finding suggests that mammographic density can mediate the protective effect of greater parity against breast cancer, at least in part while age at menarche, age at the FFTB, and breast feeding do not exert their effects through mammographic density.

  6. Computer-assisted design of individualized femoral prosthesis according to 3D reconstruction of CT images%基于CT三维重建个体化股骨假体的计算机辅助设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建炜; 刘璠; 董启榕; 许炜玮; 白恩忠; 黄希

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to individual characteristics of human body, it is difficult to well match between standard prosthesis and patient skeleton. Computer-assisted design and manufacture of individualized prosthesis can effectively prolong artificial joint lifespan and quality and reduce revision rate. However, related studies are few in China.OBJECTIVE: To explore computer-assisted design for individualized femoral head prosthesis according to three-dimensional (3D)reconstruction of CT images for improving prosthesis and affected skeleton matching.METHODS: The CT scanning image of one healthy male volunteer, with no hip joint disease, was used. His femur was scanned with GE Speed Light CT with 3.0 mm thick cross-section slices. CT 2D images were transmitted to a computer. The medical image format was translated from DICOM into bmp. Inner and external bone contours were drawn automatically or by hand and processed digitally, and then these data were downloaded into 3D Mimics8.1, and Rapidform2004 software. The 3D femoral canal model was rendered. Femur canal contours curve was downloaded into the Solidworks2004 software in the form of dxf. Femoral prosthesis was designed on the base of femoral canal contours curve.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The CT image was transmitted in the form of vector by a set of self-made medical image processing software. The accurate 3D femoral internal/external outline model was obtained by CT 2D image and reverse technique. Suitable femoral prosthesis was designed by means of image reverse engineering and norientation CAD. Reverse engineering and CAD provide an effective way to develop individualized prosthesis, improve the matching of prosthesis and affected skeleton, prevent prosthesis loosening and improve long-term stability.%背景:由于人体的绝对个性化特点,标准人工假体与患者骨骼之间的误差使二者难以很好匹配.计算机辅助设计和制造个体化假体克服了其他假体的缺点,可有效地延

  7. Computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Joyce A; Wright, Jesse H

    2010-12-01

    There has been a recent acceleration in the development and testing of programs for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CCBT). Programs are now available for treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, and other psychiatric conditions. Technology for delivery of CCBT includes multimedia programs, virtual reality, and handheld devices. Research on CCBT generally has supported the efficacy of computer-assisted therapy and has shown patient acceptance of computer tools for psychotherapy. Completion rates and treatment efficacy typically have been higher when clinicians prescribe and support the use of psychotherapeutic computer programs than when programs are delivered in a self-help format without clinician involvement. CCBT seems to have the potential to improve access to evidence-based therapies while reducing the demand for clinician time.

  8. Computer assisted learning: a new paradigm in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Wainscott; Darnell, Laura A; Hottel, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Computer assisted simulation is an important teaching modality in the preclinical training of students. In order to maximize the potential of this learning tool, the University of Tennessee's College of Dentistry has successfully incorporated DentSim technology into the restorative curriculum and has recently acquired the technology to make image guided implantology available to students, residents and faculty. This article describes the university's history and experience with simulation as a learning tool. The purpose of this article is to provide information to other educational institutions on the use of virtual reality simulation in the classroom.

  9. Computer assisted instruction: two decades in perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Thomas J. Jr.; Orrell, Janet D.

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the changes that have occurred in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAD over the past 20 years. Numerous literature sources were reviewed and the information extracted was utilized to describe the history of CAI; provide a brief description of other types of computer-based education that are often grouped under the heading of CAI; examine the changes in hardware and software costs; describe the in...

  10. COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION FOR FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Babb, Emerson M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes computer-assisted instruction for financial management which can be used to supplement an undergraduate course or to update training of persons in agribusiness. It is used to review principles of financial management, to illustrate analytical techniques, and to provide practice in the use of financial concepts and techniques. The material covered is similar to that found in traditional textbooks. Student evaluations of the software were fairly positive, but teaching effec...

  11. Computer-Assisted Surgery Using Telemanipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of computer-assisted surgery with telemanipulators. The Technology The technology for computer-assisted surgery with telemanipulators is a robotic arm that carries an endoscope while two other manipulator arms carry interchangeable tools, such as scissors and grippers. In a master-slave telemanipulator system, the master may consist of a joystick input system, or for surgery, may mimic the motion of the slave robot, such as the da Vinci and ZEUS surgical systems. These systems are capable of telerobotic surgery, or surgery from remote locations. Review Strategy The Cochrane and INAHTA databases yielded 4 health technology assessments or systematic reviews on computer-assisted surgery using telemanipulators. A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE January 1, 2001 to November 24, 2003 was conducted. This search produced 448 studies, of which 19 met the inclusion criteria. Summary of Findings Published health technology assessments indicate that there are limited data from studies, although there is initial evidence of the safety and efficacy of telemanipulators in some procedures when they are used at large academic centres for surgery on selected patients. Most studies are Level 3 and 4 observational studies and assess a wide variety of surgical procedures. Limited studies indicate the promise of telemanipulators, but their efficacy is not fully established. In some procedures, the advantages that telemanipulators may offer may also be achieved by non-robotic minimally invasive/laparoscopic techniques. To date, cost-effectiveness has not been demonstrated. Patients who have undergone robotic surgery must be followed to further define outcomes (e.g., long-term quality of the graft after coronary arterial bypass graft [CABG] surgery). The exact role of computer-assisted surgery with telemanipulators has not been fully defined

  12. The use of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Devices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Devices in ... role of information and communication technologies in language learning and teaching. ... Classroom implications and applications for the effective Computer Assisted ...

  13. On advantages and limitations of computer-assisted language learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲

    2008-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is used increasingly in foreign language teaching. Compared with the traditional teaching method, computer-assisted language learning has unparallel advantages, but in fact it does have some limitations in some aspects.

  14. Mammographic screening: keeping women alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of: Tabar L, Vitak B, Chen TH et al. Swedish Two-County Trial: impact of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality during 3 decades. Radiology 260(3), 658-663 (2011). In the 1980s, the periodic invitation of women aged 40-69 years for mammographic screening in the Swedish Two-Coun

  15. Mammographic density is the main correlate of tumors detected on ultrasound but not on mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Brehm, Barbara; Heusinger, Katharina; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Hack, Carolin C; Preuss, Caroline; Lux, Michael P; Hartmann, Arndt; Vachon, Celine M; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    Although mammography screening programs do not include ultrasound examinations, some diagnostic units do provide women with both mammography and ultrasonography. This article is concerned with estimating the risk of a breast cancer patient diagnosed in a hospital-based mammography unit having a tumor that is visible on ultrasound but not on mammography. A total of 1,399 women with invasive breast cancer from a hospital-based diagnostic mammography unit were included in this retrospective study. For inclusion, mammograms from the time of the primary diagnosis had to be available for computer-assisted assessment of percentage mammographic density (PMD), as well as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessment of mammography. In addition, ultrasound findings were available for the complete cohort as part of routine diagnostic procedures, regardless of any patient or imaging characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of mammography failure, defined as BIRADS assessment 1 or 2. The probability that the visibility of a tumor might be masked at diagnosis was estimated using a regression model with the identified predictors. Tumors were only visible on ultrasound in 107 cases (7.6%). PMD was the strongest predictor for mammography failure, but age, body mass index and previous breast surgery also influenced the risk, independently of the PMD. Risk probabilities ranged from 1% for a defined low-risk group up to 40% for a high-risk group. These findings might help identify women who should be offered ultrasound examinations in addition to mammography.

  16. Computer-Assisted Exposure Treatment for Flight Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella-Feliu, Miguel; Bornas, Xavier; Llabres, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    This review introduces the state of the art in computer-assisted treatment for behavioural disorders. The core of the paper is devoted to describe one of these interventions providing computer-assisted exposure for flight phobia treatment, the Computer-Assisted Fear of Flying Treatment (CAFFT). The rationale, contents and structure of the CAFFT…

  17. Posterior breast cancer: Mammographic and ultrasonographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Posterior breast cancers are located in the prepectoral region of the breast. Owing to this distinctive anatomical localization, physical examination and mammographic or ultrasonographic evaluation can be difficult. The purpose of the study was to assess possibilities of diagnostic mammography and breast ultrasonography in detection and differentiation of posterior breast cancers. Methods. The study included 40 women with palpable, histopathological confirmed posterior breast cancer. Mammographic and ultrasonographic features were defined according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS lexicon. Results. Based on standard two-view mammography 87.5%, of the cases were classified as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories, while after additional mammographic views all the cases were defined as BIRADS 4 and 5 categories. Among 96 mammographic descriptors, the most frequent were: spiculated mass (24.0%, architectural distortion (16.7%, clustered microcalcifications (12.6% and focal asymmetric density (12.6%. The differentiation of the spiculated mass was significantly associated with the possibility to visualize the lesion at two-view mammography (p = 0.009, without the association with lesion diameter (p = 0.083 or histopathological type (p = 0.055. Mammographic signs of invasive lobular carcinoma were significantly different from other histopathological types (architectural distortion, p = 0.003; focal asymmetric density, p = 0.019; association of four or five subtle signs of malignancy, p = 0.006. All cancers were detectable by ultrasonography. Mass lesions were found in 82.0% of the cases. Among 153 ultrasonographic descriptors, the most frequent were: irregular mass (15.7%, lobulated mass (7.2%, abnormal color Doppler signals (20.3%, posterior acoustic attenuation (18.3%. Ultrasonographic BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were defined in 72.5% of the cases, without a significant difference among various histopathological types (p = 0

  18. Computer-assisted Instruction And Discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁海晶

    2008-01-01

    From drill-and-practice software,to word-processing programs,to network and hypertext software,the gradual integration of technology in classrooms over the last twenty years has tended to reflect the technological developments and more importantly the theories of learning and instruction developed by scholars.Thus,the introduction of network technologies in education coincided with a shift in education from an interest in cognitive and developmental theories of learning to a social and collaborative view of learning.The present paper focuses on synchronous computer-mediated interaction,namely computer-assisted instruction and discussion in the second language classroom.

  19. [Computer-assisted video-endoscopic endonasal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, S; Chen, B; Lavallée, S; Coulomb, M; Chirossel, J P; Lavieille, J P; Reyt, E

    2001-02-01

    To make the surgical procedure safer and more precise in FESS, a non-invasive markerless computer-assisted system (CAS) is described for intra-operative navigation whenever the critical regions may be affected by surgical manipulation. Twenty patients with benign diseases of the paranasal sinuses were treated by Computer Assisted Video-endoscopic surgery, between December 1997 and March 1998. For the determination of accuracy and reproducibility of the system, ten anatomical landmarks on each side of the paranasal sinuses were chosen and measured. All of these points were identified on the direct live video-endoscopy image and compared to those obtained with the Optical Digitizing System (Flashpoint 5000(R)), on axial, coronal and sagittal view. The Optical Localizer we used detects the position of the relative coordinates of two rigid bodies made of IR-LED's each, one rigid body is secured to the head' of the patient with a headset, so that patient motion can be tracked, and the second rigid body attached to the operating instrument, leading to direct localization of the tip of the instrument. We use a markerless, skin surface-based registration method, which has the advantage to avoid doing a second CT scan examination usually performed to process the position of the fiducial markers. We register the data from the patient's usual paranasal CT scan. Computer-assisted surgery does not increase significantly the duration of the operation. Our markerless skin surface points registration method is reliable enabling of the movements patient's head during the procedure. Computer assistance can be used in almost any type of endoscopic sinonasal procedure. We obtained a registration and calibration accuracy of less than 1.5 mm in 89.2% of cases. CAS enables the surgeon to have a more thorough understanding of the complicated anatomy of paranasal sinuses, and may be especially helpful in revision surgery when normal anatomic landmarks are lacking. Due to the passive

  20. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and mammographic appearance of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans in a male breast: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a rare low-grade soft tissue neoplasm with trunk and extremities being the most common sites of involvement. We report a rare case of male breast with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and its imaging features. To our knowledge the imaging appearance of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the breast has never been reported in the literature. Case presentation We report the imaging appearance of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans on the breast of a 41-year-old Chinese man who initially presented with a palpable lump. A mammogram showed two lesions, one with well circumscribed and the other with an ill defined border, in his right breast. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was performed and showed the well defined larger lesion with mild central hypointensity while the smaller lesion had an irregular border. Both lesions were well characterized on the fat-suppressed sequences. Conclusions Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a rare soft tissue sarcoma and its occurrence on the breast is even rarer. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging can help in characterizing the lesion and localizing the lesion for further diagnostic evaluation and surgical planning.

  2. Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element. This books provides an up-to date and comprehensive overview of…

  3. Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element. This books provides an up-to date and comprehensive overview of…

  4. Computer-assisted Orthopaedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan eZheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopaedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  5. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing, E-mail: jing.zhang2@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  6. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type ... Breast Biopsy? What is Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  7. Quality assurance applied to mammographic equipments using phantoms and software for its evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo, Patricia, E-mail: p.mayo@titaniast.co [Titania Servicios Tecnologicos S.L., Grupo Dominguis, Apartado 46015, Valencia (Spain); Rodenas, Francisco [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 46022, Valencia (Spain); Manuel Campayo, Juan [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Avda. Blasco Ibanez, Apartado 46017, Valencia (Spain); Verdu, Gumersido [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 46022, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    The image quality assessment in radiographic equipments is a very important item for a complete quality control of the radiographic image chain. The periodic evaluation of the radiographic image quality must guarantee the constancy of this quality to carry out a suitable diagnosis. Mammographic phantom images are usually used to study the quality of images obtained by determined mammographic equipment. The digital image treatment techniques allow to carry out an automatic analysis of the phantom image. In this work we apply some techniques of digital image processing to analyze in an automatic way the image quality of mammographic phantoms, namely CIRS SP01 and RACON for different varying conditions of the mammographic equipment. The CIRS SP01 phantom is usually used in analogic mammographic equipments and the RACON phantom has been specifically developed by authors to be applied to acceptance and constancy tests of the image quality in digital radiographic equipments following recommendations of international associations. The purpose of this work consists in analyzing the image quality for both phantoms by means of an automatic software utility. This analysis allows us to study the functioning of the image chain of the mammographic system in an objective way, so an abnormal functioning of the radiographic equipment might be detected.

  8. Quality assurance applied to mammographic equipments using phantoms and software for its evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Manuel Campayo, Juan; Verdú, Gumersido

    2010-07-01

    The image quality assessment in radiographic equipments is a very important item for a complete quality control of the radiographic image chain. The periodic evaluation of the radiographic image quality must guarantee the constancy of this quality to carry out a suitable diagnosis. Mammographic phantom images are usually used to study the quality of images obtained by determined mammographic equipment. The digital image treatment techniques allow to carry out an automatic analysis of the phantom image. In this work we apply some techniques of digital image processing to analyze in an automatic way the image quality of mammographic phantoms, namely CIRS SP01 and RACON for different varying conditions of the mammographic equipment. The CIRS SP01 phantom is usually used in analogic mammographic equipments and the RACON phantom has been specifically developed by authors to be applied to acceptance and constancy tests of the image quality in digital radiographic equipments following recommendations of international associations. The purpose of this work consists in analyzing the image quality for both phantoms by means of an automatic software utility. This analysis allows us to study the functioning of the image chain of the mammographic system in an objective way, so an abnormal functioning of the radiographic equipment might be detected.

  9. Occupation and mammographic density: A population-based study (DDM-Occup).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Javier; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; González-Sánchez, Mario; Cortés Barragán, Rosa Ana; Maqueda Blasco, Jerónimo; González-Galarzo, María Carmen; Alba, Miguel Ángel; van der Haar, Rudolf; Casas, Silvia; Vicente, Cándida; Medina, Pilar; Ederra, María; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreno, María Pilar; Casanova, Francisco; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Ascunce, Nieves; García, Montse; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Llobet, Rafael; Lope, Virginia

    2017-11-01

    High mammographic density is one of the main risk factors for breast cancer. Although several occupations have been associated with breast cancer, there are no previous occupational studies exploring the association with mammographic density. Our objective was to identify occupations associated with high mammographic density in Spanish female workers. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of occupational determinants of high mammographic density in Spain, based on 1476 women, aged 45-68 years, recruited from seven screening centers within the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program network. Reproductive, family, personal, and occupational history data were collected. The latest occupation of each woman was collected and coded according to the 1994 National Classification of Occupations. Mammographic density was assessed from the cranio-caudal mammogram of the left breast using a semi-automated computer-assisted tool. Association between mammographic density and occupation was evaluated by using mixed linear regression models, using log-transformed percentage of mammographic density as dependent variable. Models were adjusted for age, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, educational level, type of mammography, first-degree relative with breast cancer, and hormonal replacement therapy use. Screening center and professional reader were included as random effects terms. Mammographic density was higher, although non-statistically significant, among secondary school teachers (e(β) = 1.41; 95%CI = 0.98-2.03) and nurses (e(β) = 1.23; 95%CI = 0.96-1.59), whereas workers engaged in the care of people (e(β) = 0.81; 95%CI = 0.66-1.00) and housewives (e(β) = 0.87; 95%CI = 0.79-0.95) showed an inverse association with mammographic density. A positive trend for every 5 years working as secondary school teachers was also detected (p-value = 0.035). Nurses and secondary school teachers were the occupations with the highest

  10. A review of computer-assisted assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gráinne Conole

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure for better measurement of stated learning outcomes has resulted in a demand for more frequent assessment. The resources available are seen to be static or dwindling, but Information and Communications Technology is seen to increase productivity by automating assessment tasks. This paper reviews computer-assisted assessment (CAA and suggests future developments. A search was conducted of CAA-related literature from the past decade to trace the development of CAA from the beginnings of its large-scale use in higher education. Lack of resources, individual inertia and risk propensity are key barriers for individual academics, while proper resourcing and cultural factors outweigh technical barriers at the institutional level.

  11. Computer-Assisted Photo Interpretation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiadek, Harry A.

    1981-11-01

    A computer-assisted photo interpretation research (CAPIR) system has been developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL), Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The system is based around the APPS-IV analytical plotter, a photogrammetric restitution device that was designed and developed by Autometric specifically for interactive, computerized data collection activities involving high-resolution, stereo aerial photographs. The APPS-IV is ideally suited for feature analysis and feature extraction, the primary functions of a photo interpreter. The APPS-IV is interfaced with a minicomputer and a geographic information system called AUTOGIS. The AUTOGIS software provides the tools required to collect or update digital data using an APPS-IV, construct and maintain a geographic data base, and analyze or display the contents of the data base. Although the CAPIR system is fully functional at this time, considerable enhancements are planned for the future.

  12. Simulation model of mammographic calcifications based on the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, or BIRADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, M; Gavrielides, M A; He, L; Berman, C G; Kim, J J; Clark, R A

    1998-10-01

    The authors developed and evaluated a method for the simulation of calcification clusters based on the guidelines of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System of the American College of Radiology. They aimed to reproduce accurately the relative and absolute size, shape, location, number, and intensity of real calcifications associated with both benign and malignant disease. Thirty calcification clusters were simulated by using the proposed model and were superimposed on real, negative mammograms digitized at 30 microns and 16 bits per pixel. The accuracy of the simulation was evaluated by three radiologists in a blinded study. No statistically significant difference was observed in the observers' evaluation of the simulated clusters and the real clusters. The observers' classification of the cluster types seemed to be a good approximation of the intended types from the simulation design. This model can provide simulated calcification clusters with well-defined morphologic, distributional, and contrast characteristics for a variety of applications in digital mammography.

  13. A novel computer-assisted surgical technique for revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacci, Maurilio; Nofrini, Laura; Iacono, Francesco; Di Martino, Alessandro; Bignozzi, Simone; Lo Presti, Mirco

    2007-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) is a skill-demanding intervention presenting several technical challenges to the surgeon due to bone deficiencies and lack of anatomical references. Computer-assisted navigation systems can potentially solve these problems. An innovative computer-assisted surgical technique for RTKA is presented. The system is image free. Based on anatomical landmarks acquired on the patient, the system automatically plans the intervention, and provides the surgeon with tools to analyse and modify the proposed plan and to accurately reproduce it on the patient. Although we performed few cases with this navigated procedure, early results obtained demonstrated to be very promising.

  14. Computer-assisted versus non-computer-assisted preoperative planning of corrective osteotomy for extra-articular distal radius malunions: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockmans Filip

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malunion is the most common complication of distal radius fracture. It has previously been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the quality of anatomical correction and overall wrist function. However, surgical correction can be difficult because of the often complex anatomy associated with this condition. Computer assisted surgical planning, combined with patient-specific surgical guides, has the potential to improve pre-operative understanding of patient anatomy as well as intra-operative accuracy. For patients with malunion of the distal radius fracture, this technology could significantly improve clinical outcomes that largely depend on the quality of restoration of normal anatomy. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare patient outcomes after corrective osteotomy for distal radius malunion with and without preoperative computer-assisted planning and peri-operative patient-specific surgical guides. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conventional planning versus computer-assisted planning for surgical correction of distal radius malunion. Adult patients with extra-articular malunion of the distal radius will be invited to enroll in our study. After providing informed consent, subjects will be randomized to two groups: one group will receive corrective surgery with conventional preoperative planning, while the other will receive corrective surgery with computer-assisted pre-operative planning and peri-operative patient specific surgical guides. In the computer-assisted planning group, a CT scan of the affected forearm as well as the normal, contralateral forearm will be obtained. The images will be used to construct a 3D anatomical model of the defect and patient-specific surgical guides will be manufactured. Outcome will be measured by DASH and PRWE scores, grip strength, radiographic measurements, and patient satisfaction at 3, 6, and 12 months

  15. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut). Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome). In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs) are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures.

  16. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosamuddin Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut. Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome. In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures.

  17. Computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing systems: A revolution in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Arbaz

    2016-01-01

    For the better part of the past 20 years, dentistry has seen the development of many new all-ceramic materials and restorative techniques fueled by the desire to capture the ever elusive esthetic perfection. This has resulted in the fusion of the latest in material science and the pen ultimate in computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. This case report describes the procedure for restoring the esthetic appearance of both the left and right maxillary peg-shaped lateral incisors with a metal-free sintered finely structured feldspar ceramic material using the latest laboratory CAD/CAM system. The use of CAD/CAM technology makes it possible to produce restorations faster with precision- fit and good esthetics overcoming the errors associated with traditional ceramo-metal technology. The incorporation of this treatment modality would mean that the dentist working procedures will have to be adapted in the methods of CAD/CAM technology.

  18. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  19. Evaluation of computer-assisted ThinPrep imaging system in the screening of cervical cancer and precancerous lesion%TIS在宫颈癌和癌前病变筛查中的价值评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米贤军; 王莹; 沈铿; 吴秋良; 肖琳; 陈昂; 徐秀梅; 孪峰; 钟守军

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价新柏氏电脑辅助阅片系统(TIS)对宫颈癌及癌前病变的诊断价值.方法 收集2011年6月至2012年6月参加中山市大规模免费宫颈癌筛查中妇女的资料,选择做过TIS检测并追踪到有确切组织病理学诊断结果的600例病例为研究对象,将ASCUS/AGC+病变列为细胞学阳性病例,将CIN1+病变列为病理学阳性病例,以病理学检查为金标准,评价TIS检测的诊断价值.结果 600例妇女中,TIS检测结果为癌(CA)9例,高度鳞状上皮内病变(HSIL) 66例,低度鳞状上皮内病变(LSIL) 104例,不除外高度鳞状上皮内病变的不典型鳞状细胞(ASC-H) 21例,非典型鳞状细胞/非典型腺细胞(ASCUS/AGC) 30例,正常(WNL) 370例.以病理学诊断结果为金标准,TIS检测的灵敏度为93.95%,特异度为92.73%,约登指数为0.867,阳性似然比12.92,阴性似然比0.065,Kappa值0.854,总符合率为93.17%,阳性预测值87.83%,阴性预测值96.49%.TIS与病理学结果的符合率在CA、HSIL、LSIL中分别为100%、90.91%和72.12%,TIS对CA和HSIL的符合率高于LSIL (P<0.01).结论 TIS对宫颈癌及癌前病变有较高的诊断价值,特别是对CA和HSIL.它是一种高效、高质量和高准确率的宫颈癌及癌前病变筛查技术.%Objective To study the diagnostic value of computer-assisted ThinPrep imaging system(TIS) in the screening of cervical cancer and precancerous lesion.Methods The clinical data of 600 cases who participated voluntarily in the screening of large-scale cervical cancer for free in Zhongshan were collected from June 2011 to June 2012.ASCUS/AGC and above were postive cytology and the postive results of pathological examination were CIN and above.Histopathological results were used as gold standard to calculate the diagnostic value of TIS technique.Results A total of 600 cases were detected by TIS,and the testing results showed 9 cases of CA,66 cases of HSIL,104 cases of LSIL,21 cases of ASC-H,30 cases of ASCUS

  20. Computer Assisted Language Learning” (CALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gündüz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, itspros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginnerson using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internetactivities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet forlanguage learning, and some easy activities you can adapt for your classes. Some special terminology related to computers will also be used in this paper. For example, computer assisted language learning(CALL refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work in the language classroom. It should be borne in mind that CALL does not refer to the use of acomputer by a teacher to type out a worksheet or a class list or preparing his/her own teaching alone.Hardware refers to any computer equipment used, including the computer itself, the keyboard, screen (or the monitor, the disc-drive, and the printer. Software (computer programs refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work.

  1. [Computer-assisted 3D phonetography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschaefer-Rube, C; Klajman, S

    1996-10-01

    Profiles of fundamental frequency sound pressure levels and voice duration are measured separately in clinical practice. It was the aim of the present study to combine the two examinations, in order to estimate the relationship between pitch, sound pressure level and voice duration and to develop a new computer-assisted graph. A three-dimensional (3D) wireframe phonogram was constructed based on SPL profiles to obtain a general view of the parameters recorded. We have termed this "phonetography". Variable further projections were selected for the analysis of different aspects of parametric relationships. The results in 21 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with hyperfunctional dysphonias demonstrated that there were three typical figures of the 3D phonograms produced, depending on the relationship between voice duration when soft ("piano") compared to loud ("forte"). In one-third of the healthy volunteers, the values of the piano voice duration were greater than those of forte for almost all pitches examined. In two-thirds of the healthy subjects the values of forte voice duration were partly greater, as were those of piano voice duration. All of the patients showed voice duration values greater for forte than for piano. The results of the study demonstrate that the 3D phonogram is a useful tool for obtaining new insights into various relationships of voice parameters.

  2. Recent developments in computer assisted rehabilitation environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rob van der Meer

    2014-01-01

    Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN) is a system that integrates a training platform (motion base), a virtual environment, a sensor system (motion capture) and D-flow software. It is useful for both diagnostic and therapeutic use. The human gait pattern can be impaired due to disease, trauma or natural decline. Gait analysis is a useful tool to identify impaired gait patterns. Traditional gait analysis is a very time consuming process and therefore only used in exceptional cases. With new systems a quick and extensive analysis is possible and provides useful tools for therapeutic purposes. The range of systems will be described in this paper, highlighting both their diagnostic use and the therapeutic possibilities. Because wounded warriors often have an impaired gait due to amputations or other extremity trauma, these systems are very useful for military rehabilitative efforts. Additionally, the virtual reality environment creates a very challenging situation for the patient, enhancing their rehabilitation experience. For that reason several Armed Forces have these systems already in use. The most recent experiences will be discussed; including new developments both in the extension of the range of systems and the improvement and adaptation of the software. A new and promising development, the use of CAREN in a special application for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), will also be reviewed.

  3. Computer-assisted femoral head resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Antony J; Inkpen, Kevin B; Shekhman, Mark; Anglin, Carolyn; Tonetti, Jerome; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive P; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V

    2005-01-01

    Femoral head resurfacing is re-emerging as a surgical option for younger patients who are not yet candidates for total hip replacement. However, this procedure is more difficult than total hip replacement, and the mechanical jigs typically used to align the implant produce significant variability in implant placement and take a significant amount of time to position properly. We propose that a computer-assisted surgical (CAS) technique could reduce implant variability with little or no increase in operative time. We describe a new CAS technique for this procedure and demonstrate in a cadaver study of five paired femurs that the CAS technique in the hands of a novice surgeon markedly reduced the varus/valgus variability of the implant relative to the pre-operative plan (2 degrees standard deviation for CAS versus 5 degrees for a mechanical jig operated by an expert surgeon). We also show that the mechanical jig resulted in significantly retroverted implant placement. There was no significant difference in operative time between the two techniques.

  4. On advantages and limitations of computer-assisted language learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲

    2008-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning(CALL)is used increasingly in foreign language teaching.Compared with the traditional teaching method,computer-assisted language learning has unparallel advantages,but in fact it does have some limitations in some aspects.

  5. Computer-Assisted Linguistic Analysis of the Peshitta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, D.; Talstra, Eep; Dyk, Janet; van Keulen, Percy; Sikkel, Constantijn; Bosman, H.J.; Jenner, K.D.; Bakker, Dirk; Volkmer, J.A.; Gutman, Ariel; van Peursen, Wido Th.

    2014-01-01

    CALAP (Computer-Assisted Linguistic Analysis of the Peshitta), a joint research project of the Peshitta Institute Leiden and the Werkgroep Informatica at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (1999-2005) CALAP concerned the computer-assisted analysis of the Peshitta to Kings (Janet Dyk and Percy van Keul

  6. Qualidade da interpretação do diagnóstico mamográfico Quality of the interpretation of diagnostic mammographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton Koch

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Demonstrar o conhecimento mamográfico dos médicos interpretadores que trabalham na rede de saúde pública do Estado do Rio de Janeiro e avaliar o conhecimento adquirido após um curso elaborado com o objetivo de capacitar profissionais médicos no diagnóstico precoce do câncer de mama. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram convidados 53 médicos que laudam exames mamográficos para o treinamento. Esses médicos eram submetidos a um pré-teste, no qual se avaliava o grau de conhecimento inicial. Depois, foram lecionadas aulas previamente elaboradas por mamografistas experientes, e para conclusão do curso esses médicos eram submetidos a um pós-teste para avaliação do conhecimento adquirido. RESULTADOS: O curso de capacitação de profissionais médicos, com ênfase em aulas teóricas, não mostrou aumento significativo na qualidade da interpretação mamográfica, destacando-se a persistência do erro na descrição morfológica das lesões fundamentais da mama, erro da classificação pelo sistema de padronização das lesões mamárias (BI-RADS®, falta de coerência entre a classificação BI-RADS adotada e a recomendação de conduta, tanto no pré-teste como no pós-teste. CONCLUSÃO: Concluiu-se que os médicos interpretadores mostram conhecimento insuficiente em relação ao diagnóstico precoce por imagem do câncer de mama e que o curso teórico não mostrou aumento significativo na qualidade da interpretação mamográfica.OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the knowledge of mammogram readers working in the public healthcare system in the State of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, and to evaluate their progress in the early diagnosis of breast cancer after a training course specifically developed for medical professionals . MATERIALS AND METHODS: A group of 53 physicians with experience in mammography reports were invited. A pre-test was given to assess their initial knowledge level. Afterwards, they were trained by experts mammographers, and

  7. Computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing systems: A revolution in restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbaz Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the better part of the past 20 years, dentistry has seen the development of many new all-ceramic materials and restorative techniques fueled by the desire to capture the ever elusive esthetic perfection. This has resulted in the fusion of the latest in material science and the pen ultimate in computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology. This case report describes the procedure for restoring the esthetic appearance of both the left and right maxillary peg-shaped lateral incisors with a metal-free sintered finely structured feldspar ceramic material using the latest laboratory CAD/CAM system. The use of CAD/CAM technology makes it possible to produce restorations faster with precision- fit and good esthetics overcoming the errors associated with traditional ceramo-metal technology. The incorporation of this treatment modality would mean that the dentist working procedures will have to be adapted in the methods of CAD/CAM technology.

  8. Mammographic and sonographic features of tuberculous mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakr, Ayman A. E-mail: fahmi.sakr@link.netaymansakr12345@hotmail.com; Fawzy, Rawya K.; Fadaly, Gylan; Baky, Moustafa Abdel

    2004-07-01

    From December 1999 to April 2001, 10 cases of tuberculous mastitis were presented to the Radiology Unit at the Medical Research Institute of Alexandria University for mammographic and sonographic evaluation. Sixty percent presented with masses, 50% mastalgia, 40% discharge, and 10% complained of skin sinus. In 30% of the patients the complaint was bilateral. All cases underwent full mammographic and ultrasonographic (US) studies, and US-guided fine needle aspiration. Also pathological, bacteriological analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were done to all patients to prove the tuberculous nature of their lesions. Thirty percent of the cases had surgical excision on their masses. On mammography 30% were found to have mass lesion mimicking malignant tumors, 40% smooth bordered masses, 40% axillary or intramammary adenopathy, 30% asymmetric density, 30% duct ectasia, 20% with skin thickening and nipple retraction, 20% with macrocalcification, and 10% with skin sinus. On US 60% had hypoechoic masses, 40% focal or sectorial duct ectasia, and 50% axillary adenopathy. History of tuberculosis was found in 30% of the cases. Chest X-ray was positive in 20% and breast magnetic resonance imaging was done to one patient who had skin sinus.

