WorldWideScience

Sample records for computer run time

  1. How Many Times Should One Run a Computational Simulation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seri, Raffaello; Secchi, Davide

    2017-01-01

    This chapter is an attempt to answer the question “how many runs of a computational simulation should one do,” and it gives an answer by means of statistical analysis. After defining the nature of the problem and which types of simulation are mostly affected by it, the article introduces statisti......This chapter is an attempt to answer the question “how many runs of a computational simulation should one do,” and it gives an answer by means of statistical analysis. After defining the nature of the problem and which types of simulation are mostly affected by it, the article introduces...

  2. A Modular Environment for Geophysical Inversion and Run-time Autotuning using Heterogeneous Computing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Joseph M.

    Heterogeneous computing systems have recently come to the forefront of the High-Performance Computing (HPC) community's interest. HPC computer systems that incorporate special purpose accelerators, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are said to be heterogeneous. Large scale heterogeneous computing systems have consistently ranked highly on the Top500 list since the beginning of the heterogeneous computing trend. By using heterogeneous computing systems that consist of both general purpose processors and special- purpose accelerators, the speed and problem size of many simulations could be dramatically increased. Ultimately this results in enhanced simulation capabilities that allows, in some cases for the first time, the execution of parameter space and uncertainty analyses, model optimizations, and other inverse modeling techniques that are critical for scientific discovery and engineering analysis. However, simplifying the usage and optimization of codes for heterogeneous computing systems remains a challenge. This is particularly true for scientists and engineers for whom understanding HPC architectures and undertaking performance analysis may not be primary research objectives. To enable scientists and engineers to remain focused on their primary research objectives, a modular environment for geophysical inversion and run-time autotuning on heterogeneous computing systems is presented. This environment is composed of three major components: 1) CUSH---a framework for reducing the complexity of programming heterogeneous computer systems, 2) geophysical inversion routines which can be used to characterize physical systems, and 3) run-time autotuning routines designed to determine configurations of heterogeneous computing systems in an attempt to maximize the performance of scientific and engineering codes. Using three case studies, a lattice-Boltzmann method, a non-negative least squares inversion, and a finite-difference fluid flow method, it is shown that

  3. Design and development of a run-time monitor for multi-core architectures in cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mikyung; Kang, Dong-In; Crago, Stephen P; Park, Gyung-Leen; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new information technology trend that moves computing and data away from desktops and portable PCs into large data centers. The basic principle of cloud computing is to deliver applications as services over the Internet as well as infrastructure. A cloud is a type of parallel and distributed system consisting of a collection of inter-connected and virtualized computers that are dynamically provisioned and presented as one or more unified computing resources. The large-scale distributed applications on a cloud require adaptive service-based software, which has the capability of monitoring system status changes, analyzing the monitored information, and adapting its service configuration while considering tradeoffs among multiple QoS features simultaneously. In this paper, we design and develop a Run-Time Monitor (RTM) which is a system software to monitor the application behavior at run-time, analyze the collected information, and optimize cloud computing resources for multi-core architectures. RTM monitors application software through library instrumentation as well as underlying hardware through a performance counter optimizing its computing configuration based on the analyzed data.

  4. Design and Development of a Run-Time Monitor for Multi-Core Architectures in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghoon Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new information technology trend that moves computing and data away from desktops and portable PCs into large data centers. The basic principle of cloud computing is to deliver applications as services over the Internet as well as infrastructure. A cloud is a type of parallel and distributed system consisting of a collection of inter-connected and virtualized computers that are dynamically provisioned and presented as one or more unified computing resources. The large-scale distributed applications on a cloud require adaptive service-based software, which has the capability of monitoring system status changes, analyzing the monitored information, and adapting its service configuration while considering tradeoffs among multiple QoS features simultaneously. In this paper, we design and develop a Run-Time Monitor (RTM which is a system software to monitor the application behavior at run-time, analyze the collected information, and optimize cloud computing resources for multi-core architectures. RTM monitors application software through library instrumentation as well as underlying hardware through a performance counter optimizing its computing configuration based on the analyzed data.

  5. Contributing to the design of run-time systems dedicated to high performance computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perache, M.

    2006-10-01

    In the field of intensive scientific computing, the quest for performance has to face the increasing complexity of parallel architectures. Nowadays, these machines exhibit a deep memory hierarchy which complicates the design of efficient parallel applications. This thesis proposes a programming environment allowing to design efficient parallel programs on top of clusters of multi-processors. It features a programming model centered around collective communications and synchronizations, and provides load balancing facilities. The programming interface, named MPC, provides high level paradigms which are optimized according to the underlying architecture. The environment is fully functional and used within the CEA/DAM (TERANOVA) computing center. The evaluations presented in this document confirm the relevance of our approach. (author)

  6. Towards the development of run times leveraging virtualization for high performance computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakhate, F.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using virtualization to improve the efficiency of data centers. This success is rooted in virtualization's excellent fault tolerance and isolation properties, in the overall flexibility it brings, and in its ability to exploit multi-core architectures efficiently. These characteristics also make virtualization an ideal candidate to tackle issues found in new compute cluster architectures. However, in spite of recent improvements in virtualization technology, overheads in the execution of parallel applications remain, which prevent its use in the field of high performance computing. In this thesis, we propose a virtual device dedicated to message passing between virtual machines, so as to improve the performance of parallel applications executed in a cluster of virtual machines. We also introduce a set of techniques facilitating the deployment of virtualized parallel applications. These functionalities have been implemented as part of a runtime system which allows to benefit from virtualization's properties in a way that is as transparent as possible to the user while minimizing performance overheads. (author)

  7. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-09-20

    EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

  8. Using Simulated Partial Dynamic Run-Time Reconfiguration to Share Embedded FPGA Compute and Power Resources across a Swarm of Unpiloted Airborne Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kearney David

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how the limited electrical power and FPGA compute resources available in a swarm of small UAVs can be shared by moving FPGA tasks from one UAV to another. A software and hardware infrastructure that supports the mobility of embedded FPGA applications on a single FPGA chip and across a group of networked FPGA chips is an integral part of the work described here. It is shown how to allocate a single FPGA's resources at run time and to share a single device through the use of application checkpointing, a memory controller, and an on-chip run-time reconfigurable network. A prototype distributed operating system is described for managing mobile applications across the swarm based on the contents of a fuzzy rule base. It can move applications between UAVs in order to equalize power use or to enable the continuous replenishment of fully fueled planes into the swarm.

  9. CMS Software and Computing Ready for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider, software and computing was a strategic strength of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The timely processing of data and simulation samples and the excellent performance of the reconstruction algorithms played an important role in the preparation of the full suite of searches used for the observation of the Higgs boson in 2012. In Run 2, the LHC will run at higher intensities and CMS will record data at a higher trigger rate. These new running conditions will provide new challenges for the software and computing systems. Over the two years of Long Shutdown 1, CMS has built upon the successes of Run 1 to improve the software and computing to meet these challenges. In this presentation we will describe the new features in software and computing that will once again put CMS in a position of physics leadership.

  10. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, Simone; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  11. Design of an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) from standard components running in real-time under Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, C; Schlögl, A; Walterspacher, D; Pfurtscheller, G

    1999-01-01

    An EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a direct connection between the human brain and the computer. Such a communication system is needed by patients with severe motor impairments (e.g. late stage of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) and has to operate in real-time. This paper describes the selection of the appropriate components to construct such a BCI and focuses also on the selection of a suitable programming language and operating system. The multichannel system runs under Windows 95, equipped with a real-time Kernel expansion to obtain reasonable real-time operations on a standard PC. Matlab controls the data acquisition and the presentation of the experimental paradigm, while Simulink is used to calculate the recursive least square (RLS) algorithm that describes the current state of the EEG in real-time. First results of the new low-cost BCI show that the accuracy of differentiating imagination of left and right hand movement is around 95%.

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run-2. An increase in both the data rate and the computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (Prodsys-2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward a flexible computing model. A flexible computing utilization exploring the use of opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model; the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover, a new data management strategy, based on a defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defined to better manage the lifecycle of the data. In this note, an overview of an operational experience of the new system and its evolution is presented. (paper)

  13. CMS Computing Operations During Run1

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    During the first run, CMS collected and processed more than 10B data events and simulated more than 15B events. Up to 100k processor cores were used simultaneously and 100PB of storage was managed. Each month petabytes of data were moved and hundreds of users accessed data samples. In this presentation we will discuss the operational experience from the first run. We will present the workflows and data flows that were executed, we will discuss the tools and services developed, and the operations and shift models used to sustain the system. Many techniques were followed from the original computing planning, but some were reactions to difficulties and opportunities. In this presentation we will also address the lessons learned from an operational perspective, and how this is shaping our thoughts for 2015.

  14. CMS computing operations during run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Adelman, J; Artieda, J; Bagliese, G; Ballestero, D; Bansal, S; Bauerdick, L; Behrenhof, W; Belforte, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blyweert, S; Bonacorsi, D; Brew, C; Contreras, L; Cristofori, A; Cury, S; da Silva Gomes, D; Dolores Saiz Santos, M; Dost, J; Dykstra, D; Fajardo Hernandez, E; Fanzango, F; Fisk, I; Flix, J; Georges, A; Gi ffels, M; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Gowdy, S; Gutsche, O; Holzman, B; Janssen, X; Kaselis, R; Kcira, D; Kim, B; Klein, D; Klute, M; Kress, T; Kreuzer, P; Lahi , A; Larson, K; Letts, J; Levin, A; Linacre, J; Linares, J; Liu, S; Luyckx, S; Maes, M; Magini, N; Malta, A; Marra Da Silva, J; Mccartin, J; McCrea, A; Mohapatra, A; Molina, J; Mortensen, T; Padhi, S; Paus, C; Piperov, S; Ralph; Sartirana, A; Sciaba, A; S ligoi, I; Spinoso, V; Tadel, M; Traldi, S; Wissing, C; Wuerthwein, F; Yang, M; Zielinski, M; Zvada, M

    2014-01-01

    During the first run, CMS collected and processed more than 10B data events and simulated more than 15B events. Up to 100k processor cores were used simultaneously and 100PB of storage was managed. Each month petabytes of data were moved and hundreds of users accessed data samples. In this document we discuss the operational experience from this first run. We present the workflows and data flows that were executed, and we discuss the tools and services developed, and the operations and shift models used to sustain the system. Many techniques were followed from the original computing planning, but some were reactions to difficulties and opportunities. We also address the lessons learned from an operational perspective, and how this is shaping our thoughts for 2015.

  15. ATLAS Distributed Computing Monitoring tools during the LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Di Girolamo, A; Jezequel, S; Ueda, I; Wenaus, T

    2013-01-01

    This contribution summarizes evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) Monitoring project during the LHC Run I. The ADC Monitoring targets at the three groups of customers: ADC Operations team to early identify malfunctions and escalate issues to an activity or a service expert, ATLAS national contacts and sites for the real-time monitoring and long-term measurement of the performance of the provided computing resources, and the ATLAS Management for long-term trends and accounting information about the ATLAS Distributed Computing resources.\\\\ During the LHC Run I a significant development effort has been invested in standardization of the monitoring and accounting applications in order to provide extensive monitoring and accounting suite. ADC Monitoring applications separate the data layer and the visualization layer. The data layer exposes data in a predefined format. The visualization layer is designed bearing in mind visual identity of the provided graphical elements, and re-usability of the visua...

  16. ATLAS Distributed Computing Monitoring tools during the LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Di Girolamo, A; Jezequel, S; Ueda, I; Wenaus, T

    2014-01-01

    This contribution summarizes evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) Monitoring project during the LHC Run I. The ADC Monitoring targets at the three groups of customers: ADC Operations team to early identify malfunctions and escalate issues to an activity or a service expert, ATLAS national contacts and sites for the real-time monitoring and long-term measurement of the performance of the provided computing resources, and the ATLAS Management for long-term trends and accounting information about the ATLAS Distributed Computing resources.\\\\ During the LHC Run I a significant development effort has been invested in standardization of the monitoring and accounting applications in order to provide extensive monitoring and accounting suite. ADC Monitoring applications separate the data layer and the visualization layer. The data layer exposes data in a predefined format. The visualization layer is designed bearing in mind visual identity of the provided graphical elements, and re-usability of the visua...

  17. Preventing Run-Time Bugs at Compile-Time Using Advanced C++

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neswold, Richard [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    When writing software, we develop algorithms that tell the computer what to do at run-time. Our solutions are easier to understand and debug when they are properly modeled using class hierarchies, enumerations, and a well-factored API. Unfortunately, even with these design tools, we end up having to debug our programs at run-time. Worse still, debugging an embedded system changes its dynamics, making it tough to find and fix concurrency issues. This paper describes techniques using C++ to detect run-time bugs *at compile time*. A concurrency library, developed at Fermilab, is used for examples in illustrating these techniques.

  18. LHCb's Time-Real Alignment in RunII

    CERN Multimedia

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configur...

  19. 12 CFR 1102.27 - Computing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 1102.27 Section 1102.27 Banks... for Proceedings § 1102.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed... time begins to run is not included. The last day so computed is included, unless it is a Saturday...

  20. CMS software and computing for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00067576

    2016-11-09

    The CMS offline software and computing system has successfully met the challenge of LHC Run 2. In this presentation, we will discuss how the entire system was improved in anticipation of increased trigger output rate, increased rate of pileup interactions and the evolution of computing technology. The primary goals behind these changes was to increase the flexibility of computing facilities where ever possible, as to increase our operational efficiency, and to decrease the computing resources needed to accomplish the primary offline computing workflows. These changes have resulted in a new approach to distributed computing in CMS for Run 2 and for the future as the LHC luminosity should continue to increase. We will discuss changes and plans to our data federation, which was one of the key changes towards a more flexible computing model for Run 2. Our software framework and algorithms also underwent significant changes. We will summarize the our experience with a new multi-threaded framework as deployed on ou...

  1. Injecting Artificial Memory Errors Into a Running Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Granat, Robert A.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2008-01-01

    Single-event upsets (SEUs) or bitflips are computer memory errors caused by radiation. BITFLIPS (Basic Instrumentation Tool for Fault Localized Injection of Probabilistic SEUs) is a computer program that deliberately injects SEUs into another computer program, while the latter is running, for the purpose of evaluating the fault tolerance of that program. BITFLIPS was written as a plug-in extension of the open-source Valgrind debugging and profiling software. BITFLIPS can inject SEUs into any program that can be run on the Linux operating system, without needing to modify the program s source code. Further, if access to the original program source code is available, BITFLIPS offers fine-grained control over exactly when and which areas of memory (as specified via program variables) will be subjected to SEUs. The rate of injection of SEUs is controlled by specifying either a fault probability or a fault rate based on memory size and radiation exposure time, in units of SEUs per byte per second. BITFLIPS can also log each SEU that it injects and, if program source code is available, report the magnitude of effect of the SEU on a floating-point value or other program variable.

  2. ATLAS Distributed Computing Monitoring tools during the LHC Run I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schovancová, J.; Campana, S.; Di Girolamo, A.; Jézéquel, S.; Ueda, I.; Wenaus, T.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This contribution summarizes evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) Monitoring project during the LHC Run I. The ADC Monitoring targets at the three groups of customers: ADC Operations team to early identify malfunctions and escalate issues to an activity or a service expert, ATLAS national contacts and sites for the real-time monitoring and long-term measurement of the performance of the provided computing resources, and the ATLAS Management for long-term trends and accounting information about the ATLAS Distributed Computing resources. During the LHC Run I a significant development effort has been invested in standardization of the monitoring and accounting applications in order to provide extensive monitoring and accounting suite. ADC Monitoring applications separate the data layer and the visualization layer. The data layer exposes data in a predefined format. The visualization layer is designed bearing in mind visual identity of the provided graphical elements, and re-usability of the visualization bits across the different tools. A rich family of various filtering and searching options enhancing available user interfaces comes naturally with the data and visualization layer separation. With a variety of reliable monitoring data accessible through standardized interfaces, the possibility of automating actions under well defined conditions correlating multiple data sources has become feasible. In this contribution we discuss also about the automated exclusion of degraded resources and their automated recovery in various activities.

  3. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 622.21 Section 622.21 Banks and... Formal Hearings § 622.21 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or... run is not to be included. The last day so computed shall be included, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday...

  4. LHCb's Real-Time Alignment in Run2

    CERN Multimedia

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performances. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to reach equivalent performances in the online and offline reconstruction. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints as well as hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger.

  5. Run 2 analysis computing for CDF and D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, S.

    1995-11-01

    Two large experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider will use upgraded of running. The associated analysis software is also expected to change, both to account for higher data rates and to embrace new computing paradigms. A discussion is given to the problems facing current and future High Energy Physics (HEP) analysis computing, and several issues explored in detail

  6. On run-time exploitation of concurrency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzenspies, P.K.F.

    2010-01-01

    The `free' speed-up stemming from ever increasing processor speed is over. Performance increase in computer systems can now only be achieved through parallelism. One of the biggest challenges in computer science is how to map applications onto parallel computers. Concurrency, seen as the set of

  7. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunchspacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  8. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-01-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  9. Implementing Run-Time Evaluation of Distributed Timing Constraints in a Real-Time Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C. H.; Drejer, N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing run-time evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time environments......In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing run-time evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time environments...

  10. Running Batch Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    and run your application. Users typically create or edit job scripts using a text editor such as vi Using Resource Feature to Request Different Node Types Peregrine has several types of compute nodes , which differ in the amount of memory and number of processor cores. The majority of the nodes have 24

  11. LHCb computing in Run II and its evolution towards Run III

    CERN Document Server

    Falabella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    his contribution reports on the experience of the LHCb computing team during LHC Run 2 and its preparation for Run 3. Furthermore a brief introduction on LHCbDIRAC, i.e. the tool to interface to the experiment distributed computing resources for its data processing and data management operations, is given. Run 2, which started in 2015, has already seen several changes in the data processing workflows of the experiment. Most notably the ability to align and calibrate the detector between two different stages of the data processing in the high level trigger farm, eliminating the need for a second pass processing of the data offline. In addition a fraction of the data is immediately reconstructed to its final physics format in the high level trigger and only this format is exported from the experiment site to the physics analysis. This concept have successfully been tested and will continue to be used for the rest of Run 2. Furthermore the distributed data processing has been improved with new concepts and techn...

  12. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: optimality of walk-run-rest mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leroy L; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2013-04-06

    On a treadmill, humans switch from walking to running beyond a characteristic transition speed. Here, we study human choice between walking and running in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground in a given allowed time duration. During this task, the subjects carried, and could look at, a stopwatch that counted down to zero. As expected, if the total time available were large, humans walk the whole distance. If the time available were small, humans mostly run. For an intermediate total time, humans often use a mixture of walking at a slow speed and running at a higher speed. With analytical and computational optimization, we show that using a walk-run mixture at intermediate speeds and a walk-rest mixture at the lowest average speeds is predicted by metabolic energy minimization, even with costs for transients-a consequence of non-convex energy curves. Thus, sometimes, steady locomotion may not be energy optimal, and not preferred, even in the absence of fatigue. Assuming similar non-convex energy curves, we conjecture that similar walk-run mixtures may be energetically beneficial to children following a parent and animals on long leashes. Humans and other animals might also benefit energetically from alternating between moving forward and standing still on a slow and sufficiently long treadmill.

  13. Combining Compile-Time and Run-Time Parallelization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungdo Moon

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that significant improvements to automatic parallelization technology require that existing systems be extended in two ways: (1 they must combine high‐quality compile‐time analysis with low‐cost run‐time testing; and (2 they must take control flow into account during analysis. We support this claim with the results of an experiment that measures the safety of parallelization at run time for loops left unparallelized by the Stanford SUIF compiler’s automatic parallelization system. We present results of measurements on programs from two benchmark suites – SPECFP95 and NAS sample benchmarks – which identify inherently parallel loops in these programs that are missed by the compiler. We characterize remaining parallelization opportunities, and find that most of the loops require run‐time testing, analysis of control flow, or some combination of the two. We present a new compile‐time analysis technique that can be used to parallelize most of these remaining loops. This technique is designed to not only improve the results of compile‐time parallelization, but also to produce low‐cost, directed run‐time tests that allow the system to defer binding of parallelization until run‐time when safety cannot be proven statically. We call this approach predicated array data‐flow analysis. We augment array data‐flow analysis, which the compiler uses to identify independent and privatizable arrays, by associating predicates with array data‐flow values. Predicated array data‐flow analysis allows the compiler to derive “optimistic” data‐flow values guarded by predicates; these predicates can be used to derive a run‐time test guaranteeing the safety of parallelization.

  14. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time. (a...

  15. Aspects for Run-time Component Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truyen, Eddy; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Joosen, Wouter

    2000-01-01

    Component framework technology has become the cornerstone of building a family of systems and applications. A component framework defines a generic architecture into which specialized components can be plugged. As such, the component framework leverages the glue that connects the different inserted...... to dynamically integrate into the architecture of middleware systems new services that support non-functional aspects such as security, transactions, real-time....

  16. Time Optimal Run-time Evaluation of Distributed Timing Constraints in Process Control Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, N.; Kristensen, C.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers run-time evaluation of an important class of constraints; Timing constraints. These appear extensively in process control systems. Timing constraints are considered in distributed systems, i.e. systems consisting of multiple autonomous nodes......

  17. Optimal Infinite Runs in One-Clock Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Ejsing-Duun, Daniel; Fontani, Lisa

    We address the problem of finding an infinite run with the optimal cost-time ratio in a one-clock priced timed automaton and pro- vide an algorithmic solution. Through refinements of the quotient graph obtained by strong time-abstracting bisimulation partitioning, we con- struct a graph with time...

  18. Accuracy versus run time in an adiabatic quantum search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezakhani, A. T.; Pimachev, A. K.; Lidar, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are characterized by their run time and accuracy. The relation between the two is essential for quantifying adiabatic algorithmic performance yet is often poorly understood. We study the dynamics of a continuous time, adiabatic quantum search algorithm and find rigorous results relating the accuracy and the run time. Proceeding with estimates, we show that under fairly general circumstances the adiabatic algorithmic error exhibits a behavior with two discernible regimes: The error decreases exponentially for short times and then decreases polynomially for longer times. We show that the well-known quadratic speedup over classical search is associated only with the exponential error regime. We illustrate the results through examples of evolution paths derived by minimization of the adiabatic error. We also discuss specific strategies for controlling the adiabatic error and run time.

  19. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.

    2004-01-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid

  20. Combining monitoring with run-time assertion checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, Stijn de

    2013-01-01

    We develop a new technique for Run-time Checking for two object-oriented languages: Java and the Abstract Behavioral Specification language ABS. In object-oriented languages, objects communicate by sending each other messages. Assuming encapsulation, the behavior of objects is completely

  1. Run-Time and Compiler Support for Programming in Adaptive Parallel Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Edjlali

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available For better utilization of computing resources, it is important to consider parallel programming environments in which the number of available processors varies at run-time. In this article, we discuss run-time support for data-parallel programming in such an adaptive environment. Executing programs in an adaptive environment requires redistributing data when the number of processors changes, and also requires determining new loop bounds and communication patterns for the new set of processors. We have developed a run-time library to provide this support. We discuss how the run-time library can be used by compilers of high-performance Fortran (HPF-like languages to generate code for an adaptive environment. We present performance results for a Navier-Stokes solver and a multigrid template run on a network of workstations and an IBM SP-2. Our experiments show that if the number of processors is not varied frequently, the cost of data redistribution is not significant compared to the time required for the actual computation. Overall, our work establishes the feasibility of compiling HPF for a network of nondedicated workstations, which are likely to be an important resource for parallel programming in the future.

  2. Thermally-aware composite run-time CPU power models

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Matthew J.; Diestelhorst, Stephan; Hansson, Andreas; Balsamo, Domenico; Merrett, Geoff V.; Al-Hashimi, Bashir M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and stable CPU power modelling is fundamental in modern system-on-chips (SoCs) for two main reasons: 1) they enable significant online energy savings by providing a run-time manager with reliable power consumption data for controlling CPU energy-saving techniques; 2) they can be used as accurate and trusted reference models for system design and exploration. We begin by showing the limitations in typical performance monitoring counter (PMC) based power modelling approaches and illust...

  3. General purpose computers in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    I see three main trends in the use of general purpose computers in real time. The first is more processing power. The second is the use of higher speed interconnects between computers (allowing more data to be delivered to the processors). The third is the use of larger programs running in the computers. Although there is still work that needs to be done, I believe that all indications are that the online need for general purpose computers should be available for the SCC and LHC machines. 2 figs

  4. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building

  5. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks’ execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs.

  6. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603... Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are computed as follows: (1) The day of the act or event from which the period begins to run is not included. (2...

  7. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3... Provisions § 221.3 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are computed as follows: (1) The day of the act or event from which the period begins to run is not included. (2) The last day of the...

  8. Novel Real-time Calibration and Alignment Procedure for LHCb Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve optimal detector performance the LHCb experiment has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II of the LHC. For the alignment tasks, data is collected and processed at the beginning of each fill while the calibrations are performed for each run. This real time alignment and calibration allows the same constants being used in both the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. Additionally the newly computed alignment and calibration constants can be instantly used in the trigger, making it more efficient. The online alignment and calibration of the RICH detectors also enable the use of hadronic particle identification in the trigger. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the LHCb trigger. An overview of all alignment and calibration tasks is presented and their performance is shown.

  9. SASD and the CERN/SPS run-time coordinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morpurgo, G.

    1990-01-01

    Structured Analysis and Structured Design (SASD) provides us with a handy way of specifying the flow of data between the different modules (functional units) of a system. But the formalism loses its immediacy when the control flow has to be taken into account as well. Moreover, due to the lack of appropriate software infrastructure, very often the actual implementation of the system does not reflect the module decoupling and independence so much emphasized at the design stage. In this paper the run-time coordinator, a complete software infrastructure to support a real decoupling of the functional units, is described. Special attention is given to the complementarity of our approach and the SASD methodology. (orig.)

  10. Success Run Waiting Times and Fuss-Catalan Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Dilworth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present power series expressions for all the roots of the auxiliary equation of the recurrence relation for the distribution of the waiting time for the first run of k consecutive successes in a sequence of independent Bernoulli trials, that is, the geometric distribution of order k. We show that the series coefficients are Fuss-Catalan numbers and write the roots in terms of the generating function of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. Our main result is a new exact expression for the distribution, which is more concise than previously published formulas. Our work extends the analysis by Feller, who gave asymptotic results. We obtain quantitative improvements of the error estimates obtained by Feller.

  11. Icelandic Public Pensions: Why time is running out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ólafur Ísleifsson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the Icelandic public sector pension system enjoying a third party guarantee. Defined benefit funds fundamentally differ from defined contribution pension funds without a third party guarantee as is the case with the Icelandic general labour market pension funds. We probe the special nature of the public sector pension funds and make a comparison to the defined contribution pension funds of the general labour market. We explore the financial and economic effects of the third party guarantee of the funds, their investment performance and other relevant factors. We seek an answer to the question why time is running out for the country’s largest pension fund that currently faces the prospect of becoming empty by the year 2022.

  12. Running Speed Can Be Predicted from Foot Contact Time during Outdoor over Ground Running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; van Oeveren, B.; Francke, A.; Zijlstra, P.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validation studies of commercially available foot pods that provide estimates of running speed is limited and these studies have been conducted under laboratory conditions. Moreover, internal data handling and algorithms used to derive speed from these pods are proprietary and thereby

  13. The Model of the Software Running on a Computer Equipment Hardware Included in the Grid network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Mityushkina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to building a cloud computing environment using Grid networks is proposed in this paper. The authors describe the functional capabilities, algorithm, model of software running on a computer equipment hardware included in the Grid network, that will allow to implement cloud computing environment using Grid technologies.

  14. Running Interactive Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    shell prompt, which allows users to execute commands and scripts as they would on the login nodes. Login performed on the compute nodes rather than on login nodes. This page provides instructions and examples of , start GUIs etc. and the commands will execute on that node instead of on the login node. The -V option

  15. Compilation time analysis to minimize run-time overhead in preemptive scheduling on multiprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Piet; Lauwereins, Rudy; Peperstraete, J.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a scheduling method for hard real-time Digital Signal Processing (DSP) applications, implemented on a multi-processor. Due to the very high operating frequencies of DSP applications (typically hundreds of kHz) runtime overhead should be kept as small as possible. Because static scheduling introduces very little run-time overhead it is used as much as possible. Dynamic pre-emption of tasks is allowed if and only if it leads to better performance in spite of the extra run-time overhead. We essentially combine static scheduling with dynamic pre-emption using static priorities. Since we are dealing with hard real-time applications we must be able to guarantee at compile-time that all timing requirements will be satisfied at run-time. We will show that our method performs at least as good as any static scheduling method. It also reduces the total amount of dynamic pre-emptions compared with run time methods like deadline monotonic scheduling.

  16. Run-time middleware to support real-time system scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, K.; Koedam, M.; Sinha, S.; Nelson, A.; Geilen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Systems on Chip (SOC) are powerful multiprocessor systems capable of running multiple independent applications, often with both real-time and non-real-time requirements. Scenarios exist at two levels: first, combinations of independent applications, and second, different states of a single

  17. Computing Refined Buneman Trees in Cubic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, G.S.; Fagerberg, R.; Östlin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary tree for a set of n species based on pairwise distances between the species is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. Neighbor joining is a popular distance based tree reconstruction method. It always proposes fully resolved binary trees despite missing evidence...... in the underlying distance data. Distance based methods based on the theory of Buneman trees and refined Buneman trees avoid this problem by only proposing evolutionary trees whose edges satisfy a number of constraints. These trees might not be fully resolved but there is strong combinatorial evidence for each...... proposed edge. The currently best algorithm for computing the refined Buneman tree from a given distance measure has a running time of O(n 5) and a space consumption of O(n 4). In this paper, we present an algorithm with running time O(n 3) and space consumption O(n 2). The improved complexity of our...

  18. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 45.3... IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a) General... run is not included. (2) The last day of the period is included. (i) If that day is a Saturday, Sunday...

  19. RAPPORT: running scientific high-performance computing applications on the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy; Filippis, Ioannis; Woodbridge, Mark; Bauer, Daniela; Hong, Neil Chue; Jackson, Mike; Butcher, Sarah; Colling, David; Darlington, John; Fuchs, Brian; Harvey, Matt

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing infrastructure is now widely used in many domains, but one area where there has been more limited adoption is research computing, in particular for running scientific high-performance computing (HPC) software. The Robust Application Porting for HPC in the Cloud (RAPPORT) project took advantage of existing links between computing researchers and application scientists in the fields of bioinformatics, high-energy physics (HEP) and digital humanities, to investigate running a set of scientific HPC applications from these domains on cloud infrastructure. In this paper, we focus on the bioinformatics and HEP domains, describing the applications and target cloud platforms. We conclude that, while there are many factors that need consideration, there is no fundamental impediment to the use of cloud infrastructure for running many types of HPC applications and, in some cases, there is potential for researchers to benefit significantly from the flexibility offered by cloud platforms.

  20. Fast algorithms for computing phylogenetic divergence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Ralph W; Williams, Tiffani L

    2017-12-06

    The inference of species divergence time is a key step in most phylogenetic studies. Methods have been available for the last ten years to perform the inference, but the performance of the methods does not yet scale well to studies with hundreds of taxa and thousands of DNA base pairs. For example a study of 349 primate taxa was estimated to require over 9 months of processing time. In this work, we present a new algorithm, AncestralAge, that significantly improves the performance of the divergence time process. As part of AncestralAge, we demonstrate a new method for the computation of phylogenetic likelihood and our experiments show a 90% improvement in likelihood computation time on the aforementioned dataset of 349 primates taxa with over 60,000 DNA base pairs. Additionally, we show that our new method for the computation of the Bayesian prior on node ages reduces the running time for this computation on the 349 taxa dataset by 99%. Through the use of these new algorithms we open up the ability to perform divergence time inference on large phylogenetic studies.

  1. An enhanced Ada run-time system for real-time embedded processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    An enhanced Ada run-time system has been developed to support real-time embedded processor applications. The primary focus of this development effort has been on the tasking system and the memory management facilities of the run-time system. The tasking system has been extended to support efficient and precise periodic task execution as required for control applications. Event-driven task execution providing a means of task-asynchronous control and communication among Ada tasks is supported in this system. Inter-task control is even provided among tasks distributed on separate physical processors. The memory management system has been enhanced to provide object allocation and protected access support for memory shared between disjoint processors, each of which is executing a distinct Ada program.

  2. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1993-10-01

    In-Tank Precipitation is a process for removing radioactivity from the salt stored in the Waste Management Tank Farm at Savannah River. The process involves precipitation of cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) and adsorption of strontium and actinides on insoluble sodium titanate (ST) particles. The purpose of this report is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs Program. The primary objective of the filter-stripper test runs and quiet time runs program is to ensure that the facility will fulfill its design basis function prior to the introduction of radioactive feed. Risks associated with the program are identified and include hazards, both personnel and environmental, associated with handling the chemical simulants; the presence of flammable materials; the potential for damage to the permanenet ITP and Tank Farm facilities. The risks, potential accident scenarios, and safeguards either in place or planned are discussed at length

  3. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1993-10-01

    In-Tank Precipitation is a process for removing radioactivity from the salt stored in the Waste Management Tank Farm at Savannah River. The process involves precipitation of cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) and adsorption of strontium and actinides on insoluble sodium titanate (ST) particles. The purpose of this report is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs Program. The primary objective of the filter-stripper test runs and quiet time runs program is to ensure that the facility will fulfill its design basis function prior to the introduction of radioactive feed. Risks associated with the program are identified and include hazards, both personnel and environmental, associated with handling the chemical simulants; the presence of flammable materials; the potential for damage to the permanenet ITP and Tank Farm facilities. The risks, potential accident scenarios, and safeguards either in place or planned are discussed at length.

  4. The Weekly Fab Five: Things You Should Do Every Week To Keep Your Computer Running in Tip-Top Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispen, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Describes five steps that school librarians should follow every week to keep their computers running at top efficiency. Explains how to update virus definitions; run Windows update; run ScanDisk to repair errors on the hard drive; run a disk defragmenter; and backup all data. (LRW)

  5. Contributing to the design of run-time systems dedicated to high performance computing; Contribution a l'elaboration d'environnements de programmation dedies au calcul scientifique hautes performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perache, M

    2006-10-15

    In the field of intensive scientific computing, the quest for performance has to face the increasing complexity of parallel architectures. Nowadays, these machines exhibit a deep memory hierarchy which complicates the design of efficient parallel applications. This thesis proposes a programming environment allowing to design efficient parallel programs on top of clusters of multi-processors. It features a programming model centered around collective communications and synchronizations, and provides load balancing facilities. The programming interface, named MPC, provides high level paradigms which are optimized according to the underlying architecture. The environment is fully functional and used within the CEA/DAM (TERANOVA) computing center. The evaluations presented in this document confirm the relevance of our approach. (author)

  6. Contributing to the design of run-time systems dedicated to high performance computing; Contribution a l'elaboration d'environnements de programmation dedies au calcul scientifique hautes performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perache, M

    2006-10-15

    In the field of intensive scientific computing, the quest for performance has to face the increasing complexity of parallel architectures. Nowadays, these machines exhibit a deep memory hierarchy which complicates the design of efficient parallel applications. This thesis proposes a programming environment allowing to design efficient parallel programs on top of clusters of multi-processors. It features a programming model centered around collective communications and synchronizations, and provides load balancing facilities. The programming interface, named MPC, provides high level paradigms which are optimized according to the underlying architecture. The environment is fully functional and used within the CEA/DAM (TERANOVA) computing center. The evaluations presented in this document confirm the relevance of our approach. (author)

  7. Run-time verification of behavioural conformance for conversational web services

    OpenAIRE

    Dranidis, Dimitris; Ramollari, Ervin; Kourtesis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Web services exposing run-time behaviour that deviates from their behavioural specifications represent a major threat to the sustainability of a service-oriented ecosystem. It is therefore critical to verify the behavioural conformance of services during run-time. This paper discusses a novel approach for run-time verification of Web services. It proposes the utilisation of Stream X-machines for constructing formal behavioural specifications of Web services which can be exploited for verifyin...

  8. Time limit and time at VO2max' during a continuous and an intermittent run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarie, S; Koralsztein, J P; Billat, V

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify, by track field tests, whether sub-elite runners (n=15) could (i) reach their VO2max while running at v50%delta, i.e. midway between the speed associated with lactate threshold (vLAT) and that associated with maximal aerobic power (vVO2max), and (ii) if an intermittent exercise provokes a maximal and/or supra maximal oxygen consumption longer than a continuous one. Within three days, subjects underwent a multistage incremental test during which their vVO2max and vLAT were determined; they then performed two additional testing sessions, where continuous and intermittent running exercises at v50%delta were performed up to exhaustion. Subject's gas exchange and heart rate were continuously recorded by means of a telemetric apparatus. Blood samples were taken from fingertip and analysed for blood lactate concentration. In the continuous and the intermittent tests peak VO2 exceeded VO2max values, as determined during the incremental test. However in the intermittent exercise, peak VO2, time to exhaustion and time at VO2max reached significantly higher values, while blood lactate accumulation showed significantly lower values than in the continuous one. The v50%delta is sufficient to stimulate VO2max in both intermittent and continuous running. The intermittent exercise results better than the continuous one in increasing maximal aerobic power, allowing longer time at VO2max and obtaining higher peak VO2 with lower lactate accumulation.

  9. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb has a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  10. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  11. The ATLAS Distributed Computing project for LHC Run-2 and beyond.

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  12. Novel Real-time Alignment and Calibration of the LHCb detector in Run2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Maurizio; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run2. Data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment parameters, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This procedure improves the quality of the online reconstruction. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam conditions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline-selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  13. Time's running out as physicians await Y2K fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elash, A

    1998-01-01

    Canada's hospitals are slowly coming to grips with the millennium bug, but Anita Elash reports that no one really knows what impact the move into the year 2000 will have on computers and medical devices, either in the hospital or doctor's office. PMID:9780972

  14. Change in skeletal muscle stiffness after running competition is dependent on both running distance and recovery time: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyedali; Newman, Cassidy; Cortes, Daniel H

    2018-01-01

    Long-distance running competitions impose a large amount of mechanical loading and strain leading to muscle edema and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Damage to various muscle fibers, metabolic impairments and fatigue have been linked to explain how DOMS impairs muscle function. Disruptions of muscle fiber during DOMS exacerbated by exercise have been shown to change muscle mechanical properties. The objective of this study is to quantify changes in mechanical properties of different muscles in the thigh and lower leg as function of running distance and time after competition. A custom implementation of Focused Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (F-CUSE) method was used to evaluate shear modulus in runners before and after a race. Twenty-two healthy individuals (age: 23 ± 5 years) were recruited using convenience sampling and split into three race categories: short distance (nine subjects, 3-5 miles), middle distance (10 subjects, 10-13 miles), and long distance (three subjects, 26+ miles). Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) measurements were taken on both legs of each subject on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), soleus, lateral gastrocnemius (LG), medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) muscles. For statistical analyses, a linear mixed model was used, with recovery time and running distance as fixed variables, while shear modulus was used as the dependent variable. Recovery time had a significant effect on the soleus ( p  = 0.05), while running distance had considerable effect on the biceps femoris ( p  = 0.02), vastus lateralis ( p  trend from before competition to immediately after competition. The preliminary results suggest that SWE could potentially be used to quantify changes of muscle mechanical properties as a way for measuring recovery procedures for runners.

  15. Change in skeletal muscle stiffness after running competition is dependent on both running distance and recovery time: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedali Sadeghi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance running competitions impose a large amount of mechanical loading and strain leading to muscle edema and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS. Damage to various muscle fibers, metabolic impairments and fatigue have been linked to explain how DOMS impairs muscle function. Disruptions of muscle fiber during DOMS exacerbated by exercise have been shown to change muscle mechanical properties. The objective of this study is to quantify changes in mechanical properties of different muscles in the thigh and lower leg as function of running distance and time after competition. A custom implementation of Focused Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (F-CUSE method was used to evaluate shear modulus in runners before and after a race. Twenty-two healthy individuals (age: 23 ± 5 years were recruited using convenience sampling and split into three race categories: short distance (nine subjects, 3–5 miles, middle distance (10 subjects, 10–13 miles, and long distance (three subjects, 26+ miles. Shear Wave Elastography (SWE measurements were taken on both legs of each subject on the rectus femoris (RF, vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM, soleus, lateral gastrocnemius (LG, medial gastrocnemius (MG, biceps femoris (BF and semitendinosus (ST muscles. For statistical analyses, a linear mixed model was used, with recovery time and running distance as fixed variables, while shear modulus was used as the dependent variable. Recovery time had a significant effect on the soleus (p = 0.05, while running distance had considerable effect on the biceps femoris (p = 0.02, vastus lateralis (p < 0.01 and semitendinosus muscles (p = 0.02. Sixty-seven percent of muscles exhibited a decreasing stiffness trend from before competition to immediately after competition. The preliminary results suggest that SWE could potentially be used to quantify changes of muscle mechanical properties as a way for measuring recovery procedures for runners.