  9. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in marketing, and for the understanding of the diversity of sperm responses to changes in the microenvironment in research. The four take-home messages from this review are: (1) animal species, extender or medium, specimen chamber, intensity of illumination, imaging hardware and software, instrument settings, technician, etc., all affect accuracy and precision of output values; (2) semen production facilities probably do not need a substantially different CASA system whereas biology laboratories would benefit from systems capable of imaging and tracking sperm in deep chambers for a flexible period of time; (3) software should enable grouping of individual sperm based on one or more attributes so outputs reflect subpopulations or clusters of similar sperm with unique properties; means or medians for the total population are insufficient; and (4) a field-use, portable CASA system for measuring one motion and two or three morphology attributes of individual sperm is needed for field

  10. Ethics and Computer-Assisted Assessment: Three Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Susan; Brantley, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Three ethical-legal case incidents involving computer-assisted psychodiagnostic assessment in the schools are presented. Each case is analyzed in terms of applicable laws, ethical codes, and standards for professional practice. (Author)

  11. Center for Advanced Energy Studies: Computer Assisted Virtual Environment (CAVE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory contains a four-walled 3D computer assisted virtual environment - or CAVE TM — that allows scientists and engineers to literally walk into their data...

  12. A Computer Assisted Learning Project in Engineering Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesewright, R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A British project in engineering science is described. Computer assisted instruction packages are being developed to provide students with experience with models or systems of models related to lecture material on electrical, electronic, nuclear, and mechanical engineering. (SD)

  13. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  14. Dental outcomes in computer-assisted orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Travis; Markiewicz, Michael R; Jarman, Joseph; Bell, R Bryan

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of computer-aided orthognathic surgery in reducing incisal overjet and establishing class I occlusion in subjects with dentofacial deformities. To address the research purpose, the investigators initiated a retrospective cohort study and enrolled a sample of subjects who underwent computer-assisted orthognathic surgery for dentofacial deformities. Two examiners assessed preoperative and postoperative lateral cephalometric radiographs for change in overjet after computer-assisted orthognathic surgery. Preoperative and postoperative occlusal photographs were then reviewed to assess for establishment of class I occlusion after computer-assisted orthognathic surgery. Cohen κ coefficient was used to assess for interrater agreement. A matched-pairs t-test was used to assess reduction in incisal overjet after computer-assisted orthognathic surgery. The sample was composed of 9 subjects who underwent computer-assisted surgery for dentofacial deformities. There was good interrater consistency for preoperative measurement of overjet (κ = 0.7, P ≤ 0.001). There was fair interrater consistency for postoperative measurement of overjet (κ = 0.4, P = 0 .02). Both examiners agreed on preoperative and postoperative assessments of occlusal photographs. There was a 3.4-mm reduction in incisal overjet after computer-assisted orthognathic surgery (P ≤ 0.001). Mean postoperative absolute overjet was 1.3 mm. In subjects with dentofacial deformities, computer-aided orthognathic surgery was effective in reducing incisal overjet and establishing class I occlusion.

  15. Interactive computer-assisted approach for evaluation of ultrastructural cilia abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Christoph; Siegmund, Heiko; Semmelmann, Matthias; Grafe, Claudia; Evert, Matthias; Schroeder, Josef A.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction - Diagnosis of abnormal cilia function is based on ultrastructural analysis of axoneme defects, especialy the features of inner and outer dynein arms which are the motors of ciliar motility. Sub-optimal biopsy material, methodical, and intrinsic electron microscopy factors pose difficulty in ciliary defects evaluation. We present a computer-assisted approach based on state-of-the-art image analysis and object recognition methods yielding a time-saving and efficient diagnosis of cilia dysfunction. Method - The presented approach is based on a pipeline of basal image processing methods like smoothing, thresholding and ellipse fitting. However, integration of application specific knowledge results in robust segmentations even in cases of image artifacts. The method is build hierarchically starting with the detection of cilia within the image, followed by the detection of nine doublets within each analyzable cilium, and ending with the detection of dynein arms of each doublet. The process is concluded by a rough classification of the dynein arms as basis for a computer-assisted diagnosis. Additionally, the interaction possibilities are designed in a way, that the results are still reproducible given the completion report. Results - A qualitative evaluation showed reasonable detection results for cilia, doublets and dynein arms. However, since a ground truth is missing, the variation of the computer-assisted diagnosis should be within the subjective bias of human diagnosticians. The results of a first quantitative evaluation with five human experts and six images with 12 analyzable cilia showed, that with default parameterization 91.6% of the cilia and 98% of the doublets were found. The computer-assisted approach rated 66% of those inner and outer dynein arms correct, where all human experts agree. However, especially the quality of the dynein arm classification may be improved in future work.

  16. Should processed or raw image data be used in mammographic image quality analyses? A comparative study of three full-field digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Mark; Badr, Ishmail; Royle, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare a number of measured image quality parameters using processed and unprocessed or raw images in two full-field direct digital units and one computed radiography mammography system. This study shows that the difference between raw and processed image data is system specific. The results have shown that there are no significant differences between raw and processed data in the mean threshold contrast values using the contrast-detail mammography phantom in all the systems investigated; however, these results cannot be generalised to all available systems. Notable differences were noted in contrast-to-noise ratios and in other tests including: response function, modulation transfer function , noise equivalent quanta, normalised noise power spectra and detective quantum efficiency as specified in IEC 62220-1-2. Consequently, the authors strongly recommend the use of raw data for all image quality analyses in digital mammography.

  17. New Computer Assisted Diagnostic to Detect Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Rabeh Amira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new Computer Assisted Diagnosis (CAD to automatically detect Alzheimer Patients (AD, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and elderly Controls, based on the segmentation and classification of the Hippocampus (H and Corpus Calosum (CC from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI. For the segmentation we used a new method based on a deformable model to extract the area wishes, and then we computed the geometric and texture features. For the classification we proposed a new supervised method. We evaluated the accuracy of our method in a group of 25 patients with AD (age±standard-deviation (SD =70±6 years, 25 patients with MCI (age±SD=65±8 years and 25 elderly healthy controls (age±SD=60±8 years. For the AD patients we found an accuracy of the classification of 92%, for the MCI we found 88% and for the elderly patients we found 96%. Overall, we found our method to be 92% accurate. Our method can be a useful tool for diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease in any of these Steps.

  18. Is Computer-assisted Distance Learning Possible in Nematology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francl, L J

    1998-06-01

    In many institutions of higher education, introductory nematology is taught to small numbers of students. Nematology and other low-enrollment courses may be placed under scrutiny, reformatted, or dropped from the curriculum to cut costs and improve faculty efficiency. Computer-assisted distance education (CADE) offers a way to increase faculty productivity and job satisfaction, student learning and socialization, and cost-effectiveness. Participating institutions gain by sharing resources with other schools and may retain or even increase enrollments through broadened educational opportunities. CADE ranges from complete course offerings and video interaction to supplemental materials on a personal computer for independent learning. A modular approach to course development is the most successfuI model because of the flexibility it offers. While an entire hematology course through CADE is not possible without substantial institutional and faculty investment, supplemental materials can help remotely located students gain an appreciation for hematology. Nematological images, text, computer programs, and other resources can easily be placed on Internet web pages. Nematologists in all sectors need to continue to reach out to the next generation of leaders to tell them what nematologists do and why nematodes are important. The Society of Nematologists can be a leader in the systematic development of CADE in nematology.

  19. Selecting a computer-assisted retrieval system: one answer to office automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, D T

    1983-11-01

    Computer-assisted retrieval (CAR) systems combine computers with microfilm to create a cost-effective, productive method of managing information. CAR systems range in size from large computerized mass-storage systems utilizing image scanning and digitized technologies to small, tabletop, standalone microprocessor-driven systems. When properly configured, a CAR system can not only provide vital information today, but will also be able to grow and expand into a total office system.

  20. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar.

  1. Mammographic Artifacts on Full-Field Digital Mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4 % (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and ...

  2. A Hybrid Segmentation Framework for Computer-Assisted Dental Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosntalab, Mohammad; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, Reza; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali; Shirani, Gholamreza; Reza Asharif, Mohammad

    Teeth segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images is a major and challenging task for various computer assisted procedures. In this paper, we introduced a hybrid method for quantification of teeth in CT volumetric dataset inspired by our previous experiences and anatomical knowledge of teeth and jaws. In this regard, we propose a novel segmentation technique using an adaptive thresholding, morphological operations, panoramic re-sampling and variational level set algorithm. The proposed method consists of several steps as follows: first, we determine the operation region in CT slices. Second, the bony tissues are separated from other tissues by utilizing an adaptive thresholding technique based on the 3D pulses coupled neural networks (PCNN). Third, teeth tissue is classified from other bony tissues by employing panorex lines and anatomical knowledge of teeth in the jaws. In this case, the panorex lines are estimated using Otsu thresholding and mathematical morphology operators. Then, the proposed method is followed by calculating the orthogonal lines corresponding to panorex lines and panoramic re-sampling of the dataset. Separation of upper and lower jaws and initial segmentation of teeth are performed by employing the integral projections of the panoramic dataset. Based the above mentioned procedures an initial mask for each tooth is obtained. Finally, we utilize the initial mask of teeth and apply a variational level set to refine initial teeth boundaries to final contour. In the last step a surface rendering algorithm known as marching cubes (MC) is applied to volumetric visualization. The proposed algorithm was evaluated in the presence of 30 cases. Segmented images were compared with manually outlined contours. We compared the performance of segmentation method using ROC analysis of the thresholding, watershed and our previous works. The proposed method performed best. Also, our algorithm has the advantage of high speed compared to our previous works.

  3. [Computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty: 12 years experience in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragaglia, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty was developed in Grenoble in the mid-1990s. The first human implantation was performed on 21 January 1997, with no particular problems. Since this date more than 200,000 patients have been implanted with our device all over the world. The device is passive (not active like a robot), and requires no pre- or perioperative imaging. It is based on kinematics and palpation, the surgeon remaining in charge at all times. The computer helps to identify the lower leg axis, to accurately fix the bone cutting guides, and to check the ligament balance. These steps are not easy to perform with conventional ancillaries. The effectiveness of computer-assisted total knee replacement is well documented, although it is too early to claim that a "well-aligned" prothesis will have a better survival rate. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, with modern prostheses, to confirm the results of historical studies.

  4. GPCALMA: a Grid Approach to Mammographic Screening

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnasco, S; Cerello, P G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Torres, E L; Masala, G L; Oliva, P R; Retico, A; Stumbo, S

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of High Energy Physics experiments requires a GRID approach to a distributed computing system and the associated data management: the key concept is the "Virtual Organisation" (VO), a group of geographycally distributed users with a common goal and the will to share their resources. A similar approach is being applied to a group of Hospitals which joined the GPCALMA project (Grid Platform for Computer Assisted Library for MAmmography), which will allow common screening programs for early diagnosis of breast and, in the future, lung cancer. HEP techniques come into play in writing the application code, which makes use of neural networks for the image analysis and shows performances similar to radiologists in the diagnosis. GRID technologies will allow remote image analysis and interactive online diagnosis, with a relevant reduction of the delays presently associated to screening programs.

  5. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...... in a computer system by an algorithm specific to each group. The third group received traditional anticoagulation treatment by physicians. The obtained INR values were compared regarding the time to reach, and the time spent within, the therapeutic target range, corresponding to INR values from 2 to 3. RESULTS......: Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...

  6. Metabolic syndrome and mammographic density in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Megan S; Biessy, Carine; Lajous, Martin; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Tamimi, Rulla M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; however, little is known about the association between metabolic syndrome and percent mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 789 premenopausal and 322 postmenopausal women in the Mexican Teacher's Cohort (ESMaestras). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition. We measured percent density on mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the association between density and metabolic syndrome, as well as its components by state (Jalisco, Veracruz) and menopausal status (premenopausal, postmenopausal). Among premenopausal women in Jalisco, women with metabolic syndrome had higher percent density than those without after adjusting for potential confounders including BMI [difference = 4.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.72-7.81]. Among the metabolic syndrome components, only low high-density lipoprotein levels (women in Jalisco (difference = 4.62; 95% CI, 1.73-7.52). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz (difference = -2.91; 95% CI, -7.19 to 1.38), nor among postmenopausal women in either state. Metabolic syndrome was associated with higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco, Mexico, but was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz, Mexico, or among postmenopausal women in either Jalisco or Veracruz. These findings provide some support for a possible role of metabolic syndrome in mammographic density among premenopausal women; however, results were inconsistent across states and require further confirmation in larger studies.

  7. Computer-assisted mapping of pyroclastic surges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M C; Sheridan, M F

    1982-08-13

    Volcanic hazard maps of surge boundaries and deposit thickness can be created by using a simplified eruption model based on an "energy line" concept of pyroclastic surge and flow emplacement. Computer image-processing techniques may be used to combine three-dimensional representations of the energy relations of pyroclasts moving under the influence of gravity (defined by an "energy cone") with digital topographic models of volcanoes to generate theoretical hazard maps. The deposit boundary and thickness calculated for the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens are qualitatively similar to those actually observed.

  8. Three-dimensional computer-assisted surgical simulation and intraoperative navigation in orthognathic surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-04-01

    By incorporating three-dimensional (3D) imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques, 3D computer-assisted technology has been applied widely to provide accurate guidance for assessment and treatment planning in clinical practice. This technology has recently been used in orthognathic surgery to improve surgical planning and outcome. The modality will gradually become popular. This study reviewed the literature concerning the use of computer-assisted techniques in orthognathic surgery including surgical planning, simulation, intraoperative translation of the virtual surgery, and postoperative evaluation. A Medline, PubMed, ProQuest, and ScienceDirect search was performed to find relevant articles with regard to 3D computer-assisted orthognathic surgery in the past 10 years. A total of 460 articles were revealed, out of which 174 were publications addressed the topic of this study. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the state-of-art methods for 3D computer-assisted technology in orthognathic surgery. From the review we can conclude that the use of computer-assisted technique in orthognathic surgery provides the benefit of optimal functional and aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, precise translation of the treatment plan, and facilitating intraoperative manipulation.

  9. Sonographic and Mammographic Features of Breast Apocrine Metaplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Youn; Kang, Seok Seon; Ji, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Tae Hee; Park, Hae Lin; Shim, Jeong Yun [CHA Hospital, Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    To evaluate the sonographic and mammographic features of apocrine metaplasia of the breast. We retrospectively evaluated the sonographic and mammographic findings of 16 lesions that were diagnosed with only apocrine metaplasia after mammotome excision. The age ranged from 27 years old to 57 years old (mean age: 40 years old). The sonographic features were interpreted by the ACR BI-RADS(American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) for shape, orientation, margin, boundary, echo pattern, posterior acoustic feature, calcification and special cases. The mammographic features were interpreted by the ACR BI-RADS (American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) for breast composition, shape, margin, density and calcification. Sonographic features were that the shapes were oval (n = 16) in 100%. The orientation was parallel (n =15) in 94%. The margins were circumscribed (n = 8) in 50% and microlobulated (n = 8) in 50%. The echo patterns were hypoechoic (n = 8) in 50%, complex (n = 5) in 31% and anechoic (n = 3) in 19%. Posterior acoustic enhancement was seen in 69% (n = 11). There was internal microcyst (n = 4) in 25%. There was no calcification. Mammography performed for 12 cases demonstrated negative findings (n = 10) for 83%, obscured hypodense mass (n = 1) for 8% in 11 cases of breast composition 3 and 4, and circumscribed isodense mass (n = 1)for 8% in one case of breast composition 2. There was no calcification. The final assessment was category 4a (n= 7) in 44%, category 3 (n = 6) in 38% and category 2 (n = 3) in 19%. Although sonographic and mammographic features of apocrine metaplasia are occasionally suspicious malignancy such as microlobulation and complex echo. We consider the possibility of apocrine metaplasia if masses show internal microcyst and abrupt boundary

  10. Bone marrow lesions in knee osteoarthritis: MR-assessment by manual segmentation and computer-assisted tresholding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Nielsen, Flemming; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Peters, David Alberg

    2012-01-01

    /1; median age 60.5 years (41.1-72.3). Volumes of BMLs in the medial femoral and tibial condyles (52 observations) were measured/calculated on anonymized images by two observers using manual segmentation (MS) and computer assisted tresholding (CAT) relative to signal intensity of normal marrow. Results were...

  11. COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION AND ITS APPLICATION IN ENGLISH LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the development of computer assisted instruction(CAI) abroad and in China, lists the advantages of CAI and deals with its application in English learning. Some suggestions about how to make better use of CAI in ELT are also given.

  12. Computer-assisted Elementary Chinese Learning for American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-yan, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Despite hopes and claims about benefits of computer-assisted language learning, few studies have documented actual cases about how American students learn elementary Chinese in a computer-equipped classroom. This paper deals with how to use computer as an educational tool to develop American students' Chinese language skills. The theoretical…

  13. Safety of computer-assisted surgery for cannulated hip screws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelinck, H.K.M; Haagmans, M.; Snoeren, M.M.; Biert, J.; Vugt, A.B. van; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery has developed considerably during the past few years. Several manufacturers produce hardware and software for use in trauma surgery. Validation of these systems before clinical application is mandatory to be sure they work accurately and safely. The accuracy of

  14. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  15. Computer-Assisted Periodical Routing and Renewal Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerkey, A. Neil

    1973-01-01

    A computer-assisted periodical control system was designed to reduce clerical time required to maintain records in three areas: renewal audit, routing, and records-keeping. The renewal audit features are unusual and are described in detail. (3 references) (Author/DH)

  16. User Interface Improvements in Computer-Assisted Instruction, the Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies user interface problems as they relate to computer-assisted instruction (CAI); reviews the learning theories and instructional theories related to CAI user interface; and presents potential CAI user interface improvements for research and development based on learning and instructional theory. Focuses on screen design improvements.…

  17. Ethical and Professional Issues in Computer-Assisted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, B. Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Discusses ethical and professional issues in psychology regarding computer-assisted therapy (CAT). Topics addressed include an explanation of CAT; whether CAT is psychotherapy; software, including independent use, validation of effectiveness, and restricted access; clinician resistance; client acceptance; the impact on ethical standards; and a…

  18. Computer-Assisted Learning in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertzani, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The fact that language teaching can be operationalized through computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has directed researchers' attention to the learning task, which, in this case, is considered to be the unit that demands analysis of the communicative processes in which the learner is involved while working with CALL. Research focuses on…

  19. Remedial and Second Language English Teaching Using Computer Assisted Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a computer assisted learning system designed to help improve the writing skills of students at Concordia University who use English as a second language. Its history, methodological and conceptual problems, theoretical considerations, hardware, and software are discussed. A bibliography of 17 items is included. (CHC)

  20. Computer Assisted Drafting (CNC) Drawings. Drafting Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. This unit contains information on computer-assisted drafting drawings. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials and 20 worksheets.…

  1. Integrating Computer-Assisted Translation Tools into Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Parra, María

    2016-01-01

    Although Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools play an important role in the curriculum in many university translator training programmes, they are seldom used in the context of learning a language, as a good command of a language is needed before starting to translate. Since many institutions often have translator-training programmes as well…

  2. Computer-Assisted Intervention for Children with Low Numeracy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanen, Pekka; Salminen, Jonna; Wilson, Anna J.; Aunio, Pirjo; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a computer-assisted intervention (CAI) study on number skills in kindergarten children. Children with low numeracy skill (n = 30) were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. The first group played a computer game (The Number Race) which emphasized numerical comparison and was designed to train number sense, while the…

  3. Enhancing Computer Assisted Assessment Using Rubrics in a QTI Editor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Patricia; Colina, Xavier; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Melero, Javier; Blat, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Santos,P., Colina, X., Hernández-Leo, D., Melero, J., & Blat, J. (accepted). Enhancing Computer Assisted Assessment Using Rubrics in a QTI Editor. The 9th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies. July, 14-18, 2009, Riga, Latvia.

  4. Computer-Assisted Accent Modification: A Report on Practice Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Linda J.; Reid, Lawry N.; Chenausky, Karen

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of the computer-assisted accent-modification program, Speech Works, with beginning college students of English as a second language with a non-speech-language pathologist trainer. Students who had weekly one-on-one sessions with a teacher and independent practice, especially when the practice was computer monitored,…

  5. Computer-Assisted Dieting: Effects of a Randomized Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Kerstin E. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of a computer-assisted dieting intervention (CAD) with and without self-management training on dieting among 55 overweight and obese adults. Methods: Random assignment to a single-session nutrition intervention (CAD-only) or a combined CAD plus self-management group intervention (CADG). Dependent variables were…

  6. Computer-assisted glucose control in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, Mathijs; Loef, Bert G.; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van Assen, Hein; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Intensive insulin therapy is associated with the risk of hypoglycemia and increased costs of material and personnel. We therefore evaluated the safety and efficiency of a computer-assisted glucose control protocol in a large population of critically ill patients. Design and setting: Obser

  7. Perceptions of University Students regarding Computer Assisted Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Mubashrah

    2012-01-01

    Computer assisted assessment (CAA) is a common technique of assessment in higher educational institutions in Western countries, but a relatively new concept for students and teachers in Pakistan. It was therefore interesting to investigate students' perceptions about CAA practices from different universities of Pakistan. Information was collected…

  8. Teaching Reading through Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Tariq Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    To study the role of reading in secondary schools and how it may be improved through computers, a year-long study was conducted to examine which of two methods of teaching reading skills, an instructor-led class vs. computer-assisted language learning (CALL), aided secondary students in improving the literal, inferential, and evaluative levels of…

  9. Client Anticipations about Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Sampson, James P., Jr.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes how 55 clients from a career center at a large, southeastern university anticipated using computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems to help in their career decision making and problem solving. Responses to a cued and a free response survey indicated that clients' most frequent anticipations included increased career…

  10. COMPUTER-ASSISTED TRANSLATION RISKS AND THREATS IN LEGAL TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana, MÎNDRECI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In a world in which IT is developing faster than ever, providing reliable solutions to all problems, regardless the field of interest, the issue of computer-assisted translation systems is more and more complex, offering both advantages and disadvantages. The field of translating legal texts from Romanian into English is deprived of a large number of specialists and this is one of the main reasons why more and more people resort to computer-assisted translations, especially Google translations when dealing with translating various texts (from Romanian into English or vice-versa, in this particular case legal texts. Yet, although this field has immensely thrived recently, and is quite reliable for simple and very easy translations, the average English speaker runs huge risks of falling into traps that can lead to errors and misinterpretations. Thus, this article aims to identify the main theoretical approaches to computer-assisted theories and the major risks and threats that occur in this type of translation, focusing particularly on legal texts. There are important differences, not only of words, but also differences in the legal systems themselves, both theoretical and practical ones, which must be correctly dealt with -something which computer-assisted translation cannot do (yet.

  11. The Effectiveness of a Computer-Assisted Math Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, K.; Haelermans, C.; Rogge, N.

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) programs are considered as a way to improve learning outcomes of students. However, little is known on the schools who implement such programs as well as on the effectiveness of similar information and communication technology programs. We provide a literature review that pays special attention to the existing…

  12. A New Approach: Computer-Assisted Problem-Solving Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Tolga

    2010-01-01

    Computer-assisted problem solving systems are rapidly growing in educational use and with the advent of the Internet. These systems allow students to do their homework and solve problems online with the help of programs like Blackboard, WebAssign and LON-CAPA program etc. There are benefits and drawbacks of these systems. In this study, the…

  13. Computer Assisted Drafting (CNC) Drawings. Drafting Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. This unit contains information on computer-assisted drafting drawings. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials and 20 worksheets.…

  14. Applications of Parsing Theory to Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosian, Lawrence Z.; Ager, Tryg A.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of an LR-1 parsing algorithm to intelligent programs for computer assisted instruction in symbolic logic and foreign languages are discussed. The system has been adequately used for diverse instructional applications, including analysis of student input, generation of pattern drills, and modeling the student's understanding of the…

  15. Social Choice in a Computer-Assisted Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2009-01-01

    Pursuing a line of inquiry suggested by Crookall, Martin, Saunders, and Coote, the author applied, within the framework of design science, an optimal-design approach to incorporate into a computer-assisted simulation two innovative social choice processes: the multiple period double auction and continuous voting. Expectations that the…

  16. Client Anticipations about Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Sampson, James P., Jr.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes how 55 clients from a career center at a large, southeastern university anticipated using computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems to help in their career decision making and problem solving. Responses to a cued and a free response survey indicated that clients' most frequent anticipations included increased career…

  17. Optimizing Computer Assisted Instruction By Applying Principles of Learning Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas O.

    The development of learning theory and its application to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) are described. Among the early theoretical constructs thought to be important are E. L. Thorndike's concept of learning connectisms, Neal Miller's theory of motivation, and B. F. Skinner's theory of operant conditioning. Early devices incorporating those…

  18. Computer Assisted Instruction. A Report to the Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneberg, Bert, Jr.

    This report presents the findings of an evaluation conducted in the Greater Albany Public School System 8J (Oregon) to determine the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in mathematics as delivered by the WICAT System 300 at the Periwinkle Elementary School. Evaluation activities were designed and conducted to determine whether the…

  19. Planning and Authoring Computer-Assisted Instruction Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that Gagne's nine events of instruction be incorporated into the systematic design of computer assisted instruction (CAI) for microcomputers and describes the nine events in relation to five different kinds of learning outcomes which occur frequently in CAI. Seven references are cited. (MER)

  20. Computer-Assisted Law Instruction: Clinical Education's Bionic Sibling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Harry G.; Platt, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI), like clinical education, has considerable potential for legal training. As an initial Cornell Law School experiment, a lesson in applying different corporate statutory dividend formulations, with a cross-section of balance sheets and other financial data, was used to supplement regular class assignments.…

  1. Computer-assisted glucose control in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, Mathijs; Loef, Bert G.; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van Assen, Hein; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    Objective: Intensive insulin therapy is associated with the risk of hypoglycemia and increased costs of material and personnel. We therefore evaluated the safety and efficiency of a computer-assisted glucose control protocol in a large population of critically ill patients. Design and setting:

  2. Collaboration and Computer-Assisted Acquisition of a Second Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renie, Delphine; Chanier, Thierry

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how collaborative learning (CL) can be used in a computer-assisted learning (CAL) environment for language learning, reviewing research in the fields of applied linguistics, educational psychology, and artificial intelligence. An application of CL and CAL in the learning of French as a Second Language, focusing on interrogative…

  3. Tubulolobular carcinoma of the breast: Clinical, mammographic and sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenhan-Bilgen, Isil [Ege University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)]. E-mail: isilbilgen@hotmail.com; Oktay, Aysenur [Ege University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To determine and quantitate radiologic characteristics of tubulolobular carcinoma of the breast and to report clinical and pathologic findings. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of records of 2872 women who received a diagnosis of breast carcinoma between January 1988 and January 2006 revealed 26 histopathologically proven tubulolobular carcinoma of the breast. Analysis included history; findings at physical examination, mammography, and sonography (US) at the time of diagnosis and in postoperative follow-up, and histopathological results. Results: At physical examination, palpable mass was present in 85% (n = 22) of the patients. The mammographic findings were mass in 17 (65%), asymmetric focal density in 2 (8%), architectural distortion in 2 (8%) and negative mammograms in 5 (19%) of the 26 patients. US depicted 25 masses in 24 patients, all of which were hypoechoic, with spiculated (n = 13) or microlobulated (n = 12) margins. The cancer was clinically occult in 12% (n = 3), mammographically occult in 19% (n = 5), and radiologically occult in 4% (n = 1) of the patients. Histologically, the mean size of the tumor was 1.7 cm and 18 (69%) patients were node negative. Conclusion: Tubulolobular carcinoma of the breast usually manifests clinically as a firm, immobile mass and mammographically as a spiculated or ill-defined, irregular, isodense mass without microcalcifications. Common findings on sonography include a homogeneously hypoechoic, spiculated or microlobulated mass with posterior acoustic shadowing or normal acoustic transmission. Tubulolobular carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis for breast masses with these imaging features.

  4. Computer-Assisted Assessment -- Research into E-Assessment. Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Assisted Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Ras, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Assisted Assessment, CAA 2014, held in Zeist, The Netherlands, in June/July 2014. The 16 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers address issues

  5. Errors and Intelligence in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Parsers and Pedagogues. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heift, Trude; Schulze, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    This book provides the first comprehensive overview of theoretical issues, historical developments and current trends in ICALL (Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning). It assumes a basic familiarity with Second Language Acquisition (SLA) theory and teaching, CALL and linguistics. It is of interest to upper undergraduate and/or graduate…

  6. Mammographic density and markers of socioeconomic status: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Sue M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socioeconomic status (SES is known to be positively associated with breast cancer risk but its relationship with mammographic density, a marker of susceptibility to breast cancer, is unclear. This study aims to investigate whether mammographic density varies by SES and to identify the underlying anthropometric, lifestyle and reproductive factors leading to such variation. Methods In a cross-sectional study of mammographic density in 487 pre-menopausal women, SES was assessed from questionnaire data using highest achieved level of formal education, quintiles of Census-derived Townsend scores and urban/rural classification of place of residence. Mammographic density was measured on digitised films using a computer-assisted method. Linear regression models were fitted to assess the association between SES variables and mammographic density, adjusting for correlated variables. Results In unadjusted models, percent density was positively associated with SES, with an absolute difference in percent density of 6.3% (95% CI 1.6%, 10.5% between highest and lowest educational categories, and of 6.6% (95% CI -0.7%, 12.9% between highest and lowest Townsend quintiles. These associations were mainly driven by strong negative associations between these SES variables and lucent area and were attenuated upon adjustment for body mass index (BMI. There was little evidence that reproductive factors explained this association. SES was not associated with the amount of dense tissue in the breast before or after BMI adjustment. The effect of education on percent density persisted after adjustment for Townsend score. Mammographic measures did not vary according to urban/rural place of residence. Conclusions The observed SES gradients in percent density paralleled known SES gradients in breast cancer risk. Although consistent with the hypothesis that percent density may be a mediator of the SES differentials in breast cancer risk, the SES gradients

  7. Computer-assisted assessment of ultrasound real-time elastography: Initial experience in 145 breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xue; Xiao, Yang [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zeng, Jie [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Qiu, Weibao; Qian, Ming; Wang, Congzhi [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zheng, Rongqin, E-mail: zhengronggin@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Hairong, E-mail: hr.zheng@siat.ac.cn [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computer-assisted method of quantifying five-point elasticity scoring system based on ultrasound real-time elastography (RTE), for classifying benign and malignant breast lesions, with pathologic results as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Conventional ultrasonography (US) and RTE images of 145 breast lesions (67 malignant, 78 benign) were performed in this study. Each lesion was automatically contoured on the B-mode image by the level set method and mapped on the RTE image. The relative elasticity value of each pixel was reconstructed and classified into hard or soft by the fuzzy c-means clustering method. According to the hardness degree inside lesion and its surrounding tissue, the elasticity score of the RTE image was computed in an automatic way. Visual assessments of the radiologists were used for comparing the diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. The Student's t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. Results: Considering score 4 or higher as test positive for malignancy, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 93.8% (136/145), 92.5% (62/67), 94.9% (74/78), 93.9% (62/66), and 93.7% (74/79) for the computer-assisted scheme, and 89.7% (130/145), 85.1% (57/67), 93.6% (73/78), 92.0% (57/62), and 88.0% (73/83) for manual assessment. Area under ROC curve (A{sub z} value) for the proposed method was higher than the A{sub z} value for visual assessment (0.96 vs. 0.93). Conclusion: Computer-assisted quantification of classical five-point scoring system can significantly eliminate the interobserver variability and thereby improve the diagnostic confidence of classifying the breast lesions to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  8. 3D computer-assisted assessment of complicated penetrating foreign bodies cases in ENT practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Bekerman, Inessa; Puterman, Max

    2009-10-01

    A retrospective research was performed in order to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) computer-assisted detection of penetrating foreign bodies (FB) in the ENT practice in order to assess its usefulness and to specify its application. FBs in the head and neck were detected using 3D CT imaging in order to assess the usefulness of 3D images in the ENT operative practice. Three blinded surgeons were involved in comparison between plain and 3D CT images in order to assess 3D usefulness for precise formulation of a surgical plan. The observed relationship of the FBs to anatomical structures of the ethmoidal sinuses, eye orbit, and neck tissues was found instrumental for surgeon's decision making in planning the approach to operative removal of the FB. It helps to understand the relationships between a FB and surrounding anatomical structures better then the plain X-rays or CT-scan. There was no significant difference in cost between plain CT and 3D images. 3D computer-assisted detection of FBs increase our diagnostic abilities and appears to be a valuable addition to our diagnostic technique. Its main importance, however, lies in its capacity to help a surgeon plan an operation much more carefully avoiding improvisation during the operation itself.

  9. Applying Integrated Computer Assisted Media (ICAM in Teaching Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opick Dwi Indah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to find out whether the use of integrated computer assisted media (ICAM is effective to improve the vocabulary achievement of the second semester students of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. The population of this research was the second semester students of English department of Cokroaminoto Palopo University in academic year 2013/2014. The samples of this research were 60 students and they were placed into two groups: experimental and control group where each group consisted of 30 students. This research used cluster random sampling technique. The research data was collected by applying vocabulary test and it was analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The result of this research was integrated computer assisted media (ICAM can improve vocabulary achievement of the students of English department of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. It can be concluded that the use of ICAM in the teaching vocabulary is effective to be implemented in improving the students’ vocabulary achievement.

  10. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  11. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

      This volume focuses on the biomechanical modeling of biological tissues in the context of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). More specifically, deformable soft tissues are addressed since they are the subject of the most recent developments in this field. The pioneering works on this CAS topic date from the 1980's, with applications in orthopaedics and biomechanical models of bones. More recently, however, biomechanical models of soft tissues have been proposed since most of the human body is made of soft organs that can be deformed by the surgical gesture. Such models are much more complicated to handle since the tissues can be subject to large deformations (non-linear geometrical framework) as well as complex stress/strain relationships (non-linear mechanical framework). Part 1 of the volume presents biomechanical models that have been developed in a CAS context and used during surgery. This is particularly new since most of the soft tissues models already proposed concern Computer Assisted Planning, with ...

  12. A review of computer assisted learning in medical undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha J John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory based practical classes, have been the corner stone of undergraduate pharmacology learning. Ethical issues with the use of animals and rapid development of information technology has led to newer trends in teaching and learning such as computer assisted learning. Computer assisted learning (CAL software includes computer based packages, focusing on interactive instruction in a specific subject area, collection of animal experiments that encourage students to understand concepts in pharmacology. CAL offers a number of advantages to both students and teachers; most important being meeting the learning objectives. Few disadvantages and pitfalls to implementation in medical schools are also associated with CAL sessions. This article reviews the trend of CAL in pharmacology, advantages, disadvantages and pitfalls to the implementation of CAL.

  13. A review of computer assisted learning in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lisha J

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory based practical classes, have been the corner stone of undergraduate pharmacology learning. Ethical issues with the use of animals and rapid development of information technology has led to newer trends in teaching and learning such as computer assisted learning. Computer assisted learning (CAL) software includes computer based packages, focusing on interactive instruction in a specific subject area, collection of animal experiments that encourage students to understand concepts in pharmacology. CAL offers a number of advantages to both students and teachers; most important being meeting the learning objectives. Few disadvantages and pitfalls to implementation in medical schools are also associated with CAL sessions. This article reviews the trend of CAL in pharmacology, advantages, disadvantages and pitfalls to the implementation of CAL.

  14. On Modeling the Instructional Content in Computer Assisted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia PECHEANU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for conceptually modeling the instructionalcontent in computer-assisted education. The different cognitive style of learnersimposes different modalities of presenting and structuring the information (thepedagogical knowledge to be taught. Conceptual organization of the training domainknowledge, with learning stages phasing, can constitute a better solution to the problemof adapting the instructional system interaction to users with different cognitive styleand needs.

  15. Is Computer-assisted Distance Learning Possible in Nematology?

    OpenAIRE

    Francl, Leonard J.

    1998-01-01

    In many institutions of higher education, introductory nematology is taught to small numbers of students. Nematology and other low-enrollment courses may be placed under scrutiny, reformatted, or dropped from the curriculum to cut costs and improve faculty efficiency. Computer-assisted distance education (CADE) offers a way to increase faculty productivity and job satisfaction, student learning and socialization, and cost-effectiveness. Participating institutions gain by sharing resources wit...

  16. Nonpalpable breast cancer : mammographic and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Seung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Cheon, Young Jik; Lee, Byung Chan [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and clinical findings of nonpalpable breast cancer. Materials and Methods : In 28 of 607 breast cancer patients examined between January 1994 and April 1997, lesions were nonpalpable. We retrospectively analyzed the mammographic, clinical and pathologic features of 25 patients (28 lesions) whose mammograms we obtained. Results : Among these 25 patients (28 lesions) screening was abnormal in 22; other symptoms were bloody nipple discharge(n=4), and nipple eczema(n=2). The patients were 34-62 (mean 52)years old. Invasive ductal carcinoma(n=13), DCIS(ductal carcinoma in situ, n-12), Paget's disease (n=2), and LCIS(lobular carcinoma in situ, n=1) were found during surgery. Six of 28 lesions(21%) showed evidence of axillary nodal metastasis;the majority arose from the upper outer quadrant of the breast (n=21). The mammographic findings were mass (50%), (and mass with microcalcification, 11%); microcalcification(29%); asymmetrical density(14%); and normal (7%). According to the mammographic density of breast parenchyma, the major finding in the low density group(N1+P1) was mass(9/9), and in the high density group(P2+DY) was microcalcification (12/19). Conclusion : The most common mammographic findings of nonpalpable breast cancer were mass (50%) and microcalcification(29%). Its features varied according to the mammographic density of breast parenchyma;mass was the main finding in the low density group and microcalcification in the high density group.

  17. COMPUTER ASSISTED LOOM IN THE REVIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MONUMENTAL TAPESTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PINTILIE Anca-Aurelia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The art of tapestry has its basics back in time, probably in the decorations of tent, the house of the nomad. Tapestry in its beginnings is the first wall of the nomad’s home and the decorative wall and canopy in the ancient Greek houses as architect Gottfried Semper stated in the nineteen century. The architectural approach is not unusual even in the next centuries. Tapestry becomes popular as a form of monumental art during the Middle Ages when it is used as decorative architectural element, coating the walls of medieval castles. During the next centuries dominated by decadent styles of baroque, rococo, the tapestry will lose its monumental spirit and architectural quality but at the middle of the XXth century a new approach will sustain the revival of the tapestry as monumental art. Later, in the XXIst century, renowned multimedia artists will approach this medium and will use computer assisted looms in ambitious tapestry projects. This technique will allow them to realize complex and exquisite tapestries, sustaining in this way the revival of the tapestry in the contemporary art world. The paper presents the importance of the architectural side of tapestry and the great achievement that computer assisted loom represents for this form of art. The research activity is willing to inform Romanian textile designers about the possibilities to create tapestries on computer assisted looms. The research was made during the initial stage of a doctoral thesis consisting in a documentary study on monumental aspects of contemporary tapestry.

  18. Computer-assisted patellar resection system: development and insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chun Kit; Wai, Jeff; Lee, Estee; Hutchison, Carol; Myden, Curtis; Batuyong, Eldridge; Anglin, Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    Incorrect resection of the patella during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can lead to anterior knee pain (AKP), patellar maltracking, patellofemoral impingement, patellar fracture, component loosening, and reduced range of motion. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) systems for the tibia and femur improve cut accuracy, but no CAS system is available for patellar resection. We developed a system that included an optoelectronic localizer, marker arrays on the patella and instruments, and navigation software. Three users performed resections on artificial patellae mounted in a simulated surgical setup using five techniques (two CAS, three conventional), each repeated at least three times in randomized order. Computer-assisted patellar resection produced better or equal cut symmetry compared to conventional techniques, particularly superoinferiorly. Using CAS with a sawguide produced better results than using CAS freehand with an oscillating saw. This study showed the feasibility of computer-assisted patellar resection, which could lead to reduced pain and complications after TKA. The feedback provided could also make patellar CAS a valuable training tool.

  19. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Service, Forster Green Hospital, Belfast, BT8 4HD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Methods: Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was

  20. The mammographic correlations of a new immunohistochemical classification of invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, S. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Road, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sheeba_taneja@yahoo.co.uk; Evans, A.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Road, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Rakha, E.A.; Green, A.R. [Division of Pathology, School of Molecular Medical Sciences, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ball, G. [Nottingham Trent University, School of Biomedical and Natural Sciences, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ellis, I.O. [Division of Pathology, School of Molecular Medical Sciences, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Aim: Recent protein expression profiling of breast cancer has identified specific subtypes with clinical, biological, and therapeutic implications. The aim of this study was to identify the mammographic correlates of these novel molecular classes of invasive breast cancer. Materials and methods: The mammographic findings of 415 patients with operable breast cancer were correlated with the previously described protein expression classes identified by our group using immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of a large series of breast cancer cases prepared as tissue microarrays (TMAs). Twenty-five proteins of known relevance in breast cancer were assessed, including hormone receptors, HER-2 status, basal and luminal markers, p53 expression, and E-cadherin. Results: The mammographic background pattern and proportion of lesions that were mammographically occult were similar in all groups. Groups characterized by luminal and hormone receptor positivity had significantly more spiculate lesions at mammography. Groups characterized by HER-2 overexpression, basal characteristics, and E-cadherin positivity had a significantly higher proportion of ill-defined masses. These findings were independent of histological grade. Conclusion: The mammographic features of breast cancer show significant correlation with molecular classes of invasive breast cancer identified by protein expression IHC analysis. The biological reasons for the findings and implications of these regarding imaging protocols require further study and may provide mechanisms for improvement of detection of these lesions.

  1. 非影像依赖型计算机辅助全膝关节置换术的初步临床观察%Investigation of preliminary clinical outcome following total knee arthroplasty using image-free computer-assisted navigation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓辉; 于建华; 郑得志; 贾健; 龚跃昆; 卜延民; 赵秀祥

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the technique, learning curve, and early clinical effects of computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or standard instrumentation TKA. Methods From August2007 to May 2008, 60 KSS-A type patients (67 knees) underwent primary TKA operations by the same surgi-cal team. Among them, 22 knees underwent THA with the aid of the image-free navigation system (including5 knees and 17 knees, with the average age of 64.53 years); the other 45 underwent conventional TKA (12 knees and 33 knees, with the average age of 66.34 years). The preoperative demographic data and functional data have no statistical differences. The operation time, blood loss, duration of early postoperative quadriceps dysfunctions and complications were compared between the two groups. Results The operating time was significantly longer in computer-assisted group compared with conventional TKA group (P0.05). No patient who received computer-assisted TKA had an extent lag of more than 25 degrees 5 days postoperatively. Conclusion Use of image-free navigation system in TKA has improved the accuracy of total knee prosthesis alignment, and provided faster quadriceps functional re-covery than conventional manual methods. The technique of using of Image-free navigation system in TKA is easy to use, and has a short learning curve.%目的 探讨非影像依赖型计算机辅助全膝关节置换术的技术特点、学习曲线及早期临床疗效.方法 2007年8月至2008年5月应用非影像依赖型无线导航技术(导航组)辅助人工全膝关节置换术治疗KSS.A类患者19例22膝,男5例5膝,女14例17膝,平均年龄64.53岁;同期应用器械定位技术(非导航组)41例45膝,男11例12膝,女30例33膝,平均年龄66.34岁.两组患者术前一般资料、下肢力线和关节活动度无差异.比较两组手术时间、出血量、术后力线内或外翻偏差、早期关节最大屈曲角度及股四头肌功能恢复情况.结果 导航组手术时间比非

  2. Design Principles for Computer-Assisted Instruction in Histology Education: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Hasan; Cakir, Hasan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process and the key components of a computer-assisted histology material. Computer-assisted histology material is designed to supplement traditional histology education in a large Midwestern university. Usability information of the computer-assisted instruction (CAI) material was obtained…

  3. A computer assisted diagnosis tool for the classification of burns by depth of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carmen; Acha, Begoña; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Acha, José I; Roa, Laura M

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) tool for the classification of burns into their depths is proposed. The aim of the system is to separate burn wounds from healthy skin, and to distinguish among the different types of burns (burn depths) by means of digital photographs. It is intended to be used as an aid to diagnosis in local medical centres, where there is a lack of specialists. Another potential use of the system is as an educational tool. The system is based on the analysis of digital photographs. It extracts from those images colour and texture information, as these are the characteristics observed by physicians in order to form a diagnosis. Clinical effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on 35 clinical burn wound images, yielding an average classification success rate of 88% compared to expert classified images.

  4. Computer-assisted surgical planning and intraoperative guidance in fetal surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Rosalind; Deprest, Jan; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L

    2015-12-01

    Fetal surgery has become a clinical reality, with interventions for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and spina bifida demonstrated to improve outcome. Fetal imaging is evolving, with the use of 3D ultrasound and fetal MRI becoming more common in clinical practise. Medical imaging analysis is also changing, with technology being developed to assist surgeons by creating 3D virtual models that improve understanding of complex anatomy, and prove powerful tools in surgical planning and intraoperative guidance. We introduce the concept of computer-assisted surgical planning, and present the results of a systematic review of image reconstruction for fetal surgical planning that identified six articles using such technology. Indications from other specialities suggest a benefit of surgical planning and guidance to improve outcomes. There is therefore an urgent need to develop fetal-specific technology in order to improve fetal surgical outcome.

  5. Diagnostic imaging of lobular carcinoma of the breast. Mammographic, US and MR findings; La diagnostica per immagini del carcinoma lobulare della mammella. Aspetti mammografici, ecografici e con Risonanza Magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzocchi, M.; Facecchia, I.; Zuiani, C.; Smania, S. [Udine Univ., Udine (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia; Puglisi, F. [Udine Univ., Udine (Italy). Reparto di Oncologia; Di Loreto, C. [Udine Univ., Udine (Italy). Ist. di Anatomia Patologica

    2000-12-01

    Purpose of this article is to evaluate the most frequent mammographic, US and MR findings of invasive lobular carcinoma and the role of MRI in defining multifocality and/or multicentricity of this tumor histotype. 45 lobular carcinomas in 39 patients were studied and selected from 421 breast cancers. Core biopsy with a 14G needle was performed in 39 cases, under US guidance in 36/39 and under mammographic guidance in 3/39 cases. Surgical biopsy was performed in 2 cases and the diagnosis could be made only after mastectomy in 5 cases. All patients were examined with mammography and US and (10-13 MHz) and 8 also with MRI. 28/46 palpable lesions (60.9%). Core biopsy correctly diagnosed 38/39 lesions (97.4%). The most frequent mammographic findings was that of a nodular opacity without microcalcifications (34.8%), followed by a mass with spiculated borders (30.4%). Microcalcifications were seen in one case only (2.2%). Mammography detected no abnormalities in 15.2% of cases, but US showed a lesion in 2 of these cases. The most frequent US pattern was that of a hypoechoic lesion (43.5%), followed by posterior US beam attenuation. No US signs of abnormality were seen 15.2%. MRI correctly detected 13 lesions. Contrast enhancement was greater than 70% at one minute in 10 cases and greater than 40% in one case; two lesions exhibited atypical slow contrast enhancement, peaking at 5 minutes. MRI detected 5 lesions missed both mammography and US and showed multifocal (3 and 2) lesions where the other techniques had detected one lesion only. At mammography and US invasive lobular carcinoma exhibits no different features than ductal carcinoma but is difficult to identify especially in its early stages. US is a useful tool especially to characterize mammography-detected lesions but in the experience it also demonstrated 2 lesions missed at mammography. MRI is a precious examination to define the multifocal, multi centric or bilateral character of invasive lobular carcinoma

  6. OE CAI: COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION OF OLD ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Alcaraz Sintes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offer a general but thorougli survey of Computer Assisted lnstruction as applied to the Old English language íkoni the work of the late 80's pioneers to December 2001. It enibraces all the different facets of the question: stand-alone and web-based applications, Internet sites. CD-ROMs, grammars, dictioriaries, general courses, reading software, extralinguistic material, exercises, handouts, audio files ... Each instruction itee whether it be a website, a java exercise, an online course or an electronic book- is reviewed and URLs are provided in Sootiiotes. These reviews are accompanied all throughout by the pertinent theoretical background and practical advice.

  7. Computer-assisted Diagnostic Checklist in Clinical Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Pasquale F; McCabe, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    Considering computers are more efficient at processing large amounts of information than the human brain, speaks to the need to explore more intelligent computer-assisted diagnostic approaches. Two diagnostic checklist programs, one for single key term entry (NeurologyINDEX), and another, with more advanced algorithms to process multiple key terms and perform additional functions (NeurologicDx) are discussed. Both programs are internet based, access the same database, and are designed to generate diagnostic checklists and disease profiles accessible with hand-held or other computer device. The development of systems that use "smart algorithms" to generate valid diagnostic checklists is the goal.

  8. The implementation of an AR (augmented reality) approach to support mammographic interpretation training: an initial feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiang; Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.

    2017-03-01

    Appropriate feedback plays an important role in optimising mammographic interpretation training whilst also ensuring good interpretation performance. The traditional keyboard, mouse and workstation technical approach has a critical limitation in providing supplementary image-related information and providing complex feedback in real time. Augmented Reality (AR) provides a possible superior approach in this situation, as feedback can be provided directly overlaying the displayed mammographic images so making a generic approach which can also be vendor neutral. In this study, radiological feedback was dynamically remapped virtually into the real world, using perspective transformation, in order to provide a richer user experience in mammographic interpretation training. This is an initial attempt of an AR approach to dynamically superimpose pre-defined feedback information of a DICOM image on top of a radiologist's view, whilst the radiologist is examining images on a clinical workstation. The study demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although there are limitations on interactive operations which are due to the hardware used. The results of this fully functional approach provide appropriate feedback/image correspondence in a simulated mammographic interpretation environment. Thus, it is argued that employing AR is a feasible way to provide rich feedback in the delivery of mammographic interpretation training.

  9. A comparison of conventional and computer-assisted semen analysis (CRISMAS software) using samples from 166 young Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Bonde, Jens P;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare assessments of sperm concentration and sperm motility analysed by conventional semen analysis with those obtained by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) (Copenhagen Rigshospitalet Image House Sperm Motility Analysis System (CRISMAS) 4.6 software) us...... and motility analysis. This needs to be accounted for in clinics using this software and in studies of determinants of these semen characteristics.......The aim of the present study was to compare assessments of sperm concentration and sperm motility analysed by conventional semen analysis with those obtained by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) (Copenhagen Rigshospitalet Image House Sperm Motility Analysis System (CRISMAS) 4.6 software......) using semen samples from 166 young Danish men. The CRISMAS software identifies sperm concentration and classifies spermatozoa into three motility categories. To enable comparison of the two methods, the four motility stages obtained by conventional semen analysis were, based on their velocity...

  10. Mammographic dose survey in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Leos [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Rada, Jiri [National Radiation Protection Institute, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    At present, it is generally accepted that the average dose to the glandular tissue is the most reasonable dose descriptor in mammography with regard to the risk of breast cancer induced by ionizing radiation. It is advantageous to use the quantity mean glandular dose M.G.D. for setting of diagnostic reference levels (D.R.L.) as well, although the quantity is not directly measurable as it is the case of D.R.L. quantities for other imaging modalities. The reason is that a directly measurable quantity suitable for mammography, incident air kerma Ki, depends a lot on a beam quality. The influence of the beam quality (expressed by tube voltage, half value layer and combination of anode/filter material) is already included in calculation of mean glandular dose. To assess a radiation burden of patients due to mammography at a national level a representative dose survey is needed to carry out. Such a study provides statistically significant dose data for setting of the national diagnostic reference levels. National Radiation Protection Institute is performing the study in the Czech Republic since the year 2005.On a basis of presented data, it could be concluded, that the situation in the Czech Republic with respect to patient doses in mammography is encouraging and that the requirements of European Commission are well fulfilled. However, it is obvious, that the obtained results can not be considered as statistically significant at the moment, because the data were not collected from a representative sample of centers, which should observe a distribution of X-ray unit types, type of a mammographic center (screening/non screening ones) and also a locality of a center. The dose survey still continues to cover the whole Czech Republic with the main task to determine new national diagnostic reference levels and to find out optimized standards for carrying out the examinations with respect to patient doses and image quality. (authors)

  11. Epidemiologic Studies of Isoflavones & Mammographic Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Tice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  12. Epidemiologic studies of isoflavones & mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Verheus, Martijn; Tice, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  13. Improved mammographic interpretation of masses using computer-aided diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichter, I. [Dept. of Electro-Optics, Jerusalem College of Technology (Israel); Fields, S.; Novak, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Mt. Scopus Jerusalem (Israel); Nirel, R. [Dept. of Statistics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem (Israel); Bamberger, P. [Dept. of Electronics, Jerusalem College of Technology, Jerusalem (Israel); Lederman, R. [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem (Israel); Buchbinder, S. [Department of Radiology, Montefiore Medical Center, University Hospital for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of computerized image enhancement, to investigate criteria for discriminating benign from malignant mammographic findings by computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), and to test the role of quantitative analysis in improving the accuracy of interpretation of mass lesions. Forty sequential mammographically detected mass lesions referred for biopsy were digitized at high resolution for computerized evaluation. A prototype CAD system which included image enhancement algorithms was used for a better visualization of the lesions. Quantitative features which characterize the spiculation were automatically extracted by the CAD system for a user-defined region of interest (ROI). Reference ranges for malignant and benign cases were acquired from data generated by 214 known retrospective cases. The extracted parameters together with the reference ranges were presented to the radiologist for the analysis of 40 prospective cases. A pattern recognition scheme based on discriminant analysis was trained on the 214 retrospective cases, and applied to the prospective cases. Accuracy of interpretation with and without the CAD system, as well as the performance of the pattern recognition scheme, were analyzed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. A significant difference (p < 0.005) was found between features extracted by the CAD system for benign and malignant cases. Specificity of the CAD-assisted diagnosis improved significantly (p < 0.02) from 14 % for the conventional assessment to 50 %, and the positive predictive value increased from 0.47 to 0.62 (p < 0.04). The area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 0.66 for the conventional assessment to 0.81 for the CAD-assisted analysis. The A{sub z} for the results of the pattern recognition scheme was higher (0.95). The results indicate that there is an improved accuracy of diagnosis with the use of the mammographic CAD system above that

  14. Stability Outcomes following Computer-Assisted ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Christino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intraoperative prereconstruction stability measurements and/or patient characteristics were associated with final knee stability after computer-assisted ACL reconstruction. Methods. This was a retrospective review of all patients who underwent computer-assisted single-bundle ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon. Prereconstruction intraoperative stability measurements were correlated with patient characteristics and postreconstruction stability measurements. 143 patients were included (87 male and 56 female. Average age was 29.8 years (SD ± 11.8. Results. Females were found to have significantly more pre- and postreconstruction internal rotation than males (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, resp.. Patients with additional intra-articular injuries demonstrated more prereconstruction anterior instability than patients with isolated ACL tears (P < 0.001. After reconstruction, these patients also had higher residual anterior translation (P = 0.01. Among all patients with ACL reconstructions, the percent of correction of anterior translation was found to be significantly higher than the percent of correction for internal or external rotation (P < 0.001. Conclusion. Anterior translation was corrected the most using a single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Females had higher pre- and postoperative internal rotation. Patients with additional injuries had greater original anterior translation and less operative correction of anterior translation compared to patients with isolated ACL tears.

  15. [Development of computer assisted learning program using cone beam projection for head radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazeko, Kazuma; Kajiwara, Hironori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kuwayama, Jun; Karube, Shuhei; Araki, Misao; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a computer assisted learning (CAL) program to simulate head radiography. The program provides cone beam projections of a target volume, simulating three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) of a head phantom. The generated image is 512 x 512 x 512 pixels with each pixel 0.6 mm on a side. The imaging geometry, such as X-ray tube orientation and phantom orientation, can be varied. The graphical user interface (GUI) of the CAL program allows the study of the effects of varying the imaging geometry; each simulated projection image is shown quickly in an adjoining window. Simulated images with an assigned geometry were compared with the image obtained using the standard geometry in clinical use. The accuracy of the simulated image was verified through comparison with the image acquired using radiography of the head phantom, subsequently processed with a computed radiography system (CR image). Based on correlation coefficient analysis and visual assessment, it was concluded that the CAL program can satisfactorily simulate the CR image. Therefore, it should be useful for the training of head radiography.

  16. A device for training and computer-assisted application of panretinal photocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; Russell, Stephen; Abramoff, Michael; Brittain, Robert; Nguyen, Phong; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    To become highly proficient at a given surgical procedure and to reduce risk to patients, physicians must gain experience through a number means. Today optical training devices based on the actual surgical device coupled with computer models can provide the required realism to provide highly effective training. This paper presents a optical system that will be used for training residents to perform panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), a laser surgical procedure for treating the retina. The system will naturally evolve into a computer-assisted device for performing PRP. With the system described herein, simulations are created in the Umbra modeling and simulation framework. The simulation is composed of four building blocks: Pre-operation planning, multi-modality image registration, tracking the patient's eye movement, and positioning the laser according to the pre-planned aim points. A prototype simulation was developed to demonstrate a realistic depiction of the PRP the procedure. The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate the software into an existing ophthalmic device to increase the accuracy of the laser application procedure by providing computer-assisted surgery.

  17. Computer-assisted virtual technology in intracapsular condylar fracture with two resorbable long-screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W H; Deng, J Y; Zhu, J; Li, M; Xia, B; Xu, B

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to fix intracapsular condylar fractures (ICF) with two resorbable long screws using preoperative computer-assisted virtual technology. From February 2008 to July 2011, 19 patients with ICF were treated with two resorbable long screws. Preoperatively we took panoramic radiographs and spiral computed tomography (CT). Depending on their digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data, the dislocated condylar segments were restored using the SimPlant Pro™ software, version 11.04. The mean (SD) widths of the condylar head and neck from lateral to medial were 19.01 (1.28)mm and 13.84 (1.13)mm, respectively. In all patients, the mandibles and the ICF seen intraoperatively corresponded with the preoperative three-dimensional and virtual reposition. All patients were followed up for 6-46 months (mean 21). Occlusion and mouth opening had been restored completely in all but one patient, and absolute anatomical reduction was also achieved in most cases. Computer-assisted virtual technology plays an important part in the diagnosis of ICF, as well as in its preoperative design. Fixation with only two resorbable long screws is an effective and reliable method for fixing ICF.

  18. History of computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Douglas W; Simon, Timothy M

    2008-06-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery and navigation applications have a history rooted in the desire to link imaging technology with real-time anatomic landmarks. Although applications are still evolving in the clinical and research setting, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery has already demonstrated in certain procedures its potential for improving the surgeon's accuracy, reproducibility (once past the learning curve), and in reducing outlier outcomes. It is also being used as an educational tool to assist less experienced surgeons in interpreting measurements and precision placements related to well defined anatomic landmarks. It also can assist experienced surgeons, in real-time, plan their bony cuts, tunnel placement, and with ligament balancing. Presently, the additional time, the expense to acquire the needed software and hardware, and restricted reimbursement have slowed the widespread use of navigation. Its current applications have been primarily in joint replacement surgery, spine surgery, and trauma. It has not been widely used in the clinical setting for sports medicine procedures. Sports medicine applications such as individualizing tunnel placement in ligament surgery, opening wedge osteotomy with and without accompanying ligament reconstruction, and balancing and tensioning of the ligaments during the procedure (allowing real-time corrections if necessary) are currently being evaluated and being used on a limited clinical basis.

  19. Stratification of mammographic computerized analysis by BI-RADS categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, Richard [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem (Israel); Leichter, Isaac [Department of Electro-Optics, Jerusalem College of Technology, P.O.B. 16031, Jerusalem (Israel); Buchbinder, Shalom [Department of Radiology of The Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Novak, Boris [Department of Applied Mathematics, Jerusalem College of Technology, P.O.B. 16031, Jerusalem 91160 (Israel); Bamberger, Philippe [Department of Electronics, Jerusalem College of Technology, POB 16031, Jerusalem (Israel); Fields, Scott [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2003-02-01

    The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was implemented to standardize characterization of mammographic findings. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate in which BI-RADS categories the changes recommended by computerized mammographic analysis are most beneficial. Archival cases including, 170 masses (101 malignant, 69 benign) and 63 clusters of microcalcifications (MCs; 36 malignant, 27 benign), were evaluated retrospectively, using the BI-RADS categories, by several radiologists, blinded to the pathology results. A computerized system then automatically extracted from the digitized mammogram features characterizing mammographic lesions, which were used to classify the lesions. The results of the computerized classification scheme were compared, by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, to the conventional interpretation. In the ''low probability of malignancy group'' (excluding BI-RADS categories 4 and 5), computerized analysis improved the A{sub z}of the ROC curve significantly, from 0.57 to 0.89. In the ''high probability of malignancy group'' (mostly category 5) the computerized analysis yielded an ROC curve with an A {sub z}of 0.99. In the ''intermediate probability of malignancy group'' computerized analysis improved the A {sub z}significantly, from 0.66 for to 0.83. Pair-wise analysis showed that in the latter group the modifications resulting from computerized analysis were correct in 83% of cases. Computerized analysis has the ability to improve the performance of the radiologists exactly in the BI-RADS categories with the greatest difficulties in arriving at a correct diagnosis. It increased the performance significantly in the problematic group of ''intermediate probability of malignancy'' and pinpointed all the cases with missed cancers in the ''low probability'' group. (orig.)

  20. [Follow-up of surgical biopsies in microcalcifications of the breast. Comparative analysis of patients submitted to mammography and digitalization of mammographic images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Vento, A R; Naninato, P; Zanetti, A; Carli, L

    1997-01-01

    Improvements in the techniques of preoperative needle localization of nonpalpable breast lesions that have been detected at mammography, coupled with surgical biopsy of smaller volumes of breast tissue and the use of local anesthesia have produced a more aggressive attitude toward early biopsy of lesions that are suspected of malignancy. The authors report the follow-up in 92 cases, who underwent breast biopsy for microcalcifications with no palpable lesions. In 46 women the presence of microcalcifications was evaluated through a computerized instrument which allows digitalization of the image.

  1. Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning: 3D virtual articulator: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanai, S; Marmulla, R; Wiechnik, J; Mühling, J; Kotrikova, B

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a computer-assisted planning system for dysgnathia treatment. It describes the process of information gathering using a virtual articulator and how the splints are constructed for orthognathic surgery. The deviation of the virtually planned splints is shown in six cases on the basis of conventionally planned cases. In all cases the plaster models were prepared and scanned using a 3D laser scanner. Successive lateral and posterior-anterior cephalometric images were used for reconstruction before surgery. By identifying specific points on the X-rays and marking them on the virtual models, it was possible to enhance the 2D images to create a realistic 3D environment and to perform virtual repositioning of the jaw. A hexapod was used to transfer the virtual planning to the real splints. Preliminary results showed that conventional repositioning could be replicated using the virtual articulator.

  2. An augmented reality framework for optimization of computer assisted navigation in endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Shen, Rui; Moreau, Richard; Brizzi, Vicenzo; Rossol, Nathaniel; Basu, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is performed by placing a catheter through blood vessels. Due to the fragility of arteries and the difficulty in controlling a long elastic wire to reach the target region, training plays an extremely important role in helping a surgeon acquire the required complex skills. Virtual reality simulators and augmented reality systems have proven to be effective in minimally invasive surgical training. These systems, however, often employ pre-captured or computer-generated medical images. We have developed an augmented reality system for ultrasound-guided endovascular surgical training, where real ultrasound images captured during the procedure are registered with a pre-scanned phantom model to give the operator a realistic experience. Our goal is to extend the planning and training environment to deliver a system for computer assisted remote endovascular surgery where the navigation of a catheter can be controlled through a robotic device based on the guidance provided by an endovascular surgeon.

  3. State of the art in computer-assisted planning, intervention, and assessment of liver-tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Christian; Rieder, Christian; Bieberstein, Jennifer; Weihusen, Andreas; Zidowitz, Stephan; Moltz, Jan Hendrik; Preusser, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous, image-guided thermal tumor ablation procedures are used increasingly for minimally invasive, local treatment of tumors in the liver. The planning of these procedures; the support of targeting, monitoring, and controlling during the intervention itself; and the assessment of the treatment response can all benefit significantly from computer assistance. The outcome can be optimized by supporting the physician in the process of determining an intervention strategy that enables complete destruction of the targeted tumor while reducing the danger of complications. During the intervention, computer-assisted methods can be used to guide the physician in the implementation of the intended strategy by providing planning information. Assessment of the intervention result is carried out by comparison of the achieved coagulation with the target tumor volume. Supporting this comparison facilitates the early detection of potential recurrences. This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art computer-assisted methods for the support of thermal tumor ablations in the liver. Proper approaches for image segmentation, access-path determination, simulation, visualization, interventional guidance, and post-interventional assessment, as well as integrated work flow-oriented solutions, are reviewed with respect to technical aspects and applicability in the clinical setting.