  16. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: optimality of walk–run–rest mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leroy L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    On a treadmill, humans switch from walking to running beyond a characteristic transition speed. Here, we study human choice between walking and running in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground in a given allowed time duration. During this task, the subjects carried, and could look at, a stopwatch that counted down to zero. As expected, if the total time available were large, humans walk the whole distance. If the time available were small, humans mostly run. For an intermediate total time, humans often use a mixture of walking at a slow speed and running at a higher speed. With analytical and computational optimization, we show that using a walk–run mixture at intermediate speeds and a walk–rest mixture at the lowest average speeds is predicted by metabolic energy minimization, even with costs for transients—a consequence of non-convex energy curves. Thus, sometimes, steady locomotion may not be energy optimal, and not preferred, even in the absence of fatigue. Assuming similar non-convex energy curves, we conjecture that similar walk–run mixtures may be energetically beneficial to children following a parent and animals on long leashes. Humans and other animals might also benefit energetically from alternating between moving forward and standing still on a slow and sufficiently long treadmill. PMID:23365192

  17. Leisure-time running reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duck-Chul; Pate, Russell R; Lavie, Carl J; Sui, Xuemei; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2014-08-05

    Although running is a popular leisure-time physical activity, little is known about the long-term effects of running on mortality. The dose-response relations between running, as well as the change in running behaviors over time, and mortality remain uncertain. We examined the associations of running with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risks in 55,137 adults, 18 to 100 years of age (mean age 44 years). Running was assessed on a medical history questionnaire by leisure-time activity. During a mean follow-up of 15 years, 3,413 all-cause and 1,217 cardiovascular deaths occurred. Approximately 24% of adults participated in running in this population. Compared with nonrunners, runners had 30% and 45% lower adjusted risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, with a 3-year life expectancy benefit. In dose-response analyses, the mortality benefits in runners were similar across quintiles of running time, distance, frequency, amount, and speed, compared with nonrunners. Weekly running even benefits, with 29% and 50% lower risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, compared with never-runners. Running, even 5 to 10 min/day and at slow speeds benefits. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ATLAS Distributed Computing experience and performance during the LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS Distributed Computing during LHC Run-1 was challenged by steadily increasing computing, storage and network requirements. In addition, the complexity of processing task workflows and their associated data management requirements led to a new paradigm in the ATLAS computing model for Run-2, accompanied by extensive evolution and redesign of the workflow and data management systems. The new systems were put into production at the end of 2014, and gained robustness and maturity during 2015 data taking. ProdSys2, the new request and task interface; JEDI, the dynamic job execution engine developed as an extension to PanDA; and Rucio, the new data management system, form the core of the Run-2 ATLAS distributed computing engine. One of the big changes for Run-2 was the adoption of the Derivation Framework, which moves the chaotic CPU and data intensive part of the user analysis into the centrally organized train production, delivering derived AOD datasets to user groups for final analysis. The effectiveness of...

  19. ATLAS Distributed Computing experience and performance during the LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ATLAS Distributed Computing during LHC Run-1 was challenged by steadily increasing computing, storage and network requirements. In addition, the complexity of processing task workflows and their associated data management requirements led to a new paradigm in the ATLAS computing model for Run-2, accompanied by extensive evolution and redesign of the workflow and data management systems. The new systems were put into production at the end of 2014, and gained robustness and maturity during 2015 data taking. ProdSys2, the new request and task interface; JEDI, the dynamic job execution engine developed as an extension to PanDA; and Rucio, the new data management system, form the core of Run-2 ATLAS distributed computing engine. One of the big changes for Run-2 was the adoption of the Derivation Framework, which moves the chaotic CPU and data intensive part of the user analysis into the centrally organized train production, delivering derived AOD datasets to user groups for final analysis. The effectiveness of the...

  20. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00144085

    2017-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run2. Data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment parameters, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This procedure improves the quality of the online reconstruction. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam conditions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline-selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructur...

  1. An Evaluation of Windows-Based Computer Forensics Application Software Running on a Macintosh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Carlton

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The two most common computer forensics applications perform exclusively on Microsoft Windows Operating Systems, yet contemporary computer forensics examinations frequently encounter one or more of the three most common operating system environments, namely Windows, OS-X, or some form of UNIX or Linux. Additionally, government and private computer forensics laboratories frequently encounter budget constraints that limit their access to computer hardware. Currently, Macintosh computer systems are marketed with the ability to accommodate these three common operating system environments, including Windows XP in native and virtual environments. We performed a series of experiments to measure the functionality and performance of the two most commonly used Windows-based computer forensics applications on a Macintosh running Windows XP in native mode and in two virtual environments relative to a similarly configured Dell personal computer. The research results are directly beneficial to practitioners, and the process illustrates affective pedagogy whereby students were engaged in applied research.

  2. Time Series Analysis Based on Running Mann Whitney Z Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sensitive and objective time series analysis method based on the calculation of Mann Whitney U statistics is described. This method samples data rankings over moving time windows, converts those samples to Mann-Whitney U statistics, and then normalizes the U statistics to Z statistics using Monte-...

  3. An Empirical Derivation of the Run Time of the Bubble Sort Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests a moving pictorial tool to help teach principles in the bubble sort algorithm. Develops such a tool applied to an unsorted list of numbers and describes a method to derive the run time of the algorithm. The method can be modified to run the times of various other algorithms. (JN)

  4. Lower bounds on the run time of the univariate marginal distribution algorithm on OneMax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejca, Martin S.; Witt, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    The Univariate Marginal Distribution Algorithm (UMDA), a popular estimation of distribution algorithm, is studied from a run time perspective. On the classical OneMax benchmark function, a lower bound of Ω(μ√n + n log n), where μ is the population size, on its expected run time is proved...... values maintained by the algorithm, including carefully designed potential functions. These techniques may prove useful in advancing the field of run time analysis for estimation of distribution algorithms in general........ This is the first direct lower bound on the run time of the UMDA. It is stronger than the bounds that follow from general black-box complexity theory and is matched by the run time of many evolutionary algorithms. The results are obtained through advanced analyses of the stochastic change of the frequencies of bit...

  5. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091576

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33}$ cm$^2$ s$^1$ and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance ...

  6. Discount-Optimal Infinite Runs in Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new discounting semantics for priced timed automata. Discounting provides a way to model optimal-cost problems for infinite traces and has applications in optimal scheduling and other areas. In the discounting semantics, prices decrease exponentially, so that the contribution...

  7. The Trick Simulation Toolkit: A NASA/Opensource Framework for Running Time Based Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Toolkit is a simulation development environment used to create high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. Its purpose is to generate a simulation executable from a collection of user-supplied models and a simulation definition file. For each Trick-based simulation, Trick automatically provides job scheduling, numerical integration, the ability to write and restore human readable checkpoints, data recording, interactive variable manipulation, a run-time interpreter, and many other commonly needed capabilities. This allows simulation developers to concentrate on their domain expertise and the algorithms and equations of their models. Also included in Trick are tools for plotting recorded data and various other supporting utilities and libraries. Trick is written in C/C++ and Java and supports both Linux and MacOSX computer operating systems. This paper describes Trick's design and use at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  8. Design-time application mapping and platform exploration for MP-SoC customised run-time management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ykman-Couvreur, Ch.; Nollet, V.; Marescaux, T.M.; Brockmeyer, E.; Catthoor, F.; Corporaal, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: In an Multi-Processor system-on-Chip (MP-SoC) environment, a customized run-time management layer should be incorporated on top of the basic Operating System services to alleviate the run-time decision-making and to globally optimise costs (e.g. energy consumption) across all active

  9. Safety provision for nuclear power plants during remaining running time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossnagel, Alexander; Hentschel, Anja

    2012-01-01

    With the phasing-out of the industrial use of nuclear energy for the power generation, the risk of the nuclear power plants has not been eliminated in principle, but only for a limited period of time. Therefore, the remaining nine nuclear power plants must also be used for the remaining ten years according to the state of science and technology. Regulatory authorities must substantiate the safety requirements for each nuclear power plant and enforce these requirements by means of various regulatory measures. The consequences of Fukushima must be included in the assessment of the safety level of nuclear power plants in Germany. In this respect, the regulatory authorities have the important tasks to investigate and assess the security risks as well as to develop instructions and orders.

  10. On the Use of Running Trends as Summary Statistics for Univariate Time Series and Time Series Association

    OpenAIRE

    Trottini, Mario; Vigo, Isabel; Belda, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Given a time series, running trends analysis (RTA) involves evaluating least squares trends over overlapping time windows of L consecutive time points, with overlap by all but one observation. This produces a new series called the “running trends series,” which is used as summary statistics of the original series for further analysis. In recent years, RTA has been widely used in climate applied research as summary statistics for time series and time series association. There is no doubt that ...

  11. Software Accelerates Computing Time for Complex Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded Newark, Delaware-based EM Photonics Inc. SBIR funding to utilize graphic processing unit (GPU) technology- traditionally used for computer video games-to develop high-computing software called CULA. The software gives users the ability to run complex algorithms on personal computers with greater speed. As a result of the NASA collaboration, the number of employees at the company has increased 10 percent.

  12. Time-Predictable Computer Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeberl Martin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's general-purpose processors are optimized for maximum throughput. Real-time systems need a processor with both a reasonable and a known worst-case execution time (WCET. Features such as pipelines with instruction dependencies, caches, branch prediction, and out-of-order execution complicate WCET analysis and lead to very conservative estimates. In this paper, we evaluate the issues of current architectures with respect to WCET analysis. Then, we propose solutions for a time-predictable computer architecture. The proposed architecture is evaluated with implementation of some features in a Java processor. The resulting processor is a good target for WCET analysis and still performs well in the average case.

  13. Effect of treadmill versus overground running on the structure of variability of stride timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Timothy R; Noakes, Timothy D; McGregor, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    Gait timing dynamics of treadmill and overground running were compared. Nine trained runners ran treadmill and track trials at 80, 100, and 120% of preferred pace for 8 min. each. Stride time series were generated for each trial. To each series, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), power spectral density (PSD), and multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis were applied to infer the regime of control along the randomness-regularity axis. Compared to overground running, treadmill running exhibited a higher DFA and PSD scaling exponent, as well as lower entropy at non-preferred speeds. This indicates a more ordered control for treadmill running, especially at non-preferred speeds. The results suggest that the treadmill itself brings about greater constraints and requires increased voluntary control. Thus, the quantification of treadmill running gait dynamics does not necessarily reflect movement in overground settings.

  14. System and Component Software Specification, Run-time Verification and Automatic Test Generation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following background technology is described in Part 5: Run-time Verification (RV), White Box Automatic Test Generation (WBATG). Part 5 also describes how WBATG...

  15. Strong normalization by type-directed partial evaluation and run-time code generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balat, Vincent; Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the synergy between type-directed partial evaluation and run-time code generation for the Caml dialect of ML. Type-directed partial evaluation maps simply typed, closed Caml values to a representation of their long βη-normal form. Caml uses a virtual machine and has the capability...... to load byte code at run time. Representing the long βη-normal forms as byte code gives us the ability to strongly normalize higher-order values (i.e., weak head normal forms in ML), to compile the resulting strong normal forms into byte code, and to load this byte code all in one go, at run time. We...... conclude this note with a preview of our current work on scaling up strong normalization by run-time code generation to the Caml module language....

  16. ANALYSIS OF POSSIBILITY TO AVOID A RUNNING-DOW ACCIDENT TIMELY BRAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarayev, A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Such circumstances under which the drive can stop the vehicle by applying timely braking before reaching the pedestrian crossing or decrease the speed to the safe limit to avoid a running-down accident is considered.

  17. Strong Normalization by Type-Directed Partial Evaluation and Run-Time Code Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balat, Vincent; Danvy, Olivier

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the synergy between type-directed partial evaluation and run-time code generation for the Caml dialect of ML. Type-directed partial evaluation maps simply typed, closed Caml values to a representation of their long βη-normal form. Caml uses a virtual machine and has the capability...... to load byte code at run time. Representing the long βη-normal forms as byte code gives us the ability to strongly normalize higher-order values (i.e., weak head normal forms in ML), to compile the resulting strong normal forms into byte code, and to load this byte code all in one go, at run time. We...... conclude this note with a preview of our current work on scaling up strong normalization by run-time code generation to the Caml module language....

  18. Running vacuum in the Universe and the time variation of the fundamental constants of Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Harald [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Munich (Germany); Sola, Joan [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona (ICCUB), Institute of Cosmos Sciences, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nunes, Rafael C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Dept. de Fisica, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    We compute the time variation of the fundamental constants (such as the ratio of the proton mass to the electron mass, the strong coupling constant, the fine-structure constant and Newton's constant) within the context of the so-called running vacuum models (RVMs) of the cosmic evolution. Recently, compelling evidence has been provided that these models are able to fit the main cosmological data (SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB) significantly better than the concordance ΛCDM model. Specifically, the vacuum parameters of the RVM (i.e. those responsible for the dynamics of the vacuum energy) prove to be nonzero at a confidence level >or similar 3σ. Here we use such remarkable status of the RVMs to make definite predictions on the cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. It turns out that the predicted variations are close to the present observational limits. Furthermore, we find that the time evolution of the dark matter particle masses should be crucially involved in the total mass variation of our Universe. A positive measurement of this kind of effects could be interpreted as strong support to the ''micro-macro connection'' (viz. the dynamical feedback between the evolution of the cosmological parameters and the time variation of the fundamental constants of the microscopic world), previously proposed by two of us (HF and JS). (orig.)

  19. Investigations of timing during the schedule and reinforcement intervals with wheel-running reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belke, Terry W; Christie-Fougere, Melissa M

    2006-11-01

    Across two experiments, a peak procedure was used to assess the timing of the onset and offset of an opportunity to run as a reinforcer. The first experiment investigated the effect of reinforcer duration on temporal discrimination of the onset of the reinforcement interval. Three male Wistar rats were exposed to fixed-interval (FI) 30-s schedules of wheel-running reinforcement and the duration of the opportunity to run was varied across values of 15, 30, and 60s. Each session consisted of 50 reinforcers and 10 probe trials. Results showed that as reinforcer duration increased, the percentage of postreinforcement pauses longer than the 30-s schedule interval increased. On probe trials, peak response rates occurred near the time of reinforcer delivery and peak times varied with reinforcer duration. In a second experiment, seven female Long-Evans rats were exposed to FI 30-s schedules leading to 30-s opportunities to run. Timing of the onset and offset of the reinforcement period was assessed by probe trials during the schedule interval and during the reinforcement interval in separate conditions. The results provided evidence of timing of the onset, but not the offset of the wheel-running reinforcement period. Further research is required to assess if timing occurs during a wheel-running reinforcement period.

  20. ATLAS Distributed Computing Experience and Performance During the LHC Run-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipčič, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    ATLAS Distributed Computing during LHC Run-1 was challenged by steadily increasing computing, storage and network requirements. In addition, the complexity of processing task workflows and their associated data management requirements led to a new paradigm in the ATLAS computing model for Run-2, accompanied by extensive evolution and redesign of the workflow and data management systems. The new systems were put into production at the end of 2014, and gained robustness and maturity during 2015 data taking. ProdSys2, the new request and task interface; JEDI, the dynamic job execution engine developed as an extension to PanDA; and Rucio, the new data management system, form the core of Run-2 ATLAS distributed computing engine. One of the big changes for Run-2 was the adoption of the Derivation Framework, which moves the chaotic CPU and data intensive part of the user analysis into the centrally organized train production, delivering derived AOD datasets to user groups for final analysis. The effectiveness of the new model was demonstrated through the delivery of analysis datasets to users just one week after data taking, by completing the calibration loop, Tier-0 processing and train production steps promptly. The great flexibility of the new system also makes it possible to execute part of the Tier-0 processing on the grid when Tier-0 resources experience a backlog during high data-taking periods. The introduction of the data lifetime model, where each dataset is assigned a finite lifetime (with extensions possible for frequently accessed data), was made possible by Rucio. Thanks to this the storage crises experienced in Run-1 have not reappeared during Run-2. In addition, the distinction between Tier-1 and Tier-2 disk storage, now largely artificial given the quality of Tier-2 resources and their networking, has been removed through the introduction of dynamic ATLAS clouds that group the storage endpoint nucleus and its close-by execution satellite sites. All stable

  1. Development of a fast running accident analysis computer program for use in a simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciabue, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes how a reactor safety nuclear computer program can be modified and improved with the aim of reaching a very fast running tool to be used as a physical model in a plant simulator, without penalizing the accuracy of results. It also discusses some ideas on how the physical theoretical model can be combined to a driving statistical tool for the build up of the entire package of software to be implemented in the simulator for risk and reliability analysis. The approach to the problem, although applied to a specific computer program, can be considered quite general if an already existing and well tested code is being used for the purpose. The computer program considered is ALMOD, originally developed for the analysis of the thermohydraulic and neutronic behaviour of the reactor core, primary circuit and steam generator during operational and special transients. (author)

  2. Design Flow Instantiation for Run-Time Reconfigurable Systems: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconfigurable system is a promising alternative to deliver both flexibility and performance at the same time. New reconfigurable technologies and technology-dependent tools have been developed, but a complete overview of the whole design flow for run-time reconfigurable systems is missing. In this work, we present a design flow instantiation for such systems using a real-life application. The design flow is roughly divided into two parts: system level and implementation. At system level, our supports for hardware resource estimation and performance evaluation are applied. At implementation level, technology-dependent tools are used to realize the run-time reconfiguration. The design case is part of a WCDMA decoder on a commercially available reconfigurable platform. The results show that using run-time reconfiguration can save over 40% area when compared to a functionally equivalent fixed system and achieve 30 times speedup in processing time when compared to a functionally equivalent pure software design.

  3. Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandun, Ursula; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Klipstein, Andreas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners. Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times. After multivariate regression, running speed of the training units (β = -0.52, P marathon race times. Marathon race time for recreational male runners may be estimated to some extent by using the following equation (r (2) = 0.44): race time ( minutes) = 326.3 + 2.394 × (percent body fat, %) - 12.06 × (speed in training, km/hours). Running speed during training sessions correlated with prerace percent body fat (r = 0.33, P = 0.0002). The model including anthropometric and training variables explained 44% of the variance of marathon race times, whereas running speed during training sessions alone explained 40%. Thus, training speed was more predictive of marathon performance times than anthropometric characteristics. The present results suggest that low body fat and running speed during training close to race pace (about 11 km/hour) are two key factors for a fast marathon race time in recreational male marathoner runners.

  4. Methods of Run-Time Error Detection in Distributed Process Control Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, N.

    of generic run-time error types, design of methods of observing application software behaviorduring execution and design of methods of evaluating run time constraints. In the definition of error types it is attempted to cover all relevant aspects of the application softwaree behavior. Methods of observation......In this thesis, methods of run-time error detection in application software for distributed process control is designed. The error detection is based upon a monitoring approach in which application software is monitored by system software during the entire execution. The thesis includes definition...... and constraint evaluation is designed for the modt interesting error types. These include: a) semantical errors in data communicated between application tasks; b) errors in the execution of application tasks; and c) errors in the timing of distributed events emitted by the application software. The design...

  5. A Matter of Computer Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Donna; Neuman, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Many low-income children do not have the opportunity to develop the computer skills necessary to succeed in our technological economy. Their only access to computers and the Internet--school, afterschool programs, and community organizations--is woefully inadequate. Educators must work to close this knowledge gap and to ensure that low-income…

  6. Relationship between running kinematic changes and time limit at vVO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo De Lucca

    2012-06-01

    Exhaustive running at maximal oxygen uptake velocity (vVO2max can alter running kinematic parameters and increase energy cost along the time. The aims of the present study were to compare characteristics of ankle and knee kinematics during running at vVO2max and to verify the relationship between changes in kinematic variables and time limit (Tlim. Eleven male volunteers, recreational players of team sports, performed an incremental running test until volitional exhaustion to determine vVO2max and a constant velocity test at vVO2max. Subjects were filmed continuously from the left sagittal plane at 210 Hz for further kinematic analysis. The maximal plantar flexion during swing (p<0.01 was the only variable that increased significantly from beginning to end of the run. Increase in ankle angle at contact was the only variable related to Tlim (r=0.64; p=0.035 and explained 34% of the performance in the test. These findings suggest that the individuals under study maintained a stable running style at vVO2max and that increase in plantar flexion explained the performance in this test when it was applied in non-runners.

  7. 12 CFR 908.27 - Computing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 908.27 Section 908.27 Banks and... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE IN HEARINGS ON THE RECORD General Rules § 908.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event...

  8. Systems-level computational modeling demonstrates fuel selection switching in high capacity running and low capacity running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Nathan R.

    2018-01-01

    High capacity and low capacity running rats, HCR and LCR respectively, have been bred to represent two extremes of running endurance and have recently demonstrated disparities in fuel usage during transient aerobic exercise. HCR rats can maintain fatty acid (FA) utilization throughout the course of transient aerobic exercise whereas LCR rats rely predominantly on glucose utilization. We hypothesized that the difference between HCR and LCR fuel utilization could be explained by a difference in mitochondrial density. To test this hypothesis and to investigate mechanisms of fuel selection, we used a constraint-based kinetic analysis of whole-body metabolism to analyze transient exercise data from these rats. Our model analysis used a thermodynamically constrained kinetic framework that accounts for glycolysis, the TCA cycle, and mitochondrial FA transport and oxidation. The model can effectively match the observed relative rates of oxidation of glucose versus FA, as a function of ATP demand. In searching for the minimal differences required to explain metabolic function in HCR versus LCR rats, it was determined that the whole-body metabolic phenotype of LCR, compared to the HCR, could be explained by a ~50% reduction in total mitochondrial activity with an additional 5-fold reduction in mitochondrial FA transport activity. Finally, we postulate that over sustained periods of exercise that LCR can partly overcome the initial deficit in FA catabolic activity by upregulating FA transport and/or oxidation processes. PMID:29474500

  9. Real time analysis with the upgraded LHCb trigger in Run III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to 1.1 MHz, a rate at which the entire detector is read out. A second level, implemented in a farm of around 20k parallel processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to around 12.5 kHz. The LHCb experiment plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC long shutdown II (2018-2019). In this upgrade, a purely software based trigger system is being developed and it will have to process the full 30 MHz of bunch crossings with inelastic collisions. LHCb will also receive a factor of 5 increase in the instantaneous luminosity, which further contributes to the challenge of reconstructing and selecting events in real time with the CPU farm. We discuss the plans and progress towards achieving efficient reconstruction and selection with a 30 MHz throughput. Another challenge is to exploit the increased signal rate that results from removing the 1.1 MHz readout bottleneck, combined with the higher instantaneous luminosity. Many charm hadron signals can be recorded at up to 50 times higher rate. LHCb is implementing a new paradigm in the form of real time data analysis, in which abundant signals are recorded in a reduced event format that can be fed directly to the physics analyses. These data do not need any further offline event reconstruction, which allows a larger fraction of the grid computing resources to be devoted to Monte Carlo productions. We discuss how this real-time analysis model is absolutely critical to the LHCb upgrade, and how it will evolve during Run-II.

  10. Adaptive Embedded Systems – Challenges of Run-Time Resource Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Understanding and efficiently controlling the dynamic behavior of adaptive embedded systems is a challenging endavor. The challenges come from the often very complicated interplay between the application, the application mapping, and the underlying hardware architecture. With MPSoC, we have...... the technology to design and fabricate dynamically reconfigurable hardware platforms. However, such platforms will pose new challenges to tools and methods to efficiently explore these platforms at run-time. This talk will address some of the challenges of run-time resource management in adaptive embedded...... systems....

  11. Shorter Ground Contact Time and Better Running Economy: Evidence From Female Kenyan Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooses, Martin; Haile, Diresibachew W; Ojiambo, Robert; Sang, Meshack; Mooses, Kerli; Lane, Amy R; Hackney, Anthony C

    2018-06-25

    Mooses, M, Haile, DW, Ojiambo, R, Sang, M, Mooses, K, Lane, AR, and Hackney, AC. Shorter ground contact time and better running economy: evidence from female Kenyan runners. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Previously, it has been concluded that the improvement in running economy (RE) might be considered as a key to the continued improvement in performance when no further increase in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max is observed. To date, RE has been extensively studied among male East African distance runners. By contrast, there is a paucity of data on the RE of female East African runners. A total of 10 female Kenyan runners performed 3 × 1,600-m steady-state run trials on a flat outdoor clay track (400-m lap) at the intensities that corresponded to their everyday training intensities for easy, moderate, and fast running. Running economy together with gait characteristics was determined. Participants showed moderate to very good RE at the first (202 ± 26 ml·kg·km) and second (188 ± 12 ml·kg·km) run trials, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed significant relationship between ground contact time (GCT) and RE at the second run (r = 0.782; p = 0.022), which represented the intensity of anaerobic threshold. This study is the first to report the RE and gait characteristics of East African female athletes measured under everyday training settings. We provided the evidence that GCT is associated with the superior RE of the female Kenyan runners.

  12. 12 CFR 1780.11 - Computing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 1780.11 Section 1780.11 Banks... time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event that commences the designated period of time is not included. The last day so...

  13. Running climate model on a commercial cloud computing environment: A case study using Community Earth System Model (CESM) on Amazon AWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuhong; Huang, Xianglei; Jiao, Chaoyi; Flanner, Mark G.; Raeker, Todd; Palen, Brock

    2017-01-01

    The suites of numerical models used for simulating climate of our planet are usually run on dedicated high-performance computing (HPC) resources. This study investigates an alternative to the usual approach, i.e. carrying out climate model simulations on commercially available cloud computing environment. We test the performance and reliability of running the CESM (Community Earth System Model), a flagship climate model in the United States developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), on Amazon Web Service (AWS) EC2, the cloud computing environment by Amazon.com, Inc. StarCluster is used to create virtual computing cluster on the AWS EC2 for the CESM simulations. The wall-clock time for one year of CESM simulation on the AWS EC2 virtual cluster is comparable to the time spent for the same simulation on a local dedicated high-performance computing cluster with InfiniBand connections. The CESM simulation can be efficiently scaled with the number of CPU cores on the AWS EC2 virtual cluster environment up to 64 cores. For the standard configuration of the CESM at a spatial resolution of 1.9° latitude by 2.5° longitude, increasing the number of cores from 16 to 64 reduces the wall-clock running time by more than 50% and the scaling is nearly linear. Beyond 64 cores, the communication latency starts to outweigh the benefit of distributed computing and the parallel speedup becomes nearly unchanged.

  14. Comparing internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djunaedy, E.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a comparison between internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software. Internal coupling can be seen as the "traditional" way of developing software, i.e. the capabilities of existing software are expanded by merging codes. With external

  15. Ada Run Time Support Environments and a common APSE Interface Set. [Ada Programming Support Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. W.; Bown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the importance of linking Ada Run Time Support Environments to the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS). A non-stop network operating systems scenario is presented to serve as a forum for identifying the important issues. The network operating system exemplifies the issues involved in the NASA Space Station data management system.

  16. Differences in ground contact time explain the less efficient running economy in north african runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Concejero, J; Granados, C; Irazusta, J; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, I; Zabala-Lili, J; Tam, N; Gil, S M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between biomechanical variables and running economy in North African and European runners. Eight North African and 13 European male runners of the same athletic level ran 4-minute stages on a treadmill at varying set velocities. During the test, biomechanical variables such as ground contact time, swing time, stride length, stride frequency, stride angle and the different sub-phases of ground contact were recorded using an optical measurement system. Additionally, oxygen uptake was measured to calculate running economy. The European runners were more economical than the North African runners at 19.5 km · h(-1), presented lower ground contact time at 18 km · h(-1) and 19.5 km · h(-1) and experienced later propulsion sub-phase at 10.5 km · h(-1),12 km · h(-1), 15 km · h(-1), 16.5 km · h(-1) and 19.5 km · h(-1) than the European runners (P Running economy at 19.5 km · h(-1) was negatively correlated with swing time (r = -0.53) and stride angle (r = -0.52), whereas it was positively correlated with ground contact time (r = 0.53). Within the constraints of extrapolating these findings, the less efficient running economy in North African runners may imply that their outstanding performance at international athletic events appears not to be linked to running efficiency. Further, the differences in metabolic demand seem to be associated with differing biomechanical characteristics during ground contact, including longer contact times.

  17. Short- and long-run time-of-use price elasticities in Swiss residential electricity demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical analysis on the residential demand for electricity by time-of-day. This analysis has been performed using aggregate data at the city level for 22 Swiss cities for the period 2000-2006. For this purpose, we estimated two log-log demand equations for peak and off-peak electricity consumption using static and dynamic partial adjustment approaches. These demand functions were estimated using several econometric approaches for panel data, for example LSDV and RE for static models, and LSDV and corrected LSDV estimators for dynamic models. The attempt of this empirical analysis has been to highlight some of the characteristics of the Swiss residential electricity demand. The estimated short-run own price elasticities are lower than 1, whereas in the long-run these values are higher than 1. The estimated short-run and long-run cross-price elasticities are positive. This result shows that peak and off-peak electricity are substitutes. In this context, time differentiated prices should provide an economic incentive to customers so that they can modify consumption patterns by reducing peak demand and shifting electricity consumption from peak to off-peak periods. - Highlights: → Empirical analysis on the residential demand for electricity by time-of-day. → Estimators for dynamic panel data. → Peak and off-peak residential electricity are substitutes.

  18. Integrating software testing and run-time checking in an assertion verification framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mera, E.; López García, Pedro; Hermenegildo, Manuel V.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a framework that unifies unit testing and run-time verification (as well as static verification and static debugging). A key contribution of our approach is that a unified assertion language is used for all of these tasks. We first propose methods for compiling runtime checks for (parts of) assertions which cannot be verified at compile-time via program transformation. This transformation allows checking preconditions and postconditions, including conditional...

  19. A Formal Approach to Run-Time Evaluation of Real-Time Behaviour in Distributed Process Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.

    This thesis advocates a formal approach to run-time evaluation of real-time behaviour in distributed process sontrol systems, motivated by a growing interest in applying the increasingly popular formal methods in the application area of distributed process control systems. We propose to evaluate...... because the real-time aspects of distributed process control systems are considered to be among the hardest and most interesting to handle....

  20. Implementering Run-time Evaluation of Distributed Timing Constraints in a Micro Kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.; Drejer, N.; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    In the present paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems......In the present paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems...

  1. Rapid Large Earthquake and Run-up Characterization in Quasi Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, F. J.; Riquelme, S.; Koch, P.; Cararo, S.

    2017-12-01

    Several test in quasi real time have been conducted by the rapid response group at CSN (National Seismological Center) to characterize earthquakes in Real Time. These methods are known for its robustness and realibility to create Finite Fault Models. The W-phase FFM Inversion, The Wavelet Domain FFM and The Body Wave and FFM have been implemented in real time at CSN, all these algorithms are running automatically and triggered by the W-phase Point Source Inversion. Dimensions (Large and Width ) are predefined by adopting scaling laws for earthquakes in subduction zones. We tested the last four major earthquakes occurred in Chile using this scheme: The 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Earthquake, The 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique Earthquake, The 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel Earthquake and The 7.6 Melinka Earthquake. We obtain many solutions as time elapses, for each one of those we calculate the run-up using an analytical formula. Our results are in agreements with some FFM already accepted by the sicentific comunnity aswell as run-up observations in the field.

  2. Operating Security System Support for Run-Time Security with a Trusted Execution Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Javier

    Software services have become an integral part of our daily life. Cyber-attacks have thus become a problem of increasing importance not only for the IT industry, but for society at large. A way to contain cyber-attacks is to guarantee the integrity of IT systems at run-time. Put differently......, it is safe to assume that any complex software is compromised. The problem is then to monitor and contain it when it executes in order to protect sensitive data and other sensitive assets. To really have an impact, any solution to this problem should be integrated in commodity operating systems...... sensitive assets at run-time that we denote split-enforcement, and provide an implementation for ARM-powered devices using ARM TrustZone security extensions. We design, build, and evaluate a prototype Trusted Cell that provides trusted services. We also present the first generic TrustZone driver...

  3. LHCb : Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run2

    CERN Multimedia

    Tobin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam collisions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new realtime alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the RICH detectors at the trigger level. T...

  4. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z., E-mail: zhirui.xu@epfl.ch; Tobin, M.

    2016-07-11

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  5. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086132; Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  6. Applied time series analysis and innovative computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Sio-Iong

    2010-01-01

    This text is a systematic, state-of-the-art introduction to the use of innovative computing paradigms as an investigative tool for applications in time series analysis. It includes frontier case studies based on recent research.

  7. Computational comparison of the effect of mixing grids of 'swirler' and 'run-through' types on flow parameters and the behavior of steam phase in WWER fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, S.; Sergeev, V.

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained using the TURBOFLOW computer code are presented for the numerical calculations of space distributions of coolant flow, heating and boiling characteristics in WWER fuel assemblies with regard to the effect of mixing grids of 'Swirler' and 'Run-through' types installed in FA on the above processes. The nature of the effect of these grids on coolant flow was demonstrated to be different. Thus, the relaxation length of cross flows after passing a 'Run-through' grid is five times as compared to a 'Swirler'-type grid, which correlates well with the experimental data. At the same time, accelerations occurring in the flow downstream of a 'Swirler'-type grid are by an order of magnitude greater than those after a 'Run-through' grid. As a result, the efficiency of one-phase coolant mixing is much higher for the grids of 'Run-through' type, while the efficiency of steam removal from fuel surface is much higher for 'Swirler'-type grids. To achieve optimal removal of steam from fuel surface it has been proposed to install into fuel assemblies two 'Swirler'-type grids in tandem at a distance of about 10 cm from each other with flow swirling in opposite directions. 'Run-through' grids would be appropriate for use for mixing in fuel assemblies with a high non-uniformity of fuel-by-fuel power generation. (authors)

  8. Running the EGS4 Monte Carlo code with Fortran 90 on a pentium computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; Bibbo, G.; Pattison, J.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility to run the EGS4 Monte Carlo code radiation transport system for medical radiation modelling on a microcomputer is discussed. This has been done using a Fortran 77 compiler with a 32-bit memory addressing system running under a memory extender operating system. In addition a virtual memory manager such as QEMM386 was required. It has successfully run on a SUN Sparcstation2. In 1995 faster Pentium-based microcomputers became available as did the Windows 95 operating system which can handle 32-bit programs, multitasking and provides its own virtual memory management. The paper describe how with simple modification to the batch files it was possible to run EGS4 on a Pentium under Fortran 90 and Windows 95. This combination of software and hardware is cheaper and faster than running it on a SUN Sparcstation2. 8 refs., 1 tab

  9. Running the EGS4 Monte Carlo code with Fortran 90 on a pentium computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caon, M. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia)]|[Univercity of South Australia, SA (Australia); Bibbo, G. [Womens and Childrens hospital, SA (Australia); Pattison, J. [Univercity of South Australia, SA (Australia)

    1996-09-01

    The possibility to run the EGS4 Monte Carlo code radiation transport system for medical radiation modelling on a microcomputer is discussed. This has been done using a Fortran 77 compiler with a 32-bit memory addressing system running under a memory extender operating system. In addition a virtual memory manager such as QEMM386 was required. It has successfully run on a SUN Sparcstation2. In 1995 faster Pentium-based microcomputers became available as did the Windows 95 operating system which can handle 32-bit programs, multitasking and provides its own virtual memory management. The paper describe how with simple modification to the batch files it was possible to run EGS4 on a Pentium under Fortran 90 and Windows 95. This combination of software and hardware is cheaper and faster than running it on a SUN Sparcstation2. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Run-Time HW/SW Scheduling of Data Flow Applications on Reconfigurable Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Fakhreddine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient dynamic and run-time Hardware/Software scheduling approach. This scheduling heuristic consists in mapping online the different tasks of a highly dynamic application in such a way that the total execution time is minimized. We consider soft real-time data flow graph oriented applications for which the execution time is function of the input data nature. The target architecture is composed of two processors connected to a dynamically reconfigurable hardware accelerator. Our approach takes advantage of the reconfiguration property of the considered architecture to adapt the treatment to the system dynamics. We compare our heuristic with another similar approach. We present the results of our scheduling method on several image processing applications. Our experiments include simulation and synthesis results on a Virtex V-based platform. These results show a better performance against existing methods.

  11. Instruction timing for the CDC 7600 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipps, H.

    1975-01-01

    This report provides timing information for all instructions of the Control Data 7600 computer, except for instructions of type 01X, to enable the optimization of 7600 programs. The timing rules serve as background information for timing charts which are produced by a program (TIME76) of the CERN Program Library. The rules that co-ordinate the different sections of the CPU are stated in as much detail as is necessary to time the flow of instructions for a given sequence of code. Instruction fetch, instruction issue, and access to small core memory are treated at length, since details are not available from the computer manuals. Annotated timing charts are given for 24 examples, chosen to display the full range of timing considerations. (Author)

  12. Real time data analysis with the ATLAS Trigger at the LHC in Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The trigger selection capabilities of the ATLAS detector have been significantly enhanced for the LHC Run- 2 in order to cope with the higher event rates and with the large number of simultaneous interactions (pile-up) per protonproton bunch crossing. A new hardware system, designed to analyse real time event-topologies at Level-1 came to full use in 2017. A hardware-based track reconstruction system, expected to be used real-time in 2018, is designed to provide track information to the high-level software trigger at its full input rate. The high-level trigger selections are largely relying on offline-like reconstruction techniques, and in some cases multivariate analysis methods. Despite the sudden change in LHC operations during the second half of 2017, which caused an increase in pile-up and therefore also in CPU usage of the trigger algorithms, the set of triggers (so called trigger menu) running online has undergone only minor modifications thanks to the robustness and redundancy of the trigger system, a...

  13. Real time data analysis with the ATLAS trigger at the LHC in Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The trigger selection capabilities of the ATLAS detector have been significantly enhanced for the LHC Run-2 in order to cope with the higher event rates and with the large number of simultaneous interactions (pile-up) per proton-proton bunch crossing. A new hardware system, designed to analyse real time event-topologies at Level-1 came to full use in 2017. A hardware-based track reconstruction system, expected to be used real-time in 2018, is designed to provide track information to the high-level software trigger at its full input rate. The high-level trigger selections are largely relying on offline-like reconstruction techniques, and in some cases multi-variate analysis methods. Despite the sudden change in LHC operations during the second half of 2017, which caused an increase in pile-up and therefore also in CPU usage of the trigger algorithms, the set of triggers (so called trigger menu) running online has undergone only minor modifications thanks to the robustness and redundancy of the trigger system, ...

  14. CASY: a dynamic simulation of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor core auxiliary cooling system. Volume II. Example computer run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    A listing of a CASY computer run is presented. It was initiated from a demand terminal and, therefore, contains the identification ST0952. This run also contains an INDEX listing of the subroutine UPDATE. The run includes a simulated scram transient at 30 seconds.

  15. CASY: a dynamic simulation of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor core auxiliary cooling system. Volume II. Example computer run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    A listing of a CASY computer run is presented. It was initiated from a demand terminal and, therefore, contains the identification ST0952. This run also contains an INDEX listing of the subroutine UPDATE. The run includes a simulated scram transient at 30 seconds

  16. Reinforcement of drinking by running: effect of fixed ratio and reinforcement time1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premack, David; Schaeffer, Robert W.; Hundt, Alan

    1964-01-01

    Rats were required to complete varying numbers of licks (FR), ranging from 10 to 300, in order to free an activity wheel for predetermined times (CT) ranging from 2 to 20 sec. The reinforcement of drinking by running was shown both by an increased frequency of licking, and by changes in length of the burst of licking relative to operant-level burst length. In log-log coordinates, instrumental licking tended to be a linear increasing function of FR for the range tested, a linear decreasing function of CT for the range tested. Pause time was implicated in both of the above relations, being a generally increasing function of both FR and CT. PMID:14120150

  17. REINFORCEMENT OF DRINKING BY RUNNING: EFFECT OF FIXED RATIO AND REINFORCEMENT TIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PREMACK, D; SCHAEFFER, R W; HUNDT, A

    1964-01-01

    Rats were required to complete varying numbers of licks (FR), ranging from 10 to 300, in order to free an activity wheel for predetermined times (CT) ranging from 2 to 20 sec. The reinforcement of drinking by running was shown both by an increased frequency of licking, and by changes in length of the burst of licking relative to operant-level burst length. In log-log coordinates, instrumental licking tended to be a linear increasing function of FR for the range tested, a linear decreasing function of CT for the range tested. Pause time was implicated in both of the above relations, being a generally increasing function of both FR and CT.

  18. Methods of Run-Time Error Detection in Distributed Process Control Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, N.