  4. Mechatronics Interface for Computer Assisted Prostate Surgery Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano del Monte, Felipe; Padilla Castañeda, Miguel A.; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2006-09-01

    In this work is presented the development of a mechatronics device to simulate the interaction of the surgeon with the surgical instrument (resectoscope) used during a Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). Our mechatronics interface is part of a computer assisted system for training in TURP, which is based on a 3D graphics model of the prostate which can be deformed and resected interactively by the user. The mechatronics interface, is the device that the urology residents will manipulate to simulate the movements performed during surgery. Our current prototype has five degrees of freedom, which are enough to have a realistic simulation of the surgery movements. Two of these degrees of freedom are linear, to determinate the linear displacement of the resecting loop and the other three are rotational to determinate three directions and amounts of rotation.

  5. Implementation of computer assisted assessment: lessons from the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Sim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws attention to literature surrounding the subject of computer-assisted assessment (CAA. A brief overview of traditional methods of assessment is presented, highlighting areas of concern in existing techniques. CAA is then defined, and instances of its introduction in various educational spheres are identified, with the main focus of the paper concerning the implementation of CAA. Through referenced articles, evidence is offered to inform practitioners, and direct further research into CAA from a technological and pedagogical perspective. This includes issues relating to interoperability of questions, security, test construction and testing higher cognitive skills. The paper concludes by suggesting that an institutional strategy for CAA coupled with staff development in test construction for a CAA environment can increase the chances of successful implementation.

  6. CAPA-An integrated computer-assisted personalized assignment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashy, E.; Sherrill, B. M.; Tsai, Y.; Thaler, D.; Weinshank, D.; Engelmann, M.; Morrissey, D. J.

    1993-12-01

    A new integrated computer-assisted personalized assignment (CAPA) system that creates individual assignments for each student has been developed and found to be a powerful motivator. The CAPA system allows students to enter their answers to personalized assignments directly via networked terminals, gives immediate feedback and hints (allowing challenging questions), while providing the instructor with on-line performance information. The students are encouraged to study together which is known to be an effective learning strategy, but each must still obtain his/her own correct answers. Students are allowed to re-enter solutions to the problems before the due date without penalty, thus providing students with different skills levels the opportunity and incentive to understand the material without being judged during the learning process. The features and operation of the system are described, observations on its use in an introductory general physics class are reported, and some of the highly favorable student reactions are included.

  7. APLIKASI PEMBELAJARAN ALGORITMA DASAR INTERAKTIF BERBASISKAN COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Yulianto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Book as a learning method is less effective and interactive since it can not deliver motion animation. Thus, a more interactive learning method is needed to have a better learning process. The goal of the research is developing an application that provides easiness for students in learning algorithm by combining computer assisted instruction (CAI and internet technology. On the development phase, the research method to uses fact finding by a survey to students who are or have been learning algorithm and a literature study, and also waterfall method for software development. The research output is a CAI application for learning algorithm interactively. The developed application is interactive for learning process and able to help students in deepen algorithm topics.

  8. Translation Memory and Computer Assisted Translation Tool for Medieval Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Törcsvári Attila

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Translation memories (TMs, as part of Computer Assisted Translation (CAT tools, support translators reusing portions of formerly translated text. Fencing books are good candidates for using TMs due to the high number of repeated terms. Medieval texts suffer a number of drawbacks that make hard even “simple” rewording to the modern version of the same language. The analyzed difficulties are: lack of systematic spelling, unusual word orders and typos in the original. A hypothesis is made and verified that even simple modernization increases legibility and it is feasible, also it is worthwhile to apply translation memories due to the numerous and even extremely long repeated terms. Therefore, methods and algorithms are presented 1. for automated transcription of medieval texts (when a limited training set is available, and 2. collection of repeated patterns. The efficiency of the algorithms is analyzed for recall and precision.

  9. Cartographic Modeling: Computer-assisted Analysis of Spatially Defined Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. K.; Tomlin, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cartographic models addressing a wide variety of applications are composed of fundamental map processing operations. These primitive operations are neither data base nor application-specific. By organizing the set of operations into a mathematical-like structure, the basis for a generalized cartographic modeling framework can be developed. Among the major classes of primitive operations are those associated with reclassifying map categories, overlaying maps, determining distance and connectivity, and characterizing cartographic neighborhoods. The conceptual framework of cartographic modeling is established and techniques for characterizing neighborhoods are used as a means of demonstrating some of the more sophisticated procedures of computer-assisted map analysis. A cartographic model for assessing effective roundwood supply is briefly described as an example of a computer analysis. Most of the techniques described have been implemented as part of the map analysis package developed at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

  10. Computer-assisted LAD bypass grafting at the open heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Christine; Gnahm, Claudia; Friedl, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Martin; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    Open heart bypass surgery is the standard treatment in advanced coronary heart diseases. For an effective revascularization procedure, optimal placement of the bypass is very important. To accelerate the intraoperative localization of the anastomosis site and to increase the precision of the procedure, a concept for computer assistance in open heart bypass surgery has been developed comprising the following steps: 1. Preprocedural planning: A patient-specific coronary map with information on vessel paths and wall plaque formations is extracted from a multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). On this basis, the heart surgeon and the cardiac radiologist define the optimal anastomosis site prior to surgery. 2. Intraoperative navigation: During surgery, data are recorded at the beating heart using a stereo camera system. After registering the pre- and intraoperative data sets, preprocedural information can be transferred to the surgical site by overlaying the coronary map and the planned anastomosis site on the live video stream. With this visual guidance system, the surgeon can navigate to the planned anastomosis site. In this work, the proposed surgical assistance system has been validated for the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The accuracy of the registration mechanism has been evaluated in retrospective on patient data sets and the effects of breathing motion were quantified. The promising results of the retrospective evaluation led to the in-vivo application of the computer assistance system during several bypass grafting procedures. Intraoperative navigation has been performed successfully and postoperative evaluation confirms that the bypass grafts were accurately positioned to the preoperatively planned anastomosis sites.

  11. Early life factors and adult mammographic density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokate, M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Berg, van den S.W.; Peeters, P.H.; Gils, van C.H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Early life factors have shown to be related to breast cancer risk. The pathophysiological link could be mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Mammary gland development already starts in utero and early life factors might affect the number of mammary cells at risk. In

  12. Intramammary metastases: Comparison of mammographic and ultrasound features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Jasmin, E-mail: Jasmin_Abbas@web.de [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06097 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Wienke, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.wienke@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Epidemiology, Biometry and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06097 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Spielmann, Rolf Peter, E-mail: rolf.spielmann@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06097 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Bach, Andreas Gunter [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06097 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Surov, Alexey, E-mail: alex.surow@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06097 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To describe the mammographical and ultrasound features of IM, and to compare radiological patterns of IM arising from different malignancies. Materials and methods: A retrospective search in the statistical database of our institution from January 2000 to December 2009 revealed 51 cases of intramammary metastases from solid malignancies. Additionally, a retrospective search in the Pubmed database was performed. Publications in the time interval from 1980 to 2010 were considered. After thorough analysis, 119 articles with 229 patients were involved in the study. Therefore, together with our cases our analysis comprises 280 patients. Mammographic and ultrasound findings of different IM were analyzed. Results: The detected metastases showed two main radiological patterns: intramammary masses (81.5%) and architectural distortion (18.5%). Carcinomas of the stomach caused more frequently an architectural distortion, whereas other malignancies tended to present as intramammary masses. The size of the masses ranged from 2 to 104 mm. The largest lesions occurred in rhabdomyosarcoma, followed by hepatocellular carcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. The smallest lesions arose from malignancies of the thyroid gland carcinoma. Most IM showed circumscribed margins, while breast lesions in rhabdomyosarcoma were rather microlobulated. On ultrasound, IM from lung cancer were usually inhomogenously hypoechoic with circumscribed margins and showed posterior shadowing in almost 50% of the cases. Breast metastases from ovarian carcinoma had typically microlobulated margins and posterior enhancement. Conclusion: IM can present with a broad spectrum of radiological features. Their imaging findings vary depending on the primary tumor.

  13. Computer Assisted Surgery and Current Trends in Orthopaedics Research and Total Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, Farid

    2008-06-01

    patients are living longer and total hip arthroplasty is performed in younger patients the risks of osteolysis associated with cumulative wear is increased. Computer-assisted surgery is based on sensing feedback; vision and imaging that help surgeons align the patient's joints during total knee or hip replacement with a degree of accuracy not possible with the naked eye. For the first time, the computer feedback is essential for ligament balancing and longevity of the implants. The computers navigation systems also help surgeons to use smaller incisions instead of the traditional larger openings. Small-incision surgery offers the potential for faster recovery, less bleeding and less pain for patients. The development of SESCAN imaging technique to create a patient based model of a 3D joint will be presented to show the effective solution of complex geometry of joints.

  14. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  15. Bilateral mammographic density asymmetry and breast cancer risk: A preliminary assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Sumkin, Jules H., E-mail: jsumkin@mail.magee.edu [Department of Radiology, Magee Womens Hospital, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zuley, Margarita L., E-mail: zuleyml@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Magee Womens Hospital, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wang, Xingwei, E-mail: wangx6@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klym, Amy H., E-mail: klymah@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Gur, David, E-mail: gurd@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    To improve efficacy of breast cancer screening and prevention programs, it requires a risk assessment model with high discriminatory power. This study aimed to assess classification performance of using computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry to predict risk of individual women developing breast cancer in near-term. The database includes 451 cases with multiple screening mammography examinations. The first (baseline) examinations of all case were interpreted negative. In the next sequential examinations, 187 cases developed cancer or surgically excised high-risk lesions, 155 remained negative (not-recalled), and 109 were recalled benign cases. From each of two bilateral cranio-caudal view images acquired from the baseline examination, we computed two features of average pixel value and local pixel value fluctuation. We then computed mean and difference of each feature computed from two images. When applying the computed features and other two risk factors (woman's age and subjectively rated mammographic density) to predict risk of cancer development, areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were computed to evaluate the discriminatory/classification performance. The AUCs are 0.633 {+-} 0.030, 0.535 {+-} 0.036, 0.567 {+-} 0.031, and 0.719 {+-} 0.027 when using woman's age, subjectively rated, computed mean and asymmetry of mammographic density, to classify between two groups of cancer-verified and negative cases, respectively. When using an equal-weighted fusion method to combine woman's age and computed density asymmetry, AUC increased to 0.761 {+-} 0.025 (p < 0.05). The study demonstrated that bilateral mammographic density asymmetry could be a significantly stronger risk factor associated to the risk of women developing breast cancer in near-term than woman's age and assessed mean mammographic density.

  16. Changes in hepatocyte ploidy in response to chromium, analyzed by computer-assisted microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J C; Bisel, T U; Peterson, P; Uyeki, E M

    1990-02-01

    BDF1 mice were given single injections of sodium dichromate (25 mg/kg) on an acute (6 hr to 7 days) or intermediate (2-4 weeks) basis, or multiple injections (12.5 mg/kg) on a chronic (4.5 months) basis. Observed hepatic changes included programmed cell death (apoptosis) in the periportal region with acute exposure and fusion of liver lobes with chronic exposure. Response to chromate exposure was measured by change in hepatocyte nuclear ploidy state (e.g., the proportion of diploid, tetraploid, and octaploid nuclei) based on computer-assisted imaging from histological sections. The computer-assisted imaging system used in this study was superior to traditional methods because it (1) allows rapid ploidy determinations from histological material and (2) can be used to collect regional information. Regional differences in ploidy were seen to occur in a consistent fashion among both control and treated animals. Nuclei adjacent to the portal triad had the lowest ploidy value (highest proportion of diploid nuclei), an intermediate value was found adjacent to the central vein, and the highest ploidy was found in the midzone. These three ploidy-based zones roughly correspond to the three functional zones of A. M. Rappaport (1973, Microvasc. Res. 6, 212-228) and W. H. Lamers et al. W. H. Lamers, A. Hilberts, E. Furt, J. Smith, G. N. Jonges, J. F. Van Noorden, J. W. G. Janzen, R. Charles, and A. F. M. Moorman, 1989, Hepatology, 10, 72-76. Temporal changes in ploidy were seen among control animals (all zones), with young animals (56 days) displaying relatively low ploidy values compared to older animals (184 days). Chromate exposure caused increased ploidy (all zones) among animals treated on an acute basis (the youngest animals). Chromate had no apparent effect on ploidy among animals treated for longer periods of time, probably because of age-related factors.

  17. Computer-assisted collision avoidance using ARPA and ECDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, J.; Mathes, S.

    1997-12-01

    In the project entitled “Computer-Assisted Collision Avoidance”, which was funded by the German Mi nistry of Education, Research and Technology and was executed in cooperation with the industrial partner STN ATLAS Elektronik, the intention was to combine the tasks of track planning, track control and collision avoidance. The aim was to develop a system which would support the officer of the watch in the handling of complex traffic situations by suggesting collision-avoidance tracks. The main points of this project were in the following areas: p] Determination and display of danger areas The positions of possible collisions with other ships, and areas to be avoided on the basis of defined closest points of approach, are computed and displayed with geometrical exactness. The target ships are fed into the system via a standardized interface. Set of rules for the handling of multi- ship encounters The software for computer-assisted collision avoidance contains a set of rules for the creation of collisi on avoidance tracks, taking account of the existing traffic situation. This set of rules takes into account the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREG) and nautical practice. In the process of generating a track suggestion, all other ships detected in the sea area concerned are included in the compu tation. Integration of ECDIS One of the main aims of the project was to combine the information and functionalities of ARPA and ECDIS. By the incorporation of chart data, the system is able to compute track suggestions, taking account of the sea area in which the ships are sailing. In this process, the own ship’s safety requirements are inclu ded. Accordingly, the track thus determined can actually be sailed. By the overlaid display of radar picture and ECDIS, the situation involving encounters with other vessels can at all times be assessed within the over all context. Economically designed man- machine interface One important subtask in the

  18. A comparative study between xerographic, computer-assisted overlay generation and animated-superimposition methods in bite mark analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Meng Wei; Chong, Zhen Feng; Asif, Muhammad Khan; Rahmat, Rabiah A; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran

    2016-09-01

    This study was to compare the suitability and precision of xerographic and computer-assisted methods for bite mark investigations. Eleven subjects were asked to bite on their forearm and the bite marks were photographically recorded. Alginate impressions of the subjects' dentition were taken and their casts were made using dental stone. The overlays generated by xerographic method were obtained by photocopying the subjects' casts and the incisal edge outlines were then transferred on a transparent sheet. The bite mark images were imported into Adobe Photoshop® software and printed to life-size. The bite mark analyses using xerographically generated overlays were done by comparing an overlay to the corresponding printed bite mark images manually. In computer-assisted method, the subjects' casts were scanned into Adobe Photoshop®. The bite mark analyses using computer-assisted overlay generation were done by matching an overlay and the corresponding bite mark images digitally using Adobe Photoshop®. Another comparison method was superimposing the cast images with corresponding bite mark images employing the Adobe Photoshop® CS6 and GIF-Animator©. A score with a range of 0-3 was given during analysis to each precision-determining criterion and the score was increased with better matching. The Kruskal Wallis H test showed significant difference between the three sets of data (H=18.761, poverlay generation and lastly the xerographic method. The superior precision contributed by digital method is discernible despite the human skin being a poor recording medium of bite marks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical activity and mammographic breast density: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Colditz, Graham A.; Wolin, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Studies show a protective relationship between physical activity and breast cancer risk across the life course from menarche to postmenopausal years. Mammographic breast density is a known and strong breast cancer risk factor. Whether the association of physical activity with breast cancer risk is mediated through mammographic breast density is poorly understood. This systematic review summarizes published studies that investigated the association between physical activity and mammographic br...

  20. Natural language processing tools for computer assisted language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandeventer Faltin, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the usefulness of natural language processing (NLP tools for computer assisted language learning (CALL through the presentation of three NLP tools integrated within a CALL software for French. These tools are (i a sentence structure viewer; (ii an error diagnosis system; and (iii a conjugation tool. The sentence structure viewer helps language learners grasp the structure of a sentence, by providing lexical and grammatical information. This information is derived from a deep syntactic analysis. Two different outputs are presented. The error diagnosis system is composed of a spell checker, a grammar checker, and a coherence checker. The spell checker makes use of alpha-codes, phonological reinterpretation, and some ad hoc rules to provide correction proposals. The grammar checker employs constraint relaxation and phonological reinterpretation as diagnosis techniques. The coherence checker compares the underlying "semantic" structures of a stored answer and of the learners' input to detect semantic discrepancies. The conjugation tool is a resource with enhanced capabilities when put on an electronic format, enabling searches from inflected and ambiguous verb forms.

  1. Computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, M; Inoue, M; Fukunami, M; Ishikawa, K; Inada, H; Abe, H

    1984-08-01

    A computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR) was developed for students to acquire the ability to logically diagnose complicated arrhythmias. This system has a logical simulator of cardiac rhythm using a mathematical model of the impulse formation and conduction system of the heart. A simulated arrhythmia (ECG pattern) is given on a graphic display unit with simulated series of the action potential of five pacemaker centers and the "ladder diagram" of impulse formation and conduction, which show the mechanism of that arrhythmia. For the purpose of the evaluation of this system, 13 medical students were given two types of tests concerning arrhythmias before and after 2-hr learning with this system. The scores they obtained after learning increased significantly from 73.3 +/- 11.9 to 93.2 +/- 3.0 (P less than 0.001) in one test and from 47.2 +/- 17.9 to 64.9 +/- 19.6 (P less than 0.001) in another one. These results proved that this CAI system is useful and effective for training ECG interpretation of arrhythmias.

  2. Implementation of Computer Assisted Test Selection System in Local Governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Azis Basri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an evaluative way of selection of civil servant system in all government areas, Computer Assisted Test selection system was started to apply in 2013. In phase of implementation for first time in all areas in 2014, this system selection had trouble in several areas, such as registration procedure and passing grade. The main objective of this essay was to describe implementation of new selection system for civil servants in the local governments and to seek level of effectiveness of this selection system. This essay used combination of study literature and field survey which data collection was made by interviews, observations, and documentations from various sources, and to analyze the collected data, this essay used reduction, display data and verification for made the conclusion. The result of this essay showed, despite there a few parts that be problem of this system such as in the registration phase but almost all phases of implementation of CAT selection system in local government areas can be said was working clearly likes in preparation, implementation and result processing phase. And also this system was fulfilled two of three criterias of effectiveness for selection system, they were accuracy and trusty. Therefore, this selection system can be said as an effective way to select new civil servant. As suggestion, local governments have to make prime preparation in all phases of test and make a good feedback as evaluation mechanism and together with central government to seek, fix and improve infrastructures as supporting tool and competency of local residents.

  3. Helping Children Learn Vocabulary during Computer-Assisted Oral Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Aist

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an indispensable skill using a unique method to teach a critical component: helping children learn to read by using computer-assisted oral reading to help children learn vocabulary. We build on Project LISTEN’s Reading Tutor, a computer program that adapts automatic speech recognition to listen to children read aloud, and helps them learn to read (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~listen. To learn a word from reading with the Reading Tutor, students must encounter the word and learn the meaning of the word in context. We modified the Reading Tutor first to help students encounter new words and then to help them learn the meanings of new words. We then compared the Reading Tutor to classroom instruction and to human-assisted oral reading as part of a yearlong study with 144 second and third graders. The result: Second graders did about the same on word comprehension in all three conditions. However, third graders who read with the 1999 Reading Tutor, modified as described in this paper, performed statistically significantly better than other third graders in a classroom control on word comprehension gains – and even comparably with other third graders who read one-on-one with human tutors.

  4. Computer-Assisted Transgenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans for Deep Phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilleland, Cody L; Falls, Adam T; Noraky, James; Heiman, Maxwell G; Yanik, Mehmet F

    2015-09-01

    A major goal in the study of human diseases is to assign functions to genes or genetic variants. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful tool because homologs of many human genes are identifiable, and large collections of genetic vectors and mutant strains are available. However, the delivery of such vector libraries into mutant strains remains a long-standing experimental bottleneck for phenotypic analysis. Here, we present a computer-assisted microinjection platform to streamline the production of transgenic C. elegans with multiple vectors for deep phenotyping. Briefly, animals are immobilized in a temperature-sensitive hydrogel using a standard multiwell platform. Microinjections are then performed under control of an automated microscope using precision robotics driven by customized computer vision algorithms. We demonstrate utility by phenotyping the morphology of 12 neuronal classes in six mutant backgrounds using combinations of neuron-type-specific fluorescent reporters. This technology can industrialize the assignment of in vivo gene function by enabling large-scale transgenic engineering.

  5. Computer-Assisted Inverse Design of Inorganic Electrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrides are intrinsic electron-rich materials enabling applications as excellent electron emitters, superior catalysts, and strong reducing agents. There are a number of organic electrides; however, their instability at room temperature and sensitivity to moisture are bottlenecks for their practical uses. Known inorganic electrides are rare, but they appear to have greater thermal stability at ambient conditions and are thus better characterized for application. Here, we develop a computer-assisted inverse-design method for searching for a large variety of inorganic electrides unbiased by any known electride structures. It uses the intrinsic property of interstitial electron localization of electrides as the global variable function for swarm intelligence structure searches. We construct two rules of thumb on the design of inorganic electrides pointing to electron-rich ionic systems and low electronegativity of the cationic elements involved. By screening 99 such binary compounds through large-scale computer simulations, we identify 24 stable and 65 metastable new inorganic electrides that show distinct three-, two-, and zero-dimensional conductive properties, among which 18 are existing compounds that have not been pointed to as electrides. Our work reveals the rich abundance of inorganic electrides by providing 33 hitherto unexpected structure prototypes of electrides, of which 19 are not in the known structure databases.

  6. Computer-Assisted Inverse Design of Inorganic Electrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunwei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2017-01-01

    Electrides are intrinsic electron-rich materials enabling applications as excellent electron emitters, superior catalysts, and strong reducing agents. There are a number of organic electrides; however, their instability at room temperature and sensitivity to moisture are bottlenecks for their practical uses. Known inorganic electrides are rare, but they appear to have greater thermal stability at ambient conditions and are thus better characterized for application. Here, we develop a computer-assisted inverse-design method for searching for a large variety of inorganic electrides unbiased by any known electride structures. It uses the intrinsic property of interstitial electron localization of electrides as the global variable function for swarm intelligence structure searches. We construct two rules of thumb on the design of inorganic electrides pointing to electron-rich ionic systems and low electronegativity of the cationic elements involved. By screening 99 such binary compounds through large-scale computer simulations, we identify 24 stable and 65 metastable new inorganic electrides that show distinct three-, two-, and zero-dimensional conductive properties, among which 18 are existing compounds that have not been pointed to as electrides. Our work reveals the rich abundance of inorganic electrides by providing 33 hitherto unexpected structure prototypes of electrides, of which 19 are not in the known structure databases.

  7. Computer-assisted learning in human and dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, S; Schumann, R R

    2004-04-01

    This article describes the development and application of new didactic methods for use in computer-assisted teaching and learning systems for training doctors and dentists. Taking the Meducase project as an example, didactic models and their technological implementation are explained, together with the limitations of imparting knowledge with the "new media". In addition, legal concepts for a progressive, pragmatic, and innovative distribution of knowledge to undergraduate students are presented. In conclusion, potential and visions for the wide use of electronic learning in the German and European universities in the future are discussed. Self-directed learning (SDL) is a key component in both undergraduate education and lifelong learning for medical practitioners. E-learning can already be used to promote SDL at undergraduate level. The Meducase project uses self-directed, constructive, case- and problem-oriented learning within a learning platform for medical and dental students. In the long run, e-learning programs can only be successful in education if there is consistent analysis and implementation of value-added factors and the development and use of media-didactic concepts matched to electronic learning. The use of innovative forms of licensing - open source licenses for software and similar licenses for content - facilitates continuous, free access to these programs for all students and teachers. These legal concepts offer the possibility of innovative knowledge distribution, quality assurance and standardization across specializations, university departments, and possibly even national borders.

  8. Generalization of Computer Assisted Prosody Training: Quantitative and Qualitative Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra M. Hardison

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted prosody training, its generalization to novel sentences and segmental accuracy, and the relationship between prosodic and lexical information in long-term memory. Experiment 1, using a pretest-posttest design, provided native English-speaking learners of French with 3 weeks of training focused on prosody using a real-time computerized pitch display. Multiple exemplars produced by native speakers (NSs of French and stored on hard disk provided training feedback. Learners' recorded pre- and posttest productions were presented to NSs for evaluation in two conditions: filtered (unintelligible segmental information and unfiltered. Ratings using 7-point scales for the prosody and segmental accuracy of unfiltered samples revealed significant improvement in prosody with generalization to segmental production and novel sentences. Comparison of prosody ratings for filtered and unfiltered samples revealed some segmental influence on the pretest ratings of prosody. In Experiment 2, involving a memory recall task using filtered stimuli of reduced intelligibility, learners identified the exact lexical content of an average of 80% of the training sentences based on prosodic cues consistent with exemplar-based learning models. Questionnaire responses indicated a greater awareness of the various aspects of speech and increased confidence in producing another language.

  9. Analisis cualitativo asistido por computadora Computer-assisted qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Cisneros Puebla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos de este ensayo son: por un lado, presentar una aproximación a la experiencia hispanoamericana en el Análisis Cualitativo Asistido por Computadora (ACAC al agrupar mediante un ejercicio de sistematización los trabajos realizados por diversos colegas provenientes de disciplinas afines. Aunque hubiese querido ser exhaustivo y minucioso, como cualquier intento de sistematización de experiencias, en este ejercicio son notables las ausencias y las omisiones. Introducir algunas reflexiones teóricas en torno al papel del ACAC en el desarrollo de la investigación cualitativa a partir de esa sistematización y con particular énfasis en la producción del dato es, por otro lado, objetivo central de esta primera aproximación.The aims of this article are: on the one hand, to present an approximation to the Hispano-American experience on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQDAS, grouping as a systematization exercise the works carried out by several colleagues from related disciplines. Although attempting to be exhaustive and thorough - as in any attempt at systematizing experiences - this exercise presents clear lacks and omissions. On the other hand, to introduce some theoretical reflections about the role played by CAQDAS in the development of qualitative investigation after that systematization, with a specific focus on data generation.

  10. Middle School Teachers' Perceptions of Computer-Assisted Reading Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippert, Kelli; Harmon, Janis

    2017-01-01

    Middle schools often turn to computer-assisted reading intervention programs to improve student reading. The questions guiding this study are (a) in what ways are computer-assisted reading intervention programs utilized, and (b) what are teachers' perceptions about these intervention programs? Nineteen secondary reading teachers were interviewed…

  11. Applications of NLP Techniques to Computer-Assisted Authoring of Test Items for Elementary Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Lin; Lin, Jen-Hsiang; Wang, Yu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    The authors report an implemented environment for computer-assisted authoring of test items and provide a brief discussion about the applications of NLP techniques for computer assisted language learning. Test items can serve as a tool for language learners to examine their competence in the target language. The authors apply techniques for…

  12. Computer-Assisted Diagnostic Decision Support: History, Challenges, and Possible Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Randolph A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of computer-assisted diagnosis, including challenges and future directions. Some ideas presented in this article on computer-assisted diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) derive from prior work by the author and his colleagues (see list in Acknowledgments) on the INTERNIST-1 and QMR projects. References…

  13. The Effect of Computer-Assisted Teaching on Remedying Misconceptions: The Case of the Subject "Probability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Ramazan; Birgin, Osman

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of computer-assisted teaching (CAT) on remedying misconceptions students often have regarding some probability concepts in mathematics. Toward this aim, computer-assisted teaching materials were developed and used in the process of teaching. Within the true-experimental research method, a pre- and…

  14. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  15. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) over Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Seda; Basol, Gülsah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to determine the overall effects of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) on academic achievement. After an extensive review of the literature, studies using Turkish samples and observing the effects of Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) on mathematics achievement were examined. As a result of this…

  16. Promoting Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Chemistry Students Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Gbodi, Bimpe E.; Olakanmi, Eyitao U.; Abalaka, Eneojo N.

    2016-01-01

    The role of computer-assisted instruction in promoting intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among Nigerian secondary school chemistry students was investigated in this study. The study employed two modes of computer-assisted instruction (computer simulation instruction and computer tutorial instructional packages) and two levels of gender (male and…

  17. Computer-Assisted Diagnostic Decision Support: History, Challenges, and Possible Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Randolph A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of computer-assisted diagnosis, including challenges and future directions. Some ideas presented in this article on computer-assisted diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) derive from prior work by the author and his colleagues (see list in Acknowledgments) on the INTERNIST-1 and QMR projects. References…

  18. Computer-aided detection of breast carcinoma in standard mammographic projections with digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destounis, S.; Hanson, S. [Elizabeth Wende Breast Clinic, Rochester (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to retrospectively evaluate a computer-aided detection system's ability to detect breast carcinoma in multiple standard mammographic projections. Forty-five lesions in 44 patients imaged with digital mammography (Selenia {sup registered}, Hologic, Bedford, MA; Senographe {sup registered}, GE, Milwaukee, WI) and had computer-aided detection (CAD, Image-checker {sup registered} V 8.3.15, Hologic/R2, Santa Clara, CA) applied at the time of examination were identified for review; all were subsequently recommended to biopsy where cancer was revealed. These lesions were determined by the study Radiologist to be visible in both standard mammographic images (mediolateral oblique, MLO; craniocaudal, CC). For each patient, case data included patient age, tissue density, lesion type, BIRADS {sup registered} assessment, lesion size, lesion visibility-visible on MLO and/or CC view, ability of CAD to correctly mark the cancerous lesion, number of CAD marks per image, needle core biopsy results and surgical pathologic correlation. For this study cohort. CAD lesion/case sensitivity of 87% (n = 39) was found and image sensitivity was found to be 69% (n = 31) for MLO view and 78% (n = 35) for the CC view. For the study cohort, cases presented with a median of four marks per cases (range 0-13). Eighty-four percent (n = 38) of lesions proceeded to excision; initial needle biopsy pathology was upgraded at surgical excision from in situ disease to invasive for 24% (n = 9) lesions. CAD has demonstrated the potential to detect mammographically visible cancers in multiple standard mammographic projections in all categories of lesions in this study cohort. (orig.)

  19. Computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening using stomach shape and appearance models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midoh, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Takashima, M.; Nakamae, K.; Fujioka, H.

    2007-03-01

    In Japan, stomach cancer is one of the three most common causes of death from cancer. Since periodic health checks of stomach X-rays have become more widely carried out, the physicians' burdens have been increasing in the mass screening to detect initial symptoms of a disease. For the purpose of automatic diagnosis, we try to develop a computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening. The proposed system has two databases. One is the stomach shape database that consists of the computer graphics stomach 3D models based on biomechanics simulation and their projected 2D images. The other is the normal appearance database that is constructed by learning patterns in a normal patient training set. The stomach contour is extracted from an X-ray image including a barium filled region by the following steps. Firstly, the approximated stomach region is obtained by nonrigid registration based on mutual information. We define nonrigid transformation as one that includes translations, rotations, scaling, air-barium interface and weights of eigenvectors determined by principal components analysis in the stomach shape database. Secondly, the accurate stomach contour is extracted from the gradient of an image by using the Dynamic Programming. After then, stomach lesions are detected by inspecting whether the Mahalanobis distance from the mean in the normal appearance database is longer than a suitable value on the extracted stomach contour. We applied our system to 75 X-ray images of barium-filled stomach to show its validity.

  20. Mammographic Breast Density and Serum Phytoestrogen Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Lowry, Sarah J.; Sprague, Brian L; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Hedman, Curtis J.; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Sisney, Gale A.; Buist, Diana S. M.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55–70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors rel...