    In this thesis, methods of run-time error detection in application software for distributed process control is designed. The error detection is based upon a monitoring approach in which application software is monitored by system software during the entire execution. The thesis includes definition...... and constraint evaluation is designed for the modt interesting error types. These include: a) semantical errors in data communicated between application tasks; b) errors in the execution of application tasks; and c) errors in the timing of distributed events emitted by the application software. The design...... of error detection methods includes a high level software specification. this has the purpose of illustrating that the designed can be used in practice....

  19. Radionuclide inventories for short run-time space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coats, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Space Nuclear Reactor Systems, especially those used for propulsion, often have expected operation run times much shorter than those for land-based nuclear power plants. This produces substantially different radionuclide inventories to be considered in the safety analyses of space nuclear systems. This presentation describes an analysis utilizing ORIGEN2 and DKPOWER to provide comparisons among representative land-based and space systems. These comparisons enable early, conceptual considerations of safety issues and features in the preliminary design phases of operational systems, test facilities, and operations by identifying differences between the requirements for space systems and the established practice for land-based power systems. Early indications are that separation distance is much more effective as a safety measure for space nuclear systems than for power reactors because greater decay of the radionuclide activity occurs during the time to transport the inventory a given distance. In addition, the inventories of long-lived actinides are very low for space reactor systems

  20. Computer network time synchronization the network time protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, David L

    2006-01-01

    What started with the sundial has, thus far, been refined to a level of precision based on atomic resonance: Time. Our obsession with time is evident in this continued scaling down to nanosecond resolution and beyond. But this obsession is not without warrant. Precision and time synchronization are critical in many applications, such as air traffic control and stock trading, and pose complex and important challenges in modern information networks.Penned by David L. Mills, the original developer of the Network Time Protocol (NTP), Computer Network Time Synchronization: The Network Time Protocol

  1. Computing the Maximum Detour of a Plane Graph in Subquadratic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    Let G be a plane graph where each edge is a line segment. We consider the problem of computing the maximum detour of G, defined as the maximum over all pairs of distinct points p and q of G of the ratio between the distance between p and q in G and the distance |pq|. The fastest known algorithm f...... for this problem has O(n^2) running time. We show how to obtain O(n^{3/2}*(log n)^3) expected running time. We also show that if G has bounded treewidth, its maximum detour can be computed in O(n*(log n)^3) expected time....

  2. An Evaluation of Windows-Based Computer Forensics Application Software Running on a Macintosh

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory H. Carlton

    2008-01-01

    The two most common computer forensics applications perform exclusively on Microsoft Windows Operating Systems, yet contemporary computer forensics examinations frequently encounter one or more of the three most common operating system environments, namely Windows, OS-X, or some form of UNIX or Linux. Additionally, government and private computer forensics laboratories frequently encounter budget constraints that limit their access to computer hardware. Currently, Macintosh computer systems a...

  3. Comparing the performance of SIMD computers by running large air pollution models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on these computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gained detailed insight about the performance of the computers involved when used to solve large-scale scientific...... problems that involve several types of numerical computations. The computers used in our study are the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5, and the MasPar MP-2216...

  4. Run-time Phenomena in Dynamic Software Updating: Causes and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Allan Raundahl; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    The development of a dynamic software updating system for statically-typed object-oriented programming languages has turned out to be a challenging task. Despite the fact that the present state of the art in dynamic updating systems, like JRebel, Dynamic Code Evolution VM, JVolve and Javeleon, all...... written in statically-typed object-oriented programming languages. In this paper, we present our experience from developing dynamically updatable applications using a state-of-the-art dynamic updating system for Java. We believe that the findings presented in this paper provide an important step towards...... provide very transparent and flexible technical solutions to dynamic updating, case studies have shown that designing dynamically updatable applications still remains a challenging task. This challenge has its roots in a number of run-time phenomena that are inherent to dynamic updating of applications...

  5. Novel time-dependent alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00386283; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require an unbiased and high resolution measurement of the charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and the quality of the alignment of its components. For the LHC Run 2, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). ATLAS Inner Detector alignment framework has been adapted and upgraded to correct very short time scale movements of the sub-detectors. In particular, a mechanical distortion of the IBL staves up to 20 μm and a vertical displacement of the Pixel detector of ~6 μm have been observed during data-taking. The techniques used to correct for these effects and to match the required Inner Detector performance will be presented.

  6. Operating Security System Support for Run-Time Security with a Trusted Execution Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Javier

    , it is safe to assume that any complex software is compromised. The problem is then to monitor and contain it when it executes in order to protect sensitive data and other sensitive assets. To really have an impact, any solution to this problem should be integrated in commodity operating systems...... in the Linux operating system. We are in the process of making this driver part of the mainline Linux kernel.......Software services have become an integral part of our daily life. Cyber-attacks have thus become a problem of increasing importance not only for the IT industry, but for society at large. A way to contain cyber-attacks is to guarantee the integrity of IT systems at run-time. Put differently...

  7. Supporting Multiprocessors in the Icecap Safety-Critical Java Run-Time Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Shuai; Wellings, Andy; Korsholm, Stephan Erbs

    The current version of the Safety Critical Java (SCJ) specification defines three compliance levels. Level 0 targets single processor programs while Level 1 and 2 can support multiprocessor platforms. Level 1 programs must be fully partitioned but Level 2 programs can also be more globally...... scheduled. As of yet, there is no official Reference Implementation for SCJ. However, the icecap project has produced a Safety-Critical Java Run-time Environment based on the Hardware-near Virtual Machine (HVM). This supports SCJ at all compliance levels and provides an implementation of the safety......-critical Java (javax.safetycritical) package. This is still work-in-progress and lacks certain key features. Among these is the ability to support multiprocessor platforms. In this paper, we explore two possible options to adding multiprocessor support to this environment: the “green thread” and the “native...

  8. Distributed computing for real-time petroleum reservoir monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayodele, O. R. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-05-01

    Computer software architecture is presented to illustrate how the concept of distributed computing can be applied to real-time reservoir monitoring processes, permitting the continuous monitoring of the dynamic behaviour of petroleum reservoirs at much shorter intervals. The paper describes the fundamental technologies driving distributed computing, namely Java 2 Platform Enterprise edition (J2EE) by Sun Microsystems, and the Microsoft Dot-Net (Microsoft.Net) initiative, and explains the challenges involved in distributed computing. These are: (1) availability of permanently placed downhole equipment to acquire and transmit seismic data; (2) availability of high bandwidth to transmit the data; (3) security considerations; (4) adaptation of existing legacy codes to run on networks as downloads on demand; and (5) credibility issues concerning data security over the Internet. Other applications of distributed computing in the petroleum industry are also considered, specifically MWD, LWD and SWD (measurement-while-drilling, logging-while-drilling, and simulation-while-drilling), and drill-string vibration monitoring. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Soft Real-Time PID Control on a VME Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayan, Vahag; Sander, Stanley; Cageao, Richard

    2007-01-01

    microPID (uPID) is a computer program for real-time proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control of a translation stage in a Fourier-transform ultraviolet spectrometer. microPID implements a PID control loop over a position profile at sampling rate of 8 kHz (sampling period 125microseconds). The software runs in a strippeddown Linux operating system on a VersaModule Eurocard (VME) computer operating in real-time priority queue using an embedded controller, a 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (D/A) board, and a laser-positioning board (LPB). microPID consists of three main parts: (1) VME device-driver routines, (2) software that administers a custom protocol for serial communication with a control computer, and (3) a loop section that obtains the current position from an LPB-driver routine, calculates the ideal position from the profile, and calculates a new voltage command by use of an embedded PID routine all within each sampling period. The voltage command is sent to the D/A board to control the stage. microPID uses special kernel headers to obtain microsecond timing resolution. Inasmuch as microPID implements a single-threaded process and all other processes are disabled, the Linux operating system acts as a soft real-time system.

  10. Computing with Windows 7 For the Older and Wiser Get Up and Running on Your Home PC

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Computing with Windows® 7 for the Older & Wiser is a user friendly guide that takes you step-by-step through the basics of using a computer.  Written in an easy-to-understand, jargon free language, it is aimed at complete beginners using PCs running on Microsoft Windows ® 7. . Inside, you will find step-by-step guidance on: Using the keyboard & the mouse; Navigating files and folders; Customising your desktop; Using Email and the Internet; Word processing; Organising your digital photos; Safely downloading files from the Internet; Finding useful websites and much more

  11. Haemoglobin mass and running time trial performance after recombinant human erythropoietin administration in trained men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Durussel

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo increases haemoglobin mass (Hb(mass and maximal oxygen uptake (v O(2 max. PURPOSE: This study defined the time course of changes in Hb(mass, v O(2 max as well as running time trial performance following 4 weeks of rHuEpo administration to determine whether the laboratory observations would translate into actual improvements in running performance in the field. METHODS: 19 trained men received rHuEpo injections of 50 IU•kg(-1 body mass every two days for 4 weeks. Hb(mass was determined weekly using the optimized carbon monoxide rebreathing method until 4 weeks after administration. v O(2 max and 3,000 m time trial performance were measured pre, post administration and at the end of the study. RESULTS: Relative to baseline, running performance significantly improved by ∼6% after administration (10:30±1:07 min:sec vs. 11:08±1:15 min:sec, p<0.001 and remained significantly enhanced by ∼3% 4 weeks after administration (10:46±1:13 min:sec, p<0.001, while v O(2 max was also significantly increased post administration (60.7±5.8 mL•min(-1•kg(-1 vs. 56.0±6.2 mL•min(-1•kg(-1, p<0.001 and remained significantly increased 4 weeks after rHuEpo (58.0±5.6 mL•min(-1•kg(-1, p = 0.021. Hb(mass was significantly increased at the end of administration compared to baseline (15.2±1.5 g•kg(-1 vs. 12.7±1.2 g•kg(-1, p<0.001. The rate of decrease in Hb(mass toward baseline values post rHuEpo was similar to that of the increase during administration (-0.53 g•kg(-1•wk(-1, 95% confidence interval (CI (-0.68, -0.38 vs. 0.54 g•kg(-1•wk(-1, CI (0.46, 0.63 but Hb(mass was still significantly elevated 4 weeks after administration compared to baseline (13.7±1.1 g•kg(-1, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Running performance was improved following 4 weeks of rHuEpo and remained elevated 4 weeks after administration compared to baseline. These field performance effects coincided with r

  12. Effect of Light/Dark Cycle on Wheel Running and Responding Reinforced by the Opportunity to Run Depends on Postsession Feeding Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belke, T. W.; Mondona, A. R.; Conrad, K. M.; Poirier, K. F.; Pickering, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Do rats run and respond at a higher rate to run during the dark phase when they are typically more active? To answer this question, Long Evans rats were exposed to a response-initiated variable interval 30-s schedule of wheel-running reinforcement during light and dark cycles. Wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased modestly during…

  13. Could running experience on SPMD computers contribute to the architectural choices for future dedicated computers for high energy physics simulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejcic, A.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.; Auguin, M.; Boeri, F.

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained on a strongly coupled parallel computer are reported. They concern Monte-Carlo simulation and pattern recognition. Though the calculations were made on an experimental computer of rather low processing power, it is believed that the quoted figures could give useful indications on architectural choices for dedicated computers. (orig.)

  14. Could running experience on SPMD computers contribute to the architectural choices for future dedicated computers for high energy physics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejcic, A.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.; Auguin, M.; Boeri, F.

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained on strongly coupled parallel computer are reported. They concern Monte-Carlo simulation and pattern recognition. Though the calculations were made on an experimental computer of rather low processing power, it is believed that the quoted figures could give useful indications on architectural choices for dedicated computers

  15. Time series modeling, computation, and inference

    CERN Document Server

    Prado, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The authors systematically develop a state-of-the-art analysis and modeling of time series. … this book is well organized and well written. The authors present various statistical models for engineers to solve problems in time series analysis. Readers no doubt will learn state-of-the-art techniques from this book.-Hsun-Hsien Chang, Computing Reviews, March 2012My favorite chapters were on dynamic linear models and vector AR and vector ARMA models.-William Seaver, Technometrics, August 2011… a very modern entry to the field of time-series modelling, with a rich reference list of the current lit

  16. A Computed River Flow-Based Turbine Controller on a Programmable Logic Controller for Run-Off River Hydroelectric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razali Jidin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The main feature of a run-off river hydroelectric system is a small size intake pond that overspills when river flow is more than turbines’ intake. As river flow fluctuates, a large proportion of the potential energy is wasted due to the spillages which can occur when turbines are operated manually. Manual operation is often adopted due to unreliability of water level-based controllers at many remote and unmanned run-off river hydropower plants. In order to overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel method by developing a controller that derives turbine output set points from computed mass flow rate of rivers that feed the hydroelectric system. The computed flow is derived by summation of pond volume difference with numerical integration of both turbine discharge flows and spillages. This approach of estimating river flow allows the use of existing sensors rather than requiring the installation of new ones. All computations, including the numerical integration, have been realized as ladder logics on a programmable logic controller. The implemented controller manages the dynamic changes in the flow rate of the river better than the old point-level based controller, with the aid of a newly installed water level sensor. The computed mass flow rate of the river also allows the controller to straightforwardly determine the number of turbines to be in service with considerations of turbine efficiencies and auxiliary power conservation.

  17. Real-Time Thevenin Impedance Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur

    2013-01-01

    operating state, and strict time constraints are difficult to adhere to as the complexity of the grid increases. Several suggested approaches for real-time stability assessment require Thevenin impedances to be determined for the observed system conditions. By combining matrix factorization, graph reduction......, and parallelization, we develop an algorithm for computing Thevenin impedances an order of magnitude faster than previous approaches. We test the factor-and-solve algorithm with data from several power grids of varying complexity, and we show how the algorithm allows realtime stability assessment of complex power...

  18. Personal best marathon time and longest training run, not anthropometry, predict performance in recreational 24-hour ultrarunners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-08-01

    In recent studies, a relationship between both low body fat and low thicknesses of selected skinfolds has been demonstrated for running performance of distances from 100 m to the marathon but not in ultramarathon. We investigated the association of anthropometric and training characteristics with race performance in 63 male recreational ultrarunners in a 24-hour run using bi and multivariate analysis. The athletes achieved an average distance of 146.1 (43.1) km. In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = -0.25), the sum of 9 skinfolds (r = -0.32), the sum of upper body skinfolds (r = -0.34), body fat percentage (r = -0.32), weekly kilometers ran (r = 0.31), longest training session before the 24-hour run (r = 0.56), and personal best marathon time (r = -0.58) were related to race performance. Stepwise multiple regression showed that both the longest training session before the 24-hour run (p = 0.0013) and the personal best marathon time (p = 0.0015) had the best correlation with race performance. Performance in these 24-hour runners may be predicted (r2 = 0.46) by the following equation: Performance in a 24-hour run, km) = 234.7 + 0.481 (longest training session before the 24-hour run, km) - 0.594 (personal best marathon time, minutes). For practical applications, training variables such as volume and intensity were associated with performance but not anthropometric variables. To achieve maximum kilometers in a 24-hour run, recreational ultrarunners should have a personal best marathon time of ∼3 hours 20 minutes and complete a long training run of ∼60 km before the race, whereas anthropometric characteristics such as low body fat or low skinfold thicknesses showed no association with performance.

  19. A new view of responses to first-time barefoot running.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Mick; Caplan, Nick; Akenhead, Richard; Hayes, Phil

    2015-01-01

    We examined acute alterations in gait and oxygen cost from shod-to-barefoot running in habitually-shod well-trained runners with no prior experience of running barefoot. Thirteen runners completed six-minute treadmill runs shod and barefoot on separate days at a mean speed of 12.5 km·h-1. Steady-state oxygen cost in the final minute was recorded. Kinematic data were captured from 30-consecutive strides. Mean differences between conditions were estimated with 90% confidence intervals. When bar...

  20. The optimal production-run time for a stock-dependent imperfect production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Divya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops an inventory model for a hypothesized volume flexible manufacturing system in which the production rate is stock-dependent and the system produces both perfect and imperfect quality items. The demand rate of perfect quality items is known and constant, whereas the demand rate of imperfect (non-conforming to specifications quality items is a function of discount offered in the selling price. In this paper, we determine an optimal production-run time and the optimal discount that should be offered in the selling price to influence the sale of imperfect quality items produced by the manufacturing system. The considered model aims to maximize the net profit obtained through the sales of both perfect and imperfect quality items subject to certain constraints of the system. The solution procedure suggests the use of ‘Interior Penalty Function Method’ to solve the associated constrained maximization problem. Finally, a numerical example demonstrating the applicability of proposed model has been included.

  1. Running out of time: exploring women's motivations for social egg freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kylie; Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Mitchell, Helene

    2018-04-12

    Few qualitative studies have explored women's use of social egg freezing. Derived from an interview study of 31 participants, this article explores the motivations of women using this technology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 31 users of social egg freezing resident in UK (n = 23), USA (n = 7) and Norway (n = 1). Interviews were face to face (n = 16), through Skype and Facetime (n = 9) or by telephone (n = 6). Data were analyzed using interpretive thematic analysis. Women's use of egg freezing was shaped by fears of running out of time to form a conventional family, difficulties in finding a partner and concerns about "panic partnering", together with a desire to avoid future regrets and blame. For some women, use of egg freezing was influenced by recent fertility or health diagnoses as well as critical life events. A fifth of the participants also disclosed an underlying fertility or health issue as affecting their decision. The study provides new insights in to the complex motivations women have for banking eggs. It identifies how women's use of egg freezing was an attempt to "preserve fertility" in the absence of the particular set of "life conditions" they regarded as crucial for pursuing parenthood. It also demonstrates that few women were motivated by a desire to enhance their career and that the boundaries between egg freezing for medical and for social reasons may be more porous than first anticipated.

  2. A Test Run of the EGSIEM Near Real-Time Service Based on GRACE Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvas, A.; Gruber, C.; Gouweleeuw, B.; Guntner, A.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; Flechtner, F. M.

    2017-12-01

    To enable the use of GRACE and GRACE-FO data for rapid monitoring applications, the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, funded by the Horizon 2020 Framework Program for Research and Innovation of the European Union, has implemented a demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service. The goal of this service is to provide daily gravity field solutions with a maximum latency of five days. For this purpose, two independent approaches were developed at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and Graz University of Technology (TUG). Based on these daily gravity field solutions, statistical flood and drought indicators are derived by the EGSIEM Hydrological Service, developed at GFZ. The NRT products are subsequently provided to the Center for Satellite based Crisis Information (ZKI) at the German Aerospace Center as well as the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) at the Joint Research Center of the European Commission. In the first part of this contribution, the performance of the service based on a statistical analysis of historical flood events during the GRACE period is evaluated. Then, results from the six month long operational test run of the service which started on April 1st 2017 are presented and a comparison between historical and operational gravity products and flood indicators is made.

  3. A Run-Time Verification Framework for Smart Grid Applications Implemented on Simulation Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2013-05-18

    Smart grid applications are implemented and tested with simulation frameworks as the developers usually do not have access to large sensor networks to be used as a test bed. The developers are forced to map the implementation onto these frameworks which results in a deviation between the architecture and the code. On its turn this deviation makes it hard to verify behavioral constraints that are de- scribed at the architectural level. We have developed the ConArch toolset to support the automated verification of architecture-level behavioral constraints. A key feature of ConArch is programmable mapping for architecture to the implementation. Here, developers implement queries to identify the points in the target program that correspond to architectural interactions. ConArch generates run- time observers that monitor the flow of execution between these points and verifies whether this flow conforms to the behavioral constraints. We illustrate how the programmable mappings can be exploited for verifying behavioral constraints of a smart grid appli- cation that is implemented with two simulation frameworks.

  4. Time reversibility, computer simulation, algorithms, chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    A small army of physicists, chemists, mathematicians, and engineers has joined forces to attack a classic problem, the "reversibility paradox", with modern tools. This book describes their work from the perspective of computer simulation, emphasizing the author's approach to the problem of understanding the compatibility, and even inevitability, of the irreversible second law of thermodynamics with an underlying time-reversible mechanics. Computer simulation has made it possible to probe reversibility from a variety of directions and "chaos theory" or "nonlinear dynamics" has supplied a useful vocabulary and a set of concepts, which allow a fuller explanation of irreversibility than that available to Boltzmann or to Green, Kubo and Onsager. Clear illustration of concepts is emphasized throughout, and reinforced with a glossary of technical terms from the specialized fields which have been combined here to focus on a common theme. The book begins with a discussion, contrasting the idealized reversibility of ba...

  5. A strategy for reducing turnaround time in design optimization using a distributed computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katherine C.; Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to explore methods for reducing lengthly computer turnaround or clock time associated with engineering design problems. Different strategies can be employed to reduce this turnaround time. One strategy is to run validated analysis software on a network of existing smaller computers so that portions of the computation can be done in parallel. This paper focuses on the implementation of this method using two types of problems. The first type is a traditional structural design optimization problem, which is characterized by a simple data flow and a complicated analysis. The second type of problem uses an existing computer program designed to study multilevel optimization techniques. This problem is characterized by complicated data flow and a simple analysis. The paper shows that distributed computing can be a viable means for reducing computational turnaround time for engineering design problems that lend themselves to decomposition. Parallel computing can be accomplished with a minimal cost in terms of hardware and software.

  6. Running into trouble with the time-dependent propagation of a wavepacket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriz, Abel E; Sztrajman, Alejandro; Mitnik, DarIo

    2010-01-01

    The propagation in time of a wavepacket is a conceptually rich problem suitable to be studied in any introductory quantum mechanics course. This subject is covered analytically in most of the standard textbooks. Computer simulations have become a widespread pedagogical tool, easily implemented in computer labs and in classroom demonstrations. However, we have detected issues raising difficulties in the practical effectuation of these codes which are especially evident when discrete grid methods are used. One issue-relatively well known-appears at high incident energies, producing a wavepacket slower than expected theoretically. The other issue, which appears at low wavepacket energies, does not affect the time evolution of the propagating wavepacket proper, but produces dramatic effects on its spectral decomposition. The origin of the troubles is investigated, and different ways to deal with these issues are proposed. Finally, we show how this problem is manifested and solved in the practical case of the electronic spectra of a metal surface ionized by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  7. Running into trouble with the time-dependent propagation of a wavepacket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garriz, Abel E; Sztrajman, Alejandro; Mitnik, DarIo, E-mail: dmitnik@df.uba.a [Instituto de AstronomIa y Fisica del Espacio, C.C. 67, Suc. 28, (C1428EGA) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-15

    The propagation in time of a wavepacket is a conceptually rich problem suitable to be studied in any introductory quantum mechanics course. This subject is covered analytically in most of the standard textbooks. Computer simulations have become a widespread pedagogical tool, easily implemented in computer labs and in classroom demonstrations. However, we have detected issues raising difficulties in the practical effectuation of these codes which are especially evident when discrete grid methods are used. One issue-relatively well known-appears at high incident energies, producing a wavepacket slower than expected theoretically. The other issue, which appears at low wavepacket energies, does not affect the time evolution of the propagating wavepacket proper, but produces dramatic effects on its spectral decomposition. The origin of the troubles is investigated, and different ways to deal with these issues are proposed. Finally, we show how this problem is manifested and solved in the practical case of the electronic spectra of a metal surface ionized by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  8. Accuracy analysis of the State-of-Charge and remaining run-time determination for lithium-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, V.; Bergveld, H.J.; Notten, P.H.L.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various error sources in a real-time State-of-Charge (SoC) evaluation system and their effects on the overall accuracy in the calculation of the remaining run-time of a battery-operated system. The SoC algorithm for Li-ion batteries studied in this paper combines direct

  9. Accuracy analysis of the state-of-charge and remaining run-time determination for lithium-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, V.; Bergveld, H.J.; Notten, P.H.L.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the various error sources in a real-time State-of-Charge (SoC) evaluation system and their effects on the overall accuracy in the calculation of the remaining run-time of a battery-operated system. The SoC algorithm for Li-ion batteries studied in this paper combines direct

  10. Primary and secondary effects of real-time feedback to reduce vertical loading rate during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, M; Willy, R W; Meardon, S A

    2017-05-01

    Gait modifications are often proposed to reduce average loading rate (AVLR) during running. While many modifications may reduce AVLR, little work has investigated secondary gait changes. Thirty-two rearfoot runners [16M, 16F, 24.7 (3.3) years, 22.72 (3.01) kg/m 2 , >16 km/week] ran at a self-selected speed (2.9 ± 0.3 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill, while 3D mechanics were calculated via real-time data acquisition. Real-time visual feedback was provided in a randomized order to cue a forefoot strike (FFS), a minimum 7.5% decrease in step length, or a minimum 15% reduction in AVLR. AVLR was reduced by FFS (mean difference = 26.4 BW/s; 95% CI = 20.1, 32.7; P < 0.001), shortened step length (8.4 BW/s; 95% CI = 2.9, 14.0; P = 0.004), and cues to reduce AVLR (14.9 BW/s; 95% CI = 10.2, 19.6; P < 0.001). FFS, shortened step length, and cues to reduce AVLR all reduced eccentric knee joint work per km [(-48.2 J/kg*m; 95% CI = -58.1, -38.3; P < 0.001), (-35.5 J/kg*m; 95% CI = -42.4, 28.6; P < 0.001), (-23.1 J/kg*m; 95% CI = -33.3, -12.9; P < 0.001)]. However, FFS and cues to reduce AVLR also increased eccentric ankle joint work per km [(54.49 J/kg*m; 95% CI = 45.3, 63.7; P < 0.001), (9.20 J/kg*m; 95% CI = 1.7, 16.7; P = 0.035)]. Potentially injurious secondary effects associated with FFS and cues to reduce AVLR may undermine their clinical utility. Alternatively, a shortened step length resulted in small reductions in AVLR, without any potentially injurious secondary effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Running the running

    OpenAIRE

    Cabass, Giovanni; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite experiment to place constraints on the running $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s} = \\mathrm{d}n_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ and the running of the running $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}} = \\mathrm{d}\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ of the spectral index $n_{\\mathrm{s}}$ of primordial scalar fluctuations. We find $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s}=0.011\\pm0.010$ and $\\beta_\\mathrm{s}=0.027\\...

  12. Biomechanical characteristics of skeletal muscles and associations between running speed and contraction time in 8- to 13-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; Pišot, Rado; Šimunič, Boštjan; Kokol, Peter; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2017-02-01

    Objective To investigate associations between running speeds and contraction times in 8- to 13-year-old children. Method This longitudinal study analyzed tensiomyographic measurements of vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles' contraction times and maximum running speeds in 107 children (53 boys, 54 girls). Data were evaluated using multiple correspondence analysis. Results A gender difference existed between the vastus lateralis contraction times and running speeds. The running speed was less dependent on vastus lateralis contraction times in boys than in girls. Analysis of biceps femoris contraction times and running speeds revealed that running speeds of boys were much more structurally associated with contraction times than those of girls, for whom the association seemed chaotic. Conclusion Joint category plots showed that contraction times of biceps femoris were associated much more closely with running speed than those of the vastus lateralis muscle. These results provide insight into a new dimension of children's development.

  13. Real-Time Accumulative Computation Motion Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino Maldonado-Bascón

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The neurally inspired accumulative computation (AC method and its application to motion detection have been introduced in the past years. This paper revisits the fact that many researchers have explored the relationship between neural networks and finite state machines. Indeed, finite state machines constitute the best characterized computational model, whereas artificial neural networks have become a very successful tool for modeling and problem solving. The article shows how to reach real-time performance after using a model described as a finite state machine. This paper introduces two steps towards that direction: (a A simplification of the general AC method is performed by formally transforming it into a finite state machine. (b A hardware implementation in FPGA of such a designed AC module, as well as an 8-AC motion detector, providing promising performance results. We also offer two case studies of the use of AC motion detectors in surveillance applications, namely infrared-based people segmentation and color-based people tracking, respectively.

  14. Mapping real-life applications on run-time reconfigurable NoC-based MPSoC on FPGA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.K.; Kumar, A.; Srikanthan, Th.; Ha, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Multiprocessor systems-on-chip (MPSoC) are required to fulfill the performance demand of modern real-life embedded applications. These MPSoCs are employing Network-on-Chip (NoC) for reasons of efficiency and scalability. Additionally, these systems need to support run-time reconfiguration of their

  15. An investigation of the relation between the 30 meter running time and the femoral volume fraction in the thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MY Tasmektepligil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leg components are thought to be a related to speed. Only a limited number of studies have, however, examined the interaction between speed and bone size. In this study, we examined the relationship between the time taken by football players to run thirty meters and the fraction which the femur forms compared to the entire thigh region. Data collected from thirty male football players of average age 17.3 (between 16-19 years old were analyzed. First we detected the thirty meter running times and then we estimated the volume fraction of the femur to the entire thigh region using stereological methods on magnetic resonance images. Our data showed that there was a highly negative relationship between the 30 meter running times and the volume fraction of the bone to the thigh region. Thus, 30 meter running time decreases as the fraction of the bone to the thigh region increases. In other words, speed increases as the fraction of bone volume increases. Our data indicate that selecting sportsman whose femoral volume fractions are high will provide a significant benefit to enhancing performance in those branches of sports which require speed. Moreover, we concluded that training which can increase the bone volume fraction should be practiced when an increase in speed is desired and that the changes in the fraction of thigh region components should be monitored during these trainings.

  16. Cluster Computing for Embedded/Real-Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, D.; Kepner, J.

    1999-01-01

    Embedded and real-time systems, like other computing systems, seek to maximize computing power for a given price, and thus can significantly benefit from the advancing capabilities of cluster computing.

  17.  Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barandun U

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners.Methods: Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times.Results: After multivariate regression, running speed of the training units (β=-0.52, P<0.0001 and percent body fat (β=0.27, P <0.0001 were the two variables most strongly correlated with marathon race times. Marathon race time for recreational male runners may be estimated to some extent by using the following equation (r2 = 0.44: race time (minutes = 326.3 + 2.394 × (percent body fat, % – 12.06 × (speed in training, km/hours. Running speed during training sessions correlated with prerace percent body fat (r=0.33, P=0.0002. The model including anthropometric and training variables explained 44% of the variance of marathon race times, whereas running speed during training sessions alone explained 40%. Thus, training speed was more predictive of marathon performance times than anthropometric characteristics.Conclusion: The present results suggest that low body fat and running speed during training close to race pace (about 11 km/hour are two key factors for a fast marathon race time in recreational male marathoner runners.Keywords: body fat, skinfold thickness, anthropometry, endurance, athlete

  18. Long-run sectoral development time series evidence for the German economy

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Andreas; Krüger, Jens J.

    2008-01-01

    In economic development, long-run structural change among the three main sectors of an economy follows a typical pattern with the primary sector (agriculture, mining) first dominating, followed by the secondary sector (manufacturing) and finally by the tertiary sector (services) in terms of employment and value added. We reconsider the verbal theoretical work of Fourastié and build a simple model encompassing its main features, most notably the macroeconomic influences on the sectoral develop...

  19. Results of the deepest all-sky survey for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO S6 data running on the Einstein@Home volunteer distributed computing project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acemese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwa, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Arker, Bd.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Be, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitoss, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Boutfanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, O.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, C.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreyer, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Egizenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholel, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, O.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Far, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.M.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, J. -D; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritsche, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garuti, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gi, K.; Glaetke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Granta, A.; Gras, S.; Cray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonsta, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howel, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, O.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Lyer, B. R.; Fzumi, K.; Jaccimin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Wads, k; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keh, M. S.; Keite, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kimbre, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kisse, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringe, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Liick, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ivia, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; Maclnnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magafia-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magafia; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Manse, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matiehard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mende, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Miche, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecehia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Hang, S.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Ram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, . J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powel, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, .; Punturo, M.; Purrer, PuppoM.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, RosiliskaS.; Ruggi, RiidigerP.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabe, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Sielleez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazus, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sunil, Suns; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepariczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tomasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Tome, C.; Tot, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifire, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozz, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Valente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bake, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; Van Heilningen, J. V.; Van Vegge, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vaslith, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Vvang, G.; Wang, O.; Wang, X.; Wiang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Wiarner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weliels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; WilIke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Whinkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; De Witte, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S.J.; Zhu, X.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report results of a deep all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars in data from the S6 LIGO science run. The search was possible thanks to the computing power provided by the volunteers of the Einstein@Home distributed computing project. We find no significant

  20. Optimal design and real time control of the integrated urban run-off system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul; Rauch, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    Traditional design of urban run-off systems is based on fixed rules with respect to the points of demarcation between the three systems involved: the sewer system, the treatment plant and the receiving water. An alternative to fixed rules is to model the total system. There is still uncertainty...... and evaluation of competing alternatives for design. However, the complexity of these systems is such that the parameters associated with pollution are hardly identifiable on the basis of reasonable monitoring programmes. The empirical-iterative approach: structures are built on simplified assumptions...

  1. The effect of time constraints and running phases on combined event pistol shooting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadswell, Clare; Payton, Carl; Holmes, Paul; Burden, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The combined event is a crucial aspect of the modern pentathlon competition, but little is known about how shooting performance changes through the event. This study aimed to identify (i) how performance-related variables changed within each shooting series and (ii) how performance-related variables changed between each shooting series. Seventeen modern pentathletes completed combined event trials. An optoelectronic shooting system recorded score and pistol movement, and force platforms recorded centre of pressure movement 1 s prior to every shot. Heart rate and blood lactate values were recorded throughout the event. Whilst heart rate and blood lactate significantly increased between series (P  0.05). Thus, combined event shooting performance following each running phase appears similar to shooting performance following only 20 m of running. This finding has potential implications for the way in which modern pentathletes train for combined event shooting, and highlights the need for modern pentathletes to establish new methods with which to enhance shooting accuracy.

  2. 6 CFR 13.27 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.27 Section 13.27 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.27 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  4. Safety, Liveness and Run-time Refinement for Modular Process-Aware Information Systems with Dynamic Sub Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Slaats, Tijs

    2015-01-01

    and verification of flexible, run-time adaptable process-aware information systems, moved into practice via the Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graphs notation co-developed with our industrial partner. Our key contributions are: (1) A formal theory of dynamic sub-process instantiation for declarative, event......We study modularity, run-time adaptation and refinement under safety and liveness constraints in event-based process models with dynamic sub-process instantiation. The study is part of a larger programme to provide semantically well-founded technologies for modelling, implementation......-based processes under safety and liveness constraints, given as the DCR* process language, equipped with a compositional operational semantics and conservatively extending the DCR Graphs notation; (2) an expressiveness analysis revealing that the DCR* process language is Turing-complete, while the fragment cor...

  5. Design and Implementation of a New Run-time Life-cycle for Interactive Public Display Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Jorge C. S.; Perpétua, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Public display systems are becoming increasingly complex. They are moving from passive closed systems to open interactive systems that are able to accommodate applications from several independent sources. This shift needs to be accompanied by a more flexible and powerful application management. In this paper, we propose a run-time life-cycle model for interactive public display applications that addresses several shortcomings of current display systems. Our mo...

  6. Effect of injection timing on combustion and performance of a direct injection diesel engine running on Jatropha methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindal, S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Technology & Engineering, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur 313001 (India)

    2011-07-01

    The present study aims at evaluation of effect of injection timing on the combustion, performance and emissions of a small power diesel engine, commonly used for agriculture purpose, running on pure biodiesel, prepared from Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) vegetable oil. The effect of varying injection timing was evaluated in terms of thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, power and mean effective pressure, exhaust temperature, cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise and the heat release rate. It was found that retarding the injection timing by 3 degrees enhances the thermal efficiency by about 8 percent.

  7. Integration of control and building performance simulation software by run-time coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yahiaoui, A.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Soethout, L.L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the background, approach and initial results of a project, which aims to achieve better integrated building and systems control modeling in building performance simulation by runtime coupling of distributed computer programs. This paper focuses on one of the essential steps

  8. Upper Bounds Prediction of the Execution Time of Programs Running on ARM Cortex-A Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotova , Irina; Krause , Bernd; Siemens , Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Part 6: Embedded and Real Time Systems; International audience; This paper describes the application of statistical analysis of the timing behavior for a generic real-time task model. Using specific processor of ARM Cortex-A series and an empirical approach of time values retrieval, the algorithm to predict the upper bounds for the task of the time acquisition operation has been formulated. For the experimental verification of the algorithm, we have used the robust Measurement-Based Probabili...

  9. Universal data access for run-time resource management in resource constrained wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Rerkrai, Krisakorn

    2012-01-01

    Resource-constrainedwireless networks, e.g.wireless sensor networks (WSNs), small embedded devices with limited computational power and energy, have been the subject of intense research in the past decade. Moreover, recent technological advances and growing demand for better efficiency have led to a great number of link and network protocols for WSNs. The protocols depend on specific interfaces to exchange necessary information. Unfortunately these interfaces are often proprietary and highly ...

  10. A Study on Run Time Assurance for Complex Cyber Physical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    Systems. PhD thesis, Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, Sep 2006. [202] Joseph Porter, Graham Hemingway , Harmon Nine...Systems Design. Part 1: Language, Framework, and Analysis. Sep 2010. [203] G. Hemingway , J. Porter, N. Kottenstette, H. Nine, C. vanBuskirk, G. Karsai...interoperability. In Intelligent Solutions in Embedded Systems, 2007 Fifth Workshop on, pages 76 –86, june 2007. [244] J. Porter and G. Hemingway . The ESMoL

  11. Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners

    OpenAIRE

    Knechtle, Beat; Barandun,; Knechtle,Patrizia; Klipstein,; Rüst,Christoph Alexander; Rosemann,Thomas; Lepers,Romuald

    2012-01-01

     Background: Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners.Methods: Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times.Results...

  12. Computer Aided Continuous Time Stochastic Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, N.R.; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2001-01-01

    A grey-box approach to process modelling that combines deterministic and stochastic modelling is advocated for identification of models for model-based control of batch and semi-batch processes. A computer-aided tool designed for supporting decision-making within the corresponding modelling cycle...

  13. Real-time data-intensive computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkinson, Dilworth Y., E-mail: dyparkinson@lbl.gov; Chen, Xian; Hexemer, Alexander; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Padmore, Howard A.; Shapiro, David; Tamura, Nobumichi [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, Keith; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Patton, Simon J.; Perciano, Talita; Stromsness, Rune; Tull, Craig E.; Ushizima, Daniela [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Correa, Joaquin; Deslippe, Jack R. [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian L. [Energy Sciences Network, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Daurer, Benedikt J.; Maia, Filipe R. N. C. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); and others

    2016-07-27

    Today users visit synchrotrons as sources of understanding and discovery—not as sources of just light, and not as sources of data. To achieve this, the synchrotron facilities frequently provide not just light but often the entire end station and increasingly, advanced computational facilities that can reduce terabytes of data into a form that can reveal a new key insight. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) has partnered with high performance computing, fast networking, and applied mathematics groups to create a “super-facility”, giving users simultaneous access to the experimental, computational, and algorithmic resources to make this possible. This combination forms an efficient closed loop, where data—despite its high rate and volume—is transferred and processed immediately and automatically on appropriate computing resources, and results are extracted, visualized, and presented to users or to the experimental control system, both to provide immediate insight and to guide decisions about subsequent experiments during beamtime. We will describe our work at the ALS ptychography, scattering, micro-diffraction, and micro-tomography beamlines.

  14. Languages, compilers and run-time environments for distributed memory machines

    CERN Document Server

    Saltz, J

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented within this volume cover a wide range of topics related to programming distributed memory machines. Distributed memory architectures, although having the potential to supply the very high levels of performance required to support future computing needs, present awkward programming problems. The major issue is to design methods which enable compilers to generate efficient distributed memory programs from relatively machine independent program specifications. This book is the compilation of papers describing a wide range of research efforts aimed at easing the task of programmin

  15. Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Next generation space missions require autonomous systems to operate without human intervention for long periods of times in highly dynamic environments. Such...

  16. Real time computer system with distributed microprocessors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, D.; Steusloff, H.; Syrbe, M.

    1979-01-01

    The usual centralized structure of computer systems, especially of process computer systems, cannot sufficiently use the progress of very large-scale integrated semiconductor technology with respect to increasing the reliability and performance and to decreasing the expenses especially of the external periphery. This and the increasing demands on process control systems has led the authors to generally examine the structure of such systems and to adapt it to the new surroundings. Computer systems with distributed, optical fibre-coupled microprocessors allow a very favourable problem-solving with decentralized controlled buslines and functional redundancy with automatic fault diagnosis and reconfiguration. A fit programming system supports these hardware properties: PEARL for multicomputer systems, dynamic loader, processor and network operating system. The necessary design principles for this are proved mainly theoretically and by value analysis. An optimal overall system of this new generation of process control systems was established, supported by results of 2 PDV projects (modular operating systems, input/output colour screen system as control panel), for the purpose of testing by apllying the system for the control of 28 pit furnaces of a steel work. (orig.) [de

  17. Spying on real-time computers to improve performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taff, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The sampled program-counter histogram, an established technique for shortening the execution times of programs, is described for a real-time computer. The use of a real-time clock allows particularly easy implementation. (Auth.)

  18. Temporal analysis and scheduling of hard real-time radios running on a multi-processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, O.

    2012-01-01

    On a multi-radio baseband system, multiple independent transceivers must share the resources of a multi-processor, while meeting each its own hard real-time requirements. Not all possible combinations of transceivers are known at compile time, so a solution must be found that either allows for

  19. Precise and accurate train run data: Approximation of actual arrival and departure times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Troels; Landex, Alex; Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær

    with the approximated actual arrival and departure times. As a result, all future statistics can now either be based on track circuit data with high precision or approximated actual arrival times with a high accuracy. Consequently, performance analysis will be more accurate, punctuality statistics more correct, KPI...

  20. Effect of advanced injection timing on emission characteristics of diesel engine running on natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwafor, O.M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State (Nigeria)

    2007-11-15

    There has been a growing concern on the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, whose consequence is global warming. The sources of greenhouse gases have been identified, of which the major contributor is the combustion of fossil fuel. Researchers have intensified efforts towards identifying greener alternative fuel substitutes for the present fossil fuel. Natural gas is now being investigated as potential alternative fuel for diesel engines. Natural gas appears more attractive due to its high octane number and perhaps, due to its environmental friendly nature. The test results showed that alternative fuels exhibit longer ignition delay, with slow burning rates. Longer delays will lead to unacceptable rates of pressure rise with the result of diesel knock. This work examines the effect of advanced injection timing on the emission characteristics of dual-fuel engine. The engine has standard injection timing of 30 BTDC. The injection was first advanced by 5.5 and given injection timing of 35.5 BTDC. The engine performance was erratic on this timing. The injection was then advanced by 3.5 . The engine performance was smooth on this timing especially at low loading conditions. The ignition delay was reduced through advanced injection timing but tended to incur a slight increase in fuel consumption. The CO and CO{sub 2} emissions were reduced through advanced injection timing. (author)

  1. QRTEngine: An easy solution for running online reaction time experiments using Qualtrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S; Haasnoot, Erwin; Bocanegra, Bruno R; van Steenbergen, Henk

    2015-12-01

    Performing online behavioral research is gaining increased popularity among researchers in psychological and cognitive science. However, the currently available methods for conducting online reaction time experiments are often complicated and typically require advanced technical skills. In this article, we introduce the Qualtrics Reaction Time Engine (QRTEngine), an open-source JavaScript engine that can be embedded in the online survey development environment Qualtrics. The QRTEngine can be used to easily develop browser-based online reaction time experiments with accurate timing within current browser capabilities, and it requires only minimal programming skills. After introducing the QRTEngine, we briefly discuss how to create and distribute a Stroop task. Next, we describe a study in which we investigated the timing accuracy of the engine under different processor loads using external chronometry. Finally, we show that the QRTEngine can be used to reproduce classic behavioral effects in three reaction time paradigms: a Stroop task, an attentional blink task, and a masked-priming task. These findings demonstrate that QRTEngine can be used as a tool for conducting online behavioral research even when this requires accurate stimulus presentation times.

  2. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  3. Exposure time, running and skill-related performance in international u20 rugby union players during an intensified tournament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Carling

    Full Text Available This study investigated exposure time, running and skill-related performance in two international u20 rugby union teams during an intensified tournament: the 2015 Junior World Rugby Championship.Both teams played 5 matches in 19 days. Analyses were conducted using global positioning system (GPS tracking (Viper 2™, Statsports Technologies Ltd and event coding (Opta Pro®.Of the 62 players monitored, 36 (57.1% participated in 4 matches and 23 (36.5% in all 5 matches while player availability for selection was 88%. Analyses of team running output (all players completing >60-min play showed that the total and peak 5-minute high metabolic load distances covered were likely-to-very likely moderately higher in the final match compared to matches 1 and 2 in back and forward players. In individual players with the highest match-play exposure (participation in >75% of total competition playing time and >75-min in each of the final 3 matches, comparisons of performance in matches 4 and 5 versus match 3 (three most important matches reported moderate-to-large decreases in total and high metabolic load distance in backs while similar magnitude reductions occurred in high-speed distance in forwards. In contrast, skill-related performance was unchanged, albeit with trivial and unclear changes, while there were no alterations in either total or high-speed running distance covered at the end of matches.These findings suggest that despite high availability for selection, players were not over-exposed to match-play during an intensified u20 international tournament. They also imply that the teams coped with the running and skill-related demands. Similarly, individual players with the highest exposure to match-play were also able to maintain skill-related performance and end-match running output (despite an overall reduction in the latter. These results support the need for player rotation and monitoring of performance, recovery and intervention strategies during

  4. Exposure time, running and skill-related performance in international u20 rugby union players during an intensified tournament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Christopher J.; Flanagan, Eamon; O’Doherty, Pearse; Piscione, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated exposure time, running and skill-related performance in two international u20 rugby union teams during an intensified tournament: the 2015 Junior World Rugby Championship. Method Both teams played 5 matches in 19 days. Analyses were conducted using global positioning system (GPS) tracking (Viper 2™, Statsports Technologies Ltd) and event coding (Opta Pro®). Results Of the 62 players monitored, 36 (57.1%) participated in 4 matches and 23 (36.5%) in all 5 matches while player availability for selection was 88%. Analyses of team running output (all players completing >60-min play) showed that the total and peak 5-minute high metabolic load distances covered were likely-to-very likely moderately higher in the final match compared to matches 1 and 2 in back and forward players. In individual players with the highest match-play exposure (participation in >75% of total competition playing time and >75-min in each of the final 3 matches), comparisons of performance in matches 4 and 5 versus match 3 (three most important matches) reported moderate-to-large decreases in total and high metabolic load distance in backs while similar magnitude reductions occurred in high-speed distance in forwards. In contrast, skill-related performance was unchanged, albeit with trivial and unclear changes, while there were no alterations in either total or high-speed running distance covered at the end of matches. Conclusions These findings suggest that despite high availability for selection, players were not over-exposed to match-play during an intensified u20 international tournament. They also imply that the teams coped with the running and skill-related demands. Similarly, individual players with the highest exposure to match-play were also able to maintain skill-related performance and end-match running output (despite an overall reduction in the latter). These results support the need for player rotation and monitoring of performance, recovery and

  5. QRTEngine: An easy solution for running online reaction time experiments using Qualtrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan Sebastiaan; Haasnoot, Erwin; Bocanegra, Bruno R.; van Steenbergen, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Performing online behavioral research is gaining increased popularity among researchers in psychological and cognitive science. However, the currently available methods for conducting online reaction time experiments are often complicated and typically require advanced technical skills. In this

  6. A free-running, time-based readout method for particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerres, A; Ritman, J; Stockmanns, T; Bugalho, R; Francesco, A Di; Gastón, C; Gonçalves, F; Rolo, M D; Silva, J C da; Silva, R; Varela, J; Veckalns, V; Mazza, G; Mignone, M; Pietro, V Di; Riccardi, A; Rivetti, A; Wheadon, R

    2014-01-01

    For the EndoTOFPET-US experiment, the TOFPET ASIC has been developed as a front-end chip to read out data from silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) [1]. It introduces a time of flight information into the measurement of a PET scanner and hence reduces radiation exposure of the patient [2]. The chip is designed to work with a high event rate up to 100 kHz and a time resolution of 50 ps LSB. Using two threshold levels, it can measure the leading edge of the event pulse precisely while successfully suppressing dark counts from the SiPM. This also enables a time over threshold determination, leading to a charge measurement of the signal's pulse. The same, time-based concept is chosen for the PASTA chip used in the PANDA experiment. This high-energy particle detector contains sub-systems for specific measurement goals. The innermost of these is the Micro Vertex Detector, a silicon-based tracking system. The PASTA chip's approach is much like the TOFPET ASIC with some differences. The most significant ones are a changed amplifying part for different input signals as well as protection for radiation effects of the high-radiation environment. Apart from that, the simple and general concept combined with a small area and low power consumption support the choice for using this approach

  7. A free-running, time-based readout method for particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerres, A.; Bugalho, R.; Di Francesco, A.; Gastón, C.; Gonçalves, F.; Mazza, G.; Mignone, M.; Di Pietro, V.; Riccardi, A.; Ritman, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; da Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Stockmanns, T.; Varela, J.; Veckalns, V.; Wheadon, R.

    2014-03-01

    For the EndoTOFPET-US experiment, the TOFPET ASIC has been developed as a front-end chip to read out data from silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) [1]. It introduces a time of flight information into the measurement of a PET scanner and hence reduces radiation exposure of the patient [2]. The chip is designed to work with a high event rate up to 100 kHz and a time resolution of 50 ps LSB. Using two threshold levels, it can measure the leading edge of the event pulse precisely while successfully suppressing dark counts from the SiPM. This also enables a time over threshold determination, leading to a charge measurement of the signal's pulse. The same, time-based concept is chosen for the PASTA chip used in the PANDA experiment. This high-energy particle detector contains sub-systems for specific measurement goals. The innermost of these is the Micro Vertex Detector, a silicon-based tracking system. The PASTA chip's approach is much like the TOFPET ASIC with some differences. The most significant ones are a changed amplifying part for different input signals as well as protection for radiation effects of the high-radiation environment. Apart from that, the simple and general concept combined with a small area and low power consumption support the choice for using this approach.

  8. Run-time Adaptable VLIW Processors : Resources, Performance, Power Consumption, and Reliability Trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anjam, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, we propose to combine programmability with reconfigurability by implementing an adaptable programmable VLIW processor in a reconfigurable hardware. The approach allows applications to be developed at high-level (C language level), while at the same time, the processor

  9. Deriving Tools from Real-time Runs: A New CCMC Support for SEC and AFWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2008-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions. the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models. and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity. the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. After consultations with NOA/SEC and with AFWA, CCMC has developed a set of tools as a first step to make real-time model output useful to forecast centers. In this presentation, we will discuss the motivation for this activity, the actions taken so far, and options for future tools from model output.

  10. The immediate effect of long-distance running on T2 and T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in young healthy adults at 3.0 T MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Welsch, Goetz H; Laqmani, Azien; Henes, Frank O; Kaul, Michael G; Schoen, Gerhard; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-08-01

    To quantitatively assess the immediate effect of long-distance running on T2 and T2* relaxation times of the articular cartilage of the knee at 3.0 T in young healthy adults. 30 healthy male adults (18-31 years) who perform sports at an amateur level underwent an initial MRI at 3.0 T with T2 weighted [16 echo times (TEs): 9.7-154.6 ms] and T2* weighted (24 TEs: 4.6-53.6 ms) relaxation measurements. Thereafter, all participants performed a 45-min run. After the run, all individuals were immediately re-examined. Data sets were post-processed using dedicated software (ImageJ; National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD). 22 regions of interest were manually drawn in segmented areas of the femoral, tibial and patellar cartilage. For statistical evaluation, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and confidence intervals were computed. Mean initial values were 35.7 ms for T2 and 25.1 ms for T2*. After the run, a significant decrease in the mean T2 and T2* relaxation times was observed for all segments in all participants. A mean decrease of relaxation time was observed for T2 with 4.6 ms (±3.6 ms) and for T2* with 3.6 ms (±5.1 ms) after running. A significant decrease could be observed in all cartilage segments for both biomarkers. Both quantitative techniques, T2 and T2*, seem to be valuable parameters in the evaluation of immediate changes in the cartilage ultrastructure after running. This is the first direct comparison of immediate changes in T2 and T2* relaxation times after running in healthy adults.

  11. 29 CFR 1921.22 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 1921.22 Section 1921.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT Miscellaneous § 1921.22 Computation of time. Sundays and holidays shall be...

  12. 5 CFR 890.101 - Definitions; time computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions; time computations. 890.101....101 Definitions; time computations. (a) In this part, the terms annuitant, carrier, employee, employee... in section 8901 of title 5, United States Code, and supplement the following definitions: Appropriate...

  13. Transforming parts of a differential equations system to difference equations as a method for run-time savings in NONMEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, K J F; Friberg, L E; Karlsson, M O

    2010-10-01

    Computer models of biological systems grow more complex as computing power increase. Often these models are defined as differential equations and no analytical solutions exist. Numerical integration is used to approximate the solution; this can be computationally intensive, time consuming and be a large proportion of the total computer runtime. The performance of different integration methods depend on the mathematical properties of the differential equations system at hand. In this paper we investigate the possibility of runtime gains by calculating parts of or the whole differential equations system at given time intervals, outside of the differential equations solver. This approach was tested on nine models defined as differential equations with the goal to reduce runtime while maintaining model fit, based on the objective function value. The software used was NONMEM. In four models the computational runtime was successfully reduced (by 59-96%). The differences in parameter estimates, compared to using only the differential equations solver were less than 12% for all fixed effects parameters. For the variance parameters, estimates were within 10% for the majority of the parameters. Population and individual predictions were similar and the differences in OFV were between 1 and -14 units. When computational runtime seriously affects the usefulness of a model we suggest evaluating this approach for repetitive elements of model building and evaluation such as covariate inclusions or bootstraps.

  14. Time computations in anuran auditory systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J Rose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Temporal computations are important in the acoustic communication of anurans. In many cases, calls between closely related species are nearly identical spectrally but differ markedly in temporal structure. Depending on the species, calls can differ in pulse duration, shape and/or rate (i.e., amplitude modulation, direction and rate of frequency modulation, and overall call duration. Also, behavioral studies have shown that anurans are able to discriminate between calls that differ in temporal structure. In the peripheral auditory system, temporal information is coded primarily in the spatiotemporal patterns of activity of auditory-nerve fibers. However, major transformations in the representation of temporal information occur in the central auditory system. In this review I summarize recent advances in understanding how temporal information is represented in the anuran midbrain, with particular emphasis on mechanisms that underlie selectivity for pulse duration and pulse rate (i.e., intervals between onsets of successive pulses. Two types of neurons have been identified that show selectivity for pulse rate: long-interval cells respond well to slow pulse rates but fail to spike or respond phasically to fast pulse rates; conversely, interval-counting neurons respond to intermediate or fast pulse rates, but only after a threshold number of pulses, presented at optimal intervals, have occurred. Duration-selectivity is manifest as short-pass, band-pass or long-pass tuning. Whole-cell patch recordings, in vivo, suggest that excitation and inhibition are integrated in diverse ways to generate temporal selectivity. In many cases, activity-related enhancement or depression of excitatory or inhibitory processes appear to contribute to selective responses.

  15. Advanced real time radioscopy and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, Ch.; Nuding, W.; Grimm, R.; Wiacker, H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes three x-ray inspection systems. One radioscopic system is designed for the inspection of castings. The next integrates a radioscopic and a tomographic mode. The radioscopy has a high resolution camera and real time image processor. Radiation sources are a 450 kV industrial and a 200 kV microfocus tube. The third system is a tomographic system with 30 scintillation detectors for the inspection of nuclear waste containers. (author)

  16. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  17. Interface Testing for RTOS System Tasks based on the Run-Time Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Ahyoung; Choi, Byoungju

    2006-01-01

    Safety critical embedded system requires high dependability of not only hardware but also software. It is intricate to modify embedded software once embedded. Therefore, it is necessary to have rigorous regulations to assure the quality of safety critical embedded software. IEEE V and V (Verification and Validation) process is recommended for software dependability, but a more quantitative evaluation method like software testing is necessary. In case of safety critical embedded software, it is essential to have a test that reflects unique features of the target hardware and its operating system. The safety grade PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) is a safety critical embedded system where hardware and software are tightly coupled. The PLC has HdS (Hardware dependent Software) and it is tightly coupled with RTOS (Real Time Operating System). Especially, system tasks that are tightly coupled with target hardware and RTOS kernel have large influence on the dependability of the entire PLC. Therefore, interface testing for system tasks that reflects the features of target hardware and RTOS kernel becomes the core of the PLC integration test. Here, we define interfaces as overlapped parts between two different layers on the system architecture. In this paper, we identify interfaces for system tasks and apply the identified interfaces to the safety grade PLC. Finally, we show the test results through the empirical study

  18. Interface Testing for RTOS System Tasks based on the Run-Time Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ahyoung; Choi, Byoungju [Ewha University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Safety critical embedded system requires high dependability of not only hardware but also software. It is intricate to modify embedded software once embedded. Therefore, it is necessary to have rigorous regulations to assure the quality of safety critical embedded software. IEEE V and V (Verification and Validation) process is recommended for software dependability, but a more quantitative evaluation method like software testing is necessary. In case of safety critical embedded software, it is essential to have a test that reflects unique features of the target hardware and its operating system. The safety grade PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) is a safety critical embedded system where hardware and software are tightly coupled. The PLC has HdS (Hardware dependent Software) and it is tightly coupled with RTOS (Real Time Operating System). Especially, system tasks that are tightly coupled with target hardware and RTOS kernel have large influence on the dependability of the entire PLC. Therefore, interface testing for system tasks that reflects the features of target hardware and RTOS kernel becomes the core of the PLC integration test. Here, we define interfaces as overlapped parts between two different layers on the system architecture. In this paper, we identify interfaces for system tasks and apply the identified interfaces to the safety grade PLC. Finally, we show the test results through the empirical study.

  19. Real time analysis with the upgraded LHCb trigger in Run-III

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to 1 MHz, a rate at which the entire detector is read out. A second level, implemented in a farm of around 20k parallel processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to around 12.5 kHz. The LHCb experiment plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC long shutdown II (2018-2019 ). In this upgrade, a purely software based trigger system is being developed and it will have to process the full 30 MHz of bunch crossings with inelastic collisions. LHCb will also receive a factor of 5 increase in the instantaneous luminosity, which further contributes to the challenge of reconstructing and selecting events in real time with the CPU farm. We discuss the plans and progress towards achieving efficient reconstruction and selection with a 30 MHz throughput. Another challenge is to exploit the increased signal rate that results from removing the 1 MHz readout bottleneck, combined with the high...

  20. Effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on sprint time in a sled-towing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthorne, Nicholas P; Cooper, James E

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise. The coefficients of friction of four common sports surfaces (a synthetic athletics track, a natural grass rugby pitch, a 3G football pitch, and an artificial grass hockey pitch) were determined from the force required to tow a weighted sled across the surface. Timing gates were then used to measure the 30-m sprint time for six rugby players when towing a sled of varied weight across the surfaces. There were substantial differences between the coefficients of friction for the four surfaces (micro = 0.21-0.58), and in the sled-towing exercise the athlete's 30-m sprint time increased linearly with increasing sled weight. The hockey pitch (which had the lowest coefficient of friction) produced a substantially lower rate of increase in 30-m sprint time, but there were no significant differences between the other surfaces. The results indicate that although an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise is affected by the coefficient offriction of the surface, the relationship relationship between the athlete's rate of increase in 30-m sprint time and the coefficient of friction is more complex than expected.

  1. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  3. Addressing Thermal Model Run Time Concerns of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume; Guerrero, Sergio; Hawk, John; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Jackson, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) utilizes an existing 2.4 m diameter Hubble sized telescope donated from elsewhere in the federal government for near-infrared sky surveys and Exoplanet searches to answer crucial questions about the universe and dark energy. The WFIRST design continues to increase in maturity, detail, and complexity with each design cycle leading to a Mission Concept Review and entrance to the Mission Formulation Phase. Each cycle has required a Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis to ensure the design can meet the stringent pointing and stability requirements. As such, the models have also grown in size and complexity leading to increased model run time. This paper addresses efforts to reduce the run time while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for STOP analyses. A technique was developed to identify slews between observing orientations that were sufficiently different to warrant recalculation of the environmental fluxes to reduce the total number of radiation calculation points. The inclusion of a cryocooler fluid loop in the model also forced smaller time-steps than desired, which greatly increases the overall run time. The analysis of this fluid model required mitigation to drive the run time down by solving portions of the model at different time scales. Lastly, investigations were made into the impact of the removal of small radiation couplings on run time and accuracy. Use of these techniques allowed the models to produce meaningful results within reasonable run times to meet project schedule deadlines.

  4. Computation and evaluation of scheduled waiting time for railway networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Timetables are affected by scheduled waiting time (SWT) that prolongs the travel times for trains and thereby passengers. SWT occurs when a train hinders another train to run with the wanted speed. The SWT affects both the trains and the passengers in the trains. The passengers may be further...... affected due to longer transfer times to other trains. SWT can be estimated analytically for a given timetable or by simulation of timetables and/or plans of operation. The simulation of SWT has the benefit that it is possible to examine the entire network. This makes it possible to improve the future...

  5. Real-time dual-comb spectroscopy with a free-running bidirectionally mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehravar, S.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.; Kieu, K.

    2016-06-01

    Dual-comb technique has enabled exciting applications in high resolution spectroscopy, precision distance measurements, and 3D imaging. Major advantages over traditional methods can be achieved with dual-comb technique. For example, dual-comb spectroscopy provides orders of magnitude improvement in acquisition speed over standard Fourier-transform spectroscopy while still preserving the high resolution capability. Wider adoption of the technique has, however, been hindered by the need for complex and expensive ultrafast laser systems. Here, we present a simple and robust dual-comb system that employs a free-running bidirectionally mode-locked fiber laser operating at telecommunication wavelength. Two femtosecond frequency combs (with a small difference in repetition rates) are generated from a single laser cavity to ensure mutual coherent properties and common noise cancellation. As the result, we have achieved real-time absorption spectroscopy measurements without the need for complex servo locking with accurate frequency referencing, and relatively high signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Recent achievements in real-time computational seismology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Real-time computational seismology is currently possible to be achieved which needs highly connection between seismic database and high performance computing. We have developed a real-time moment tensor monitoring system (RMT) by using continuous BATS records and moment tensor inversion (CMT) technique. The real-time online earthquake simulation service is also ready to open for researchers and public earthquake science education (ROS). Combine RMT with ROS, the earthquake report based on computational seismology can provide within 5 minutes after an earthquake occurred (RMT obtains point source information ROS completes a 3D simulation real-time now. For more information, welcome to visit real-time computational seismology earthquake report webpage (RCS).

  7. Real-time data acquisition and feedback control using Linux Intel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Piglowski, D.A.; Johnson, R.D.; Walker, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the experiences of the DIII-D programming staff in adapting Linux based Intel computing hardware for use in real-time data acquisition and feedback control systems. Due to the highly dynamic and unstable nature of magnetically confined plasmas in tokamak fusion experiments, real-time data acquisition and feedback control systems are in routine use with all major tokamaks. At DIII-D, plasmas are created and sustained using a real-time application known as the digital plasma control system (PCS). During each experiment, the PCS periodically samples data from hundreds of diagnostic signals and provides these data to control algorithms implemented in software. These algorithms compute the necessary commands to send to various actuators that affect plasma performance. The PCS consists of a group of rack mounted Intel Xeon computer systems running an in-house customized version of the Linux operating system tailored specifically to meet the real-time performance needs of the plasma experiments. This paper provides a more detailed description of the real-time computing hardware and custom developed software, including recent work to utilize dual Intel Xeon equipped computers within the PCS

  8. Evaluation of the 1996 predictions of the run-timing of wild migrant spring/summer yearling chinook in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, R.L.; Yasuda, D.; Skalski, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a post-season analysis of the accuracy of the 1996 predictions from the program RealTime. Observed 1996 migration data collected at Lower Granite Dam were compared to the predictions made by RealTime for the spring outmigration of wild spring/summer chinook. Appendix A displays the graphical reports of the RealTime program that were interactively accessible via the World Wide Web during the 1996 migration season. Final reports are available at address http://www.cqs.washington.edu/crisprt/. The CRISP model incorporated the predictions of the run status to move the timing forecasts further down the Snake River to Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary Dams. An analysis of the dams below Lower Granite Dam is available separately

  9. Time-of-Flight Cameras in Computer Graphics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolb, Andreas; Barth, Erhardt; Koch, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Computer Graphics, Computer Vision and Human Machine Interaction (HMI). These technologies are starting to have an impact on research and commercial applications. The upcoming generation of ToF sensors, however, will be even more powerful and will have the potential to become “ubiquitous real-time geometry...

  10. 29 CFR 4245.8 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 4245.8 Section 4245.8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE OF INSOLVENCY § 4245.8 Computation of...

  11. Noise-constrained switching times for heteroclinic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabio Schittler; Voit, Maximilian; Timme, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Heteroclinic computing offers a novel paradigm for universal computation by collective system dynamics. In such a paradigm, input signals are encoded as complex periodic orbits approaching specific sequences of saddle states. Without inputs, the relevant states together with the heteroclinic connections between them form a network of states—the heteroclinic network. Systems of pulse-coupled oscillators or spiking neurons naturally exhibit such heteroclinic networks of saddles, thereby providing a substrate for general analog computations. Several challenges need to be resolved before it becomes possible to effectively realize heteroclinic computing in hardware. The time scales on which computations are performed crucially depend on the switching times between saddles, which in turn are jointly controlled by the system's intrinsic dynamics and the level of external and measurement noise. The nonlinear dynamics of pulse-coupled systems often strongly deviate from that of time-continuously coupled (e.g., phase-coupled) systems. The factors impacting switching times in pulse-coupled systems are still not well understood. Here we systematically investigate switching times in dependence of the levels of noise and intrinsic dissipation in the system. We specifically reveal how local responses to pulses coact with external noise. Our findings confirm that, like in time-continuous phase-coupled systems, piecewise-continuous pulse-coupled systems exhibit switching times that transiently increase exponentially with the number of switches up to some order of magnitude set by the noise level. Complementarily, we show that switching times may constitute a good predictor for the computation reliability, indicating how often an input signal must be reiterated. By characterizing switching times between two saddles in conjunction with the reliability of a computation, our results provide a first step beyond the coding of input signal identities toward a complementary coding for

  12. Time-dependent transport of energetic particles in magnetic turbulence: computer simulations versus analytical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, V.; Shalchi, A.

    2018-06-01

    We explore numerically the transport of energetic particles in a turbulent magnetic field configuration. A test-particle code is employed to compute running diffusion coefficients as well as particle distribution functions in the different directions of space. Our numerical findings are compared with models commonly used in diffusion theory such as Gaussian distribution functions and solutions of the cosmic ray Fokker-Planck equation. Furthermore, we compare the running diffusion coefficients across the mean magnetic field with solutions obtained from the time-dependent version of the unified non-linear transport theory. In most cases we find that particle distribution functions are indeed of Gaussian form as long as a two-component turbulence model is employed. For turbulence setups with reduced dimensionality, however, the Gaussian distribution can no longer be obtained. It is also shown that the unified non-linear transport theory agrees with simulated perpendicular diffusion coefficients as long as the pure two-dimensional model is excluded.

  13. A time-domain digitally controlled oscillator composed of a free running ring oscillator and flying-adder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Zhang Shengdong; Wang Yangyuan; Li Wei; Ren Peng; Lin Qinglong

    2009-01-01

    A time-domain digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) is proposed. The DCO is composed of a free-running ring oscillator (FRO) and a two lap-selectors integrated flying-adder (FA). With a coiled cell array which allows uniform loading capacitances of the delay cells, the FRO produces 32 outputs with consistent tap spacing for the FA as reference clocks. The FA uses the outputs from the FRO to generate the output of the DCO according to the control number, resulting in a linear dependence of the output period, instead of the frequency on the digital controlling word input. Thus the proposed DCO ensures a good conversion linearity in a time-domain, and is suitable for time-domain all-digital phase locked loop applications. The DCO was implemented in a standard 0.13 μm digital logic CMOS process. The measurement results show that the DCO has a linear and monotonic tuning curve with gain variation of less than 10%, and a very low root mean square period jitter of 9.3 ps in the output clocks. The DCO works well at supply voltages ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 V, and consumes 4 mW of power with 500 MHz frequency output at 1.2 V supply voltage.

  14. Relativistic Photoionization Computations with the Time Dependent Dirac Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6795--16-9698 Relativistic Photoionization Computations with the Time Dependent Dirac... Photoionization Computations with the Time Dependent Dirac Equation Daniel F. Gordon and Bahman Hafizi Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 22 Daniel Gordon (202) 767-5036 Tunneling Photoionization Ionization of inner shell electrons by laser

  15. Recent run-time experience and investigation of impurities in turbines circuit of Helium plant of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the key sub-systems of Steady State superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is cryogenic 1.3 kW at 4.5 K Helium refrigerator/liquefier system. The helium plant consists of 3 nos. of screw compressors, oil removal system, purifier and cold-box with 3 turbo expanders (turbines) and helium cold circulator. During the recent SST-1 plasma campaigns, we observed high pressure drop of the order of 3 bar between the wheel outlet of turbine A and the wheel inlet of turbine - B. This was significant higher values of pressures drop across turbines, which reduced the speed of turbine A and B and in turn reduced the overall plant capacity. The helium circuits in the plant have 10-micron filter at the mouth of turbine - B. Initially, major suspects of such high blockage are assumed to be air-impurity, dust particles or collapse of filter. Several breaks in plant operation have been taken to warm up the turbines circuits up to 90 K to remove condensation of air-impurities at filter. Still this exercise did not solve blockage of filter in turbine circuits. A detailed investigation exercise with air/water regeneration and rinsing of cold box as well as purification of helium gas in buffer tanks are carried out to remove air impurities from cold-box. A trial run of cold box was executed in liquefier mode with turbines up to cryogenic temperatures and solved blockage in turbine circuits. The paper describes run-time experience of helium plant with helium impurity in turbine circuits, methods to remove impurity, demonstration of turbine performance and lessons learnt during this operation. (author)

  16. Launching applications on compute and service processors running under different operating systems in scalable network of processor boards with routers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, James L [Albuquerque, NM; Camp, William J [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-03-17

    A multiple processor computing apparatus includes a physical interconnect structure that is flexibly configurable to support selective segregation of classified and unclassified users. The physical interconnect structure also permits easy physical scalability of the computing apparatus. The computing apparatus can include an emulator which permits applications from the same job to be launched on processors that use different operating systems.

  17. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  18. Determinants of the abilities to jump higher and shorten the contact time in a running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Zushi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain useful information for developing training techniques for the running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball (lay-up shot jump). The ability to perform the lay-up shot jump and various basic jumps was measured by testing 19 male basketball players. The basic jumps consisted of the 1-legged repeated rebound jump, the 2-legged repeated rebound jump, and the countermovement jump. Jumping height, contact time, and jumping index (jumping height/contact time) were measured and calculated using a contact mat/computer system that recorded the contact and air times. The jumping index indicates power. No significant correlation existed between the jumping height and contact time of the lay-up shot jump, the 2 components of the lay-up shot jump index. As a result, jumping height and contact time were found to be mutually independent abilities. The relationships in contact time between the lay-up shot jump to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the 2-legged repeated rebound jump were correlated on the same significance levels (p jumping height existed between the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the lay-up shot jump (p jumping height between the lay-up shot jump and both the 2-legged repeated rebound jump and countermovement jump. The lay-up shot index correlated more strongly to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump index (p jump index (p jump is effective in improving both contact time and jumping height in the lay-up shot jump.

  19. Automated selection of brain regions for real-time fMRI brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Michael; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) implemented with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) use fMRI time-courses from predefined regions of interest (ROIs). To reach best performances, localizer experiments and on-site expert supervision are required for ROI definition. To automate this step, we developed two unsupervised computational techniques based on the general linear model (GLM) and independent component analysis (ICA) of rt-fMRI data, and compared their performances on a communication BCI. Approach. 3 T fMRI data of six volunteers were re-analyzed in simulated real-time. During a localizer run, participants performed three mental tasks following visual cues. During two communication runs, a letter-spelling display guided the subjects to freely encode letters by performing one of the mental tasks with a specific timing. GLM- and ICA-based procedures were used to decode each letter, respectively using compact ROIs and whole-brain distributed spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI activity, automatically defined from subject-specific or group-level maps. Main results. Letter-decoding performances were comparable to supervised methods. In combination with a similarity-based criterion, GLM- and ICA-based approaches successfully decoded more than 80% (average) of the letters. Subject-specific maps yielded optimal performances. Significance. Automated solutions for ROI selection may help accelerating the translation of rt-fMRI BCIs from research to clinical applications.

  20. A Distributed Computing Network for Real-Time Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-03

    7 ) AU2 o NAVA TUNDEWATER SY$TEMS CENTER NEWPORT RI F/G 9/2 UIS RIBUT E 0 COMPUTIN G N LTWORK FOR REAL - TIME SYSTEMS .(U) UASSIFIED NOV Al 6 1...MORAIS - UT 92 dLEVEL c A Distributed Computing Network for Real - Time Systems . 11 𔃺-1 Gordon E/Morson I7 y tm- ,r - t "en t As J 2 -p .. - 7 I’ cNaval...NUMBER TD 5932 / N 4. TITLE mand SubotI. S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED A DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING NETWORK FOR REAL - TIME SYSTEMS 6. PERFORMING ORG

  1. Computer simulations of long-time tails: what's new?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoef, van der M.A.; Frenkel, D.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty five years ago Alder and Wainwright discovered, by simulation, the 'long-time tails' in the velocity autocorrelation function of a single particle in fluid [1]. Since then, few qualitatively new results on long-time tails have been obtained by computer simulations. However, within the

  2. Computation of reactor control rod drop time under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Yikang; Yao Weida; Yang Renan; Jiang Nanyan

    1998-01-01

    The computational method of reactor control rod drop time under accident conditions lies mainly in establishing forced vibration equations for the components under action of outside forces on control rod driven line and motion equation for the control rod moving in vertical direction. The above two kinds of equations are connected by considering the impact effects between control rod and its outside components. Finite difference method is adopted to make discretization of the vibration equations and Wilson-θ method is applied to deal with the time history problem. The non-linearity caused by impact is iteratively treated with modified Newton method. Some experimental results are used to validate the validity and reliability of the computational method. Theoretical and experimental testing problems show that the computer program based on the computational method is applicable and reliable. The program can act as an effective tool of design by analysis and safety analysis for the relevant components

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  4. Scalable space-time adaptive simulation tools for computational electrocardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Dorian; Krause, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development of computational tools for the solution of reaction-diffusion equations from the field of computational electrocardiology. We designed lightweight spatially and space-time adaptive schemes for large-scale parallel simulations. We propose two different adaptive schemes based on locally structured meshes, managed either via a conforming coarse tessellation or a forest of shallow trees. A crucial ingredient of our approach is a non-conforming morta...

  5. Continuous-Time Symmetric Hopfield Nets are Computationally Universal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří; Orponen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2003), s. 693-733 ISSN 0899-7667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA ČR GA201/02/1456 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : continuous-time Hopfield network * Liapunov function * analog computation * computational power * Turing universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2003

  6. Heterogeneous real-time computing in radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John M.; Demorest, Paul; Ransom, Scott

    2010-07-01

    Modern computer architectures suited for general purpose computing are often not the best choice for either I/O-bound or compute-bound problems. Sometimes the best choice is not to choose a single architecture, but to take advantage of the best characteristics of different computer architectures to solve your problems. This paper examines the tradeoffs between using computer systems based on the ubiquitous X86 Central Processing Units (CPU's), Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based signal processors, and Graphical Processing Units (GPU's). We will show how a heterogeneous system can be produced that blends the best of each of these technologies into a real-time signal processing system. FPGA's tightly coupled to analog-to-digital converters connect the instrument to the telescope and supply the first level of computing to the system. These FPGA's are coupled to other FPGA's to continue to provide highly efficient processing power. Data is then packaged up and shipped over fast networks to a cluster of general purpose computers equipped with GPU's, which are used for floating-point intensive computation. Finally, the data is handled by the CPU and written to disk, or further processed. Each of the elements in the system has been chosen for its specific characteristics and the role it can play in creating a system that does the most for the least, in terms of power, space, and money.

  7. Highly reliable computer network for real time system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, F.A.; Omar, A.A.; Ayad, N.M.A.; Madkour, M.A.I.; Ibrahim, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    Many of computer networks have been studied different trends regarding the network architecture and the various protocols that govern data transfers and guarantee a reliable communication among all a hierarchical network structure has been proposed to provide a simple and inexpensive way for the realization of a reliable real-time computer network. In such architecture all computers in the same level are connected to a common serial channel through intelligent nodes that collectively control data transfers over the serial channel. This level of computer network can be considered as a local area computer network (LACN) that can be used in nuclear power plant control system since it has geographically dispersed subsystems. network expansion would be straight the common channel for each added computer (HOST). All the nodes are designed around a microprocessor chip to provide the required intelligence. The node can be divided into two sections namely a common section that interfaces with serial data channel and a private section to interface with the host computer. This part would naturally tend to have some variations in the hardware details to match the requirements of individual host computers. fig 7

  8. Liquidity Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matta, R.; Perotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Can the risk of losses upon premature liquidation produce bank runs? We show how a unique run equilibrium driven by asset liquidity risk arises even under minimal fundamental risk. To study the role of illiquidity we introduce realistic norms on bank default, such that mandatory stay is triggered

  9. TimeSet: A computer program that accesses five atomic time services on two continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    TimeSet is a shareware program for accessing digital time services by telephone. At its initial release, it was capable of capturing time signals only from the U.S. Naval Observatory to set a computer's clock. Later the ability to synchronize with the National Institute of Standards and Technology was added. Now, in Version 7.10, TimeSet is able to access three additional telephone time services in Europe - in Sweden, Austria, and Italy - making a total of five official services addressable by the program. A companion program, TimeGen, allows yet another source of telephone time data strings for callers equipped with TimeSet version 7.10. TimeGen synthesizes UTC time data strings in the Naval Observatory's format from an accurately set and maintained DOS computer clock, and transmits them to callers. This allows an unlimited number of 'freelance' time generating stations to be created. Timesetting from TimeGen is made feasible by the advent of Becker's RighTime, a shareware program that learns the drift characteristics of a computer's clock and continuously applies a correction to keep it accurate, and also brings .01 second resolution to the DOS clock. With clock regulation by RighTime and periodic update calls by the TimeGen station to an official time source via TimeSet, TimeGen offers the same degree of accuracy within the resolution of the computer clock as any official atomic time source.

  10. Computing return times or return periods with rare event algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestang, Thibault; Ragone, Francesco; Bréhier, Charles-Edouard; Herbert, Corentin; Bouchet, Freddy

    2018-04-01

    The average time between two occurrences of the same event, referred to as its return time (or return period), is a useful statistical concept for practical applications. For instance insurances or public agencies may be interested by the return time of a 10 m flood of the Seine river in Paris. However, due to their scarcity, reliably estimating return times for rare events is very difficult using either observational data or direct numerical simulations. For rare events, an estimator for return times can be built from the extrema of the observable on trajectory blocks. Here, we show that this estimator can be improved to remain accurate for return times of the order of the block size. More importantly, we show that this approach can be generalised to estimate return times from numerical algorithms specifically designed to sample rare events. So far those algorithms often compute probabilities, rather than return times. The approach we propose provides a computationally extremely efficient way to estimate numerically the return times of rare events for a dynamical system, gaining several orders of magnitude of computational costs. We illustrate the method on two kinds of observables, instantaneous and time-averaged, using two different rare event algorithms, for a simple stochastic process, the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process. As an example of realistic applications to complex systems, we finally discuss extreme values of the drag on an object in a turbulent flow.