  1. Computer assisted diagnosis in renal nuclear medicine: rationale, methodology and interpretative criteria for diuretic renography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew T; Garcia, Ernest V

    2014-01-01

    The goal of artificial intelligence, expert systems, decision support systems and computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) in imaging is the development and implementation of software to assist in the detection and evaluation of abnormalities, to alert physicians to cognitive biases, to reduce intra and inter-observer variability and to facilitate the interpretation of studies at a faster rate and with a higher level of accuracy. These developments are needed to meet the challenges resulting from a rapid increase in the volume of diagnostic imaging studies coupled with a concurrent increase in the number and complexity of images in each patient data. The convergence of an expanding knowledge base and escalating time constraints increases the likelihood of physician errors. Errors are even more likely when physicians interpret low volume studies such as 99mTc-MAG3 diuretic scans where imagers may have had limited training or experience. Decision support systems include neural networks, case-based reasoning, expert systems and statistical systems. iRENEX (renal expert) is an expert system for diuretic renography that uses a set of rules obtained from human experts to analyze a knowledge base of both clinical parameters and quantitative parameters derived from the renogram. Initial studies have shown that the interpretations provided by iRENEX are comparable to the interpretations of a panel of experts. iRENEX provides immediate patient specific feedback at the time of scan interpretation, can be queried to provide the reasons for its conclusions and can be used as an educational tool to teach trainees to better interpret renal scans. iRENEX also has the capacity to populate a structured reporting module and generate a clear and concise impression based on the elements contained in the report; adherence to the procedural and data entry components of the structured reporting module assures and documents procedural competency. Finally, although the focus is CAD applied to

  2. THE MAMMOGRAPHIC CALCIFICATIONS IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Ruiying; Liu Jingxian; Gaowen

    1998-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to exam the relativeship between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer. Methods: All of the 184 patients with breast diseases underwent mammography before either an open biopsy or a mastectomy. The presence,morphology, and distribution of calcifications visualized on mammograms for breast cancer were compared with the controls who remained cancer free. Statistical comparisons were made by using the x2 test. Results:Of the 184 patients with breast diaeases, 93 malignant and 91 benign lesions were histologically confirmed.Calcifications were visualized on mammograms in 60(64%) of 93 breast cancers and 26 (28%) of 91 non breast cancers. The estimated odds ratio (OR) of breast cancer was 4.5 in women with calcifications seen on mammograms, compared with those having none (P<0.01). Of the 60 breast carcinomas having mammographic calcifications, 28 (47%) were infiltrating ductal carcinomas.There were only 8 (24%) cases with infiltrating ductal cancers in the group of without calcifications seen on the mammograms (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our finding suggests that mammographic calcification appears to be a risk factor for breast cancer. The granular and linear cast type calcification provide clues to the presence of breast cancer, especially when the carcinomas without associated masses were seen on mammograms.

  3. The implantable loop recorder and its mammographic appearance: A case based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Sharon; Margolies, Laurie R

    2017-01-15

    The normal radiographic appearance of implantable loop recorders has been illustrated in the radiology literature; however, their mammographic appearance has not been described. Breast imagers should become familiar with the appearance of loop recorders in order to create an accurate report. In this paper we report 3 cases of patients with implantable loop recorders who underwent mammography. We describe the types and components of implantable loop recorders, indications for their placement, and their classic appearance on mammography.

  4. Computer-assisted learning in anatomy at the international medical school in Debrecen, Hungary: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Gary; Cook, Samuel A; Kis, Gréta

    2013-01-01

    The University of Debrecen's Faculty of Medicine has an international, multilingual student population with anatomy courses taught in English to all but Hungarian students. An elective computer-assisted gross anatomy course, the Computer Human Anatomy (CHA), has been taught in English at the Anatomy Department since 2008. This course focuses on an introduction to anatomical digital images along with clinical cases. This low-budget course has a large visual component using images from magnetic resonance imaging and computer axial tomogram scans, ultrasound clinical studies, and readily available anatomy software that presents topics which run in parallel to the university's core anatomy curriculum. From the combined computer images and CHA lecture information, students are asked to solve computer-based clinical anatomy problems in the CHA computer laboratory. A statistical comparison was undertaken of core anatomy oral examination performances of English program first-year medical students who took the elective CHA course and those who did not in the three academic years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. The results of this study indicate that the CHA-enrolled students improved their performance on required anatomy core curriculum oral examinations (P students benefit from computer-assisted learning in a multilingual and diverse cultural environment.

  5. Mammographic compression – A need for mechanical standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan, E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groot, Jerry E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Highnam, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.highnam@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Chan, Ariane, E-mail: ariane.chan@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Böhm-Vélez, Marcela, E-mail: marcelabvelez@gmail.com [Weinstein Imaging Associates, 5850 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States); Broeders, Mireille J.M., E-mail: mireille.broeders@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department for Health Evidence, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den, E-mail: g.denheeten@lrcb.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Grimbergen, Cornelis A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We studied mechanical breast compression practice in two different clinical sites. •We visualized the distributions of not only the applied force but also the pressure. •The applied pressure was highly variable, both within and between the data sets. •The average applied pressure and the variation were higher for smaller breasts. •A proposal for improved individualization, by standardizing pressure, is discussed. -- Abstract: Background: A lack of consistent guidelines regarding mammographic compression has led to wide variation in its technical execution. Breast compression is accomplished by means of a compression paddle, resulting in a certain contact area between the paddle and the breast. This procedure is associated with varying levels of discomfort or pain. On current mammography systems, the only mechanical parameter available in estimating the degree of compression is the physical entity of force (daN). Recently, researchers have suggested that pressure (kPa), resulting from a specific force divided by contact area on a breast, might be a more appropriate parameter for standardization. Software has now become available which enables device-independent cross-comparisons of key mammographic metrics, such as applied compression pressure (force divided by contact area), breast density and radiation dose, between patient populations. Purpose: To compare the current compression practice in mammography between different imaging sites in the Netherlands and the United States from a mechanical point of view, and to investigate whether the compression protocols in these countries can be improved by standardization of pressure (kPa) as an objective mechanical parameter. Materials and methods: We retrospectively studied the available parameters of a set of 37,518 mammographic compressions (9188 women) from the Dutch national breast cancer screening programme (NL data set) and of another set of 7171 compressions (1851 women) from a breast imaging

  6. Computer-assisted photo identification outperforms visible implant elastomers in an endangered salamander, Eurycea tonkawae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F Bendik

    Full Text Available Despite recognition that nearly one-third of the 6300 amphibian species are threatened with extinction, our understanding of the general ecology and population status of many amphibians is relatively poor. A widely-used method for monitoring amphibians involves injecting captured individuals with unique combinations of colored visible implant elastomer (VIE. We compared VIE identification to a less-invasive method - computer-assisted photographic identification (photoID - in endangered Jollyville Plateau salamanders (Eurycea tonkawae, a species with a known range limited to eight stream drainages in central Texas. We based photoID on the unique pigmentation patterns on the dorsal head region of 1215 individual salamanders using identification software Wild-ID. We compared the performance of photoID methods to VIEs using both 'high-quality' and 'low-quality' images, which were taken using two different camera types and technologies. For high-quality images, the photoID method had a false rejection rate of 0.76% compared to 1.90% for VIEs. Using a comparable dataset of lower-quality images, the false rejection rate was much higher (15.9%. Photo matching scores were negatively correlated with time between captures, suggesting that evolving natural marks could increase misidentification rates in longer term capture-recapture studies. Our study demonstrates the utility of large-scale capture-recapture using photo identification methods for Eurycea and other species with stable natural marks that can be reliably photographed.

  7. BI-RADS CATEGORIZATION AND POSITIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE OF MAMMOGRAPHIC FEATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; Rui-ying

    2001-01-01

    [1]American College of Radiology (ACR). Breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) [M]. 3rd ed. Reston, VA: American College of Radiology, 1998.[2]Laura L, Andrea FA, Fredric BS, et al. The breast imaging reporting and data system: positive predictive value of mammographic features and final assessment categories [J]. AJR 1998; 171:35.[3]Susan GO, Nicole K, Carol R, et al. BI-RADS categorization as a predictor of malignancy [J]. Radiology 1999; 211:845.[4]Jay AB, Phyllis JK, Carey EF. Breast imaging reporting and data system standardized mammography lexicon: observer variability in lesion description [J]. AJR 1996; 166:773.[5]Berg WA, Campassi, Sexton MJ, et al. Analysis of sources of variation in mammographic interpretation [J]. Radiology 1997; 205:447.[6]Daniel BK. Standardized mammography reporting [J]. Radiologic Clinics of North America 1992; 30:257.[7]Jay AB, Phyllis JK, Joseph YL, et al. Breast cancer: prediction with artificial neural network based on BI-RADS standardized lexicon [J]. Radiology 1995; 196:817.[8]Berube M, Curpen B, Ugolini P, et al. Level of suspicion of a mammographic lesion: use of features defined by BI-RADS lexicon and correlation with large core breast biopsy [J]. Can Assoc Radiol J 1998; 49:223.

  8. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation for positioning of plate fixation in Lefort I osteotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Suenaga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography images are used for three-dimensional planning in orthognathic surgery. This facilitates the actual surgery by simulating the surgical scenario. We performed a computer-assisted virtual orthognathic surgical procedure using optically scanned three-dimensional (3D data and real computed tomography data on a personal computer. It helped maxillary bone movement and positioning and the titanium plate temporary fixation and positioning. This simulated the surgical procedure, which made the procedure easy, and we could perform precise actual surgery and could forecast the postsurgery outcome. This simulation method promises great potential in orthognathic surgery to help surgeons plan and perform operative procedures more precisely.

  9. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation for positioning of plate fixation in Lefort I osteotomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Asako; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Computed tomography images are used for three-dimensional planning in orthognathic surgery. This facilitates the actual surgery by simulating the surgical scenario. We performed a computer-assisted virtual orthognathic surgical procedure using optically scanned three-dimensional (3D) data and real computed tomography data on a personal computer. It helped maxillary bone movement and positioning and the titanium plate temporary fixation and positioning. This simulated the surgical procedure, which made the procedure easy, and we could perform precise actual surgery and could forecast the postsurgery outcome. This simulation method promises great potential in orthognathic surgery to help surgeons plan and perform operative procedures more precisely.

  10. GPCALMA: a Grid-based tool for Mammographic Screening

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnasco, S; Cerello, P; Cheran, S C; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Fauci, F; Forni, G; Lauria, A; Torres, E L; Magro, R; Masala, G L; Oliva, P; Palmiero, R; Ramello, L; Raso, G; Retico, A; Sitta, M; Stumbo, S; Tangaro, S; Zanon, E

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments requires a GRID approach to a distributed computing system and the associated data management: the key concept is the Virtual Organisation (VO), a group of distributed users with a common goal and the will to share their resources. A similar approach is being applied to a group of Hospitals which joined the GPCALMA project (Grid Platform for Computer Assisted Library for MAmmography), which will allow common screening programs for early diagnosis of breast and, in the future, lung cancer. HEP techniques come into play in writing the application code, which makes use of neural networks for the image analysis and proved to be useful in improving the radiologists' performances in the diagnosis. GRID technologies allow remote image analysis and interactive online diagnosis, with a potential for a relevant reduction of the delays presently associated to screening programs. A prototype of the system, based on AliEn GRID Services, is already available, wit...

  11. Changes in mammographic density and breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokate, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer among women worldwide. One of the most important risk factors for breast cancer is high mammographic density. Mammographic density represents the amount of fibroglandular tissue relative to the fat tissue in the breast. Women with >75% of their b

  12. Computer-assisted lip diagnosis on traditional Chinese medicine using multi-class support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li FuFeng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, the lip diagnosis is an important diagnostic method which has a long history and is applied widely. The lip color of a person is considered as a symptom to reflect the physical conditions of organs in the body. However, the traditional diagnostic approach is mainly based on observation by doctor’s nude eyes, which is non-quantitative and subjective. The non-quantitative approach largely depends on the doctor’s experience and influences accurate the diagnosis and treatment in TCM. Developing new quantification methods to identify the exact syndrome based on the lip diagnosis of TCM becomes urgent and important. In this paper, we design a computer-assisted classification model to provide an automatic and quantitative approach for the diagnosis of TCM based on the lip images. Methods A computer-assisted classification method is designed and applied for syndrome diagnosis based on the lip images. Our purpose is to classify the lip images into four groups: deep-red, red, purple and pale. The proposed scheme consists of four steps including the lip image preprocessing, image feature extraction, feature selection and classification. The extracted 84 features contain the lip color space component, texture and moment features. Feature subset selection is performed by using SVM-RFE (Support Vector Machine with recursive feature elimination, mRMR (minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and IG (information gain. Classification model is constructed based on the collected lip image features using multi-class SVM and Weighted multi-class SVM (WSVM. In addition, we compare SVM with k-nearest neighbor (kNN algorithm, Multiple Asymmetric Partial Least Squares Classifier (MAPLSC and Naïve Bayes for the diagnosis performance comparison. All displayed faces image have obtained consent from the participants. Results A total of 257 lip images are collected for the modeling of lip diagnosis in TCM. The

  13. Urinary cadmium and mammographic density in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott V; Newcomb, Polly A; Shafer, Martin M; Atkinson, Charlotte; Bowles, Erin J Aiello; Newton, Katherine M; Lampe, Johanna W

    2011-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk, is influenced by genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Cadmium, a persistent and widespread environmental pollutant, has been associated with risk of breast cancer, and laboratory evidence suggests cadmium is a carcinogen in the breast. We investigated the hypothesis that cadmium exposure is associated with higher MD. In a cross-sectional study of MD and urinary cadmium concentration, percentage MD (MD%) and Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS®) density category were determined from screening mammograms of 190 premenopausal women ages 40-45 years. Women completed a health questionnaire, and the cadmium content of spot urine samples was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and corrected for urine creatinine. Urinary cadmium concentrations are thought to reflect exposure to cadmium during a period of 20-30 years. Multivariable linear regression and logistic regression were used to estimate the strength of association between urinary cadmium and mammographic breast density. Adjusted mean MD% among women in the upper tertile of creatinine-corrected urinary cadmium was 4.6% higher (95% CI: -2.3 to 11.6%) than in women in the lowest cadmium tertile. Each twofold increase in urinary cadmium was associated with higher odds of MD% in the upper tertile (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.82-2.02) or a BI-RADS category rating of "extremely dense" (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.14-2.70). Stronger associations were observed among nulliparous women, and current or former smokers. Exposure to cadmium may be associated with increased breast density in premenopausal women.

  14. Blind trials of computer-assisted structure elucidation software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moser Arvin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the largest challenges in chemistry today remains that of efficiently mining through vast amounts of data in order to elucidate the chemical structure for an unknown compound. The elucidated candidate compound must be fully consistent with the data and any other competing candidates efficiently eliminated without doubt by using additional data if necessary. It has become increasingly necessary to incorporate an in silico structure generation and verification tool to facilitate this elucidation process. An effective structure elucidation software technology aims to mimic the skills of a human in interpreting the complex nature of spectral data while producing a solution within a reasonable amount of time. This type of software is known as computer-assisted structure elucidation or CASE software. A systematic trial of the ACD/Structure Elucidator CASE software was conducted over an extended period of time by analysing a set of single and double-blind trials submitted by a global audience of scientists. The purpose of the blind trials was to reduce subjective bias. Double-blind trials comprised of data where the candidate compound was unknown to both the submitting scientist and the analyst. The level of expertise of the submitting scientist ranged from novice to expert structure elucidation specialists with experience in pharmaceutical, industrial, government and academic environments. Results Beginning in 2003, and for the following nine years, the algorithms and software technology contained within ACD/Structure Elucidator have been tested against 112 data sets; many of these were unique challenges. Of these challenges 9% were double-blind trials. The results of eighteen of the single-blind trials were investigated in detail and included problems of a diverse nature with many of the specific challenges associated with algorithmic structure elucidation such as deficiency in protons, structure symmetry, a large number of

  15. Effect of a low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary intervention on change in mammographic density over menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa J; Greenberg, Carolyn V; Kriukov, Valentina; Minkin, Salomon; Jenkins, David J A; Yaffe, Martin; Hislop, Gregory; Boyd, Norman F

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that a low-fat dietary intervention for 2 years in women with extensive mammographic density decreased mammographic density to a greater extent than in the control group. Post-hoc analysis indicated that this effect was strongest in women who became postmenopausal during the follow-up period. The purpose of the present study was to determine if this potentially important finding could be confirmed in a new and larger group of subjects with a longer follow-up time. Participants in a low-fat dietary intervention trial who were premenopausal at entry and became postmenopausal during follow-up were examined. Total breast, dense, and non-dense area and percent density were measured in baseline and postmenopause mammograms using a computer-assisted method. Total breast and non dense area increased more in the control group compared to the intervention group (for breast area 2.6 and 0.2 cm(2), respectively; P=0.05, and for non-dense area 10.9 and 8.1 cm(2), respectively; P=0.06). Dense area decreased to a similar degree in both groups (-8.2 and -8.0 cm(2), respectively; P=0.84). Percent density decreased to a slightly greater degree in the control compared to intervention group (-9.4 and -7.8%, respectively, P=0.11). There were no significant differences between study groups after adjustment for weight change. Menopause reduced density to a similar extent in the low-fat diet and control groups. If a low-fat diet reduces breast cancer risk, the effect is unlikely to be through changes in mammographic density at menopause.

  16. Commercialization of computer assisted detection: the path from science to product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menhardt, Wido

    2004-01-01

    Computer Assisted Detection (CAD) is a rapidly growing field with applications in a growing number of diseases, modalities, and anatomies. Academic and industrial research groups worldwide are proposing and publishing new approaches, techniques, and paradigms at an ever-increasing rate: The results are encouraging and imply the potential for dramatic improvements in disease detection and tracking. To researchers, it often seems curious that commercialization of these advances lags far behind academic progress, but there are many obstacles to be overcome, from IP management to QSR (Quality Systems Regulations) compliance, from image data and truth collection to GCP (Good Clinical Practices), from bio-statistics to proof of Safety & Effectiveness with regulatory agencies. This two-hour session is designed to shed light on experiences in CAD commercialization of innovative CAD technologies into the marketplace. The goal is to share best practices, non-competitive ideas, and "mistakes not to be repeated" among the seminar participants and with researchers in industry and academia. All speakers are involved in bringing a variety of CAD applications to market. Panelists are: Susan Wood--R2 Peter Whitehead--Quantitative Imaging Michael Yeh--Deus Chris Wood--Confirma Fred Lachmann--Medipattern Alok Gupta--Siemens Patrick Hess--Imatx Wido Menhardt--Eastman Kodak.

  17. Automated effect-specific mammographic pattern measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Pettersen, Paola;

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to develop methodologies for assessing effect specific structural changes of the breast tissue using a general statistical machine learning framework. We present an approach of obtaining objective mammographic pattern measures quantifying a specific biological effect......, such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We compare results using this approach to using standard density measures. We show that the proposed method can quantify both age related effects and effects caused by HRT. Age effects are significantly detected by our method where standard methodologies fail...

  18. Automated effect-specific mammographic pattern measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Pettersen, Paola; Tanko, Laszlo B; Nielsen, Mads

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to develop methodologies for assessing effect specific structural changes of the breast tissue using a general statistical machine learning framework. We present an approach of obtaining objective mammographic pattern measures quantifying a specific biological effect, such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We compare results using this approach to using standard density measures. We show that the proposed method can quantify both age related effects and effects caused by HRT. Age effects are significantly detected by our method where standard methodologies fail. The separation of HRT subpopulations using our approach is comparable to the best methodology, which is interactive.

  19. What's New in Software? Current Sources of Information Boost Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Nancy J.

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews current resources on computer-assisted instruction. Included are sources of software and hardware evaluations, advances in current technology, research, an information hotline, and inventories of available technological assistance. (DB)

  20. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremenska, Anelly

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Kremenska, A. (2006). Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia,

  1. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremenska, Anelly

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Kremenska, A. (2006). Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgar

  2. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremenska, Anelly

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Kremenska, A. (2006). Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgar

  3. The Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Classes for English as a Second Language

    OpenAIRE

    Ioana Iacob

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the efficiency of the computer assisted English classes and to emphasize the necessity of developing sound methodological strategies adjusted to the new technology. It also present the benefits of using the computer in the pre-school and elementary school classes, highlighted by a report on the comparative observation of four groups of children studying English in a computer assisted environment.

  4. Learner/Machine Interaction in Computer-Assisted Language Learning. Report of the IEC/CILT Computer-Assisted Language Learning Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric, Comp.

    The proceedings of a conference on learner-machine interaction in computer-assisted language learning (CALL) include the texts of four papers, descriptions of program demonstrations and talks given by participants, a report on the plenary session by Eric Brown, information sources about CALL, a comment on the workshop by Leslie Churchman, a review…

  5. Learner/Machine Interaction in Computer-Assisted Language Learning. Report of the IEC/CILT Computer-Assisted Language Learning Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric, Comp.

    The proceedings of a conference on learner-machine interaction in computer-assisted language learning (CALL) include the texts of four papers, descriptions of program demonstrations and talks given by participants, a report on the plenary session by Eric Brown, information sources about CALL, a comment on the workshop by Leslie Churchman, a review…

  6. [Computer-assisted surgery-(CAS-)guided correction arthrodesis of the subtalar joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Martinus

    2010-10-01

    Restoration of a stable and plantigrade foot in deformities at the hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the subtalar joint. Deformities at the hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the subtalar joint. Active local infection or relevant vascular insufficiency. Prone position and posterolateral approach to the subtalar joint. Placement of dynamic reference bases in talus and calcaneus through stab incisions. Two-dimensional image acquisition for navigation. Definition of the axes of talus and calcaneus, and of the extent of correction. Exposure of the subtalar joint and removal of remaining cartilage. Computer- assisted surgery-(CAS-)guided correction and transfixation of the corrected position with two 2.5-mm Kirschner wires. Transplantation of autologous cancellous and cortical bone, if necessary. Three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition for analysis of the accuracy of the correction and planning of the drillings for the screws. CAS-guided drilling and insertion of the screws. 3-D image acquisition for analysis of the accuracy of the correction implant position. Wound closure in layers. 15 kg partial weight bearing in an orthosis (e.g. Vacuped TM, OPED Inc., Valley, Germany) for 6 weeks, followed by full weight bearing in a stable standard shoe. From September 1, 2006 to August 31, 2008, 26 correction arthrodeses were performed. The accuracy was assessed by intraoperative 3-D imaging. All achieved angles/translations were within a maximum deviation of 2°/2 mm when compared to the planned correction. Complications that were associated with CAS were not observed. In all 25 cases that completed 2-year follow-up, timely fusion was registered.

  7. Accuracy of treatment planning based on stereolithography in computer assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicho, Kurt; Figl, Michael; Seemann, Rudolf; Ewers, Rolf; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Wagner, Arne; Watzinger, Franz; Baumann, Arnulf; Kainberger, Franz; Fruehwald, Julia; Klug, Clemens

    2006-09-01

    Three-dimensional stereolithographic models (SL models), made of solid acrylic resin derived from computed-tomography (CT) data, are an established tool for preoperative treatment planning in numerous fields of medicine. An innovative approach, combining stereolithography with computer-assisted point-to-point navigation, can support the precise surgical realization of a plan that has been defined on an SL model preoperatively. The essential prerequisites for the application of such an approach are: (1) The accuracy of the SL models (including accuracy of the CT scan and correspondence of the model with the patient's anatomy) and (2) the registration method used for the transfer of the plan from the SL model to the patient (i.e., whether the applied registration markers can be added to the SL model corresponding to the markers at the patient with an accuracy that keeps the "cumulative error" at the end of the chain of errors, in the order of the accuracy of contemporary navigation systems). In this study, we focus on these two topics: By applying image-matching techniques, we fuse the original CT data of the patient with the corresponding CT data of the scanned SL model, and measure the deviations of defined parameter (e.g., distances between anatomical points). To evaluate the registration method used for the planning transfer, we apply a point-merge algorithm, using four marker points that should be located at exactly corresponding positions at the patient and at connective bars that are added to the surface of the SL model. Again, deviations at defined anatomical structures are measured and analyzed statistically. Our results prove sufficient correspondence of the two data sets and accuracy of the registration method for routine clinical application. The evaluation of the SL model accuracy revealed an arithmetic mean of the relative deviations from 0.8% to 5.4%, with an overall mean deviation of 2.2%. Mean deviations of the investigated anatomical structures

  8. Calcified trichinosis of pectoral muscle: mammographic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apesteguia, L. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Murillo, A. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Biurrun, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Garcia-Rostan, G. [Servicio Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Reta, A. [Servicio de Analisis Clinicos, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Dominguez, F. [Servicio Cirugia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    By mammographic screening we had detected six asymptomatic women who showed numerious tiny and well-delineated round to ovoid microcalcification superimposed on pectoral shadows, in the oblique medio-lateral (OML) view. Our objective was to achieve a better evaluation of these calcifications and investigate their origin. Magnified mammograms of pectoral muscles were done in the six women. A questionnaire concerning the patients` diets was also administered. Trichinella antibody titres were quantified by sero-agglutination. Microcalcifications within pectoral muscle fibres were demonstrated in all the cases. Five women admitted to having eaten home-made pork products in the past. One of them showed a slightly elevated antibody titre. We confirmed the suspected diagnosis of calcified trichinosis by a surgical biopsy of the pectoral muscle performed on one of the patients. We conclude that chronic calcified trichinosis of the pectoral muscle can be visualised in the OML view of a conventional mammogram. The mammographic appearance of this entity is very characteristic and biopsy would not be required for its diagnosis in the future. (orig.)

  9. Radiologists' preferences for digital mammographic display. The International Digital Mammography Development Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, E D; Cole, E B; Major, S; Zong, S; Hemminger, B M; Muller, K E; Johnston, R E; Walsh, R; Conant, E; Fajardo, L L; Feig, S A; Nishikawa, R M; Yaffe, M J; Williams, M B; Aylward, S R

    2000-09-01

    To determine the preferences of radiologists among eight different image processing algorithms applied to digital mammograms obtained for screening and diagnostic imaging tasks. Twenty-eight images representing histologically proved masses or calcifications were obtained by using three clinically available digital mammographic units. Images were processed and printed on film by using manual intensity windowing, histogram-based intensity windowing, mixture model intensity windowing, peripheral equalization, multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA), contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, Trex processing, and unsharp masking. Twelve radiologists compared the processed digital images with screen-film mammograms obtained in the same patient for breast cancer screening and breast lesion diagnosis. For the screening task, screen-film mammograms were preferred to all digital presentations, but the acceptability of images processed with Trex and MUSICA algorithms were not significantly different. All printed digital images were preferred to screen-film radiographs in the diagnosis of masses; mammograms processed with unsharp masking were significantly preferred. For the diagnosis of calcifications, no processed digital mammogram was preferred to screen-film mammograms. When digital mammograms were preferred to screen-film mammograms, radiologists selected different digital processing algorithms for each of three mammographic reading tasks and for different lesion types. Soft-copy display will eventually allow radiologists to select among these options more easily.

  10. Computer assisted quantitative analysis of deformities of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, B; Nijlunsing, R; Gerritsen, FA; Cheung, J; Veldhuizen, A; Devillers, S; Makram-Ebeid, S; Wells, WM; Colchester, A; Delp, S

    1998-01-01

    Nowadays, conventional X-ray radiographs are still the images of choice for evaluating spinal deformaties such as scoliosis. However, digital translation reconstruction gives easy access to high quality, digital overview images of the entire spine. This work aims at improving the description of the

  11. Computer-Assisted Reconstruction and Motion Analysis of the Three-Dimensional Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Soll

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though several microscopic techniques provide three-dimensional (3D information on fixed and living cells, the perception persists that cells are two-dimensional (2D. Cells are, in fact, 3D and their behavior, including the extension of pseudopods, includes an important 3D component. Although treating the cell as a 2D entity has proven effective in understanding how cells locomote, and in identifying defects in a variety of mutant and abnormal cells, there are cases in which 3D reconstruction and analysis are essential. Here, we describe advanced computer-assisted 3D reconstruction and motion analysis programs for both individual live, crawling cells and developing embryos. These systems (3D-DIAS, 3D-DIASemb can be used to reconstruct and motion analyze at short time intervals the nucleus and pseudopodia as well as the entire surface of a single migrating cell, or every cell and nucleus in a developing embryo. Because all images are converted to mathematical representations, a variety of motility and dynamic morphology parameters can be computed that have proven quite valuable in the identification of mutant behaviors. We also describe examples of mutant behaviors in Dictyostelium that were revealed through 3D analysis.

  12. Algerian EFL University Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Bouchefra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of training and absence of facilities are clearly apparent, stakeholders’ attitudes are a decisive aspect that needs to be mapped out if we are to alter the current situation. Thus, the present work aims at investigating EFL university teachers’ attitudes towards CALL at Djilali Liabes University (western Algeria. The current work is a cross-sectional descriptive study that explores teachers’ attitudes across the three domains (affective, cognitive, and behavioural and investigates other related aspects that may help indicate teachers’ likelihood to adopt CALL in the future. The results are promising as the investigated population not only demonstrated a clearly positive attitude towards CALL but also manifested a number of signs that indicate their likelihood to adopt CALL in the future if circumstances are favourable.

  13. [A new concept in digestive surgery: the computer assisted surgical procedure, from virtual reality to telemanipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marescaux, J; Clément, J M; Nord, M; Russier, Y; Tassetti, V; Mutter, D; Cotin, S; Ayache, N

    1997-11-01

    Surgical simulation increasingly appears to be an essential aspect of tomorrow's surgery. The development of a hepatic surgery simulator is an advanced concept calling for a new writing system which will transform the medical world: virtual reality. Virtual reality extends the perception of our five senses by representing more than the real state of things by the means of computer sciences and robotics. It consists of three concepts: immersion, navigation and interaction. Three reasons have led us to develop this simulator: the first is to provide the surgeon with a comprehensive visualisation of the organ. The second reason is to allow for planning and surgical simulation that could be compared with the detailed flight-plan for a commercial jet pilot. The third lies in the fact that virtual reality is an integrated part of the concept of computer assisted surgical procedure. The project consists of a sophisticated simulator which has to include five requirements: visual fidelity, interactivity, physical properties, physiological properties, sensory input and output. In this report we will describe how to get a realistic 3D model of the liver from bi-dimensional 2D medical images for anatomical and surgical training. The introduction of a tumor and the consequent planning and virtual resection is also described, as are force feedback and real-time interaction.

  14. CLASSIFICATION OF MAMMOGRAPHIC MASSES USING FUZZY INFERENCE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Divyadarshini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer aided detection (CAD intends to provide assistance to the mammography detection, reducing breast cancer misdiagnosis, thus allowing better diagnosis and more efficient treatments. In this work the task of automatically classifying the mass tissue into Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS shape categories: round, oval, lobular, irregular and also as benign or malignant is investigated. Geometrical shape and margin features based on maximum and minimum radius of mass are used in this work to classify the masses. These geometric features are found to be good in discriminating regular shapes from irregular shapes. For the purpose of classification, the masses are segmented from the mammogram using gray level thresholding. Finally, the classification is performed using fuzzy inference system. The fuzzy rules are used to construct the generalized fuzzy membership function for classifying the shape and severity of masses. The images were collected from Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS Database and Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM. The experiments were implemented in MATLAB.

  15. Assessment of two mammographic density related features in predicting near-term breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    In order to establish a personalized breast cancer screening program, it is important to develop risk models that have high discriminatory power in predicting the likelihood of a woman developing an imaging detectable breast cancer in near-term (e.g., BIRADS), and computed mammographic density related features we compared classification performance in estimating the likelihood of detecting cancer during the subsequent examination using areas under the ROC curves (AUC). The AUCs were 0.63+/-0.03, 0.54+/-0.04, 0.57+/-0.03, 0.68+/-0.03 when using woman's age, BIRADS rating, computed mean density and difference in computed bilateral mammographic density, respectively. Performance increased to 0.62+/-0.03 and 0.72+/-0.03 when we fused mean and difference in density with woman's age. The results suggest that, in this study, bilateral mammographic tissue density is a significantly stronger (p<0.01) risk indicator than both woman's age and mean breast density.

  16. Clinical Utility of Breast MRI in the Diagnosis of Malignancy After Inconclusive or Equivocal Mammographic Diagnostic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giess, Catherine S; Chikarmane, Sona A; Sippo, Dorothy A; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical utility of breast MRI for diagnosing malignancy in women with equivocal mammographic findings but no symptoms. Retrospective review of an institutional MRI database of 7332 contrast-enhanced breast MRI examinations from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, yielded the records of 296 (4.0%) examinations of 294 women without symptoms who underwent MRI for mammographic findings uncertain at diagnostic evaluation. Imaging findings, histopathologic results, and patient demographics were obtained from the electronic medical record. The mean patient age was 55 years (range, 29-83 years). Mammographic lesion type (n = 294) included 89 focal asymmetries, 76 asymmetries, 64 masses, 44 architectural distortions, 17 surgical scar versus lesion, and four miscellaneous lesions. Diagnostic ultrasound, performed on 286 of 294 (97.3%) lesions at mammographic evaluation, showed an ultrasound correlate in 37 (12.9%) lesions, equivocal correlate in 48 (16.8%), and no ultrasound correlate in 201 (70.3%). MRI examination of 294 index lesions showed a correlate in 133 (45.2%) and no correlate in 161 (54.8%). Forty of 294 (13.6%) index lesions were malignant, 37 (92.5%) with an MRI correlate and three (7.5%) without an MRI correlate. Among 250 patients who underwent biopsy or had 2 or more years of imaging stability, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of breast MRI for malignancy were 92.5%, 62.4%, 97.8%, and 31.9%. Forty-four of 294 (15.0%) patients had lesions incidentally found at MRI; 7 of 41 (17.1%) lesions that were biopsied or were stable for at least 1 year were malignant. Problem-solving breast MRI for inconclusive mammographic findings helps identify malignancies with high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value.