  11. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  12. Development of real-time visualization system for Computational Fluid Dynamics on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Otani, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Takei, Toshifumi; Doi, Shun

    1998-03-01

    A real-time visualization system for computational fluid dynamics in a network connecting between a parallel computing server and the client terminal was developed. Using the system, a user can visualize the results of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation on the parallel computer as a client terminal during the actual computation on a server. Using GUI (Graphical User Interface) on the client terminal, to user is also able to change parameters of the analysis and visualization during the real-time of the calculation. The system carries out both of CFD simulation and generation of a pixel image data on the parallel computer, and compresses the data. Therefore, the amount of data from the parallel computer to the client is so small in comparison with no compression that the user can enjoy the swift image appearance comfortably. Parallelization of image data generation is based on Owner Computation Rule. GUI on the client is built on Java applet. A real-time visualization is thus possible on the client PC only if Web browser is implemented on it. (author)

  13. Energy expended and knee joint load accumulated when walking, running, or standing for the same amount of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ross H; Edwards, W Brent; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests prolonged bouts of sitting are unhealthy, and some public health messages have recently recommended replacing sitting with more standing. However, the relative benefits of replacing sitting with standing compared to locomotion are not known. Specifically, the biomechanical consequences of standing compared to other sitting-alternatives like walking and running are not well known and are usually not considered in studies on sitting. We compared the total knee joint load accumulated (TKJLA) and the total energy expended (TEE) when performing either walking, running, or standing for a common exercise bout duration (30 min). Walking and running both (unsurprisingly) had much more TEE than standing (+300% and +1100%, respectively). TKJLA was similar between walking and standing and 74% greater in running. The results suggest that standing is a poor replacement for walking and running if one wishes to increases energy expenditure, and may be particularly questionable for use in individuals at-risk for knee osteoarthritis due to its surprisingly high TKJLA (just as high as walking, 56% of the load in running) and the type of loading (continuous compression) it places on cartilage. However, standing has health benefits as an "inactivity interrupter" that extend beyond its direct energy expenditure. We suggest that future studies on standing as an inactivity intervention consider the potential biomechanical consequences of standing more often throughout the day, particularly in the case of prolonged bouts of standing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. THE MATRYOSHKA RUN. II. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENCE STATISTICS, STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION, AND MICROPHYSICS IMPACT IN A MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the Matryoshka run to study the time-dependent statistics of structure-formation-driven turbulence in the intracluster medium of a 10 15 M ☉ galaxy cluster. We investigate the turbulent cascade in the inner megaparsec for both compressional and incompressible velocity components. The flow maintains approximate conditions of fully developed turbulence, with departures thereof settling in about an eddy-turnover time. Turbulent velocity dispersion remains above 700 km s –1 even at low mass accretion rate, with the fraction of compressional energy between 10% and 40%. The normalization and the slope of the compressional turbulence are susceptible to large variations on short timescales, unlike the incompressible counterpart. A major merger occurs around redshift z ≅ 0 and is accompanied by a long period of enhanced turbulence, ascribed to temporal clustering of mass accretion related to spatial clustering of matter. We test models of stochastic acceleration by compressional modes for the origin of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. The turbulence simulation model constrains an important unknown of this complex problem and brings forth its dependence on the elusive microphysics of the intracluster plasma. In particular, the specifics of the plasma collisionality and the dissipation physics of weak shocks affect the cascade of compressional modes with strong impact on the acceleration rates. In this context radio halos emerge as complex phenomena in which a hierarchy of processes acting on progressively smaller scales are at work. Stochastic acceleration by compressional modes implies statistical correlation of radio power and spectral index with merging cores distance, both testable in principle with radio surveys

  15. New Flutter Analysis Technique for Time-Domain Computational Aeroelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    A new time-domain approach for computing flutter speed is presented. Based on the time-history result of aeroelastic simulation, the unknown unsteady aerodynamics model is estimated using a system identification technique. The full aeroelastic model is generated via coupling the estimated unsteady aerodynamic model with the known linear structure model. The critical dynamic pressure is computed and used in the subsequent simulation until the convergence of the critical dynamic pressure is achieved. The proposed method is applied to a benchmark cantilevered rectangular wing.

  16. Effect of the MCNP model definition on the computation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šunka, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The presented work studies the influence of the method of defining the geometry in the MCNP transport code and its impact on the computational time, including the difficulty of preparing an input file describing the given geometry. Cases using different geometric definitions including the use of basic 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects and theirs combinations were studied. The results indicate that an inappropriate definition can increase the computational time by up to 59% (a more realistic case indicates 37%) for the same results and the same statistical uncertainty. (orig.)

  17. TV time but not computer time is associated with cardiometabolic risk in Dutch young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, Teatske M; de Kroon, Marlou L A; Renders, Carry M; Hirasing, Remy; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2013-01-01

    TV time and total sedentary time have been positively related to biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk in adults. We aim to examine the association of TV time and computer time separately with cardiometabolic biomarkers in young adults. Additionally, the mediating role of waist circumference (WC) is studied. Data of 634 Dutch young adults (18-28 years; 39% male) were used. Cardiometabolic biomarkers included indicators of overweight, blood pressure, blood levels of fasting plasma insulin, cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides and a clustered cardiometabolic risk score. Linear regression analyses were used to assess the cross-sectional association of self-reported TV and computer time with cardiometabolic biomarkers, adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors. Mediation by WC was checked using the product-of-coefficient method. TV time was significantly associated with triglycerides (B = 0.004; CI = [0.001;0.05]) and insulin (B = 0.10; CI = [0.01;0.20]). Computer time was not significantly associated with any of the cardiometabolic biomarkers. We found no evidence for WC to mediate the association of TV time or computer time with cardiometabolic biomarkers. We found a significantly positive association of TV time with cardiometabolic biomarkers. In addition, we found no evidence for WC as a mediator of this association. Our findings suggest a need to distinguish between TV time and computer time within future guidelines for screen time.

  18. The Reliability and Validity of a Four-Minute Running Time-Trial in Assessing V˙O2max and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry McGawley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional graded-exercise tests to volitional exhaustion (GXTs are limited by the need to establish starting workloads, stage durations, and step increments. Short-duration time-trials (TTs may be easier to implement and more ecologically valid in terms of real-world athletic events. The purpose of the current study was to assess the reliability and validity of maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max and performance measured during a traditional GXT (STEP and a four-minute running time-trial (RunTT.Methods: Ten recreational runners (age: 32 ± 7 years; body mass: 69 ± 10 kg completed five STEP tests with a verification phase (VER and five self-paced RunTTs on a treadmill. The order of the STEP/VER and RunTT trials was alternated and counter-balanced. Performance was measured as time to exhaustion (TTE for STEP and VER and distance covered for RunTT.Results: The coefficient of variation (CV for V˙O2max was similar between STEP, VER, and RunTT (1.9 ± 1.0, 2.2 ± 1.1, and 1.8 ± 0.8%, respectively, but varied for performance between the three types of test (4.5 ± 1.9, 9.7 ± 3.5, and 1.8 ± 0.7% for STEP, VER, and RunTT, respectively. Bland-Altman limits of agreement (bias ± 95% showed V˙O2max to be 1.6 ± 3.6 mL·kg−1·min−1 higher for STEP vs. RunTT. Peak HR was also significantly higher during STEP compared with RunTT (P = 0.019.Conclusion: A four-minute running time-trial appears to provide more reliable performance data in comparison to an incremental test to exhaustion, but may underestimate V˙O2max.

  19. Real-time computational photon-counting LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Matthew; Johnson, Steven; Phillips, David; Padgett, Miles

    2018-03-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost, and high-speed MEMS-based spatial light modulators has generated widespread interest in alternative sampling strategies for imaging systems utilizing single-pixel detectors. The development of compressed sensing schemes for real-time computational imaging may have promising commercial applications for high-performance detectors, where the availability of focal plane arrays is expensive or otherwise limited. We discuss the research and development of a prototype light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system via direct time of flight, which utilizes a single high-sensitivity photon-counting detector and fast-timing electronics to recover millimeter accuracy three-dimensional images in real time. The development of low-cost real time computational LiDAR systems could have importance for applications in security, defense, and autonomous vehicles.

  20. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  1. Nuclear energy as a 'golden bridge'? Constitutional legal problems of the negotiation of the prolongation of the running time against skimming of profits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldhoff, Christian; Aswege, Hanka von

    2010-01-01

    The coalition agreement of Christian Demographic Union (CDU), Christian Social Union (CSU) and Free Democratic Party (FDP) from 26th October, 2009 characterizes the nuclear energy as a bridge technology. The coalition parties explain to prolong the running times of German nuclear power stations up to a reliable replacement by renewable energies. The conditions for the prolongation of the running times are to be regulated in agreement with energy supply companies. In the contribution under consideration, the authors report on the fiscal legal problems of the skimming of profits. Constitutional legal problems of the earmaking of a skimming of profits as well as a consensual agreement are discussed in this contribution. In the result, a financial constitutionally reliable way for the skimming of added profits due to prolongation of the running time is not evident. The legal earmaking of the duty advent for the promotion of renewable energies increases the constitutional doubts.

  2. A sub-cubic time algorithm for computing the quartet distance between two general trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Anders Kabell; Mailund, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background When inferring phylogenetic trees different algorithms may give different trees. To study such effects a measure for the distance between two trees is useful. Quartet distance is one such measure, and is the number of quartet topologies that differ between two trees. Results We have...... derived a new algorithm for computing the quartet distance between a pair of general trees, i.e. trees where inner nodes can have any degree ≥ 3. The time and space complexity of our algorithm is sub-cubic in the number of leaves and does not depend on the degree of the inner nodes. This makes...... it the fastest algorithm so far for computing the quartet distance between general trees independent of the degree of the inner nodes. Conclusions We have implemented our algorithm and two of the best competitors. Our new algorithm is significantly faster than the competition and seems to run in close...

  3. Imprecise results: Utilizing partial computations in real-time systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kwei-Jay; Natarajan, Swaminathan; Liu, Jane W.-S.

    1987-01-01

    In real-time systems, a computation may not have time to complete its execution because of deadline requirements. In such cases, no result except the approximate results produced by the computations up to that point will be available. It is desirable to utilize these imprecise results if possible. Two approaches are proposed to enable computations to return imprecise results when executions cannot be completed normally. The milestone approach records results periodically, and if a deadline is reached, returns the last recorded result. The sieve approach demarcates sections of code which can be skipped if the time available is insufficient. By using these approaches, the system is able to produce imprecise results when deadlines are reached. The design of the Concord project is described which supports imprecise computations using these techniques. Also presented is a general model of imprecise computations using these techniques, as well as one which takes into account the influence of the environment, showing where the latter approach fits into this model.

  4. Wake force computation in the time domain for long structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-07-01

    One is often interested in calculating the wake potentials for short bunches in long structures using TBCI. For ultra-relativistic particles it is sufficient to solve for the fields only over a window containing the bunch and moving along with it. This technique reduces both the memory and the running time required by a factor that equals the ratio of the structure length to the window length. For example, for a bunch with sigma/sub z/ of one picosecond traversing a single SLAC cell this improvement factor is 15. It is thus possible to solve for the wakefields in very long structures: for a given problem, increasing the structure length will not change the memory required while only adding linearly to the CPU time needed

  5. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  6. Subjective time runs faster under the influence of bright rather than dim light conditions during the forenoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Fukui, Tomoe; Morofushi, Masayo; Tokura, Hiromi

    2007-05-16

    The study investigated if 6 h morning bright light exposure, compared with dim light exposure, could influence time sense (range: 5-15 s). Eight women served as participants. The participant entered a bioclimatic chamber at 10:00 h on the day before the test day, where an ambient temperature and relative humidity were controlled at 25 degrees C and 60%RH. She sat quietly in a sofa in 50 lx until 22:00 h, retired at 22:00 h and then slept in total darkness. She rose at 07:00 h the following morning and again sat quietly in a sofa till 13:00 h, either in bright (2500 lx) or dim light (50 lx), the order of light intensities between the two occasions being randomized. The time-estimation test was performed from 13:00 to 13:10 h in 200 lx. The participant estimated the time that had elapsed between two buzzers, ranging over 5-15 s, and inputting the estimate into a computer. The test was carried out separately upon each individual. Results showed that the participants estimated higher durations of the given time intervals after previous exposure to 6 h of bright rather than dim light. The finding is discussed in terms of different load errors (difference between the actual core temperature and its thermoregulatory set-point) following 6-h exposure to bright or dim light in the morning.

  7. The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on bench press strength and time to running exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Travis W; Housh, Terry J; Malek, Moh H; Mielke, Michelle; Hendrix, Russell

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement (SUPP) on one-repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press strength and time to running exhaustion (TRE) at a velocity that corresponded to 85% of the peak oxygen uptake ([latin capital V with dot above]O2peak). The study used a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Thirty-one men (mean +/- SD age = 23.0 +/- 2.6 years) were randomly assigned to take either the SUPP or placebo (PLAC) first. The SUPP contained 201 mg of caffeine, and the PLAC was microcrystalline cellulose. All subjects were tested for 1-RM bench press strength and TRE at 45 minutes after taking either the SUPP or PLAC. After 1 week of rest, the subjects returned to the laboratory and ingested the opposite substance (SUPP or PLAC) from what was taken during the previous visit. The 1-RM bench press and TRE tests were then performed in the same manner as before. The results indicated that the SUPP had no effect on 1-RM bench press strength or TRE at 85% [latin capital V with dot above]O2peak. It is possible that the acute effects of caffeine are affected by differences in training status and/or the relative intensity of the exercise task. Future studies should examine these issues, in addition to testing the acute effects of various caffeine doses on performance during maximal strength, power, and aerobic activities. These findings do not, however, support the use of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in untrained to moderately trained individuals.

  8. Analysis and Design of Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter in the Extended Run Time DC UPS System Based on Fuel Cell and Supercapacitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract-In this paper, an extended run time DC UPS system structure with fuel cell and supercapacitor is investigated. A wide input range bi-directional dc-dc converter is described along with the phase-shift modulation scheme and phase-shift with duty cycle control, in different modes. The deli......Abstract-In this paper, an extended run time DC UPS system structure with fuel cell and supercapacitor is investigated. A wide input range bi-directional dc-dc converter is described along with the phase-shift modulation scheme and phase-shift with duty cycle control, in different modes...

  9. Real-time brain computer interface using imaginary movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Madani, Ahmad; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Kjær, Troels W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is the method of transforming mental thoughts and imagination into actions. A real-time BCI system can improve the quality of life of patients with severe neuromuscular disorders by enabling them to communicate with the outside world. In this paper...

  10. GRAPHIC, time-sharing magnet design computer programs at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes three magnet design computer programs in use at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron of Argonne National Laboratory. These programs are used in the time sharing mode in conjunction with a Tektronix model 4012 graphic display terminal. The first program in called TRIM, the second MAGNET, and the third GFUN. (U.S.)

  11. Instructional Advice, Time Advice and Learning Questions in Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N = 97) used an introductory text and a computer simulation to learn fundamental concepts about statistical analyses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression analysis and General Linear Model). Each learner was randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (with or without instructional advice) x 2 (with or without time advice) x 2…

  12. Triathlon: running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  13. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Rietmann, Max

    2016-11-25

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100×). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  14. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietmann, Max, E-mail: max.rietmann@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute for Computational Science, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano (Switzerland); Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Grote, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.grote@unibas.ch [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Basel (Switzerland); Peter, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.peter@kaust.edu.sa [Institute for Computational Science, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano (Switzerland); Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Schenk, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.schenk@usi.ch [Institute for Computational Science, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano (Switzerland)

    2017-04-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  15. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Rietmann, Max; Grote, Marcus; Peter, Daniel; Schenk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100×). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  16. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions.

  17. Hard real-time quick EXAFS data acquisition with all open source software on a commodity personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, I.; Siddons, D.P.; Caliebe, W.A.; Khalid, S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe here the data acquisition subsystem of the Quick EXAFS (QEXAFS) experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. For ease of future growth and flexibility, almost all software components are open source with very active maintainers. Among them, Linux running on x86 desktop computer, RTAI for real-time response, COMEDI driver for the data acquisition hardware, Qt and PyQt for graphical user interface, PyQwt for plotting, and Python for scripting. The signal (A/D) and energy-reading (IK220 encoder) devices in the PCI computer are also EPICS enabled. The control system scans the monochromator energy through a networked EPICS motor. With the real-time kernel, the system is capable of deterministic data-sampling period of tens of micro-seconds with typical timing-jitter of several micro-seconds. At the same time, Linux is running in other non-real-time processes handling the user-interface. A modern Qt-based controls-frontend enhances productivity. The fast plotting and zooming of data in time or energy coordinates let the experimenters verify the quality of the data before detailed analysis. Python scripting is built-in for automation. The typical data-rate for continuous runs are around 10 M bytes/min

  18. Patellofemoral Joint Loads During Running at the Time of Return to Sport in Elite Athletes With ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Lee; Alarifi, Saud; Jones, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Patellofemoral joint pain and degeneration are common in patients who undergo anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The presence of patellofemoral joint pain significantly affects the patient's ability to continue sport participation and may even affect participation in activities of daily living. The mechanisms behind patellofemoral joint pain and degeneration are unclear, but previous research has identified altered patellofemoral joint loading in individuals with patellofemoral joint pain when running. It is unclear whether this process occurs after ACLR. To assess the patellofemoral joint stresses during running in ACLR knees and compare the findings to the noninjured knee and matched control knees. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-four elite sports practitioners who had undergone ACLR and 34 age- and sex-matched controls participated in the study. The participants' running gait was assessed via 3D motion capture, and knee loads and forces were calculated by use of inverse dynamics. A significance difference was found in knee extensor moment, knee flexion angles, patellofemoral contact force (about 23% greater), and patellofemoral contact pressure (about 27% greater) between the ACLR and the noninjured limb ( P ≤ .04) and between the ACLR and the control limb ( P ≤ .04); no significant differences were found between the noninjured and control limbs ( P ≥ .44). Significantly greater levels of patellofemoral joint stress and load were found in the ACLR knee compared with the noninjured and control knees. Altered levels of patellofemoral stress in the ACLR knee during running may predispose individuals to patellofemoral joint pain.

  19. Effects of selective breeding for increased wheel-running behavior on circadian timing of substrate oxidation and ingestive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonas, I.; Vaanholt, L. M.; Doornbos, M.; Garland, T.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Nyakas, C.; van Dijk, G.; Garland Jr., T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations in substrate preference and utilization across the circadian cycle may be influenced by the degree of physical activity and nutritional status. In the present study, we assessed these relationships in control mice and in mice from a line selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running

  20. Reduced computational cost in the calculation of worst case response time for real time systems

    OpenAIRE

    Urriza, José M.; Schorb, Lucas; Orozco, Javier D.; Cayssials, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Modern Real Time Operating Systems require reducing computational costs even though the microprocessors become more powerful each day. It is usual that Real Time Operating Systems for embedded systems have advance features to administrate the resources of the applications that they support. In order to guarantee either the schedulability of the system or the schedulability of a new task in a dynamic Real Time System, it is necessary to know the Worst Case Response Time of the Real Time tasks ...

  1. Efficient quantum algorithm for computing n-time correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernales, J S; Di Candia, R; Egusquiza, I L; Casanova, J; Solano, E

    2014-07-11

    We propose a method for computing n-time correlation functions of arbitrary spinorial, fermionic, and bosonic operators, consisting of an efficient quantum algorithm that encodes these correlations in an initially added ancillary qubit for probe and control tasks. For spinorial and fermionic systems, the reconstruction of arbitrary n-time correlation functions requires the measurement of two ancilla observables, while for bosonic variables time derivatives of the same observables are needed. Finally, we provide examples applicable to different quantum platforms in the frame of the linear response theory.

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  3. Real-time Tsunami Inundation Prediction Using High Performance Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently off-shore tsunami observation stations based on cabled ocean bottom pressure gauges are actively being deployed especially in Japan. These cabled systems are designed to provide real-time tsunami data before tsunamis reach coastlines for disaster mitigation purposes. To receive real benefits of these observations, real-time analysis techniques to make an effective use of these data are necessary. A representative study was made by Tsushima et al. (2009) that proposed a method to provide instant tsunami source prediction based on achieving tsunami waveform data. As time passes, the prediction is improved by using updated waveform data. After a tsunami source is predicted, tsunami waveforms are synthesized from pre-computed tsunami Green functions of linear long wave equations. Tsushima et al. (2014) updated the method by combining the tsunami waveform inversion with an instant inversion of coseismic crustal deformation and improved the prediction accuracy and speed in the early stages. For disaster mitigation purposes, real-time predictions of tsunami inundation are also important. In this study, we discuss the possibility of real-time tsunami inundation predictions, which require faster-than-real-time tsunami inundation simulation in addition to instant tsunami source analysis. Although the computational amount is large to solve non-linear shallow water equations for inundation predictions, it has become executable through the recent developments of high performance computing technologies. We conducted parallel computations of tsunami inundation and achieved 6.0 TFLOPS by using 19,000 CPU cores. We employed a leap-frog finite difference method with nested staggered grids of which resolution range from 405 m to 5 m. The resolution ratio of each nested domain was 1/3. Total number of grid points were 13 million, and the time step was 0.1 seconds. Tsunami sources of 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake were tested. The inundation prediction up to 2 hours after the

  4. Effects of computing time delay on real-time control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kang G.; Cui, Xianzhong

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of a real-time digital control system depends not only on the reliability of the hardware and software used, but also on the speed in executing control algorithms. The latter is due to the negative effects of computing time delay on control system performance. For a given sampling interval, the effects of computing time delay are classified into the delay problem and the loss problem. Analysis of these two problems is presented as a means of evaluating real-time control systems. As an example, both the self-tuning predicted (STP) control and Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control are applied to the problem of tracking robot trajectories, and their respective effects of computing time delay on control performance are comparatively evaluated. For this example, the STP (PID) controller is shown to outperform the PID (STP) controller in coping with the delay (loss) problem.

  5. Sorting on STAR. [CDC computer algorithm timing comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Timing comparisons are given for three sorting algorithms written for the CDC STAR computer. One algorithm is Hoare's (1962) Quicksort, which is the fastest or nearly the fastest sorting algorithm for most computers. A second algorithm is a vector version of Quicksort that takes advantage of the STAR's vector operations. The third algorithm is an adaptation of Batcher's (1968) sorting algorithm, which makes especially good use of vector operations but has a complexity of N(log N)-squared as compared with a complexity of N log N for the Quicksort algorithms. In spite of its worse complexity, Batcher's sorting algorithm is competitive with the serial version of Quicksort for vectors up to the largest that can be treated by STAR. Vector Quicksort outperforms the other two algorithms and is generally preferred. These results indicate that unusual instruction sets can introduce biases in program execution time that counter results predicted by worst-case asymptotic complexity analysis.

  6. Computational intelligence in time series forecasting theory and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Palit, Ajoy K

    2005-01-01

    Foresight in an engineering enterprise can make the difference between success and failure, and can be vital to the effective control of industrial systems. Applying time series analysis in the on-line milieu of most industrial plants has been problematic owing to the time and computational effort required. The advent of soft computing tools offers a solution. The authors harness the power of intelligent technologies individually and in combination. Examples of the particular systems and processes susceptible to each technique are investigated, cultivating a comprehensive exposition of the improvements on offer in quality, model building and predictive control and the selection of appropriate tools from the plethora available. Application-oriented engineers in process control, manufacturing, production industry and research centres will find much to interest them in this book. It is suitable for industrial training purposes, as well as serving as valuable reference material for experimental researchers.

  7. Just in Time - Expecting Failure: Do JIT Principles Run Counter to DoD’s Business Nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Regiment. The last several years witnessed both commercial industry and the Department of Defense (DoD) logistics supply chains trending to-ward an...moving items through a production system only when needed. Equating inventory to an avoidable waste instead of adding value to a company directly...Louisiana plant for a week, Honda Motor Company to suspend orders for Japanese-built Honda and Acura models, and pro- ducers of Boeing’s 787 to run billions

  8. Control bandwidth improvements in GRAVITY fringe tracker by switching to a synchronous real time computer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuter, Roberto; Dembet, Roderick; Lacour, Sylvestre; di Lieto, Nicola; Woillez, Julien; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fedou, Pierre; Phan Duc, Than

    2016-08-01

    The new VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) 1 instrument GRAVITY5, 22, 23 is equipped with a fringe tracker16 able to stabilize the K-band fringes on six baselines at the same time. It has been designed to achieve a performance for average seeing conditions of a residual OPD (Optical Path Difference) lower than 300 nm with objects brighter than K = 10. The control loop implementing the tracking is composed of a four stage real time computer system compromising: a sensor where the detector pixels are read in and the OPD and GD (Group Delay) are calculated; a controller receiving the computed sensor quantities and producing commands for the piezo actuators; a concentrator which combines both the OPD commands with the real time tip/tilt corrections offloading them to the piezo actuator; and finally a Kalman15 parameter estimator. This last stage is used to monitor current measurements over a window of few seconds and estimate new values for the main Kalman15 control loop parameters. The hardware and software implementation of this design runs asynchronously and communicates the four computers for data transfer via the Reflective Memory Network3. With the purpose of improving the performance of the GRAVITY5, 23 fringe tracking16, 22 control loop, a deviation from the standard asynchronous communication mechanism has been proposed and implemented. This new scheme operates the four independent real time computers involved in the tracking loop synchronously using the Reflective Memory Interrupts2 as the coordination signal. This synchronous mechanism had the effect of reducing the total pure delay of the loop from 3.5 [ms] to 2.0 [ms] which then translates on a better stabilization of the fringes as the bandwidth of the system is substantially improved. This paper will explain in detail the real time architecture of the fringe tracker in both is synchronous and synchronous implementation. The achieved improvements on reducing the delay via this mechanism will be

  9. The investigation and implementation of real-time face pose and direction estimation on mobile computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Deqian; Gao, Lisheng; Jhang, Seong Tae

    2012-04-01

    The mobile computing device has many limitations, such as relative small user interface and slow computing speed. Usually, augmented reality requires face pose estimation can be used as a HCI and entertainment tool. As far as the realtime implementation of head pose estimation on relatively resource limited mobile platforms is concerned, it is required to face different constraints while leaving enough face pose estimation accuracy. The proposed face pose estimation method met this objective. Experimental results running on a testing Android mobile device delivered satisfactory performing results in the real-time and accurately.

  10. Spike-timing-based computation in sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan F M Goodman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal.

  11. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  13. A heterogeneous hierarchical architecture for real-time computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skroch, D.A.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The need for high-speed data acquisition and control algorithms has prompted continued research in the area of multiprocessor systems and related programming techniques. The result presented here is a unique hardware and software architecture for high-speed real-time computer systems. The implementation of a prototype of this architecture has required the integration of architecture, operating systems and programming languages into a cohesive unit. This report describes a Heterogeneous Hierarchial Architecture for Real-Time (H{sup 2} ART) and system software for program loading and interprocessor communication.

  14. Modern EMC analysis I time-domain computational schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Kantartzis, Nikolaos V

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this two-volume book is the systematic and comprehensive description of the most competitive time-domain computational methods for the efficient modeling and accurate solution of contemporary real-world EMC problems. Intended to be self-contained, it performs a detailed presentation of all well-known algorithms, elucidating on their merits or weaknesses, and accompanies the theoretical content with a variety of applications. Outlining the present volume, the analysis covers the theory of the finite-difference time-domain, the transmission-line matrix/modeling, and the finite i

  15. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. STICK: Spike Time Interval Computational Kernel, a Framework for General Purpose Computation Using Neurons, Precise Timing, Delays, and Synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagorce, Xavier; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-11-01

    There has been significant research over the past two decades in developing new platforms for spiking neural computation. Current neural computers are primarily developed to mimic biology. They use neural networks, which can be trained to perform specific tasks to mainly solve pattern recognition problems. These machines can do more than simulate biology; they allow us to rethink our current paradigm of computation. The ultimate goal is to develop brain-inspired general purpose computation architectures that can breach the current bottleneck introduced by the von Neumann architecture. This work proposes a new framework for such a machine. We show that the use of neuron-like units with precise timing representation, synaptic diversity, and temporal delays allows us to set a complete, scalable compact computation framework. The framework provides both linear and nonlinear operations, allowing us to represent and solve any function. We show usability in solving real use cases from simple differential equations to sets of nonlinear differential equations leading to chaotic attractors.

  17. [Research and implementation of a real-time monitoring system for running status of medical monitors based on the internet of things].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Qian, Mingli; Li, Long; Li, Bin

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposed a real-time monitoring system for running status of medical monitors based on the internet of things. In the aspect of hardware, a solution of ZigBee networks plus 470 MHz networks is proposed. In the aspect of software, graphical display of monitoring interface and real-time equipment failure alarm is implemented. The system has the function of remote equipment failure detection and wireless localization, which provides a practical and effective method for medical equipment management.

  18. Climate Data Provenance Tracking for Just-In-Time Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, S.; Nadeau, D.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    The "Climate Data Management System" (CDMS) was created in 1996 as part of the Climate Data Analysis Tools suite of software. It provides a simple interface into a wide variety of climate data formats, and creates NetCDF CF-Compliant files. It leverages the NumPy framework for high performance computation, and is an all-in-one IO and computation package. CDMS has been extended to track manipulations of data, and trace that data all the way to the original raw data. This extension tracks provenance about data, and enables just-in-time (JIT) computation. The provenance for each variable is packaged as part of the variable's metadata, and can be used to validate data processing and computations (by repeating the analysis on the original data). It also allows for an alternate solution for sharing analyzed data; if the bandwidth for a transfer is prohibitively expensive, the provenance serialization can be passed in a much more compact format and the analysis rerun on the input data. Data provenance tracking in CDMS enables far-reaching and impactful functionalities, permitting implementation of many analytical paradigms.

  19. A note on computing average state occupation times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Beyersmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This review discusses how biometricians would probably compute or estimate expected waiting times, if they had the data. Methods: Our framework is a time-inhomogeneous Markov multistate model, where all transition hazards are allowed to be time-varying. We assume that the cumulative transition hazards are given. That is, they are either known, as in a simulation, determined by expert guesses, or obtained via some method of statistical estimation. Our basic tool is product integration, which transforms the transition hazards into the matrix of transition probabilities. Product integration enjoys a rich mathematical theory, which has successfully been used to study probabilistic and statistical aspects of multistate models. Our emphasis will be on practical implementation of product integration, which allows us to numerically approximate the transition probabilities. Average state occupation times and other quantities of interest may then be derived from the transition probabilities.

  20. Output improvement of Sg. Piah run-off river hydro-electric station with a new computed river flow-based control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jidin, Razali; Othman, Bahari

    2013-06-01

    The lower Sg. Piah hydro-electric station is a river run-off hydro scheme with generators capable of generating 55MW of electricity. It is located 30km away from Sg. Siput, a small town in the state of Perak, Malaysia. The station has two turbines (Pelton) to harness energy from water that flow through a 7km tunnel from a small intake dam. The trait of a run-off river hydro station is small-reservoir that cannot store water for a long duration; therefore potential energy carried by the spillage will be wasted if the dam level is not appropriately regulated. To improve the station annual energy output, a new controller based on the computed river flow has been installed. The controller regulates the dam level with an algorithm based on the river flow derived indirectly from the intake-dam water level and other plant parameters. The controller has been able to maintain the dam at optimum water level and regulate the turbines to maximize the total generation output.

  1. Output improvement of Sg. Piah run-off river hydro-electric station with a new computed river flow-based control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jidin, Razali; Othman, Bahari

    2013-01-01

    The lower Sg. Piah hydro-electric station is a river run-off hydro scheme with generators capable of generating 55MW of electricity. It is located 30km away from Sg. Siput, a small town in the state of Perak, Malaysia. The station has two turbines (Pelton) to harness energy from water that flow through a 7km tunnel from a small intake dam. The trait of a run-off river hydro station is small-reservoir that cannot store water for a long duration; therefore potential energy carried by the spillage will be wasted if the dam level is not appropriately regulated. To improve the station annual energy output, a new controller based on the computed river flow has been installed. The controller regulates the dam level with an algorithm based on the river flow derived indirectly from the intake-dam water level and other plant parameters. The controller has been able to maintain the dam at optimum water level and regulate the turbines to maximize the total generation output.

  2. Hourly Comparison of GPM-IMERG-Final-Run and IMERG-Real-Time (V-03) over a Dense Surface Network in Northeastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Ehsan; Steinacker, Reinhold; Saghafian, Bahram

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantitative daily precipitation estimation is key to meteorological and hydrological applications in hazards forecast and management. In-situ observations over mountainous areas are mostly limited, however, currently available satellite precipitation products can potentially provide the precipitation estimation needed for meteorological and hydrological applications. Over the years, blended methods that use multi-satellites and multi-sensors have been developed for estimating of global precipitation. One of the latest satellite precipitation products is GPM-IMERG (Global Precipitation Measurement with 30-minute temporal and 0.1-degree spatial resolutions) which consists of three products: Final-Run (aimed for research), Real-Time early run, and Real-Time late run. The Integrated Multisatellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products built upon the success of TRMM's Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products continue to make improvements in spatial and temporal resolutions and snowfall estimates. Recently, researchers who evaluated IMERG-Final-Run V-03 and other precipitation products indicated better performance for IMERG-Final-Run against other similar products. In this study two GPM-IMERG products, namely final run and real time-late run, were evaluated against a dense synoptic stations network (62 stations) over Northeastern Austria for mid-March 2015 to end of January 2016 period at hourly time-scale. Both products were examined against the reference data (stations) in capturing the occurrence of precipitation and statistical characteristics of precipitation intensity. Both satellite precipitation products underestimated precipitation events of 0.1 mm/hr to 0.4 mm/hr in intensity. For precipitations 0.4 mm/hr and greater, the trend was reversed and both satellite products overestimated than station recorded data. IMERG-RT outperformed IMERG-FR for precipitation intensity in the range of 0.1 mm/hr to 0.4 mm/hr while in the range of 1.1 to 1.8 mm

  3. Computer network time synchronization the network time protocol on earth and in space

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, David L

    2010-01-01

    Carefully coordinated, reliable, and accurate time synchronization is vital to a wide spectrum of fields-from air and ground traffic control, to buying and selling goods and services, to TV network programming. Ill-gotten time could even lead to the unimaginable and cause DNS caches to expire, leaving the entire Internet to implode on the root servers.Written by the original developer of the Network Time Protocol (NTP), Computer Network Time Synchronization: The Network Time Protocol on Earth and in Space, Second Edition addresses the technological infrastructure of time dissemination, distrib

  4. The LHCb Run Control

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Callot, O; Duval, P-Y; Franek, B; Frank, M; Galli, D; Gaspar, C; v Herwijnen, E; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N; Sambade, A; Schwemmer, R; Somogyi, P

    2010-01-01

    LHCb has designed and implemented an integrated Experiment Control System. The Control System uses the same concepts and the same tools to control and monitor all parts of the experiment: the Data Acquisition System, the Timing and the Trigger Systems, the High Level Trigger Farm, the Detector Control System, the Experiment's Infrastructure and the interaction with the CERN Technical Services and the Accelerator. LHCb's Run Control, the main interface used by the experiment's operator, provides access in a hierarchical, coherent and homogeneous manner to all areas of the experiment and to all its sub-detectors. It allows for automated (or manual) configuration and control, including error recovery, of the full experiment in its different running modes. Different instances of the same Run Control interface are used by the various sub-detectors for their stand-alone activities: test runs, calibration runs, etc. The architecture and the tools used to build the control system, the guidelines and components provid...

  5. Computational electrodynamics the finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Taflove, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This extensively revised and expanded third edition of the Artech House bestseller, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, offers engineers the most up-to-date and definitive resource on this critical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The method helps practitioners design antennas, wireless communications devices, high-speed digital and microwave circuits, and integrated optical devices with unsurpassed efficiency. There has been considerable advancement in FDTD computational technology over the past few years, and the third edition brings professionals the very latest details with entirely new chapters on important techniques, major updates on key topics, and new discussions on emerging areas such as nanophotonics. What's more, to supplement the third edition, the authors have created a Web site with solutions to problems, downloadable graphics and videos, and updates, making this new edition the ideal textbook on the subject as well.

  6. In this issue: Time to replace doctors’ judgement with computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Informaticians continue to rise to the challenge, set by the English Health Minister, of trying to replace doctors’ judgement with computers. This issue describes successes and where there are barriers. However, whilst there is progress this tends to be incremental and there are grand challenges to be overcome before computers can replace clinician. These grand challenges include: (1 improving usability so it is possible to more readily incorporate technology into clinical workflow; (2 rigorous new analytic methods that make use of the mass of available data, ‘Big data’, to create real-world evidence; (3 faster ways of meeting regulatory and legal requirements including ensuring privacy; (4 provision of reimbursement models to fund innovative technology that can substitute for clinical time and (5 recognition that innovations that improve quality also often increase cost. Informatics more is likely to support and augment clinical decision making rather than replace clinicians.

  7. Low contrast volume run-off CT angiography with optimized scan time based on double-level test bolus technique – feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxa, Jan; Vendiš, Tomáš; Moláček, Jiří; Štěpánková, Lucie; Flohr, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Korporaal, Johannes G.; Ferda, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the technical feasibility of low contrast volume (40 mL) run-off CT angiography (run-off CTA) with the individual scan time optimization based on double-level test bolus technique. Materials and methods: A prospective study of 92 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA performed with 40 mL of contrast medium (injection rate of 6 mL/s) and optimized scan times on a second generation of dual-source CT. Individual optimized scan times were calculated from aortopopliteal transit times obtained on the basis of double-level test bolus technique – the single injection of 10 mL test bolus and dynamic acquisitions in two levels (abdominal aorta and popliteal arteries). Intraluminal attenuation (HU) was measured in 6 levels (aorta, iliac, femoral and popliteal arteries, middle and distal lower-legs) and subjective quality (3-point score) was assessed. Relations of image quality, test bolus parameters and arterial circulation involvement were analyzed. Results: High mean attenuation (HU) values (468; 437; 442; 440; 342; 274) and quality score in all monitored levels was achieved. In 91 patients (0.99) the sufficient diagnostic quality (score 1–2) in aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was determined. A total of 6 patients (0.07) were not evaluable in distal lower-legs. Only the weak indirect correlation of image quality and test-bolus parameters was proved in iliac, femoral and popliteal levels (r values: −0.263, −0.298 and −0.254). The statistically significant difference of the test-bolus parameters and image quality was proved in patients with occlusive and aneurysmal disease. Conclusion: We proved the technical feasibility and sufficient quality of run-off CTA with low volume of contrast medium and optimized scan time according to aortopopliteal transit time calculated from double-level test bolus

  8. Computation Offloading for Frame-Based Real-Time Tasks under Given Server Response Time Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas S. M. Toma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computation offloading has been adopted to improve the performance of embedded systems by offloading the computation of some tasks, especially computation-intensive tasks, to servers or clouds. This paper explores computation offloading for real-time tasks in embedded systems, provided given response time guarantees from the servers, to decide which tasks should be offloaded to get the results in time. We consider frame-based real-time tasks with the same period and relative deadline. When the execution order of the tasks is given, the problem can be solved in linear time. However, when the execution order is not specified, we prove that the problem is NP-complete. We develop a pseudo-polynomial-time algorithm for deriving feasible schedules, if they exist.  An approximation scheme is also developed to trade the error made from the algorithm and the complexity. Our algorithms are extended to minimize the period/relative deadline of the tasks for performance maximization. The algorithms are evaluated with a case study for a surveillance system and synthesized benchmarks.

  9. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  10. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  11. Real time simulation of large systems on mini-computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhle, Michel; Roux, Pierre.

    1979-01-01

    Most simulation languages will only accept an explicit formulation of differential equations, and logical variables hold no special status therein. The pace of the suggested methods of integration is limited by the smallest time constant of the model submitted. The NEPTUNIX 2 simulation software has a language that will take implicit equations and an integration method of which the variable pace is not limited by the time constants of the model. This, together with high time and memory ressources optimization of the code generated, makes NEPTUNIX 2 a basic tool for simulation on mini-computers. Since the logical variables are specific entities under centralized control, correct processing of discontinuities and synchronization with a real process are feasible. The NEPTUNIX 2 is the industrial version of NEPTUNIX 1 [fr

  12. NNSA?s Computing Strategy, Acquisition Plan, and Basis for Computing Time Allocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkel, D J

    2009-07-21

    This report is in response to the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (H.R. 1105; Public Law 111-8) in its funding of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. This bill called for a report on ASC's plans for computing and platform acquisition strategy in support of stockpile stewardship. Computer simulation is essential to the stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Annual certification of the country's stockpile systems, Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs), and execution of Life Extension Programs (LEPs) are dependent on simulations employing the advanced ASC tools developed over the past decade plus; indeed, without these tools, certification would not be possible without a return to nuclear testing. ASC is an integrated program involving investments in computer hardware (platforms and computing centers), software environments, integrated design codes and physical models for these codes, and validation methodologies. The significant progress ASC has made in the past derives from its focus on mission and from its strategy of balancing support across the key investment areas necessary for success. All these investment areas must be sustained for ASC to adequately support current stockpile stewardship mission needs and to meet ever more difficult challenges as the weapons continue to age or undergo refurbishment. The appropriations bill called for this report to address three specific issues, which are responded to briefly here but are expanded upon in the subsequent document: (1) Identify how computing capability at each of the labs will specifically contribute to stockpile stewardship goals, and on what basis computing time will be allocated to achieve the goal of a balanced program among the labs. (2) Explain the NNSA's acquisition strategy for capacity and capability of machines at each of the labs and how it will fit within the existing budget constraints. (3

  13. FRANTIC: a computer code for time dependent unavailability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.; Goldberg, F.F.