  17. Different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems highly influence sperm motility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryshpolets, S; Kowalski, R K; Dietrich, G J; Dzyuba, B; Ciereszko, A

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we examined different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems (CRISMAS, Hobson Sperm Tracker, and Image J CASA) on the exact same video recordings to evaluate the differences in sperm motility parameters related to the specific CASA used. To cover a wide range of sperm motility parameters, we chose 12-second video recordings at 25 and 50 Hz frame rates after sperm motility activation using three taxonomically distinct fish species (sterlet: Acipenser ruthenus L.; common carp: Cyprinus carpio L.; and rainbow trout: Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) that are characterized by essential differences in sperm behavior during motility. Systematically higher values of velocity and beat cross frequency (BCF) were observed in video recordings obtained at 50 Hz frame frequency compared with 25 Hz for all three systems. Motility parameters were affected by the CASA and species used for analyses. Image J and CRISMAS calculated higher curvilinear velocity (VCL) values for rainbow trout and common carp at 25 Hz frequency compared with the Hobson Sperm Tracker, whereas at 50 Hz, a significant difference was observed only for rainbow trout sperm recordings. No significant difference was observed between the CASA systems for sterlet sperm motility at 25 and 50 Hz. Additional analysis of 1-second segments taken at three time points (1, 6, and 12 seconds of the recording) revealed a dramatic decrease in common carp and rainbow trout sperm speed. The motility parameters of sterlet spermatozoa did not change significantly during the 12-second motility period and should be considered as a suitable model for longer motility analyses. Our results indicated that the CASA used can affect motility results even when the same motility recordings are used. These results could be critically altered by the recording quality, time of analysis, and frame rate of camera, and could result in erroneous conclusions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis: Identification of Temporal Changes in Brain Lesions with Computer-Assisted Detection Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, M.; Arkuszewski, M.; Nucifora, P.; Nasrallah, I.; Melhem, E.R.; Cirillo, L.; Krejza, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with a progressing and evolving course. Serial imaging with MRI is the mainstay in monitoring and managing MS patients. In this work we demonstrate the performance of a locally developed computer-assisted detection (CAD) software used to track temporal changes in brain MS lesions. CAD tracks changes in T2-bright MS lesions between two time points on a 3D high-resolution isotropic FLAIR MR sequence of the brain acquired at 3 Tesla. The program consists of an image-processing pipeline, and displays scrollable difference maps used as an aid to the neuroradiologist for assessing lesional change. To assess the value of the software we have compared diagnostic accuracy and duration of interpretation of the CAD-assisted and routine clinical interpretations in 98 randomly chosen, paired MR examinations from 88 patients (68 women, 20 men, mean age 43.5, age range 21–75) with a diagnosis of definite MS. The ground truth was determined by a three-expert panel. In case-wise analysis, CAD interpretation showed higher sensitivity than a clinical report (87% vs 77%, respectively). Lesion-wise analysis demonstrated improved sensitivity of CAD over a routine clinical interpretation of 40%–48%. Mean software-assisted interpretation time was 2.7 min. Our study demonstrates the potential of including CAD software in the workflow of neuroradiology practice for the detection of MS lesional change. Automated quantification of temporal change in MS lesion load may also be used in clinical research, e.g., in drug trials. PMID:23859235

  19. The views of science and technology teachers about computer assisted instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Töman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to present the views of the teachers of Primary Science and Technology course about computer assisted instruction. Qualitative research was used in the study. In qualitative researches, the sampling group is small in order to examine the sampling in-depth. Semi-structured interviews were used in the study as data collection tools. The interviews were carried out with the teachers of Science and Technology Course. The participants were chosen from the primary schools located in the city centre of Bayburt. When the findings of the study, which aimed at revealing the views of the teachers of Science and Technology Course about computer assisted instruction, were examined, it was revealed that the teachers had basic knowledge about the benefits of computer assisted instruction practices. In the light of the findings, it was found that most of the teachers did not use computer assisted instruction practices in their lessons. The recent research about the effects of computer assisted instruction is limited in terms of duration and content. Therefore, extended studies in the long run and covering many courses are required.

  20. Accuracy study of new computer-assisted orthopedic surgery software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidon, Eli [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beilinson-Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Steinberg, Ely L., E-mail: steinberge@tasmc.health.gov.il [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The new computerized system is based on image analysis and designed to aid in orthopedic surgeries by virtual trajectory of the guide wire, intra-operative planning and various measurements. Validation of the accuracy and safety of any computer-aided surgery system is essential before implementing it clinically. We examined the accuracy of guide-wire length and angle measurements and fusion of multiple adjacent images (panoramic view image, PVI{sup ®}) of the new software. Methods: This is a 2-part study. Part I: twenty guide wires were drilled to various depths in a synthetic femur model and the results obtained by the software measurements were compared with manual measurements by a caliper and a depth gauge. Part II: a sawbone femur shaft was osteotomized and various inclinations of >10° to the varus or valgus angles were tested. The manually obtained measurements of angles and lengths were compared to the new computerized system software PVI. Results: There was a significant positive linear correlation between all groups of the computerized length and the control measurements (r > 0.983, p < 0.01). There was no significant difference among different distances, angles or positions from the image intensifier. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the angle and length measurement on the PVI and the control measurement (r > 0.993, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The new computerized software has high reliability in performing measurements of length using an aiming, positioning and referring device intra-operatively.

  1. Efeito do raloxifeno sobre a densidade mamográfica em mulheres na pós-menopausa Effect of treatment with raloxifene on mammographic breast density in postmenopausa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Donida Silverio

    2007-10-01

    (control, paired by age and time of menopause. The treated group was composed of patients with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine. Those with history of breast surgery and users of hormone therapy up to six months prior to the study were excluded. The breast density was assessed qualitatively (subjective and quantitatively (objective in two moments, initial and final, after a 6-month follow-up. The 320 mammograms (craniocaudal and oblique were interpreted qualitatively by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS classification and quantitatively by digital scanning and computer-assisted segmentation. For statistical analysis t-test, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney, Spearman correlation and the kappa index were used. RESULTS: on the initial statistical comparison, the groups were considered homogenous for the variables: analyzed age, time of menopause, parity, breast feeding, previous hormonal therapy and body mass index. Baseline breast density, by qualitative and quantitative methods, correlated negatively with the age in both groups (p0.05. It was observed a weak agreement rate (kappa=0.25 between the BI-RADS classification and digital scanning/computer-assisted segmentation. CONCLUSIONS: in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis, submitted to raloxifene treatment for six months, no alterations were observed on the mammographic breast density.

  2. Creating a computer-assisted learning module for the non-expert nephrology nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Hazel A

    2011-01-01

    The development of computer-assisted learning for the nephrology nurse allows the nurse to absorb information at a comfortable pace and gain knowledge in a safe environment. A computer-assisted learning module on dialysis complications that focused on the nonexpert nephrology nurse was created to determine if non-expert nephrology nurses gained knowledge of dialysis complications and if there is acceptance of this type of learning in the nephrology environment. An improvement of more than 20% was noted between the pre- to post-test scores of the non-expert nephrology nurse after reviewing the module. The results of this study indicate that computer-assisted learning can be an effective strategy in the education of nephrology nurses.

  3. Mobile augmented reality for computer-assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Michael; Rassweiler, Marie-Claire; Klein, Jan; Seitel, Alexander; Gondan, Matthias; Baumhauer, Matthias; Teber, Dogu; Rassweiler, Jens J; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2013-07-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) plays an integral role in treatment of renal stones. Creating percutaneous renal access is the most important and challenging step in the procedure. To facilitate this step, we evaluated our novel mobile augmented reality (AR) system for its feasibility of use for PCNL. A tablet computer, such as an iPad[Formula: see text], is positioned above the patient with its camera pointing toward the field of intervention. The images of the tablet camera are registered with the CT image by means of fiducial markers. Structures of interest can be superimposed semi-transparently on the video images. We present a systematic evaluation by means of a phantom study. An urological trainee and two experts conducted 53 punctures on kidney phantoms. The trainee performed best with the proposed AR system in terms of puncturing time (mean: 99 s), whereas the experts performed best with fluoroscopy (mean: 59 s). iPad assistance lowered radiation exposure by a factor of 3 for the inexperienced physician and by a factor of 1.8 for the experts in comparison with fluoroscopy usage. We achieve a mean visualization accuracy of 2.5 mm. The proposed tablet computer-based AR system has proven helpful in assisting percutaneous interventions such as PCNL and shows benefits compared to other state-of-the-art assistance systems. A drawback of the system in its current state is the lack of depth information. Despite that, the simple integration into the clinical workflow highlights the potential impact of this approach to such interventions.

  4. Non-photorealistic rendering of virtual implant models for computer-assisted fluoroscopy-based surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan

    2007-03-01

    Surgical navigation systems visualize the positions and orientations of surgical instruments and implants as graphical overlays onto a medical image of the operated anatomy on a computer monitor. The orthopaedic surgical navigation systems could be categorized according to the image modalities that are used for the visualization of surgical action. In the so-called CT-based systems or 'surgeon-defined anatomy' based systems, where a 3D volume or surface representation of the operated anatomy could be constructed from the preoperatively acquired tomographic data or through intraoperatively digitized anatomy landmarks, a photorealistic rendering of the surgical action has been identified to greatly improve usability of these navigation systems. However, this may not hold true when the virtual representation of surgical instruments and implants is superimposed onto 2D projection images in a fluoroscopy-based navigation system due to the so-called image occlusion problem. Image occlusion occurs when the field of view of the fluoroscopic image is occupied by the virtual representation of surgical implants or instruments. In these situations, the surgeon may miss part of the image details, even if transparency and/or wire-frame rendering is used. In this paper, we propose to use non-photorealistic rendering to overcome this difficulty. Laboratory testing results on foamed plastic bones during various computer-assisted fluoroscopybased surgical procedures including total hip arthroplasty and long bone fracture reduction and osteosynthesis are shown.

  5. [Computer-assisted navigation in orthognathic surgery. Application to Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassarou, M; Benassarou, A; Meyer, C

    2013-08-05

    Computer-assisted navigation is a tool that allows the surgeon to reach intraoperatively a previously defined target. This technique can be applied to the positioning of bone fragments in orthognathic surgery. It is not used routinely yet because there are no specifically dedicated systems available on the market for this kind of surgery. The goal of our study was to describe the various systems that could be used in orthognathic surgery and to report our experience of computer-assisted surgery in the positioning of the maxilla during maxillomandibular osteotomies.

  6. Computer-Assisted 3D Structure Elucidation of Natural Products using Residual Dipolar Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troche-Pesqueira, Eduardo; Anklin, Clemens; Gil, Roberto R; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando

    2017-03-20

    An enhanced computer-assisted procedure for the determination of the relative configuration of natural products, which starts from the molecular formula and uses a combination of conventional 1D and 2D NMR spectra, and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), is reported. Having already the data acquired (1D/2D NMR and RDCs), the procedure begins with the determination of the molecular constitution using standard computer-assisted structure elucidation (CASE) and is followed by fully automated determination of relative configuration through RDC analysis. In the case of moderately flexible molecules the simplest data-explaining conformational model is selected by the use of the Akaike information criterion.

  7. Mammographic artifacts on full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4% (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and skin line artifacts) were the most commonly detected types (1.7%). Underexposure among hardware related artifacts and high-density artifacts among software processing artifacts also were common (0.7 and 0.5%, respectively). These artifacts, specific to digital mammography, were more common with the direct detector type and the crossed air grid type than with the indirect type and linear grid type (p artifacts on FFDM were patient related, which might be controlled by the instruction of a patient and technologist. Underexposure and high-density artifacts were more common with direct detector and crossed air type of grid.

  8. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery and robotic surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  9. Evaluation of computer-assisted quantification of carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Christina; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Thomas, Christoph; Kasperek, Bernadette; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of advanced software assistance on the assessment of carotid artery stenosis; particularly, the inter-observer variability of readers with different level of experience is to be investigated. Forty patients with suspected carotid artery stenosis received head and neck dual-energy CT angiography as part of their pre-interventional workup. Four blinded readers with different levels of experience performed standard imaging interpretation. At least 1 day later, they performed quantification using an advanced vessel analysis software including automatic dual-energy bone and hard plaque removal, automatic and semiautomatic vessel segmentation, as well as creation of curved planar reformation. Results were evaluated for the reproducibility of stenosis quantification of different readers by calculating the kappa and correlation values. Consensus reading of the two most experienced readers was used as the standard of reference. For standard imaging interpretation, experienced readers reached very good (k = 0.85) and good (k = 0.78) inter-observer variability. Inexperienced readers achieved moderate (k = 0.6) and fair (k = 0.24) results. Sensitivity values 80%, 91%, 83%, 77% and specificity values 100%, 84%, 82%, 53% were achieved for significant area stenosis >70%. For grading using advanced vessel analysis software, all readers achieved good inter-observer variability (k = 0.77, 0.72, 0.71, and 0.77). Specificity values of 97%, 95%, 95%, 93% and sensitivity values of 84%, 78%, 86%, 92% were achieved. In conclusion, when supported by advanced vessel analysis software, experienced readers are able to achieve good reproducibility. Even inexperienced readers are able to achieve good results in the assessment of carotid artery stenosis when using advanced vessel analysis software.

  10. Development of a computer-assisted forensic radiographic identification method using the lateral cervical and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Sharon M; Raxter, Michelle H; Hipp, John A; Goel, Priya; Chan, Elaine F; Love, Jennifer C; Wiersema, Jason M; Akella, N Shastry

    2015-01-01

    Medical examiners and coroners (ME/C) in the United States hold statutory responsibility to identify deceased individuals who fall under their jurisdiction. The computer-assisted decedent identification (CADI) project was designed to modify software used in diagnosis and treatment of spinal injuries into a mathematically validated tool for ME/C identification of fleshed decedents. CADI software analyzes the shapes of targeted vertebral bodies imaged in an array of standard radiographs and quantifies the likelihood that any two of the radiographs contain matching vertebral bodies. Six validation tests measured the repeatability, reliability, and sensitivity of the method, and the effects of age, sex, and number of radiographs in array composition. CADI returned a 92-100% success rate in identifying the true matching pair of vertebrae within arrays of five to 30 radiographs. Further development of CADI is expected to produce a novel identification method for use in ME/C offices that is reliable, timely, and cost-effective.

  11. Target registration and target positioning errors in computer-assisted neurosurgery: proposal for a standardized reporting of error assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Stoffner, Rudolf; Sieb, Michael; Bale, Reto

    2009-12-01

    Assessment of errors is essential in development, testing and clinical application of computer-assisted neurosurgery. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive overview of the different methods to assess target registration error (TRE) and target positioning error (TPE) and to develop a proposal for a standardized reporting of error assessment. A PubMed research on phantom, cadaver or clinical studies on TRE and TPE has been performed. Reporting standards have been defined according to (a) study design and evaluation methods and (b) specifications of the navigation technology. The proposed standardized reporting includes (a) study design (controlled, non-controlled), study type (non-anthropomorphic phantom, anthropomorphic phantom, cadaver, patient), target design, error type and subtypes, space of TPE measurement, statistics, and (b) image modality, scan parameters, tracking technology, registration procedure and targeting technique. Adoption of the proposed standardized reporting may help in the understanding and comparability of different accuracy reports. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; pBIRADS having a mean of 2.13 and the mean VDG higher at 2.50 (t = -11.99; pBIRADS showed a positive strong correlation (r=0.84; pBIRADS and VDG AvBD% also showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86; pBIRADS categories for each of the VDG AvBD% classifications. Using Volpara, the Hologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  13. Childhood factors associated with mammographic density in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Moreno, María Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Ascunce, Nieves; Román, Isabel González; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, María Carmen; Carrete, Jose Antonio Vázquez; Collado-García, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ederra, María; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Peris, Mercé; Abad, Soledad; Cabanes, Anna; Pollán, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Growth and development factors could contribute to the development of breast cancer associated with an increase in mammographic density. This study examines the influence of certain childhood-related, socio-demographic and anthropometric variables on mammographic density in adult woman. The study covered 3574 women aged 45-68 years, participating in breast cancer-screening programmes in seven Spanish cities. Based on a craniocaudal mammogram, blind, anonymous measurement of mammographic density was made by a single radiologist, using Boyd's semiquantitative scale. Data associated with the early stages of life were obtained from a direct survey. Ordinal logistic regression and generalised linear models were employed to estimate the association between mammographic density and the variables covered by the questionnaire. Screening programme was introduced as a random effects term. Age, number of children, body mass index (BMI) and other childhood-related variables were used as adjustment variables, and stratified by menopausal status. A total of 811 women (23%) presented mammographic density of over 50%, and 5% of densities exceeded 75%. Our results show a greater prevalence of high mammographic density in women with low prepubertal weight (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.02-1.36); marked prepubertal height (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 0.97-1.60) and advanced age of their mothers at their birth (>39 years: OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.03-1.60); and a lower prevalence of high mammographic density in women with higher prepubertal weight, low birth weight and earlier menarche. The influence of these early-life factors may be explained by greater exposure to hormones and growth factors during the development of the breast gland, when breast tissue would be particularly susceptible to proliferative and carcinogenic stimulus.

  14. Rugoscopy: Human identification by computer-assisted photographic superimposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezwana Begum Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human identification has been studied since fourteenth century and it has gradually advanced for forensic purposes. Traditional methods such as dental, fingerprint, and DNA comparisons are probably the most common techniques used in this context, allowing fast and secure identification processes. But, in circumstances where identification of an individual by fingerprint or dental record comparison is difficult, palatal rugae may be considered as an alternative source of material. Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the individualistic nature and use of palatal rugae patterns for personal identification and also to test the efficiency of computerized software for forensic identification by photographic superimposition of palatal photographs obtained from casts. Materials and Methods: Two sets of Alginate impressions were made from the upper arches of 100 individuals (50 males and 50 females with one month interval in between and the casts were poured. All the teeth except the incisors were removed to ensure that only the palate could be used in identification process. In one set of the casts, the palatal rugae were highlighted with a graphite pencil. All the 200 casts were randomly numbered, and then, they were photographed with a 10.1 Mega Pixel Kodak digital camera using standardized method. Using computerized software, the digital photographs of the models without highlighting the palatal rugae were overlapped over the images (transparent of the palatal rugae with highlighted palatal rugae, in order to identify the pairs by superimposition technique. Incisors were remained and used as landmarks to determine the magnification required to bring the two set of photographs to the same size, in order to make perfect superimposition of images. Results: The result of the overlapping of the digital photographs of highlighted palatal rugae over normal set of models without highlighted palatal rugae resulted in 100% positive

  15. Computer-assisted diagnostic system for neurodegenerative dementia using brain SPECT and 3D-SSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kazunari; Kanda, Tomonori; Uemura, Takafumi; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yoshikawa, Toshiki [Hyogo Brain and Heart Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Shimada, Kenichi; Ohkawa, Shingo [Hyogo Brain and Heart Center, Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Minoshima, Satoshi [University of Washington, Radiology and Bioengineering, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    To develop a computer-assisted automated diagnostic system to distinguish among Alzheimer disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild dementia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images with injection of N-Isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained from patients with mild degenerative dementia. First, datasets from 20 patients mild AD, 15 patients with dementia with DLB, and 17 healthy controls were used to develop an automated diagnosing system based on three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP). AD- and DLB-specific regional templates were created using 3D-SSP, and critical Z scores in the templates were established. Datasets from 50 AD patients, 8 DLB patients, and 10 patients with non-AD/DLB type degenerative dementia (5 with frontotemporal dementia and 5 with progressive supranuclear palsy) were then used to test the diagnostic accuracy of the optimized automated system in comparison to the diagnostic interpretation of conventional IMP-SPECT images. These comparisons were performed to differentiate AD and DLB from non-AD/DLB and to distinguish AD from DLB. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The area under the ROC curve (Az) and the accuracy of the automated diagnosis system were 0.89 and 82%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the visual inspection were 0.84 and 77%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the combination of visual inspection and this system were 0.96 and 91%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 66%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The system developed in the present study achieved as good discrimination of AD, DLB, and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild

  16. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of determining radiographic sagittal parameters of the spine and pelvis using a manual and a computer-assisted methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimar, John R; Carreon, Leah Y; Labelle, Hubert; Djurasovic, Mladen; Weidenbaum, Mark; Brown, Courtney; Roussouly, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Sagittal imbalance is a significant factor in determining clinical treatment outcomes in patients with deformity. Measurement of sagittal alignment using the traditional Cobb technique is frequently hampered by difficulty in visualizing landmarks. This report compares traditional manual measurement techniques to a computer-assisted sagittal plane measurement program which uses a radius arc methodology. The intra and inter-observer reliability of the computer program has been shown to be 0.92-0.99. Twenty-nine lateral 90 cm radiographs were measured by a computer program for an array of sagittal plane measurements. Ten experienced orthopedic spine surgeons manually measured the same parameters twice, at least 48 h apart, using a digital caliper and a standardized radiographic manual. Intraclass correlations were used to determine intra- and interobserver reliability between different manual measures and between manual measures and computer assisted-measures. The inter-observer reliability between manual measures was poor, ranging from -0.02 to 0.64 for the different sagittal measures. The intra-observer reliability in manual measures was better ranging from 0.40 to 0.93. Comparing manual to computer-assisted measures, the ICC ranged from 0.07 to 0.75. Surgeons agreed more often with each other than with the machine when measuring the lumbar curve, the thoracic curve, and the spino-sacral angle. The reliability of the computer program is significantly higher for all measures except for lumbar lordosis. A computer-assisted program produces a reliable measurement of the sagittal profile of the spine by eliminating the need for distinctly visible endplates. The use of a radial arc methodology allows for infinite data points to be used along the spine to determine sagittal measurements. The integration of this technique with digital radiography's ability to adjust image contrast and brightness will enable the superior identification of key anatomical parameters normally

  17. Computer-assisted cognitive remediation therapy: cognition, self-esteem and quality of life in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Gemma; Barrios, Maite; Penadés, Rafael; Enríquez, Maria; Garolera, Maite; Aragay, Núria; Pajares, Marta; Vallès, Vicenç; Delgado, Luis; Alberni, Joan; Faixa, Carlota; Vendrell, Josep M

    2013-11-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in the treatment of schizophrenia. Cognitive deficits have an impact on functional outcomes. Cognitive remediation therapy is emerging as a psychological intervention that targets cognitive impairment, but the effect of computer-assisted cognitive remediation on neuropsychology and social functioning and wellbeing remains unclear. The aim of the current study is to investigate the neurocognitive outcomes of computer-assisted cognitive remediation (CACR) therapy in a sample of schizophrenia patients, and to measure the quality of life and self-esteem as secondary outcomes. Sixty-seven people with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to computer-assisted cognitive remediation or an active control condition. The main outcomes were neuropsychological measures and secondary outcomes (self-esteem and quality of life). Measurements were recorded at baseline and post-treatment. The CACR therapy group improved in speed of processing, working memory and reasoning and problem-solving cognitive domains. QoL and self-esteem measures also showed significant improvements over time in this group. Computer-assisted cognitive remediation therapy for people with schizophrenia achieved improvements in neuropsychological performance and in QoL and self-esteem measurements. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Instruction: Task Based vs. Form Focused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanyilmaz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: to describe a prototype for a computer-assisted task-based language instruction (CATBI) tool designed and developed for Turkish as a Foreign Language, and to report on the effectiveness of the CATBI tool. More specifically, this work discusses an experimental study that examined the role of teaching approach…

  19. Automatization of Mathematics Skills via Computer-Assisted Instruction among Students with Mild Mental Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, David M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This evaluation study with 94 elementary students (50 with mild mental handicap) compared computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and paper-and-pencil practices in promoting automatization of basic addition and subtraction skills. Findings suggested CAI was more effective but that the students with mental handicap required more practice than…

  20. L'Enseignement des langues assiste par ordinateur: nouvelle pedagogie? (Computer Assisted Language Instruction: New Pedagogy?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkabas, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Recent second language instruction computer software focuses almost exclusively on the structures and forms of language, and on programed learning instead of developing communicative skills. Until artificial intelligence changes these old behavioristic principles, computer-assisted language instruction can only play a minor role in language…

  1. Review Question Formats and Web Design Usability in Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca S.; Eppler, Marion A.; Ironsmith, Marsha; Wuensch, Karl L.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the effects of two embedded review question formats and the application of web design guidelines in a computer-assisted mastery learning course in developmental psychology. Students used either a branching review question format that redirected them to relevant portions of the study module after incorrect answers or a linear format that…

  2. Computer-Assisted Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Muniya S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of Camp Cope-A-Lot (CCAL), a computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in youth. Method: Children (49; 33 males) ages 7-13 (M = 10.1 [plus or minus] 1.6; 83.7% Caucasian, 14.2% African American, 2% Hispanic) with a principal anxiety disorder were…

  3. The Accuracy of Computer-Assisted Feedback and Students' Responses to It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavolette, Elizabeth; Polio, Charlene; Kahng, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Various researchers in second language acquisition have argued for the effectiveness of immediate rather than delayed feedback. In writing, truly immediate feedback is impractical, but computer-assisted feedback provides a quick way of providing feedback that also reduces the teacher's workload. We explored the accuracy of feedback from…

  4. English Language Teachers' Perceptions of Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu Lin

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies have reported the potential use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and other types of technology for ESL and EFL students. So far, most studies on CALL have focused on CALL-classroom comparisons (Chenoweth & Murday, 2003; Chenoweth, Ushida, & Murday, 2007; Fitze, 2006; Neri, Mich, Gerosa, &…

  5. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  6. Inservice Mathematics Education for Elementary School Teachers Via Computer-Assisted Instruction (Gladeville). Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Keith A.; And Others

    A second field test of a computer-based, mobile, in-service teacher education program in modern mathematics for elementary school teachers is reported here. Evaluations of the students' achievement and of their attitudes towards mathematics and computer-assisted instruction, as well as an analysis of the relationships among achievement, attitudes,…

  7. Computer Assisted Instruction in Mathematics Can Improve Students' Test Scores: A Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Frank

    This research assessed the academic impact of a computer-assisted instructional (CAI) software program to teach mathematics. The research hypothesis states that the use of the CAI program will produce superior academic achievement in mathematics for students who use the program compared to students instructed in mathematics without the program.…

  8. Relationship between Pre-Service Music Teachers' Personality and Motivation for Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkmen, Serkan; Cevik, Beste

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between pre-service music teachers' personalities and their motivation for computer-assisted music instruction (CAI). The "Big Five" Model of Personality served as the framework. Participants were 83 pre-service music teachers in Turkey. Correlation analysis revealed that three…

  9. Interactive Computer Assisted Instruction in Teaching of Process Analysis and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Herbert E., Jr.; Himmelblau, David M.

    To improve the instructional process, time shared computer-assisted instructional methods were developed to teach upper division undergraduate chemical engineering students the concepts of process simulation and analysis. The interactive computer simulation aimed at enabling the student to learn the difficult concepts of process dynamics by…

  10. Discourse Synthesis, Analysis and Their Application to CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Stanley Y. W.; Moore, Robert L.

    This paper deals with the computer's production and recognition of sentences in a connected discourse and its application to computer assisted instruction. Studies of textual properties in real discourses have been carried out at the paragraph level. The theoretical concepts of representing paragraph content in terms of (1) the factual data…

  11. Improving English Pronunciation through Computer-Assisted Programs in Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudah, Fatima Zaki Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of using computer- assisted programs for teaching English pronunciation on students' performance in English Language pronunciation in Jordanian universities. To achieve the purpose of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' level in English pronunciation. The sample…

  12. The pedagogical effectiveness of ASR-based computer assisted pronunciation training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.

    2007-01-01

    Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training (CAPT) systems with Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology have become increasingly popular to train pronunciation in the second language (L2). The advantage of these systems is the provision of a self-paced, stress-free type of training with automatic

  13. Teaching Pronunciation with Computer Assisted Pronunciation Instruction in a Technological University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sze-Chu; Hung, Po-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of computer assisted pronunciation instruction in English pronunciation for students in vocational colleges and universities in Taiwan. The participants were fifty-one first-year undergraduate students from a technological university located in central Taiwan. The participants received an…

  14. Variables that Affect Math Teacher Candidates' Intentions to Integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Based on Social Cognitive Carier Theory (SCCT) (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994, 2002), this study tested the effects of mathematics teacher candidates' self-efficacy in, outcome expectations from, and interest in CAME on their intentions to integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME). While mathematics teacher candidates' outcome…

  15. Climate Change Discourse in Mass Media: Application of Computer-Assisted Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Andrei P.; Stepchenkova, Svetlana O.

    2012-01-01

    Content analysis of mass media publications has become a major scientific method used to analyze public discourse on climate change. We propose a computer-assisted content analysis method to extract prevalent themes and analyze discourse changes over an extended period in an objective and quantifiable manner. The method includes the following: (1)…

  16. Characteristics of an Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction Shell with an Example in Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Yehudit J.; Yochim, Jerome M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses exemplary teacher and student characteristics that can provide the base to generate an Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction (ICAI) shell. Outlines the expertise, learning, student-model, and inference modules of an ICAI shell. Describes the development of an ICAI shell for an undergraduate course in human physiology. (33 references)…

  17. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF HYPERACTIVATED MOTILITY IN RAT SPERMATOZA USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective evaluation of hyperactivated motility in rat spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis.Cancel AM, Lobdell D, Mendola P, Perreault SD.Toxicology Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.The aim of this study was t...

  18. MONTHLY VARIATION IN SPERM MOTILITY IN COMMON CARP ASSESSED USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperm motility variables from the milt of the common carp Cyprinus carpio were assessed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system across several months (March-August 1992) known to encompass the natural spawning period. Two-year-old pond-raised males obtained each mo...

  19. Development and Evaluation of Computer Assisted Instruction for Navy Electronics Training. Two, Inductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock, Richard E.

    A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) curriculum module covering the area of electrical inductance was developed and evaluated. This module was a part of a program in which a series of CAI modules are being developed and tested for a Navy training course in basic electronics. After the module was written, it was given three tryout tests.…

  20. A Compilation of Postgraduate Theses Written in Turkey on Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Demirbas, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study conducted is to present in-depth information about the postgraduate theses written within the context of Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education in Turkey. The theses collected in National Thesis Centre of Turkish Council of Higher Education were examined. As a result of an examination, it was found that about…

  1. Views of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers Regarding Computer Assisted Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Ilhan

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to highlight the importance of computer assisted instruction in environmental education. Recently, the importance of environmental education in many countries has begun to increase in parallel with environmental problems. This has led to increased interest in environmental education. The fact that computers were the…

  2. A Computer-Assisted Instruction in Teaching Abstract Statistics to Public Affairs Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ali Osman

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate the applicability of a computer-assisted instruction supported with simulated data in teaching abstract statistical concepts to political science and public affairs students in an introductory research methods course. The software is called the Elaboration Model Computer Exercise (EMCE) in that it takes a great…

  3. Evaluation of DILearn: An Interactive Computer-Assisted Learning Program for Drug Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunget, Cynthia L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Use of an interactive computer-assisted learning program to teach basic skills in obtaining drug information was investigated with 26 doctoral pharmacy students and a control group of 25 students receiving lecture instruction. Findings indicated no significant differences in short-term retention of drug information between groups and that students…

  4. Application of computer-assisted semen analysis to explain variations in pig fertility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuijse, M.L.W.J.; Sostaric, E.; Feitsma, H.; Gadella, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm quality is often evaluated through computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and is an indicator of boar fertility. The aim of this research was to study the relationship between CASA motility parameters and fertility results in pigs. Insemination records and semen parameters from a total of 45,

  5. Views of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers Regarding Computer Assisted Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Ilhan

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to highlight the importance of computer assisted instruction in environmental education. Recently, the importance of environmental education in many countries has begun to increase in parallel with environmental problems. This has led to increased interest in environmental education. The fact that computers were the…

  6. Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in Saudi Schools: A Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alresheed, Saleh; Leask, Marilyn; Raiker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) technology and pedagogy have gained recognition globally for their success in supporting second language acquisition (SLA). In Saudi Arabia, the government aims to provide most educational institutions with computers and networking for integrating CALL into classrooms. However, the recognition of CALL's…

  7. A Comparison of Computer-Assisted Instruction and Tutorials in Hematology and Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study comparing the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and small group instruction found no significant difference in medical student achievement in oncology but higher achievement through small-group instruction in hematology. Students did not view CAI as more effective, but saw it as a supplement to traditional methods. (MSE)

  8. Enhancement of Self-Esteem Through the Use of Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Elizabeth B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of computer assisted instruction on learners' global self esteem, using over 1000 home economics students as participants. Students in both experimental and control groups completed pre- and posttest Likert scales measuring self esteem. Findings are discussed. (Author/MT)

  9. Associations among Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer-Assisted Education and TPACK Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturay, Meltem Huri; Gökçearslan, Sahin; Sahin, Semsettin

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the attitudes of teachers towards Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) and their knowledge of technology, pedagogy and content via TPACK model that assesses the competencies for developing and implementing successful teaching. There were 280 participants in the study. The results of the study indicate that teachers'…

  10. Brother-Sister Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer-Assisted Self Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebel, Sandra S.; O'Keefe, Stephen L.; Beard, Keith W.; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-sister incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The…

  11. Technology development for remote, computer-assisted operation of a continuous mining machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnakenberg, G.H. [Pittsburgh Research Center, PA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines was created to conduct research to improve the health, safety, and efficiency of the coal and metal mining industries. In 1986, the Bureau embarked on a new, major research effort to develop the technology that would enable the relocation of workers from hazardous areas to areas of relative safety. This effort is in contrast to historical efforts by the Bureau of controlling or reducing the hazardous agent or providing protection to the worker. The technologies associated with automation, robotics, and computer software and hardware systems had progressed to the point that their use to develop computer-assisted operation of mobile mining equipment appeared to be a cost-effective and accomplishable task. At the first International Symposium of Mine Mechanization and Automation, an overview of the Bureau`s computer-assisted mining program for underground coal mining was presented. The elements included providing computer-assisted tele-remote operation of continuous mining machines, haulage systems and roof bolting machines. Areas of research included sensors for machine guidance and for coal interface detection. Additionally, the research included computer hardware and software architectures which are extremely important in developing technology that is transferable to industry and is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of machines used in coal mining today. This paper provides an update of the research under the computer-assisted mining program.