    1977-03-01

    The FRANTIC computer code evaluates the time dependent and average unavailability for any general system model. The code is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM 370 computer. Non-repairable components, monitored components, and periodically tested components are handled. One unique feature of FRANTIC is the detailed, time dependent modeling of periodic testing which includes the effects of test downtimes, test overrides, detection inefficiencies, and test-caused failures. The exponential distribution is used for the component failure times and periodic equations are developed for the testing and repair contributions. Human errors and common mode failures can be included by assigning an appropriate constant probability for the contributors. The output from FRANTIC consists of tables and plots of the system unavailability along with a breakdown of the unavailability contributions. Sensitivity studies can be simply performed and a wide range of tables and plots can be obtained for reporting purposes. The FRANTIC code represents a first step in the development of an approach that can be of direct value in future system evaluations. Modifications resulting from use of the code, along with the development of reliability data based on operating reactor experience, can be expected to provide increased confidence in its use and potential application to the licensing process

  14. Variable dead time counters: 2. A computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooton, B.W.; Lees, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    A computer model has been developed to give a pulse train which simulates that generated by a variable dead time counter (VDC) used in safeguards determination of Pu mass. The model is applied to two algorithms generally used for VDC analysis. It is used to determine their limitations at high counting rates and to investigate the effects of random neutrons from (α,n) reactions. Both algorithms are found to be deficient for use with masses of 240 Pu greater than 100g and one commonly used algorithm is shown, by use of the model and also by theory, to yield a result which is dependent on the random neutron intensity. (author)

  15. Effects of cognitive stimulation with a self-modeling video on time to exhaustion while running at maximal aerobic velocity: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagin, Vincent; Gonzales, Benoît R; Groslambert, Alain

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed whether video self-modeling improves running performance and influences the rate of perceived exertion and heart rate response. Twelve men (M age=26.8 yr., SD=6; M body mass index=22.1 kg.m(-2), SD=1) performed a time to exhaustion running test at 100 percent maximal aerobic velocity while focusing on a video self-modeling loop to synchronize their stride. Compared to the control condition, there was a significant increase of time to exhaustion. Perceived exertion was lower also, but there was no significant change in mean heart rate. In conclusion, the video self-modeling used as a pacer apparently increased endurance by decreasing perceived exertion without affecting the heart rate.

  16. Passenger Sharing of the High-Speed Railway from Sensitivity Analysis Caused by Price and Run-time Based on the Multi-Agent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ning

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nowadays, governments around the world are active in constructing the high-speed railway. Therefore, it is significant to make research on this increasingly prevalent transport.Design/methodology/approach: In this paper, we simulate the process of the passenger’s travel mode choice by adjusting the ticket fare and the run-time based on the multi-agent system (MAS.Findings: From the research we get the conclusion that increasing the run-time appropriately and reducing the ticket fare in some extent are effective ways to enhance the passenger sharing of the high-speed railway.Originality/value: We hope it can provide policy recommendations for the railway sectors in developing the long-term plan on high-speed railway in the future.

  17. A cascadic monotonic time-discretized algorithm for finite-level quantum control computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditz, P.; Borzi`, A.

    2008-03-01

    A computer package (CNMS) is presented aimed at the solution of finite-level quantum optimal control problems. This package is based on a recently developed computational strategy known as monotonic schemes. Quantum optimal control problems arise in particular in quantum optics where the optimization of a control representing laser pulses is required. The purpose of the external control field is to channel the system's wavefunction between given states in its most efficient way. Physically motivated constraints, such as limited laser resources, are accommodated through appropriately chosen cost functionals. Program summaryProgram title: CNMS Catalogue identifier: ADEB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADEB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 770 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7098 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB 6 Computer: AMD Athlon 64 × 2 Dual, 2:21 GHz, 1:5 GB RAM Operating system: Microsoft Windows XP Word size: 32 Classification: 4.9 Nature of problem: Quantum control Solution method: Iterative Running time: 60-600 sec

  18. Symmetry in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibert, M H

    1986-03-14

    Symmetry plays a key role in simplifying the control of legged robots and in giving them the ability to run and balance. The symmetries studied describe motion of the body and legs in terms of even and odd functions of time. A legged system running with these symmetries travels with a fixed forward speed and a stable upright posture. The symmetries used for controlling legged robots may help in elucidating the legged behavior of animals. Measurements of running in the cat and human show that the feet and body sometimes move as predicted by the even and odd symmetry functions.

  19. On the Correctness of Real-Time Modular Computer Systems Modeling with Stopwatch Automata Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina B. Glonina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a schedulability analysis problem for real-time modular computer systems (RT MCS. A system configuration is called schedulable if all the jobs finish within their deadlines. The authors propose a stopwatch automata-based general model of RT MCS operation. A model instance for a given RT MCS configuration is a network of stopwatch automata (NSA and it can be built automatically using the general model. A system operation trace, which is necessary for checking the schedulability criterion, can be obtained from the corresponding NSA trace. The paper substantiates the correctness of the proposed approach. A set of correctness requirements to models of system components and to the whole system model were derived from RT MCS specifications. The authors proved that if all models of system components satisfy the corresponding requirements, the whole system model built according to the proposed approach satisfies its correctness requirements and is deterministic (i.e. for a given configuration a trace generated by the corresponding model run is uniquely determined. The model determinism implies that any model run can be used for schedulability analysis. This fact is crucial for the approach efficiency, as the number of possible model runs grows exponentially with the number of jobs in a system. Correctness requirements to models of system components models can be checked automatically by a verifier using observer automata approach. The authors proved by using UPPAAL verifier that all the developed models of system components satisfy the corresponding requirements. User-defined models of system components can be also used for system modeling if they satisfy the requirements.

  20. Distance walked and run as improved metrics over time-based energy estimation in epidemiological studies and prevention; evidence from medication use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available The guideline physical activity levels are prescribed in terms of time, frequency, and intensity (e.g., 30 minutes brisk walking, five days a week or its energy equivalence and assume that different activities may be combined to meet targeted goals (exchangeability premise. Habitual runners and walkers may quantify exercise in terms of distance (km/day, and for them, the relationship between activity dose and health benefits may be better assessed in terms of distance rather than time. Analyses were therefore performed to test: 1 whether time-based or distance-based estimates of energy expenditure provide the best metric for relating running and walking to hypertensive, high cholesterol, and diabetes medication use (conditions known to be diminished by exercise, and 2 the exchangeability premise.Logistic regression analyses of medication use (dependent variable vs. metabolic equivalent hours per day (METhr/d of running, walking and other exercise (independent variables using cross-sectional data from the National Runners' (17,201 male, 16,173 female and Walkers' Health Studies (3,434 male, 12,384 female.Estimated METhr/d of running and walking activity were 38% and 31% greater, respectively, when calculated from self-reported time than distance in men, and 43% and 37% greater in women, respectively. Percent reductions in the odds for hypertension and high cholesterol medication use per METhr/d run or per METhr/d walked were ≥ 2-fold greater when estimated from reported distance (km/wk than from time (hr/wk. The per METhr/d odds reduction was significantly greater for the distance- than the time-based estimate for hypertension (runners: P<10(-5 for males and P=0.003 for females; walkers: P=0.03 for males and P<10(-4 for females, high cholesterol medication use in runners (P<10(-4 for males and P=0.02 for females and male walkers (P=0.01 for males and P=0.08 for females and for diabetes medication use in male runners (P<10(-3.Although causality

  1. Fast computation of hologram patterns of a 3D object using run-length encoding and novel look-up table methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2009-02-20

    In this paper we propose a new approach for fast generation of computer-generated holograms (CGHs) of a 3D object by using the run-length encoding (RLE) and the novel look-up table (N-LUT) methods. With the RLE method, spatially redundant data of a 3D object are extracted and regrouped into the N-point redundancy map according to the number of the adjacent object points having the same 3D value. Based on this redundancy map, N-point principle fringe patterns (PFPs) are newly calculated by using the 1-point PFP of the N-LUT, and the CGH pattern for the 3D object is generated with these N-point PFPs. In this approach, object points to be involved in calculation of the CGH pattern can be dramatically reduced and, as a result, an increase of computational speed can be obtained. Some experiments with a test 3D object are carried out and the results are compared to those of the conventional methods.

  2. Time Series Analysis, Modeling and Applications A Computational Intelligence Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shyi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Temporal and spatiotemporal data form an inherent fabric of the society as we are faced with streams of data coming from numerous sensors, data feeds, recordings associated with numerous areas of application embracing physical and human-generated phenomena (environmental data, financial markets, Internet activities, etc.). A quest for a thorough analysis, interpretation, modeling and prediction of time series comes with an ongoing challenge for developing models that are both accurate and user-friendly (interpretable). The volume is aimed to exploit the conceptual and algorithmic framework of Computational Intelligence (CI) to form a cohesive and comprehensive environment for building models of time series. The contributions covered in the volume are fully reflective of the wealth of the CI technologies by bringing together ideas, algorithms, and numeric studies, which convincingly demonstrate their relevance, maturity and visible usefulness. It reflects upon the truly remarkable diversity of methodological a...

  3. Computation of the target state and feedback controls for time optimal consensus in multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Ameer K.; Patil, Deepak U.; Chakraborty, Debraj

    2018-02-01

    N identical agents with bounded inputs aim to reach a common target state (consensus) in the minimum possible time. Algorithms for computing this time-optimal consensus point, the control law to be used by each agent and the time taken for the consensus to occur, are proposed. Two types of multi-agent systems are considered, namely (1) coupled single-integrator agents on a plane and, (2) double-integrator agents on a line. At the initial time instant, each agent is assumed to have access to the state information of all the other agents. An algorithm, using convexity of attainable sets and Helly's theorem, is proposed, to compute the final consensus target state and the minimum time to achieve this consensus. Further, parts of the computation are parallelised amongst the agents such that each agent has to perform computations of O(N2) run time complexity. Finally, local feedback time-optimal control laws are synthesised to drive each agent to the target point in minimum time. During this part of the operation, the controller for each agent uses measurements of only its own states and does not need to communicate with any neighbouring agents.

  4. Accessible high performance computing solutions for near real-time image processing for time critical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielski, Conrad; Lemoine, Guido; Syryczynski, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) hardware solutions such as grid computing and General Processing on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) are now accessible to users with general computing needs. Grid computing infrastructures in the form of computing clusters or blades are becoming common place and GPGPU solutions that leverage the processing power of the video card are quickly being integrated into personal workstations. Our interest in these HPC technologies stems from the need to produce near real-time maps from a combination of pre- and post-event satellite imagery in support of post-disaster management. Faster processing provides a twofold gain in this situation: 1. critical information can be provided faster and 2. more elaborate automated processing can be performed prior to providing the critical information. In our particular case, we test the use of the PANTEX index which is based on analysis of image textural measures extracted using anisotropic, rotation-invariant GLCM statistics. The use of this index, applied in a moving window, has been shown to successfully identify built-up areas in remotely sensed imagery. Built-up index image masks are important input to the structuring of damage assessment interpretation because they help optimise the workload. The performance of computing the PANTEX workflow is compared on two different HPC hardware architectures: (1) a blade server with 4 blades, each having dual quad-core CPUs and (2) a CUDA enabled GPU workstation. The reference platform is a dual CPU-quad core workstation and the PANTEX workflow total computing time is measured. Furthermore, as part of a qualitative evaluation, the differences in setting up and configuring various hardware solutions and the related software coding effort is presented.

  5. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  6. Effect of foot orthoses on magnitude and timing of rearfoot and tibial motions, ground reaction force and knee moment during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Mansour; Begon, Mickaël; Hinse, Sébastien; Sadeghi, Heydar; Popov, Peter; Allard, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Changes in magnitude and timing of rearfoot eversion and tibial internal rotation by foot orthoses and their contributions to vertical ground reaction force and knee joint moments are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to test if orthoses modify the magnitude and time to peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, active ground reaction force and knee adduction moment and determine if rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation magnitudes are correlated to peak active ground reaction force and knee adduction moment during the first 60% stance phase of running. Eleven healthy men ran at 170 steps per minute in shod and with foot orthoses conditions. Video and force-plate data were collected simultaneously to calculate foot joint angular displacement, ground reaction forces and knee adduction moments. Results showed that wearing semi-rigid foot orthoses significantly reduced rearfoot eversion 40% (4.1 degrees ; p=0.001) and peak active ground reaction force 6% (0.96N/kg; p=0.008). No significant time differences occurred among the peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation and peak active ground reaction force in both conditions. A positive and significant correlation was observed between peak knee adduction moment and the magnitude of rearfoot eversion during shod (r=0.59; p=0.04) and shod/orthoses running (r=0.65; p=0.02). In conclusion, foot orthoses could reduce rearfoot eversion so that this can be associated with a reduction of knee adduction moment during the first 60% stance phase of running. Finding implies that modifying rearfoot and tibial motions during running could not be related to a reduction of the ground reaction force.

  7. Kajian dan Implementasi Real Time Operating System pada Single Board Computer Berbasis Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedjaja A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Operating System is an important software in computer system. For personal and office use the operating system is sufficient. However, to critical mission applications such as nuclear power plants and braking system on the car (auto braking system which need a high level of reliability, it requires operating system which operates in real time. The study aims to assess the implementation of the Linux-based operating system on a Single Board Computer (SBC ARM-based, namely Pandaboard ES with the Dual-core ARM Cortex-A9, TI OMAP 4460 type. Research was conducted by the method of implementation of the General Purpose OS Ubuntu 12:04 OMAP4-armhf-RTOS and Linux 3.4.0-rt17 + on PandaBoard ES. Then research compared the latency value of each OS on no-load and with full-load condition. The results obtained show the maximum latency value of RTOS on full load condition is at 45 uS, much smaller than the maximum value of GPOS at full-load at 17.712 uS. The lower value of latency demontrates that the RTOS has ability to run the process in a certain period of time much better than the GPOS.

  8. Just-in-Time Compilation-Inspired Methodology for Parallelization of Compute Intensive Java Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHULAM MUSTAFA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compute intensive programs generally consume significant fraction of execution time in a small amount of repetitive code. Such repetitive code is commonly known as hotspot code. We observed that compute intensive hotspots often possess exploitable loop level parallelism. A JIT (Just-in-Time compiler profiles a running program to identify its hotspots. Hotspots are then translated into native code, for efficient execution. Using similar approach, we propose a methodology to identify hotspots and exploit their parallelization potential on multicore systems. Proposed methodology selects and parallelizes each DOALL loop that is either contained in a hotspot method or calls a hotspot method. The methodology could be integrated in front-end of a JIT compiler to parallelize sequential code, just before native translation. However, compilation to native code is out of scope of this work. As a case study, we analyze eighteen JGF (Java Grande Forum benchmarks to determine parallelization potential of hotspots. Eight benchmarks demonstrate a speedup of up to 7.6x on an 8-core system

  9. Just-in-time compilation-inspired methodology for parallelization of compute intensive java code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, G.; Ghani, M.U.

    2017-01-01

    Compute intensive programs generally consume significant fraction of execution time in a small amount of repetitive code. Such repetitive code is commonly known as hotspot code. We observed that compute intensive hotspots often possess exploitable loop level parallelism. A JIT (Just-in-Time) compiler profiles a running program to identify its hotspots. Hotspots are then translated into native code, for efficient execution. Using similar approach, we propose a methodology to identify hotspots and exploit their parallelization potential on multicore systems. Proposed methodology selects and parallelizes each DOALL loop that is either contained in a hotspot method or calls a hotspot method. The methodology could be integrated in front-end of a JIT compiler to parallelize sequential code, just before native translation. However, compilation to native code is out of scope of this work. As a case study, we analyze eighteen JGF (Java Grande Forum) benchmarks to determine parallelization potential of hotspots. Eight benchmarks demonstrate a speedup of up to 7.6x on an 8-core system. (author)

  10. Impact of Different Time Series Streamflow Data on Energy Generation of a Run-of-River Hydropower Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentel, E.; Cetinkaya, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Global issues such as population increase, power supply crises, oil prices, social and environmental concerns have been forcing countries to search for alternative energy sources such as renewable energy to satisfy the sustainable development goals. Hydropower is the most common form of renewable energy in the world. Hydropower does not require any fuel, produces relatively less pollution and waste and it is a reliable energy source with relatively low operating cost. In order to estimate the average annual energy production of a hydropower plant, sufficient and dependable streamflow data is required. The goal of this study is to investigate impact of streamflow data on annual energy generation of Balkusan HEPP which is a small run-of-river hydropower plant at Karaman, Turkey. Two different stream gaging stations are located in the vicinity of Balkusan HEPP and these two stations have different observation periods: one from 1986 to 2004 and the other from 2000 to 2009. These two observation periods show different climatic characteristics. Thus, annual energy estimations based on data from these two different stations differ considerably. Additionally, neither of these stations is located at the power plant axis, thus streamflow observations from these two stream gaging stations need to be transferred to the plant axis. This requirement introduces further errors into energy estimations. Impact of different streamflow data and transfer of streamflow observations to plant axis on annual energy generation of a small hydropower plant is investigated in this study.

  11. Effects of selective breeding for increased wheel-running behavior on circadian timing of substrate oxidation and ingestive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónás, I; Vaanholt, L M; Doornbos, M; Garland, T; Scheurink, A J W; Nyakas, C; van Dijk, G

    2010-04-19

    Fluctuations in substrate preference and utilization across the circadian cycle may be influenced by the degree of physical activity and nutritional status. In the present study, we assessed these relationships in control mice and in mice from a line selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running behavior, either when feeding a carbohydrate-rich/low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet. Housed without wheels, selected mice, and in particular the females, exhibited higher cage activity than their non-selected controls during the dark phase and at the onset of the light phase, irrespective of diet. This was associated with increases in energy expenditure in both sexes of the selection line. In selected males, carbohydrate oxidation appeared to be increased compared to controls. In contrast, selected females had profound increases in fat oxidation above the levels in control females to cover the increased energy expenditure during the dark phase. This is remarkable in light of the finding that the selected mice, and in particular the females showed higher preference for the LF diet relative to controls. It is likely that hormonal and/or metabolic signals increase carbohydrate preference in the selected females, which may serve optimal maintenance of cellular metabolism in the presence of augmented fat oxidation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12.  Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners

    OpenAIRE

    Barandun U; Knechtle B; Knechtle P; Klipstein A; Rust CA; Rosemann T; Lepers R

    2012-01-01

     Background: Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners.Methods: Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times.Results...

  13. Pre-Exercise Hyperhydration-Induced Bodyweight Gain Does Not Alter Prolonged Treadmill Running Time-Trial Performance in Warm Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. B. Goulet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effect of pre-exercise hyperhydration (PEH and pre-exercise euhydration (PEE upon treadmill running time-trial (TT performance in the heat. Six highly trained runners or triathletes underwent two 18 km TT runs (~28 °C, 25%–30% RH on a motorized treadmill, in a randomized, crossover fashion, while being euhydrated or after hyperhydration with 26 mL/kg bodyweight (BW of a 130 mmol/L sodium solution. Subjects then ran four successive 4.5 km blocks alternating between 2.5 km at 1% and 2 km at 6% gradient, while drinking a total of 7 mL/kg BW of a 6% sports drink solution (Gatorade, USA. PEH increased BW by 1.00 ± 0.34 kg (P < 0.01 and, compared with PEE, reduced BW loss from 3.1% ± 0.3% (EUH to 1.4% ± 0.4% (HYP (P < 0.01 during exercise. Running TT time did not differ between groups (PEH: 85.6 ± 11.6 min; PEE: 85.3 ± 9.6 min, P = 0.82. Heart rate (5 ± 1 beats/min and rectal (0.3 ± 0.1 °C and body (0.2 ± 0.1 °C temperatures of PEE were higher than those of PEH (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in abdominal discomfort and perceived exertion or heat stress between groups. Our results suggest that pre-exercise sodium-induced hyperhydration of a magnitude of 1 L does not alter 80–90 min running TT performance under warm conditions in highly-trained runners drinking ~500 mL sports drink during exercise.

  14. Multiscale Methods, Parallel Computation, and Neural Networks for Real-Time Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiti, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents new algorithms for low and intermediate level computer vision. The guiding ideas in the presented approach are those of hierarchical and adaptive processing, concurrent computation, and supervised learning. Processing of the visual data at different resolutions is used not only to reduce the amount of computation necessary to reach the fixed point, but also to produce a more accurate estimation of the desired parameters. The presented adaptive multiple scale technique is applied to the problem of motion field estimation. Different parts of the image are analyzed at a resolution that is chosen in order to minimize the error in the coefficients of the differential equations to be solved. Tests with video-acquired images show that velocity estimation is more accurate over a wide range of motion with respect to the homogeneous scheme. In some cases introduction of explicit discontinuities coupled to the continuous variables can be used to avoid propagation of visual information from areas corresponding to objects with different physical and/or kinematic properties. The human visual system uses concurrent computation in order to process the vast amount of visual data in "real -time." Although with different technological constraints, parallel computation can be used efficiently for computer vision. All the presented algorithms have been implemented on medium grain distributed memory multicomputers with a speed-up approximately proportional to the number of processors used. A simple two-dimensional domain decomposition assigns regions of the multiresolution pyramid to the different processors. The inter-processor communication needed during the solution process is proportional to the linear dimension of the assigned domain, so that efficiency is close to 100% if a large region is assigned to each processor. Finally, learning algorithms are shown to be a viable technique to engineer computer vision systems for different applications starting from

  15. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Mi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequencyadaptation (SFA at single neurons, and short-term facilitation (STF and depression (STDat neuronal synapses. These dynamical features typically covers a broad range of time scalesand exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what the computationalbenefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics is. In this study, we proposethat the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictorycomputations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractorneural network (CANN as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing timeconstants in their dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity,adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, andhence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar timeconstants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network isable to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed lighton the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realizediverse cognitive functions.

  16. Chemistry, physics and time: the computer modelling of glassmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martlew, David

    2003-01-01

    A decade or so ago the remains of an early flat glass furnace were discovered in St Helens. Continuous glass production only became feasible after the Siemens Brothers demonstrated their continuous tank furnace at Dresden in 1870. One manufacturer of flat glass enthusiastically adopted the new technology and secretly explored many variations on this theme during the next fifteen years. Study of the surviving furnace remains using today's computer simulation techniques showed how, in 1887, that technology was adapted to the special demands of window glass making. Heterogeneous chemical reactions at high temperatures are required to convert the mixture of granular raw materials into the homogeneous glass needed for windows. Kinetics (and therefore the economics) of glassmaking is dominated by heat transfer and chemical diffusion as refractory grains are converted to highly viscous molten glass. Removal of gas bubbles in a sufficiently short period of time is vital for profitability, but the glassmaker must achieve this in a reaction vessel which is itself being dissolved by the molten glass. Design and operational studies of today's continuous tank furnaces need to take account of these factors, and good use is made of computer simulation techniques to shed light on the way furnaces behave and how improvements may be made. This paper seeks to show how those same techniques can be used to understand how the early Siemens continuous tank furnaces were designed and operated, and how the Victorian entrepreneurs succeeded in managing the thorny problems of what was, in effect, a vulnerable high temperature continuous chemical reactor.

  17. Predicting timing of foot strike during running, independent of striking technique, using principal component analysis of joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osis, Sean T; Hettinga, Blayne A; Leitch, Jessica; Ferber, Reed

    2014-08-22

    As 3-dimensional (3D) motion-capture for clinical gait analysis continues to evolve, new methods must be developed to improve the detection of gait cycle events based on kinematic data. Recently, the application of principal component analysis (PCA) to gait data has shown promise in detecting important biomechanical features. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to define a new foot strike detection method for a continuum of striking techniques, by applying PCA to joint angle waveforms. In accordance with Newtonian mechanics, it was hypothesized that transient features in the sagittal-plane accelerations of the lower extremity would be linked with the impulsive application of force to the foot at foot strike. Kinematic and kinetic data from treadmill running were selected for 154 subjects, from a database of gait biomechanics. Ankle, knee and hip sagittal plane angular acceleration kinematic curves were chained together to form a row input to a PCA matrix. A linear polynomial was calculated based on PCA scores, and a 10-fold cross-validation was performed to evaluate prediction accuracy against gold-standard foot strike as determined by a 10 N rise in the vertical ground reaction force. Results show 89-94% of all predicted foot strikes were within 4 frames (20 ms) of the gold standard with the largest error being 28 ms. It is concluded that this new foot strike detection is an improvement on existing methods and can be applied regardless of whether the runner exhibits a rearfoot, midfoot, or forefoot strike pattern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The CMS trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2018-01-01

    During its second period of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will reach a peak instantaneous luminosity of approximately 2$\\times 10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}s^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realised by a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm.\\\\ In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has undergone a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT went through big improvements; in particular, new ap...

  19. Click trains and the rate of information processing: does "speeding up" subjective time make other psychological processes run faster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke A; Allely, Clare S; Wearden, John H

    2011-02-01

    A series of experiments demonstrated that a 5-s train of clicks that have been shown in previous studies to increase the subjective duration of tones they precede (in a manner consistent with "speeding up" timing processes) could also have an effect on information-processing rate. Experiments used studies of simple and choice reaction time (Experiment 1), or mental arithmetic (Experiment 2). In general, preceding trials by clicks made response times significantly shorter than those for trials without clicks, but white noise had no effects on response times. Experiments 3 and 4 investigated the effects of clicks on performance on memory tasks, using variants of two classic experiments of cognitive psychology: Sperling's (1960) iconic memory task and Loftus, Johnson, and Shimamura's (1985) iconic masking task. In both experiments participants were able to recall or recognize significantly more information from stimuli preceded by clicks than those preceded by silence.

  20. The LHCb Run Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessio, F; Barandela, M C; Frank, M; Gaspar, C; Herwijnen, E v; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N; Sambade, A; Schwemmer, R; Somogyi, P [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Callot, O [LAL, IN2P3/CNRS and Universite Paris 11, Orsay (France); Duval, P-Y [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Franek, B [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Galli, D, E-mail: Clara.Gaspar@cern.c [Universita di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    LHCb has designed and implemented an integrated Experiment Control System. The Control System uses the same concepts and the same tools to control and monitor all parts of the experiment: the Data Acquisition System, the Timing and the Trigger Systems, the High Level Trigger Farm, the Detector Control System, the Experiment's Infrastructure and the interaction with the CERN Technical Services and the Accelerator. LHCb's Run Control, the main interface used by the experiment's operator, provides access in a hierarchical, coherent and homogeneous manner to all areas of the experiment and to all its sub-detectors. It allows for automated (or manual) configuration and control, including error recovery, of the full experiment in its different running modes. Different instances of the same Run Control interface are used by the various sub-detectors for their stand-alone activities: test runs, calibration runs, etc. The architecture and the tools used to build the control system, the guidelines and components provided to the developers, as well as the first experience with the usage of the Run Control will be presented

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  2. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  3. Changes in running kinematics, kinetics, and spring-mass behavior over a 24-h run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behavior over a 24-h treadmill run (24TR). Kinematics, kinetics, and spring-mass characteristics of the running step were assessed in 10 experienced ultralong-distance runners before, every 2 h, and after a 24TR using an instrumented treadmill dynamometer. These measurements were performed at 10 km·h, and mechanical parameters were sampled at 1000 Hz for 10 consecutive steps. Contact and aerial times were determined from ground reaction force (GRF) signals and used to compute step frequency. Maximal GRF, loading rate, downward displacement of the center of mass, and leg length change during the support phase were determined and used to compute both vertical and leg stiffness. Subjects' running pattern and spring-mass behavior significantly changed over the 24TR with a 4.9% higher step frequency on average (because of a significantly 4.5% shorter contact time), a lower maximal GRF (by 4.4% on average), a 13.0% lower leg length change during contact, and an increase in both leg and vertical stiffness (+9.9% and +8.6% on average, respectively). Most of these changes were significant from the early phase of the 24TR (fourth to sixth hour of running) and could be speculated as contributing to an overall limitation of the potentially harmful consequences of such a long-duration run on subjects' musculoskeletal system. During a 24TR, the changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behavior show a clear shift toward a higher oscillating frequency and stiffness, along with lower GRF and leg length change (hence a reduced overall eccentric load) during the support phase of running. © 2011 by the American College of Sports Medicine

  4. Balancing Exploration, Uncertainty Representation and Computational Time in Many-Objective Reservoir Policy Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatarain-Salazar, J.; Reed, P. M.; Quinn, J.; Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.

    2016-12-01

    As we confront the challenges of managing river basin systems with a large number of reservoirs and increasingly uncertain tradeoffs impacting their operations (due to, e.g. climate change, changing energy markets, population pressures, ecosystem services, etc.), evolutionary many-objective direct policy search (EMODPS) solution strategies will need to address the computational demands associated with simulating more uncertainties and therefore optimizing over increasingly noisy objective evaluations. Diagnostic assessments of state-of-the-art many-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) to support EMODPS have highlighted that search time (or number of function evaluations) and auto-adaptive search are key features for successful optimization. Furthermore, auto-adaptive MOEA search operators are themselves sensitive to having a sufficient number of function evaluations to learn successful strategies for exploring complex spaces and for escaping from local optima when stagnation is detected. Fortunately, recent parallel developments allow coordinated runs that enhance auto-adaptive algorithmic learning and can handle scalable and reliable search with limited wall-clock time, but at the expense of the total number of function evaluations. In this study, we analyze this tradeoff between parallel coordination and depth of search using different parallelization schemes of the Multi-Master Borg on a many-objective stochastic control problem. We also consider the tradeoff between better representing uncertainty in the stochastic optimization, and simplifying this representation to shorten the function evaluation time and allow for greater search. Our analysis focuses on the Lower Susquehanna River Basin (LSRB) system where multiple competing objectives for hydropower production, urban water supply, recreation and environmental flows need to be balanced. Our results provide guidance for balancing exploration, uncertainty, and computational demands when using the EMODPS

  5. Draft Forecasts from Real-Time Runs of Physics-Based Models - A Road to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2008-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models, and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity, the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. After consultations with NOAA/SEC and with AFWA, CCMC has developed a set of tools as a first step to make real-time model output useful to forecast centers. In this presentation, we will discuss the motivation for this activity, the actions taken so far, and options for future tools from model output.

  6. Decreasing Computational Time for VBBinaryLensing by Point Source Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirrell, Bethany M.; Visgaitis, Tiffany A.; Bozza, Valerio

    2018-01-01

    The gravitational lens of a binary system produces a magnification map that is more intricate than a single object lens. This map cannot be calculated analytically and one must rely on computational methods to resolve. There are generally two methods of computing the microlensed flux of a source. One is based on ray-shooting maps (Kayser, Refsdal, & Stabell 1986), while the other method is based on an application of Green’s theorem. This second method finds the area of an image by calculating a Riemann integral along the image contour. VBBinaryLensing is a C++ contour integration code developed by Valerio Bozza, which utilizes this method. The parameters at which the source object could be treated as a point source, or in other words, when the source is far enough from the caustic, was of interest to substantially decrease the computational time. The maximum and minimum values of the caustic curves produced, were examined to determine the boundaries for which this simplification could be made. The code was then run for a number of different maps, with separation values and accuracies ranging from 10-1 to 10-3, to test the theoretical model and determine a safe buffer for which minimal error could be made for the approximation. The determined buffer was 1.5+5q, with q being the mass ratio. The theoretical model and the calculated points worked for all combinations of the separation values and different accuracies except the map with accuracy and separation equal to 10-3 for y1 max. An alternative approach has to be found in order to accommodate a wider range of parameters.

  7. Time-of-Flight Sensors in Computer Graphics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolb, Andreas; Barth, Erhardt; Koch, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    , including Computer Graphics, Computer Vision and Man Machine Interaction (MMI). These technologies are starting to have an impact on research and commercial applications. The upcoming generation of ToF sensors, however, will be even more powerful and will have the potential to become “ubiquitous real...

  8. ALICE HLT Run 2 performance overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Lindenstruth, Volker; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    For the LHC Run 2 the ALICE HLT architecture was consolidated to comply with the upgraded ALICE detector readout technology. The software framework was optimized and extended to cope with the increased data load. Online calibration of the TPC using online tracking capabilities of the ALICE HLT was deployed. Offline calibration code was adapted to run both online and offline and the HLT framework was extended to support that. The performance of this schema is important for Run 3 related developments. An additional data transport approach was developed using the ZeroMQ library, forming at the same time a test bed for the new data flow model of the O2 system, where further development of this concept is ongoing. This messaging technology was used to implement the calibration feedback loop augmenting the existing, graph oriented HLT transport framework. Utilising the online reconstruction of many detectors, a new asynchronous monitoring scheme was developed to allow real-time monitoring of the physics performance of the ALICE detector, on top of the new messaging scheme for both internal and external communication. Spare computing resources comprising the production and development clusters are run as a tier-2 GRID site using an OpenStack-based setup. The development cluster is running continuously, the production cluster contributes resources opportunistically during periods of LHC inactivity.

  9. An approach to profiling for run-time checking of computational properties and performance debugging in logic programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Mera, E.; Trigo, Teresa; López García, Pedro; Hermenegildo, Manuel V.

    2010-01-01

    Although several profiling techniques for identifying performance bottlenecks in logic programs have been developed, they are generally not automatic and in most cases they do not provide enough information for identifying the root causes of such bottlenecks. This complicates using their results for guiding performance improvement. We present a profiling method and tool that provides such explanations. Our profiler associates cost centers to certain program elements and can measure different ...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6503(d)-1 - Suspension of running of period of limitation; extension of time for payment of estate tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension of running of period of limitation... ADMINISTRATION Limitations Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6503(d)-1 Suspension of running of... payment of any estate tax, the running of the period of limitations for collection of such tax is...

  11. Design and development of a diversified real time computer for future FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujith, K.R.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Behera, R.P.; Murali, N.

    2014-01-01

    The current safety related computer system of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) under construction in Kalpakkam consists of two redundant Versa Module Europa (VME) bus based Real Time Computer system with a Switch Over Logic Circuit (SOLC). Since both the VME systems are identical, the dual redundant system is prone to common cause failure (CCF). The probability of CCF can be reduced by adopting diversity. Design diversity has long been used to protect redundant systems against common-mode failures. The conventional notion of diversity relies on 'independent' generation of 'different' implementations. This paper discusses the design and development of a diversified Real Time Computer which will replace one of the computer system in the dual redundant architecture. Compact PCI (cPCI) bus systems are widely used in safety critical applications such as avionics, railways, defence and uses diverse electrical signaling and logical specifications, hence was chosen for development of the diversified system. Towards the initial development a CPU card based on an ARM-9 processor, 16 channel Relay Output (RO) card and a 30 channel Analog Input (AI) card was developed. All the cards mentioned supports hot-swap and geographic addressing capability. In order to mitigate the component obsolescence problem the 32 bit PCI target controller and associated glue logic for the slave I/O cards was indigenously developed using VHDL. U-boot was selected as the boot loader and arm Linux 2.6 as the preliminary operating system for the CPU card. Board specific initialization code for the CPU card was written in ARM assembly language and serial port initialization was written in C language. Boot loader along with Linux 2.6 kernel and jffs2 file system was flashed into the CPU card. Test applications written in C language were used to test the various peripherals of the CPU card. Device driver for the AI and RO card was developed as Linux kernel modules and application library was also

  12. ORLIB: a computer code that produces one-energy group, time- and spatially-averaged neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.; Dye, R.E.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    Calculation of neutron activation of proposed fusion reactors requires a library of neutron-activation cross sections. One such library is ACTL, which is being updated and expanded by Howerton. If the energy-dependent neutron flux is also known as a function of location and time, the buildup and decay of activation products can be calculated. In practice, hand calculation is impractical without energy-averaged cross sections because of the large number of energy groups. A widely used activation computer code, ORIGEN2, also requires energy-averaged cross sections. Accordingly, we wrote the ORLIB code to collapse the ACTL library, using the flux as a weighting function. The ORLIB code runs on the LLNL Cray computer network. We have also modified ORIGEN2 to accept the expanded activation libraries produced by ORLIB

  13. Development of econometric models for cost and time over-runs: an empirical study of major road construction projects in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Chaudhary, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The construction industry is flourishing worldwide and contributes about 10% to the GDP of the world i.e. up to the tune of 4.6 Trillion US dollars. It employs almost 7% of the total employee dpersons and, consumes around 40% of the total energy. The Pakistani construction sector has displayed impressive growth in recent past years. The efficient road network is a key part of construction business and plays a significant role in the economic uplift of country. The overruns in costs and delays in completion of projects are very common phenomena and it has also been observed that the projects involving construction of roads also face problems of delays and cost over runs especially in developing countries. The causes of cost overruns and delays in road projects being undertaken by the premier road construction organization of Pakistan National Highway Authority (NHA) have been considered in this study. It has been done specifically in the context of impact of cause(s) determined from project report of a total of one hundred and thirty one (131) projects. The ten causative factors which we recognize as Design, Planning and Scheduling Related problems, Financial Constraint Related reasons, Social Problem Related reasons, Technical Reasons, Administrative Reasons, Scope Increase, Specification Changes, Cost Escalation Related reasons, Non-Availability of Equipment or Material and Force Majeure play a commanding role in determination of the cost and time over runs. It has also been observed that among these identified causes, the factors of Administrative Reason, Design, Planning and Scheduling Related, Technical Reasons and Force Majeure are the most significant reasons in cost and time overruns. Whereas, the Cost Escalation related reasons has the least impact on cost increase and delays. The NHA possesses a financial worth of around Rs. 36 billion and with an annual turn over amounting to Rs. 22 billion is responsible to perform road construction project in entire

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  17. 12 CFR 516.10 - How does OTS compute time periods under this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How does OTS compute time periods under this part? 516.10 Section 516.10 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES § 516.10 How does OTS compute time periods under this part? In computing...

  18. Elastic Spatial Query Processing in OpenStack Cloud Computing Environment for Time-Constraint Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial big data analysis (GBDA is extremely significant for time-constraint applications such as disaster response. However, the time-constraint analysis is not yet a trivial task in the cloud computing environment. Spatial query processing (SQP is typical computation-intensive and indispensable for GBDA, and the spatial range query, join query, and the nearest neighbor query algorithms are not scalable without using MapReduce-liked frameworks. Parallel SQP algorithms (PSQPAs are trapped in screw-processing, which is a known issue in Geoscience. To satisfy time-constrained GBDA, we propose an elastic SQP approach in this paper. First, Spark is used to implement PSQPAs. Second, Kubernetes-managed Core Operation System (CoreOS clusters provide self-healing Docker containers for running Spark clusters in the cloud. Spark-based PSQPAs are submitted to Docker containers, where Spark master instances reside. Finally, the horizontal pod auto-scaler (HPA would scale-out and scale-in Docker containers for supporting on-demand computing resources. Combined with an auto-scaling group of virtual instances, HPA helps to find each of the five nearest neighbors for 46,139,532 query objects from 834,158 spatial data objects in less than 300 s. The experiments conducted on an OpenStack cloud demonstrate that auto-scaling containers can satisfy time-constraint GBDA in clouds.

  19. Adaptive real-time methodology for optimizing energy-efficient computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing [Los Alamos, NM; Feng, Wu-Chun [Blacksburg, VA

    2011-06-28

    Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is an effective way to reduce energy and power consumption in microprocessor units. Current implementations of DVFS suffer from inaccurate modeling of power requirements and usage, and from inaccurate characterization of the relationships between the applicable variables. A system and method is proposed that adjusts CPU frequency and voltage based on run-time calculations of the workload processing time, as well as a calculation of performance sensitivity with respect to CPU frequency. The system and method are processor independent, and can be applied to either an entire system as a unit, or individually to each process running on a system.

  20. Estimating Stair Running Performance Using Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro V. Ojeda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stair running, both ascending and descending, is a challenging aerobic exercise that many athletes, recreational runners, and soldiers perform during training. Studying biomechanics of stair running over multiple steps has been limited by the practical challenges presented while using optical-based motion tracking systems. We propose using foot-mounted inertial measurement units (IMUs as a solution as they enable unrestricted motion capture in any environment and without need for external references. In particular, this paper presents methods for estimating foot velocity and trajectory during stair running using foot-mounted IMUs. Computational methods leverage the stationary periods occurring during the stance phase and known stair geometry to estimate foot orientation and trajectory, ultimately used to calculate stride metrics. These calculations, applied to human participant stair running data, reveal performance trends through timing, trajectory, energy, and force stride metrics. We present the results of our analysis of experimental data collected on eleven subjects. Overall, we determine that for either ascending or descending, the stance time is the strongest predictor of speed as shown by its high correlation with stride time.

  1. A general algorithm for computing distance transforms in linear time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, A.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Hesselink, W.H.; Goutsias, J; Vincent, L; Bloomberg, DS

    2000-01-01

    A new general algorithm fur computing distance transforms of digital images is presented. The algorithm consists of two phases. Both phases consist of two scans, a forward and a backward scan. The first phase scans the image column-wise, while the second phase scans the image row-wise. Since the

  2. Driving-Simulator-Based Test on the Effectiveness of Auditory Red-Light Running Vehicle Warning System Based on Time-To-Collision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Yan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM. The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT, maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles.

  3. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-12-02

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. This protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted, plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured via a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Species interactions and response time to climate change: ice-cover and terrestrial run-off shaping Arctic char and brown trout competitive asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finstad, A. G.; Palm Helland, I.; Jonsson, B.; Forseth, T.; Foldvik, A.; Hessen, D. O.; Hendrichsen, D. K.; Berg, O. K.; Ulvan, E.; Ugedal, O.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a growing recognition that single species responses to climate change often mainly are driven by interaction with other organisms and single species studies therefore not are sufficient to recognize and project ecological climate change impacts. Here, we study how performance, relative abundance and the distribution of two common Arctic and sub-Arctic freshwater fishes (brown trout and Arctic char) are driven by competitive interactions. The interactions are modified both by direct climatic effects on temperature and ice-cover, and indirectly through climate forcing of terrestrial vegetation pattern and associated carbon and nutrient run-off. We first use laboratory studies to show that Arctic char, which is the world's most northernmost distributed freshwater fish, outperform trout under low light levels and also have comparable higher growth efficiency. Corresponding to this, a combination of time series and time-for-space analyses show that ice-cover duration and carbon and nutrient load mediated by catchment vegetation properties strongly affected the outcome of the competition and likely drive the species distribution pattern through competitive exclusion. In brief, while shorter ice-cover period and decreased carbon load favored brown trout, increased ice-cover period and increased carbon load favored Arctic char. Length of ice-covered period and export of allochthonous material from catchments are major, but contrasting, climatic drivers of competitive interaction between these two freshwater lake top-predators. While projected climate change lead to decreased ice-cover, corresponding increase in forest and shrub cover amplify carbon and nutrient run-off. Although a likely outcome of future Arctic and sub-arctic climate scenarios are retractions of the Arctic char distribution area caused by competitive exclusion, the main drivers will act on different time scales. While ice-cover will change instantaneously with increasing temperature

  5. Changes in Running Mechanics During a 6-Hour Running Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, Nicola; Taboga, Paolo; Lazzer, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    To investigate changes in running mechanics during a 6-h running race. Twelve ultraendurance runners (age 41.9 ± 5.8 y, body mass 68.3 ± 12.6 kg, height 1.72 ± 0.09 m) were asked to run as many 874-m flat loops as possible in 6 h. Running speed, contact time (t c ), and aerial time (t a ) were measured in the first lap and every 30 ± 2 min during the race. Peak vertical ground-reaction force (F max ), stride length (SL), vertical downward displacement of the center of mass (Δz), leg-length change (ΔL), vertical stiffness (k vert ), and leg stiffness (k leg ) were then estimated. Mean distance covered by the athletes during the race was 62.9 ± 7.9 km. Compared with the 1st lap, running speed decreased significantly from 4 h 30 min onward (mean -5.6% ± 0.3%, P running, reaching the maximum difference after 5 h 30 min (+6.1%, P = .015). Conversely, k vert decreased after 4 h, reaching the lowest value after 5 h 30 min (-6.5%, P = .008); t a and F max decreased after 4 h 30 min through to the end of the race (mean -29.2% and -5.1%, respectively, P running, suggesting a possible time threshold that could affect performance regardless of absolute running speed.

  6. Quo vadis? : persuasive computing using real time queue information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meys, Wouter; Groen, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    By presenting tourists with real-time information an increase in efficiency and satisfaction of their day planning can be achieved. At the same time, real-time information services can offer the municipality the opportunity to spread the tourists throughout the city centre. An important factor for

  7. Using Computer Techniques To Predict OPEC Oil Prices For Period 2000 To 2015 By Time-Series Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmail Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The instability in the world and OPEC oil process results from many factors through a long time. The problems can be summarized as that the oil exports dont constitute a large share of N.I. only but it also makes up most of the saving of the oil states. The oil prices affect their market through the interaction of supply and demand forces of oil. The research hypothesis states that the movement of oil prices caused shocks crises and economic problems. These shocks happen due to changes in oil prices need to make a prediction within the framework of economic planning in a short run period in order to avoid shocks through using computer techniques by time series models.

  8. Event Based Simulator for Parallel Computing over the Wide Area Network for Real Time Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Elankovan; Harwood, Aaron; Kotagiri, Ramamohanarao; Satria Prabuwono, Anton

    As the computational requirement of applications in computational science continues to grow tremendously, the use of computational resources distributed across the Wide Area Network (WAN) becomes advantageous. However, not all applications can be executed over the WAN due to communication overhead that can drastically slowdown the computation. In this paper, we introduce an event based simulator to investigate the performance of parallel algorithms executed over the WAN. The event based simulator known as SIMPAR (SIMulator for PARallel computation), simulates the actual computations and communications involved in parallel computation over the WAN using time stamps. Visualization of real time applications require steady stream of processed data flow for visualization purposes. Hence, SIMPAR may prove to be a valuable tool to investigate types of applications and computing resource requirements to provide uninterrupted flow of processed data for real time visualization purposes. The results obtained from the simulation show concurrence with the expected performance using the L-BSP model.

  9. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  10. 5 CFR 831.703 - Computation of annuities for part-time service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of annuities for part-time... part-time service. (a) Purpose. The computational method in this section shall be used to determine the annuity for an employee who has part-time service on or after April 7, 1986. (b) Definitions. In this...

  11. Storm blueprints patterns for distributed real-time computation

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, P Taylor

    2014-01-01

    A blueprints book with 10 different projects built in 10 different chapters which demonstrate the various use cases of storm for both beginner and intermediate users, grounded in real-world example applications.Although the book focuses primarily on Java development with Storm, the patterns are more broadly applicable and the tips, techniques, and approaches described in the book apply to architects, developers, and operations.Additionally, the book should provoke and inspire applications of distributed computing to other industries and domains. Hadoop enthusiasts will also find this book a go

  12. Macroprocessing is the computing design principle for the times

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In a keynote speech, Intel Corporation CEO Craig Barrett emphasized that "macroprocessing" provides innovative and cost effective solutions to companies that they can customize and scale to match their own data needs. Barrett showcased examples of macroprocessing implementations from business, government and the scientific community, which use the power of Intel Architecture and Oracle9i Real Application Clusters to build large complex and scalable database solutions. A testimonial from CERN explained how the need for high performance computing to perform scientific research on sub-atomic particles was accomplished by using clusters of Xeon processor-based servers.

  13. Real-time exposure fusion on a mobile computer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bachoo, AK

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available information in these scenarios. An image captured using a short exposure time will not saturate bright image re- gions while an image captured with a long exposure time will show more detail in the dark regions. The pixel depth provided by most camera.... The auto exposure also creates strong blown-out highlights in the foreground (the grass patch). The short shutter time (Exposure 1) correctly exposes the grass while the long shutter time (Exposure 3) is able to correctly expose the camouflaged dummy...

  14. Effects of running time of a cattle-cooling system on core body temperature of cows on dairy farms in an arid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, X A; Smith, J F; Bradford, B J; Harner, J P; Oddy, A

    2010-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted on a commercial dairy farm to describe the effects of a reduction in Korral Kool (KK; Korral Kool Inc., Mesa, AZ) system operating time on core body temperature (CBT) of primiparous and multiparous cows. In the first experiment, KK systems were operated for 18, 21, or 24 h/d while CBT of 63 multiparous Holstein dairy cows was monitored. All treatments started at 0600 h, and KK systems were turned off at 0000 h and 0300 h for the 18-h and 21-h treatments, respectively. Animals were housed in 9 pens and assigned randomly to treatment sequences in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. In the second experiment, 21 multiparous and 21 primiparous cows were housed in 6 pens and assigned randomly to treatment sequences (KK operated for 21 or 24 h/d) in a switchback design. All treatments started at 0600 h, and KK systems were turned off at 0300 h for the 21-h treatments. In experiment 1, cows in the 24-h treatment had a lower mean CBT than cows in the 18- and 21-h treatments (38.97, 39.08, and 39.03±0.04°C, respectively). The significant treatment by time interaction showed that the greatest treatment effects occurred at 0600 h; treatment means at this time were 39.43, 39.37, and 38.88±0.18°C for 18-, 21-, and 24-h treatments, respectively. These results demonstrate that a reduction in KK system running time of ≥3 h/d will increase CBT. In experiment 2, a significant parity by treatment interaction was found. Multiparous cows on the 24-h treatment had lower mean CBT than cows on the 21-h treatment (39.23 and 39.45±0.17°C, respectively), but treatment had no effect on mean CBT of primiparous cows (39.50 and 39.63±0.20°C for 21- and 24-h treatments, respectively). A significant treatment by time interaction was observed, with the greatest treatment effects occurring at 0500 h; treatment means at this time were 39.57, 39.23, 39.89, and 39.04±0.24°C for 21-h primiparous, 24-h primiparous, 21-h multiparous, and 24-h multiparous cows

  15. Massively parallel signal processing using the graphics processing unit for real-time brain-computer interface feature extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam Wilson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past five years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card (GPU was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI. The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter, followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally-intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a CPU-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  16. Massively Parallel Signal Processing using the Graphics Processing Unit for Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin C

    2009-01-01

    The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past 5 years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card [graphics processing unit (GPU)] was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI). The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter), followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a central processing unit-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels of 250 ms in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  17. Computer-determined assay time based on preset precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, L.A.; Hagan, R.; Martin, E.R.; Wachter, J.R.; Bonner, C.A.; Malcom, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Most current assay systems for special nuclear materials (SNM) operate on the principle of a fixed assay time which provides acceptable measurement precision without sacrificing the required throughput of the instrument. Waste items to be assayed for SNM content can contain a wide range of nuclear material. Counting all items for the same preset assay time results in a wide range of measurement precision and wastes time at the upper end of the calibration range. A short time sample taken at the beginning of the assay could optimize the analysis time on the basis of the required measurement precision. To illustrate the technique of automatically determining the assay time, measurements were made with a segmented gamma scanner at the Plutonium Facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory with the assay time for each segment determined by counting statistics in that segment. Segments with very little SNM were quickly determined to be below the lower limit of the measurement range and the measurement was stopped. Segments with significant SNM were optimally assays to the preset precision. With this method the total assay time for each item is determined by the desired preset precision. This report describes the precision-based algorithm and presents the results of measurements made to test its validity

  18. Computer-controlled neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, S.H.

    1979-12-01

    A time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron inelastic scattering research has been interfaced to a PDP-15/30 computer. The computer is used for experimental data acquisition and analysis and for apparatus control. This report was prepared to summarize the functions of the computer and to act as a users' guide to the software system

  19. A computer program for the estimation of time of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N

    1993-01-01

    In the 1960s Marshall and Hoare presented a "Standard Cooling Curve" based on their mathematical analyses on the postmortem cooling of bodies. Although fairly accurate under standard conditions, the "curve" or formula is based on the assumption that the ambience temperature is constant and that t......In the 1960s Marshall and Hoare presented a "Standard Cooling Curve" based on their mathematical analyses on the postmortem cooling of bodies. Although fairly accurate under standard conditions, the "curve" or formula is based on the assumption that the ambience temperature is constant...... cooling of bodies is presented. It is proposed that by having a computer program that solves the equation, giving the length of the cooling period in response to a certain rectal temperature, and which allows easy comparison of multiple solutions, the uncertainties related to ambience temperature...

  20. 42 CFR 93.509 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... holiday observed by the Federal government, in which case it includes the next business day. (b) When the... required or authorized under the rules in this part to be filed for good cause shown. When time permits...

  1. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, J D; Yung, M-H; Tempel, D G; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Boixo, S

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn–Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn–Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn–Sham potential with controllable error bounds. (paper)

  2. On some methods for improving time of reachability sets computation for the dynamic system control problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, Artem; Matviychuk, Alexander; Ushakov, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents two different approaches to reduce the time of computer calculation of reachability sets. First of these two approaches use different data structures for storing the reachability sets in the computer memory for calculation in single-threaded mode. Second approach is based on using parallel algorithms with reference to the data structures from the first approach. Within the framework of this paper parallel algorithm of approximate reachability set calculation on computer with SMP-architecture is proposed. The results of numerical modelling are presented in the form of tables which demonstrate high efficiency of parallel computing technology and also show how computing time depends on the used data structure.

  3. CDF run II run control and online monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisawa, T.; Ikado, K.; Badgett, W.; Chlebana, F.; Maeshima, K.; McCrory, E.; Meyer, A.; Patrick, J.; Wenzel, H.; Stadie, H.; Wagner, W.; Veramendi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The authors discuss the CDF Run II Run Control and online event monitoring system. Run Control is the top level application that controls the data acquisition activities across 150 front end VME crates and related service processes. Run Control is a real-time multi-threaded application implemented in Java with flexible state machines, using JDBC database connections to configure clients, and including a user friendly and powerful graphical user interface. The CDF online event monitoring system consists of several parts: the event monitoring programs, the display to browse their results, the server program which communicates with the display via socket connections, the error receiver which displays error messages and communicates with Run Control, and the state manager which monitors the state of the monitor programs

  4. Cloud Computing: A model Construct of Real-Time Monitoring for Big Dataset Analytics Using Apache Spark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasem, Ameen; Liu, Hongwei; Zuo, Decheng; Algarash, Basheer

    2018-01-01

    The volume of data being collected, analyzed, and stored has exploded in recent years, in particular in relation to the activity on the cloud computing. While large-scale data processing, analysis, storage, and platform model such as cloud computing were previously and currently are increasingly. Today, the major challenge is it address how to monitor and control these massive amounts of data and perform analysis in real-time at scale. The traditional methods and model systems are unable to cope with these quantities of data in real-time. Here we present a new methodology for constructing a model for optimizing the performance of real-time monitoring of big datasets, which includes a machine learning algorithms and Apache Spark Streaming to accomplish fine-grained fault diagnosis and repair of big dataset. As a case study, we use the failure of Virtual Machines (VMs) to start-up. The methodology proposition ensures that the most sensible action is carried out during the procedure of fine-grained monitoring and generates the highest efficacy and cost-saving fault repair through three construction control steps: (I) data collection; (II) analysis engine and (III) decision engine. We found that running this novel methodology can save a considerate amount of time compared to the Hadoop model, without sacrificing the classification accuracy or optimization of performance. The accuracy of the proposed method (92.13%) is an improvement on traditional approaches.

  5. Computing Fault-Containment Times of Self-Stabilizing Algorithms Using Lumped Markov Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Turau

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of self-stabilizing algorithms is often limited to the worst case stabilization time starting from an arbitrary state, i.e., a state resulting from a sequence of faults. Considering the fact that these algorithms are intended to provide fault tolerance in the long run, this is not the most relevant metric. A common situation is that a running system is an a legitimate state when hit by a single fault. This event has a much higher probability than multiple concurrent faults. Therefore, the worst case time to recover from a single fault is more relevant than the recovery time from a large number of faults. This paper presents techniques to derive upper bounds for the mean time to recover from a single fault for self-stabilizing algorithms based on Markov chains in combination with lumping. To illustrate the applicability of the techniques they are applied to a new self-stabilizing coloring algorithm.

  6. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mellem

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes.

  7. Invariant set computation for constrained uncertain discrete-time systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Athanasopoulos, N.; Bitsoris, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article a novel approach to the determination of polytopic invariant sets for constrained discrete-time linear uncertain systems is presented. First, the problem of stabilizing a prespecified initial condition set in the presence of input and state constraints is addressed. Second, the

  8. 10 CFR 13.27 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; and (2) By 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time for a document served by the E-Filing system. [72 FR 49153, Aug. 28... the calculation of additional days when a participant is not entitled to receive an entire filing... same filing and service method, the number of days for service will be determined by the presiding...

  9. 10 CFR 2.306 - Computation of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...:59 p.m. Eastern Time for a document served by the E-Filing system. [72 FR 49151, Aug. 28, 2007] ... the calculation of additional days when a participant is not entitled to receive an entire filing... filing and service method, the number of days for service will be determined by the presiding officer...

  10. Real time operating system for a nuclear power plant computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, L.S.; Lala, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A quadruply redundant synchronous fault tolerant processor (FTP) is now under fabrication at the C.S. Draper Laboratory to be used initially as a trip monitor for the Experimental Breeder Reactor EBR-II operated by the Argonne National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The real time operating system for this processor is described

  11. LORD-Q: a long-run real-time PCR-based DNA-damage quantification method for nuclear and mitochondrial genome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Merz, Britta; Malak, Peter N.; Becker, Michael S.; Schmezer, Peter; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Rothfuss, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage is tightly associated with various biological and pathological processes, such as aging and tumorigenesis. Although detection of DNA damage is attracting increasing attention, only a limited number of methods are available to quantify DNA lesions, and these techniques are tedious or only detect global DNA damage. In this study, we present a high-sensitivity long-run real-time PCR technique for DNA-damage quantification (LORD-Q) in both the mitochondrial and nuclear genome. While most conventional methods are of low-sensitivity or restricted to abundant mitochondrial DNA samples, we established a protocol that enables the accurate sequence-specific quantification of DNA damage in >3-kb probes for any mitochondrial or nuclear DNA sequence. In order to validate the sensitivity of this method, we compared LORD-Q with a previously published qPCR-based method and the standard single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, demonstrating a superior performance of LORD-Q. Exemplarily, we monitored induction of DNA damage and repair processes in human induced pluripotent stem cells and isogenic fibroblasts. Our results suggest that LORD-Q provides a sequence-specific and precise method to quantify DNA damage, thereby allowing the high-throughput assessment of DNA repair, genotoxicity screening and various other processes for a wide range of life science applications. PMID:24371283

  12. The reliable solution and computation time of variable parameters Logistic model

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei, Wang; Xinnong, Pan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable computation time (RCT, marked as Tc) when applying a double precision computation of a variable parameters logistic map (VPLM) is studied. First, using the method proposed, the reliable solutions for the logistic map are obtained. Second, for a time-dependent non-stationary parameters VPLM, 10000 samples of reliable experiments are constructed, and the mean Tc is then computed. The results indicate that for each different initial value, the Tcs of the VPLM are generally different...

  13. Using Real Time Workshop for rapid and reliable control implementation in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade Feedback Control System running under RTAI-GNU/Linux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centioli, C.; Iannone, F.; Ledauphin, M.; Panella, M.; Pangione, L.; Podda, S.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Feedback Control System running at FTU has been recently ported from a commercial platform (based on LynxOS) to an open-source GNU/Linux-based RTAI-LXRT platform, thereby, obtaining significant performance and cost improvements. Based on the new open-source platform, it is now possible to experiment novel control strategies aimed at improving the robustness and accuracy of the feedback control. Nevertheless, the implementation of control ideas still requires a great deal of coding of the control algorithms that, if carried out manually, may be prone to coding errors, therefore time consuming both in the development phase and in the subsequent validation tests consisting of dedicated experiments carried out on FTU. In this paper, we report on recent developments based on Mathworks' Simulink and Real Time Workshop (RTW) packages to obtain a user-friendly environment where the real time code implementing novel control algorithms can be easily generated, tested and validated. Thanks to this new tool, the control designer only needs to specify the block diagram of the control task (namely, a high level and functional description of the new algorithm under consideration) and the corresponding real time code generation and testing is completely automated without any need of dedicated experiments. In the paper, the necessary work carried out to adapt the Real Time Workshop to our RTAI-LXRT context will be illustrated. A necessary re-organization of the previous real time software, aimed at incorporating the code coming from the adapted RTW, will also be discussed. Moreover, we will report on a performance comparison between the code obtained using the automated RTW-based procedure and the hand-written C code, appropriately optimised; at the moment, a preliminary performance comparison consisting of dummy algorithms has shown that the code automatically generated from RTW is faster (about 30% up) than the manually written one. This preliminary result combined with the

  14. 22 CFR 1429.21 - Computation of time for filing papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Computation of time for filing papers. 1429.21... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.21 Computation of time for filing papers. In... subchapter requires the filing of any paper, such document must be received by the Board or the officer or...

  15. Time-ordered product expansions for computational stochastic system biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The time-ordered product framework of quantum field theory can also be used to understand salient phenomena in stochastic biochemical networks. It is used here to derive Gillespie’s stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) for chemical reaction networks; consequently, the SSA can be interpreted in terms of Feynman diagrams. It is also used here to derive other, more general simulation and parameter-learning algorithms including simulation algorithms for networks of stochastic reaction-like processes operating on parameterized objects, and also hybrid stochastic reaction/differential equation models in which systems of ordinary differential equations evolve the parameters of objects that can also undergo stochastic reactions. Thus, the time-ordered product expansion can be used systematically to derive simulation and parameter-fitting algorithms for stochastic systems. (paper)

  16. Real-time FPGA architectures for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Estrada, Miguel; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents an architecture for real-time generic convolution of a mask and an image. The architecture is intended for fast low level image processing. The FPGA-based architecture takes advantage of the availability of registers in FPGAs to implement an efficient and compact module to process the convolutions. The architecture is designed to minimize the number of accesses to the image memory and is based on parallel modules with internal pipeline operation in order to improve its performance. The architecture is prototyped in a FPGA, but it can be implemented on a dedicated VLSI to reach higher clock frequencies. Complexity issues, FPGA resources utilization, FPGA limitations, and real time performance are discussed. Some results are presented and discussed.

  17. HOPE: Just-in-time Python compiler for astrophysical computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeret, Joel; Gamper, Lukas; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    HOPE is a specialized Python just-in-time (JIT) compiler designed for numerical astrophysical applications. HOPE focuses on a subset of the language and is able to translate Python code into C++ while performing numerical optimization on mathematical expressions at runtime. To enable the JIT compilation, the user only needs to add a decorator to the function definition. By using HOPE, the user benefits from being able to write common numerical code in Python while getting the performance of compiled implementation.

  18. Computational micromagnetics: prediction of time dependent and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrefl, T.; Scholz, W.; Suess, Dieter; Fidler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element modeling treats magnetization processes on a length scale of several nanometers and thus gives a quantitative correlation between the microstructure and the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials. This work presents a novel finite element/boundary element micro-magnetics solver that combines a wavelet-based matrix compression technique for magnetostatic field calculations with a BDF/GMRES method for the time integration of the Gilbert equation of motion. The simulations show that metastable energy minima and nonuniform magnetic states within the grains are important factors in the reversal dynamics at finite temperature. The numerical solution of the Gilbert equation shows how reversed domains nucleate and expand. The switching time of submicron magnetic elements depends on the shape of the elements. Elements with slanted ends decrease the overall reversal time, as a transverse demagnetizing field suppresses oscillations of the magnetization. Thermal activated processes can be included adding a random thermal field to the effective magnetic field. Thermally assisted reversal was studied for CoCrPtTa thin-film media

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  1. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  2. Relationship between running kinematic changes and time limit at vVO2max. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n4p428

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Iberes Lopes Melo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n4p428Exhaustive running at maximal oxygen uptake velocity (vVO2max can alter running kinematic parameters and increase energy cost along the time. The aims of the present study were to compare characteristics of ankle and knee kinematics during running at vVO2max and to verify the relationship between changes in kinematic variables and time limit (Tlim. Eleven male volunteers, recreational players of team sports, performed an incremental running test until volitional exhaustion to determine vVO2max and a constant velocity test at vVO2max. Subjects were filmed continuously from the left sagittal plane at 210 Hz for further kinematic analysis. The maximal plantar flexion during swing (p<0.01 was the only variable that increased significantly from beginning to end of the run. Increase in ankle angle at contact was the only variable related to Tlim (r=0.64; p=0.035 and explained 34% of the performance in the test. These findings suggest that the individuals under study maintained a stable running style at vVO2max and that increase in plantar flexion explained the performance in this test when it was applied in non-runners.

  3. Applications of parallel computer architectures to the real-time simulation of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doster, J.M.; Sills, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the authors report on efforts to utilize parallel computer architectures for the thermal-hydraulic simulation of nuclear power systems and current research efforts toward the development of advanced reactor operator aids and control systems based on this new technology. Many aspects of reactor thermal-hydraulic calculations are inherently parallel, and the computationally intensive portions of these calculations can be effectively implemented on modern computers. Timing studies indicate faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity physics models can be developed when the computational algorithms are designed to take advantage of the computer's architecture. These capabilities allow for the development of novel control systems and advanced reactor operator aids. Coupled with an integral real-time data acquisition system, evolving parallel computer architectures can provide operators and control room designers improved control and protection capabilities. Current research efforts are currently under way in this area

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  5. Design and development of FPGA based TCP/IP module for real time computers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasri, G. Janani; Santhana Raj, A.; Gour, Aditya; Murali, N.; Manikandan, J.

    2013-01-01

    An VME (Virtual Module Europa) bus based Real Time Computer's (RTC's) are being developed for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in an advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, where the RTC's have to communicate to the central process computer on the data collected from the field instrument and receive data from the central process computer. A Distributed Digital Control System (DDSC) architecture has been designed for this communication which is based on Transfer Communication Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over Ethernet. Currently the RTC's uses 'Wiznet Module', a bought out chip which implements the TCP/IP stack in hardware. This project concentrates on the design and development of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based TCP/IP module that runs on Microblaze, a 32-bit softcore processor, to take care of the communication as that of Wiznet module. Advantage of switching over to FPGA based system are its reconfigurability, desired number of sockets, and the design is stable even if the FPGA's get obsolete. (author)

  6. A users manual for a computer program which calculates time optical geocentric transfers using solar or nuclear electric and high thrust propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, L. L.; Edelbaum, T. N.; Malchow, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    This manual is a guide for using a computer program which calculates time optimal trajectories for high-and low-thrust geocentric transfers. Either SEP or NEP may be assumed and a one or two impulse, fixed total delta V, initial high thrust phase may be included. Also a single impulse of specified delta V may be included after the low thrust state. The low thrust phase utilizes equinoctial orbital elements to avoid the classical singularities and Kryloff-Boguliuboff averaging to help insure more rapid computation time. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 in double precision for use on an IBM 360 computer. The manual includes a description of the problem treated, input/output information, examples of runs, and source code listings.

  7. Run Clever - No difference in risk of injury when comparing progression in running volume and running intensity in recreational runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Daniel; Rasmussen, Sten; Sørensen, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Background/aim: The Run Clever trial investigated if there was a difference in injury occurrence across two running schedules, focusing on progression in volume of running intensity (Sch-I) or in total running volume (Sch-V). It was hypothesised that 15% more runners with a focus on progression...... in volume of running intensity would sustain an injury compared with runners with a focus on progression in total running volume. Methods: Healthy recreational runners were included and randomly allocated to Sch-I or Sch-V. In the first eight weeks of the 24-week follow-up, all participants (n=839) followed...... participants received real-time, individualised feedback on running intensity and running volume. The primary outcome was running-related injury (RRI). Results: After preconditioning a total of 80 runners sustained an RRI (Sch-I n=36/Sch-V n=44). The cumulative incidence proportion (CIP) in Sch-V (reference...

  8. Computation of a long-time evolution in a Schroedinger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, R.; Kroeger, H.; Labelle, P.; Bajzer, Z.

    1988-01-01

    We compare different techniques for the computation of a long-time evolution and the S matrix in a Schroedinger system. As an application we consider a two-nucleon system interacting via the Yamaguchi potential. We suggest computation of the time evolution for a very short time using Pade approximants, the long-time evolution being obtained by iterative squaring. Within the technique of strong approximation of Moller wave operators (SAM) we compare our calculation with computation of the time evolution in the eigenrepresentation of the Hamiltonian and with the standard Lippmann-Schwinger solution for the S matrix. We find numerical agreement between these alternative methods for time-evolution computation up to half the number of digits of internal machine precision, and fairly rapid convergence of both techniques towards the Lippmann-Schwinger solution

  9. LHC Computing Grid Project Launches intAction with International Support. A thousand times more computing power by 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first phase of the LHC Computing Grid project was approved at an extraordinary meeting of the Council on 20 September 2001. CERN is preparing for the unprecedented avalanche of data that will be produced by the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A thousand times more computer power will be needed by 2006! CERN's need for a dramatic advance in computing capacity is urgent. As from 2006, the four giant detectors observing trillions of elementary particle collisions at the LHC will accumulate over ten million Gigabytes of data, equivalent to the contents of about 20 million CD-ROMs, each year of its operation. A thousand times more computing power will be needed than is available to CERN today. The strategy the collabortations have adopted to analyse and store this unprecedented amount of data is the coordinated deployment of Grid technologies at hundreds of institutes which will be able to search out and analyse information from an interconnected worldwide grid of tens of thousands of computers and storag...

  10. Multiscale Space-Time Computational Methods for Fluid-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-13

    thermo-fluid analysis of a ground vehicle and its tires ST-SI Computational Analysis of a Vertical - Axis Wind Turbine We have successfully...of a vertical - axis wind turbine . Multiscale Compressible-Flow Computation with Particle Tracking We have successfully tested the multiscale...Tezduyar, Spenser McIntyre, Nikolay Kostov, Ryan Kolesar, Casey Habluetzel. Space–time VMS computation of wind - turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics

  11. A Non-Linear Digital Computer Model Requiring Short Computation Time for Studies Concerning the Hydrodynamics of the BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisch, F; Vayssier, G

    1969-05-15

    This non-linear model serves as one of the blocks in a series of codes to study the transient behaviour of BWR or PWR type reactors. This program is intended to be the hydrodynamic part of the BWR core representation or the hydrodynamic part of the PWR heat exchanger secondary side representation. The equations have been prepared for the CSMP digital simulation language. By using the most suitable integration routine available, the ratio of simulation time to real time is about one on an IBM 360/75 digital computer. Use of the slightly different language DSL/40 on an IBM 7044 computer takes about four times longer. The code has been tested against the Eindhoven loop with satisfactory agreement.

  12. Real Time Animation of Trees Based on BBSC in Computer Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Ao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available That researchers in the field of computer games usually find it is difficult to simulate the motion of actual 3D model trees lies in the fact that the tree model itself has very complicated structure, and many sophisticated factors need to be considered during the simulation. Though there are some works on simulating 3D tree and its motion, few of them are used in computer games due to the high demand for real-time in computer games. In this paper, an approach of animating trees in computer games based on a novel tree model representation—Ball B-Spline Curves (BBSCs are proposed. By taking advantage of the good features of the BBSC-based model, physical simulation of the motion of leafless trees with wind blowing becomes easier and more efficient. The method can generate realistic 3D tree animation in real-time, which meets the high requirement for real time in computer games.

  13. Ubiquitous computing technology for just-in-time motivation of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intille, Stephen S

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a vision of health care where "just-in-time" user interfaces are used to transform people from passive to active consumers of health care. Systems that use computational pattern recognition to detect points of decision, behavior, or consequences automatically can present motivational messages to encourage healthy behavior at just the right time. Further, new ubiquitous computing and mobile computing devices permit information to be conveyed to users at just the right place. In combination, computer systems that present messages at the right time and place can be developed to motivate physical activity and healthy eating. Computational sensing technologies can also be used to measure the impact of the motivational technology on behavior.

  14. Influence of the Heel-to-Toe Drop of Standard Cushioned Running Shoes on Injury Risk in Leisure-Time Runners: A Randomized Controlled Trial With 6-Month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisoux, Laurent; Chambon, Nicolas; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Modern running shoes are available in a wide range of heel-to-toe drops (ie, the height difference between the forward and rear parts of the inside of the shoe). While shoe drop has been shown to influence strike pattern, its effect on injury risk has never been investigated. Therefore, the reasons for such variety in this parameter are unclear. The first aim of this study was to determine whether the drop of standard cushioned running shoes influences running injury risk. The secondary aim was to investigate whether recent running regularity modifies the relationship between shoe drop and injury risk. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Leisure-time runners (N = 553) were observed for 6 months after having received a pair of shoes with a heel-to-toe drop of 10 mm (D10), 6 mm (D6), or 0 mm (D0). All participants reported their running activities and injuries (time-loss definition, at least 1 day) in an electronic system. Cox regression analyses were used to compare injury risk between the 3 groups based on hazard rate ratios (HRs) and their 95% CIs. A stratified analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of shoe drop in occasional runners (running regularity, low-drop shoes (D6 and D0) were found to be associated with a lower injury risk in occasional runners (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.23-0.98), whereas these shoes were associated with a higher injury risk in regular runners (HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07-2.62). Overall, injury risk was not modified by the drop of standard cushioned running shoes. However, low-drop shoes could be more hazardous for regular runners, while these shoes seem to be preferable for occasional runners to limit injury risk. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Effect of Minimalist Footwear on Running Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, Stephen M.; Laux, Sara; Kuivila, Thomas; Hass, Daniel; Joy, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although minimalist footwear is increasingly popular among runners, claims that minimalist footwear enhances running biomechanics and efficiency are controversial. Hypothesis: Minimalist and barefoot conditions improve running efficiency when compared with traditional running shoes. Study Design: Randomized crossover trial. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Fifteen experienced runners each completed three 90-second running trials on a treadmill, each trial performed in a different type of footwear: traditional running shoes with a heavily cushioned heel, minimalist running shoes with minimal heel cushioning, and barefoot (socked). High-speed photography was used to determine foot strike, ground contact time, knee angle, and stride cadence with each footwear type. Results: Runners had more rearfoot strikes in traditional shoes (87%) compared with minimalist shoes (67%) and socked (40%) (P = 0.03). Ground contact time was longest in traditional shoes (265.9 ± 10.9 ms) when compared with minimalist shoes (253.4 ± 11.2 ms) and socked (250.6 ± 16.2 ms) (P = 0.005). There was no difference between groups with respect to knee angle (P = 0.37) or stride cadence (P = 0.20). When comparing running socked to running with minimalist running shoes, there were no differences in measures of running efficiency. Conclusion: When compared with running in traditional, cushioned shoes, both barefoot (socked) running and minimalist running shoes produce greater running efficiency in some experienced runners, with a greater tendency toward a midfoot or forefoot strike and a shorter ground contact time. Minimalist shoes closely approximate socked running in the 4 measurements performed. Clinical Relevance: With regard to running efficiency and biomechanics, in some runners, barefoot (socked) and minimalist footwear are preferable to traditional running shoes. PMID:26131304

  16. Online Operation Guidance of Computer System Used in Real-Time Distance Education Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiguo

    2011-01-01

    Computer system is useful for improving real time and interactive distance education activities. Especially in the case that a large number of students participate in one distance lecture together and every student uses their own computer to share teaching materials or control discussions over the virtual classrooms. The problem is that within…

  17. 78 FR 38949 - Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... exposed to various forms of cyber attack. In some cases, attacks can be thwarted through the use of...-3383-01] Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response... systems will be successfully attacked. When a successful attack occurs, the job of a Computer Security...

  18. Recent improvements in the performance of the muiltitasked TORT on time-shared Cray computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Coarse-grained angular domain decomposition of the mesh sweep algorithm has been implemented in ORNL's three dimensional transport code TORT for Cray's macrotasking environment on platforms running the UNICOS operating system. A performance model constructed earlier is reviewed and its main result, namely the identification of the sources of parallelization overhead, is used to motivate the present work. The sources of overhead treated here are: redundant operations in the angular loop across participating tasks; repetitive task creation; lock utilization to prevent overwriting the flux moment arrays accumulated by the participating tasks. Substantial reduction in the parallelization overhead is demonstrated via sample runs with fixed tunning, i.e. zero CPU hold time. Up to 50% improvement in the wall clock speedup over the previous implementation with autotunning is observed in some test problems

  19. Application verification research of cloud computing technology in the field of real time aerospace experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Junwei; Chen, Hongyan; Zhao, Jing

    2017-08-01

    According to the requirements of real-time, reliability and safety for aerospace experiment, the single center cloud computing technology application verification platform is constructed. At the IAAS level, the feasibility of the cloud computing technology be applied to the field of aerospace experiment is tested and verified. Based on the analysis of the test results, a preliminary conclusion is obtained: Cloud computing platform can be applied to the aerospace experiment computing intensive business. For I/O intensive business, it is recommended to use the traditional physical machine.

  20. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key elements of feasibility for a high speed automated time domain terahertz computed axial tomography (TD-THz CT) non destructive...

  1. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase 2 project, we propose to develop, construct, and deliver to NASA a computed axial tomography time-domain terahertz (CT TD-THz) non destructive...

  2. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  4. CROSAT: A digital computer program for statistical-spectral analysis of two discrete time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos Domis, M.

    1978-03-01

    The program CROSAT computes directly from two discrete time series auto- and cross-spectra, transfer and coherence functions, using a Fast Fourier Transform subroutine. Statistical analysis of the time series is optional. While of general use the program is constructed to be immediately compatible with the ICL 4-70 and H316 computers at AEE Winfrith, and perhaps with minor modifications, with any other hardware system. (author)

  5. Hard Real-Time Task Scheduling in Cloud Computing Using an Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Mahmood

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud computing model, virtualized computing resources in the form of virtual machines are provided over the Internet. A user can rent an arbitrary number of computing resources to meet their requirements, making cloud computing an attractive choice for executing real-time tasks. Economical task allocation and scheduling on a set of leased virtual machines is an important problem in the cloud computing environment. This paper proposes a greedy and a genetic algorithm with an adaptive selection of suitable crossover and mutation operations (named as AGA to allocate and schedule real-time tasks with precedence constraint on heterogamous virtual machines. A comprehensive simulation study has been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms in terms of their solution quality and efficiency. The simulation results show that AGA outperforms the greedy algorithm and non-adaptive genetic algorithm in terms of solution quality.

  6. Running and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, Stuart E; Hansen, Pamela A

    2010-07-01

    The overall health benefits of cardiovascular exercise, such as running, are well established. However, it is also well established that in certain circumstances running can lead to overload injuries of muscle, tendon, and bone. In contrast, it has not been established that running leads to degeneration of articular cartilage, which is the hallmark of osteoarthritis. This article reviews the available literature on the association between running and osteoarthritis, with a focus on clinical epidemiologic studies. The preponderance of clinical reports refutes an association between running and osteoarthritis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Time expenditure in computer aided time studies implemented for highly mechanized forest equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Camelia Mușat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Time studies represent important tools that are used in forest operations research to produce empirical models or to comparatively assess the performance of two or more operational alternatives with the general aim to predict the performance of operational behavior, choose the most adequate equipment or eliminate the useless time. There is a long tradition in collecting the needed data in a traditional fashion, but this approach has its limitations, and it is likely that in the future the use of professional software would be extended is such preoccupations as this kind of tools have been already implemented. However, little to no information is available in what concerns the performance of data analyzing tasks when using purpose-built professional time studying software in such research preoccupations, while the resources needed to conduct time studies, including here the time may be quite intensive. Our study aimed to model the relations between the variation of time needed to analyze the video-recorded time study data and the variation of some measured independent variables for a complex organization of a work cycle. The results of our study indicate that the number of work elements which were separated within a work cycle as well as the delay-free cycle time and the software functionalities that were used during data analysis, significantly affected the time expenditure needed to analyze the data (α=0.01, p<0.01. Under the conditions of this study, where the average duration of a work cycle was of about 48 seconds and the number of separated work elements was of about 14, the speed that was usedto replay the video files significantly affected the mean time expenditure which averaged about 273 seconds for half of the real speed and about 192 seconds for an analyzing speed that equaled the real speed. We argue that different study designs as well as the parameters used within the software are likely to produce

  8. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  11. Real-time computing platform for spiking neurons (RT-spike).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Eduardo; Ortigosa, Eva M; Agís, Rodrigo; Carrillo, Richard; Arnold, Michael

    2006-07-01

    A computing platform is described for simulating arbitrary networks of spiking neurons in real time. A hybrid computing scheme is adopted that uses both software and hardware components to manage the tradeoff between flexibility and computational power; the neuron model is implemented in hardware and the network model and the learning are implemented in software. The incremental transition of the software components into hardware is supported. We focus on a spike response model (SRM) for a neuron where the synapses are modeled as input-driven conductances. The temporal dynamics of the synaptic integration process are modeled with a synaptic time constant that results in a gradual injection of charge. This type of model is computationally expensive and is not easily amenable to existing software-based event-driven approaches. As an alternative we have designed an efficient time-based computing architecture in hardware, where the different stages of the neuron model are processed in parallel. Further improvements occur by computing multiple neurons in parallel using multiple processing units. This design is tested using reconfigurable hardware and its scalability and performance evaluated. Our overall goal is to investigate biologically realistic models for the real-time control of robots operating within closed action-perception loops, and so we evaluate the performance of the system on simulating a model of the cerebellum where the emulation of the temporal dynamics of the synaptic integration process is important.

  12. Variation in computer time with geometry prescription in monte carlo code KENO-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    In most studies, the Monte Carlo criticality code KENO-IV has been compared with other Monte Carlo codes, but evaluation of its performance with different box descriptions has not been done so far. In Monte Carlo computations, any fractional savings of computing time is highly desirable. Variation in computation time with box description in KENO for two different fast reactor fuel subassemblies of FBTR and PFBR is studied. The K eff of an infinite array of fuel subassemblies is calculated by modelling the subassemblies in two different ways (i) multi-region, (ii) multi-box. In addition to these two cases, excess reactivity calculations of FBTR are also performed in two ways to study this effect in a complex geometry. It is observed that the K eff values calculated by multi-region and multi-box models agree very well. However the increase in computation time from the multi-box to the multi-region is considerable, while the difference in computer storage requirements for the two models is negligible. This variation in computing time arises from the way the neutron is tracked in the two cases. (author)

  13. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  14. Computation of transit times using the milestoning method with applications to polymer translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Alexander T.; Konda, Sai Sriharsha M.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2013-08-01

    Milestoning is an efficient approximation for computing long-time kinetics and thermodynamics of large molecular systems, which are inaccessible to brute-force molecular dynamics simulations. A common use of milestoning is to compute the mean first passage time (MFPT) for a conformational transition of interest. However, the MFPT is not always the experimentally observed timescale. In particular, the duration of the transition path, or the mean transit time, can be measured in single-molecule experiments, such as studies of polymers translocating through pores and fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies of protein folding. Here we show how to use milestoning to compute transit times and illustrate our approach by applying it to the translocation of a polymer through a narrow pore.