  12. Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Build Math Fact Fluency: An Implementation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Renee O.; Collins, Tai; Hernan, Colleen; Flowers, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Research findings support the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) as a curriculum supplement for improving math skills, including math fact fluency. There are a number of websites and mobile applications (i.e., apps) designed to build students' math fact fluency, but the options can become overwhelming. This article provides implementation…

  13. Generalization of Computer-Assisted Prosody Training: Quantitative and Qualitative Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Debra M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted prosody training, its generalization to novel sentences and segmental accuracy, and the relationship between prosodic and lexical information in long-term memory. Experiment 1, using a pretest-posttest design, provided native English-speaking learners of French with 3 weeks of…

  14. Computer Assisted Instruction in Economics: An Approach for Illustrating General Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Robert W.

    A market exchange simulation utilizing the PLATO computer-assisted instructional system at the University of Illinois has been designed to teach students the principles of a general equilibrium system. It serves a laboratory function which supplements traditional instruction by stimulating students' interests and providing them with illustrations…

  15. Computer-assisted delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders in primary-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Rose, Raphael D; Lang, Ariel; Welch, Stacy Shaw; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B; Roy-Byrne, Peter P

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program designed to support the delivery of evidenced-based CBT for the four most commonly occurring anxiety disorders (panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder) in primary-care settings. The purpose of the current report is to (1) present the structure and format of the computer-assisted CBT program, and (2) to present evidence for acceptance of the program by clinicians and the effectiveness of the program for patients. Thirteen clinicians using the computer-assisted CBT program with patients in our ongoing Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management study provided Likert-scale ratings and open-ended responses about the program. Rating scale data from 261 patients who completed at least one CBT session were also collected. Overall, the program was highly rated and modally described as very helpful. Results indicate that the patients fully participated (i.e., attendance and homework compliance), understood the program material, and acquired CBT skills. In addition, significant and substantial improvements occurred to the same degree in randomly audited subsets of each of the four primary anxiety disorders (N=74), in terms of self ratings of anxiety, depression, and expectations for improvement. Computer-assisted CBT programs provide a practice-based system for disseminating evidence-based mental health treatment in primary-care settings while maintaining treatment fidelity, even in the hands of novice clinicians. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Contact-2: A computer-assisted instructional strategy for promoting conceptual change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, H.J.A.; Simons, P.R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Previous research seems to support the assumption that students need instructional guidance to activate and correct their preconceptions. Such an instructional strategy is the CONTACT strategy, characterised by continuous, computer-assisted activation of the conceptions of individual learners. Our p

  17. A Mathematical Model for Project Planning and Cost Analysis in Computer Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, William F.

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has become sufficiently widespread to require attention to the relationships between its costs, administration and benefits. Despite difficulties in instituting them, quantifiable cost-effectiveness analyses offer several advantages. They allow educators to specify with precision anticipated instructional loads,…

  18. Use of a Computer-Assisted Program to Improve Metacognition in Persons with Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Javier; Saldana, David

    2005-01-01

    Metacognition and self-regulation are processes extremely relevant to education of persons with intellectual disabilities. They play a central role in specific limitations, such as outer-directedness and lack of strategy transfer, and are related to desirable educational objectives such as self-determination. Although computer-assisted training…

  19. Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Enhance Achievement of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Hussein, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in English-Language environments offer practice time, motivates students, enhance student learning, increase authentic materials that students can study, and has the potential to encourage teamwork between students. The findings from this particular study suggested that students who used computer assisted…

  20. Integrated workflow for computer assisted history matching on a channelized reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Wilschut, F.; Leeuwenburgh, O.; Hooff, P.M.E. van

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly computer assisted techniques are used for history matching reservoir models. Such methods will become indispensable in view of the increasing amount of information generated by intelligent wells, in which case manual interpretation becomes too time consuming. Also, with the increasing

  1. Computer-Assisted Analysis of Spontaneous Speech: Quantification of Basic Parameters in Aphasic and Unimpaired Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Katja; Grande, Marion; Meffert, Elisabeth; Christoph, Swetlana; Piefke, Martina; Willmes, Klaus; Huber, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Although generally accepted as an important part of aphasia assessment, detailed analysis of spontaneous speech is rarely carried out in clinical practice mostly due to time limitations. The Aachener Sprachanalyse (ASPA; Aachen Speech Analysis) is a computer-assisted method for the quantitative analysis of German spontaneous speech that allows for…

  2. The Impact of Computer Assisted Grammar Teaching on EFL Pupils' Performance in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Naba'h, Abdallah M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of using computer assisted grammar teaching on the performance of Jordanian pupils studying English as a foreign language. The sample of the study consisted of (212) secondary pupils distributed randomly on four experimental groups and four control groups. To find out the impact of a software program on…

  3. The Effect of Computer Assisted Grammar Teaching on the Academic Success of Classroom Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyup, Bircan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of computer assisted grammar teaching on the academic success of classroom teacher candidates. The study group consists of 2nd grade students from Karadeniz Technical University Fatih, Faculty of Education, Department of Classroom Teaching in the educational year of 2010 to 2011. Experimental…

  4. The Relationship between Second Language Acquisition Theory and Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The point of departure for this article is the contrast between the theoretical landscape within view of language teaching professionals in 1991 and that of today. I argue that the pragmatic goal of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) developers and researchers to create and evaluate learning opportunities pushes them to consider a variety…

  5. Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Build Math Fact Fluency: An Implementation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Renee O.; Collins, Tai; Hernan, Colleen; Flowers, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Research findings support the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) as a curriculum supplement for improving math skills, including math fact fluency. There are a number of websites and mobile applications (i.e., apps) designed to build students' math fact fluency, but the options can become overwhelming. This article provides implementation…

  6. Effects of Computer-Assisted Jigsaw II Cooperative Learning Strategy on Physics Achievement and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted Jigsaw II cooperative strategy on physics achievement and retention. The study also determined how moderating variables of achievement levels as it affects students' performance in physics when Jigsaw II cooperative learning is used as an instructional strategy. Purposive sampling technique…

  7. Computer Assisted Project-Based Instruction: The Effects on Science Achievement, Computer Achievement and Portfolio Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz; Dede, Dinçer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of computer assisted project-based instruction on learners' achievement in a science and technology course, in a computer course and in portfolio development. With this aim in mind, a quasi-experimental design was used and a sample of 70 seventh grade secondary school students from Org. Esref…

  8. Environmental Factors Affecting Computer Assisted Language Learning Success: A Complex Dynamic Systems Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Michael W.; Wu, Wen-Chi Vivian

    2014-01-01

    This conceptual, interdisciplinary inquiry explores Complex Dynamic Systems as the concept relates to the internal and external environmental factors affecting computer assisted language learning (CALL). Based on the results obtained by de Rosnay ["World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution", 67(4/5), 304-315 (2011)], who observed…

  9. A Computer-Assisted Multiliteracies Programme as an Alternative Approach to EFL Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmee; Ardeshiri, Minoo; Cummins, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a computer-assisted multiliteracies programme (CaMP) as an alternative approach to English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instruction in order to overcome the educational limitations that are inherent in most EFL settings. In a number of monolingual societies with a dominant language other than English,…

  10. Variables that Affect Math Teacher Candidates' Intentions to Integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Based on Social Cognitive Carier Theory (SCCT) (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994, 2002), this study tested the effects of mathematics teacher candidates' self-efficacy in, outcome expectations from, and interest in CAME on their intentions to integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME). While mathematics teacher candidates' outcome…

  11. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Knowledge of Postschool Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.; Wood, Charles L.; Richter, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing students' ability to make informed choices is an important precursor to successful choice-making, decision-making, and goal-setting. This study used a multiple-baseline design across behaviors replicated across participants to examine the effects of computer-assisted instruction on acquisition of students' knowledge of postschool options…

  12. The Effect of Computer Assisted Grammar Teaching on the Academic Success of Classroom Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyup, Bircan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of computer assisted grammar teaching on the academic success of classroom teacher candidates. The study group consists of 2nd grade students from Karadeniz Technical University Fatih, Faculty of Education, Department of Classroom Teaching in the educational year of 2010 to 2011. Experimental…

  13. Effect of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Secondary School Students' Achievement in Ecological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkemdilim, Egbunonu Roseline; Okeke, Sam O. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on students' achievement in ecological concepts. Quasi-experimental design, specifically the pre-test post test non-equivalent control group design was adopted. The sample consisted of sixty-six (66) senior secondary year two (SS II) biology students, drawn from two…

  14. Feasibility of a computer-assisted feedback system between dispatch centre and ambulances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Veronica; Karlsten, Rolf; Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Castrèn, Maaret

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a newly developed computer-assisted feedback system between dispatch centre and ambulances in Stockholm, Sweden. A computer-assisted feedback system based on a Finnish model was designed to fit the Swedish emergency medical system. Feedback codes were identified and divided into three categories; assessment of patients' primary condition when ambulance arrives at scene, no transport by the ambulance and level of priority. Two ambulances and one emergency medical communication centre (EMCC) in Stockholm participated in the study. A sample of 530 feedback codes sent through the computer-assisted feedback system was reviewed. The information on the ambulance medical records was compared with the feedback codes used and 240 assignments were further analyzed. The used feedback codes sent from ambulance to EMCC were correct in 92% of the assignments. The most commonly used feedback code sent to the emergency medical dispatchers was 'agree with the dispatchers' assessment'. In addition, in 160 assignments there was a mismatch between emergency medical dispatchers and ambulance nurse assessments. Our results have shown a high agreement between medical dispatchers and ambulance nurse assessment. The feasibility of the feedback codes seems to be acceptable based on the small margin of error. The computer-assisted feedback system may, when used on a daily basis, make it possible for the medical dispatchers to receive feedback in a structural way. The EMCC organization can directly evaluate any changes in the assessment protocol by structured feedback sent from the ambulance.

  15. Secondary School Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics Computer--Assisted Instruction Environment in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwei, Philip K.; Wando, Dave; Too, Jackson K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of research conducted in six classes (Form IV) with 205 students with a sample of 94 respondents. Data represent students' statements that describe (a) the role of Mathematics teachers in a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) environment and (b) effectiveness of CAI in Mathematics instruction. The results indicated…

  16. Moderators of Efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Molly Rae

    2013-01-01

    Research investigating career intervention efficacy has inadequately investigated the identification of important client factors which might moderate the effects of various career interventions. The current study had two aims. First it examined the efficacy of a newly developed Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) used alone, and the…

  17. Training Counselors to Use Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems More Effectively: A Model Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Becky L.; Robbins, Steven B.; Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Harris-Bowlsbey, JoAnn; Lapan, Richard T.; Dahir, Carol A.; Jepsen, David A.

    2005-01-01

    A model graduate training curriculum that emphasizes the counselor's role in assisting clients in the effective use of computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems is described in this article. This 4-module graduate training program emphasizes client readiness and exploration using CACG systems, skill building and simulation exercises, and…

  18. Promoting Contextual Vocabulary Learning through an Adaptive Computer-Assisted EFL Reading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-H.

    2016-01-01

    The study developed an adaptive computer-assisted reading system and investigated its effect on promoting English as a foreign language learner-readers' contextual vocabulary learning performance. Seventy Taiwanese college students were assigned to two reading groups. Participants in the customised reading group read online English texts, each of…

  19. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted STAD Cooperative Learning Strategy on Physics Problem Solving, Achievement and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted Students' Team Achievement Division (STAD) cooperative learning strategy on physics problem solving, students' achievement and retention. It also examined if the student performance would vary with gender. Purposive sampling technique was used to select two senior secondary schools…

  20. Persistence of Learning Gains from Computer Assisted Learning: Experimental Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Huang, W.; Shi, Y.; Boswell, M.; Rozelle, S.

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs have been shown to be effective in improving educational outcomes. However, the existing studies on CAL have almost all been conducted over a short period of time. There is very little evidence on how the impact evolves over time. In response, we conducted a clustered randomized experiment involving 2741…

  1. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Journal of Computer Assisted Learning," 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kyle R.; Zabriskie, Grant D.; Ashton, Scott M.; Borup, Jered; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the authors analyzed all research articles published between 2002 and 2011 in the "Journal of Computer Assisted Learning," in order to understand the research topics methods, major contributing authors, and most-cited publications. Over the 10-year period, they found the journal has explored educational uses of computer…

  2. Listening Strategy Use and Influential Factors in Web-Based Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates second and foreign language (L2) learners' listening strategy use and factors that influence their strategy use in a Web-based computer assisted language learning (CALL) system. A strategy inventory, a factor questionnaire and a standardized listening test were used to collect data from a group of 82 Chinese students…

  3. Computer-Assisted Evaluation of Speaking Competencies in the Basic Speech Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Chris R.; Behnke, Ralph R.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses concerns when a college-level course utilizes a number of instructors and sections. Notes the importance of the various sections receiving essentially the same educational experience. Describes section variation trends. Discusses use of the computer assisted speech evaluation software at Texas Christian University. Recommends the use of…

  4. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  5. MONTHLY VARIATION IN SPERM MOTILITY IN COMMON CARP ASSESSED USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperm motility variables from the milt of the common carp Cyprinus carpio were assessed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system across several months (March-August 1992) known to encompass the natural spawning period. Two-year-old pond-raised males obtained each mo...

  6. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF HYPERACTIVATED MOTILITY IN RAT SPERMATOZA USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective evaluation of hyperactivated motility in rat spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis.Cancel AM, Lobdell D, Mendola P, Perreault SD.Toxicology Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.The aim of this study was t...

  7. Learning Achievement in Solving Word-Based Mathematical Questions through a Computer-Assisted Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Hua; Liu, Yuan-Chen; Chang, Hsiu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a computer-assisted mathematical problem-solving system in the form of a network instruction website to help low-achieving second- and third-graders in mathematics with word-based addition and subtraction questions in Taiwan. According to Polya's problem-solving model, the system is designed to guide these low-achievers…

  8. The Utilization of a Computer Assisted Guidance System in Academic Advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfautz, Charles Van Vleck

    2010-01-01

    Computer assisted guidance systems may adapt well to various models of academic advising, and they have the ability to address the challenge of meeting the diverse advising needs of community college students without sacrificing the integrity of academic advising (Fowkes & McWhirter, 2007). The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess…

  9. Review Question Formats and Web Design Usability in Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca S.; Eppler, Marion A.; Ironsmith, Marsha; Wuensch, Karl L.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the effects of two embedded review question formats and the application of web design guidelines in a computer-assisted mastery learning course in developmental psychology. Students used either a branching review question format that redirected them to relevant portions of the study module after incorrect answers or a linear format that…

  10. The Effect of Adaptive Confidence Strategies in Computer-Assisted Instruction on Learning and Learner Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Richard Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of including adaptive confidence strategies in instructionally sound computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on learning and learner confidence. Seventy-one general educational development (GED) learners recruited from various GED learning centers at community colleges in the southeast United…

  11. Use of Computer Assisted Career Guidance with Prior Cognitive Structuring. Technical Report Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnasarian, Michael; Peterson, Gary W.

    Cognitive structuring was implemented by showing 30 subjects a 10-minute videotape that presented Holland's (1985) model of the world of work before they used an interactive computer-assisted guidance system (DISCOVER). The effect of prior structuring was assessed in terms of a subject's representation of the world of work, occupational certainty,…

  12. The Effect of Adaptive Confidence Strategies in Computer-Assisted Instruction on Learning and Learner Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Richard Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of including adaptive confidence strategies in instructionally sound computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on learning and learner confidence. Seventy-one general educational development (GED) learners recruited from various GED learning centers at community colleges in the southeast United…

  13. Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

  14. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Stad Cooperative Learning Strategy on Physics Problem Solving, Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amosa Isiaka Gambari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted Students’ Team Achievement Division (STAD cooperative learning strategy on physics problem solving on students’ achievement and retention. It also examined if the performance of the students would vary with gender. Purposive sampling technique was used to select two senior secondary schools year two physics students (SS II. The schools were assigned into computer-assisted STAD and Individualized Computer Instruction (ICI groups. 84 students from two intact classes participated in the study. Computer-Assisted Learning Package (CALP on physics and Physics Achievement Test (PAT were used as treatment and test instruments respectively. Analysis of Covariance and Scheffe test were used for data analysis. Findings indicated that students taught physics with computer-supported STAD performed and better than their counterparts in ICI group. In addition, they had better retention than those in ICI group. However, gender has no influence on students’ performance. Based on the findings, it was recommended among others that physics teacher should be encouraged to use computer-assisted cooperative instructional to enhance students’ performance.

  15. Learning to use a word processor with concurrent computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, P.R.J.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this study the effects of 7embedding regulation questions and regulation hints in a concurrent computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program aimed at learning to use a word processor were examined. This instructional shell WP-DAGOGUE controlled the interaction between the subject and the word proce

  16. Computer-Assisted Techniques to Enhance Transformative Learning in First-Year Literature Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Marguerite; Kajs, Rebecca; Agee, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Illustrates techniques to foster transformative learning in computer-assisted literature classes: (1) a lesson plan on John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning"; (2) a plan to analyze "Oedipus Rex" using the "Daedalus" Interactive Writing Environment; and (3) a demonstration of how students engage in "meta-reflection" as they explore…

  17. Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Enhance Achievement of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Hussein, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in English-Language environments offer practice time, motivates students, enhance student learning, increase authentic materials that students can study, and has the potential to encourage teamwork between students. The findings from this particular study suggested that students who used computer assisted…

  18. Secondary School Mathematics Teachers' and Students' Views on Computer Assisted Mathematics Instruction in Turkey: Mathematica Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Mehmet Alper; Isleyen, Tevfik

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the secondary school mathematics teachers' and students' views on computer-assisted mathematics instruction (CAMI) conducted via Mathematica. Accordingly, three mathematics teachers in Adiyaman and nine 10th-grade students participated in the research. Firstly, the researchers trained the mathematics teachers in the…

  19. A PERT/CPM of the Computer Assisted Completion of The Ministry September Report. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, J. D.

    Using two statistical analysis techniques (the Program Evaluation and Review Technique and the Critical Path Method), this study analyzed procedures for compiling the required yearly report of the Metropolitan Separate School Board (Catholic) of Toronto, Canada. The computer-assisted analysis organized the process of completing the report more…

  20. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Contraception for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janet; Tymchyshyn, Patricia

    1992-01-01

    Assessed changes in contraceptive knowledge of 58 white female undergraduate students following computer-assisted instruction program on contraception. At six-month follow-up, students evidenced knowledge gains on duration of pill use, rationale for triphasics and biphasics, appropriate contingencies for missing two days of pill, danger signs…

  1. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  2. The Application of Electroencephalography to Computer Assisted Instruction: A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack, Edna O.

    This paper examines the possibility of developing a conceptual framework on which future research on the application of electroencephalography (EEG) to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) could be based. Consistent associations between EEG and cognitive functions for learning and instruction have the potential for bringing cognitivism into the…

  3. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  4. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems: A Part of NCDA History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Bowlsbey, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    The first computer-assisted career planning systems were developed in the late 1960s and were based soundly on the best of career development and decision-making theory. Over the years, this tradition has continued as the technology that delivers these systems' content has improved dramatically and as they have been universally accepted as…

  5. Moderators of Efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Molly Rae

    2013-01-01

    Research investigating career intervention efficacy has inadequately investigated the identification of important client factors which might moderate the effects of various career interventions. The current study had two aims. First it examined the efficacy of a newly developed Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) used alone, and the…

  6. Using a Dialogue System Based on Dialogue Maps for Computer Assisted Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Kwon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil; Lee, Yunkeun

    2016-01-01

    In order to use dialogue systems for computer assisted second-language learning systems, one of the difficult issues in such systems is how to construct large-scale dialogue knowledge that matches the dialogue modelling of a dialogue system. This paper describes how we have accomplished the short-term construction of large-scale and…

  7. The Effects of Computer-assisted and Distance Learning of Geometric Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Sozcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of computer-assisted and distance learning of geometric modeling and computer aided geometric design are studied. It was shown that computer algebra systems and dynamic geometric environments can be considered as excellent tools for teaching mathematical concepts of mentioned areas, and distance education technologies would be indispensable for consolidation of successfully passed topics

  8. Climate Change Discourse in Mass Media: Application of Computer-Assisted Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Andrei P.; Stepchenkova, Svetlana O.

    2012-01-01

    Content analysis of mass media publications has become a major scientific method used to analyze public discourse on climate change. We propose a computer-assisted content analysis method to extract prevalent themes and analyze discourse changes over an extended period in an objective and quantifiable manner. The method includes the following: (1)…

  9. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems: A Part of NCDA History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Bowlsbey, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    The first computer-assisted career planning systems were developed in the late 1960s and were based soundly on the best of career development and decision-making theory. Over the years, this tradition has continued as the technology that delivers these systems' content has improved dramatically and as they have been universally accepted as…

  10. The Application of Electroencephalography to Computer Assisted Instruction: A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack, Edna O.

    This paper examines the possibility of developing a conceptual framework on which future research on the application of electroencephalography (EEG) to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) could be based. Consistent associations between EEG and cognitive functions for learning and instruction have the potential for bringing cognitivism into the…

  11. Computer-assisted semen analysis parameters as predictors for fertility of men from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L; Scheike, Thomas Harder; Jensen, Tina Kold;

    2000-01-01

    The predictive value of sperm motility parameters obtained by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) was evaluated for the fertility of men from general population. In a prospective study with couples stopping use of contraception in order to try to conceive, CASA was performed on semen samples...

  12. Computer Assisted English Language Learning in Costa Rican Elementary Schools: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Marinelli, Horacio; Blanco, Marta; Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Irby, Beverly J.; Tong, Fuhui; Stanley, Katherine; Fan, Yinan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents first-year findings of a 25-week longitudinal project derived from a two-year longitudinal randomized trial study at the elementary school level in Costa Rica on effective computer-assisted language learning (CALL) approaches in an English as a foreign language (EFL) setting. A pre-test-post-test experimental group design was…

  13. Detection of mammographically occult architectural distortion on digital breast tomosynthesis screening: initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Luke; Lourenco, Ana P; Mainiero, Martha B

    2014-07-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve the sensitivity of screening mammography. DBT may have the most potential impact in cases of subtle mammographic findings such as architectural distortion (AD). The objective of our study was to determine whether DBT provides better visualization of AD than digital mammography (DM) and whether sensitivity for cancer detection is increased by the addition of DBT as it relates to cases of mammographically occult AD. Retrospective review of BI-RADS category 0 reports from 9982 screening DM examinations with adjunct DBT were searched for the term "architectural distortion" and were reviewed in consensus by three radiologists. ADs were classified by whether they were seen better on DM or DBT, were seen equally well on both, or were occult on either modality. The electronic medical record was reviewed to identify additional imaging studies, biopsy results, and surgical excision pathology results. Review identified 26 cases of AD, 19 (73%) of which were seen only on the DBT images. Of the remaining seven ADs, six were seen better on DBT than DM. On diagnostic workup, nine lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4 or 5. Surgical pathology revealed two invasive carcinomas, two ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, three radial scars, and two lesions showing atypia. The cancer detection rate of DBT in mammographically occult AD was 21% (4/19). The positive predictive value of biopsy was 44%. DBT provides better visualization of AD than DM and identifies a subset of ADs that are occult on DM. Identification of additional ADs on DBT increases the cancer detection rate.

  14. Development and application of a segmentation routine in a mammographic mass CAD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarious, David M., Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new segmentation routine developed for mammographic masses. We previously developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that employed a simple but imprecise segmentation procedure. To improve the systems performance, an iterative, linear segmentation routine was developed. The routine begins by employing a linear discriminant function to determine the optimal threshold between estimates of an objects interior and exterior pixels. After applying the threshold and identifying the objects outline, two constraints are applied to minimize the influence of extraneous background structures. Each iteration further refines the outline until the stopping criterion is reached. The segmentation algorithm was tested on a database of 181 mammographic images that contained forty-nine malignant and fifty benign masses. A set of suspicious regions of interest (ROIs) was found using the previous CAD system. Twenty features were measured from the regions before and after applying the new segmentation routine. The difference in the features discriminatory ability was examined via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A significant performance difference was observed in many features, particularly those describing the object border. Free-response ROC (FROC) curves were utilized to examine how the overall CAD system performance changed with the inclusion of the segmentation routine. The FROC performance appeared to be improved, especially for malignant masses. When detecting 90% of the malignant masses, the previous system achieved 4.4 false positives per image (FPpI) compared to the post-segmentation systems 3.7 FPpI. At 85%, the respective FPpI are 4.1 and 2.1.

  15. Malignant Lesions as Mammographically Appearing Intramammary Ganglia; Lesiones malignas con apariencia mamografica de ganglios intramamarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Miraveta, P.; Pons, M. J.; Pina, L. J.; Zornoza, G. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra. Pamplona (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Intramammary ganglia are frequent mammographic findings of no pathological importance. We present two cases of malignant breast lesions whose mammographic appearance could resemble that of intramammary ganglia. Although the mammographic appearance of a lesion is similar to that of intramammary ganglia, it should be carefully studied, especially if it presents a poorly defined border or is palpable. (Author)

  16. BREAST CANCER RISK EVALUATION - A CORRELATION BETWEEN MAMMOGRAPHIC DENSITY AND THE GAIL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Baytchev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gail model is a statistical tool, which assesses breast cancer probability, based on nonmodifiable risk factors. In contrast, the evaluation of mammographic breast density is an independent and dynamic risk factor influenced by interventions modifying breast cancer risk incidence. The aim of the present study is to compare the possibilities for risk factor integration and analysis and to search for a correlation between mammographic density and the Gail model for breast cancer risk evaluation. The subject of this prospective study is a cohort of 107 women at ages from 37 to 71 years, who have had benign breast diseases, digital mammograms, and Gail model risk evaluation. Mammographic density is evaluated in craniocaudal projection subjectively visually and objectively using the computer imaging software. (Image J software The Gail risk evaluation is completed using the standardized NCI questionnaire (Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool. In concordance with the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RAD by ACR, mammographic density is evaluated using a four-grade scale. Low density D1 (less than 25% was determined in 24 cases, D2 (25-50% in 36 cases, D3 (51-75% in 31 cases and high density D4 (greater than 75% in 16 cases. According to the Gail model, 80 (74,8% of the examined patients did not have an increased risk (less than 1,67% for a five-year period, whereas the remaining 27 (25,2% had a statistically significant increase in risk (greater than 1,67% for a five-year period. Women with increased risk more often present with denser breast (34% with D3, D4 versus 18,3% for D1, D2. The Gail model does not adequately explain the correlation between breast density and statistically calculated risk. The development of more detailed tools, which take into consideration breast density, as well as other risk factors, may be helpful for a more accurate evaluation of the individual risk for breast cancer.

  17. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the estrogen pathway and mammographic density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumas Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the estrogen pathway appear to be associated with breast cancer risk and possibly with mammographic density (MD, but little is known of these associations among premenopausal women. This study examines the association of 11 polymorphisms in five estrogen-related genes (estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα, ERβ, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1 with premenopausal MD. Effect modification of four estrogen-related factors (parity, age at menarche, hormonal derivatives use and body mass index (BMI on this relation is also assessed. Methods Polymorphisms were genotyped in 741 premenopausal Caucasian women whose MD was measured in absolute density (AD, cm2 and percent density using a computer-assisted method. Multivariate linear models were used to examine the associations (Ptrend and interactions (Pi. Results None of the SNPs showed a statistically significant association with AD. However, each additional rare allele of rs1056836 CYP1B1 was associated with a reduction in AD among nulliparous women (Ptrend = 0.004, while no association was observed among parous women (Ptrend = 0.62; Pi = 0.02. An increase in the number of rare alleles of the HSD17B1 SNP (rs598126 and rs2010750 was associated with an increase in AD among women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.06 and Ptrend = 0.04, respectively, but with a decrease in AD among past hormonal derivatives users (Ptrend = 0.04; Pi = 0.02 and Ptrend = 0.08; Pi = 0.01, respectively. Moreover, a negative association of rs598126 HSD17B1 SNP with AD was observed among women with higher BMI (>median (Ptrend = 0.01; Pi = 0.02. A negative association between an increased number of rare alleles of COMT rs4680 SNP and AD was limited to women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.02; Pi = 0.03 or with late age at menarche (>median

  18. Computer-aided detection of breast carcinoma in standard mammographic projections with digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destounis, Stamatia [Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Hanson, Sarah; Morgan, Renee; Murphy, Philip; Somerville, Patricia; Seifert, Posy; Andolina, Valerie; Arieno, Andrea; Skolny, Melissa; Logan-Young, Wende [Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A retrospective evaluation of the ability of computer-aided detection (CAD) ability to identify breast carcinoma in standard mammographic projections. Forty-five biopsy proven lesions in 44 patients imaged digitally with CAD applied at examination were reviewed. Forty-four screening BIRADS {sup registered} category 1 digital mammography examinations were randomly identified to serve as a comparative normal/control population. Data included patient age; BIRADS {sup registered} breast density; lesion type, size, and visibility; number, type, and location of CAD marks per image; CAD ability to mark lesions; needle core and surgical pathologic correlation. The CAD lesion/case sensitivity of 87% (n=39), image sensitivity of 69% (n=31) for mediolateral oblique view and 78% (n=35) for the craniocaudal view was found. The average false positive rate in 44 normal screening cases was 2.0 (range 1-8). The 2.0 figure is based on 88 reported false positive CAD marks in 44 normal screening exams: 98% (n=44) lesions proceeded to excision; initial pathology upgraded at surgical excision from in situ to invasive disease in 24% (n=9) lesions. CAD demonstrated potential to detect mammographically visible cancers in standard projections for all lesion types. (orig.)

  19. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction with Conceptual Change Texts on Removing the Misconceptions of Radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YUMUŞAK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Training young scientists, enabling conceptual understanding in science education is quite important. Misconception is one of the important indications for whether the concepts are understood or not. The most important educational tools to remove misconceptions are conceptual change texts. In addition, one of the important methods to remove misconceptions is computer-assisted instruction. The goal of this study is to research the effects of the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI, conceptual change texts (CCT, computer-assisted instruction with conceptual change texts (CAI+CCT, and use of traditional teaching method (TTM on removing the misconceptions of science teacher candidates on the subject of radioactivity. Research sample was made of totally 92 students studying at four different groups of senior students in Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education in 2011-2012 academic year. A different teaching method was used in each group. Experimental groups were randomly determined; in the first experimental group, computer-assisted instruction was used (23 students; in the second experimental group, conceptual change texts were used (23 students; in the third experimental group, computer-assisted instruction with conceptual change texts were used (23 students; and the fourth group, on which traditional education method was used, was called control group (23 students. Two-tier misconception diagnostic instrument, which was developed by the researcher, was used as data collection tool of the research. “Nonequivalent Control Groups Experimental Design” was used in this research in order to determine the efficiency of different teaching methods. Obtained data were analyzed by using SPSS 21.0. As a result of the research, it was determined that methods used on experimental groups were more successful than traditional teaching method practiced on control group in terms of removing misconceptions on

  20. Circumscribed breast carcinoma: Mammographic and sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Soo Young; Lee, Yul; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Ke Sook [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Circumscribe breast cancer is a well demarcated mass with or without a lobulated border simulating a benign tumor like fibroadenoma on mammography or breast US and is reported as approximate 10% of the incidence among primary breast carcinoma(1.2). Pathologically medullary, colloid, papillary, intraductal and rarely invasive ductal carcinomas are included in this group which show the less intense desmoplastic reaction than the scirrhous type cancer, resulting in the most favorable prognosis of all carcinoma of the breast. Among 214 primary breast carcinoma during the past 8 years, we experienced 6 case of pathologically proven circumscribed breast cancer(2 cases of medullary carcinoma, 1 of colloid carcinoma, 1 of intracystic papillary carcinoma, 2 of comedo type intraductal carcinoma). Clinically 2 cases showed bloody nipple discharge from one hole of a unilateral nipple orifice. Mammography showed a well circumscribed nodule with or without partial lobular contour and no pathologic calcification. Breast sonographic findings were a well defined heterogeneous hypoechoic nodule with weak posterior acoustic enhancement. Characteristically a thin dilated lactiferous duct between the mass and the nipple on US could be detected in 2 cases which clinically was accompanied by bloody nipple discharge. Although the mammographic criteria is promising as benign tumor, the possibility of circumscribed as benign tumor, the possibility of circumscribed breast carcinoma must be considered in heterogeneous hypoechoic nodule with weak posterior acoustic enhancement in US, especially in the presence of a dilated lactiferous duct between the mass and the nipple with bloody nipple discharge.

  1. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  2. Pre-Service Teachers' Uses of and Barriers from Adopting Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Ebrahim; Baki, Roselan; Razali, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Success in implementation of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) programs depends on the teachers' understanding of the roles of CALL programs in education. Consequently, it is also important to understand the barriers teachers face in the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) programs. The current study was conducted on 14…

  3. Equivalency of Computer-Assisted and Paper-and-Pencil Administered Versions of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsoneault, Terry B.

    1996-01-01

    Computer-assisted and paper-and-pencil-administered formats for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventories were investigated. Subjects were 32 master's and doctoral-level counseling students. Findings indicated that the two formats were comparable and that students preferred the computer-assisted format. (AEF)

  4. Computer-Assisted Teaching and Assessment of Disabled Students in Higher Education: The Interface between Academic Standards and Disability Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konur, O.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-assisted teaching and assessment has become a regular feature across many areas of the curriculum in higher education courses around the world in recent years. This development has resulted in the "digital divide" between disabled students and their nondisabled peers regarding their participation in computer-assisted courses. However,…

  5. Effects of a Computer-Assisted Concept Mapping Learning Strategy on EFL College Students' English Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Lin; Chen, Chiu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on EFL college learners' English reading comprehension. The research questions were: (1) what was the influence of the computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on different learners' English reading comprehension? (2) did…

  6. Physical activity and mammographic parenchymal patterns among Greek postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmara, Eleni A; Papacharalambous, Xenofon N; Kouloulias, Vassilios E; Maridaki, D Maria; Baltopoulos, J Panayiotis

    2011-05-01

    To examine whether physical activity during the last five years is related to later breast mammographic density in postmenopausal Greek women. We designed a cross-sectional study in 724 women, of ages 45-67 years. An interview-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on duration and intensity of recreational physical activity during five years preceding study recruitment. Mammograms were evaluated according to BIRADS classification and BIRADS score was also estimated. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between physical activity index and breast density according to the BIRADS classification methods. We observed a statistically significant inverse association of mammographic breast density measured by the BIRADS classification method and recreational exercise (OR=-0.10; 95% CI -0.018, -0.001; p=0.022). For one unit increase in physical activity as expressed by the MET-h/week score, the odds of lower versus higher breast density categories are 1.105 greater, given that all of the other variables in the model are held constant. A modifying effect by age at recruitment was evident among participants, with a stronger inverse association between recreational activity and mammographic breast density among older women (OR=-0.036; 95% CI -0.063, -0.009; p=0.009). An inverse association between physical activity and BIRADS score was evident, not reaching statistical significance (OR=0.00; 95% CI -0.009, 0.008; p=0.887). Mammographic breast area was lower in postmenopausal women who participated in sports/recreational physical activity compared to inactive controls. Increasing physical activity levels among postmenopausal women might be a reasonable approach to reduce mammographic density. However, until more physical activity and mammographic breast density studies are conducted that confirm our findings, they have to be interpreted with caution, due to the retrospective nature of our data and the possibility of

  7. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  8. Clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions: detection and classification with high-resolution sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberger, W; Niehoff, A; Obrist, P; DeKoekkoek-Doll, P; Dünser, M

    2000-08-01

    With recent significant advances in ultrasound technology, the potential of high-resolution sonography to improve the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis in women with dense breasts has become a matter of interest for breast imagers. To determine how often physician-performed high-resolution sonography can detect nonpalpable breast cancers that are not revealed by mammography, 8,970 women with breast density grades 2 through 4 underwent high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography. All sonographically detected, clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions that were not simple cysts were prospectively classified into benign, indeterminate, or malignant categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, core-needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy. In 8,103 women with normal findings at mammography and physical examination, 32 cancers and 330 benign lesions were detected in 273 patients with sonography only. Eight additional cancers were found in 867 patients with a malignant (n = 5) or a benign (n = 3) palpable or mammographically detected index lesion. The overall prevalence of cancers detected with screening sonography was 0.41%, and the proportion of sonographically detected cancers to the total number of nonpalpable cancers was 22%. The mean size of invasive cancers detected only by sonography was 9.1 mm, and was not statistically different from the mean size of invasive cancers detected by mammography. The sensitivity of prospective sonographic classification for malignancy was 100%, and the specificity was 31%. In conclusion, the use of high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography in women with dense breasts may lead to detection of a significant number of otherwise occult cancers that are no different in size from nonpalpable mammographically detected cancers. Prospective classification of these lesions based on sonographic characteristics resulted in an acceptable benign-to-malignant biopsy rate of 6.3:1.

  9. Evaluation of mammographic density patterns: reproducibility and concordance among scales

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased mammographic breast density is a moderate risk factor for breast cancer. Different scales have been proposed for classifying mammographic density. This study sought to assess intra-rater agreement for the most widely used scales (Wolfe, Tabár, BI-RADS and Boyd) and compare them in terms of classifying mammograms as high- or low-density. Methods The study covered 3572 mammograms drawn from women included in the DDM-Spain study, carried-out in seven Spanish Autonom...

  10. Body mass index and participation in organized mammographic screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Sophie Sell; Njor, Sisse Helle; Lynge, Elsebeth;

    2015-01-01

    screening, but hardly addressed the influence of potential effect-modifiers. We studied the association between objective measures of BMI and participation in mammographic screening in a Danish prospective cohort, and explored the influence of menopausal status, hormone therapy (HT), previous screening...... participation, and morbidities on this relationship. METHODS: A total of 5,134 women from the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort who were invited to population based mammographic screening in Copenhagen were included in analysis. Women were 50-64 years old at inclusion (1993-97) when their height and weight were...

  11. Stereoscopic representation of the breast from two mammographic view with external markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, Maria; Manohar, Anand

    2003-05-01

    A new breast imaging technique has been develoepd and tested for the stereoscopic representation of the breast. The method uses markers at specific locations on the breast surface and standard mammographic projections and was tested with an anthropomorphic phantom containing five mass-like objects at locations determined by a CT scan. The phantom was imaged with a GE Senographe 2000D digital system with and without the markers. The algorithm's modules included: 1) Breast area segmentation; 2) Pectoral muscle segmentation; 3) Registration and alignment of the mammographic projections based on selected reference points; 4) Breast volume estimation basdd on volume conservation principle during compression and shape definition using surface points; 5) 3D lesion(s) localization and representation. An interactive, ILD-based, graphical interface was also developed for the stereoscopic display of the breast. The reconstruction algorithm assumed that the breast shrinks and stretches uniformly when compression is applied and removed. The relative movement of the markers after compression allowed more accurate estimation of the shrinking and stretching of the surface offering a relatively simple and practical way to improve volume estimation and surface reconstruction. Such stereoscopic representation of the breast and associated findings may improve radiological interpretation and physical examinations for breast cancer diagnosis.

  12. Mammographic Breast Density in Chinese Women: Spatial Distribution and Autocorrelation Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W K Lai

    Full Text Available Mammographic breast density (MBD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. The spatial distribution of MBD in the breast is variable and dependent on physiological, genetic, environmental and pathological factors. This pilot study aims to define the spatial distribution and autocorrelation patterns of MBD in Chinese women aged 40-60. By analyzing their digital mammographic images using a public domain Java image processing program for segmentation and quantification of MBD, we found their left and right breasts were symmetric to each other in regard to their breast size (Total Breast Area, the amount of BMD (overall PD and Moran's I values. Their MBD was also spatially autocorrelated together in the anterior part of the breast in those with a smaller breast size, while those with a larger breast size tend to have their MBD clustered near the posterior part of the breast. Finally, we observed that the autocorrelation pattern of MBD was dispersed after a 3-year observation period.

  13. Perspectives of family physicians on computer-assisted health-risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farah; Skinner, Harvey A; Stewart, Donna E; Levinson, Wendy

    2010-05-07

    The firsthand experience of physicians using computer-assisted health-risk assessment is salient for designing practical eHealth solutions. The aim of this study was to enhance understanding about computer-assisted health-risk assessments from physicians' perspectives after completion of a trial at a Canadian, urban, multi-doctor, hospital-affiliated family practice clinic. A qualitative approach of face-to-face, in-depth, semi-structured interviews was used. All interviews were audio recorded and field notes taken. Analytic induction and constant comparative techniques were used for coding and analyses. Interpretation was facilitated by peer audit and insights gained from the social exchange theoretical perspective. Ten physicians (seven female and three male) participated in the interviews. Three overarching themes emerged in relation to computer-assisted health-risk assessments: (1) perceived benefits, (2) perceived concerns or challenges, and (3) feasibility. Physicians unanimously acknowledged the potential of computer-assisted health-risk assessments to open dialogue on psychosocial health risks. They also appreciated the general facilitative roles of the tool, such as improving time-efficiency by asking questions on health risks prior to the consultation and triggering patients' self-reflections on the risks. However, in the context of ongoing physician-patient relationships, physicians expressed concerns about the impact of the computer-assisted health-risk assessment tool on visit time, patient readiness to talk about psychosocial issues when the purpose of the visit was different, and the suitability of such risk assessment for all visits to detect new risk information. In terms of feasibility, physicians displayed general acceptance of the risk assessment tool but considered it most feasible for periodic health exams and follow-up visits based on their perceived concerns or challenges and the resources needed to implement such programs. These included

  14. Computer-assisted learning and simulation lab with 40 DentSim units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, A; Maggio, M P; Simon, J F; Scarbecz, M; Harrison, J A; Wicks, R A; Gilpatrick, R O

    2008-01-01

    There are an increasing number of studies about the computer-assisted dental patient simulator DentSim (DenX, Israel), by which dental students can acquire cognitive motor skills in a multimedia environment. However, only a very few studies have been published dealing with efficient ways to use and to manage a computer-assisted dental simulation lab with 40 DentSim units. The current approach and optimization steps of the College of Dentistry at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center were evaluated based on theoretical and practical tests and by questionnaires (partial 5-point Likert scale). Half of the D1 (first-year) students (2004/05) already had experience with computer-assisted learning at their undergraduate college and most of the students even expected to be taught via computer-assisted learning systems (83.5%) at the dental school. 87.3% of the students working with DentSim found the experience to be very interesting or interesting. Before the students carried out the preparation exercises, they were trained in the skills they needed to work with the sophisticated technology, eg, system-specific operation skills (66.6% attained maximal reachable points) and information searching skills (79.5% attained maximal reachable points). The indirect knowledge retention rate / incidental learning rate of the preparation exercises in the sense of computer-assisted problem-oriented learning regarding anatomy, preparation procedures, and cavity design was promising. The wide- ranging number of prepared teeth needed to acquire the necessary skills shows the varied individual learning curves of the students. The acceptance of, and response to, additional elective training time in the computer-assisted simulation lab were very high. Integrating the DentSim technology into the existing curriculum is a way to improve dental education, but it is also a challenge for both teachers and the students. It requires a shift in both curriculum and instructional goals that

  15. Learning curve of computer-assisted navigation system in spine surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-shu; ZHANG Ye; CHEN Zi-qiang; WANG Chuan-feng; ZHAO Ying-chuan; SHI Zhi-cai; LI Ming; LIU Ka Po Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Background Spine surgery using computer-assisted navigation (CAN) has been proven to result in low screw misplacement rates, low incidence of radiation exposure and excellent operative field viewing versus the conventional intraoperative image intensifier (CⅢ). However, as we know, few previous studies have described the learning curve of CAN in spine surgery.Methods We performed two consecutive case cohort studies on pedicel screw accuracy and operative time of two spine surgeons with different experience backgrounds, A and B, in one institution during the same period. Lumbar pedicel screw cortical perforation rate and operative time of the same kind of operation using CAN were analyzed and compared using CⅢ for the two surgeons at initial, 6 months and 12 months of CAN usage.Results CAN spine surgery had an overall lower cortical perforation rate and less mean operative time compared with CⅢ for both surgeon A and B cohorts when total cases of four years were included. It missed being statistically significant,with 3.3% versus 4.7% (P=0.191) and 125.7 versus 132.3 minutes (P=0.428) for surgeon A and 3.6% versus 6.4%(P=0.058), and 183.2 versus 213.2 minutes (P=0.070) for surgeon B. in an attempt to demonstrate the learning curve,the cases after 6 months of the CAN system in each surgeon's cohort were compared. The perforation rate decreased by 2.4% (P=0.039) and 4.3% (P=0.003) and the operative time was reduced by 31.8 minutes (P=0.002) and 14.4 minutes (P=0.026) for the CAN groups of surgeons A and B, respectively. When only the cases performed after 12 months using the CAN system were considered, the perforation rate decreased by 3.9% (P=0.006) and 5.6% (P <0.001) and the operative time was reduced by 20.9 minutes (P <0.001) and 40.3 minutes (P <0.001) for the CAN groups of surgeon A and B, respectively.Conclusions In the long run, CAN spine surgery decreased the lumbar screw cortical perforation rate and operative time. The learning curve showed a

  16. Mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk driven by breast anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Oustimov, Andrew; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2017-03-01

    Image-derived features of breast parenchymal texture patterns have emerged as promising risk factors for breast cancer, paving the way towards personalized recommendations regarding women's cancer risk evaluation and screening. The main steps to extract texture features of the breast parenchyma are the selection of regions of interest (ROIs) where texture analysis is performed, the texture feature calculation and the texture feature summarization in case of multiple ROIs. In this study, we incorporate breast anatomy in these three key steps by (a) introducing breast anatomical sampling for the definition of ROIs, (b) texture feature calculation aligned with the structure of the breast and (c) weighted texture feature summarization considering the spatial position and the underlying tissue composition of each ROI. We systematically optimize this novel framework for parenchymal tissue characterization in a case-control study with digital mammograms from 424 women. We also compare the proposed approach with a conventional methodology, not considering breast anatomy, recently shown to enhance the case-control discriminatory capacity of parenchymal texture analysis. The case-control classification performance is assessed using elastic-net regression with 5-fold cross validation, where the evaluation measure is the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic. Upon optimization, the proposed breast-anatomy-driven approach demonstrated a promising case-control classification performance (AUC=0.87). In the same dataset, the performance of conventional texture characterization was found to be significantly lower (AUC=0.80, DeLong's test p-valuebreast anatomy may further leverage the associations of parenchymal texture features with breast cancer, and may therefore be a valuable addition in pipelines aiming to elucidate quantitative mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk.

  17. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarious, David M; Baydush, Alan H; Floyd, Carey E

    2006-11-01

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions, (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number

  18. Computer assisted preoperative planning of bone fracture reduction: Simulation techniques and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Delgado, Juan J; Paulano-Godino, Félix; PulidoRam-Ramírez, Rubén; Jiménez-Pérez, J Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The development of support systems for surgery significantly increases the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory results. In the case of fracture reduction interventions these systems enable surgery planning, training, monitoring and assessment. They allow improvement of fracture stabilization, a minimizing of health risks and a reduction of surgery time. Planning a bone fracture reduction by means of a computer assisted simulation involves several semiautomatic or automatic steps. The simulation deals with the correct position of osseous fragments and fixation devices for a fracture reduction. Currently, to the best of our knowledge there is no computer assisted methods to plan an entire fracture reduction process. This paper presents an overall scheme of the computer based process for planning a bone fracture reduction, as described above, and details its main steps, the most common proposed techniques and their main shortcomings. In addition, challenges and new trends of this research field are depicted and analyzed.

  19. Criteria of Human-computer Interface Design for Computer Assisted Surgery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-guo; LIN Yan-ping; WANG Cheng-tao; LIU Zhi-hong; YANG Qing-ming

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, computer assisted surgery (CAS) systems become more and more common in clinical practices, but few specific design criteria have been proposed for human-computer interface (HCI) in CAS systems. This paper tried to give universal criteria of HCI design for CAS systems through introduction of demonstration application, which is total knee replacement (TKR) with a nonimage-based navigation system.A typical computer assisted process can be divided into four phases: the preoperative planning phase, the intraoperative registration phase, the intraoperative navigation phase and finally the postoperative assessment phase. The interface design for four steps is described respectively in the demonstration application. These criteria this paper summarized can be useful to software developers to achieve reliable and effective interfaces for new CAS systems more easily.

  20. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction of Simple Circuits on Experimental Process Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma ULUKÖK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental and control groups were composed of 30 sophomores majoring in Classroom Teaching for this study investigating the effects of computer-assisted instruction of simple circuits on the development of experimental process skills. The instruction includes experiments and studies about simple circuits and its elements (serial, parallel, and mixed conncetions of resistors covered in Science and Technology Laboratory II course curriculum. In this study where quantitative and qualitative methods were used together, the control list developed by the researchers was used to collect data. Results showed that experimental process skills of sophomores in experimental group were more developed than that of those in control group. Thus, it can be said that computer-assisted instruction has a positive impact on the development of experimental process skills of students.

  1. Equivalence study of a dental anatomy computer-assisted learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacki, Russell E; Best, Al; Abbey, Louis M

    2004-08-01

    Tooth Morphology is a computer-assisted learning program designed to teach the anatomy of the adult dentition. The purpose of this study was to test whether Tooth Morphology could teach dental anatomy to first-year dental students as well as the traditional lecture. A randomized controlled trial was performed with forty-five first-year dental students. The students were randomly assigned to either the Tooth Morphology group (n=23), which used the computer-assisted learning program and did not attend lecture, or the lecture group (n=22), which attended the traditional lecture and did not use Tooth Morphology. The Tooth Morphology group had a final exam average of 90.0 (standard deviation=5.2), and the lecture group had a final exam average of 90.9 (sd=5.3). Analysis showed that the two groups' scores were statistically equivalent (pdental anatomy lectures.

  2. COMPUTER-ASSISTED SEMEN ANALYSIS OF RAT SPERMATOZOA AFTER AN INTRAPERITONEAL ADMINISTRATION OF INSECTICIDE DIAZINON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. TOMAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the effect of diazinon on the rat spermatozoa motility characteristics using the computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA. Motility, progressive motility, DAP, DCL, DSL, VAP, VCL, VSL, STR, LIN, WOB, ALH, and BCF after the diazinon i.p. administration of 20 mg/kg b.w. were evaluated. 36 hours after the diazinon administration, only slight decrease in VCL, DCL and increase in percentage of progressive motility in the diazinon-treated group. Significant decrease (P<0.01 was only observed in BCF in diazinon-treated group. Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA of rat sperm motility showed that acute diazinon administration slightly affected the rat sperm motility which can be the first step in the decreased fertilization capacity caused by pesticides. Further investigation of reproductive effects of diazinon is needed.

  3. One-Stage Computer-Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty and Tibial Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denjean, S; Chatain, F; Tayot, O

    2017-03-02

    Same-stage tibial osteotomy may deserve consideration in candidates to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who have severe bone deformities, particularly at extra-articular sites. This strategy obviates the need for either a major and technically difficult ligament release procedure, which may compromise ligament balancing, or the use of a semi-constrained prosthesis. This technical note describes a one-stage, computer-assisted technique consisting in TKA followed by corrective tibial osteotomy to obtain an overall mechanical axis close to 180° without extensive ligament balancing. This technique provided satisfactory outcomes in 8 patients followed-up for at least 3 years, with no specific complications or ligament instability and with a hip-knee-ankle angle close to 180°. After planning, intra-operative computer assistance ensures accurate determination of both implant position and the degree of correction achieved by the osteotomy.

  4. English language learning activity using spoken language and intelligent computer-assisted technologies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents work in progress on language technologies applied to secondary school education. The application presented integrates several state-of-the-art technologies related to spoken language and intelligent computer-assisted language learning. We envision to show that the technology has reached a level of maturity that suggests that the time may be right to use it to second language learning. To achieve this objective, an activity was designed to be tested at several Spanish...

  5. Computer-assisted coloring and illuminating based on a region-tree structure

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Renata; Queiroz, Fabiane; Rocha, Allan; Ren, Tsang Ing; Mello, Vinicius; Peixoto, Adelailson

    2012-01-01

    Colorization and illumination are key processes for creating animated cartoons. Computer assisted methods have been incorporated in animation/illustration systems to reduce the artists' workload. This paper presents a new method for illumination and colorization of 2D drawings based on a region- tree representation. Starting from a hand-drawn cartoon, the proposed method extracts geometric and topological information and builds a tree structure, ensuring independence among parts of the drawin...

  6. Learning Performance Enhancement Using Computer-Assisted Language Learning by Collaborative Learning Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-huei Wang; Hung-Chang Liao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to test whether the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and innovative collaborative learning could be more effective than the use of traditional collaborative learning in improving students’ English proficiencies. A true experimental design was used in the study. Four randomly-assigned groups participated in the study: a traditional collaborative learning group (TCLG, 34 students), an innovative collaborative learning group (ICLG, 31 students), a CALL tradi...

  7. Effect of Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in the TOEFL Performance of Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Marlene R. Castillo

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the relationship between the use of a computer-assisted language learning (CALL) software and the TOEFL performance of nursing students. This descriptive study used a pre-test and post-test and a survey questionnaire to gather data. Interviews and observations were also conducted to gain further insights in the use of the software. Results indicate that for the three areas of the TOEFL model practice test, there is a statistically significant increase in the gain ...

  8. The Design and Application of Computer Assisted Language Learning System in Business English Writing course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xi Wen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning system is an effective method in business English writing teaching, particularly for students which are non-speaking countries. The CALLS is suited to self-learning because of the Rich scenario module design. Application results are examined by using the methods of group experiments, questionnaires, examinations and others. The CALLS is especially suited to creating a better studying atmosphere among students in the process of business English writing teaching than other methods.

  9. Putting Our New Computer-Assisted Japanese and English Language Teaching Methods into Practice

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has widely been utilized in language education and frequently been written about in many professional journals. But yet, Japanese educators have written about it in their field of expertise whereas English educators have done the same in theirs ; hence, the collaboration between them has rarely been done on the topic. Here, in this article, Yoshida and Masuyama, teaching English and Japanese languages respectively, will explain how they have been uti...

  10. Clinicians’ Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Medication Summarization of Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimin, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medicat...

  11. MITK-OpenIGTLink for combining open-source toolkits in real-time computer-assisted interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Martin; Kirchner, Thomas; Gröhl, Janek; Cheray, Dominique; Nolden, Marco; Seitel, Alexander; Hoppe, Harald; Maier-Hein, Lena; Franz, Alfred M

    2017-03-01

    Due to rapid developments in the research areas of medical imaging, medical image processing and robotics, computer-assisted interventions (CAI) are becoming an integral part of modern patient care. From a software engineering point of view, these systems are highly complex and research can benefit greatly from reusing software components. This is supported by a number of open-source toolkits for medical imaging and CAI such as the medical imaging interaction toolkit (MITK), the public software library for ultrasound imaging research (PLUS) and 3D Slicer. An independent inter-toolkit communication such as the open image-guided therapy link (OpenIGTLink) can be used to combine the advantages of these toolkits and enable an easier realization of a clinical CAI workflow. MITK-OpenIGTLink is presented as a network interface within MITK that allows easy to use, asynchronous two-way messaging between MITK and clinical devices or other toolkits. Performance and interoperability tests with MITK-OpenIGTLink were carried out considering the whole CAI workflow from data acquisition over processing to visualization. We present how MITK-OpenIGTLink can be applied in different usage scenarios. In performance tests, tracking data were transmitted with a frame rate of up to 1000 Hz and a latency of 2.81 ms. Transmission of images with typical ultrasound (US) and greyscale high-definition (HD) resolutions of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] is possible at up to 512 and 128 Hz, respectively. With the integration of OpenIGTLink into MITK, this protocol is now supported by all established open-source toolkits in the field. This eases interoperability between MITK and toolkits such as PLUS or 3D Slicer and facilitates cross-toolkit research collaborations. MITK and its submodule MITK-OpenIGTLink are provided open source under a BSD-style licence ( http://mitk.org ).

  12. COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING: PERCEPTION AND ACCEPTABILITY OF UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS IN PHARMACOLOGY EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Babu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to Medical Council of India theory and practical curriculum is very essential for all medical subjects in the under-graduate medical course in India. Animal based experimental pharmacology is still being taught in many institutions in the country, though such a practice has been abandoned at many centers. However, the use of animals in research and experimentation has been debated, defended and protested by both individuals and organizations at various levels. In recent years undergraduate training in pharmacology has been revolutionized with adoptions of new methods of teaching that focus on supportive learning through novel teaching approaches like CAL (Computer Assisted Learning. OBJECTIVE To assess the student’s perception and acceptability of Computer Assisted Learning (CAL as a tool in demonstrating the drug effects in animals and to analyze feedback about advantages and disadvantages of CAL software. METHODS CAL software was used to demonstrate action of drugs in animals. Feedback was taken from students regarding their perception, acceptability, advantages and disadvantages of this tool. RESULTS More than 50% of the students opined that CAL is an effective method of teaching practical aspects of pharmacology; 88.88% of students expressed that lack of interaction with living tissues and animals is the main disadvantage. CONCLUSION Computer Assisted Learning (CAL is an excellent beneficial tool. It enhances the learning experience of the students and it is one of the alternative educational tools to demonstrate the drug effects in animals.

  13. Effects of a test taking strategy on postsecondary computer assisted chemistry assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Sharon Ann

    Metacognitive test taking strategies have proven advantageous in improving content-based test scores in a wide variety of disciplines and age/grade levels using traditional paper-and-pencil tests. However, despite the increase in computer assisted assessment (CAA), little research has examined whether these test taking strategies are effective for computer assisted tests. Research was conducted to determine if learning a proven test taking strategy would improve the online quiz scores of six university students in an introductory chemistry course intended for science, technology, engineering and math majors. Participants completed six to ten chemistry quizzes prior to intervention---learning the test taking strategy---and four to eight chemistry quizzes after intervention. Results indicated that, while students learned the strategy, it had little effect on their online chemistry quiz scores. Additionally, at the end of the semester, participants completed a satisfaction survey indicating general satisfaction with having learned the test taking strategy and generalization to other courses and types of tests. Furthermore, results suggest that adaptations to the on-line delivery method of the quizzes and to the test taking strategies may improve the robustness of the effect. Due to the increased use of computer assisted assessment, additional research is warranted to determine appropriate test taking strategies for online tests.

  14. Mammographic compression--a need for mechanical standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, W.; Groot, J.E. de; Highnam, R.; Chan, A.; Bohm-Velez, M.; Broeders, M.J.; Heeten, GJ. den; Grimbergen, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lack of consistent guidelines regarding mammographic compression has led to wide variation in its technical execution. Breast compression is accomplished by means of a compression paddle, resulting in a certain contact area between the paddle and the breast. This procedure is associate

  15. Mammographic detection and staging of invasive lobular carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Boetes, C.; Die, L. van; Bult, P.; Blickman, J.G.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate mammography in detecting and staging of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) in order to assess the performance and impact of observer variability. Forty-two cases of ILC were retrospectively evaluated twice by two breast radiologists. Mammographic performance as wel

  16. Mammographic and sonographic findings of periductal mastitis : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Sun Yang [Pochon CHA Univ. College of Medicine, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Ki Keun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    Periductal mastitis arises from major ducts. Radiographic reports describing the phases of duct ectasia and secretory calcifications, have been published, but descriptions of the phases of periductal mastitis are rare. We report the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of periductal mastitis in a 30-year-old woman who presented with a breast lump.

  17. Mammographic breast density in infertile and parous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Meggiorini Maria; Rita, Vestri Anna; Grazia, De Stefano Maria; Valentina, Cipolla; Filippo, Bellati; Diana, Maffucci; Paola, Nusiner Maria; Cesare, Aragona; Carlo, De Felice

    2016-02-09

    Mammographic breast density is a useful marker for breast cancer risk, as breast density is considered one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors. The study objective was to evaluate and compare mammographic breast density in infertile and parous women, as infertility may be associated with high breast density and cancer occurrence. This study evaluated mammographic breast density using two different systems, BIRADS and Boyd. A selected patient population of 151 women with primary infertility (case group) was compared to 154 parous women who had at least one previous pregnancy (control group). Both groups were premenopausal women aged ≥ 35. Evaluation of mammographic features showed that 66.9% of case group patients and 53.9% of control group patients were classified BIRADS-3/BIRADS-4; p BIRADS-3/BIRADS-4 was 1.78 (95% CI: 1.10-2.89). Using the Boyd classification system, 53.6% of case group patients and 31.8% of control group patients were classified E/F; p BIRADS classification systems indicate to what extend breast cancer lesions may be missed on mammography due to masking by dense tissue. Therefore, patients with a high BIRADS or Boyd score should undergo further investigation.

  18. How mammographic breast density affects radiologists' visual search patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mousa, Dana S; Brennan, Patrick C; Ryan, Elaine A; Lee, Warwick B; Tan, Jennifer; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    To determine the impact of mammographic breast density on the visual search process of radiologists when reading digital mammograms. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A set of 149 craniocaudal digital mammograms were read by seven radiologists, and observer search patterns were recorded. Total time examining each case, time to first hit the lesion, dwell time, and number of hits per area were calculated. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical evaluation. In both low- and high-mammographic density cases, significant increases were observed in the time to first hit lesions when they were located outside, compared to overlying fibroglandular dense tissue (P = .001). Significantly longer dwell time (P = .003) and greater number of fixations (P = .0003) were observed when the lesions were situated within--rather than outside--the dense fibroglandular tissue. Increased mammographic breast density changes radiologists' visual search patterns. Dense areas of the parenchyma attracted greater visual attention in both high- and low-mammographic density cases, resulting in faster detection of lesions overlying the fibroglandular dense tissue, along with longer dwell times and greater number of fixations, as compared to lesions located outside the dense fibroglandular regions. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Overdiagnosis in mammographic screening for breast cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puliti, Donella; Duffy, Stephen W; Miccinesi, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Overdiagnosis, the detection through screening of a breast cancer that would never have been identified in the lifetime of the woman, is an adverse outcome of screening. We aimed to determine an estimate range for overdiagnosis of breast cancer in European mammographic service screening programmes....

  20. Computer-assisted visual interactive recognition and its prospects of implementation over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jie; Gattani, Abhishek

    2005-01-01

    When completely automated systems don't yield acceptable accuracy, many practical pattern recognition systems involve the human either at the beginning (pre-processing) or towards the end (handling rejects). We believe that it may be more useful to involve the human throughout the recognition process rather than just at the beginning or end. We describe a methodology of interactive visual recognition for human-centered low-throughput applications, Computer Assisted Visual InterActive Recognition (CAVIAR), and discuss the prospects of implementing CAVIAR over the Internet. The novelty of CAVIAR is image-based interaction through a domain-specific parameterized geometrical model, which reduces the semantic gap between humans and computers. The user may interact with the computer anytime that she considers its response unsatisfactory. The interaction improves the accuracy of the classification features by improving the fit of the computer-proposed model. The computer makes subsequent use of the parameters of the improved model to refine not only its own statistical model-fitting process, but also its internal classifier. The CAVIAR methodology was applied to implement a flower recognition system. The principal conclusions from the evaluation of the system include: 1) the average recognition time of the CAVIAR system is significantly shorter than that of the unaided human; 2) its accuracy is significantly higher than that of the unaided machine; 3) it can be initialized with as few as one training sample per class and still achieve high accuracy; and 4) it demonstrates a self-learning ability. We have also implemented a Mobile CAVIAR system, where a pocket PC, as a client, connects to a server through wireless communication. The motivation behind a mobile platform for CAVIAR is to apply the methodology in a human-centered pervasive environment, where the user can seamlessly interact with the system for classifying field-data. Deploying CAVIAR to a networked mobile