  15. Reducing the throughput time of the diagnostic track involving CT scanning with computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lent, Wineke A.M. van; Deetman, Joost W.; Teertstra, H. Jelle; Muller, Sara H.; Hans, Erwin W.; Harten, Wim H. van

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To examine the use of computer simulation to reduce the time between the CT request and the consult in which the CT report is discussed (diagnostic track) while restricting idle time and overtime. Methods: After a pre implementation analysis in our case study hospital, by computer simulation three scenarios were evaluated on access time, overtime and idle time of the CT; after implementation these same aspects were evaluated again. Effects on throughput time were measured for outpatient short-term and urgent requests only. Conclusion: The pre implementation analysis showed an average CT access time of 9.8 operating days and an average diagnostic track of 14.5 operating days. Based on the outcomes of the simulation, management changed the capacity for the different patient groups to facilitate a diagnostic track of 10 operating days, with a CT access time of 7 days. After the implementation of changes, the average diagnostic track duration was 12.6 days with an average CT access time of 7.3 days. The fraction of patients with a total throughput time within 10 days increased from 29% to 44% while the utilization remained equal with 82%, the idle time increased by 11% and the overtime decreased by 82%. The fraction of patients that completed the diagnostic track within 10 days improved with 52%. Computer simulation proved useful for studying the effects of proposed scenarios in radiology management. Besides the tangible effects, the simulation increased the awareness that optimizing capacity allocation can reduce access times.

  16. Reducing the throughput time of the diagnostic track involving CT scanning with computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lent, Wineke A.M. van, E-mail: w.v.lent@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Twente, IGS Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, Department of Health Technology Services Research (HTSR), Enschede (Netherlands); Deetman, Joost W., E-mail: j.deetman@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Teertstra, H. Jelle, E-mail: h.teertstra@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Muller, Sara H., E-mail: s.muller@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hans, Erwin W., E-mail: e.w.hans@utwente.nl [University of Twente, School of Management and Governance, Dept. of Industrial Engineering and Business Intelligence Systems, Enschede (Netherlands); Harten, Wim H. van, E-mail: w.v.harten@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Twente, IGS Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, Department of Health Technology Services Research (HTSR), Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: To examine the use of computer simulation to reduce the time between the CT request and the consult in which the CT report is discussed (diagnostic track) while restricting idle time and overtime. Methods: After a pre implementation analysis in our case study hospital, by computer simulation three scenarios were evaluated on access time, overtime and idle time of the CT; after implementation these same aspects were evaluated again. Effects on throughput time were measured for outpatient short-term and urgent requests only. Conclusion: The pre implementation analysis showed an average CT access time of 9.8 operating days and an average diagnostic track of 14.5 operating days. Based on the outcomes of the simulation, management changed the capacity for the different patient groups to facilitate a diagnostic track of 10 operating days, with a CT access time of 7 days. After the implementation of changes, the average diagnostic track duration was 12.6 days with an average CT access time of 7.3 days. The fraction of patients with a total throughput time within 10 days increased from 29% to 44% while the utilization remained equal with 82%, the idle time increased by 11% and the overtime decreased by 82%. The fraction of patients that completed the diagnostic track within 10 days improved with 52%. Computer simulation proved useful for studying the effects of proposed scenarios in radiology management. Besides the tangible effects, the simulation increased the awareness that optimizing capacity allocation can reduce access times.

  17. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong, E-mail: xsli@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  18. Kajian dan Implementasi Real TIME Operating System pada Single Board Computer Berbasis Arm

    OpenAIRE

    A, Wiedjaja; M, Handi; L, Jonathan; Christian, Benyamin; Kristofel, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Operating System is an important software in computer system. For personal and office use the operating system is sufficient. However, to critical mission applications such as nuclear power plants and braking system on the car (auto braking system) which need a high level of reliability, it requires operating system which operates in real time. The study aims to assess the implementation of the Linux-based operating system on a Single Board Computer (SBC) ARM-based, namely Pandaboard ES with ...

  19. Y2K issues for real time computer systems for fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, P.

    1999-01-01

    Presentation shows the classification of real time systems related to operation, control and monitoring of the fast breeder test reactor. Software life cycle includes software requirement specification, software design description, coding, commissioning, operation and management. A software scheme in supervisory computer of fast breeder test rector is described with the twenty years of experience in design, development, installation, commissioning, operation and maintenance of computer based supervision control system for nuclear installation with a particular emphasis on solving the Y2K problem

  20. Electron run-away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, I.B.

    1975-01-01

    The run-away effect of electrons for the Coulomb scattering has been studied by Dricer, but the question for other scattering mechanisms is not yet studied. Meanwhile, if the scattering is quasielastic, a general criterion for the run-away may be formulated; in this case the run-away influence on the distribution function may also be studied in somewhat general and qualitative manner. (Auth.)

  1. Near real-time digital holographic microscope based on GPU parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gang; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wang, Huarui; Yang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    A transmission near real-time digital holographic microscope with in-line and off-axis light path is presented, in which the parallel computing technology based on compute unified device architecture (CUDA) and digital holographic microscopy are combined. Compared to other holographic microscopes, which have to implement reconstruction in multiple focal planes and are time-consuming the reconstruction speed of the near real-time digital holographic microscope can be greatly improved with the parallel computing technology based on CUDA, so it is especially suitable for measurements of particle field in micrometer and nanometer scale. Simulations and experiments show that the proposed transmission digital holographic microscope can accurately measure and display the velocity of particle field in micrometer scale, and the average velocity error is lower than 10%.With the graphic processing units(GPU), the computing time of the 100 reconstruction planes(512×512 grids) is lower than 120ms, while it is 4.9s using traditional reconstruction method by CPU. The reconstruction speed has been raised by 40 times. In other words, it can handle holograms at 8.3 frames per second and the near real-time measurement and display of particle velocity field are realized. The real-time three-dimensional reconstruction of particle velocity field is expected to achieve by further optimization of software and hardware. Keywords: digital holographic microscope,

  2. Challenges in reducing the computational time of QSTS simulations for distribution system analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deboever, Jeremiah [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhang, Xiaochen [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grijalva, Santiago [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Therrien, Francis [CME International T& D, St. Bruno, QC (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    The rapid increase in penetration of distributed energy resources on the electric power distribution system has created a need for more comprehensive interconnection modelling and impact analysis. Unlike conventional scenario - based studies , quasi - static time - series (QSTS) simulation s can realistically model time - dependent voltage controllers and the diversity of potential impacts that can occur at different times of year . However, to accurately model a distribution system with all its controllable devices, a yearlong simulation at 1 - second resolution is often required , which could take conventional computers a computational time of 10 to 120 hours when an actual unbalanced distribution feeder is modeled . This computational burden is a clear l imitation to the adoption of QSTS simulation s in interconnection studies and for determining optimal control solutions for utility operations . Our ongoing research to improve the speed of QSTS simulation has revealed many unique aspects of distribution system modelling and sequential power flow analysis that make fast QSTS a very difficult problem to solve. In this report , the most relevant challenges in reducing the computational time of QSTS simulations are presented: number of power flows to solve, circuit complexity, time dependence between time steps, multiple valid power flow solutions, controllable element interactions, and extensive accurate simulation analysis.

  3. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Shunji; Sugiura, Hiromichi; Tanoue, Hironori; Kojima, Makoto; Kono, Mitsunobu; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1) the distal position (DP), in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2) the proximal position (PP), in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses), operating efficiencies (based on word counts), and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale - VAS). Oxygen consumption (VO(2)), the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (T(i)/T(total)), respiratory rate (RR), minute ventilation (VE), and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/T(i)) were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT), carbon dioxide output rates (VCO(2)/VE), and oxygen extraction fractions (VO(2)/VE) were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when operating a computer.

  4. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Sako

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. Material and Methods: The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1 the distal position (DP, in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2 the proximal position (PP, in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses, operating efficiencies (based on word counts, and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale – VAS. Results: Oxygen consumption (VO2, the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (Ti/Ttotal, respiratory rate (RR, minute ventilation (VE, and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/Ti were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT, carbon dioxide output rates (VCO2/VE, and oxygen extraction fractions (VO2/VE were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when

  5. Review of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, S.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computers are machines that can be programmed to perform logical and arithmetical operations. Contemporary digital computers are ''universal,'' in the sense that a program that runs on one computer can, if properly compiled, run on any other computer that has access to enough memory space and time. Any one universal computer can simulate the operation of any other; and the set of tasks that any such machine can perform is common to all universal machines. Since Bennett's discovery that computation can be carried out in a non-dissipative fashion, a number of Hamiltonian quantum-mechanical systems have been proposed whose time-evolutions over discrete intervals are equivalent to those of specific universal computers. The first quantum-mechanical treatment of computers was given by Benioff, who exhibited a Hamiltonian system with a basis whose members corresponded to the logical states of a Turing machine. In order to make the Hamiltonian local, in the sense that its structure depended only on the part of the computation being performed at that time, Benioff found it necessary to make the Hamiltonian time-dependent. Feynman discovered a way to make the computational Hamiltonian both local and time-independent by incorporating the direction of computation in the initial condition. In Feynman's quantum computer, the program is a carefully prepared wave packet that propagates through different computational states. Deutsch presented a quantum computer that exploits the possibility of existing in a superposition of computational states to perform tasks that a classical computer cannot, such as generating purely random numbers, and carrying out superpositions of computations as a method of parallel processing. In this paper, we show that such computers, by virtue of their common function, possess a common form for their quantum dynamics

  6. Explicit time marching methods for the time-dependent Euler computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, C.H.; Chiang, D.C.; Su, Y.P.

    1997-01-01

    Four explicit type time marching methods, including one proposed by the authors, are examined. The TVD conditions of this method are analyzed with the linear conservation law as the model equation. Performance of these methods when applied to the Euler equations are numerically tested. Seven examples are tested, the main concern is the performance of the methods when discontinuities with different strengths are encountered. When the discontinuity is getting stronger, spurious oscillation shows up for three existing methods, while the method proposed by the authors always gives the results with satisfaction. The effect of the limiter is also investigated. To put these methods in the same basis for the comparison the same spatial discretization is used. Roe's solver is used to evaluate the fluxes at the cell interface; spatially second-order accuracy is achieved by the MUSCL reconstruction. 19 refs., 8 figs

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  11. Optimisation of the ATLAS Track Reconstruction Software for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of particle trajectories in the tracking detectors of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the most complex parts in analysing the collected data from beam-beam collisions. To achieve the desired integrated luminosity during Run-1 of the LHC data taking period, the number of simultaneous proton-proton interactions per beam crossing (pile-up) was steadily increased. The track reconstruction is the most time consuming reconstruction component and scales non-linear in high luminosity environments. Flat budget projections (at best) for computing resources during the upcoming Run-2 of the LHC together with the demands of reconstructing higher pile-up collision data at rates more than double compared to Run-1 have put pressure on the track reconstruction software to stay within the available computing resources. The ATLAS experiment has thus performed a two year long software campaign which led to a reduction of the reconstruction time for Run-2 conditions by a factor of four:...

  12. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Henry; Ma Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing Lei

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47x speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed. (note)

  13. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Henry [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ma Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing Lei, E-mail: hwang41@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47x speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed. (note)

  14. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Ma, Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47× speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed.

  15. A computationally simple and robust method to detect determinism in a time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Sheng; Ju, Ki Hwan; Kanters, Jørgen K.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new, simple, and fast computational technique, termed the incremental slope (IS), that can accurately distinguish between deterministic from stochastic systems even when the variance of noise is as large or greater than the signal, and remains robust for time-varying signals. The IS ......We present a new, simple, and fast computational technique, termed the incremental slope (IS), that can accurately distinguish between deterministic from stochastic systems even when the variance of noise is as large or greater than the signal, and remains robust for time-varying signals...

  16. SLMRACE: a noise-free RACE implementation with reduced computational time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Juliet; Provenzi, Edoardo

    2017-05-01

    We present a faster and noise-free implementation of the RACE algorithm. RACE has mixed characteristics between the famous Retinex model of Land and McCann and the automatic color equalization (ACE) color-correction algorithm. The original random spray-based RACE implementation suffers from two main problems: its computational time and the presence of noise. Here, we will show that it is possible to adapt two techniques recently proposed by Banić et al. to the RACE framework in order to drastically decrease the computational time and noise generation. The implementation will be called smart-light-memory-RACE (SLMRACE).

  17. Ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, G H

    1978-03-02

    The rotatable ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner is designed for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation. With it there can be measured parameters that are of importance for the structure of soft tissues, e.g. time as a function of the velocity distribution along a certain path of flight(the method is analogous to the transaxial X-ray tomography). Moreover it permits to perform the quantitative measurement of two-dimensional velocity distributions and may therefore be applied to serial examinations for detecting cancer of the breast. As computers digital memories as well as analog-digital-hybrid systems are suitable.

  18. Overcoming the "Run" Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that it is not simply experiencing anxiety that affects mathematics performance but also how one responds to and regulates that anxiety (Lyons and Beilock 2011). Most people have faced mathematics problems that have triggered their "run response." The issue is not whether one wants to run, but rather…

  19. Overuse injuries in running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2016-01-01

    What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence.......What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence....

  20. PRECIS Runs at IITM

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. PRECIS Runs at IITM. Evaluation experiment using LBCs derived from ERA-15 (1979-93). Runs (3 ensembles in each experiment) already completed with LBCs having a length of 30 years each, for. Baseline (1961-90); A2 scenario (2071-2100); B2 scenario ...

  1. Computer-games for gravitational wave science outreach: Black Hole Pong and Space Time Quest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, L; Bond, C; Brown, D; Brückner, F; Grover, K; Lodhia, D; Mingarelli, C M F; Fulda, P; Smith, R J E; Unwin, R; Vecchio, A; Wang, M; Whalley, L; Freise, A

    2012-01-01

    We have established a program aimed at developing computer applications and web applets to be used for educational purposes as well as gravitational wave outreach activities. These applications and applets teach gravitational wave physics and technology. The computer programs are generated in collaboration with undergraduates and summer students as part of our teaching activities, and are freely distributed on a dedicated website. As part of this program, we have developed two computer-games related to gravitational wave science: 'Black Hole Pong' and 'Space Time Quest'. In this article we present an overview of our computer related outreach activities and discuss the games and their educational aspects, and report on some positive feedback received.

  2. Of faeces and sweat. How much a mouse is willing to run: having a hard time measuring spontaneous physical activity in different mouse sub-strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Coletti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has multiple beneficial effects in the physiology and pathology of the organism. In particular, we and other groups have shown that running counteracts cancer cachexia in both humans and rodents. The latter are prone to exercise in wheel-equipped cages even at advanced stages of cachexia. However, when we wanted to replicate the experimental model routinely used at the University of Rome in a different laboratory (i.e. at Paris 6 University, we had to struggle with puzzling results due to unpredicted mouse behavior. Here we report the experience and offer the explanation underlying these apparently irreproducible results. The original data are currently used for teaching purposes in undergraduate student classes of biological sciences.

  3. Computational Procedures for a Class of GI/D/k Systems in Discrete Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mostafizur Rahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A class of discrete time GI/D/k systems is considered for which the interarrival times have finite support and customers are served in first-in first-out (FIFO order. The system is formulated as a single server queue with new general independent interarrival times and constant service duration by assuming cyclic assignment of customers to the identical servers. Then the queue length is set up as a quasi-birth-death (QBD type Markov chain. It is shown that this transformed GI/D/1 system has special structures which make the computation of the matrix R simple and efficient, thereby reducing the number of multiplications in each iteration significantly. As a result we were able to keep the computation time very low. Moreover, use of the resulting structural properties makes the computation of the distribution of queue length of the transformed system efficient. The computation of the distribution of waiting time is also shown to be simple by exploiting the special structures.

  4. IMPLEMENTING FISCAL OR MONETARY POLICY IN TIME OF CRISIS? RUNNING GRANGER CAUSALITY TO TEST THE PHILLIPS CURVE IN SOME EURO ZONE COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Gianluigi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide empirical evidence about the theoretical relationship between inflation and unemployment in 9 European countries. Based on two major goals for economic policymakers namely, to keep both inflation and unemployment low, we use the ingredients of the Phillips curve to orient fiscal and monetary policies. These policies are prerogative for the achievement of a desirable combination of unemployment and inflation. More in detail, we attempt to address two basic issues. One strand of the study examines the size and sign of the impact of unemployment rate on percentage changes in inflation. In our preferred econometric model, we have made explicit the evidence according to which one unit increase (% in unemployment reduces inflation of roughly 0.73 percent, on average. Next, we turn to the question concerning the causal link between inflation and unemployment and we derive a political framework enables to orient European policymakers in the implementation of either fiscal or monetary policy. In this context, by means of the Granger causality test, we mainly find evidence of a directional causality which runs from inflation to unemployment in 4 out of 9 European countries under analysis. This result implies that political authorities of Austria, Belgium, Germany and Italy should implement monetary policy in order to achieve pre-established targets of unemployment and inflation. In the same context, a directional causality running from unemployment to inflation has been found in France and Cyprus suggesting that a reduction in the unemployment level can be achieved through controlling fiscal policy. However, succeeding in this goal may lead to an increasing demand for goods and services which, in turn, might cause a higher inflation than expected. Finally, while there is no statistical evidence of a causal link between unemployment and inflation in Finland and Greece, a bidirectional causality has been found in Estonia. This

  5. Visualization of synchronization of the uterine contraction signals: running cross-correlation and wavelet running cross-correlation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczeretko, Edward; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Kitlas, Agnieszka; Laudanski, Tadeusz; Pierzynski, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    In physiological research, we often study multivariate data sets, containing two or more simultaneously recorded time series. The aim of this paper is to present the cross-correlation and the wavelet cross-correlation methods to assess synchronization between contractions in different topographic regions of the uterus. From a medical point of view, it is important to identify time delays between contractions, which may be of potential diagnostic significance in various pathologies. The cross-correlation was computed in a moving window with a width corresponding to approximately two or three contractions. As a result, the running cross-correlation function was obtained. The propagation% parameter assessed from this function allows quantitative description of synchronization in bivariate time series. In general, the uterine contraction signals are very complicated. Wavelet transforms provide insight into the structure of the time series at various frequencies (scales). To show the changes of the propagation% parameter along scales, a wavelet running cross-correlation was used. At first, the continuous wavelet transforms as the uterine contraction signals were received and afterwards, a running cross-correlation analysis was conducted for each pair of transformed time series. The findings show that running functions are very useful in the analysis of uterine contractions.

  6. Support system for ATLAS distributed computing operations

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, Tomoe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS distributed computing system has allowed the experiment to successfully meet the challenges of LHC Run 2. In order for distributed computing to operate smoothly and efficiently, several support teams are organized in the ATLAS experiment. The ADCoS (ATLAS Distributed Computing Operation Shifts) is a dedicated group of shifters who follow and report failing jobs, failing data transfers between sites, degradation of ATLAS central computing services, and more. The DAST (Distributed Analysis Support Team) provides user support to resolve issues related to running distributed analysis on the grid. The CRC (Computing Run Coordinator) maintains a global view of the day-to-day operations. In this presentation, the status and operational experience of the support system for ATLAS distributed computing in LHC Run 2 will be reported. This report also includes operations experience from the grid site point of view, and an analysis of the errors that create the biggest waste of wallclock time. The report of oper...

  7. Television viewing, computer use and total screen time in Canadian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Amy E; Boyce, William F; Janssen, Ian

    2006-11-01

    Research has linked excessive television viewing and computer use in children and adolescents to a variety of health and social problems. Current recommendations are that screen time in children and adolescents should be limited to no more than 2 h per day. To determine the percentage of Canadian youth meeting the screen time guideline recommendations. The representative study sample consisted of 6942 Canadian youth in grades 6 to 10 who participated in the 2001/2002 World Health Organization Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. Only 41% of girls and 34% of boys in grades 6 to 10 watched 2 h or less of television per day. Once the time of leisure computer use was included and total daily screen time was examined, only 18% of girls and 14% of boys met the guidelines. The prevalence of those meeting the screen time guidelines was higher in girls than boys. Fewer than 20% of Canadian youth in grades 6 to 10 met the total screen time guidelines, suggesting that increased public health interventions are needed to reduce the number of leisure time hours that Canadian youth spend watching television and using the computer.

  8. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  9. Interactive Real-time Simulation of a Nuclear Reactor Emergency Core Cooling System on a Desktop Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muncharoen, C.; Chanyotha, S.; Bereznai, G.

    1998-01-01

    The simulation of the Emergency Core Cooling System for a 900 MW nuclear power plant has been developed by using object oriented programming language. It is capable of generating code that executes in real-time on a PENTIUM 100 or equivalent personal computer. Graphical user interface ECCS screens have been developed using Lab VIEW to allow interactive control of ECCS. The usual simulator functions, such as freeze, run, iterate, have been provided, and a number of malfunctions may be activated. A large pipe break near the reactor inlet header has been simulated to verify the response of the ECCS model. LOCA detection, ECC initiation, injection and recovery phased are all modeled, and give results consistent with safety analysis data for a 100% break. With stand alone ECCS simulation, the changes of flow and pressure in ECCS can be observed. The operator can study operational procedures and get used to LOCA in case of the LOCA. Practicing with malfunction, the operator will improve problem solving skills and gain a deeper comprehension of ECCS

  10. Implementation of a General Real-Time Visual Anomaly Detection System Via Soft Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Ferrell, Bob; Steinrock, Todd (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The intelligent visual system detects anomalies or defects in real time under normal lighting operating conditions. The application is basically a learning machine that integrates fuzzy logic (FL), artificial neural network (ANN), and generic algorithm (GA) schemes to process the image, run the learning process, and finally detect the anomalies or defects. The system acquires the image, performs segmentation to separate the object being tested from the background, preprocesses the image using fuzzy reasoning, performs the final segmentation using fuzzy reasoning techniques to retrieve regions with potential anomalies or defects, and finally retrieves them using a learning model built via ANN and GA techniques. FL provides a powerful framework for knowledge representation and overcomes uncertainty and vagueness typically found in image analysis. ANN provides learning capabilities, and GA leads to robust learning results. An application prototype currently runs on a regular PC under Windows NT, and preliminary work has been performed to build an embedded version with multiple image processors. The application prototype is being tested at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, to visually detect anomalies along slide basket cables utilized by the astronauts to evacuate the NASA Shuttle launch pad in an emergency. The potential applications of this anomaly detection system in an open environment are quite wide. Another current, potentially viable application at NASA is in detecting anomalies of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's radiator panels.

  11. Efficient Buffer Capacity and Scheduler Setting Computation for Soft Real-Time Stream Processing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekooij, Marco; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Wiggers, M.H.; van Meerbergen, Jef

    2007-01-01

    Soft real-time applications that process data streams can often be intuitively described as dataflow process networks. In this paper we present a novel analysis technique to compute conservative estimates of the required buffer capacities in such process networks. With the same analysis technique

  12. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  13. Math modeling and computer mechanization for real time simulation of rotary-wing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computer mechanization for real time simulation of rotary wing aircraft is discussed. Error analysis in the digital simulation of dynamic systems, such as rotary wing aircraft is described. The method for digital simulation of nonlinearities with discontinuities, such as exist in typical flight control systems and rotor blade hinges, is discussed.

  14. Efficient Geo-Computational Algorithms for Constructing Space-Time Prisms in Road Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Space-time prism (STP is a key concept in time geography for analyzing human activity-travel behavior under various Space-time constraints. Most existing time-geographic studies use a straightforward algorithm to construct STPs in road networks by using two one-to-all shortest path searches. However, this straightforward algorithm can introduce considerable computational overhead, given the fact that accessible links in a STP are generally a small portion of the whole network. To address this issue, an efficient geo-computational algorithm, called NTP-A*, is proposed. The proposed NTP-A* algorithm employs the A* and branch-and-bound techniques to discard inaccessible links during two shortest path searches, and thereby improves the STP construction performance. Comprehensive computational experiments are carried out to demonstrate the computational advantage of the proposed algorithm. Several implementation techniques, including the label-correcting technique and the hybrid link-node labeling technique, are discussed and analyzed. Experimental results show that the proposed NTP-A* algorithm can significantly improve STP construction performance in large-scale road networks by a factor of 100, compared with existing algorithms.

  15. Computer-generated versus nurse-determined strategy for incubator humidity and time to regain birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2008-01-01

    To compare effects on premature infants' weight gain of a computer-generated and a nurse-determined incubator humidity strategy. An optimal humidity protocol is thought to reduce time to regain birthweight. Prospective randomized controlled design. Level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit in the

  16. Computing Camps for Girls : A First-Time Experience at the University of Limerick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInerney, Clare; Lamprecht, A.L.; Margaria, Tiziana

    2018-01-01

    Increasing the number of females in ICT-related university courses has been a major concern for several years. In 2015, we offered a girls-only computing summer camp for the first time, as a new component in our education and outreach activities to foster students’ interest in our discipline. In

  17. A Real-Time Plagiarism Detection Tool for Computer-Based Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Heimo J.; Lall, Manoj; Kogeda, Okuthe P.

    2018-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The aim of this article is to develop a tool to detect plagiarism in real time amongst students being evaluated for learning in a computer-based assessment setting. Background: Cheating or copying all or part of source code of a program is a serious concern to academic institutions. Many academic institutions apply a combination of…

  18. Modeling of requirement specification for safety critical real time computer system using formal mathematical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Bindu; Sasidhar Rao, B.; Ilango Sambasivam, S.; Swaminathan, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Real time computer systems are increasingly used for safety critical supervision and control of nuclear reactors. Typical application areas are supervision of reactor core against coolant flow blockage, supervision of clad hot spot, supervision of undesirable power excursion, power control and control logic for fuel handling systems. The most frequent cause of fault in safety critical real time computer system is traced to fuzziness in requirement specification. To ensure the specified safety, it is necessary to model the requirement specification of safety critical real time computer systems using formal mathematical methods. Modeling eliminates the fuzziness in the requirement specification and also helps to prepare the verification and validation schemes. Test data can be easily designed from the model of the requirement specification. Z and B are the popular languages used for modeling the requirement specification. A typical safety critical real time computer system for supervising the reactor core of prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) against flow blockage is taken as case study. Modeling techniques and the actual model are explained in detail. The advantages of modeling for ensuring the safety are summarized

  19. Green computing: power optimisation of VFI-based real-time multiprocessor dataflow applications (extended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, W.; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Execution time is no longer the only performance metric for computer systems. In fact, a trend is emerging to trade raw performance for energy savings. Techniques like Dynamic Power Management (DPM, switching to low power state) and Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS, throttling processor

  20. Green computing: power optimisation of vfi-based real-time multiprocessor dataflow applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, W.; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Execution time is no longer the only performance metric for computer systems. In fact, a trend is emerging to trade raw performance for energy savings. Techniques like Dynamic Power Management (DPM, switching to low power state) and Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS, throttling processor

  1. Effect of exposure time reduction towards sensitivity and SNR for computed radiography (CR) application in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapizah Rahim; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Noorhazleena Azaman; Shaharudin Sayuti; Siti Madiha Muhammad Amir; Arshad Yassin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity study of Computed Radiography (CR) system with reduction of exposure time is presented. The purposes of this research are to determine the behavior of SNR toward three different thicknesses (step wedge; 5, 10 and 15 mm) and the ability of CR system to recognize hole type penetrameter when the exposure time decreased up to 80 % according to the exposure chart (D7; ISOVOLT Titan E). It is shown that the SNR is decreased with decreasing of exposure time percentage but the high quality image is achieved until 80 % reduction of exposure time. (author)

  2. Application of queueing models to multiprogrammed computer systems operating in a time-critical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A model of a central processor (CPU) which services background applications in the presence of time critical activity is presented. The CPU is viewed as an M/M/1 queueing system subject to periodic interrupts by deterministic, time critical process. The Laplace transform of the distribution of service times for the background applications is developed. The use of state of the art queueing models for studying the background processing capability of time critical computer systems is discussed and the results of a model validation study which support this application of queueing models are presented.

  3. A computer-based time study system for timber harvesting operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Joe McNeel; John Baumgras

    2003-01-01

    A computer-based time study system was developed for timber harvesting operations. Object-oriented techniques were used to model and design the system. The front-end of the time study system resides on the MS Windows CE and the back-end is supported by MS Access. The system consists of three major components: a handheld system, data transfer interface, and data storage...

  4. Low Computational Signal Acquisition for GNSS Receivers Using a Resampling Strategy and Variable Circular Correlation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeqing Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the objective of essentially decreasing computational complexity and time consumption of signal acquisition, this paper explores a resampling strategy and variable circular correlation time strategy specific to broadband multi-frequency GNSS receivers. In broadband GNSS receivers, the resampling strategy is established to work on conventional acquisition algorithms by resampling the main lobe of received broadband signals with a much lower frequency. Variable circular correlation time is designed to adapt to different signal strength conditions and thereby increase the operation flexibility of GNSS signal acquisition. The acquisition threshold is defined as the ratio of the highest and second highest correlation results in the search space of carrier frequency and code phase. Moreover, computational complexity of signal acquisition is formulated by amounts of multiplication and summation operations in the acquisition process. Comparative experiments and performance analysis are conducted on four sets of real GPS L2C signals with different sampling frequencies. The results indicate that the resampling strategy can effectively decrease computation and time cost by nearly 90–94% with just slight loss of acquisition sensitivity. With circular correlation time varying from 10 ms to 20 ms, the time cost of signal acquisition has increased by about 2.7–5.6% per millisecond, with most satellites acquired successfully.

  5. Low Computational Signal Acquisition for GNSS Receivers Using a Resampling Strategy and Variable Circular Correlation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeqing; Wang, Meiling; Li, Yafeng

    2018-01-01

    For the objective of essentially decreasing computational complexity and time consumption of signal acquisition, this paper explores a resampling strategy and variable circular correlation time strategy specific to broadband multi-frequency GNSS receivers. In broadband GNSS receivers, the resampling strategy is established to work on conventional acquisition algorithms by resampling the main lobe of received broadband signals with a much lower frequency. Variable circular correlation time is designed to adapt to different signal strength conditions and thereby increase the operation flexibility of GNSS signal acquisition. The acquisition threshold is defined as the ratio of the highest and second highest correlation results in the search space of carrier frequency and code phase. Moreover, computational complexity of signal acquisition is formulated by amounts of multiplication and summation operations in the acquisition process. Comparative experiments and performance analysis are conducted on four sets of real GPS L2C signals with different sampling frequencies. The results indicate that the resampling strategy can effectively decrease computation and time cost by nearly 90–94% with just slight loss of acquisition sensitivity. With circular correlation time varying from 10 ms to 20 ms, the time cost of signal acquisition has increased by about 2.7–5.6% per millisecond, with most satellites acquired successfully. PMID:29495301

  6. Computationally determining the salience of decision points for real-time wayfinding support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Takemiya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the concept of computational salience to explain the discriminatory efficacy of decision points, which in turn may have applications to providing real-time assistance to users of navigational aids. This research compared algorithms for calculating the computational salience of decision points and validated the results via three methods: high-salience decision points were used to classify wayfinders; salience scores were used to weight a conditional probabilistic scoring function for real-time wayfinder performance classification; and salience scores were correlated with wayfinding-performance metrics. As an exploratory step to linking computational and cognitive salience, a photograph-recognition experiment was conducted. Results reveal a distinction between algorithms useful for determining computational and cognitive saliences. For computational salience, information about the structural integration of decision points is effective, while information about the probability of decision-point traversal shows promise for determining cognitive salience. Limitations from only using structural information and motivations for future work that include non-structural information are elicited.

  7. In-Network Computation is a Dumb Idea Whose Time Has Come

    KAUST Repository

    Sapio, Amedeo; Abdelaziz, Ibrahim; Aldilaijan, Abdulla; Canini, Marco; Kalnis, Panos

    2017-01-01

    Programmable data plane hardware creates new opportunities for infusing intelligence into the network. This raises a fundamental question: what kinds of computation should be delegated to the network? In this paper, we discuss the opportunities and challenges for co-designing data center distributed systems with their network layer. We believe that the time has finally come for offloading part of their computation to execute in-network. However, in-network computation tasks must be judiciously crafted to match the limitations of the network machine architecture of programmable devices. With the help of our experiments on machine learning and graph analytics workloads, we identify that aggregation functions raise opportunities to exploit the limited computation power of networking hardware to lessen network congestion and improve the overall application performance. Moreover, as a proof-of-concept, we propose DAIET, a system that performs in-network data aggregation. Experimental results with an initial prototype show a large data reduction ratio (86.9%-89.3%) and a similar decrease in the workers' computation time.

  8. In-Network Computation is a Dumb Idea Whose Time Has Come

    KAUST Repository

    Sapio, Amedeo

    2017-11-27

    Programmable data plane hardware creates new opportunities for infusing intelligence into the network. This raises a fundamental question: what kinds of computation should be delegated to the network? In this paper, we discuss the opportunities and challenges for co-designing data center distributed systems with their network layer. We believe that the time has finally come for offloading part of their computation to execute in-network. However, in-network computation tasks must be judiciously crafted to match the limitations of the network machine architecture of programmable devices. With the help of our experiments on machine learning and graph analytics workloads, we identify that aggregation functions raise opportunities to exploit the limited computation power of networking hardware to lessen network congestion and improve the overall application performance. Moreover, as a proof-of-concept, we propose DAIET, a system that performs in-network data aggregation. Experimental results with an initial prototype show a large data reduction ratio (86.9%-89.3%) and a similar decrease in the workers\\' computation time.

  9. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  11. The CERN Data Centre readies for Run 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    While the world waits for Run 2 data with growing anticipation, the CERN Data Centre is battening down the hatches. Run 2 is set to see a significant increase in the amount of data produced by the LHC experiments, with more than one hundred additional petabytes expected over the next three years. How will CERN manage this flood of results? The Bulletin checks in with the IT Department to find out...   The CERN Data Centre: the heart of CERN's entire scientific, administrative, and computing infrastructure. With every second of run-time, gigabytes of data will come pouring into the CERN Data Centre to be stored, sorted and shared with physicists worldwide. To cope with this massive influx of Run 2 data, the CERN Data and Storage Services group focused on three areas: speed, capacity and reliability. First on the list, the group set out to increase the rate at which they could store data. "During Run 1, we were storing 1 gigabyte-per-second, with the occasional peak of 6 giga...

  12. Quantification of Artifact Reduction With Real-Time Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Acquisition Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Ulrich W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the magnitude and frequency of artifacts in simulated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images using three real-time acquisition methods- direction-dependent displacement acquisition, simultaneous displacement and phase acquisition, and simultaneous displacement and velocity acquisition- and to compare these methods with commonly used retrospective phase sorting. Methods and Materials: Image acquisition for the four 4D CT methods was simulated with different displacement and velocity tolerances for spheres with radii of 0.5 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.5 cm, using 58 patient-measured tumors and respiratory motion traces. The magnitude and frequency of artifacts, CT doses, and acquisition times were computed for each method. Results: The mean artifact magnitude was 50% smaller for the three real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. The dose was ∼50% lower, but the acquisition time was 20% to 100% longer for the real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. Conclusions: Real-time acquisition methods can reduce the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D CT images, as well as the imaging dose, but they increase the image acquisition time. The results suggest that direction-dependent displacement acquisition is the preferred real-time 4D CT acquisition method, because on average, the lowest dose is delivered to the patient and the acquisition time is the shortest for the resulting number and magnitude of artifacts.

  13. Set up and programming of an ALICE Time-Of-Flight trigger facility and software implementation for its Quality Assurance (QA) during LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Toschi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic and Topology Trigger Module (CTTM) is the main component of a trigger based on the ALICE TOF detector. Taking advantage of the TOF fast response, this VME board implements the trigger logic and delivers several L0 trigger outputs, used since Run 1, to provide cosmic triggers and rare triggers in pp, p+Pb and Pb+Pb data taking. Due to TOF DCS architectural change of the PCs controlling the CTTM (from 32 bits to 64 bits) it is mandatory to upgrade the software related to the CTTM including the code programming the FPGA firmware. A dedicated CTTM board will be installed in a CERN lab (Meyrin site), with the aim of recreating the electronics chain of the TOF trigger, to get a comfortable porting of the code to the 64 bit environment. The project proposed to the summer student is the setting up of the CTTM and the porting of the software. Moreover, in order to monitor the CTTM Trigger board during the real data taking, the implementation of a new Quality Assurance (QA) code is also crucial, together wit...

  14. An Efficient Integer Coding and Computing Method for Multiscale Time Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONG Xiaochong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focus on the exist problem and status of current time segment coding, proposed a new set of approach about time segment coding: multi-scale time segment integer coding (MTSIC. This approach utilized the tree structure and the sort by size formed among integer, it reflected the relationship among the multi-scale time segments: order, include/contained, intersection, etc., and finally achieved an unity integer coding processing for multi-scale time. On this foundation, this research also studied the computing method for calculating the time relationships of MTSIC, to support an efficient calculation and query based on the time segment, and preliminary discussed the application method and prospect of MTSIC. The test indicated that, the implement of MTSIC is convenient and reliable, and the transformation between it and the traditional method is convenient, it has the very high efficiency in query and calculating.

  15. RUNNING INJURY DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karen Krogh; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. PURPOSE: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runners...... able to compete in national championships and their coaches about factors associated with running injury development. METHODS: A link to an online survey was distributed to middle- and long-distance runners and their coaches across 25 Danish Athletics Clubs. The main research question was: "Which...... factors do you believe influence the risk of running injuries?". In response to this question, the athletes and coaches had to click "Yes" or "No" to 19 predefined factors. In addition, they had the possibility to submit a free-text response. RESULTS: A total of 68 athletes and 19 coaches were included...

  16. Running Injury Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Johansen, Karen; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    Background: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. Purpose: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runners...... able to compete in national championships and their coaches about factors associated with running injury development. Methods: A link to an online survey was distributed to middle- and long-distance runners and their coaches across 25 Danish Athletics Clubs. The main research question was: “Which...... factors do you believe influence the risk of running injuries?”. In response to this question, the athletes and coaches had to click “Yes” or “No” to 19 predefined factors. In addition, they had the possibility to submit a free-text response. Results: A total of 68 athletes and 19 coaches were included...

  17. An assessment of the real-time application capabilities of the SIFT computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The real-time capabilities of the SIFT computer system, a highly reliable multicomputer architecture developed to support the flight controls of a relaxed static stability aircraft, are discussed. The SIFT computer system was designed to meet extremely high reliability requirements and to facilitate a formal proof of its correctness. Although SIFT represents a significant achievement in fault-tolerant system research it presents an unusual and restrictive interface to its users. The characteristics of the user interface and its impact on application system design are assessed.

  18. Theory and computation of disturbance invariant sets for discrete-time linear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolmanovsky Ilya

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the characterization and computation of invariant sets for discrete-time, time-invariant, linear systems with disturbance inputs whose values are confined to a specified compact set but are otherwise unknown. The emphasis is on determining maximal disturbance-invariant sets X that belong to a specified subset Γ of the state space. Such d-invariant sets have important applications in control problems where there are pointwise-in-time state constraints of the form χ ( t ∈ Γ . One purpose of the paper is to unite and extend in a rigorous way disparate results from the prior literature. In addition there are entirely new results. Specific contributions include: exploitation of the Pontryagin set difference to clarify conceptual matters and simplify mathematical developments, special properties of maximal invariant sets and conditions for their finite determination, algorithms for generating concrete representations of maximal invariant sets, practical computational questions, extension of the main results to general Lyapunov stable systems, applications of the computational techniques to the bounding of state and output response. Results on Lyapunov stable systems are applied to the implementation of a logic-based, nonlinear multimode regulator. For plants with disturbance inputs and state-control constraints it enlarges the constraint-admissible domain of attraction. Numerical examples illustrate the various theoretical and computational results.

  19. Hardware architecture design of image restoration based on time-frequency domain computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Jiao, Zipeng

    2013-10-01

    The image restoration algorithms based on time-frequency domain computation is high maturity and applied widely in engineering. To solve the high-speed implementation of these algorithms, the TFDC hardware architecture is proposed. Firstly, the main module is designed, by analyzing the common processing and numerical calculation. Then, to improve the commonality, the iteration control module is planed for iterative algorithms. In addition, to reduce the computational cost and memory requirements, the necessary optimizations are suggested for the time-consuming module, which include two-dimensional FFT/IFFT and the plural calculation. Eventually, the TFDC hardware architecture is adopted for hardware design of real-time image restoration system. The result proves that, the TFDC hardware architecture and its optimizations can be applied to image restoration algorithms based on TFDC, with good algorithm commonality, hardware realizability and high efficiency.

  20. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Gary N Garcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.